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Sample records for modulating radiation-induced heart

  1. Radiation-induced heart disease in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Kiszel, Z.; Buschmann, J.; Trott, K.R.

    1985-04-01

    After local irradiation of the rat heart with X ray doses of over 10 Gy (single dose), animals developed symptoms of radiation-induced heart disease, which at higher doses would lead to fatal cardiac failure. The LD 50 at 1 year was between 15 Gy and 20 Gy. The pericardium and epicardium responded to irradiation with exudative pericarditis after 4 months. Focal myocardial damage was secondary to progressive capillary damage.

  2. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Potential targets for intervention in radiation-induced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boerma, M; Hauer-Jensen, M

    2010-11-01

    Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors, if all or part of the heart was included in the radiation field, can lead to radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), a late and potentially severe side effect. RIHD presents clinically several years after irradiation and manifestations include accelerated atherosclerosis, pericardial and myocardial fibrosis, conduction abnormalities, and injury to cardiac valves. The pathogenesis of RIHD is largely unknown, and a treatment is not available. Hence, ongoing pre-clinical studies aim to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms of RIHD. Here, an overview of recent pre-clinical studies is given, and based on the results of these studies, potential targets for intervention in RIHD are discussed.

  4. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  5. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  6. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    PubMed

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    postulate that radiation-induced TNFR I probably acts as a “ brake ” on immunity. Because of the high risk of the proposed experiment and high...the rest of body shielded. Tumor diameters were measured in three mutually orthogonal dimensions at 2–3 day intervals with a vernier caliper and the

  8. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  9. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  10. Modulation of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.; Threatte, G.; Londe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Immediately before or after exposure to sublethal irradiation, mice were given a single injection of anti-mouse platelet serum (APS), normal heterologous serum, neuraminidase (N'ase), or saline, or no further treatment was provided. Hemopoiesis was evaluated by blood cell counts, hematocrits, and incorporation of (75Se)selenomethionine into platelets. APS and N'ase induced an acute thrombocytopenia from which there was partial recovery before the platelet count started to fall from the radiation. During the second post-treatment week, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis were greater in mice that received APS or N'ase in addition to radiation than in control irradiated mice. Differences in leukopoiesis were not apparent. Therefore, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis appeared to be responsive to a stimulus generated by acute thrombocytopenia in sublethally irradiated mice.

  11. UV radiation induced surface modulation time evolution in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, I.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Iordache, I.; Hurduc, N.; Sava, I.; Sacarescu, L.; Stoica, I.

    2010-11-01

    The reorganization processes at submicron level of the polymeric materials have been investigated because of their applications in optoelectronics and bio-science. We have obtained surface relief modulation in single step processing on the photo resist and polysiloxane films. But for technical applications the time evolution and stability of the induced surface structure is an important parameter and is a problem to be discussed. In case of single step surface relief formation on polymeric materials the process is connected with the photochromic behavior of the materials. As it is known the UV light induced effects on the material structure are reversible under the action of visible light, but with different speeds. In this report is analyzed the time evolution of the surface modulation obtained under the action of the UV light for azopolymers with different structures.

  12. Radiation-Induce Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Riverside, CA Invited Seminar: "The Proteasome as a Senor of Stress " 3/17/04 UCLA Department of Dentistry Monthly Seminar, Los Angeles, CA Invited...affects protective antitutnor imnmunity induced by Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured using 100 pM SucLLVY-7- AdVMARTI/DC vaccination amido -4...adjuvant activity was heightened if the cells were first stressed by radiation, indicating that injury can modulate this effect. In situ induction of

  13. High-dose Radiation Induced Heart Damage in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kiscsatári, Laura; Sárközy, Márta; Kővári, Bence; Varga, Zoltán; Gömöri, Kamilla; Morvay, Nikolett; Leprán, István; Hegyesi, Hargita; Fábián, Gabriella; Cserni, Bálint; Cserni, Gábor; Csont, Tamás; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a concern during radiotherapy. For its comprehensive study, an in vivo selective heart irradiation model was developed. Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 50 Gy and functional imaging, biochemical (circulating growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and morphological (picrosirius red staining of the heart) objectives were tested. Signs and symptoms of RIHD occurred >12 weeks after irradiation with tachypnea, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and body development retardation. Plasma GDF-15 was increased 3, 12 and 26, while plasma TGF-beta was increased 12 weeks after irradiation. At autopsy, extensive pleural fluid was found in the irradiated animals. Interstitial fibrosis could be reliably detected and quantified in irradiated hearts after a follow-up time of 19 weeks. The studied parameters could be used in future experiments for testing protective agents for prevention of radiation heart injury. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Potential markers and metabolic processes involved in the mechanism of radiation-induced heart injury.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Jan; Kura, Branislav; Babal, Pavel; Barancik, Miroslav; Ferko, Miroslav; Frimmel, Karel; Kalocayova, Barbora; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Lazou, Antigone; Mezesova, Lucia; Okruhlicova, Ludmila; Ravingerova, Tanya; Singal, Pawan K; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Viczenczova, Csilla; Vrbjar, Norbert; Tribulova, Narcis

    2017-10-01

    Irradiation of normal tissues leads to acute increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species that serve as intra- and inter-cellular signaling to alter cell and tissue function. In the case of chest irradiation, it can affect the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, with consequent tissue remodelation and adverse side effects and symptoms. This complex process is orchestrated by a large number of interacting molecular signals, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombogenesis, organ dysfunction, and ultimate failing of the heart occur as a pathological entity - "radiation-induced heart disease" (RIHD) that is major source of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to bring insights into the basic mechanisms of RIHD that may lead to the identification of targets for intervention in the radiotherapy side effect. Studies of authors also provide knowledge about how to select targeted drugs or biological molecules to modify the progression of radiation damage in the heart. New prospective studies are needed to validate that assessed factors and changes are useful as early markers of cardiac damage.

  15. Zingiber officinale Rosc. modulates gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok; Haksar, Anupum; Chawla, Raman; Kumar, Raj; Arora, Rajesh; Singh, Surender; Prasad, Jagdish; Islam, F; Arora, M P; Kumar Sharma, Rakesh

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurobehavioral protective efficacy of a hydroalcoholic extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) in mitigating gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of Zingiber extract 1 h before 2-Gy gamma irradiation was effective in blocking the saccharin avoidance response for 5 post-treatment observational days, both in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with 200 mg/kg b.w. i.p. being the most effective dose. Highest saccharin intake in all the groups was observed on the fifth post-treatment day. The potential of ginger extract to inhibit lipid peroxidation induced by radiation (2 Gy) and ascorbate-ion stress in brain homogenate and its ability to scavenge highly reactive superoxide anions were evaluated. The 1000-microg/ml and 2000-microg/ml concentration of ginger extract showed the highest efficiency in scavenging free radicals and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. The lipid peroxidation and superoxide-anion scavenging ability of the extract further supports its radioprotective properties. The results clearly establish the neurobehavioral efficacy of ginger extract and the antioxidant properties appear to be a contributing factor in its overall ability to modulate radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion. Ginger extract has tremendous potential for clinical applications in mitigation of radiation-induced emesis in humans.

  16. Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Xiong Mai; Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao; Deng Ling; Lin Yuehao; Rong Tiehua

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

  17. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  19. Radiation-induced changes in DNA methylation of repetitive elements in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Nzabarushimana, Etienne; Skinner, Charles M; Melnyk, Stepan B; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism, needed for proper control over the expression of genetic information and silencing of repetitive elements. Exposure to ionizing radiation, aside from its strong genotoxic potential, may also affect the methylation of DNA, within the repetitive elements, in particular. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J male mice to low absorbed mean doses of two types of space radiation-proton (0.1 Gy, 150 MeV, dose rate 0.53 ± 0.08 Gy/min), and heavy iron ions ((56)Fe) (0.5 Gy, 600 MeV/n, dose rate 0.38 ± 0.06 Gy/min). Radiation-induced changes in cardiac DNA methylation associated with repetitive elements were detected. Specifically, modest hypomethylation of retrotransposon LINE-1 was observed at day 7 after irradiation with either protons or (56)Fe. This was followed by LINE-1, and other retrotransposons, ERV2 and SINE B1, as well as major satellite DNA hypermethylation at day 90 after irradiation with (56)Fe. These changes in DNA methylation were accompanied by alterations in the expression of DNA methylation machinery and affected the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Furthermore, loss of transposable elements expression was detected in the cardiac tissue at the 90-day time-point, paralleled by substantial accumulation of mRNA transcripts, associated with major satellites. Given that the one-carbon metabolism pathway can be modulated by dietary modifications, these findings suggest a potential strategy for the mitigation and, possibly, prevention of the negative effects exerted by ionizing radiation on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, we show that the methylation status and expression of repetitive elements may serve as early biomarkers of exposure to space radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory

  1. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. )

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  2. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improves radiation-induced heart injury through DNA damage repair in rat model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Zhao, Zhiying; Wu, Rong; Zeng, Yuecan; Zhang, Zhenyong; Miao, Jianing; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective form of therapy for most thoracic malignant tumors. However, myocardial injury resulting from the high doses of radiation is a severe complication. Here we aimed to study the possibility of reducing radiation-induced myocardial injury with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation. We used MSCs extracted from bone marrow (BMSCs) to transplant via the tail vein into a radiation-induced heart injury (RIHI) rat model. The rats were divided into six groups: a Sham group, an IRR (irradiation) group, and four IRR + BMSCs transplantation groups obtained at different time points. After irradiation, BMSC transplantation significantly enhanced the cardiac function in rats. By analyzing the expression of PPAR-α, PPAR-γ, TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-8, we found that BMSC transplantation alleviated radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and decreased the inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, we found that expression of γ-H2AX, XRCC4, DNA ligase4, and TP53BP1, which are associated with DNA repair, was up-regulated, along with increased secretion of growth factors SDF-1, CXCR4, VEGF, and IGF in rat myocardium in the IRR + BMSCs transplantation groups compared with the IRR group. Thus, BMSC transplantation has the potential to improve RIHI via DNA repair and be a new therapeutic approach for patients with myocardial injury.

  3. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  4. Radiation-induced signaling results in mitochondrial impairment in mouse heart at 4 weeks after exposure to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Schmaltz, Dominik; Shyla, Alena; Azimzadeh, Omid; Schulz, Sabine; Haagen, Julia; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sarioglu, Hakan; Schäfer, Alexander; Atkinson, Michael J; Zischka, Hans; Tapio, Soile

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment of breast cancer, Hodgkin's disease or childhood cancers expose the heart to high local radiation doses, causing an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the survivors decades after the treatment. The mechanisms that underlie the radiation damage remain poorly understood so far. Previous data show that impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism is directly linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. In this study, the radiation-induced in vivo effects on cardiac mitochondrial proteome and function were investigated. C57BL/6N mice were exposed to local irradiation of the heart with doses of 0.2 Gy or 2 Gy (X-ray, 200 kV) at the age of eight weeks, the control mice were sham-irradiated. After four weeks the cardiac mitochondria were isolated and tested for proteomic and functional alterations. Two complementary proteomics approaches using both peptide and protein quantification strategies showed radiation-induced deregulation of 25 proteins in total. Three main biological categories were affected: the oxidative phophorylation, the pyruvate metabolism, and the cytoskeletal structure. The mitochondria exposed to high-dose irradiation showed functional impairment reflected as partial deactivation of Complex I (32%) and Complex III (11%), decreased succinate-driven respiratory capacity (13%), increased level of reactive oxygen species and enhanced oxidation of mitochondrial proteins. The changes in the pyruvate metabolism and structural proteins were seen with both low and high radiation doses. This is the first study showing the biological alterations in the murine heart mitochondria several weeks after the exposure to low- and high-dose of ionizing radiation. Our results show that doses, equivalent to a single dose in radiotherapy, cause long-lasting changes in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondria-associated cytoskeleton. This prompts us to propose that these first pathological changes lead to an increased

  5. Modeling the risk of radiation-induced lung fibrosis: Irradiated heart tissue is as important as irradiated lung.

    PubMed

    Cella, Laura; D'Avino, Vittoria; Palma, Giuseppe; Conson, Manuel; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Picardi, Marco; Pressello, Maria Cristina; Boboc, Genoveva Ionela; Battistini, Roberta; Donato, Vittorio; Pacelli, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    We used normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling to explore the impact of heart irradiation on radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF). We retrospectively reviewed for RILF 148 consecutive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with sequential chemo-radiotherapy (CHT-RT). Left, right, total lung and heart dose-volume and dose-mass parameters along with clinical, disease and treatment-related characteristics were analyzed. NTCP modeling by multivariate logistic regression analysis using bootstrapping was performed. Models were evaluated by Spearman Rs coefficient and ROC area. At a median time of 13months, 18 out of 115 analyzable patients (15.6%) developed RILF after treatment. A three-variable predictive model resulted to be optimal for RILF. The two models most frequently selected by bootstrap included increasing age and mass of heart receiving >30Gy as common predictors, in combination with left lung V5 (Rs=0.35, AUC=0.78), or alternatively, the lungs near maximum dose D2% (Rs=0.38, AUC=0.80). CHT-RT may cause lung injury in a small, but significant fraction of HL patients. Our results suggest that aging along with both heart and lung irradiation plays a fundamental role in the risk of developing RILF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls. All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p < 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p < 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p < 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p < 0.05) or IB (p < 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p < 0.01). Early administrative of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusin, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  7. Myocardial hydroxyproline reduced by early administration of methylprednisolone or ibuprofen to rabbits with radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Cunningham, D.; Schwiter, E.J.; Abt, A.; Skarlatos, S.; Wood, M.A.; Whitesell, L.

    1982-05-01

    The ability of methylprednisolone (MP) and ibuprofen (IB) to reduce the severity of the late state of radiation-induced heart disease was assessed in 57 New Zealand white rabbits. Before and shortly after cardiac irradiation, 15 rabbits received i.v. MP, 30 mg/kg twice daily for 3 days, and 15 others received IB, 12.5 mg/kg twice daily for 2 days. No drug was administered to 14 irradiated rabbits, and neither irradiation nor drugs were administered to 13 rabbits that served as controls, All 15 rabbits treated with MP and 13 of the 15 treated with IB lived for 100 days. Only seven of the untreated, irradiated rabbits lived that long. Longevity of each treated group of rabbits was better (p less than 0.01 and 0.05) than that of the untreated, irradiated rabbits. Surviving rabbits were killed 100 days after irradiation. Pericarditis (p less than 0.05) and pericardial effusion (p less than 0.01) were less frequent in the treated, irradiated groups than in the untreated, irradiated rabbits. At least some rabbits in each irradiated group had microscopic evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The fibrosis was quantitated by determination of myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations (MHP). MHP concentration in the untreated, irradiated rabbits was greater than in those treated with MP (p less than 0.05) or IB (p less than 0.01) and in the untreated, unirradiated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Early administration of MP or IB retarded the development of myocardial fibrosis, pericarditis and pericardial effusion, and improved survival in this experimental model of radiation-induced heart disease.

  8. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  9. Modulation of radiation-induced alteration in the antioxidant status of mice by naringin.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Reddy, Tiyyagura Koti

    2005-07-01

    The alteration in the antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation was investigated in Swiss albino mice treated with 2 mg/kg b.wt. naringin, a citrus flavoglycoside, before exposure to 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were determined in the liver and small intestine of mice treated or not with naringin at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h post-irradiation. Whole-body irradiation of mice caused a dose-dependent elevation in the lipid peroxidation while a dose-dependent depletion was observed for glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in both liver as well as small intestine. Treatment of mice with 2 mg/kg b. wt. naringin inhibited the radiation-induced elevation in the lipid peroxidation as well as depletion of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver and small intestine. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation increased with time, which was greatest at 2 h post-irradiation and declined thereafter in the liver and small intestine. Similarly, a maximum decline in the glutathione glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was observed at 1 h, while catalase showed a maximum decline at 2 h post-irradiation. Our study demonstrates that naringin protects mouse liver and intestine against the radiation-induced damage by elevating the antioxidant status and reducing the lipid peroxidation.

  10. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Methods Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. Results The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII

  11. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Savita; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract, we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP ) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 µg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 µg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 µg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 45.65% at 500 µg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of radiation

  12. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Rui-Ting; Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  13. BET-bromodomain inhibitors modulate epigenetic patterns at the diacylglycerol kinase alpha enhancer associated with radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valinciute, Gintvile; Weigel, Christoph; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Oakes, Christopher C; Herskind, Carsten; Wenz, Frederik; Plass, Christoph; Schmezer, Peter; Popanda, Odilia

    2017-09-12

    Fibrosis is a frequent adverse effect of radiotherapy and no effective treatments are currently available to prevent or reverse fibrotic disease. We have previously identified altered epigenetic patterns at a gene enhancer of the diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKA) locus in normal skin fibroblasts derived from fibrosis patients. An open chromatin pattern related to radiation-inducibility of DGKA is associated with onset of radiation-induced fibrosis. Here, we explore epigenetic modulation of DGKA as a way to mitigate predisposition to fibrosis. We studied the effect of the BET-bromodomain inhibitors (JQ1, PFI-1) on DGKA inducibility in primary fibroblasts. Hence, DGKA transcription was additionally induced by the radiomimetic drug bleomycin, and DGKA mRNA expression, histone H3K27 acetylation and downstream markers of profibrotic fibroblast activation after BET-bromodomain inhibition were determined. BET-bromodomain inhibition suppressed induction of DGKA in bleomycin-treated fibroblasts, reduced H3K27ac at the DGKA enhancer and repressed collagen marker gene expression. Alterations in fibroblast morphology and reduction of collagen deposition were observed. For the DGKA enhancer, we show that BET-bromodomain inhibitors can alter the epigenetic landscape of fibroblasts, thus counteracting profibrotic transcriptional events. Interference with epigenetic patterns of fibrosis predisposition may provide novel preventive therapies that improve radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cholecystokinin attenuates radiation-induced lung cancer cell apoptosis by modulating p53 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Su, Chongyu; Yu, Daping; Zhou, Shijie; Song, Xiaoyun; Liu, Shuku; Qin, Ming; Li, Yunsong; Xiao, Ning; Cao, Xiaoqing; Shi, Kang; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    The deregulation of p53 in cancer cells is one of the important factors by which cancer cells escape from the immune surveillance. Cholecystokinin (CCK) has strong bioactivity in the regulation of a number of cell activities. This study tests a hypothesis that CCK interferes with p53 expression to affect the apoptotic process in lung cancer (tumor) cells. In this study, tumor-bearing mice and A549 cells (a tumor cell line) were irradiated. The expression of CCK and p53 in tumor cells was assessed with RT-qPCR and Western blotting. The binding of p300 to the promoter of p53 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We observed that, with a given amount and within a given period, small doses/more sessions of irradiation markedly increased the levels of CCK in the sera and tumor cells, which were positively correlated with the tumor growth in mice and negatively correlated with tumor cell apoptosis. CCK increased the levels of histone acetyltransferase p300 and repressed the levels of nuclear factor-kB at the p53 promoter locus in tumor cells, which suppressed the expression of p53. In conclusion, CCK plays an important role in attenuating the radiation-induced lung cancer cell apoptosis. CCK may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of lung cancers. PMID:28337291

  15. Modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation by phospholipase A 2 and calmodulin antagonists: Relevance to detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1995-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 0.9 Gy s -1. Lipid peroxidation initiated by ionizing radiation was enhanced by phospholipase A 2, and required both phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase for consecutive action to convert fatty acid peroxides into corresponding alcohols. The ability of phospholipase A 2 to enhance lipid peroxidation was increased in presence of Ca 2+. However, in combination, phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase were effective in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. These findings show that free fatty acid peroxides considerably increase the peroxidation. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit lipid peroxidation and decrease the radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from the membranes. Our results suggest the importance of Ca 2+ dependent phospholipase A 2 in detoxification of fatty acid peroxides in the membranes. It is quite possible that scavenging of free radicals by calmodulin antagonists lower the formation of hydroperoxides, resulting in the decrease in activity of phospholipase A 2. Alternatively, decrease in Ca 2+ release due to the calmodulin antagonists might have affected the activity of phospholipase A 2. Our observations might be of considerable significance in the understanding of post irradiation effect on biological membranes.

  16. Different Sequences of Fractionated Low-Dose Proton and Single Iron-Radiation-Induced Divergent Biological Responses in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Sasi, Sharath P; Yan, Xinhua; Zuriaga-Herrero, Marian; Gee, Hannah; Lee, Juyong; Mehrzad, Raman; Song, Jin; Onufrak, Jillian; Morgan, James; Enderling, Heiko; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A

    2017-08-01

    survival signaling pathways. These data suggest that fractionated doses of radiation induces cellular and molecular changes that result in depressed heart functions both under basal conditions and particularly after myocardial infarction.

  17. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenqing; Nie, Lili; Yu, K N; Wu, Lijun; Kong, Peizhong; Bao, Lingzhi; Chen, Guodong; Yang, Haoran; Han, Wei

    2016-12-08

    During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2), at a relatively low concentration (20 µM), effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and micronucleus (MN). In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2) of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2) with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1), MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  18. Differential modulation of a radiation-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma cells by pifithrin-α and wortmannin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Zhang, Jianghong; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The implication of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) for both radiation protection and radiotherapy has attracted significant attention, but a key question is how to modulate the RIBE. The present study found that, when a fraction of glioblastoma cells in T98G population were individually targeted with precise helium particles through their nucleus, micronucleus (MN) were induced and its yield increased non-linearly with radiation dose. After co-culturing with irradiated cells, additional MN could be induced in the non-irradiated bystander cells and its yield was independent of irradiation dose, giving direct evidence of a RIBE. Further results showed that the RIBE could be eliminated by pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) but enhanced by wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor). Moreover, it was found that nitric oxide (NO) contributed to this RIBE, and the levels of NO of both irradiated cells and bystander cells could be extensively diminished by pifithrin-α but insignificantly reduced by wortmannin. Our results indicate that RIBE can be modulated by p53 and PI3K through a NO-dependent and NO-independent pathway, respectively.

  19. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenqing; Nie, Lili; Yu, K. N.; Wu, Lijun; Kong, Peizhong; Bao, Lingzhi; Chen, Guodong; Yang, Haoran; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2), at a relatively low concentration (20 µM), effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and micronucleus (MN). In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2) of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2) with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1), MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures. PMID:27941646

  20. UV radiation-induced surface modulation time evolution in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, I.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Iordache, I.; Hurduc, N.; Sava, I.; Sacarescu, L.; Stoica, I.

    2009-05-01

    The reorganization processes at submicron level of the polymeric materials have been investigated because of their applications in optoelectronics and bio-science. We have obtained surface relief modulation in single step processing on the photo resist and polysiloxane films. But for technical applications the time evolution and stability of the induced surface structure is an important parameter and is a problem to be discussed. In case of single step surface relief formation on polymeric materials the process is connected with the photochromic behavior of the materials. As it is known the UV light induced effects on the material structure are reversible under the action of visible light, but with different speeds. In this report is analyzed the time evolution of the surface modulation obtained under the action of the UV light for azopolymers with different structures.

  1. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  2. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  3. Investigating the influence of respiratory motion on the radiation induced bystander effect in modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Aidan J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory motion introduces complex spatio-temporal variations in the dosimetry of radiotherapy and may contribute towards uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. This study investigates the potential radiobiological implications occurring due to tumour motion in areas of geometric miss in lung cancer radiotherapy. A bespoke phantom and motor-driven platform to replicate respiratory motion and study the consequences on tumour cell survival in vitro was constructed. Human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and H1299 were irradiated in modulated radiotherapy configurations in the presence and absence of respiratory motion. Clonogenic survival was calculated for irradiated and shielded regions. Direction of motion, replication of dosimetry by multi-leaf collimator (MLC) manipulation and oscillating lead shielding were investigated to confirm differences in cell survival. Respiratory motion was shown to significantly increase survival for out-of-field regions for H460/H1299 cell lines when compared with static irradiation (p < 0.001). Significantly higher survival was found in the in-field region for the H460 cell line (p < 0.030). Oscillating lead shielding also produced these significant differences. Respiratory motion and oscillatory delivery of radiation dose to human tumour cells has a significant impact on in- and out-of-field survival in the presence of non-uniform irradiation in this in vitro set-up. This may have important radiobiological consequences for modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  4. Modulation of radiation-induced alterations in oxidative stress and cytokine expression in lung tissue by Panax ginseng extract.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong Soon; Kim, Hyeong Geug; Han, Jong Min; Lee, Jin Seok; Choi, Min Kyung; Huh, Gil Ja; Son, Chang Gue

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the modulating effect of Panax ginseng extract (PGE) on radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) by measuring early changes in oxidative stress levels, cytokine expression, and the histopathology of mouse lung tissue treated with high dose of X-ray radiation. The mice were pretreated with 25, 50, and 100-mg/kg doses of PGE orally for four consecutive days, and their thoraces were then exposed to 15-Gy X-ray radiation 1 h after the last administration of PGE on day 4. The pretreatments with 50 and 100 mg/kg PGE led to significant reductions in the elevation of lipid peroxidation levels at 2 and 10 days, respectively, after irradiation. The mice pretreated with PGE exhibited dose-dependent reductions in the irradiation-induced production of tumor necrosis factor α and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines 10 days after irradiation, with these reductions nearly reaching the control levels after the 100-mg/kg dose. Furthermore, together with providing significant protection against reductions in catalase activity and glutathione content, pretreatment with 100 mg/kg PGE resulted in a marked attenuation of the severity of inflammatory changes in lung tissue 10 days after irradiation. A high pretreatment dose of PGE may be a useful pharmacological approach for protection against RILI.

  5. Ribosome Synthesis and MAPK Activity Modulate Ionizing Radiation-Induced Germ Cell Apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Ralf; Stergiou, Lilli; Hofmann, E. Randal; Hofmann, Jen; Haenni, Simon; Teo, Youjin; Furger, André; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) is an elemental biological process and is key for cellular homeostasis. In a forward genetic screen in C. elegans designed to identify DNA damage-response factors, we isolated a point mutation of RNA pol I, rpoa-2(op259), that leads to altered rRNA synthesis and a concomitant resistance to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced germ cell apoptosis. This weak apoptotic IR response could be phenocopied when interfering with other factors of ribosome synthesis. Surprisingly, despite their resistance to DNA damage, rpoa-2(op259) mutants present a normal CEP-1/p53 response to IR and increased basal CEP-1 activity under normal growth conditions. In parallel, rpoa-2(op259) leads to reduced Ras/MAPK pathway activity, which is required for germ cell progression and physiological germ cell death. Ras/MAPK gain-of-function conditions could rescue the IR response defect in rpoa-2(op259), pointing to a function for Ras/MAPK in modulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis downstream of CEP-1. Our data demonstrate that a single point mutation in an RNA pol I subunit can interfere with multiple key signalling pathways. Ribosome synthesis and growth-factor signalling are perturbed in many cancer cells; such an interplay between basic cellular processes and signalling might be critical for how tumours evolve or respond to treatment. PMID:24278030

  6. The Effect of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Radiation-Induced Second Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D. Davis, Sidney; Evans, Cherie; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Haynes, Matthew; Hunter, Alistair

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of carcinogenic risk for actual clinical scenarios. Method and Materials: Clinically equivalent IMRT plans were generated for prostate, breast, and head-and-neck cases treated with 3D-CRT. Two possible dose-response models for radiocarcinogenesis were generated based on A-bomb survivor data corrected for fractionation. Dose-volume histogram analysis was used to determine dose and its distribution to nontargeted tissues within the planning CT scan volume and thermoluminescent dosimetry for the rest of the body. Carcinogenic estimates were calculated with and without a correction factor accounting for cancer patients' advanced age and reduced longevity. Results: For the model assuming a plateau in risk above 2-Gy single-fraction-equivalent (SFE), IMRT and 3D-CRT produced risks of 1.7% and 2.1%, respectively, for prostate; 1.9% and 1.8%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.4-2.2% and 1.5-1.6%, respectively, depending on technique, for breast. Assuming a reduction in risk above 2-Gy SFE, risks for IMRT and 3D-CRT were 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively, for prostate; 1.4% and 1.2%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.3-1.8% vs. 1.3-1.6%, respectively, for breast. Applying a correction factor of 0.5 for cancer patients halved these risks and their relative differences. Conclusions: Carcinogenic risks were comparable in absolute terms between modalities. Risks are dependant on technique used. Risks with IMRT are influenced by monitor unit demand and are therefore software/hardware dependant. The dose-response model accounting for cell killing at higher doses fitted best with actual observed risks.

  7. Radiation-induced accelerated coronary arteriosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Thompson, M.; Dameshek, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on radiation-induced coronary heart disease. A young patient with myocardial infarction following mediastinal irradiation is described. The role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the subsequent development of coronary heart disease is discussed.

  8. Low-dose spiruchostatin-B, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor enhances radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells via modulation of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Zhao, Qing Li; Li, Peng; Narita, Koichi; Katoh, Tadashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Spiruchostatin B (SP-B), is a potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in addition to HDAC inhibition, the pharmacological effects of SP-B are also attributed to its ability to produce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2. In this study, we investigated the effects of low dose (non-toxic) SP-B on radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells in vitro. The treatment of cells with low-dose SP-B induced the acetylation of histones, however, does not induce apoptosis. Whereas, the combined treatment with SP-B and radiation significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, suggesting the potential role of this combined treatment for future radiation therapy. Interestingly, the enhancement of apoptosis was accompanied by significant increased in the ROS generation. Pre-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited the enhancement of apoptosis induced by combined treatment, indicating that ROS play an essential role. It was also found that SP-B combined with radiation caused the activation of death receptor and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, via modulation of ROS-mediated signaling. Moreover, SP-B also significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis in other lymphoma cell lines such as Molt-4 and HL-60. Taken together, our findings suggest that the low-dose SP-B enhances radiation-induced apoptosis via modulation of redox signaling because of its ability to serve as an intracellular ROS generating agent, mainly (H2O2 or [Formula: see text]). This study provides further insights into the mechanism of action of SP-B with radiation and demonstrates that SP-B can be used as a future novel sensitizer for radiation therapy.

  9. Radiation-induced up-regulation of Mmp2 involves increased mRNA stability, redox modulation, and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiling; Goswami, Prabhat C; Robbins, Mike E C

    2004-04-01

    We have previously observed time- and dose-dependent increases in matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2) protein levels in rat tubule epithelial cells (NRK52E) after irradiation. However, the mechanism(s) involved remains unclear. In the present study, irradiating NRK52E cells with 0-20 Gy gamma rays was associated with time- and dose-dependent increases in Mmp2 mRNA. Studies using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) added 24 h after irradiation revealed the t(1/2) of Mmp2 mRNA to be approximately 8 h in control cells. In contrast, the increase in Mmp2 mRNA levels in irradiated cells was essentially unchanged after incubation with ActD for up to 12 h. Incubating cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine or ebselen or the MEK pathway inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 prior to irradiation abolished the radiation-induced up-regulation of Mmp2. Irradiating NRK52E cells led to reactive oxygen species-mediated Erk1/2 activation; preincubation with NAC prevented the radiation-induced increase in phosphorylated Erk1/2. Transfecting cells with a dominant-negative ERK mutant completely inhibited radiation-induced Erk phosphorylation and abolished the radiation-induced up-regulation of Mmp2 protein. Thus the radiation-induced up-regulation of Mmp2 mRNA is due in part to increased mRNA stability and is mediated by redox; the ERK MAPK signaling pathway may be involved.

  10. Imaging radiation-induced normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Mike E; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K; Peiffer, Ann M; Tsien, Christina I; Bailey, Janet E; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-04-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them.

  11. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (−1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC+ cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury. PMID:28289414

  12. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by an antioxidant chlorophyllin through increased stem cell activity and modulation of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Thoh, Maikho; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells (HSPC) are low in abundance and exhibit high radiosensitivity and their ability to divide dramatically decreases following exposure to ionizing radiation. Our earlier studies have shown antiapoptotic, immune-stimulatory, and antioxidant effects of chlorophyllin, a constituent of the over the counter drug derifil. Here we describe the beneficial effects of chlorophyllin against radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome. Chlorophyllin administration significantly enhanced the abundance of HSPC in vivo. It induced a transient cell cycle arrest in lineage-negative cells in the bone marrow. However, the chlorophyllin-treated mice exposed to whole body irradiation (WBI) had a significantly higher proportion of actively dividing HSPC in the bone marrow as compared to only WBI-exposed mice. It significantly increased the number of colony forming units (CFUs) by bone marrow cells in vitro and spleen CFUs in irradiated mice in vivo. Pharmacokinetic study showed that chlorophyllin had a serum half-life of 141.8 min in mice. Chlorophyllin upregulated antiapoptotic genes and antioxidant machinery via activation of prosurvival transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB and increased the survival and recovery of bone marrow cells in mice exposed to WBI. Chlorophyllin stimulated granulocyte production in bone marrow and increased the abundance of peripheral blood neutrophils by enhancing serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulation factor (GCSF). Most importantly, prophylactic treatment of mice with chlorophyllin significantly abrogated radiation-induced mortality. Chlorophyllin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, enhancing granulopoiesis, and stimulating prosurvival pathways in bone marrow cells and lymphocytes.

  13. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M H; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (-1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC(+) cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury.

  14. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rafat, Navid; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Shahidi, Maryam; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2016-01-01

    The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ) against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap %) was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0) and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24) by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002). In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  15. A dose-dependent perturbation in cardiac energy metabolism is linked to radiation-induced ischemic heart disease in Mayak nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Omid; Azizova, Tamara; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Subramanian, Vikram; Bakshi, Mayur V; Moseeva, Maria; Zubkova, Olga; Hauck, Stefanie M; Anastasov, Nataša; Atkinson, Michael J; Tapio, Soile

    2017-02-07

    Epidemiological studies show a significant increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) incidence associated with total external gamma-ray dose among Mayak plutonium enrichment plant workers. Our previous studies using mouse models suggest that persistent alteration of heart metabolism due to the inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha accompanies cardiac damage after high doses of ionising radiation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced IHD in humans. The cardiac proteome response to irradiation was analysed in Mayak workers who were exposed only to external doses of gamma rays. All participants were diagnosed during their lifetime with IHD that also was the cause of death. Label-free quantitative proteomics analysis was performed on tissue samples from the cardiac left ventricles of individuals stratified into four radiation dose groups (0 Gy, < 100 mGy, 100-500 mGy, and > 500 mGy). The groups could be separated using principal component analysis based on all proteomics features. Proteome profiling showed a dose-dependent increase in the number of downregulated mitochondrial and structural proteins. Both proteomics and immunoblotting showed decreased expression of several oxidative stress responsive proteins in the irradiated hearts. The phosphorylation of transcription factor PPAR alpha was increased in a dose-dependent manner, which is indicative of a reduction in transcriptional activity with increased radiation dose. These data suggest that chronic external radiation enhances the risk for IHD by inhibiting PPAR alpha and altering the expression of mitochondrial, structural, and antioxidant components of the heart.

  16. Method for Correction of Consequences of Radiation-Induced Heart Disease using Low-Intensity Electromagnetic Emission under Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bavrina, A P; Monich, V A; Malinovskaya, S L; Yakovleva, E I; Bugrova, M L; Lazukin, V F

    2015-05-01

    Effects of successive exposure to ionizing irradiation and low-intensity broadband red light on electrical activity of the heart and myocardium microstructure were studied in rats. Lowintensity red light corrected some ECG parameters, in particular, it normalized QT and QTc intervals and voltage of R and T waves. Changes in ECG parameters were followed by alterations in microstructure of muscle fi laments in the myocardium of treatment group animals comparing to control group.

  17. BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 are potential molecular targets for the modulation of a radiation-induced DNA damage response in bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Rothkamm, Kai; McClelland, Keeva; Al Rashid, Shahnaz T; Prise, Kevin M

    2015-01-28

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment option for many human cancers. Current research is investigating the use of molecular targeted drugs in order to improve responses to radiotherapy in various cancers. The cellular response to irradiation is driven by both direct DNA damage in the targeted cell and intercellular signalling leading to a broad range of bystander effects. This study aims to elucidate radiation-induced DNA damage response signalling in bystander cells and to identify potential molecular targets to modulate the radiation induced bystander response in a therapeutic setting. Stalled replication forks in T98G bystander cells were visualised via bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) nuclear foci detection at sites of single stranded DNA. γH2AX co-localised with these BrdU foci. BRCA1 and FANCD2 foci formed in T98G bystander cells. Using ATR mutant F02-98 hTERT and ATM deficient GM05849 fibroblasts it could be shown that ATR but not ATM was required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to sites of replication associated DNA damage in bystander cells whereas BRCA1 bystander foci were ATM-dependent. Phospho-Chk1 foci formation was observed in T98G bystander cells. Clonogenic survival assays showed moderate radiosensitisation of directly irradiated cells by the Chk1 inhibitor UCN-01 but increased radioresistance of bystander cells. This study identifies BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 as potential targets for the modulation of radiation response in bystander cells. It adds to our understanding of the key molecular events propagating out-of-field effects of radiation and provides a rationale for the development of novel molecular targeted drugs for radiotherapy optimisation.

  18. BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 are potential molecular targets for the modulation of a radiation-induced DNA damage response in bystander cells

    PubMed Central

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Rothkamm, Kai; McClelland, Keeva; Al Rashid, Shahnaz T.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment option for many human cancers. Current research is investigating the use of molecular targeted drugs in order to improve responses to radiotherapy in various cancers. The cellular response to irradiation is driven by both direct DNA damage in the targeted cell and intercellular signalling leading to a broad range of bystander effects. This study aims to elucidate radiation-induced DNA damage response signalling in bystander cells and to identify potential molecular targets to modulate the radiation induced bystander response in a therapeutic setting. Stalled replication forks in T98G bystander cells were visualised via bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) nuclear foci detection at sites of single stranded DNA. γH2AX co-localised with these BrdU foci. BRCA1 and FANCD2 foci formed in T98G bystander cells. Using ATR mutant F02-98 hTERT and ATM deficient GM05849 fibroblasts it could be shown that ATR but not ATM was required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to sites of replication associated DNA damage in bystander cells whereas BRCA1 bystander foci were ATM-dependent. Phospho-Chk1 foci formation was observed in T98G bystander cells. Clonogenic survival assays showed moderate radiosensitisation of directly irradiated cells by the Chk1 inhibitor UCN-01 but increased radioresistance of bystander cells. This study identifies BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 as potential targets for the modulation of radiation response in bystander cells. It adds to our understanding of the key molecular events propagating out-of-field effects of radiation and provides a rationale for the development of novel molecular targeted drugs for radiotherapy optimisation. PMID:25304378

  19. Pten regulates Aurora-A and cooperates with Fbxw7 in modulating radiation-induced tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Won; Kim, Il-Jin; Wu, Di; Lu, Jing; Stock, William A; Liu, Yueyong; Huang, Yurong; Kang, Hio Chung; DelRosario, Reyno; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wei, Guangwei; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-06-01

    The Aurora-A kinase gene is frequently amplified and/or overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, leading to major efforts to develop therapeutic agents targeting this pathway. Here, we show that Aurora-A is targeted for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the F-box protein FBXW7 in a process that is regulated by GSK3β. Using a series of truncated Aurora-A proteins and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified distinct FBXW7 and GSK3β-binding sites in Aurora-A. Mutation of critical residues in either site substantially disrupts degradation of Aurora-A. Furthermore, we show that loss of Pten results in the stabilization of Aurora-A by attenuating FBXW7-dependent degradation of Aurora-A through the AKT/GSK3β pathway. Moreover, radiation-induced tumor latency is significantly shortened in Fbxw7(+/-)Pten(+/-) mice as compared with either Fbxw7(+/-) or Pten(+/-) mice, indicating that Fbxw7 and Pten appear to cooperate in suppressing tumorigenesis. Our results establish a novel posttranslational regulatory network in which the Pten and Fbxw7 pathways appear to converge on the regulation of Aurora-A level. 2012 AACR

  20. A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Alleviates Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis and Fibrosis through Modulation of Lung Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Verma, Savita; Kalita, Bhargab; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis are predominant consequences of radiation exposure, whether planned or accidental. The present study, demonstrates radioprotective potential of a formulation, prepared by combining podophyllotoxin and rutin (G-003M), in mice exposed to 11 Gy thoracic gamma radiation (TGR). Treated mice were observed for survival and other symptomatic features. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/nitric oxide (NO) was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. DNA damage and cell death were assessed in alveolar cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Total protein (TP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)/serum of mice to assess lung vascular permeability. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), cluster of differentiation 45, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitrotyrosine were also estimated in lungs/BALF of differentially treated mice. Our observations revealed 100% survival in G-003M-pretreated mice against 66.50% in 11 Gy TGR exposed. Other symptoms like reduction in graying of hair, weight loss, and breathing rate were also observed in pretreated groups. Significant decline in ROS/NO and cell death in formulation pretreated mice were also observed. Decreased level of TP, LDH, and ALP in BALF/serum samples revealed G-003M-induced inhibition in lung permeability. Level of IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 in the lungs of these mice was found corresponding to control group at 8 weeks posttreatment. On the contrary, these cytokines raised significantly in 11 Gy TGR-exposed mice. Lung pneumonitis and fibrosis were found significantly countered in these mice. The observations revealed that G-003M could regulate immune system by curtailing radiation-induced oxidative and inflammatory stress, which has helped in minimizing radiation-inflicted pneumonitis and

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy reduces radiation-induced trismus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective study with >5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Jin; Ma, Hong-Lian; Lai, Shu-Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Han, Fei; Lu, Li-Xia; Bao, Yong; Chen, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) provides better temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sparing and, thus, may reduce the incidence of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate radiation-induced trismus in patients with NPC who had received IMRT and to assess the pretreatment factors, relevant treatment factors, and dosimetry parameters associated with trismus. A prospective, single-arm measurement study with more than 5 years of follow-up was designed. Patients with newly diagnosed stage I through IVB NPC who received treatment with IMRT were eligible. Patients received 66 to 70 grays (Gy) to the gross tumor volume. The maximal interincisal distance (MID) was measured at baseline and 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after they completed IMRT. The trial enrolled 211 consecutive patients from 2001 to 2004. The mean dose to the TMJ ranged from 6.18 Gy to 51.36 Gy (median dose, 29.88 Gy). Compared with baseline MID levels, normalized MID levels at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after IMRT were 94.6% ± 9.9%, 92.5% ± 10.5%, 92% ± 10.6%, 92.2% ± 10.5%, 92.1% ± 10.2%, and 90.3% ± 11.4%, respectively (P < .001). According to a revised subjective-objective management-analytical (SOMA) scale, grade 1/2 trismus was identified in 12 of 211 patients (5.7%), and no grade 3/4 trismus was observed. There was an increasing risk of trismus after IMRT when the MID was <40.5 mm at baseline compared with an MID >40.5 mm (P = .007). No dosimetric parameter was associated with trismus. IMRT was able to reduce the radiation dose to the TMJ and likely reduced the incidence and severity of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  2. Modulating fatty acid oxidation in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Stanley, William C.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2011-01-01

    In the advanced stages of heart failure, many key enzymes involved in myocardial energy substrate metabolism display various degrees of down-regulation. The net effect of the altered metabolic phenotype consists of reduced cardiac fatty oxidation, increased glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and rigidity of the metabolic response to changes in workload. Is this metabolic shift an adaptive mechanism that protects the heart or a maladaptive process that accelerates structural and functional derangement? The question remains open; however, the metabolic remodelling of the failing heart has induced a number of investigators to test the hypothesis that pharmacological modulation of myocardial substrate utilization might prove therapeutically advantageous. The present review addresses the effects of indirect and direct modulators of fatty acid (FA) oxidation, which are the best pharmacological agents available to date for ‘metabolic therapy’ of failing hearts. Evidence for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies based on modulators of FA metabolism is mixed, pointing to the possibility that the molecular/biochemical alterations induced by these pharmacological agents are more complex than originally thought. Much remains to be understood; however, the beneficial effects of molecules such as perhexiline and trimetazidine in small clinical trials indicate that this promising therapeutic strategy is worthy of further pursuit. PMID:21289012

  3. Modulating fatty acid oxidation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Stanley, William C; Recchia, Fabio A

    2011-05-01

    In the advanced stages of heart failure, many key enzymes involved in myocardial energy substrate metabolism display various degrees of down-regulation. The net effect of the altered metabolic phenotype consists of reduced cardiac fatty oxidation, increased glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and rigidity of the metabolic response to changes in workload. Is this metabolic shift an adaptive mechanism that protects the heart or a maladaptive process that accelerates structural and functional derangement? The question remains open; however, the metabolic remodelling of the failing heart has induced a number of investigators to test the hypothesis that pharmacological modulation of myocardial substrate utilization might prove therapeutically advantageous. The present review addresses the effects of indirect and direct modulators of fatty acid (FA) oxidation, which are the best pharmacological agents available to date for 'metabolic therapy' of failing hearts. Evidence for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies based on modulators of FA metabolism is mixed, pointing to the possibility that the molecular/biochemical alterations induced by these pharmacological agents are more complex than originally thought. Much remains to be understood; however, the beneficial effects of molecules such as perhexiline and trimetazidine in small clinical trials indicate that this promising therapeutic strategy is worthy of further pursuit.

  4. The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck Module, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Predicts the Severity of Radiation-Induced Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Mendoza, Tito R.; Chambers, Mark; Burkett, V. Shannon; Garden, Adam S.; Hessell, Amy C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Ang, K. Kian; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) module, a symptom burden instrument, with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) module, a quality-of-life instrument, for the assessment of mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify the most distressing symptoms from the patient's perspective. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer (n = 134) completed the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN before radiotherapy (time 1) and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (time 2). The mean global and subscale scores for each instrument were compared with the objective mucositis scores determined from the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The global and subscale scores for each instrument showed highly significant changes from time 1 to time 2 and a significant correlation with the objective mucositis scores at time 2. Only the MDASI scores, however, were significant predictors of objective Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events mucositis scores on multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient, 0.355 for the global score and 0.310 for the head-and-neck cancer-specific score). Most of the moderate and severe symptoms associated with mucositis as identified on the MDASI-HN are not present on the FACT-HN. Conclusion: Both the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN modules can predict the mucositis scores. However, the MDASI-HN, a symptom burden instrument, was more closely associated with the severity of radiation-induced mucositis than the FACT-HN on multivariate regression analysis. This greater association was most likely related to the inclusion of a greater number of face-valid mucositis-related items in the MDASI-HN compared with the FACT-HN.

  5. Ferulic acid inhibits UVB-radiation induced photocarcinogenesis through modulating inflammatory and apoptotic signaling in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ambothi, Kanagalakshmi; Prasad, N Rajendra; Balupillai, Agilan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photochemopreventive effects of ferulic acid (FA) against chronic ultraviolet-B (290-320 nm) induced oxidative stress, inflammation and angiogenesis in the skin of Swiss albino mice. Chronic UVB exposure (180 mJ/cm(2) for 30 weeks; thrice in a week) induced tumor formation in the mice skin that showed increased expression of carcinogenic and inflammatory markers when compared with the control animals. The intraperitoneal (FAIP) and topical (FAT) administration of FA significantly reduced the incidence of UVB-induced tumor volume and tumor weight in the mice skin. Histopathological studies revealed that both FAIP and FAT administration prevented the UVB-induced hyperplasia, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and dysplastic feature in the mice skin. Further, it has been observed that FA treatment reverted chronic UVB-induced oxidative damage (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) accompanied with modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-6 in the mice skin tumor. FA treatment also modulates mutated p53, Bcl-2 and Bax expressions in the UVB-induced mice skin tumor. Thus, the results of the present study indicate ferulic acid has potential against UVB-induced carcinogenesis in the Swiss albino mice.

  6. Modulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced G{sub 2} Arrest by Cyclooxygenase-2 and its Inhibitor Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young Mee; Park, Soo Yeon; Park, Ji Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Shin Ae; Pyo, Hongryull

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Prolongation or attenuation of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G{sub 2}-M arrest in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpressing or celecoxib-treated cells, respectively, has been previously observed. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated the molecules involved in G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways after treatment with IR {+-} celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Various molecules in the G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways were investigated in HCT-116-Mock and -COX-2 cells. Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed to investigate whether expression and activity of the ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) could be modulated by COX-2 and its selective inhibitors. Results: COX-2 overexpression increased expression and activity of ATR after IR exposure. Celecoxib downregulated ATR in all tested cell lines independent of COX-2 expression, but downregulation was greater in COX-2 overexpressing cells after cells were irradiated. Celecoxib pretreatment before radiation caused strongly inhibited G{sub 2} arrest. Conclusions: COX-2 appears to prolong IR-induced G{sub 2} arrest by upregulating ATR. Celecoxib downregulated ATR preferentially in irradiated COX-2 overexpressing cells. Celecoxib may radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting G{sub 2} arrest through ATR downregulation.

  7. Anti-oxidant modulation in response to gamma radiation induced oxidative stress in developing seedlings of Psoralea corylifolia L.

    PubMed

    Jan, Sumira; Parween, Talat; Siddiqi, T O; Mahmooduzzafar

    2012-11-01

    The seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L., an important medicinal herb in Indian and Chinese Pharmacopeia were exposed to gamma rays (2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy) from Co(60) source at dose rate of 1.65 kGy h(-1). Enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidant responses were verified according to the developmental stages and gamma dose applied. Plants grown from seeds exposed to higher gamma doses exhibit higher activity of the antioxidants such as [Ascorbate peroxidase (APX, 1.11.1.1), superoxide dismutase (SOD, 1.15.1.1), glutathione reductase (GR, 1.6.4.2) and MDA content till flowering and declined thereafter. In contrast, CAT (1.11.1.6) activity declined in dose and age dependent manner. The correlation of gamma dose applied and oxidative stress was inferred from the increased enzymes activities and depression in total glutathione pool in seedlings developed from irradiated seeds. Nevertheless, the maintenance of high anti-oxidant capacity, psoralen accumulation seems to be an important strategy during acclimation of P. corylifolia to gamma radiation stress. Pronounced accumulation of psoralen following 15 and 20 kGy at post-flowering stage where oxidative stress is triggered modulates lipid peroxidation and proline accumulation. Further, in psoralen producing plants an increase in psoralen content can be used as a biomarker which specifies plant is under stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicted Risk of Radiation-Induced Cancers After Involved Field and Involved Node Radiotherapy With or Without Intensity Modulation for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma in Female Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C.; Johanson, Safora; Peguret, Nicolas; Cozzi, Luca; Olsen, Dag R.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the excess relative risk (ERR) of radiation-induced cancers (RIC) in female patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) female patients treated with conformal (3DCRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc (RA) radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 early-stage HL female patients were computed for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA with involved field RT (IFRT) and involvednode RT (INRT) radiation fields. Organs at risk dose--volume histograms were computed and inter-compared for IFRT vs. INRT and 3DCRT vs. IMRT/RA, respectively. The ERR for cancer induction in breasts, lungs, and thyroid was estimated using both linear and nonlinear models. Results: The mean estimated ERR for breast, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower (p < 0.01) with INRT than with IFRT planning, regardless of the radiation delivery technique used, assuming a linear dose-risk relationship. We found that using the nonlinear model, the mean ERR values were significantly (p < 0.01) increased with IMRT or RA compared to those with 3DCRT planning for the breast, lung, and thyroid, using an IFRT paradigm. After INRT planning, IMRT or RA increased the risk of RIC for lung and thyroid only. Conclusions: In this comparative planning study, using a nonlinear dose--risk model, IMRT or RA increased the estimated risk of RIC for breast, lung, and thyroid for HL female patients. This study also suggests that INRT planning, compared to IFRT planning, may reduce the ERR of RIC when risk is predicted using a linear model. Observing the opposite effect, with a nonlinear model, however, questions the validity of these biologically parameterized models.

  9. Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Modulated in Hypoxia for Remodeling of Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    PubMed Central

    An, Hye-Young; Shin, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Kim, Hun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether a secretome from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) modulated by hypoxic conditions to contain therapeutic factors contributes to salivary gland (SG) tissue remodeling and has the potential to improve irradiation (IR)-induced salivary hypofunction in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSC) were isolated, expanded, and exposed to hypoxic conditions (O2 < 5%). The hypoxia-conditioned medium was then filtered to a high molecular weight fraction and prepared as a hAdMSC secretome. The hAdMSC secretome was subsequently infused into the tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local IR once a day for seven consecutive days. The control group received equal volume (500 μL) of vehicle (PBS) only. SG function and structural tissue remodeling by the hAdMSC secretome were investigated. Human parotid epithelial cells (HPEC) were obtained, expanded in vitro, and then irradiated and treated with either the hypoxia-conditioned medium or a normoxic control medium. Cell proliferation and IR-induced cell death were examined to determine the mechanism by which the hAdMSC secretome exerted its effects. Results The conditioned hAdMSC secretome contained high levels of GM-CSF, VEGF, IL-6, and IGF-1. Repeated systemic infusion with the hAdMSC secretome resulted in improved salivation capacity and increased levels of salivary proteins, including amylase and EGF, relative to the PBS group. The microscopic structural integrity of SG was maintained and salivary epithelial (AQP-5), endothelial (CD31), myoepithelial (α-SMA) and SG progenitor cells (c-Kit) were successfully protected from radiation damage and remodeled. The hAdMSC secretome strongly induced proliferation of HPEC and led to a significant decrease in cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic effects of the hAdMSC secretome were found to be promoted after hypoxia-preconditioning relative to normoxia

  10. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  11. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  12. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelaers, Win; Lahorte, Philippe

    This chapter is part one of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced bioradicals is discussed. Bioradicals play a pivotal role in the complex chain of processes starting with the absorption of radiation in biological materials and ending with the radiation-induced biological after-effects. The general aspects of the four consecutive stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) are discussed from an interdisciplinary point of view. The close relationship between radiation dose and track structure, induced DNA damage and cell survival or killing is treated in detail. The repair mechanisms that cells employ, to insure DNA stability following irradiation, are described. Because of their great biomedical importance tumour suppressor genes involved in radiation-induced DNA repair and in checkpoint activation will be treated briefly, together with the molecular genetics of radiosensitivity. Part two of this review will deal with modern theoretical methods and experimental instrumentation for quantitative studies in this research field. Also an extensive overview of the applications of radiation-induced bioradicals will be given. A comprehensive list of references allows further exploration of this research field, characterised in the last decade by a substantial advance, both in fundamental knowledge and in range of applications.

  13. H2-blocker modulates heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ooie, T; Saikawa, T; Hara, M; Ono, H; Seike, M; Sakata, T

    1999-01-01

    The use of H2-blockers in the treatment of patients with peptic ulcer has become popular. However, this treatment has adverse cardiovascular effects. The aim of this study was to investigate proarrhythmic rhythm and autonomic nervous activity by analyzing heart rate variability in patients treated with omeprazole, ranitidine, and plaunotol. Nineteen patients (mean age 67.5 +/- 2.7 years) with active gastric ulcer were treated with omeprazole (20 mg/day) for 8 weeks, then ranitidine (300 mg/day) for the next 4 months, and finally plaunotol (240 mg/day). At each stage of the treatment, Holter electrocardiography was performed, and heart rate variability and arrhythmias analyzed. Heart rate variability yielded power in the low- (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency components (0.15-0.4 Hz). Although both ranitidine and omeprazole induced little change in cardiac rhythm, the high-frequency power was higher (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 ms, P < 0.05) and the ratio of low-to-high frequency power was lower (1.41 +/-0.10 vs 1.59 +/- 0.09. P < 0.05) during ranitidine than during plaunotol treatment. Cosinor analysis of heart rate variability revealed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency power during omeprazole compared with during ranitidine and plaunotol treatment. Ranitidine modulated high-frequency power which may be related to the adverse cardiovascular effects of H2-blocker.

  14. Reducing the probability of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity by changing the treatment modality from helical tomotherapy to fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Jang, Hong Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT) in helical tomotherapy and fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Twenty patients with unresectable HCC treated with tomotherapy were selected. We performed tomotherapy re-planning to reduce the non-target normal liver volume receiving a dose of more than 15 Gy (NTNL-V15Gy), and we created a fixed-beam IMRT plan (FB-P). We compared the dosimetric results as well as the estimated probability of RIHT among the tomotherapy initial plan (T-IP), the tomotherapy re-plan (T-RP), and the FB-P. Results Comparing the T-RP and FB-P, the homogeneity index was 0.11 better with the T-RP. However, the mean NTNL-V15Gy was 6.3% lower with the FB-P. These differences result in a decline in the probability of RIHT from 0.216 in the T-RP to 0.115 in the FB-P. In patients whose NTNL-V15Gy was higher than 43.2% with the T-RP, the probability of RIHT markedly reduced from 0.533 to 0.274. Conclusions By changing the treatment modality from tomotherapy to fixed-beam IMRT, we could reduce the liver dose and the probability of RIHT without scarifying the target coverage, especially in patients whose liver dose is high. PMID:26376679

  15. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  16. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Radiation-induced Myocardial Fibrosis

    PubMed

    Liu, Li Kun; Ouyang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xing; Su, Sheng Fa; Yang, Yan; Ding, Wen Jin; Luo, Da Xian; He, Zhi Xu; Lu, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most important methods for the treatment of malignant tumors. However, in radiotherapy for thoracic tumors such as breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and mediastinal lymphoma, the heart, located in the mediastinum, is inevitably affected by the irradiation, leading to pericardial disease, myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, valvular lesions, and cardiac conduction system injury, which are considered radiation-induced heart diseases. Delayed cardiac injury especially myocardial fibrosis is more prominent, and its incidence is as high as 20–80%. Myocardial fibrosis is the final stage of radiation-induced heart diseases, and it increases the stiffness of the myocardium and decreases myocardial systolic and diastolic function, resulting in myocardial electrical physiological disorder, arrhythmia, incomplete heart function, or even sudden death. This article reviews the pathogenesis and prevention of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis for providing references for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Neural modulation for hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smith, S; Rossignol, P; Willis, S; Zannad, F; Mentz, R; Pocock, S; Bisognano, J; Nadim, Y; Geller, N; Ruble, S; Linde, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and heart failure (HF) have a significant global impact on health, and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy for these conditions, there is a need for additional treatment modalities. Patients with sub-optimally treated HTN have increased risk for stroke, renal failure and heart failure. The outcome of HF patients remains poor despite modern pharmacological therapy and with established device therapies such as CRT and ICDs. Therefore, the potential role of neuromodulation via renal denervation, baro-reflex modulation and vagal stimulation for the treatment of resistant HTN and HF is being explored. In this manuscript, we review current evidence for neuromodulation in relation to established drug and device therapies and how these therapies may be synergistic in achieving therapy goals in patients with treatment resistant HTN and heart failure. We describe lessons learned from recent neuromodulation trials and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 11th annual CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Forum in Washington, DC on December 5-7, 2014. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic Modulators in Heart Disease: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They continue to be major burden on health care systems throughout the world, despite major advances made over the past 40 years in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat these debilitating diseases. A potential therapeutic approach that has been underutilized in treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure is "metabolic modulation." Major alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in ischemic heart disease and heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the heart. A metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency (oxygen consumed per work performed) and functional impairment in ischemic heart disease as well as in heart failure. This has led to the concept that optimizing energy substrate use with metabolic modulators can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, primarily by improving cardiac efficiency. Two approaches for metabolic modulator therapy are to stimulate myocardial glucose oxidation and/or inhibit fatty acid oxidation. In this review, the past, present, and future of metabolic modulators as an approach to optimizing myocardial energy substrate metabolism and treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure are discussed. This includes a discussion of pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation in the heart, as well as enzymes involved in ketone and branched chain amino acid catabolism in the heart. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  20. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  1. Lowering Whole-Body Radiation Doses in Pediatric Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Through the Use of Unflattened Photon Beams;Flattening filter; Pediatric; Intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Second cancers; Radiation-induced malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Jason; Ramtohul, Mark; Ford, Dan

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been linked with an increased risk of secondary cancer induction due to the extra leakage radiation associated with delivery of these techniques. Removal of the flattening filter offers a simple way of reducing head leakage, and it may be possible to generate equivalent IMRT plans and to deliver these on a standard linear accelerator operating in unflattened mode. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Precise linear accelerator has been commissioned to operate in both conventional and unflattened modes (energy matched at 6 MV) and a direct comparison made between the treatment planning and delivery of pediatric intracranial treatments using both approaches. These plans have been evaluated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Plans generated in unflattened mode are clinically identical to those for conventional IMRT but can be delivered with greatly reduced leakage radiation. Measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom at clinically relevant positions including the thyroid, lung, ovaries, and testes show an average reduction in peripheral doses of 23.7%, 29.9%, 64.9%, and 70.0%, respectively, for identical plan delivery compared to conventional IMRT. Conclusions: IMRT delivery in unflattened mode removes an unwanted and unnecessary source of scatter from the treatment head and lowers leakage doses by up to 70%, thereby reducing the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Removal of the flattening filter is recommended for IMRT treatments.

  2. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  3. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  4. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle: an in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Verma, Savita; Gupta, Manju Lata; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar; Flora, Swaran J S

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 microg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 microg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 microg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 55.65% at 500 microg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Radiation-Induced Changes in Rat Lung: Modulation by the Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Rabender, Christopher S.; Sankala, Heidi; Gauter-Fleckenstein, Ben; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Batinic-Haberle, Ines Ph.D.; Jackson, Isabel; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Mikkelsen, Ross B.; Graves, Paul R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To identify temporal changes in protein expression in the irradiated rat lung and generate putative mechanisms underlying the radioprotective effect of the manganese superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}. Methods and Materials: Female Fischer 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 28 Gy and killed from day 1 to 20 weeks after irradiation. Proteomic profiling was performed to identify proteins that underwent significant changes in abundance. Some irradiated rats were administered MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} and changes in protein expression and phosphorylation determined at 6 weeks after irradiation. Results: Radiation induced a biphasic stress response in the lung, as shown by the induction of heme oxygenase 1 at 1-3 days and at 6-8 weeks after irradiation. At 6-8 weeks after irradiation, the down-regulation of proteins involved in cytoskeletal architecture (filamin A and talin), antioxidant defense (biliverdin reductase and peroxiredoxin II), and cell signaling ({beta}-catenin, annexin II, and Rho-guanosine diphosphate dissociation inhibitor) was observed. Treatment with MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+} partially prevented the apparent degradation of filamin and talin, reduced the level of cleaved caspases 3 and 9, and promoted Akt phosphorylation as well as {beta}-catenin expression. Conclusion: A significant down-regulation of proteins and an increase in protein markers of apoptosis were observed at the onset of lung injury in the irradiated rat lung. Treatment with MnTE-2-PyP{sup 5+}, which has been demonstrated to reduce lung injury from radiation, reduced apparent protein degradation and apoptosis indicators, suggesting that preservation of lung structural integrity and prevention of cell loss may underlie the radioprotective effect of this compound.

  6. Transesophageal Echocardiography and Radiation-induced Damages

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Marzia; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Buffa, Vitaliano; Musumeci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The long-term sequelae of mantle therapy include, especially lung and cardiac disease but also involve the vessels and the organs in the neck and thorax (such as thyroid, aorta, and esophagus). We presented the case of 66-year-old female admitted for congestive heart failure in radiation-induced heart disease. The patient had undergone to massive radiotherapy 42 years ago for Hodgkin's disease (type 1A). Transesophageal echocardiography was performed unsuccessfully with difficulty because of the rigidity and impedance of esophageal walls. Our case is an extraordinary report of radiotherapy's latency effect as a result of dramatic changes in the structure of mediastinum, in particular in the esophagus, causing unavailability of a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:27867461

  7. Health Activities Project (HAP): Heart Fitness and Action Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) learning packet are activities for children in grades 5-8. Design of the activities centers around the idea that students can control their own health and safety. Within the Heart Fitness and Action Module are teacher and student folios describing five activities which involve students in…

  8. A Signal Processing Module for the Analysis of Heart Sounds and Heart Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Faizan; Venkatachalam, P. A.; H, Ahmad Fadzil M.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper a Signal Processing Module (SPM) for the computer-aided analysis of heart sounds has been developed. The module reveals important information of cardiovascular disorders and can assist general physician to come up with more accurate and reliable diagnosis at early stages. It can overcome the deficiency of expert doctors in rural as well as urban clinics and hospitals. The module has five main blocks: Data Acquisition & Pre-processing, Segmentation, Feature Extraction, Murmur Detection and Murmur Classification. The heart sounds are first acquired using an electronic stethoscope which has the capability of transferring these signals to the near by workstation using wireless media. Then the signals are segmented into individual cycles as well as individual components using the spectral analysis of heart without using any reference signal like ECG. Then the features are extracted from the individual components using Spectrogram and are used as an input to a MLP (Multiple Layer Perceptron) Neural Network that is trained to detect the presence of heart murmurs. Once the murmur is detected they are classified into seven classes depending on their timing within the cardiac cycle using Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution. The module has been tested with real heart sounds from 40 patients and has proved to be quite efficient and robust while dealing with a large variety of pathological conditions.

  9. Cardiac contractility modulation in patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kahwash, Rami; Burkhoff, Daniel; Abraham, William T

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) is a novel device-based therapy for heart failure that involves applying electrical signals during the absolute refractory period of the myocardial action potential. This therapy has been shown to augment the strength of left ventricular contraction independent of myocardial oxygen consumption in animal models as well as human studies of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fractions. The mechanism underlying CCM is an alteration of myocardial calcium handling in a fashion that extends beyond the traditional pharmacological effects of inotropic agents. Analysis of myocardial tissue from both animal models and human hearts treated by CCM demonstrates a shift of abnormally expressed genes towards normal function, positively affecting pathways involving proteins that regulate calcium cycling and myocardial contraction. CCM effects are proven to be independent of QRS duration; however, clinical studies to date have primarily focused on patients with normal QRS since cardiac resynchronization therapy is a well-established option for patients with heart failure and a prolonged QRS duration. Clinical trials show that CCM improves exercise tolerance, as measured by VO(2,peak) and quality of life, assessed by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. The device is currently available for the treatment of heart failure in Europe. Approval in the USA is pending additional testing currently underway using a protocol approved by the US FDA.

  10. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  11. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  12. Photo-protective effect of sargachromenol against UVB radiation-induced damage through modulating cellular antioxidant systems and apoptosis in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Piao, Mei Jing; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Ko, Mi Hee; Ko, Chang Sik; Byeon, Sang Hee; Mun, Seung Ri; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photo-preventive effects of sargachromenol (SC) against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes via assessing the antioxidant properties and underlying molecular mechanisms. SC exhibited a significant scavenging effect on UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). SC attenuated UVB-induced oxidative macromolecular damage, including the protein carbonyl content, DNA strand break, and 8-isoprostane level. Furthermore, SC decreased UVB-induced Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 protein levels, but increased that of Bcl-2, which are well-known key mediators of apoptosis. Moreover, SC increased superoxide dismutase, catalase, and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression. Pre-treatment with SC upregulated the main transcription factor of antioxidant enzymes, erythroid 2-related factor 2 level, which was reduced by UVB irradiation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) are involved in the regulation of many cellular events, including apoptosis. SC treatment reversed ERK and JNK activation induced by UVB. Collectively, these data indicate that SC can provide remarkable cytoprotection against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating cellular antioxidant systems, and suggest the potential of developing a medical agent for ROS-induced skin diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  14. Potential for reduced radiation-induced toxicity using intensity-modulated arc therapy for whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Wang, Fen

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the accuracy, plan quality, and efficiency of using intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) patients with sparing not only the hippocampus (following RTOG 0933 compliance criteria) but also other organs at risk (OARs). A total of 10 patients previously treated with nonconformal opposed laterals whole-brain radiotherapy (NC-WBRT) were retrospectively replanned for hippocampal sparing using IMAT treatment planning. The hippocampus was volumetrically contoured on fused diagnostic T1-weighted MRI with planning CT images and hippocampus avoidance zone (HAZ) was generated using a 5 mm uniform margin around the hippocampus. Both hippocampi were defined as one paired organ. Whole brain tissue minus HAZ was defined as the whole-brain planning target volume (WB-PTV). Highly conformal IMAT plans were generated in the Eclipse treatment planning system for Novalis TX linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV beam for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions following RTOG 0933 dosimetric criteria. Two full coplanar arcs with orbits avoidance sectors were used. In addition to RTOG criteria, doses to other organs at risk (OARs), such as parotid glands, cochlea, external/middle ear canals, skin, scalp, optic pathways, brainstem, and eyes/lens, were also evaluated. Subsequently, dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each IMAT plan was assessed by delivering quality assurance (QA) plans with a MapCHECK device, recording actual beam-on time and measuring planed vs. measured dose agreement using a gamma index. On IMAT plans, following RTOG 0933 dosimetric criteria, the maximum dose to WB-PTV, mean WB-PTV D2%, and mean WB-PTV D98% were 34.9±0.3 Gy,33.2±0.4 Gy, and 26.0±0.4 Gy, respectively. Accordingly, WB-PTV received the prescription dose of 30 Gy and mean V30 was 90.5%±0.5%. The D100%, and mean

  15. Potential for reduced radiation-induced toxicity using intensity-modulated arc therapy for whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Pravesh; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Wang, Fen

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the accuracy, plan quality, and efficiency of using intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) patients with sparing not only the hippocampus (following RTOG 0933 compliance criteria) but also other organs at risk (OARs). A total of 10 patients previously treated with nonconformal opposed laterals whole-brain radiotherapy (NC-WBRT) were retrospectively replanned for hippocampal sparing using IMAT treatment planning. The hippocampus was volumetrically contoured on fused diagnostic T1-weighted MRI with planning CT images and hippocampus avoidance zone (HAZ) was generated using a 5 mm uniform margin around the hippocampus. Both hippocampi were defined as one paired organ. Whole brain tissue minus HAZ was defined as the whole-brain planning target volume (WB-PTV). Highly conformal IMAT plans were generated in the Eclipse treatment planning system for Novalis TX linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV beam for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions following RTOG 0933 dosimetric criteria. Two full coplanar arcs with orbits avoidance sectors were used. In addition to RTOG criteria, doses to other organs at risk (OARs), such as parotid glands, cochlea, external/middle ear canals, skin, scalp, optic pathways, brainstem, and eyes/lens, were also evaluated. Subsequently, dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each IMAT plan was assessed by delivering quality assurance (QA) plans with a MapCHECK device, recording actual beam-on time and measuring planed vs. measured dose agreement using a gamma index. On IMAT plans, following RTOG 0933 dosimetric criteria, the maximum dose to WB-PTV, mean WB-PTV D2%, and mean WB-PTV D98% were 34.9 ± 0.3 Gy, 33.2 ± 0.4 Gy, and 26.0± 0.4Gy, respectively. Accordingly, WB-PTV received the prescription dose of 30Gy and mean V30 was 90.5% ± 0.5%. The D100%, and

  16. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Marcy B.; Singh, Vijay K.; Rhee, Juong G.; Jackson, William E.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:22843381

  17. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grace, Marcy B; Singh, Vijay K; Rhee, Juong G; Jackson, William E; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Whitnall, Mark H

    2012-11-01

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3ß,17ß-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

  18. Radiation-induced bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Uyama, T.; Nakamura, S.; Moriwaki, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cases are presented of radiation-induced bladder carcinoma which followed prior irradiation for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. One was a sixty-eight-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma fourteen years after irradiation (total dose of 4,500 rad) for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. The other was a sixty-four-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma twenty-five years after irradiation with 150-K volt apparatus for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. From the late radiation change of the skin, it was estimated that the total dose of prior radiation might be 4,000 rad or more. Both had high-grade, high-stage transitional cell bladder carcinoma, and the former was with marked mucus-forming adenomatous metaplasia.

  19. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:28589080

  20. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  1. Radiation-induced cognitive impairment-from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 000 patients per year in the United States with primary and metastatic brain tumor survive long enough (>6 months) to develop radiation-induced brain injury. Before 1970, the human brain was thought to be radioresistant; the acute central nervous system (CNS) syndrome occurs after single doses of ≥30 Gy, and white matter necrosis can occur at fractionated doses of ≥60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern radiation therapy techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become increasingly important, having profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenic mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Although reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal-dependent cognitive function have been observed in rodent models, it is important to recognize that other brain regions are affected; non–hippocampal-dependent reductions in cognitive function occur. Neuroinflammation is viewed as playing a major role in radiation-induced cognitive impairment. During the past 5 years, several preclinical studies have demonstrated that interventional therapies aimed at modulating neuroinflammation can prevent/ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive impairment independent of changes in neurogenesis. Translating these exciting preclinical findings to the clinic offers the promise of improving the quality of life in patients with brain tumors who receive radiation therapy. PMID:23095829

  2. Resting autonomic modulations and the heart rate response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Donovan, Gay; Singleton, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2010-08-01

    Identify the underlying role of resting heart rate variability (HRV) in the hearts response to graded exercise testing (GXT). Resting 5-min HRV and heart rate (HR) measurements were made in 33 volunteers (19 males, median age 34, range 25-63 years and 14 females median age 48, range 21-63 years). Measures of VO2 peak and HR obtained during a maximal GXT and heart rate recovery (HRR) post-GXT were assessed for associations with resting HRV. Differences and effect size (d) for measures of HRV were assessed between groups based on established risk cut-points for resting, exercise and recovery HR responses. Small associations were observed for the majority of resting HRV and GXT HR responses (best r value = -0.27, P > 0.05). Measures of HRV demonstrated moderate associations with HRR (best r value = 0.46, P < 0.05) and were able to predict a negative risk HRR. In contrast to other dependent variables, measures of HRV were consistently able to demonstrate significant and moderate to large (d = 0.9-2.0) differences between groups based on literature defined prognostic HR cut-points. Small associations with HR responses to exercise prevent their accurate prediction from resting HRV. Data support the use of vagally mediated resting HRV in predicting better HRR. Lower resting autonomic modulations underlined high risk resting and exercise HR responses. Resting short-term HRV measurements should be considered when assessing cardiac autonomic health from the HR response before, during and/or after exercise.

  3. Late onset radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-feng; Yang, Yan-min; Sun, Xiao-lu; Liao, Zhong-kai; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a serious side effect of cancer treatment, including coronary artery disease, valvular cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, aortopathy, and chronic constrictive pericarditis. Herein, this case we present was diagnosed as radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy by means of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and transthoracic echocardiogram, finally confirmed by pathology after performing heart transplant operation. Conclusions: This case supports a notion that RIHD often causes multiple heart impairment and CMR is helpful to diagnose cardiomyopathy after radiation. PMID:28151876

  4. Respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheyden, Bart; Couckuyt, Kurt; Liu, Jiexin; Aubert, Andre

    During everyday life, gravity constantly stresses the human circulation by diminishing venous return in the upright position. This induces baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular adjustments that are aimed to prevent the blood pressure from falling. In weightlessness, gravitational pressure gradients do not arise in the circulation so that baroreflex function remains chronically unchallenged. This may contribute to the development of post spaceflight orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate after a week of weightlessness in space. We tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular control in space will be similar to the baseline supine condition on Earth. We studied nine male cosmonauts during seven different space missions aboard the ISS (age 40 - 52 yrs, height 1.69 - 1.85 m, weight 67 - 90 kg). Data collection was performed between 30 and 45 days before launch in the standing and supine positions, and after 8 days in space. Cosmonauts were carefully trained to perform in-flight data collection by themselves. They were instructed to pace their breathing to a fixed rate of 12 breaths per minute (0.2 Hz) for a total duration of 3 minutes. The electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat finger arterial blood pressure were recorded at 1-kHz sample rate. Respiratory rate was evaluated using an abdominal pressure sensor. We used power spectral analysis to calculate respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as well as the low-frequency (0.04 - 0.15 Hz) powers of spontaneous oscillations in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated in the time domain using cross-correlation analysis. As expected, there was a rise in heart rate upon assuming the standing position before space- flight (59 ± 6 to 79 ± 11 beats per min; p ¡ 0.001). This was accompanied by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (84 ± 6 to 93 ± 6 mmHg; p ¡ 0.001). Standing up further induced a marked

  5. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  6. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  7. Rapid Speed Modulation of a Rotary Total Artificial Heart Impeller.

    PubMed

    Kleinheyer, Matthias; Timms, Daniel L; Tansley, Geoffrey D; Nestler, Frank; Greatrex, Nicholas A; Frazier, O Howard; Cohn, William E

    2016-09-01

    Unlike the earlier reciprocating volume displacement-type pumps, rotary blood pumps (RBPs) typically operate at a constant rotational speed and produce continuous outflow. When RBP technology is used in constructing a total artificial heart (TAH), the pressure waveform that the TAH produces is flat, without the rise and fall associated with a normal arterial pulse. Several studies have suggested that pulseless circulation may impair microcirculatory perfusion and the autoregulatory response and may contribute to adverse events such as gastrointestinal bleeding, arteriovenous malformations, and pump thrombosis. It may therefore be beneficial to attempt to reproduce pulsatile output, similar to that generated by the native heart, by rapidly modulating the speed of an RBP impeller. The choice of an appropriate speed profile and control strategy to generate physiologic waveforms while minimizing power consumption and blood trauma becomes a challenge. In this study, pump operation modes with six different speed profiles using the BiVACOR TAH were evaluated in vitro. These modes were compared with respect to: hemodynamic pulsatility, which was quantified as surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE); maximum rate of change of pressure (dP/dt); pulse power index; and motor power consumption as a function of pulse pressure. The results showed that the evaluated variables underwent different trends in response to changes in the speed profile shape. The findings indicated a possible trade-off between SHE levels and flow rate pulsatility related to the relative systolic duration in the speed profile. Furthermore, none of the evaluated measures was sufficient to fully characterize hemodynamic pulsatility. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  9. Atorvastatin Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KunYi; He, XuYu; Zhou, Yingling; Gao, Lijuan; Qi, Zhengyu; Chen, Jiyan; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced heart injury is one of the major side effects of radiotherapy for thoracic malignancies. Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy induced myocardial fibrosis and intensified myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether atorvastatin could inhibit radiation-induced heart fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into six groups: control; radiation only; and four treatment groups receiving atorvastatin plus radiation (E1, E2, E3 and E4). All rats, except the control group, received local heart irradiation in 7 daily fractions of 3 Gy for a total of 21 Gy. Rats in groups E1 (10 mg/kg/day) and E2 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin and radiation treatment until week 12 after exposure. Rats in groups E3 (10 mg/kg/day) and E4 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin treatment from 3 months before irradiation to week 12 after irradiation. The expressions of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3, fibronectin, ROCK I and p-Akt in heart tissues were evaluated using real-time PCR or Western blot analyses. Atorvastatin significantly reduced the expression of TGF-β1, Smad3/P-Smad3, ROCK I and p-Akt in rats of the E1-E4 groups and in a dose-dependent manner. Fibronectin exhibited a similar pattern of expression changes. In addition, echocardiography showed that atorvastatin treatment can inhibit the increase of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and prevent the decrease of ejection fraction and fraction shortening in E1-E4 groups compared with the radiation only group. This study demonstrated that radiation exposure increased the expression of fibronectin in cardiac fibroblasts and induced cardiac fibrosis through activation of the TGF-β1/Smad3, RhoA/ROCK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Statins ameliorated radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results suggest that atorvastatin is effective for the treatment of radiation-induced

  10. Gum chewing modulates heart rate variability under noise stress.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Noriko; Morita, Manabu

    2012-12-01

    Gum chewing may relieve stress, although this hypothesis has not been proven. Heart-rate variability (HRV) is commonly used to measure stress levels. However, it is not known if gum chewing modulates HRV under acute stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gum chewing on HRV under acute stress. A cross-over study involving 47 non-smoking healthy subjects, aged 22-27 years, was carried out. The subjects received a stress procedure with gum chewing (GS group) and without gum chewing (S group). Additionally, the other 20 subjects were allocated to the gum chewing without stress group (G group). The GS and S groups were exposed to noise for 5 min (75 dBA) as stress. Before and after stress exposure/gum chewing, participants completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and a single Stress Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measurement. HRV measurement was performed before and during stress/gum chewing for 5 min. After the stress procedure, VAS score significantly increased in the GS and S groups. During the stress procedure, the GS group showed a significantly lower level of high frequency (HF) and higher levels of low frequency (LF) and LF/HF than the S group. However, there were no significant differences in the scores of the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and VAS between the two stress groups. These findings suggest that gum chewing modulates HRV, but may not relieve acute stress caused by noise.

  11. Sex differences in leptin modulate ventilation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cundrle, Ivan; Somers, Virend K; Singh, Prachi; Johnson, Bruce D; Scott, Christopher G; Olson, Lyle J

    Leptin modulates ventilation and circulating levels are higher in normal women than men. The aim of this study was to compare exercise ventilation and gas exchange in men and women with heart failure (HF) and their relation to circulating leptin concentration. Consecutive HF patients were studied by cardiopulmonary exercise testing and assay of circulating leptin concentration. Fifty-seven men and 20 women were similar with respect to age, BMI, NYHA class, left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak oxygen consumption (all p > 0.05). Leptin concentration was lower (10.3 ± 10 vs. 25.3 ± 16 ng/mL; p < 0.01) and peak exercise ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2) was higher (43 ± 10 vs. 36 ± 5; p < 0.01) in men. Leptin concentration was associated with peak exercise VE/VCO2 (b = -0.35; F = 5.6; p = 0.02). Men have significantly lower circulating leptin concentration and increased ventilatory drive during exercise than women with comparable HF. In men with HF, lower leptin concentration may account for an increased ventilatory drive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Dominant Parasympathetic Modulation of Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in a Wild-Caught Seabird.

    PubMed

    Carravieri, Alice; Müller, Martina S; Yoda, Ken; Hayama, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Maki

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) provide noninvasive measures of the relative activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), which promotes self-maintenance and restoration, and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), which prepares an animal for danger. The PNS decreases HR, whereas the SNS increases HR. The PNS and SNS also contribute to oscillations in heartbeat intervals at different frequencies, producing HRV. HRV promotes resilience and adjustment capacity in the organism to intrinsic and extrinsic changes. Measuring HRV can reveal the condition and emotional state of animals, including aspects of their stress physiology. Until now, the functioning of the PNS and SNS and their relationship with other physiological systems have been studied almost exclusively in humans. In this study, we tested their influence on HR and HRV for the first time in a wild-caught seabird, the streaked shearwater (Calonectris leucomelas). We analyzed electrocardiograms collected from birds carrying externally attached HR loggers and that received injections that pharmacologically blocked the PNS, the SNS, or both, as well as those that received a saline (sham) injection or no injection (control). The PNS strongly dominated modulation of HR and also HRV across all frequencies, whereas the SNS contributed only slightly to low-frequency oscillations. The saline injection itself acted as a stressor, causing a dramatic drop in PNS activity in HRV and an increase in HR, though PNS activity continued to dominate even during acute stress. Dominant PNS activity is expected for long-lived species, which should employ physiological strategies that minimize somatic deterioration coming from stress.

  13. Modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise. Potential effects on blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Kingsley, J Derek; Malkani, Kabir; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2017-07-10

    It was initially assumed that heart rate and arterial blood pressure were modulated by normal respiration and muscle contraction. The arterial baroreflex, an inverse relationship between blood pressure and heart rate, was later reported. Nonetheless, it was then assumed that those responses involved vagal modulation. We summarize available evidence on the modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise as well as its potential implications on BP control. Numerous studies have tried to clarify whether aerobic exercise modifies neurally-mediated vasoconstriction, but they report contradictory results. In view of these incongruities, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize available evidence on the modulation of heart rate by acute or chronic aerobic exercise as well as its potential implications on blood pressure control. We mainly focus on the effects of aerobic exercise in both heart rate and blood pressure. Heart rate and heart rate variability have been indistinctly considered similar metrics, but they have completely different meanings when properly used. Both are risk markers in cardiac disease, whereas heart rate variability is also an index of sympathovagal modulation of heart rate. On the other hand, heart rate recovery has been also used as an index for mirroring both cardiovascular fitness and autonomic function, and can be used as a measure of vagal reactivation. Importantly, it is now well-known that a reduced rate of heart rate recovery represents a powerful predictor of overall mortality. In this review, due to its complexity, we have included studies in which any of these three parameters have been analyzed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Coexpression Analysis Reveals Key Gene Modules and Pathway of Human Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu; Ke, Zun-Ping; Peng, Yi-Gen; Cai, Ping-Tai

    2017-08-31

    Coronary heart disease is a kind of disease which causes great injury to people world-widely. Although gene expression analyses had been performed previously, to our best knowledge, systemic co-expression analysis for this disease is still lacking to date. Microarray data of coronary heart disease was downloaded from NCBI with the accession number of GSE20681. Co-expression modules were constructed by WGCNA. Besides, the connectivity degree of eigengenes was analyzed. Furthermore, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis was performed on these eigengenes in these constructed modules. A total of 11 co-expression modules were constructed by the 3,000 up-regulated genes from the 99 samples with coronary heart disease. The average number of genes in these modules was 270. The interaction analysis indicated the relative independence of gene expression in these modules. The functional enrichment analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the enriched terms and degree among these 11 modules. The results showed that module 9 and module 10 played critical roles in the occurrence of coronary disease. Pathways of hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation)and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) were thought to be closely related to the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease. Our result demonstrated that module 9 and module 10 were the most critical modules in the occurrence of coronary heart disease. Pathways as hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation) and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) had the potential to serve as the prognostic and predictive marker of coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  16. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  17. Radiation-induced vaginal stenosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lucinda; Do, Viet; Chard, Jennifer; Brand, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer commonly involves pelvic radiation therapy (RT) and/or brachytherapy. A commonly observed side effect of such treatment is radiation-induced vaginal stenosis (VS). This review analyzed the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation(s) and assessment and grading of radiation-induced VS. In addition, risk factors, prevention and treatment options and follow-up schedules are also discussed. The limited available literature on many of these aspects suggests that additional studies are required to more precisely determine the best management strategy of this prevalent group after RT. PMID:28496367

  18. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Sabochick, M. J.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1994-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu4Ti3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed.

  19. Neuropeptides modulate the heart of the stick insect Baculum extradentatum.

    PubMed

    Lange, Angela B; Calvin, Amanda; da Silva, Rosa

    2009-04-01

    The dorsal vessel of the stick insect Baculum extradentatum consists of a tubular heart and an aorta that extends anteriorly into the head. Alary muscles, associated with the heart, are anchored to the body wall with attachments to the dorsal diaphragm. Alary muscle contraction draws hemolymph into the heart through incurrent ostia. Hemolymph exits the heart through the excurrent ostia present on the dorsal vessel in thoracic and abdominal segments. FMRFamide-related peptides are present in axons of the segmental nerves that project to the dorsal vessel and in processes extending over the heart and alary muscles. Immunoreactive processes are also localized to the valves of the incurrent ostia and excurrent ostia and to the lateral cardiac nerve and lateral cardiac neurons.

  20. Heart failure modulates electropharmacological characteristics of sinoatrial nodes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Lin; Chuang, Hui-Lun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2017-01-01

    The impact of heart failure (HF) on sinoatrial node (SAN) channel regulation and electropharmacological responses has remained elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of HF on the electrical activity of SANs with and without pharmacological interventions. Action potentials (APs) were recorded in isolated SANs from normal rabbits (control) and those with HF (rapid ventricular pacing for 4 weeks) prior to and after administration of a funny current blocker (ivabradine; 0.1, 0.3, 3 or 10 µM), a calmodulin kinase II inhibitor (KN-93; 0.3 or 3 µM), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release inhibitor (ryanodine; 0.3 or 3 µM), a sodium current inhibitor (tetrodotoxin; 1, 3 or 10 µM) and a late sodium current inhibitor (ranolazine; 10 µM). Western blot analysis was used to investigate the protein expression in SANs from normal rabbits and those with HF. Control SANs had a higher beating rate than SANs from rabbits with HF (2.3±0.1 vs. 1.5±0.1 Hz; P<0.001). Similarly, ivabradine (10 µM), KN-93 (3 µM), ranolazine (10 µM) and ryanodine (3 µM) decreased the beating rates of SANs in the control (n=6) and HF (n=6) groups. Ivabradine treatment resulted in a higher incidence of AP block in HF vs. control SANs (66.7 vs. 0%; P<0.05). Tetrodotoxin (1, 3 or 10 µM) decreased the beating rate to a higher extent in SANs from rabbits with HF than in those from control rabbits and induced a higher incidence of AP block (66.7 vs. 0%; P<0.05). Furthermore, SANs from rabbits with HF had higher protein levels of phospholamban (PLB) and lower levels of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 4, ryanodine receptor and phosphorylated PLB than control SANs. In conclusion, HF modulates electropharmacological responses in the SAN by channel regulation, which may result in SAN dysfunction. PMID:28352365

  1. RGS6, a Modulator of Parasympathetic Activation in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianqi; Huang, Jie; Maity, Biswanath; Gao, Zhan; Lorca, Ramón A.; Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Li, Jingdong; Stewart, Adele; Swaminathan, Paari Dominic; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita; Shepherd, Andrew; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kutschke, William; Mohler, Peter J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Anderson, Mark E.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Parasympathetic regulation of heart rate is mediated by acetylcholine binding to G protein-coupled muscarinic M2 receptors, which activate heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins to promote GIRK channel activation. RGS proteins, which function to inactivate G proteins, are indispensable for normal parasympathetic control of the heart. However it is unclear which of the more than twenty known RGS proteins function to negatively regulate and thereby ensure normal parasympathetic control of the heart. Objective To examine the specific contribution of RGS6 as an essential regulator of parasympathetic signaling in heart. Methods and Results We developed RGS6 knockout mice to determine the functional impact of loss of RGS6 on parasympathetic regulation of cardiac automaticity. RGS6 exhibited a uniquely robust expression in the heart, particularly in sinoatrial (SAN) and atrioventricular (AVN) nodal regions. Loss of RGS6 provoked dramatically exaggerated bradycardia in response to carbachol in mice and isolated perfused hearts and significantly enhanced the effect of carbachol on inhibition of spontaneous action potential firing in SAN cells. Consistent with a role of RGS6 in G protein inactivation, RGS6-deficient atrial myocytes exhibited a significant reduction in the time course of IKAch activation and deactivation, as well as the extent of IKAch desensitization. Conclusions RGS6 is a previously unrecognized, but essential regulator of parasympathetic activation in heart, functioning to prevent parasympathetic override and severe bradycardia. These effects likely result from actions of RGS6 as a negative regulator of G protein activation of GIRK channels. PMID:20864673

  2. Dysregulated long intergenic non-coding RNA modules contribute to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fulong; Lan, Yujia; Xu, Jinyuan; Pang, Bo; Han, Dong; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules involved in diseases including heart failure. However, little is known about how the lincRNAs work together with protein-coding genes (PCGs) contributing to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive transcriptome profile of lincRNAs, PCGs and miRNAs using RNA-seq and miRNA-seq data of 16 heart failure patients (HFs) and 8 non-failing individuals (NFs). Through integrating lincRNA and PCG expression profiles, we identified HF-associated lincRNA modules. We identified a heart-specific lincRNA module which was significantly enriched for differentially expressed lincRNAs and PCGs. This module was associated with heart failure rather than with other clinical traits such as sex, age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the module was significantly correlated with certain indicators of left ventricular function like ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, implying the potential of its components as crucial biomarkers. Apart from enhancer-like function, lincRNAs in this module could act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to regulate genes which were associated with left-ventricular systolic function. Our work provided deep insights into the critical roles of lincRNAs in the pathology of heart failure and suggested that they could be valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:28040802

  3. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  4. Molecular pathways: radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Moore, Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E

    2013-05-01

    Each year, approximately 200,000 patients in the United States will receive partial- or whole-brain irradiation for the treatment of primary or metastatic brain cancer. Early and delayed radiation effects are transient and reversible with modern therapeutic standards; yet, late radiation effects (≥6 months postirradiation) remain a significant risk, resulting in progressive cognitive impairment. These risks include functional deficits in memory, attention, and executive function that severely affect the patient's quality of life. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cognitive impairment remain ill defined. Classically, radiation-induced alterations in vascular and neuroinflammatory glial cell clonogenic populations were hypothesized to be responsible for radiation-induced brain injury. Recently, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampus, one of two sites of adult neurogenesis within the brain, which plays an important role in learning and memory. Radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Neuronal stem cells implanted into the hippocampus prevent the decrease in neurogenesis and improve cognition after irradiation. Clinically prescribed drugs, including PPARα and PPARγ agonists, as well as RAS blockers, prevent radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment independent of improved neurogenesis. Translating these exciting findings to the clinic offers the promise of improving the quality of life of brain tumor patients who receive radiotherapy. ©2013 AACR.

  5. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized.

  6. Radiation-induced mitral and tricuspid regurgitation with severe ostial coronary artery disease: a case report with successful surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Raviprasad, G S; Salem, B I; Gowda, S; Leidenfrost, R

    1995-06-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with congestive heart failure due to severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitations. In addition, she had significant ostial right coronary stenosis. She received radiation therapy following left radical mastectomy for carcinoma of breast in the past. She underwent successful combined mitral valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty, and coronary artery bypass graft for radiation-induced heart disease.

  7. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  8. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Zeng, Jing; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Wang, Hong-Mei; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury.

  9. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis damage in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jing; Li, Hai-Long; Wu, Hong-Yan; Gu, Mei; Li, Ying-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Ming, Hai-Xia; Dong, Xiao-Li; Liu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The main pathological change in radiation-induced heart disease is fibrosis. Emerging evidence has indicated that sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) was used for treating fibrosis diseases. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effect of STS on radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis (RICF) on cultured cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). CFs were irradiated with 1 or 2 Gy X-rays, and the expression of TGF-β1 and collagen I (Col-1) increased, indicating that low-dose X-rays promoted fibrosis damage effect. The fibrosis damage was accompanied by morphologic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as an increase in the expression of the ER stress-related molecules, GRP78 and CHOP. Administration of STS reduced ROS production and decreased the expression of Col-1, TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, GRP78, and CHOP in irradiated CFs, thus weakening the radiation-induced fibrosis damage and ER stress. Radiation-induced fibrosis damage was observed on a cellular level. The involvement of ER stress in radiation-induced fibrosis damage was demonstrated for the first time. STS attenuated the fibrosis damage effect in CFs and this effect may be related to its antioxidant action, and also related to its inhibition of ER stress and TGF-β1-Smad pathway. These results suggest that STS shows a good prospect in clinical prevention and treatment of RICF.

  10. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  11. Perinatal hypothyroidism modulates antioxidant defence status in the developing rat liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Dong, Yan; Su, Qing

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant defence status in perinatal hypothyroid rat liver and heart. We found that the proteincarbonyl content did not differ significantly between the three groups both in the pup liver and in the heart. The OH˙ level was significantly decreased in the hypothyroid heart but not in the liver compared with controls. A slight but not significant decrease in SOD activity was observed in both perinatal hypothyroid liver and heart. A significantly increased activity of CAT was observed in the liver but not in the heart of hypothyroid pups. The GPx activity was considerably increased compared with controls in the perinatal hypothyroid heart and was unaltered in the liver of hypothyroid pups. We also found that vitamin E levels in the liver decreased significantly in hypothyroidism and were unaltered in the heart of perinatal hypothyroid rats. The GSH content was elevated significantly in both hypothyroid liver and heart. The total antioxidant capacity was higher in the liver of the hypothyroid group but not in the hypothyroid heart. Thyroxine replacement could not repair the above changes to normal. In conclusion, perinatal hypothyroidism modulates the oxidative stress status of the perinatal liver and heart.

  12. Interventional and device-based autonomic modulation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mark J; Zipes, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    "Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent disease with high mortality and public health burden. It is associated with autonomic imbalance characterized by sympathetic hyperactivity and parasympathetic hypoactivity. Evolving novel interventional and device-based therapies have sought to restore autonomic balance by neuromodulation. Results of preclinical animal studies and early clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of these therapies in heart failure. This article discusses specific neuromodulatory treatment modalities individually-spinal cord stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, baroreceptor activation therapy, and renal sympathetic nerve denervation."

  13. The effects of oxytocin and atosiban on the modulation of heart rate in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Amir; Tobia, Rana Swed; Burke, Yechiel Z; Maxymovski, Olga; Drugan, Arie

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate autonomic modulation of heart rate in pregnant women treated with oxytocin to induce labor and with atosiban (an oxytocin antagonist) to arrest preterm labor. A prospective study with two cohorts: 14 pregnant women treated with atosiban for premature uterine contractions, and 28 women undergoing induction of labor with oxytocin. Computerized analyses of the electrocardiogram were performed with spectral and nonlinear dynamic analyses. Atosiban did not alter any of the variables associated with heart rate variability, whereas oxytocin showed a dose-dependent decrease in heart rate (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in all spectral variables studied (p < 0.01). Atosiban has no adverse effects on the cardiovascular system or the modulation of heart rate. Oxytocin, on the other hand, can cause a dose-dependent bradycardic effect and an increase in the spectral power, thus should be used with caution in certain pregnant women.

  14. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  15. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  16. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Moss, S D; Rockswold, G L; Chou, S N; Yock, D; Berger, M S

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  17. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  18. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. )

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  19. Modeling of Diffusion Based Correlations Between Heart Rate Modulations and Respiration Pattern

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    1 of 4 MODELING OF DIFFUSION BASED CORRELATIONS BETWEEN HEART RATE MODULATIONS AND RESPIRATION PATTERN R.Langer,(1) Y.Smorzik,(2) S.Akselrod,(1...generations of the bronchial tree. The second stage describes the oxygen diffusion process from the pulmonary gas in the alveoli into the pulmonary...patterns (FRC, TV, rate). Keywords – Modeling, Diffusion , Heart Rate fluctuations I. INTRODUCTION Under a whole-body management perception, the

  20. Voluntary control of breathing does not alter vagal modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Eckberg, D. L.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in respiratory pattern influence the heart rate spectrum. It has been suggested, hence, that metronomic respiration should be used to correctly assess vagal modulation of heart rate by using spectral analysis. On the other hand, breathing to a metronome has been reported to increase heart rate spectral power in the high- or respiratory frequency region; this finding has led to the suggestion that metronomic respiration enhances vagal tone or alters vagal modulation of heart rate. To investigate whether metronomic breathing complicates the interpretation of heart rate spectra by altering vagal modulation, we recorded the electrocardiogram and respiration from eight volunteers during three breathing trials of 10 min each: 1) spontaneous breathing (mean rate of 14.4 breaths/min); 2) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 15, 18, and 21 breaths/min for 2, 6, and 2 min, respectively; and 3) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 18 breaths/min for 10 min. Data were also collected from eight volunteers who breathed spontaneously for 20 min and breathed metronomically at each subject's mean spontaneous breathing frequency for 20 min. Results from the three 10-min breathing trials showed that heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region was smaller during metronomic breathing than during spontaneous breathing. This decrease could be explained fully by the higher breathing frequencies used during trials 2 and 3 of metronomic breathing. When the subjects breathed metronomically at each subject's mean breathing frequency, the heart rate powers during metronomic breathing were similar to those during spontaneous breathing. Our results suggest that vagal modulation of heart rate is not altered and vagal tone is not enhanced during metronomic breathing.

  1. Voluntary control of breathing does not alter vagal modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Eckberg, D. L.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in respiratory pattern influence the heart rate spectrum. It has been suggested, hence, that metronomic respiration should be used to correctly assess vagal modulation of heart rate by using spectral analysis. On the other hand, breathing to a metronome has been reported to increase heart rate spectral power in the high- or respiratory frequency region; this finding has led to the suggestion that metronomic respiration enhances vagal tone or alters vagal modulation of heart rate. To investigate whether metronomic breathing complicates the interpretation of heart rate spectra by altering vagal modulation, we recorded the electrocardiogram and respiration from eight volunteers during three breathing trials of 10 min each: 1) spontaneous breathing (mean rate of 14.4 breaths/min); 2) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 15, 18, and 21 breaths/min for 2, 6, and 2 min, respectively; and 3) breathing to a metronome at the rate of 18 breaths/min for 10 min. Data were also collected from eight volunteers who breathed spontaneously for 20 min and breathed metronomically at each subject's mean spontaneous breathing frequency for 20 min. Results from the three 10-min breathing trials showed that heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region was smaller during metronomic breathing than during spontaneous breathing. This decrease could be explained fully by the higher breathing frequencies used during trials 2 and 3 of metronomic breathing. When the subjects breathed metronomically at each subject's mean breathing frequency, the heart rate powers during metronomic breathing were similar to those during spontaneous breathing. Our results suggest that vagal modulation of heart rate is not altered and vagal tone is not enhanced during metronomic breathing.

  2. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis.

  3. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-β signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-β in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-β, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  4. Nitric oxide modulates the frog heart ventricle morphodynamics.

    PubMed

    Acierno, Raffaele; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Guerrieri, Antonio; Mannarino, Cinzia; Amelio, Daniela; Tota, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate in the avascular heart of the frog Rana esculenta the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on ventricular systolic and diastolic functions by using a novel image analysis technique. The external volume variations of the whole ventricle were monitored during the heart cycle by video acquisition(visible light) and analysed by an appropriately developed software with a specific formula for irregular convex solids. The system, which measures the rate of volume changes and the ejection fraction, directly determined the volumetric behaviour of the working frog heart after stimulation or inhibition of NOS-NOcGMP pathway. End-diastolic volume (EDVext), end-systolic volume (ESVext), contraction and relaxation velocities (dV/dtsys and dV/dtdia, respectively), stroke volume (SV) and ejection fraction (EF), were measured before and after perfusion with NOS substrate (L-arginine), NO donor (SIN-1), cGMP analogue (8-Br-cGMP),NOS inhibitors (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA; L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-ornithine, L-NIO; 7-Nitroindazole,7-NI) and guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ). The results showed that NO reduces ventricular systolicfunction improving diastolic filling, while NOS inhibition increases contractility impairing ventricular filling capacity. The presence of activated eNOS (p-eNOS) was morphologically documented, further supporting that the mechanical activity of the ventricular pump in frog is influenced by a tonic release of NOS-generated NO.

  5. The Heart of Matter: A Nuclear Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Vic; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching nuclear chemistry. In this book, the fundamental concepts of nuclear science and the applications of nuclear energy are discussed. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students…

  6. Modulations of Heart Rate, ECG, and Cardio-Respiratory Coupling Observed in Polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Penzel, Thomas; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Riedl, Maik; Kraemer, Jan F.; Wessel, Niels; Garcia, Carmen; Glos, Martin; Fietze, Ingo; Schöbel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac component of cardio-respiratory polysomnography is covered by ECG and heart rate recordings. However, their evaluation is often underrepresented in summarizing reports. As complements to EEG, EOG, and EMG, these signals provide diagnostic information for autonomic nervous activity during sleep. This review presents major methodological developments in sleep research regarding heart rate, ECG, and cardio-respiratory couplings in a chronological (historical) sequence. It presents physiological and pathophysiological insights related to sleep medicine obtained by new technical developments. Recorded nocturnal ECG facilitates conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, studies of cyclical variations of heart rate, and analysis of ECG waveform. In healthy adults, the autonomous nervous system is regulated in totally different ways during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep. Analysis of beat-to-beat heart-rate variations with statistical methods enables us to estimate sleep stages based on the differences in autonomic nervous system regulation. Furthermore, up to some degree, it is possible to track transitions from wakefulness to sleep by analysis of heart-rate variations. ECG and heart rate analysis allow assessment of selected sleep disorders as well. Sleep disordered breathing can be detected reliably by studying cyclical variation of heart rate combined with respiration-modulated changes in ECG morphology (amplitude of R wave and T wave). PMID:27826247

  7. Modulations of Heart Rate, ECG, and Cardio-Respiratory Coupling Observed in Polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Penzel, Thomas; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Bartsch, Ronny P; Riedl, Maik; Kraemer, Jan F; Wessel, Niels; Garcia, Carmen; Glos, Martin; Fietze, Ingo; Schöbel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac component of cardio-respiratory polysomnography is covered by ECG and heart rate recordings. However, their evaluation is often underrepresented in summarizing reports. As complements to EEG, EOG, and EMG, these signals provide diagnostic information for autonomic nervous activity during sleep. This review presents major methodological developments in sleep research regarding heart rate, ECG, and cardio-respiratory couplings in a chronological (historical) sequence. It presents physiological and pathophysiological insights related to sleep medicine obtained by new technical developments. Recorded nocturnal ECG facilitates conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, studies of cyclical variations of heart rate, and analysis of ECG waveform. In healthy adults, the autonomous nervous system is regulated in totally different ways during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep. Analysis of beat-to-beat heart-rate variations with statistical methods enables us to estimate sleep stages based on the differences in autonomic nervous system regulation. Furthermore, up to some degree, it is possible to track transitions from wakefulness to sleep by analysis of heart-rate variations. ECG and heart rate analysis allow assessment of selected sleep disorders as well. Sleep disordered breathing can be detected reliably by studying cyclical variation of heart rate combined with respiration-modulated changes in ECG morphology (amplitude of R wave and T wave).

  8. Cardiolipin modulates allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification by horse heart cytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cardiolipin binding to cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-dependent peroxynitrite isomerization by cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays pro-apoptotic effects. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays anti-apoptotic effects. -- Abstract: Upon interaction with bovine heart cardiolipin (CL), horse heart cytochrome c (cytc) changes its tertiary structure disrupting the heme-Fe-Met80 distal bond, reduces drastically the midpoint potential out of the range required for its physiological role, binds CO and NO with high affinity, and displays peroxidase activity. Here, the effect of CL on peroxynitrite isomerization by ferric cytc (cytc-Fe(III)) is reported. In the absence of CL, hexa-coordinated cytc does not catalyze peroxynitrite isomerization. In contrast, CL facilitates cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite in a dose-dependent fashion inducing the penta-coordination of the heme-Fe(III)-atom. The value of the second order rate constant for CL-cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite (k{sub on}) is (3.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The apparent dissociation equilibrium constant for CL binding to cytc-Fe(III) is (5.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -5} M. These results suggest that CL-cytc could play either pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects facilitating lipid peroxidation and scavenging of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite, respectively.

  9. Modulation of ventricular fibrillation in isolated perfused heart by dofetilide.

    PubMed

    Amitzur, Giora; Shenkar, Nitza; Leor, Jonathan; Novikov, Ilia; Eldar, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The authors studied the involvement of IKr potassium current in ventricular fibrillation during perfusion. Electrophysiologic parameters were measured before and after dofetilide administration (2.5, 7.5, and 12.5 x 10-7 M, n = 8) in isolated perfused feline hearts. During pacing, these parameters included epicardial conduction time, refractoriness, and the fastest rate for 1:1 pacing/response capture. During 8 minutes of electrically induced tachyarrhythmias, they included heart rate and normalized entropy reflecting the degree of organization. In all groups, arrhythmia rate was slower in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle. Dofetilide decreased the arrhythmia rate more than it increased organization, reduced its maintenance, or increased difficulty in initiation. Refractoriness was prolonged in a reverse use-dependent way which was less than 1:1 pacing/response capture. Unexpectedly, a moderate prolongation of conduction time was observed. Inverse correlation was found between the arrhythmia rate and changes in refractoriness and conduction time and between the degree of organization and refractoriness (both ventricles) and conduction time (right ventricle). Dofetilide, which intensively blocks IKr current and unexpectedly suppressed conduction, has different quantitative effects on fibrillation features. These changes in fibrillation suggest that these effects are mainly associated with refractoriness prolongation and do not seem to be attenuated by conduction suppression.

  10. Radiation-induced injury of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Lepke, R.A.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1983-08-01

    Forty patients with functional or morphologic esophageal abnormalities following radiotherapy were identified. Abnormalities included abnormal motility with and without mucosal edema, stricture, ulceration and pseudodiverticulum, and fistula. Abnormal motility occurred 4 to 12 weeks following radiotherapy alone and as early as 1 week after therapy when concomitant chemotherapy had been given. Strictures developed 4 to 8 months following completion of radiotherapy. Ulceration, pseudodiverticulum, and fistula formation did not develop in a uniform time frame. Radiation-induced esophageal injury is more frequent when radiotherapy and chemotherapy are combined than it is with radiotherapy alone.

  11. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  12. Radiation induced detwinning in nanotwinned Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youxing; Wang, Haiyan; Kirk, Mark A.; Li, Meimei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xinghang

    2016-11-15

    Superior radiation tolerance has been experimentally examined in nanotwinned metals. The stability of nanotwinned structure under radiation is the key factor for advancing the application of nanotwinned metals for nuclear reactors. We thus performed in situ radiation tests for nanotwinned Cu with various twin thicknesses inside a transmission electron microscope. We found that there is a critical twin thickness (10 nm), below which, radiation induced detwinning is primarily accomplished through migration of incoherent twin boundaries. Lastly, detwinning is faster for thinner twins in this range, while thicker twins are more stable.

  13. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  14. Modulation of sympathetic activity and heart rate variability by ivabradine.

    PubMed

    Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Rocchetti, Marcella; Wu, Maddalena A; Malfatto, Gabriella; Montano, Nicola; Zaza, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Bradycardic agents are currently used in the treatment of angina and heart failure; direct information on their effects on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) may be relevant to their chronic use. The present study evaluates the effect of pacemaker inhibition on SNA; direct nerve recordings and indirect autonomic indexes are compared. Experiments were performed in 18 anaesthetized rats. SNA (direct nerve recording) and heart rate variability (HRV) indexes were evaluated in parallel. All parameters were recorded 10 min before to 60 min after administration of the If blocker ivabradine (IVA; 2 mg/kg, i.v.; n = 8) or vehicle (VEH; n = 5). IVA-induced RR interval (RR) prolongation (at 60 min +15.0 ± 7.1%, P < 0.01) was associated with decreased diastolic arterial pressure (DAP; -17.3 ± 8.4%, P < 0.05) and increased SNA (+51.1 ± 12.3%, P < 0.05). These effects were accompanied by increased RR variance (RRσ(2)), which showed strong positive correlation with RR. Frequency-domain HRV indexes (in normalized units) were unchanged by IVA. After baroreceptor reflexes had been eliminated by sino-aortic denervation (n = 5), similar IVA-induced RR prolongation (at 60 min +14.3 ± 5.9%, NS vs. intact) was associated with a larger DAP reduction (-30.9 ± 4.1%, P < 0.05 vs. intact), but failed to affect SNA. (i) IVA-induced bradycardia was associated with increased SNA, resulting from baroreceptor unloading; if this applied to chronic IVA use in humans, it would be of relevance for therapeutic use of the drug. (ii) Whenever mean HR is concomitantly changed, time-domain HRV indexes should not be unequivocally interpreted in terms of autonomic balance. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Epigenetics in radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Weigel, C; Schmezer, P; Plass, C; Popanda, O

    2015-04-23

    Radiotherapy is a major cancer treatment option but dose-limiting side effects such as late-onset fibrosis in the irradiated tissue severely impair quality of life in cancer survivors. Efforts to explain radiation-induced fibrosis, for example, by genetic variation remained largely inconclusive. Recently published molecular analyses on radiation response and fibrogenesis showed a prominent role of epigenetic gene regulation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epigenetic modifications in fibrotic disease and radiation response, and it points out the important role for epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, microRNAs and histone modifications in the development of this disease. The synopsis illustrates the complexity of radiation-induced fibrosis and reveals the need for investigations to further unravel its molecular mechanisms. Importantly, epigenetic changes are long-term determinants of gene expression and can therefore support those mechanisms that induce and perpetuate fibrogenesis even in the absence of the initial damaging stimulus. Future work must comprise the interconnection of acute radiation response and long-lasting epigenetic effects in order to assess their role in late-onset radiation fibrosis. An improved understanding of the underlying biology is fundamental to better comprehend the origin of this disease and to improve both preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  17. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  18. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  20. Barriers to Radiation-Induced In Situ Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wennerberg, Erik; Lhuillier, Claire; Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Pilones, Karsten A.; García-Martínez, Elena; Rudqvist, Nils-Petter; Formenti, Silvia C.; Demaria, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The immunostimulatory properties of radiation therapy (RT) have recently generated widespread interest due to preclinical and clinical evidence that tumor-localized RT can sometimes induce antitumor immune responses mediating regression of non-irradiated metastases (abscopal effect). The ability of RT to activate antitumor T cells explains the synergy of RT with immune checkpoint inhibitors, which has been well documented in mouse tumor models and is supported by observations of more frequent abscopal responses in patients refractory to immunotherapy who receive RT during immunotherapy. However, abscopal responses following RT remain relatively rare in the clinic, and antitumor immune responses are not effectively induced by RT against poorly immunogenic mouse tumors. This suggests that in order to improve the pro-immunogenic effects of RT, it is necessary to identify and overcome the barriers that pre-exist and/or are induced by RT in the tumor microenvironment. On the one hand, RT induces an immunogenic death of cancer cells associated with release of powerful danger signals that are essential to recruit and activate dendritic cells (DCs) and initiate antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, RT can promote the generation of immunosuppressive mediators that hinder DCs activation and impair the function of effector T cells. In this review, we discuss current evidence that several inhibitory pathways are induced and modulated in irradiated tumors. In particular, we will focus on factors that regulate and limit radiation-induced immunogenicity and emphasize current research on actionable targets that could increase the effectiveness of radiation-induced in situ tumor vaccination. PMID:28348554

  1. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  2. Plasma-Radiation-Induced Interface States in Metal-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Structure of Charge-Coupled Device Image Sensor and Their Reduction Using Pulse-Time-Modulated Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okigawa, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Yasushi; Samukawa, Seiji

    2003-04-01

    We found that ultraviolet (UV) light from helium discharge plasma and a halogen lamp clearly induce SiO2-Si interface states in a metal-silicon-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) structure. A dark current originating in the interface states of charge-coupled-device (CCD) image sensors also increases by this UV irradiation. Pulse-time-modulated (TM) plasma suppresses the interface states, resulting in the CCD dark current, by decreasing the UV light. On the other hand, results of Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurement did not show the difference between UV irradiation and no irradiation. This indicates that fixed charges in the SiO2 cannot be generated by the UV lights. Using optical filters, we revealed that a photon energy of 3.90 eV (318 nm) to 4.96 eV (250 nm) causes an increase in the interface states.

  3. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  4. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  5. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  6. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre.

  7. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-04-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  8. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure. PMID:28217410

  9. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhijian; Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  10. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhijian; Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  11. Extracellular Adenosine Production by ecto-5'-Nucleotidase (CD73) Enhances Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W; Blackburn, Michael R; Westendorf, Astrid M; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-05-15

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks postirradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately 3-fold. Histologic evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P < 0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacologic strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3045-56. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 1D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Ferrero, Jose M.; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a final common pathway or descriptor for various cardiac pathologies. It is associated with sudden cardiac death, which is frequently caused by ventricular arrhythmias. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling, fibrosis and autonomic imbalance have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure etiology and progression. Objective In this study we investigate in silico the role of electrophysiological and structural heart failure remodeling on the modulation of key elements of the arrhythmogenic substrate, i.e., electrophysiological gradients and abnormal impulse propagation. Methods Two different mathematical models of the human ventricular action potential were used to formulate models of the failing ventricular myocyte. This provided the basis for simulations of the electrical activity within a transmural ventricular strand. Our main goal was to elucidate the roles of electrophysiological and structural remodeling in setting the stage for malignant life-threatening arrhythmias. Results Simulation results illustrate how the presence of M cells and heterogeneous electrophysiological remodeling in the human failing ventricle modulate the dispersion of action potential duration and repolarization time. Specifically, selective heterogeneous remodeling of expression levels for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA pump decrease these heterogeneities. In contrast, fibroblast proliferation and cellular uncoupling both strongly increase repolarization heterogeneities. Conduction velocity and the safety factor for conduction are also reduced by the progressive structural remodeling during heart failure. Conclusion An extensive literature now establishes that in human ventricle, as heart failure progresses, gradients for repolarization are changed significantly by protein specific electrophysiological remodeling (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Our simulations illustrate and provide new insights into this

  13. Investigations of radiation-induced and carrier-enhanced conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.; Parker, L. W.; Yadlowski, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

    1985-03-01

    A steady-state carrier computer code, PECK (Parker Enhanced Carrier Kinetics), that predicts the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced in a dielectric by an electron beam was developed. The model, which assumes instantly-trapped holes, was then applied to experimental measurements on thin Kapton samples penetrated by an electron beam. Measurements at high bias were matched in the model by an appropriate choice for the trap-modulated electron mobility. A fractional split between front and rear currents measured at zone bias is explained on the basis of beam-scattering. The effects of carrier-enhanced conductivity (CEC) on data obtained for thick, free-surface Kapton samples is described by using an analytical model that incorporates field injection of carriers from the RIC region. The computer code, LWPCHARGE, modified for carrier transport, is also used to predict partial penetration effects associated with CEC in the unirradiated region. Experimental currents and surface voltages, when incorporated in the appropriate models, provide a value for the trap modulated mobility that is in essential agreement with the RIC results.

  14. Investigations of radiation-induced and carrier-enhanced conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.; Parker, L. W.; Yadlowski, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A steady-state carrier computer code, PECK (Parker Enhanced Carrier Kinetics), that predicts the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced in a dielectric by an electron beam was developed. The model, which assumes instantly-trapped holes, was then applied to experimental measurements on thin Kapton samples penetrated by an electron beam. Measurements at high bias were matched in the model by an appropriate choice for the trap-modulated electron mobility. A fractional split between front and rear currents measured at zone bias is explained on the basis of beam-scattering. The effects of carrier-enhanced conductivity (CEC) on data obtained for thick, free-surface Kapton samples is described by using an analytical model that incorporates field injection of carriers from the RIC region. The computer code, LWPCHARGE, modified for carrier transport, is also used to predict partial penetration effects associated with CEC in the unirradiated region. Experimental currents and surface voltages, when incorporated in the appropriate models, provide a value for the trap modulated mobility that is in essential agreement with the RIC results.

  15. [Medical prevention and treatment of radiation-induced pulmonary complications].

    PubMed

    Vallard, A; Rancoule, C; Le Floch, H; Guy, J-B; Espenel, S; Le Péchoux, C; Deutsch, É; Magné, N; Chargari, C

    2017-08-01

    Radiation-induced lung injuries mainly include the (acute or sub-acute) radiation pneumonitis, the lung fibrosis and the bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). The present review aims at describing the diagnostic process, the current physiopathological knowledge, and the available (non dosimetric) preventive and curative treatments. Radiation-induced lung injury is a diagnosis of exclusion, since clinical, radiological, or biological pathognomonic evidences do not exist. Investigations should necessarily include a thoracic high resolution CT-scan and lung function tests with a diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. No treatment ever really showed efficacy to prevent acute radiation-induced lung injury, or to treat radiation-induced lung fibrosis. The most promising drugs in order to prevent radiation-induced lung injury are amifostine, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and pentoxifylline. Inhibitors of collagen synthesis are currently tested at a pre-clinical stage to limit the radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Regarding available treatments of radiation-induced pneumonitis, corticoids can be considered the cornerstone. However, no standardized program or guidelines concerning the initial dose and the gradual tapering have been scientifically established. Alternative treatments can be prescribed, based on clinical cases reporting on the efficacy of immunosuppressive drugs. Such data highlight the major role of the lung dosimetric protection in order to efficiently prevent radiation-induced lung injury. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  17. Grape seed extract Vitis vinifera protects against radiation-induced oxidative damage and metabolic disorders in rats.

    PubMed

    Saada, Helen N; Said, Ussama Z; Meky, Nefissa H; Abd El Azime, Afrag S

    2009-03-01

    Whole body exposure to ionizing radiation induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different tissues provoking oxidative damage, organ dysfunction and metabolic disturbances. The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of grape seed extract (GSE), rich in proanthocyanidins against gamma-radiation-induced oxidative stress in heart and pancreas tissues associated with serum metabolic disturbances. Irradiated rats were whole body exposed to 5 Gy gamma-radiation. GSE-treated irradiated rats received 100 mg GSE/kg/day, by gavage, for 14 days before irradiation. The animals were killed on days 1, 14 and 28 after irradiation. Significant decreases of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities associated with significant increases of TBARS levels were recorded in both tissues after irradiation. GSE administration pre-irradiation significantly attenuated the radiation-induced oxidative stress in heart tissues which was substantiated by a significant amelioration of serum LDH, CPK and AST activities. GSE treatment also attenuated the oxidative stress in pancreas tissues which was associated with a significant improvement in radiation-induced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that GSE would protect the heart and pancreas tissues from oxidative damage induced by ionizing irradiation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Adenosine Kinase Inhibition Protects against Cranial Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Baulch, Janet E; Lusardi, Theresa A; Allen, Barrett D; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Baddour, Al Anoud D; Limoli, Charles L; Boison, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK). Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy) showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks [novel place recognition, novel object recognition (NOR), and contextual fear conditioning (FC)] 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the FC task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days) prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS functionality to altered

  19. Novel concepts in radiation-induced cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Jason R; Sharma, Gyanendra K; Conger, Preston D; Weintraub, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors who have undergone mediastinal radiation therapy (RT). Cardiovascular complications include effusive or constrictive pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and coronary/vascular disease. These are pathophysiologically distinct disease entities whose prevalence varies depending on the timing and extent of radiation exposure to the heart and great vessels. Although refinements in RT dosimetry and shielding will inevitably limit future cases of RICVD, the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, including those treated with older higher-dose RT regimens, will ensure a steady flow of afflicted patients for the foreseeable future. Thus, there is a pressing need for enhanced understanding of the disease mechanisms, and improved detection methods and treatment strategies. Newly characterized mechanisms responsible for the establishment of chronic fibrosis, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and epigenetic modifications, are discussed and linked to potential treatments currently under study. Novel imaging modalities may serve as powerful screening tools in RICVD, and recent research and expert opinion advocating their use is introduced. Data arguing for the aggressive use of percutaneous interventions, such as transcutaneous valve replacement and drug-eluting stents, are examined and considered in the context of prior therapeutic approaches. RICVD and its treatment options are the subject of a rich and dynamic body of research, and patients who are at risk or suffering from this disease will benefit from the care of physicians with specialty expertise in the emerging field of cardio-oncology. PMID:27721934

  20. Radiation-induced degradation of aqueous fluoranthene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Petar; Getoff, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of fluoranthene (FA) in slightly alkaline aqueous solution was investigated in the presence of air as well as of N 2O. Depending on the starting FA-concentration the determined Gi(-FA) was 0.34 for 1×10 -5 mol/l FA upto 0.67 for 4.6×10 -5 mol/l FA. As major radiolytic products found by HPLC-analysis were: 9-fluorene carboxylic acid ( Gi =0.006), 9-fluorenone ( Gi=0.004) and fluorene ( Gi=0.002) in addition to a mixture of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. In the presence of N 2O (90% OH, 10% H) practically the same products were observed, however in this case the yield of the carboxylic acids was about 2-times higher than in solutions saturated with air, but 4-times less aldehydes, resp. For illustration of the rather complicated degradation process a probable reaction mechanism is presented.

  1. Radiation-induced segregation, hardening, and IASCC

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Nelson, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    Intergranular cracking has been discovered after extended radiation exposure in several boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components made of austenitic stainless steel and nickel-based alloys. There are fewer field observations of intergranular cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWR), but failures have occurred in bolts, springs, and fuel cladding. There is concern for other PWR components, some of which will receive greater radiation doses than BWR components during the plant lifetime. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the connection between radiation induced segregation, hardening and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). A data base was developed containing the available data on austenitic stainless steel where the grain boundary composition was measured by Field Emission Gun-Scanning Transmission Election Microscopy (FEG-STEM), the stress corrosion susceptibility was measured by constant extension rate tests (CERT) in light water reactor environments, some estimate of irradiated strength was available and the irradiation was conducted in a power reactor. The data base was analyzed using advanced data analysis techniques, including tree-structured pattern recognition and transformation analysis codes. The most sensitive variables and optimal modeling forms were identified using these techniques, then preliminary models were calibrated using nonlinear least squares. The results suggest that more than one mechanism causes IASCC.

  2. Radiation-induced cardiovascular diseases: Is the epidemiologic evidence compatible with the radiobiologic data?

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Hector, Susanne . E-mail: susanne.schultz-hector@helmholtz.de; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger Prof.

    2007-01-01

    The Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors demonstrates that radiation exposure significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease, in particular myocardial infarction. Similarly, epidemiologic investigations in very large populations of patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer or for peptic ulcer demonstrate that radiation exposure of the heart with an average equivalent single dose of approximately 2 Gy significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease more than 10 years after irradiation. These epidemiologic findings are compatible with radiobiologic data on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced heart disease in experimental animals. The critical target structure appears to be the endothelial lining of blood vessels, in particular arteries, leading to early functional alterations such as pro-inflammatory responses and other changes, which are slowly progressive. Research should concentrate on the interaction of these radiation-induced endothelial changes with the early stages of age-related atherosclerosis to develop criteria for optimizing treatment plans in radiotherapy and also potential interventional strategies.

  3. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  4. Pharmacological analysis of dopamine modulation in the Drosophila melanogaster larval heart

    PubMed Central

    Titlow, Josh S; Rufer, Jenna M; King, Kayla E; Cooper, Robin L

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and other neurotransmitters affect nonneuronal tissues in insects by circulating in the hemolymph. In several organisms, DA has been shown to modulate distinct aspects of cardiac function but the signal transduction pathways that mediate dopaminergic effects on the heart are not well characterized. Here, we used a semiintact Drosophila melanogaster larva preparation and drugs targeting DA receptors and canonical second messenger pathways to identify signaling cascades that mediate the effect of DA on a myogenic heart. DA has a positive chronotropic effect that is mimicked by SKF38393 (type-1 DA receptor agonist) and quinpirole (type-2 DA receptor agonist). SCH23390 and spiperone (type-1 and type-2 DA receptor antagonists) are moderately effective at inhibiting DA's effect. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor (SQ,22536) is also effective at blocking the stimulatory effect of DA but the drug has its own dose-dependent effect. Activation of protein kinase C with a diacylglycerol analog has a stimulatory effect on heart rate (HR). These results suggest that (1) both DA receptor subtypes are expressed in third instar larva cardiac myocytes to increase HR in response to rising levels of DA in the hemolymph, and (2) canonical second messenger pathways modulate HR in D. melanogaster larvae. Having these disparate signaling cascades converge toward a common modulatory function appears redundant, but in the context of multiple cardioactive chemicals this redundancy is likely to increase the fidelity of signal transduction. PMID:24303109

  5. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Mak, Walter; Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao; Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Do, Ly

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  6. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  7. Autonomic modulation of heart rate in paraplegic wheelchair basketball players: Linear and nonlinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Silva, Ester; Teodori, Rosana Macher; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the autonomic modulation of heart rate in sedentary paraplegics and paraplegic wheelchair basketball players with thoracic spinal cord injury below T6. Seven paraplegic wheelchair basketball players (active paraplegic group), five paraplegics who were not involved in regular exercise (sedentary paraplegic group) and 10 able-bodied participants (control group) took part in the study. The heart rate variability was evaluated by linear (low frequency and high frequency band in normalised units and low frequency/high frequency ratio) and nonlinear methods (Shannon entropy, corrected conditional entropy, and symbolic analysis). The sedentary group presented significantly higher values for low frequency, low frequency/high frequency ratio and symbolic index with no significant variations (0V%), and also lower values for the high frequency and symbolic index with two significant unlike variation (2ULV%) compared to active paraplegic group. Shannon entropy and corrected conditional entropy analyses revealed significantly lower values in the sedentary group than in the control or active paraplegic groups. Paraplegic individuals who regularly undertake physical exercise have higher complexity of R-R interval time series, lower sympathetic modulation, and higher parasympathetic modulation than sedentary paraplegic participants.

  8. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism modulates the effects of social support on heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Kanthak, Magdalena K.; Chen, Frances S.; Kumsta, Robert; Hill, LaBarron K.; Thayer, Julian F.; Heinrichs, Markus

    2017-01-01

    A large body of empirical research has demonstrated stress-buffering effects of social support. However, recent studies suggest that genetic variation of the oxytocin system (specifically, a common single nucleotide polymorphism, rs53576, of the oxytocin receptor gene) modulates the efficacy of social support. The timing and neurobiological basis of this genetic modulation were investigated using a standardized, laboratory-based psychological stress procedure (Trier Social Stress Test for Groups, TSST-G). To index potential stress buffering effects of social support mediated by the oxytocin system, heart rate variability (HRV) was obtained before and during the TSST-G from 40 healthy participants. Results indicate that social support is associated with higher HRV only in G allele carriers. Specifically, social support increased heart rate variability during direct social interaction and only in individuals with at least one copy of the G allele of rs53576. These findings support the idea that the stress-attenuating effects of social support are modulated by genetic variation of the oxytocin system. PMID:26903384

  9. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients. PMID:23909719

  10. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  11. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    effect on the depressed levels in the spleen or draining lymph node. T cell frequencies alone can be vastly misleading in terms of efficacy and...outcome and Radoja et al. 32 recently demonstrated that T cell frequencies and T cell function on a single cell basis do not necessarily correlate . Our...mice but did not affect the depressed levels in tumor-bearing mice, suggest that local microenvironmental factors may outweigh the influence of

  12. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Research Society, Denver, CO, 2004. Dörthe Schaue, Yu-Pei Liao, Begonya Comin-Anduix, Antoni Ribas , Annelies Debucquoy, Karin Haustermans, and William H...Submitted, 2006. Schaue, D., Y. Liao, B. Comin-Anduix, A. Ribas , D.C. Altieri, A. Debucquoy, K. Haustermans and W.H. McBride: The Effect of Radiation...Comin-Anduix, A. Ribas , D.C. Altieri, A. Debucquoy, K. Haustermans and W.H. McBride: The Effect of Radiation Therapy on Tumor-Specific Immune Responses

  13. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ounsakul, Vipawee; Iamsumang, Wimolsiri

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia. PMID:28074164

  14. Lipotransfer for radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Griffin, M; Adigbli, G; Kalavrezos, N; Butler, P E M

    2016-07-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a late complication of radiotherapy that results in progressive functional and cosmetic impairment. Autologous fat has emerged as an option for soft tissue reconstruction. There are also sporadic reports suggesting regression of fibrosis following regional lipotransfer. This systematic review aimed to identify cellular mechanisms driving RIF, and the potential role of lipotransfer in attenuating these processes. PubMed, OVID and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify all original articles regarding lipotransfer for RIF. All articles describing irradiated fibroblast or myofibroblast behaviour were included. Data elucidating the mechanisms of RIF, role of lipotransfer in RIF and methods to quantify fibrosis were extracted. Ninety-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A single, definitive model of RIF is yet to be established, but four cellular mechanisms were identified through in vitro studies. Twenty-one studies identified connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines as drivers of fibrotic cascades. Hypoxia was demonstrated to propagate fibrogenesis in three studies. Oxidative stress from the release of reactive oxygen species and free radicals was also linked to RIF in 11 studies. Purified autologous fat grafts contain cellular and non-cellular properties that potentially interact with these processes. Six methods for quantifying fibrotic changes were evaluated including durometry, ultrasound shear wave elastography, thermography, dark field imaging, and laser Doppler and laser speckle flowmetry. Understanding how lipotransfer causes regression of RIF remains unclear; there are a number of new hypotheses for future research. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  16. Mouse models of radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced (RI) secondary cancers were not a major clinical concern even as little as 15 years ago. However, advances in cancer diagnostics, therapy, and supportive care have saved numerous lives and many former cancer patients are now living for 5, 10, 20, and more years beyond their initial diagnosis. The majority of these patients have received radiotherapy as a part of their treatment regimen and are now beginning to develop secondary cancers arising from normal tissue exposure to damaging effects of ionizing radiation. Because historically patients rarely survived past the extended latency periods inherent to these RI cancers, very little effort was channeled towards the research leading to the development of therapeutic agents intended to prevent or ameliorate oncogenic effects of normal tissue exposure to radiation. The number of RI cancers is expected to increase very rapidly in the near future, but the field of cancer biology might not be prepared to address important issues related to this phenomena. One such issue is the ability to accurately differentiate between primary tumors and de novo arising secondary tumors in the same patient. Another issue is the lack of therapeutic agents intended to reduce such cancers in the future. To address these issues, large-scale epidemiological studies must be supplemented with appropriate animal modeling studies. This work reviews relevant mouse (Mus musculus) models of inbred and F1 animals and methodologies of induction of most relevant radiation-associated cancers: leukemia, lymphoma, and lung and breast cancers. Where available, underlying molecular pathologies are included. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of walking on heart rate recovery, endothelium modulators and quality of life in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Karatzaferi, Christina; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Haliassos, Alexander; Kouretas, Demetrios; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Veskoukis, Aristidis; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Kyriakides, Zenon; Constantinou, Louis; Koutedakis, Yannis; Rentoukas, Elias

    2011-08-01

    Few studies have addressed the impact of moderate unsupervised everyday physical activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated the effects of a 12-week walking programme as the sole exercise intervention on heart rate recovery (HRR), index of the autonomic system equilibrium, serum modulators of endothelial function (i.e. asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and homocysteine), markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and quality of life measures (i.e. SF-36 and the Zung depression scale) in CHF patients. Twenty-eight stabilized CHF patients of ΝYHΑ class II and III volunteered to participate either in the exercise (n = 18) or in the non-exercise (n = 10) groups. Ten age-matched healthy volunteers provided reference values. The exercise programme consisted of unsupervised 40-minute walking for five days per week. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant improvements in HRR (p < 0.001) in the exercise patients compared to their non-exercise counterparts. ADMA levels in CHF patients at baseline were found higher than the healthy reference volunteers (p < 0.03), while a decrease in ADMA levels after walking was associated with HRR changes (r = 0.74, p = 0.007). Homocysteine levels both at baseline and at the end of the walking intervention decreased in the exercise group, but were still higher than in the healthy individuals. Average walking distance positively correlated with homocysteine decrease (p < 0.05). Total SF-36 score significantly improved (p < 0.02) mainly due to enhancements in the physical component score (p < 0.026). A 12-week unsupervised walking programme exhibits a pronounced HRR amelioration, possibly attenuates endothelial damage and induces a concomitant improvement in perceived quality of life in CHF patients.

  18. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  19. Polyol pathway and modulation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Hwang, Yuying C; Ananthakrishnan, Radha; Oates, Peter J; Guberski, Dennis; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of polyol pathway enzymes aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in mediating injury due to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in Type 2 diabetic BBZ rat hearts. Specifically, we investigated, (a) changes in glucose flux via cardiac AR and SDH as a function of diabetes duration, (b) ischemic injury and function after IR, (c) the effect of inhibition of AR or SDH on ischemic injury and function. Hearts isolated from BBZ rats, after 12 weeks or 48 weeks diabetes duration, and their non-diabetic littermates, were subjected to IR protocol. Myocardial function, substrate flux via AR and SDH, and tissue lactate:pyruvate (L/P) ratio (a measure of cytosolic NADH/NAD+), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (a marker of IR injury) were measured. Zopolrestat, and CP-470,711 were used to inhibit AR and SDH, respectively. Myocardial sorbitol and fructose content, and associated changes in L/P ratios were significantly higher in BBZ rats compared to non-diabetics, and increased with disease duration. Induction of IR resulted in increased ischemic injury, reduced ATP levels, increases in L/P ratio, and poor cardiac function in BBZ rat hearts, while inhibition of AR or SDH attenuated these changes and protected hearts from IR injury. These data indicate that AR and SDH are key modulators of myocardial IR injury in BBZ rat hearts and that inhibition of polyol pathway could in principle be used as a therapeutic adjunct for protection of ischemic myocardium in Type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:18957123

  20. Pioglitazone Attenuates Acute Cocaine Toxicity in Rat Isolated Heart: Potential Protection by Metabolic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Guy L.; Ripper, Richard; Bern, Sarah; Lin, Bocheng; Edelman, Lucas; DiGregorio, Guido; Piano, Mariann; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors test whether cocaine depresses mitochondrial acylcarnitine exchange and if a drug that enhances glucose metabolism could protect against cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction. Methods Oxygen consumption with and without cocaine was compared in rat cardiac mitochondria using either octanoylcarnitine (lipid) or pyruvate (non-lipid) substrates. Isolated hearts from rats with or without pioglitazone-supplemented diet were exposed to cocaine. Results Cocaine 0.5mM inhibited respiration supported by octanoylcarnitine (82 +/− 10.4 and 45.7 +/− 4.24 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM, for control and cocaine treatment, respectively; p < 0.02) but not pyruvate-supported respiration (281 +/− 12.5 and 267 +/− 12.7 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM; p = 0.45). Cocaine altered contractility, lusitropy, coronary resistance and lactate production in isolated heart. These effects were each blunted in pioglitazone-treated hearts. Pioglitazone diet attenuated the drop in rate-pressure product (p = 0.002), cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.04) and myocardial vascular resistance (p = 0.05) compared to controls. Lactate production was higher in pretreated hearts (p = 0.008) and in ventricular myocytes cultured with pioglitazone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Cocaine inhibited octanoylcarnitine-supported mitochondrial respiration. Pioglitazone diet significantly attenuated the effects of cocaine on isolated heart. The authors postulate that inhibition of acylcarnitine exchange could contribute to cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction and that metabolic modulation warrants further study a potential treatment for such toxicity. PMID:21487283

  1. Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury of the Heart. Advantages and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Di Lisa, Fabio; Bernardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In the last twenty years, numerous reports provided solid evidence on the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) in myocardial injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion. Indeed, significant cardioprotection is obtained by reducing the open probability of the PTP. This goal has been achieved by pharmacological and genetic interventions aimed at inhibiting cyclophilin D (CyPD), a regulatory protein that favors PTP opening. On the other hand, CyPD inhibition or deletion has been shown to worsen remodeling of the hypertrophic heart, an adverse outcome that must find an explanation within PTP modulation by CyPD. In this review, recent advancements in defining the molecular identity of the PTP are analyzed in relation to its pathophysiological functions and pharmacological modulation. In this respect, advantages and limitations of compounds targeting CyPD are discussed with the analysis of novel PTP inhibitors that do not interact with CyPD.

  2. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  3. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  4. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  5. [Update in radiation-induced neoplasms: genetic studies].

    PubMed

    Chauveinc, Laurent; Lefevre, Sandrine; Malfoy, Bernard; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Radiation induced tumors are a possible (very) late complications of radiotherapy. The evaluation of the risks of radiation-induced tumors has been presented in different epidemiological studies, with the evaluation of the relative risk for different tissues. But, the genetic studies are rare, and no global theory exists. Two cytogenetic profiles are described, one with translocations and one with genetic material losses, evoking two different genetic evolutions. Two questions are stated. What are the radiation-induced genetic mechanisms? Is it possible to differentiate the radiation-induced and spontaneous tumors with genetic approaches? With 37 cytogenetic cases, 12 analyzed in our laboratory, the radiation-induced tumors were characterized by genetic material losses. An anti-oncogenic evolution is probable. A new molecularly study confirm these results. Only thyroid tumors do not have this evolution. For tumors with simple karyotype, like meningioma, radiation-induced tumors seem to be more complex than spontaneous tumors. But for the others, the differentiation is impossible to be done with cytogenetic. The mechanism of the chromosomic material losses in unknown, but some hypothesis are discussed.

  6. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function: I. Effect of modulation.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A G; Dubovick, B V; Degtyariov, I G; Pronkevich, A N

    1995-01-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10(-6)-10(-2) s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100-3000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1-0.4 degree C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. The data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  7. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 1: Effect of modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}2} s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100--3,000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1--0.4 C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. the data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  8. The Role of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Modulation of Heart Rate Dynamics in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Roham; Eftekhari, Golnar; Rahimi, Maryam; Khori, Vahid; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Mani, Ali R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that artificial stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces systemic inflammation in experimental models of sepsis. This phenomenon is a part of a broader cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway which activates the vagus nerve to modulate inflammation through activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nACHR). Heart rate variability represents the complex interplay between autonomic nervous system and cardiac pacemaker cells. Reduced heart rate variability and increased cardiac cycle regularity is a hallmark of clinical conditions that are associated with systemic inflammation (e.g. endotoxemia and sepsis). The present study was aimed to assess the role of α7nACHR in modulation of heart rate dynamics during systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation was induced by injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats. Electrocardiogram and body temperature were recorded in conscious animals using a telemetric system. Linear and non-linear indices of heart rate variability (e.g. sample entropy and fractal-like temporal structure) were assessed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed that α7nACHR is expressed in rat atrium and is mainly localized at the endothelial layer. Systemic administration of an α7nACHR antagonist (methyllycaconitine) did not show a significant effect on body temperature or heart rate dynamics in naïve rats. However, α7nACHR blockade could further reduce heart rate variability and elicit a febrile response in endotoxemic rats. Pre-treatment of endotoxemic animals with an α7nACHR agonist (PHA-543613) was unable to modulate heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats but could prevent the effect of endotoxin on body temperature within 24 h experiment. Neither methyllycaconitine nor PHA-543613 could affect cardiac beating variability of isolated perfused hearts taken from control or endotoxemic rats. Based on our observations we suggest a tonic role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in

  9. Cardiovascular microRNAs: as modulators and diagnostic biomarkers of diabetic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Shruti; Manning, Patrick; Katare, Rajesh

    2014-02-14

    Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the people with diabetes, with approximately 80% of the deaths in diabetics are due to cardiovascular complications. Importantly, heart disease in the diabetics develop at a much earlier stage, although remaining asymptomatic till the later stage of the disease, thereby restricting its early detection and active therapeutic management. Thus, a better understanding of the modulators involved in the pathophysiology of DHD is necessary for the early diagnosis and development of novel therapeutic implications for diabetes-associated cardiovascular complications. microRNAs (miRs) have recently been evolved as key players in the various cardiovascular events through the regulation of cardiac gene expression. Besides their credible involvement in controlling the cellular processes, they are also released in to the circulation in disease states where they serve as potential diagnostic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease. However, their potential role in DHD as modulators as well as diagnostic biomarkers is largely unexplored. In this review, we describe the putative mechanisms of the selected cardiovascular miRs in relation to cardiovascular diseases and discuss their possible involvement in the pathophysiology and early diagnosis of DHD.

  10. The mammalian target of rapamycin modulates the immunoproteasome system in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Jianliang; Hamilton, Ryan; Diaz, Vivian; Zhang, Yiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in cardiac development and function. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin has been shown to attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophy and improve the function of aging heart, accompanied by an inhibition of the cardiac proteasome activity. The current study aimed to determine the potential mechanism(s) by which mTOR inhibition modulates cardiac proteasome. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin was found to reduce primarily the immunoproteasome in both H9c2 cells in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, without significant effect on the constitutive proteasome and protein ubiquitination. Concurrent with the reduction of the immunoproteasome, rapamycin reduced two important inflammatory response pathways, the NF-κB and Stat3 signaling. In addition, rapamycin attenuated the induction of the immunoproteasome in H9c2 cells by inflammatory cytokines, including INFγ and TNFα, by suppressing NF-κB signaling. These data indicate that rapamycin indirectly modulated immunoproteasome through the suppression of inflammatory response pathways. Lastly, the role of the immunoproteasome during the development of cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. Administration of a specific inhibitor of the immunoproteasome ONX 0914 attenuated isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that the immunoproteasome may be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and therefore could be a therapeutic target. In conclusion, rapamycin inhibits the immunoproteasome through its effect on the inflammatory signaling pathways and the immunoproteasome could be a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  11. Nitrite is a positive modulator of the Frank-Starling response in the vertebrate heart.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Tommaso; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Imbrogno, Sandra; Mazza, Rosa; Tota, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Evidence from both mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates indicates that intracardiac nitric oxide (NO) facilitates myocardial relaxation, ventricular diastolic distensibility, and, consequently, the Frank-Starling response, i.e., the preload-induced increase of cardiac output. Since nitrite ion (NO(2)(-)), the major storage pool of bioactive NO, recently emerged as a cardioprotective endogenous modulator, we explored its influence on the Frank-Starling response in eel, frog, and rat hearts, used as paradigms of fish, amphibians, and mammals, respectively. We demonstrated that, like NO, exogenous nitrite improves the Frank-Starling response in all species, as indicated by an increase of stroke volume and stroke work (eel and frog) and of left ventricular (LV) pressure and LVdP/dt max (rat), used as indexes of inotropism. Unlike in frog and rat, in eel, the positive influence of nitrite appeared to be dependent on NO synthase inhibition. In all species, the effect was sensitive to NO scavengers, independent on nitroxyl anion, and mediated by a cGMP/PKG-dependent pathway. Moreover, the nitrite treatment increased S-nitrosylation of lower-molecular-weight proteins in cytosolic and membrane fractions. These results suggest that nitrite acts as a physiological source of NO, modulating through different species-specific mechanisms, the stretch-induced intrinsic regulation of the vertebrate heart.

  12. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Oivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Chang, Celia; Wang, Haifang; Yan, Jun; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Barnes, Brian M

    2011-03-31

    Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3), which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments.

  13. Hypnotizability-dependent modulation of the changes in heart rate control induced by upright stance.

    PubMed

    Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Balocchi, Rita; Scattina, Eliana; Manzoni, Diego; Bruschini, Luca; Ghelarducci, Brunello; Varanini, Maurizio

    2008-03-28

    Subjects with high (Highs) and low (Lows) susceptibility to hypnosis show differences in the sensory-motor integration for postural control and in the cardiovascular response to stress and experimental pain. Aim of the experiment was to assess whether the cardiac response to gravity-related stimulation depending on changes in the body position were different in the two groups. Thus, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were evaluated in sitting and upright position in Highs and Lows. Position-related HRV changes were studied in the time (statistical indexes, Poincaré Plot) and frequency (spectral analysis) domain. Results indicated that upright stance was associated with similar changes in heart rate and different modulation of HRV in the two groups. The association of time and frequency domain analyses allowed hypothesizing different control mechanisms as responsible for the cardiac response to upright stance in Highs and Lows, likely due to a different role of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) spectral component of HRV in the two groups. The results are in line with previous findings indicating a natural protection of Highs against cardiovascular events and suggest that the Highs' cardiac function might be less impaired by microgravity than the Lows' one.

  14. Radiation-induced cardiomyopathy as a function of radiation beam gating to the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, David J.; Flanagan, Michael F.; Southworth, Jean B.; Hadley, Vaughn; Thibualt, Melissa Wei; Hug, Eugen B.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2004-04-01

    Portions of the heart are often unavoidably included in the primary treatment volume during thoracic radiotherapy, and radiation-induced heart disease has been observed as a treatment-related complication. Such complications have been observed in humans following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease and treatment of the left breast for carcinoma. Recent attempts have been made to prevent re-stenosis following angioplasty procedures using external beam irradiation. These attempts were not successful, however, due to the large volume of heart included in the treatment field and subsequent cardiac morbidity. We suggest a mechanism for sparing the heart from radiation damage by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle and delivering radiation only when the heart is in a relatively hypoxic state. We present data from a rat model testing this hypothesis and show that radiation damage to the heart can be altered by synchronizing the radiation beam with the cardiac cycle. This technique may be useful in reducing radiation damage to the heart secondary to treatment for diseases such as Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer.

  15. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. Inhibition of CDK4/6 protects against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liang; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Wang, Xinwei; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy causes dose-limiting toxicity and long-term complications in rapidly renewing tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there is no FDA-approved agent for the prevention or treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. In this study, we have shown that PD 0332991 (PD), an FDA-approved selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6), prevents radiation-induced lethal intestinal injury in mice. Treating mice with PD or a structurally distinct CDK4/6 inhibitor prior to radiation blocked proliferation and crypt apoptosis and improved crypt regeneration. PD treatment also enhanced LGR5+ stem cell survival and regeneration after radiation. PD was an on-target inhibitor of RB phosphorylation and blocked G1/S transition in the intestinal crypts. PD treatment strongly but reversibly inhibited radiation-induced p53 activation, which blocked p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis–dependent (PUMA-dependent) apoptosis without affecting p21-dependent suppression of DNA damage accumulation, with a repair bias toward nonhomologous end joining. Further, deletion of PUMA synergized with PD treatment for even greater intestinal radioprotection. Our results demonstrate that the cell cycle critically regulates the DNA damage response and survival of intestinal stem cells and support the concept that pharmacological quiescence is a potentially highly effective and selective strategy for intestinal radioprotection. PMID:27701148

  17. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  18. Differential modulation of citrate synthesis and release by fatty acids in perfused working rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Genevieve; Bouchard, Bertrand; Khairallah, Maya; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of increasing fatty acid concentrations on substrate fluxes through pathways leading to citrate synthesis and release in the heart. This was accomplished using semirecirculating work-performing rat hearts perfused with substrate mixtures mimicking the in situ milieu (5.5 mM glucose, 8 nM insulin, 1 mM lactate, 0.2 mM pyruvate, and 0.4 mM oleate-albumin) and 13C methods. Raising the fatty acid concentration from 0.4 to 1 mM with long-chain oleate or medium-chain octanoate resulted in a lowering ( approximately 20%) of cardiac output and efficiency with unaltered O2 consumption. At the metabolic level, beyond the expected effects of high fatty acid levels on the contribution of pyruvate decarboxylation (reduced >3-fold) and beta-oxidation (enhanced approximately 3-fold) to citrate synthesis, there was also a 2.4-fold lowering of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation. Despite the dual inhibitory effect of high fatty acids on pyruvate decarboxylation and carboxylation, tissue citrate levels were twofold higher, but citrate release rates remained unchanged at 11-14 nmol/min, representing <0.5% of citric acid cycle flux. A similar trend was observed for most metabolic parameters after oleate or octanoate addition. Together, these results emphasize a differential modulation of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and citrate release in the heart by fatty acids. We interpret the lack of effects of high fatty acid concentrations on citrate release rates as suggesting that, under physiological conditions, this process is maximal, probably limited by the activity of its mitochondrial or plasma membrane transporter. Limited citrate release at high fatty acid concentrations may have important consequences for the heart's fuel metabolism and function.

  19. ALCOHOL MODULATION OF MMP AND TIMP EXPRESSION IN THE HEART FAVORS COLLAGEN ACCUMULATION

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, E.C.; El hajj, M.C.; Voloshenyuk, T.G.; Mouton, A.J.; Khoutorova, E.; Molina, P.E.; Gilpin, N.W.; Gardner, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol consumption has been shown in human and animal studies to result in collagen accumulation, myocardial fibrosis, and heart failure. Cardiac fibroblasts produce collagen and regulate extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis through the synthesis and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP), with the balance of MMPs/TIMPs determining the rate of collagen turnover. Dynamic changes of MMP and TIMP expression were reported in alcohol induced hepatic fibrosis; however, the effect of alcohol on MMP/TIMP balance in the heart and cardiac fibroblasts is unknown. We hypothesized that alcohol exposure alters cardiac fibroblast MMP and TIMP expression to promote collagen accumulation in the heart. Methods Cardiac fibroblasts isolated from adult rats were cultured in the presence of alcohol (12.5–200 mM) for 48 hrs. MMP, TIMP, and collagen type I and III expression were assayed by Western blot analysis. Hydroxyproline (HPro) was used as a marker of collagen production. The in vivo cardiac effects of ethanol were determined using rats exposed to ethanol vapor for two weeks, resulting in blood alcohol levels of 150–200 mg/dl. Cardiac collagen volume fraction (CVF), as well as MMP, TIMP and collagen expression, was assessed. Results Ethanol exposed rats exhibited upregulation of TIMP-1, -3 and -4 in the heart, with no significant increases in MMPs. Cardiac fibroblasts exhibited transformation to a profibrotic phenotype following exposure to alcohol. These changes were reflected by increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen I and III expression, as well as increased collagen secretion. In vivo ethanol exposure also produced fibrosis, indicated by increased CVF and expression of collagens. Conclusion Alcohol exposure modulates cardiac fibroblast MMP/TIMP expression favoring a profile associated with collagen accumulation. Our data suggest that this disrupted MMP/TIMP profile may contribute to the development of

  20. The effect of ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulation on heart rate in isolated muskrat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Streeby, D R; McKean, T A

    1994-12-01

    Muskrats (Ondontra zibethicus) are common freshwater diving mammals exhibiting a bradycardia with both forced and voluntary diving. This bradycardia is mediated by vagal innervation; however, if hypoxia is present there may be local factors that also decrease heart rate. Some of these local factors may include ATP-sensitive potassium channel activation and extracellular accumulation of potassium ions, hydrogen ions and lactate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of these factors in the isolated perfused hearts of muskrats and of a non-diving mammal, the guinea pig. Although lactate and proton administration reduced heart rate in isolated muskrat and guinea pig hearts, there was no difference in the response to lactate and proton infusion between the two species. Muskrat hearts were more sensitive to the heart-rate-lowering effects of exogenously applied potassium than were guinea pig hearts. Early increases in extracellular potassium concentration during hypoxia are thought to be mediated by the ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Activation of these channels under normoxic conditions had a mildly negative chronotropic effect in both species; however, activation of these channels with Lemakalim under hypoxic conditions caused the guinea pig heart to respond with an augmented bradycardia similar to that seen in the hypoxic muskrat heart in the absence of drugs. Inhibition of these channels by glibenclamide during hypoxia was partially successful in blocking the bradycardia in guinea pig hearts, but inhibition of the same channels in hypoxic muskrat hearts had a damaging effect as two of five hearts went into contracture during the hypoxia. Thus, although ATP-sensitive potassium channels appear to have a major role in the bradycardia of hypoxia in guinea pigs, the failure to prevent the bradycardia by inhibition of these channels in muskrat hearts suggests that multiple factors are involved in the hypoxia-induced bradycardia in this species.

  1. Akt protects the heart against ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hall, Andrew R; Dongworth, Rachel K; Kalkhoran, Siavash; Pyakurel, Aswin; Scorrano, Luca; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism through which the protein kinase Akt (also called PKB), protects the heart against acute ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is not clear. Here, we investigate whether Akt mediates its cardioprotective effect by modulating mitochondrial morphology. Transfection of HL-1 cardiac cells with constitutively active Akt (caAkt) changed mitochondrial morphology as evidenced by an increase in the proportion of cells displaying predominantly elongated mitochondria (73 ± 5.0 % caAkt vs 49 ± 5.8 % control: N=80 cells/group; p< 0.05). This effect was associated with delayed time taken to induce mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening (by 2.4 ± 0.5 fold; N=80 cells/group: p< 0.05); and reduced cell death following simulated IRI (32.8 ± 1.2 % caAkt vs 63.8 ± 5.6 % control: N=320 cells/group: p< 0.05). Similar effects on mitochondrial morphology, MPTP opening, and cell survival post-IRI, were demonstrated with pharmacological activation of Akt using the known cardioprotective cytokine, erythropoietin (EPO). The effect of Akt on inducing mitochondrial elongation was found to be dependent on the mitochondrial fusion protein, Mitofusin-1 (Mfn1), as ablation of Mfn1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) abrogated Akt-mediated mitochondrial elongation. Finally, in vivo pre-treatment with EPO reduced myocardial infarct size (as a % of the area at risk) in adult mice subjected to IRI (26.2 ± 2.6 % with EPO vs 46.1 ± 6.5 % in control; N=7/group: p< 0.05), and reduced the proportion of cells displaying myofibrillar disarray and mitochondrial fragmentation observed by electron microscopy in adult murine hearts subjected to ischaemia from 5.8 ± 1.0 % to 2.2 ± 1.0 % (N=5 hearts/group; p< 0.05). In conclusion, we found that either genetic or pharmacological activation of Akt protected the heart against acute ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mitochondrial morphology.

  2. A Multidisciplinary Self-Directed Learning Module Improves Knowledge of a Quality Improvement Instrument: The HEART Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas D; Harper, Erin N; Leppert, Lauren M; Browning, Brittany M; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David E; Mahler, Simon A

    2016-07-20

    We created and tested an educational intervention to support implementation of an institution wide QI project (the HEART Pathway) designed to improve care for patients with acute chest pain. Although online learning modules have been shown effective in imparting knowledge regarding QI projects, it is unknown whether these modules are effective across specialties and healthcare professions. Participants, including nurses, advanced practice clinicians, house staff and attending physicians (N = 486), were enrolled into an online, self-directed learning course exploring the key concepts of the HEART Pathway. The module was completed by 97% of enrollees (469/486) and 90% passed on the first attempt (422/469). Out of 469 learners, 323 completed the pretest, learning module and posttest in the correct order. Mean test scores across learners improved significantly from 74% to 89% from the pretest to the posttest. Following the intervention, the HEART Pathway was used for 88% of patients presenting to our institution with acute chest pain. Our data demonstrate that this online, self-directed learning module can improve knowledge of the HEART Pathway across specialties-paving the way for more efficient and informed care for acute chest pain patients.

  3. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  4. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael; Schiestl, Robert H

    2014-07-25

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included.

  5. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Kevin F. Lee, Edward W.; Cagnon, Christopher H.; Al-Hakim, Ramsey A. Kee, Stephen T.

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  6. Modulation of Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Oxidative/Nitrative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Sárközy, Márta; Pipicz, Márton; Dux, László; Csont, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a frequent metabolic disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition to its well-known proatherogenic effect, hypercholesterolemia may exert direct effects on the myocardium resulting in contractile dysfunction, aggravated ischemia/reperfusion injury, and diminished stress adaptation. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggested that elevated oxidative and/or nitrative stress plays a key role in cardiac complications induced by hypercholesterolemia. Therefore, modulation of hypercholesterolemia-induced myocardial oxidative/nitrative stress is a feasible approach to prevent or treat deleterious cardiac consequences. In this review, we discuss the effects of various pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, some novel potential pharmacological approaches, and physical exercise on hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative/nitrative stress and subsequent cardiac dysfunction as well as impaired ischemic stress adaptation of the heart in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26788247

  7. Radiofrequency radiation-induced calcium ion efflux enhancement from human and other neuroblastoma cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.; Ghosh, B.; Blackman, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    To test the generality of radiofrequency radiation-induced changes in /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude-modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.001, and 0.0005 W/kg. Significant /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux was obtained at SAR values of 0.05 and 0.005 W/kg. Enhanced efflux at 0.05 W/kg peaked at the 13-16 Hz and at the 57.5-60 Hz modulation ranges. A Chinese hamster-mouse hybrid neuroblastoma was also shown to exhibit enhanced radiation-induced /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux at an SAR of 0.05 W/kg, using 147 MHz, AM at 16 Hz. These results confirm that amplitude-modulated radiofrequency radiation can induce responses in cells of nervous tissue origin from widely different animal species, including humans. The results are also consistent with the reports of similar findings in avian and feline brain tissues and indicate the general nature of the phenomenon.

  8. Oxidative stress and inflammation modulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors with regional discrepancy in diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Pan, Nan-Hung; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2010-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play a pivotal role in myocardial lipid and glucose homeostasis. We investigated the effects of diabetes on PPAR isoforms in different cardiac regions and explored whether proinflammatory cytokines or oxidative stress modulate PPARs in diabetic hearts. Male Wistar rats were separated into control, diabetes and ascorbate-treated diabetes groups. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were performed on PPAR isoforms, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6, from left and right atria and ventricles. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity was quantified through photometric measurements. In control hearts, PPAR-alpha was most expressed, and PPAR-gamma least expressed in mRNA and protein levels. Diabetes decreased the protein and mRNA levels of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-delta. Ascorbate attenuated the diabetes-induced down-regulations of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-delta proteins in all cardiac regions and down-regulation of PPAR-alpha mRNA in the left atrium. In PPAR-gamma, the protein and mRNA levels were increased in diabetic atria and ventricles, which were decreased by ascorbate. Moreover, diabetes increased the TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels, and NAD(P)H oxidase activities in atria and ventricles. Ascorbate attenuated the increase of TNF-alpha, IL-6 protein levels and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in the atria, but only attenuated the increase of NAD(P)H oxidase activities in the ventricles. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor isoforms are differentially expressed in the atria and ventricles. Diabetes can modulate PPARs through increased inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, which are attenuated by ascorbate treatment.

  9. Heart rate response and parasympathetic modulation during recovery from exercise in boys and men.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, Justin P; Overstreet, Matthew; Fernhall, Bo; Mahon, Anthony D

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of postexercise parasympathetic modulation, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), on heart rate recovery (HRR) in boys (n = 13, 10.1 ± 0.8 years) and men (n = 13, 23.9 ± 1.5 years) following maximal and submaximal exercise. Subjects completed 10 min of supine rest, followed by graded exercise on a cycle ergometer to maximal effort. On a separate day, subjects exercised at an intensity equivalent to ventilatory threshold. Immediately following both exercise bouts, 1-min HRR was assessed in the supine position. HRV was analyzed under controlled breathing during the final 5 min of rest and recovery in the time and frequency domains and transformed to natural log (ln) values. Boys had a greater 1-min HRR than men following maximal (58 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 11 beats·min(-1)) and submaximal (59 ± 8 vs. 47 ± 15 beats·min(-1)) exercise (p < 0.05). Following maximal exercise, boys had greater ln root mean square successive differences in R-R intervals (2.52 ± 0.95 ms), ln standard deviation of NN intervals (3.34 ± 0.57 ms), ln high-frequency power (4.32 ± 2.00 ms(2)), and ln low-frequency power (4.98 ± 1.17 ms(2)) than men (1.33 ± 0.37 ms, 2.52 ± 0.24 ms, 1.32 ± 1.06 ms(2) and 2.80 ± 0.74 ms(2), respectively) (p < 0.05). There were no differences in any HRV variables between groups following submaximal exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it appears that greater parasympathetic modulation accounts for greater HRR following maximal exercise in boys versus men. Although submaximal HRR was greater in boys, parasympathetic responses were similar between groups.

  10. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. Results We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3), which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Conclusions Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:21453527

  11. Modulation of {beta}-adrenoceptor signaling in the hearts of 4-wk simulated weightlessness rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen; Liu, Jin-Cheng; Fan, Rong; Sun, Xi-Qing; Ma, Jin; Feng, Na; Zhang, Quan Yu; Yin, Zhao; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Guo, Hai-Tao; Bi, Hui; Wang, Yue-Min; Sun, Xin; Cheng, Liang; Cui, Qin; Yu, Shi-Qiang; Yi, Ding-Hua; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2008-08-01

    The modulation of beta-adrenoceptor signaling in the hearts of hindlimb unweighting (HU) simulated weightlessness rats has not been reported. In the present study, we adopted the rat tail suspension for 4 wk to simulate weightlessness; then the effects of simulated microgravity on beta-adrenoceptor signaling were studied. Mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), left ventricular pressure (LVP), systolic function (+dP/dtmax), and diastolic function (-dP/dtmax) were monitored in the course of the in vivo experiment. Single rat ventricular myocyte was obtained by the enzymatic dissociation method. Hemodynamics, myocyte contraction, and cAMP production in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation with isoproterenol or adenylyl cyclase stimulation with forskolin were measured, and Gs protein was also determined. Compared with the control group, no significant changes were found in heart weight, body weight and ABP, while LVP and +/-dP/dtmax were significantly reduced. The ABP decrease, LVP increase, and +/-dP/dtmax in response to isoproterenol administration were significantly attenuated in the HU group. The effects of isoproterenol on electrically induced single-cell contraction and cAMP production in myocytes of ventricles in the HU rats were significantly attenuated. The biologically active isoform, Gsalpha (45 kDa) in the heart, was unchanged. Both the increased electrically induced contraction and cAMP production in response to forskolin were also significantly attenuated in the simulated weightlessness rats. Above results indicated that impaired function of adenylyl cyclase causes beta-adrenoceptor desensitization, which may be partly responsible for the depression of cardiac function.

  12. Heart rate modulates the slow enhancement of contraction due to sudden left ventricular dilation.

    PubMed

    Tucci, P J; Murad, N; Rossi, C L; Nogueira, R J; Santana, O

    2001-05-01

    In isovolumic blood-perfused dog hearts, left ventricular developed pressure (DP) was recorded while a sudden ventricular dilation was promoted at three heart rate (HR) levels: low (L: 52 +/- 1.7 beats/min), intermediate (M: 82 +/- 2.2 beats/min), and high (H: 117 +/- 3.5 beats/min). DP increased instantaneously with chamber expansion (Delta(1)DP), and another continuous increase occurred for several minutes (Delta(2)DP). HR elevation did not alter Delta(1)DP (32.8 +/- 1.6, 33.6 +/- 1.5, and 34.3 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), even though it intensified Delta(2)DP (17.3 +/- 0.9, 20.7 +/- 1.0, and 26.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), meaning that the treppe phenomenon enhances the length dependence of the contraction component related to changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Frequency increments reduced the half time of the slow response (82 +/- 3.6, 67 +/- 2.6, and 53 +/- 2.0 s for L, M, and H, respectively), while the number of beats included in half time increased (72 +/- 2.9, 95 +/- 2.9, and 111 +/- 3.2 beats for L, M, and H, respectively). HR modulation of the slow response suggests that L-type Ca(2+) channel currents and/or the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger plays a relevant role in the stretch-triggered Ca(2+) gain when HR increases in the canine heart.

  13. Modulation of mitochondrial proteome and improved mitochondrial function by biventricular pacing of dyssynchronous failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Agnetti, Giulio; Kaludercic, Nina; Kane, Lesley A; Elliott, Steven T; Guo, Yurong; Chakir, Khalid; Samantapudi, Daya; Paolocci, Nazareno; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Kass, David A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves chamber mechanoenergetics and morbidity and mortality of patients manifesting heart failure with ventricular dyssynchrony; however, little is known about the molecular changes underlying CRT benefits. We hypothesized that mitochondria may play an important role because of their involvement in energy production. Mitochondria isolated from the left ventricle in a canine model of dyssynchronous or resynchronized (CRT) heart failure were analyzed by a classical, gel-based, proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that 31 mitochondrial proteins where changed when controlling the false discovery rate at 30%. Key enzymes in anaplerotic pathways, such as pyruvate carboxylation and branched-chain amino acid oxidation, were increased. These concerted changes, along with others, suggested that CRT may increase the pool of Krebs cycle intermediates and fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Nearly 50% of observed changes pertained to subunits of the respiratory chain. ATP synthase-beta subunit of complex V was less degraded, and its phosphorylation modulated by CRT was associated with increased formation (2-fold, P=0.004) and specific activity (+20%, P=0.05) of the mature complex. The importance of these modifications was supported by coordinated changes in mitochondrial chaperones and proteases. CRT increased the mitochondrial respiratory control index with tightened coupling when isolated mitochondria were reexposed to substrates for both complex I (glutamate and malate) and complex II (succinate), an effect likely related to ATP synthase subunit modifications and complex quantity and activity. CRT potently affects both the mitochondrial proteome and the performance associated with improved cardiac function.

  14. Hypopharyngeal carcinoma after radiation for tuberculosis: radiation-induced carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Lisa; de Bree, Remco; Kuik, Dirk J; Rietveld, Derek H F; Langendijk, Johannes A; Leemans, C René

    2010-09-01

    Radiation may cause radiation-induced cancers after a long latency period. In a group of 111 patients surgically treated for hypopharyngeal carcinoma, patients previously treated with radiotherapy for tuberculosis in the neck were compared to patients without previous radiotherapy. Seven patients (7.4%) underwent radiotherapy (median age 15 years) and developed a hypopharyngeal carcinoma (median age 70 years, median latency period 54.4 year). Considering this long latency period and the localisation in the previous radiation field these tumours can be classified as potentially radiation-induced carcinomas. Patients with potentially radiation-induced carcinomas were significantly older when the hypopharyngeal carcinoma was diagnosed (p=0.048), were more frequently females (p=0.05) and had a worse 5-year regional control rate (p=0.048). When radiotherapy is considered in young patients the risk of induction of tumours has to be kept in mind. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Tocotrienol-Enriched Formulation Protects against Radiation-Induced Changes in Cardiac Mitochondria without Modifying Late Cardiac Function or Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly J; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a common and sometimes severe late side effect of radiation therapy for intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. We have previously shown that local heart irradiation in a rat model caused prolonged changes in mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Because tocotrienols are known to protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, in this study, we examined the effects of tocotrienols on radiation-induced alterations in mitochondria, and structural and functional manifestations of RIHD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized X irradiation to the heart to a total dose of 21 Gy. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, rats received a tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. Mitochondrial function and mitochondrial membrane parameters were studied at 2 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. In addition, cardiac function and histology were examined at 28 weeks. A single oral dose of the tocotrienol-enriched formulation preserved Bax/Bcl2 ratios and prevented mPTP opening and radiation-induced alterations in succinate-driven mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, the late effects of local heart irradiation pertaining to myocardial function and structure were not modified. Our studies suggest that a single dose of tocotrienols protects against radiation-induced mitochondrial changes, but these effects are not sufficient against long-term alterations in cardiac function or remodeling. PMID:25710576

  16. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  17. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  18. [Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced enteritis].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Baranyai, Zsolt; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Teknos, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Hegedus, László; Mayer, Arpád

    2010-09-05

    The number of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant diseases is increasing worldwide. During the radiotherapy of tumors in the minor pelvis and abdomen intestinal inflammation of different degree may occur even if special attention is paid. Irradiation to the minor pelvis causes in half of the cases radiation induced acute enteritis, whereas in 25% chronic enteritis and colitis will develop. Chronic enteritis following radiotherapy raises a number of diagnostic and therapeutic problems that can be solved only with cooperation of different specialties. Authors present a short review regarding therapeutical options of radiation induced enteritis.

  19. Titin/connectin-based modulation of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Norio; Granzier, Henk L

    2005-01-01

    The basis of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart is the increase in active force when muscle is stretched. Various findings have shown that muscle length, i.e., sarcomere length (SL), modulates activation of cardiac myofilaments at a given concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]). This augmented Ca2+ activation with SL, commonly known as "length-dependent activation", is manifested as the leftward shift of the force-pCa (= -log [Ca2+]) relation as well as by the increase in maximal Ca2+ -activated force. Despite the numerous studies that have been undertaken, the molecular mechanism(s) of length-dependent activation is (are) still not fully understood. The giant sarcomere protein titin/connectin is the largest protein known to date. Titin/connectin is responsible for most passive force in vertebrate striated muscle and also functions as a molecular scaffold during myofibrillogenesis. Recent studies suggest that titin/connectin plays an important role in length-dependent activation by sensing stretch and promoting actomyosin interaction. Here we review and extend this previous work and focus on the mechanism by which titin/connectin might modulate actomyosin interaction.

  20. Do mobile phones pose a potential risk to autonomic modulation of the heart?

    PubMed

    Barutcu, Irfan; Esen, Ali Metin; Kaya, Dayimi; Turkmen, Muhsin; Karakaya, Osman; Saglam, Mustafa; Melek, Mehmet; Çelik, Ataç; Kilit, Celal; Onrat, Ersel; Kirma, Cevat

    2011-11-01

    It has long been speculated that mobile phones may interact with the cardiac devices and thereby cardiovascular system may be a potential target for the electromagnetic fields emitted by the mobile phones. Therefore, the present study was designed to test possible effects of radiofrequency waves emitted by digital mobile phones on cardiac autonomic modulation by short-time heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A total of 20 healthy young subjects were included to the study. All participants were rested in supine position at least for 15 minutes on a comfortable bed, and then time and frequency domain HRV parameters were recorded at baseline in supine position for 5 minutes. After completion of baseline records, by using a mobile GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) phone, HRV parameters were recorded at turned off mode, at turned on mode, and at calling mode over 5 minutes periods for each stage. Neither time nor frequency domain HRV parameters altered significantly during off mode compare to their baseline values. Also, neither time nor frequency domain HRV parameters altered significantly during turned on and calling mode compared to their baseline values. Short-time exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone does not affect cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects.

  1. Brain Correlates of Autonomic Modulation: Combining Heart Rate Variability with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Dhond, Rupali; Conti, Giulia; Makris, Nikos; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The central autonomic network (CAN) has been described in animal models but has been difficult to elucidate in humans. Potential confounds include physiological noise artifacts affecting brainstem neuroimaging data, and difficulty in deriving non-invasive continuous assessments of autonomic modulation. We have developed and implemented a new method which relates cardiac-gated fMRI timeseries with continuous-time heart rate variability (HRV) to estimate central autonomic processing. As many autonomic structures of interest are in brain regions strongly affected by cardiogenic pulsatility, we chose to cardiac-gate our fMRI acquisition to increase sensitivity. Cardiac-gating introduces T1-variability, which was corrected by transforming fMRI data to a fixed TR using a previously published method (Guimaraes et al. 1998). The electrocardiogram was analyzed with a novel point process adaptive-filter algorithm for computation of the high-frequency (HF) index, reflecting the time-varying dynamics of efferent cardiovagal modulation. Central command of cardiovagal outflow was inferred by using the HF timeseries resampled at as a regressor to the fMRI data. A grip task was used to perturb the autonomic nervous system. Our combined HRV-fMRI approach demonstrated HF correlation with fMRI activity in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, parabrachial nucleus/locus ceruleus, periaqueductal gray, amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and dorsomedial/dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior insular, and middle temporal cortices. While some regions consistent with central cardiovagal control in animal models gave corroborative evidence for our methodology, other mostly higher cortical or limbic-related brain regions may be unique to humans. Our approach should be optimized and applied to study the human brain correlates of autonomic modulation for various stimuli in both physiological and pathological states. PMID:18524629

  2. Extracellular adenosine production by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) enhances radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V.; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F.; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately three-fold. Histological evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P<0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacological strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. PMID:26921334

  3. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  4. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  5. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  6. Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Troup, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response has been shown to occur both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence is presented to implicate injury to an extremely radiosensitive T cell in the expression of this phenomenon. Experiments are outlined which could be employed to support or reflect this hypothesis.

  7. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Delia, P; Sansotta, G; Donato, V; Frosina, P; Messina, G; De Renzis, C; Famularo, G

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of a high-potency probiotic preparation on prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea in cancer patients. METHODS: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Four hundred and ninety patients who underwent adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy after surgery for sigmoid, rectal, or cervical cancer were assigned to either the high-potency probiotic preparation VSL#3 (one sachet t.i.d.,) or placebo starting from the first day of radiation therapy. Efficacy endpoints were incidence and severity of radiation-induced diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, and the time from the start of the study to the use of loperamide as rescue medication. RESULTS: More placebo patients had radiation-induced diarrhea than VSL#3 patients (124 of 239 patients, 51.8%, and 77 of 243 patients, 31.6%; P < 0.001) and more patients given placebo suffered grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared with VSL#3 recipients (55.4% and 1.4%, P < 0.001). Daily bowel movements were 14.7 ± 6 and 5.1 ± 3 among placebo and VSL#3 recipients (P < 0.05), and the mean time to the use of loperamide was 86 ± 6 h for placebo patients and 122 ± 8 h for VSL#3 patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Probiotic lactic acid-producing bacteria are an easy, safe, and feasible approach to protect cancer patients against the risk of radiation-induced diarrhea. PMID:17352022

  8. Radiation-induced xerostomia: pathophysiology, clinical course and supportive treatment.

    PubMed

    Guchelaar, H J; Vermes, A; Meerwaldt, J H

    1997-07-01

    Xerostomia, or oral dryness, is one of the most common complaints experienced by patients who have had radiotherapy of the oral cavity and neck region. The hallmarks of radiation-induced damage are acinar atrophy and chronic inflammation of the salivary glands. The early response, resulting in atrophy of the secretory cells without inflammation might be due to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the late response with inflammation could be a result of radiation-induced necrosis. The subjective complaint of a dry mouth appears to be poorly correlated with objective findings of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomia, with secondary symptoms of increased dental caries, difficulty in chewing, swallowing and speaking, and an increased incidence of oral candidiasis, can have a significant effect on the quality of life. At present there is no causal treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia. Temporary symptomatic relief can be offered by moistening agents and saliva substitutes, and is the only option for patients without residual salivary function. In patients with residual salivary function, oral administration of pilocarpine 5-10 mg three times a day is effective in increasing salivary flow and improving the symptoms of xerostomia, and this therapy should be considered as the treatment of choice. Effectiveness of sialogogue treatment requires residual salivary function, which emphasizes the potential benefit from sparing normal tissue during irradiation. The hypothesis concerning the existence of early apoptotic and late necrotic effects of irradiation on the salivary glands theoretically offers a way of achieving this goal.

  9. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  10. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  11. Radiation-induced nonlinear optical response of quartz fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, O. A.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity of radiation-induced luminescence and transient optical losses in KU-1 (Russia) and K-3 (Japan) quartz glass optical tibers irradiated in a fast pulsed fission reactor (a pulse duration of 80 μs and a neutron flux up to 7 × 1016 cm 2 s 2) has been measured in the visible range. The intensity of the fast luminescence component nonlinearly depends on the neutron flux. The luminescence intensity and the transient optical losses depend on the probe light intensity. Suppression of radiation-induced luminescence is observed at wavelengths that are longer or shorter than the probe light wavelength. Light probing leads to an increase in transient optical losses and a more rapid recovery of transparency. A model of two photon fluxes is proposed to analyze the relationship of the effects of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence and the increase in optical losses upon light probing. The effect of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence can be used to control the optical properties of fibers in radiation fields.

  12. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  13. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    acetylcysteine and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal...similar to amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to

  14. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    acetylcysteine and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal...similar to amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to

  15. Prevention of Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer by Amifostine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    and captopril . 4 Task 2. To determine if post-irradiation amifostine treatment can reduce the frequency of radiation-induced ductal dysplasia...amifostine but more suited to oral administration such as WR- 3689, WR151327, N-acetylcysteine and captopril . The first task is to determine if

  16. Radiation induces senescence and a bystander effect through metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Liao, E-C; Hsu, Y-T; Chuah, Q-Y; Lee, Y-J; Hu, J-Y; Huang, T-C; Yang, P-M; Chiu, S-J

    2014-05-22

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest; however, the metabolic processes of senescent cells remain active. Our previous studies have shown that radiation induces senescence of human breast cancer cells that display low expression of securin, a protein involved in control of the metaphase-anaphase transition and anaphase onset. In this study, the protein expression profile of senescent cells was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to investigate associated metabolic alterations. We found that radiation induced the expression and activation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that has an important role in glycolysis. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase A, which is involved in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, the release of lactate and the acidification of the extracellular environment, was also induced. Inhibition of glycolysis by dichloroacetate attenuated radiation-induced senescence. In addition, radiation also induced activation of the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways to promote senescence. We also found that radiation increased the expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) that facilitates the export of lactate into the extracellular environment. Inhibition of glycolysis or the AMPK/NF-κB signalling pathways reduced MCT1 expression and rescued the acidification of the extracellular environment. Interestingly, these metabolic-altering signalling pathways were also involved in radiation-induced invasion of the surrounding, non-irradiated breast cancer and normal endothelial cells. Taken together, radiation can induce the senescence of human breast cancer cells through metabolic alterations.

  17. Modelling of organ-specific radiation-induced secondary cancer risks following particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Stokkevåg, Camilla H; Fukahori, Mai; Nomiya, Takuma; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Engeseth, Grete May; Hysing, Liv B; Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S; Rørvik, Eivind; Szostak, Artur; Muren, Ludvig P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation-induced cancer is a serious late effect that may follow radiotherapy. A considerable uncertainty is associated with carcinogenesis from photon-based treatment, and even less established when including relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for particle therapy. The aim of this work was therefore to estimate and in particular explore relative risks (RR) of secondary cancer (SC) following particle therapy as applied in treatment of prostate cancer. RRs of radiation-induced SC in the bladder and rectum were estimated using a bell-shaped dose-response model incorporating RBE and fractionation effects. The risks from volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were compared to intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and scanning carbon ions for ten patients. The mean estimated RR (95% CI) of SC for VMAT/C-ion was 1.31 (0.65-2.18) for the bladder and 0.58 (0.41-0.80) for the rectum. Corresponding values for VMAT/IMPT were 1.72 (1.06-2.37) and 1.10 (0.78-1.43). The radio-sensitivity parameter α had the strongest influence on the results with decreasing RR for increasing values of α. Based on the wide spread in RR between patients and variations across the included parameter values, the risk profiles of the rectum and bladder were not dramatically different for the investigated radiotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk and survival outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica W; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    Patients treated with cranial radiation are at risk of developing secondary CNS tumors. Understanding the incidence, treatment, and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors plays a role in clinical decision-making and patient education. Additionally, as meningiomas and pituitary tumors have been detected at increasing rates across all ages and may potentially be treated with radiation, it is important to know and communicate the risk of secondary tumors in children and adults. After conducting an extensive literature search, we identified publications that report incidence and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors. We reviewed 14 studies in children, which reported that radiation confers a 7- to 10-fold increase in subsequent CNS tumors, with a 20-year cumulative incidence ranging from 1.03 to 28.9 %. The latency period for secondary tumors ranged from 5.5 to 30 years, with gliomas developing in 5-10 years and meningiomas developing around 15 years after radiation. We also reviewed seven studies in adults, where the two strongest studies showed no increased risk while the remaining studies found a higher risk compared to the general population. The latency period for secondary CNS tumors in adults ranged from 5 to 34 years. Treatment and long-term outcomes of radiation-induced CNS tumors have been documented in four case series, which did not conclusively demonstrate that secondary CNS tumors fared worse than primary CNS tumors. Radiation-induced CNS tumors remain a rare occurrence that should not by itself impede radiation treatment. Additional investigation is needed on the risk of radiation-induced tumors in adults and the long-term outcomes of these tumors.

  19. Loss of Breathing Modulation of Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Recent and Long Standing Diabetes Mellitus Type II.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Estañol, Bruno; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C; Callejas-Rojas, José A; Gien-López, José A; Delgado-García, Guillermo R; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Healthy subjects under rhythmic breathing have heart interbeat intervals with a respiratory band in the frequency domain that can be an index of vagal activity. Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM) affects the autonomic nervous system of patients, thus it can be expected changes on the vagal activity. Here, the influence of DM on the breathing modulation of the heart rate is evaluated by analyzing in the frequency domain heart interbeat interval (IBI) records obtained from 30 recently diagnosed, 15 long standing DM patients, and 30 control subjects during standardized clinical tests of controlled breathing at 0.1 Hz, supine rest and standing upright. Fourier spectral analysis of IBI records quantifies heart rate variability in different regions: low-frequencies (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), high-frequencies (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz), and a controlled breathing peak (RP, centered around 0.1 Hz). Two new parameters are introduced: the frequency radius rf (square root of the sum of LF and HF squared) and β (power of RP divided by the sum of LF and HF). As diabetes evolves, the controlled breathing peak loses power and shifts to smaller frequencies, indicating that heart rate modulation is slower in diabetic patients than in controls. In contrast to the traditional parameters LF, HF and LF/HF, which do not show significant differences between the three populations in neither of the clinical tests, the new parameters rf and β, distinguish between control and diabetic subjects in the case of controlled breathing. Sympathetic activity that is driven by the baroreceptor reflex associated with the 0.1 Hz breathing modulations is affected in DM patients. Diabetes produces not only a rigid heartbeat with less autonomic induced variability (rf diminishes), but also alters the coupling between breathing and heart rate (reduced β), due to a progressive decline of vagal and sympathetic activity.

  20. Loss of Breathing Modulation of Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Recent and Long Standing Diabetes Mellitus Type II

    PubMed Central

    Estañol, Bruno; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Callejas-Rojas, José A.; Gien-López, José A.; Delgado-García, Guillermo R.; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Healthy subjects under rhythmic breathing have heart interbeat intervals with a respiratory band in the frequency domain that can be an index of vagal activity. Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM) affects the autonomic nervous system of patients, thus it can be expected changes on the vagal activity. Here, the influence of DM on the breathing modulation of the heart rate is evaluated by analyzing in the frequency domain heart interbeat interval (IBI) records obtained from 30 recently diagnosed, 15 long standing DM patients, and 30 control subjects during standardized clinical tests of controlled breathing at 0.1 Hz, supine rest and standing upright. Fourier spectral analysis of IBI records quantifies heart rate variability in different regions: low-frequencies (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), high-frequencies (HF, 0.15–0.4 Hz), and a controlled breathing peak (RP, centered around 0.1 Hz). Two new parameters are introduced: the frequency radius rf (square root of the sum of LF and HF squared) and β (power of RP divided by the sum of LF and HF). As diabetes evolves, the controlled breathing peak loses power and shifts to smaller frequencies, indicating that heart rate modulation is slower in diabetic patients than in controls. In contrast to the traditional parameters LF, HF and LF/HF, which do not show significant differences between the three populations in neither of the clinical tests, the new parameters rf and β, distinguish between control and diabetic subjects in the case of controlled breathing. Sympathetic activity that is driven by the baroreceptor reflex associated with the 0.1 Hz breathing modulations is affected in DM patients. Diabetes produces not only a rigid heartbeat with less autonomic induced variability (rf diminishes), but also alters the coupling between breathing and heart rate (reduced β), due to a progressive decline of vagal and sympathetic activity. PMID:27802329

  1. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P<0.05) and HF and total power were higher (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women. In all groups, LBNP decreased (P<0.05) SBP, HF and total power and increased (P<0.05) HR and LF/HF ratio. However, HF and total power remained higher (P<0.05) and HR, SBP and LF/HF ratio remained lower (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women, in whom measures did not differ (P>0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (P<0.05) with HF. In conclusion, ExFHA women demonstrate augmented vagal yet unchanged sympathetic HR modulation, both at rest and during orthostatic stress. Although the role of oestrogen deficiency is unclear, these findings are in contrast with studies reporting decreased HRV in hypoestrogenic post-menopausal women.

  2. Effects of low-intensity exercise conditioning on blood pressure, heart rate, and autonomic modulation of heart rate in men and women with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lien P T; Brown, C Ann; Hains, Sylvia J M; Godwin, Marshall; Parlow, Joel L

    2009-10-01

    Untreated hypertension increases cardiovascular risk 2-fold to 3-fold, leading to serious cardiovascular problems that include left ventricular hypertrophy, stroke, ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, vascular disease, renal disease, and death. Exercise conditioning is recommended as one of the initial treatments for hypertension. The purpose of this pretest-posttest study was to quantify the effects of a 12-week home-based low-intensity exercise conditioning (walking) program in hypertensive men and women on systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and autonomic modulation of heart rate. A total of 20 mildly hypertensive men and women who were assigned to a structured exercise (walking) program were compared with a control group of 20 nonexercising mildly hypertensive participants. Electrocardiographic heart rate and R-R interval data and beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure data were collected continuously for 10 min with participants in the supine and standing postures and during low-intensity steady-state exercise. The results show that systolic and diastolic blood pressure and R-R interval decreased and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity increased in the exercise group. The decline in blood pressure was significant statistically and clinically. The increase in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity indicates that the ability of the cardiovascular system to respond rapidly to changing stimuli improved after the 12-week walking protocol. The low-intensity exercise conditioning program achieved a training effect in this population.

  3. Gossypetin ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice liver--a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amitava; Manna, Krishnendu; Das, Dipesh Kr; Kesh, Swaraj Bandhu; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Ujjal; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Sikder, Kunal; Datta, Sanjukta; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Banerji, Asoke; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-10-01

    Radioprotective action of gossypetin (GTIN) against gamma (γ)-radiation-induced oxidative stress in liver was explored in the present article. Our main aim was to evaluate the protective efficacy of GTIN against radiation-induced alteration of liver in murine system. To evaluate the effect of GTIN, it was orally administered to mice at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight for three consecutive days prior to γ-radiation at a dose of 5 Gy. Radioprotective efficacy of GTIN were evaluated at physiological, cellular, and molecular level using biochemical analysis, comet assay, flow cytometry, histopathology, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting techniques. Ionizing radiation was responsible for augmentation of hepatic oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies showed that irradiation enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) level, which leads to hepatic inflammation. To investigate further, we found that radiation induced the activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK)-mediated apoptotic pathway and deactivation of the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated redox signaling pathway, whereas GTIN pretreatment ameliorated these radiation-mediated effects. This is the novel report where GTIN rationally validated the molecular mechanism in terms of the modulation of cellular signaling system' instead of ' This is the novel report where GTIN is rationally validated in molecular terms to establish it as promising radioprotective agents. This might be fruitful especially for nuclear workers and defense personnel assuming the possibility of radiation exposure.

  4. Oligomer formation in the radiation-induced polymerization of styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harayma, Hiroshi; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Silverman, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    Analyses of the oligomers formed in radiation-induced polymerization of purified styrene were performed. The principal dimeric products were cis- and trans-diphenyl-cyclobutane with a relatively small amount of 1-phenyltetralin; the trimeric products were the optical isomers of 1-phenyl-4-[1'-phenylethyl-(1')]-tetralin in gamma-ray and 60 MeV proton irradiation. Oligomer formation increased with increasing dose, but more gradually than the linear formation of high polymer with dose. The yield was 0.25-3.1 μmol/J at low doses and decreased to an asymptotic value of 0.15 at higher doses. It appears that oligomers act as chain transfer agents during the polymerization reaction which would account for the observed decrease in molecular weight of the high polymer with increase in dose. Although the thermal and radiation-induced polymerization of styrene have different initiation steps, the oligomers produced by both reactions are similar in composition.

  5. Faecal microbiota transplantation protects against radiation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; Xiao, Huiwen; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Lixin; Zhao, Shuyi; Luo, Dan; Zheng, Qisheng; Dong, Jiali; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Junling; Lu, Lu; Wang, Haichao; Fan, Saijun

    2017-04-01

    Severe radiation exposure may cause acute radiation syndrome, a possibly fatal condition requiring effective therapy. Gut microbiota can be manipulated to fight against many diseases. We explored whether intestinal microbe transplantation could alleviate radiation-induced toxicity. High-throughput sequencing showed that gastrointestinal bacterial community composition differed between male and female mice and was associated with susceptibility to radiation toxicity. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) increased the survival rate of irradiated animals, elevated peripheral white blood cell counts and improved gastrointestinal tract function and intestinal epithelial integrity in irradiated male and female mice. FMT preserved the intestinal bacterial composition and retained mRNA and long non-coding RNA expression profiles of host small intestines in a sex-specific fashion. Despite promoting angiogenesis, sex-matched FMT did not accelerate the proliferation of cancer cells in vivo FMT might serve as a therapeutic to mitigate radiation-induced toxicity and improve the prognosis of tumour patients after radiotherapy.

  6. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  7. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy α-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose α-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  8. Radioadaptive response for protection against radiation-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the characteristics of the radioadaptive response in mice, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations in ICR mice. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a priming dose of 2 cGy (667 muGy/min) on day 9.5 of gestation and to a challenging dose of 2 Gy (1.04 Gy/min) 4 h later and were killed on day 18.5 of gestation. The incidence of malformations and prenatal death and fetal body weights were studied. The incidence of external malformations was significantly lower (by approximately 10%) in the primed (2 cGy + 2 Gy) mice compared to the unprimed (2 Gy alone) mice. However, there were no differences in the incidence of prenatal death or the skeletal malformations or the body weights between primed and unprimed mice. These results suggest that primary conditioning with low doses of radiation suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis.

  9. Radiation induced viscous flow in amorphous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, S. G.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Averback, R. S.

    2003-03-01

    We investigate surface roughness and stress relaxation in amorphous thin films during ion beam irradiation by a combination of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. These experiments show, that smoothing occurs by a viscous mechanism. With computer simulations we investigate the model system CuTi, and find that radiation induced viscous flow is independent of the recoil energy between 100 and 15keV, when compared on the basis of defect production. Additionally we can identify a threshold recoil energy for flow of approximately 10eV. We show, that point defects can mediate the flow, by injection of interstitial and vacancy-like defects, which induce the same amount of flow as recoil events. The results are compared with the thermal spike model of radiation induced viscous flow.

  10. Dose and volume impact on radiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Luca; Salvi, Giovanna; Caiazza, Adolfo; Di Rienzo, Luigi; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Murino, Paola; Macchia, Gabriella

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia consists in the chronic dryness of the mouth caused by parotid gland irradiation. Parotid glands produce approximately 60% of saliva while the rest is secreted by submandibular and accessory salivary glands. Methods of measuring the salivary output are essentially represented by 99mTc-pertechnate scintigraphy or simpler albeit less accurate methods in stimulated or unstimulated saliva. There are subjective and objective criteria of classification and grading of the secretion of saliva. Radiation-induced xerostomia, namely the residual salivary gland function is evidently associated with the mean dose absorbed. The salivary output tends to decrease after the end of radiotherapy. The partial dose-volume is substantially correlated with the mean dose to the whole gland. As for ipsilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer, conformal RT or IMRT allow to spare the contralateral parotid gland without increasing the risk of contralateral nodal recurrences. The monitoring system of late toxicity used by the authors is presented.

  11. Radiation-induced transient darkening of optically transparent polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, S.W.; Builta, L.A.; Carlson, R.L.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Moir, D.C.

    1986-11-15

    Results are presented for the radiation-induced transient darkening of thin organic polymer films normally used as Cerenkov light emissions sources. The radiation source is a 27-MeV, 10-..mu..C, 200-ns electron beam generated by the PHERMEX accelerator. The typical dose for a single pulse is 5 Mrad. At this dose, the broadband time-resolved percent transmission above 520 nm was measured for four common polymers: polyimide (Kapton-H), polyethylene terephthalate (Mylar), cellulose acetate, and high-density polyethylene. Kapton was found to darken the most and polyethylene darkened the least. The recovery time to normal transmission for Kapton was found to be greater than 10--20 ..mu..s. The radiation-induced attenuation coefficient is shown to depend on electronic band energy separation. The results show that Kapton is not the material of choice for a Cerenkov light source.

  12. Prosthodontic management of radiation induced xerostomic patient using flexible dentures

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Varsha; V, Yuvraj; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2012-01-01

    Xerostomia causes discomfort for complete denture wearers as the tissues become dry and friable due to lack of lubricating properties of saliva. Common problems faced by such patients are glossitis, mucositis, angular chelitis, dysgeusia and difficulty in chewing and swallowing. This case report describes a new method in addressing such issues by using flexible complete denture construction in radiation induced xerostomic patient with minimal tissue damage during and after denture construction procedures. PMID:22605708

  13. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Helen B.; de Kretser, David M.; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. Experimental design C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Results Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Conclusions Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. PMID:28301516

  14. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Helen B; de Kretser, David M; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer.

  15. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  16. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties.

  17. Thermodynamic models of radiation-induced processes in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Eremin, E. N.; Kasymov, S. S.; Laurinas, V. CH; Chernyavskii, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is proposed to qualitatively describe the radiation-induced processes in solids: temperature dependence of the X-ray radio luminescence output, dependence of these processes on the excitation density, energy accumulating in a solid under exposure to ionizing radiation and its temperature dependence. The proposed model and the formula derived can be used to develop radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive materials.

  18. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  19. Dynamics of radiation-induced amorphization in intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R. ); Devanathan, R. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Meshii, M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    Recent progress in molecular-dynamics simulations of radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in intermetallic compounds and the relationship between amorphization and melting are discussed. By focusing on the mean-square static displacement, which provides a generic measure of energy stored in the lattice in the forms of chemical and topological disorder, a unified description of solid-state amorphization as a disorder-induced, isothermal melting process can be developed within the framework of a generalized Lindemann criterion.

  20. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  1. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  2. Heart rate recovery and parasympathetic modulation in boys and girls following maximal and submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, J P; Overstreet, M; Mahon, A D

    2015-10-01

    This study examined heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) following submaximal and maximal exercise in boys (n = 13; 10.1 ± 0.8 years) and girls (n = 12; 10.1 ± 0.7 years). Participants completed 10 min of supine rest followed by a graded exercise test to maximal effort. On a separate day, participants performed submaximal exercise at ventilatory threshold. Immediately following both exercise bouts, 1-min HRR was assessed in the supine position. HRV variables were analyzed under controlled breathing in the time and frequency domains over the final 5 min of rest and recovery. There were no significant differences in HRR following maximal and submaximal exercise between boys (58 ± 8 and 59 ± 8 beats min(-1), respectively) and girls (54 ± 6 and 52 ± 19 beats min(-1), respectively). There also were no significant interactions between groups from rest to recovery from maximal exercise for any HRV variables. However, there was a difference in the response between sexes from rest to recovery from submaximal exercise for log transformed standard deviation of NN intervals (lnSDNN) and log transformed total power (lnTP). No differences were observed for lnSDNN at rest (boys = 4.61 ± 0.28 vs. girls = 4.28 ± 0.52 ms) or during recovery (lnSDNN: boys 3.78 ± 0.46 vs. girls 3.87 ± 0.64 ms and lnTP: boys 7.33 ± 1.09 vs. girls; 7.44 ± 1.24 ms(2)). Post hoc pairwise comparisons showed a significant difference between boys and girls for lnTP at rest (boys = 9.14 ± 0.42 vs. girls = 8.30 ± 1.05 ms(2)). Parasympathetic modulation was similar between boys and girls at rest and during recovery from exercise, which could explain similarities observed in HRR.

  3. Prostaglandin modulation of venoconstriction to physiological stress in normals and heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Dzeka, T Nancy; Arnold, J Malcolm O

    2003-03-01

    Prostaglandins released from blood vessels modulate vascular tone, and inhibition of their production during exogenous infusions of catecholamines causes increased venoconstriction. To determine the influence of prostaglandin production on venoconstriction during physiological stimuli known to cause sympathetic activation, and to assess its importance in chronic heart failure (CHF), we studied 11 normal subjects (62 +/- 4 yr) and 14 patients with CHF (64 +/- 2 yr, left ventricular ejection fraction 23 +/- 1%, New York Heart Association classes II and III) (means +/- SE). Dorsal hand vein distension was measured during mental arithmetic (MA), cold pressor test (CPT), and lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10 and -40 mmHg), with saline infusion in one hand and local indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) infusion (3 microg/min) in the other. Acetylcholine (0.01-1 nmol/min) dilated veins preconstricted with PGF(2alpha) in normals but, consistent with endothelial dysfunction, barely did so in CHF patients (P = 0.001). Nonendothelial venodilation to sodium nitroprusside (0.3-10 nmol/min) was not different between normals and CHF patients. Resting venous norepinephrine levels were higher in CHF patients (2,812 +/- 420 pmol/l) than normals (1,418 +/- 145 pmol/l, P = 0.007). In normals, indomethacin caused increased venoconstriction to MA (from 4.9 +/- 1.5 to 19.2 +/- 4.5%, P = 0.022) and CPT (from 2.9 +/- 3.8 to 17.6 +/- 4.2%, P = 0.007). In CHF, indomethacin caused increased venoconstriction to MA (from 6.6 +/- 3.9% to 19.0 +/- 4.5%, P = 0.014), CPT (from 9.6 +/- 2.1% to 20.1 +/- 3.7%, P = 0.001), and -40 mmHg LBNP (from 10.7 +/- 3.0% to 23.2 +/- 3.8%, P = 0.041). Control responses for all tests were not different between normals and CHF patients. The effects of indomethacin on venoconstriction to MA and CPT were not different between normals and CHF patients, but venoconstriction to -40 mmHg LBNP was accentuated in CHF patients (P = 0.036). Inhibition of

  4. Radiation-induced failures and degradation of wireless real-time dosimeter under high-dose-rate irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Kuroki, K.; Akiba, N.; Kurosawa, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Nishiyama, J.; Harano, H.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-induced malfunction and degradation of electronic modules in certain operating conditions are described in this report. The cumulative radiation effects on Atmel AVR microcontrollers, and 2.4 GHz and 303 MHz wireless network devices were evaluated under gamma ray irradiation with dose rates of 100, 10 and 3 Gy/h. The radiation-induced malfunctions occurred at doses of 510+/-22 Gy for AVR microcontrollers, and 484+/-111 and 429+/-14 Gy for 2.4 GHz and 303 MHz wireless network devices, respectively, under a 100 Gy/h equivalent dose rate. The degradation of microcontrollers occurred for total ionizing doses between 400 and 600 Gy under X-ray irradiation. In addition, we evaluated the reliability of neutron dosimeters using a standard neutron field. One of the neutron dosimeters gave a reading that was half of the standard field value.

  5. Resting heart rate and risk of sudden cardiac death in the general population: influence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart rate-modulating drugs.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Carmen; Reinier, Kyndaron; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S

    2013-08-01

    Higher levels of resting heart rate (HR) have been associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) but mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and HR-modulating drugs explain the HR-SCD relationship. To evaluate the relationship between HR, severe LVSD, HR-modulating drugs, and SCD in the community by using a case-control approach. From the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study, SCD cases (n = 378) aged ≥35 years and with electrocardiogram-documented resting HR were compared to 378 age- and gender-matched control subjects with coronary artery disease (mean age 68 ± 13 years; 69% man). Associations with SCD were assessed by using multivariable logistic regression. Mean resting HR was significantly higher among SCD cases compared to controls (7.5 beats/min difference; P < .0001). HR was a significant determinant of SCD after adjustment for significant comorbidities and medications (odds ratio for 10 beats/min increase 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.14-1.38; P < .0001). After considering LVSD, resting HR was slightly attenuated but remained significantly associated with SCD (P = .005). In addition to diabetes and digoxin as well as pulmonary and renal disease, LVSD was also independently associated with SCD (odds ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.11-2.87; P = .02). Contrary to expectations, the significant relationship between increased resting HR and SCD persisted even after adjustment for LVSD and HR-modulating drugs. These findings suggest a potential role for additional novel interventions/therapies that modulate autonomic tone. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling radiation induced segregation in Iron-Chromium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Senninger, Oriane; Soisson, Frederic; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Nastar, Maylise; Fu, Chu-Chun; Brechet, Yves

    2015-10-16

    Radiation induced segregation in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys is studied by Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that include di usion of chemical species by vacancy and interstitial migration, recombination, and elimination at sinks. The parameters of the di usion model are tted to DFT calculations. Transport coe cients that control the coupling between di usion of defects and chemical species are measured in dilute and concentrated alloys. Radiation induced segregation near grain boundaries is directly simulated with this model. We nd that the di usion of vacancies toward sinks leads to a Cr depletion. Meanwhile, the di usion of self-interstitials causes an enrichment of Cr in the vicinity of sinks. For concentrations lower than 15%Cr, we predict that sinks will be enriched with Cr for temperatures lower than a threshold. When the temperature is above this threshold value, the sinks will be depleted in Cr. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and models. Cases of radiation induced precipitation and radiation accelerated precipitation are considered.

  7. Modeling radiation induced segregation in Iron-Chromium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Senninger, Oriane; Soisson, Frederic; Martinez Saez, Enrique; ...

    2015-10-16

    Radiation induced segregation in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys is studied by Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that include di usion of chemical species by vacancy and interstitial migration, recombination, and elimination at sinks. The parameters of the di usion model are tted to DFT calculations. Transport coe cients that control the coupling between di usion of defects and chemical species are measured in dilute and concentrated alloys. Radiation induced segregation near grain boundaries is directly simulated with this model. We nd that the di usion of vacancies toward sinks leads to a Cr depletion. Meanwhile, the di usion of self-interstitials causesmore » an enrichment of Cr in the vicinity of sinks. For concentrations lower than 15%Cr, we predict that sinks will be enriched with Cr for temperatures lower than a threshold. When the temperature is above this threshold value, the sinks will be depleted in Cr. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and models. Cases of radiation induced precipitation and radiation accelerated precipitation are considered.« less

  8. Radiation-induced cataract in astronauts and cosmonauts.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Noushin; Eckart, Peter; Mertz, Manfred

    2002-07-01

    Opacification of the ocular lens is an important effect of exposure to ionizing radiation. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to relatively high doses of all types of radiation in space, including high-energy particle radiation. A study was initiated to examine the lenses of the eyes of astronauts/cosmonauts to detect signs of radiation-induced cataracts. The aim of this study was to take a first step towards gaining improved, quantitative insight into the risk of radiation-induced cataract associated with long space missions. The lenses of 21 former astronauts and cosmonauts were examined, using an upgraded Topcon SL-45 B Scheimpflug camera system. The degrees of opacification in this group of astronauts and cosmonauts were compared with the measurements in a reference group. This reference group was established by examining a cohort of 395 persons using the same Scheimpflug system. Initial results indicated that opacity values in most of the astronauts and cosmonauts were slightly to strongly increased in regions IV (posterior cortex) and V (posterior capsule), compared with the average opacity values for the respective age-group of the reference cohort. The aim of this study - to conduct first examinations of astronauts' and cosmonauts' ocular lenses with regard to signs of radiation-induced cataract - was successfully achieved in a total of 21 astronauts and cosmonauts using a Scheimpflug camera system. It is planned to examine a larger group of astronauts and cosmonauts in the future.

  9. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis.

  10. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  11. Radiation-induced grain boundary segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Vetrano, J.S.; Simonen, E.P.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to grain boundaries in Fe-Ni-Cr-Si stainless alloys has been measured as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. Heavy-ion irradiation was used to produce damage levels from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures from 175 to 550{degrees}C. Measured Fe, Ni, and Cr segregation increased sharply with irradiation dose (from G to 5 dpa) and temperature (from 175 to about 350{degrees}C). However, grain boundary concentrations did not change significantly as dose or temperatures were further increased. Although interfacial compositions were similar, the width of radiation-induced enrichment or depletion profiles increased consistently with increasing dose or temperature. Impurity segregation (Si and P) was also measured, but only Si enrichment appeared to be radiation-induced. Grain boundary Si peaked at levels approaching 10 at% after irradiation doses to 10 dpa at an intermediate temperature of 325{degrees}C. No evidence of grain boundary silicide precipitation was detected after irradiation at any temperature. Equilibrium segregation of P was measured in the high-P alloys, but interfacial concentration did not increase with irradiation exposure. Comparisons to reported RIS in neutron-irradiated stainless steels revealed similar grain boundary compositional changes for both major alloying and impurity elements.

  12. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-11

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2.

  13. Molecular hydrogen attenuates radiation-induced nucleobase damage to DNA in aerated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Gardette, Bernard; Cadet, Jean; Gharib, Bouchra; De Reggi, Max; Douki, Thierry; Triantaphylides, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of the present study is to gain mechanistic insights into the modulating effect of molecular hydrogen on the γ-radiation-induced alteration pathways of DNA nucleobases. Aerated aqueous solutions of calf thymus DNA were exposed to a (60)Co source at doses ranging from 0 to 55 Gy under normoxic conditions, in the presence or not of 0.7 MPa hydrogen or helium. The measurement of several modified bases was performed using HPLC associated with electrospray ionization tandem pass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Bleaching of aqueous solutions of p-nitrosodimethylaniline (p-NDA) solutions was also used to allow the quantification of hydroxyl radical (•OH) formation. pNDA bleaching was significantly reduced in the presence of hyperbaric hydrogen. This is undoubtedly due to (•)OH scavenging by H2 since, under the same conditions, He had no effect. Similarly, base alterations were significantly reduced in the presence of hydrogen, as compared to controls under normal atmosphere or in the presence of helium. The relative proportions of modified nucleobases were not changed, showing that the only effect of H2 is to scavenge (•)OH without exhibiting reducing properties. Our findings demonstrate that H2 exerts a significant protection against radiation-induced DNA base damage in aqueous solutions, (•)OH scavenging being the only mechanism involved.

  14. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2. PMID:27165942

  15. Gene-modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect Against Radiation-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianxin; Li, Xin; Lu, You; Gan, Lu; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Yongsheng; Lan, Jie; Liu, Shurui; Sun, Lan; Jia, Li; Mo, Xianming; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) presents a common and major obstacle in the radiotherapy of thoracic cancers. The aim of this study was to examine whether RILI could be alleviated by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing soluble transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type II receptor via an adenovirus (Ad-sTβR). Here, we systemically administered male MSCs into female mice challenged with thoracic irradiation. The data showed that either MSCs or Ad-sTβR transduced MSCs (Ad-sTβR-MSCs) specifically migrated into radiation-injured lung. Ad-sTβR-MSCs obviously alleviated lung injury, as reflected by survival and histopathology data, as well as the assays of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyproline, plasma cytokines, and the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Furthermore, MSCs and Ad-sTβR-MSCs could adopt the characteristics of alveolar type II (ATII) cells. However, the MSCs levels in the lungs were relatively low to account for the noted therapeutic effects, suggesting the presence of other mechanisms. In vivo, MSCs-conditioned medium (MSCs CM) significantly attenuated RILI. In vitro, MSCs CM protected ATII cells against radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage, and modulated the inflammatory response, indicating the beneficial effects of MSCs are largely due to its paracrine activity. Our results provide a novel insight for RILI therapy that currently lack efficient treatments. PMID:23299797

  16. Pediatric Cranio-spinal Axis Irradiation: Comparison of Radiation-induced Secondary Malignancy Estimations Based on Three Methods of Analysis for Three Different Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Myers, P A; Mavroidis, P; Komisopoulos, G; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric cranio-spinal axis irradiation (CSI) is a valuable treatment for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases, but due to the life expectancies and quality of life expectations for children, the minimization of the risk for radiation-induced secondary malignancies must be a high priority. This study compared the estimated CSI-induced secondary malignancy risks of three radiation therapy modalities using three different models. Twenty-four (n = 24) pediatric patients previously treated with CSI for tumors of the CNS were planned using three different treatment modalities: three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and Tomotherapy. Each plan was designed to deliver 23.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the target which was defined as the entire brain and spinal column with a 0.7 cm expansion. The mean doses as well as the dose volume histograms (DVH) of specific organs were analyzed for secondary malignancy risk according to three different methods: the effective dose equivalent (EDE), the excess relative risk (ERR), and the linear quadratic (LQ) models. Using the EDE model, the average secondary risk was highest for the 3D-CRT plans (37.60%), compared to VMAT (28.05%) and Tomotherapy (27.90%). The ERR model showed similarly that the 3D-CRT plans had considerably higher risk (10.84%) than VMAT and Tomotherapy, which showed almost equal risks (7.05 and 7.07%, respectively). The LQ model requires organ-specific cell survival parameters, which for the lungs, heart, and breast relevant values were found and applied. The lung risk for secondary malignancy was found to be 1.00, 1.96, and 2.07% for 3D-CRT, VMAT, and Tomotherapy, respectively. The secondary cancer risk for breast was estimated to be 0.09, 0.21, and 0.27% and for heart it was 9.75, 6.02 and 6.29% for 3D-CRT, VMAT, and Tomotherapy, respectively. Based on three methods of secondary malignancy estimation, the 3D-CRT plans produced highest radiation-induced

  17. Dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells of mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Urata, Yoshishige; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells (CDCs), a mixed cell population grown from heart tissues. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 250 mGy γ-rays for 7 days and atrial tissues were collected for experiments 24 hours after last exposure. The number of CDCs was significantly decreased by daily exposure to over 250 mGy. Interestingly, daily exposure to over 50 mGy significantly decreased the c-kit expression and telomerase activity, increased 53BP1 foci in the nuclei of CDCs. However, CD90 expression and growth factors production in CDCs were not significantly changed even after daily exposure to 250 mGy. We further evaluated the reversibility of radiation-induced injury in CDCs at 1 week and 3 weeks after a single exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays. The number and growth factors production of CDCs were soon recovered at 1 week. However, the increased expression of CD90 were retained at 1 week, but recovered at 3 weeks. Moreover, the decreased expression of c-kit, impaired telomerase activity, and increased 53BP1 foci were poorly recovered even at 3 weeks. These data may help us to find the most sensitive and reliable bio-parameter(s) for evaluating radiation-induced injury in CDCs. PMID:28098222

  18. PPARδ prevents radiation-induced proinflammatory responses in microglia via transrepression of NF-κB and inhibition of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Caroline I; Kooshki, Mitra; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Sui, Guangchao; Robbins, Mike E

    2012-05-01

    Partial or whole-brain irradiation is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year in the United States. Although the exact mechanisms underlying radiation-induced late effects remain unclear, oxidative stress and inflammation are thought to play a critical role. Microglia are key mediators of neuroinflammation. Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ has been shown to be a potent regulator of anti-inflammatory responses. Thus, we hypothesized that PPARδ activation would modulate the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the PPARδ agonist L-165041 prevented the radiation-induced increase in: (i) intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, (ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and (iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occurred, in part, through PPARδ-mediated modulation of stress-activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARδ inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARδ activation can modulate radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in microglia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. G protein-mediated FMRFamidergic modulation of calcium influx in dissociated heart muscle cells from squid, Loligo forbesii

    PubMed Central

    Chrachri, Abdesslam; Ödblom, Maria; Williamson, Roddy

    2000-01-01

    The actions of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) on the L-type (ICa,L) and T-type (ICa,T) calcium currents were investigated in muscle cells dissociated from the heart of squid, Loligo forbseii. The heart muscle cells could be divided into type I and type II cells, on the basis of morphological differences in the dissociated myocytes. FMRFamide induced a substantial block of the L-type calcium current seen in type I cells; this inhibition was rapid, reversible and dose dependent (IC50 = 0.1 μm). FMRFamide induced an increase in the amplitude of the L-type calcium current in the type II heart muscle cells, but had no effect on the T-type calcium current in either type of dissociated heart muscle cell, even at concentrations much higher than those found to affect the L-type calcium current. Internal dialysis of isolated type I heart muscle cells with guanosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS, 100 μm), a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, mimicked the FMRFamide inhibition of the Ca2+ current and occluded any further FMRFamide-induced inhibition. Internal dialysis of these cells with guanosine 5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS, 100 μm) reduced the FMRFamide-induced inhibition of the peak Ca2+ current. The inhibitory effects of FMRFamide were abolished by pre-incubation of the cells with pertussis toxin (200 ng ml−1). The activation kinetics of ICa,L were not affected by FMRFamide application, nor by internal perfusion with GTPγS, and the FMRFamide-induced reduction in ICa,L was not relieved by large depolarising prepulses. These data indicate that FMRFamide can modulate ICa,L, but not ICa,T, in squid heart muscle cells, and that the underlying G protein pathway is dissimilar to that commonly associated with transmitter modulation of channel activity. The FMRFamide-modulated increase in ICa,L seen in the type II heart muscle cells was not mediated by a PTX-sensitive G protein pathway. PMID:10835048

  20. Associations of Heart Rate With Inflammatory Markers Are Modulated by Gender and Obesity in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bandinelli, Stefania; Gemma, Antonella; Ferrucci, Luigi; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2015-01-01

    Background. Faster resting heart rate (HR), which is associated with inflammation and elevated cortisol levels, is a risk factor for excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, inflammation, and elevated cortisol levels. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of Body Mass Index (BMI) with inflammation and cortisol in modulating HR in older subjects. Methods. We analyzed data of 895 participants aged 65+ enrolled in the “InCHIANTI” study, in sinus rhythm, and not taking beta blockers or digoxin. Linear regression was performed to assess the adjusted association between HR, IL-6, and cortisol levels. The model was also analyzed stratifying for BMI tertiles. Logistic regression was adopted for evaluating the association of HR exceeding the mean value with Il-6 and serum cortisol. Results. According to multivariable linear regression, IL-6 and cortisol levels were associated with HR (B = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.43–2.42; p = .005 and B = .34, 95% CI = 0.17–.51; p < .0001, respectively). The association was significant only among women in the highest BMI tertile (B = 4.16, 95% CI = 1.40–6.91; p = .003 for IL-6 and B = .57, 95% CI = 0.14–1.01; p = .010 for cortisol). Logistic regression confirmed that IL-6 and cortisol levels were associated with HR above the mean value in the highest BMI tertile (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.15–3.97; p = .009 and OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03–1.25; p = .009, respectively). Conclusions. Faster HR is associated with proinflammatory state in elderly patients; this association seems to be limited to women with higher BMI. PMID:25429009

  1. Associations of Heart Rate With Inflammatory Markers Are Modulated by Gender and Obesity in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Laudisio, Alice; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gemma, Antonella; Ferrucci, Luigi; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2015-07-01

    Faster resting heart rate (HR), which is associated with inflammation and elevated cortisol levels, is a risk factor for excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, inflammation, and elevated cortisol levels. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of Body Mass Index (BMI) with inflammation and cortisol in modulating HR in older subjects. We analyzed data of 895 participants aged 65+ enrolled in the "InCHIANTI" study, in sinus rhythm, and not taking beta blockers or digoxin. Linear regression was performed to assess the adjusted association between HR, IL-6, and cortisol levels. The model was also analyzed stratifying for BMI tertiles. Logistic regression was adopted for evaluating the association of HR exceeding the mean value with Il-6 and serum cortisol. According to multivariable linear regression, IL-6 and cortisol levels were associated with HR (B = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.43-2.42; p = .005 and B = .34, 95% CI = 0.17-.51; p < .0001, respectively). The association was significant only among women in the highest BMI tertile (B = 4.16, 95% CI = 1.40-6.91; p = .003 for IL-6 and B = .57, 95% CI = 0.14-1.01; p = .010 for cortisol). Logistic regression confirmed that IL-6 and cortisol levels were associated with HR above the mean value in the highest BMI tertile (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.15-3.97; p = .009 and OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03-1.25; p = .009, respectively). Faster HR is associated with proinflammatory state in elderly patients; this association seems to be limited to women with higher BMI. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Speed Modulation of the Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart to Simulate a Physiologic Arterial Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Shiose, Akira; Nowak, Kathleen; Horvath, David J.; Massiello, Alex L.; Golding, Leonard A.R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrated the concept of using speed modulation in a continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) to shape arterial pressure waveforms and to adjust pressure pulsatility. A programmable function generator was used to determine the optimum pulsatile speed profile. Three speed profiles (sinusoidal, rectangular, and optimized [a profile optimized for generation of a physiologic arterial pressure waveform]) were evaluated using the CFTAH mock circulatory loop. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at average pump speeds of 2,700 rpm and a modulation cycle of 60 beats per minute. The effects of varying physiologically relevant vascular resistance and lumped compliance on the hemodynamics were assessed. The feasibility of using speed modulation to manipulate systemic arterial pressure waveforms, including a physiologic pressure waveform, was demonstrated in vitro. The additional pump power consumption needed to generate a physiologic pulsatile pressure was 16.2% of the power consumption in nonpulsatile continuous-flow mode. The induced pressure waveforms and pulse pressure were shown to be very responsive to changes in both systemic vascular resistance and arterial compliance. This system also allowed pulsatile pulmonary arterial waveform. Speed modulation in the continuous-flow total artificial heart could enable physicians to obtain desired pressure waveforms by simple manual adjustment of speed control input waveforms. PMID:20616704

  3. Assessment of cardiac autonomic modulation during graded head-up tilt by symbolic analysis of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alberto; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Guzzetti, Stefano; Furlan, Raffaello; Montano, Nicola; Gnecchi-Ruscone, Tomaso

    2007-07-01

    Two symbolic indexes, the percentage of sequences characterized by three heart periods with no significant variations (0V%) and that with two significant unlike variations (2UV%), have been found to reflect changes in sympathetic and vagal modulations, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that symbolic indexes may track the gradual shift of the cardiac autonomic modulation during an incremental head-up tilt test. Symbolic analysis was carried out over heart period variability series (250 cardiac beats) derived from ECG recordings during a graded head-up tilt test (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees ) in 17 healthy subjects. The percentage of subjects showing a significant linear correlation (Spearman rank-order correlation) with tilt angles was utilized to evaluate the performance of symbolic analysis. Spectral analysis was carried out for comparison over the same series. 0V% progressively increased with tilt angles, whereas 2UV% gradually decreased. The decline of 2UV% was greater than the increase of 0V% at low tilt angles. Linear correlation with tilt angles was exhibited in a greater percentage of subjects for 0V% and 2UV% than for any spectral index. Our findings suggest that symbolic analysis performed better than spectral analysis and, thus, is a suitable methodology for assessment of the subtle changes of cardiac autonomic modulation induced by a graded head-up tilt test. Moreover, symbolic analysis indicates that the changes of cardiac sympathetic and vagal modulations observed during this protocol were reciprocal but characterized by different absolute magnitudes.

  4. The use of heart rate variability measures as indicators of autonomic nervous modulation must be careful in patients after orthotopic heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wan-An; Chen, Gau-Yang; Shih, Chun-Che; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-10-01

    The precise relation between heart rate variability (HRV) and autonomic re-innervation has not been established explicitly in patients after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), but can be inferred from the fact that the HRV is reduced immediately after OHT and may increase gradually with time. The aim of this study was to investigate the residual HRV in patients about 1-2 years after OHT, as compared with patients after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Thirteen patients who had received OHT and 14 patients who had received CABG surgery were recruited. HRV analysis was performed and the HRV measures in supine position were compared between these two groups of patients. We found that the mean (mRRI), standard deviation and coefficient of variation of RR intervals, total power, very low frequency power (VLFP), low frequency power, high frequency power (HFP), normalized VLFP (nVLFP) and low-/high-frequency power ratio in the OHT group were all significantly decreased, while the heart rate (HR) and normalized HFP (nHFP) were significantly increased, as compared with the CABG group. The decrease in HRV was more severe in the VLFP region. A smaller nVLFP and a greater nHFP were associated with a smaller mRRI and a larger HR in the OHT patients. The slope of the power law relation of HRV became positive in OHT patients, instead of negative in CABG patients. We conclude that patients after OHT have residual HRV which were characterized by severely depressed time and frequency domain HRV, increased HR and nHFP, decreased nVLFP, and positive slope of the power-law relation of HRV. The use of nHFP as the indicator of vagal modulation and the use of nVLFP as the indicator of renin-angiotensin modulation, thermoregulation and vagal withdrawal must be careful in the OHT patients.

  5. Strong modulation of ectopic focus as a mechanism of repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy with heart rate doubling.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Kan; Nakahara, Shiro; Toratani, Noritaka; Chida, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Sayuki; Sakai, Yoshihiko; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-10-01

    Repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy (RIVB) can introduce a doubling of the ventricular rate. To clarify the mechanism of RIVB, we hypothesized that it was introduced by a strong modulation of the ventricular automatic focus. RIVB, defined as more than 7 bigeminy events, was detected by instantaneous heart rate and bigeminy interval (BI) tachograms in 1450 successive patients with frequent ventricular premature contractions (≥3000 per day). Postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves were plotted to determine the degree of modulation. Mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curves were plotted for selection. RIVB was simulated by using a computer-based parasystole model. RIVB was observed in 7 patients (age 60 ± 16 years; 2 men and 5 women) with a heart rate of 58.2 ± 6.5 beats/min during a rest period both during the day and at night. The tachograms disclosed the onset of the RIVB with a doubled ventricular rate to 112.3 ± 8.5 beats/min. On the postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves, compensatory bigeminy and interpolated bigeminy constituted overlapping regression lines with slopes close to 1.00 and RIVB was located in the lower left portion. RIVB lasting for up to 3 hours was quickly detected by mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curve. The PQ interval immediately after RIVB was prolonged in comparison with baseline (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.21 ± 0.02 seconds; P < .001). The simulation was able to reproduce RIVB faithfully at a slow heart rate. Our findings support the hypothesis that RIVB was introduced by strongly modulated ventricular pacemaker accelerated by an intervening normal QRS. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of dysfunctional modules and disease genes in congenital heart disease by a network-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is continuously increasing among infants born alive nowadays, making it one of the leading causes of infant morbidity worldwide. Various studies suggest that both genetic and environmental factors lead to CHD, and therefore identifying its candidate genes and disease-markers has been one of the central topics in CHD research. By using the high-throughput genomic data of CHD which are available recently, network-based methods provide powerful alternatives of systematic analysis of complex diseases and identification of dysfunctional modules and candidate disease genes. Results In this paper, by modeling the information flow from source disease genes to targets of differentially expressed genes via a context-specific protein-protein interaction network, we extracted dysfunctional modules which were then validated by various types of measurements and independent datasets. Network topology analysis of these modules revealed major and auxiliary pathways and cellular processes in CHD, demonstrating the biological usefulness of the identified modules. We also prioritized a list of candidate CHD genes from these modules using a guilt-by-association approach, which are well supported by various kinds of literature and experimental evidence. Conclusions We provided a network-based analysis to detect dysfunctional modules and disease genes of CHD by modeling the information transmission from source disease genes to targets of differentially expressed genes. Our method resulted in 12 modules from the constructed CHD subnetwork. We further identified and prioritized candidate disease genes of CHD from these dysfunctional modules. In conclusion, module analysis not only revealed several important findings with regard to the underlying molecular mechanisms of CHD, but also suggested the distinct network properties of causal disease genes which lead to identification of candidate CHD genes. PMID:22136190

  7. Analysis of autonomic modulation of heart rate in patients with Parkinson's disease and elderly individuals submitted to game therapy training.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rodrigo Santiago Barbosa; De Oliveira Rocha, Larissa Salgado; Pena, Elza Sara Maués; Caldas, Laiz Cristinna Ponce; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2017-08-23

    Elderly patients and individuals with Parkinson's disease have a reduction in autonomic heart rate modulation, which may influence the survival of these patients, and rehabilitation can minimize this event. We tested the hypothesis that rehabilitation protocol with game console would influence the cardiac autonomic modulation of patients with Parkinson's Disease. Eight-seven volunteers were divided into two groups, control (n = 45) and Parkinson's (n = 42), they completed the study 40 volunteers in the control group (CG) and 31 patients in the Parkinson group (PG), and subjected to 24 sessions of game therapy physiotherapy, thrice a week. Analysis of autonomic HR modulation was conducted before and after the rehabilitation program using a Polar RS800CX HR sensor. For the analysis of heart rate variability the data were transferred to the Kubios HRV 2.2 program. Statistical analysis was performed in the Biostat 5.2 program, the comparison of the data by ANOVA followed by Tukey test, and the general characteristics by the chi-square test. The critical value for rejecting the null hypothesis was set at P < 0.05. HR variability in patients with PD exhibited higher influence on the sympathetic nervous system before protocol implementation and, following the protocol, patients did not attain the normality values of the control group, exhibiting a discreet improvement and maintenance of autonomic modulation of HR values. Subjects with PD exhibit less autonomic modulation of HR and the rehabilitation protocol with game therapy improved autonomic modulation of HR. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Histamine H3-receptor stimulation is unable to modulate noradrenaline release by the isolated rat heart during ischaemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mazenot, C; Durand, A; Ribuot, C; Demenge, P; Godin-Ribuot, D

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of H3-histaminergic prejunctional receptors to modulate the noradrenaline release induced by myocardial ischaemia in the rat, and the effects of an eventual modulation on haemodynamic, biochemical and electrophysiological parameters. Isolated rat hearts were perfused according to the Langendorff technique. Control hearts (n = 13) were not treated; two groups were treated with the H3-agonist R-alpha-methyl-histamine at 0.3 microM (n = 14) and 1 microM (n = 11) and one group, used as positive control, was treated with the selective alpha 2-agonist Mivazerol at 0.5 microM (n = 14) added to the perfusion medium. Noradrenaline, lactate and transaminase output in the coronary effluent, as well as various haemodynamic and electrophysiological parameters, were measured during global and total ischaemia (30 min) and reperfusion (30 min). alpha 2-receptor stimulation increased ischaemia-induced noradrenaline release during reperfusion (195 +/- 13 vs. 145 +/- 12 pmol.g-1 in control group, P < 0.05). In contrast, R-alpha-methyl-histamine, at both doses, did not significantly modify these parameters. Both treatments did not affect ischaemia- and reperfusion-induced haemodynamic (decrease in heart rate or in left ventricular developed pressure), biochemical (lactate and GOT release) and electrophysiological (arrhythmias or increase in action potential duration) alterations. Unlike other species, the rat appears to be insensitive to H3-histaminergic receptor modulation of ischaemia-induced noradrenaline release, although a modulation can be seen with other prejunctional receptor agonists.

  9. Decreased autonomic modulation of heart rate and altered cardiac sympathovagal balance in patients with Cushing's syndrome: role of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dinu S; Ali, Naseer; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Jyotsna, Viveka P; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous literature suggested multiple possible links by which hypercortisolism may alter the autonomic control of cardiovascular functions. We investigated the impact of chronic endogenous hypercortisolism on the autonomic regulation of cardiac functions by short-term heart rate variability analysis. Eighteen patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome and 20 age-, gender- and BMI-matched controls participated in the study. ECG signal was acquired in lead II configuration for 5 min and heart rate variability assessment was made in both time and frequency domain using the extracted RR interval data. All time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patient group compared to the control group. The patient group had an altered sympathovagal balance with low frequency/high frequency band ratio significantly higher than the control group [1.857 (0.6747-2.610) vs. 0.8581 (0.4779-1.352); p = 0.0253]. A significant negative correlation was obtained between normalized high frequency power of heart rate variability and basal cortisol levels (r = -0.6594; p = 0.0029). Multiple linear regression analysis identified age, disease duration (in months), basal cortisol levels and systolic blood pressure as independent predictors of normalized high frequency power. Findings of the study clearly portrayed the diminished autonomic modulation of heart rate in endogenous Cushing's syndrome and its possible relationship with hypercortisolism as the main causative factor. Diminished heart rate variability may be an indicator of the increased risk of cardiac mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Inhibition of radiation-induced skin fibrosis with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn E; Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela; White, Ayla O; Mitchell, James B; Citrin, Deborah E

    2013-03-01

    Dermal fibrosis is a disabling late toxicity of radiotherapy. Several lines of evidence suggest that overactive signaling via the Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) and V-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (cAbl) may be etiologic factors in the development of radiation-induced fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that imatinib, a clinically available inhibitor of PDGFR-β, Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (c-kit) and cAbl, would reduce the severity of dermal fibrosis in a murine model. The right hind legs of female C3H/HeN mice were exposed to 35 Gy of X-rays. Cohorts of mice were maintained on chow formulated with imatinib 0.5 mg/g or control chow for the duration of the experiment. Bilateral hind limb extension was measured serially to assess fibrotic contracture. Immunohistochemistry and biochemical assays were used to evaluate the levels of collagen and cytokines implicated in radiation-induced fibrosis. Imatinib treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture and dermal thickness after irradiation. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a substantial reduction in PDGFR-β phosphorylation. We also observed reduced Transforming Growth factor-β (TGF-β) and collagen expression in irradiated skin of imatinib-treated mice, suggesting that imatinib may suppress the fibrotic process by interrupting cross-talk between these pathways. Taken together, these results support that imatinib may be a useful agent in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced dermal fibrosis.

  11. Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Prevents Radiation-Induced DNA Strand Breaks, Apoptosis and Gene Expression in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Krieger, Stephanie; Feiveson, Alan; Kovach, Annie Marie; Buerkle, Alexander; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Under Earth gravity conditions cellular damage can be counteracted by activation of the physiological defense mechanisms or through medical interventions. The mode of action of both, physiological response and medical interventions can be affected by microgravity leading to failure in repairing the damage. There are many studies reporting the effects of microgravity and/or radiation on cellular functions. However, little is known about the synergistic effects on cellular response to radiation when other endogenous cellular stress-response pathways are previously activated. Here, we investigated whether previous stimulation of the adrenergic receptor, which modulates immune response, affects radiation-induced apoptosis in immune cells under simulated microgravity conditions. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with isoproterenol (a sympathomimetic drug) and exposed to 0.8 or 2Gy gamma-radiation in simulated microgravity versus Earth gravity. Expression of genes involved in adrenergic receptor pathways, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as the number of apoptotic cells and DNA strand breaks were determined. Our results showed that, under simulated microgravity conditions, previous treatment with isoproterenol prevented radiation-induced i) gene down regulation, ii) DNA strand breaks formation and iii) apoptosis induction. Interestedly, we found a radiation-induced increase of adrenergic receptor gene expression, which was also abolished in simulated microgravity. Understanding the mechanisms of isoproterenol-mediated radioprotection in simulated microgravity can help to develop countermeasures for space-associated health risks as well as radio-sensitizers for cancer therapy.

  12. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Zhang, Tian-Xia; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mangoura, Safwat A.; Abdel-Raheem, Mahmoud H.; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2). Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages), but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages) 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair. PMID:27764217

  13. [Cardiac contractility modulation. A new form of therapy for patients with heart failure and narrow QRS complex?].

    PubMed

    Kleemann, T

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) is a stimulation therapy by an implantable impulse generator, which enhances ventricular contractile performance by delivering CCM impulses to the right ventricle during the absolute refractory period. The CCM signals mediate increased inotropy by prolonging the duration of the action potential, which leads to an enhanced influx of calcium into cardiomyocytes and a greater release of calcium by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The increase of cardiac contractility is not associated with increased oxygen consumption. Several small studies have shown that CCM therapy can safely improve symptoms of heart failure and peak oxygen consumption in patients with moderate to severe heart failure who are not eligible for resynchronization therapy. Therefore, CCM is a novel potential therapy for patients with heart failure, an ejection fraction ≤ 35 % and a normal QRS duration < 130 ms. However, apart from selecting appropriate patients for CCM therapy there are still unanswered questions, such as the impact of CCM therapy on established clinical endpoints. At present no data are available which have shown that CCM therapy leads to reduction of hospitalization for heart failure or mortality.

  14. Roselle Polyphenols Exert Potent Negative Inotropic Effects via Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Regulatory Channels in Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yi-Cheng; Budin, Siti Balkis; Othman, Faizah; Latip, Jalifah; Zainalabidin, Satirah

    2016-07-11

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.) calyces have demonstrated propitious cardioprotective effects in animal and clinical studies; however, little is known about its action on cardiac mechanical function. This study was undertaken to investigate direct action of roselle polyphenols (RP) on cardiac function in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. We utilized RP extract which consists of 12 flavonoids and seven phenolic acids (as shown by HPLC profiling) and has a safe concentration range between 125 and 500 μg/ml in this study. Direct perfusion of RP in concentration-dependent manner lowered systolic function of the heart as shown by lowered LVDP and dP/dt max, suggesting a negative inotropic effect. RP also reduced heart rate (negative chronotropic action) while simultaneously increasing maximal velocity of relaxation (positive lusitropic action). Conversely, RP perfusion increased coronary pressure, an indicator for improvement in coronary blood flow. Inotropic responses elicited by pharmacological agonists for L-type Ca(2+) channel [(±)-Bay K 8644], ryanodine receptor (4-chloro-m-cresol), β-adrenergic receptor (isoproterenol) and SERCA blocker (thapsigargin) were all abolished by RP. In conclusion, RP elicits negative inotropic, negative chronotropic and positive lusitropic responses by possibly modulating calcium entry, release and reuptake in the heart. Our findings have shown the potential use of RP as a therapeutic agent to treat conditions like arrhythmia.

  15. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  16. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schroeder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Dosch, H.; Honkimaeki, V.; Bilgram, J.

    2009-08-28

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0 deg. C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25 g/cm{sup 3}) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  17. A model of radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the rst and second generation introducing extra U(1) gauge symmetry, discrete Z 2 symmetry, vector-like fermions and exotic scalar elds. Then we analyze the allowed parameter regions which simultaneously satisfy the constraints of FCNCs for the quark sector and of LFVs including μ - e conversion, observed quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. In addition, the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model is presented. We also show extension of the model in which Majorana type neutrino masses are generated at the two loop level.

  18. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    kilogram ( C kg –1 ) rad [absorbed dose] 1 × 10 –2 joule per kilogram (J kg –1 ) [gray (Gy)] rem [equivalent and effective dose] 1 × 10–2 joule per...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-17-5 Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced...CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c . THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 00-10-2016 Final Oct 5, 2010 - Dec 31, 2015 Mechanisms of

  19. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  20. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  1. Skeletal Scintigraphy in Radiation-Induced Fibrosis With Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqi; Iranmanesh, Arya M; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Despite increasing reliance on CT, MRI, and FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging, whole-body skeletal scintigraphy remains a frontline modality for staging and surveillance of osseous metastatic disease. We present a 54-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who received palliative external-beam radiation to the left ilium. Serial follow-up Tc-MDP bone scans demonstrated progressive soft-tissue uptake in her left lower extremity, extending from thigh to leg, with associated enlargement and skin thickening, consistent with lymphedema related to radiation-induced fibrosis. Correlative abdominopelvic CT scans confirmed fibrotic changes in the left thigh.

  2. Exaggerated radiation-induced fibrosis in patients with systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, J.; Haustein, U.F.; Creech, R.H.; Dwyer, J.P.; Jimenez, S.A. )

    1991-06-26

    Four patients with stable systemic sclerosis and limited skin involvement received radiation for the treatment of solid malignant neoplasms. Following localized irradiation, each patient developed an exaggerated cutaneous and internal fibrotic reaction in the irradiated areas. The surface area of fibrosis extended beyond the radiation portals employed, and the fibrotic process was poorly responsive to antifibrotic therapy. Three of the patients died of complications caused by fibrous encasement of internal organs. The extent and severity of postradiation fibrosis in these patients was distinctly unusual. These observations suggest that patients with systemic sclerosis are particularly susceptible to developing excessive radiation-induced fibrosis.

  3. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schröder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Honkimäki, V.; Bilgram, J.; Dosch, H.

    2009-08-01

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0°C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25g/cm3) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  4. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in Radiation-induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zwaans, Bernadette M.M.; Nicolai, Heinz G.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Lamb, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    As diagnosis and treatment of cancer is improving, medical and social issues related to cancer survivorship are becoming more prevalent. Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), a rare but serious disease that may affect patients after pelvic radiation or systemic chemotherapy, has significant unmet medical needs. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are employed for HC. Effects of nonsurgical treatments for HC are of modest success and studies aiming to control radiation-induced bladder symptoms are lacking. In this review, we present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for HC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term urologic health issues. PMID:27601964

  6. Radiation-Induced Intraspinal Chondrosarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Obid, Peter; Vierbuchen, Mathias; Wolf, Eduard; Reichl, Michael; Niemeyer, Thomas; Übeyli, Hüseyin; Richter, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To report a unique case of an intraspinal chondrosarcoma that was diagnosed 18 years after radiotherapy for a cervical carcinoma and its remarkably unusual clinical presentation. Methods A retrospective case description of an intraspinal mass lesion that occurred 6 weeks after previous spinal surgery. Results Within ∼9 weeks, the tumor had infiltrated the peritoneal cavity and reached the lumbar subcutaneous tissue. Conclusion Radiation-induced sarcomas are rare, are highly aggressive, and may be difficult to diagnose. Furthermore, the only means of achieving long-term survival is through early and extensive surgery. PMID:26430606

  7. Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tato-Varela, Sara; Albalat-Fernández, Rosa; Pabón-Fernández, Sara; Núñez-García, Diego; Calle-Marcos, Manolo La

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcoma is a severe but rare late complication in the breast-preserving management of breast cancer through surgery and radiotherapy [1]. Often the initial diagnosis of this entity is complex given its relatively anodyne nature and usually being present in the form of typically multifocal reddish-purple papular skin lesions [2]. Because of the low incidence of this tumour, there is a limited number of studies regarding its optimal therapeutic management [3]. The preferred treatment is aggressive surgical removal and the prognosis is poor with an overall survival rate of 12–20% at five years [4]. PMID:28101140

  8. SOX9 modulates the expression of key transcription factors required for heart valve development.

    PubMed

    Garside, Victoria C; Cullum, Rebecca; Alder, Olivia; Lu, Daphne Y; Vander Werff, Ryan; Bilenky, Mikhail; Zhao, Yongjun; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Underhill, T Michael; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2015-12-15

    Heart valve formation initiates when endothelial cells of the heart transform into mesenchyme and populate the cardiac cushions. The transcription factor SOX9 is highly expressed in the cardiac cushion mesenchyme, and is essential for heart valve development. Loss of Sox9 in mouse cardiac cushion mesenchyme alters cell proliferation, embryonic survival, and valve formation. Despite this important role, little is known about how SOX9 regulates heart valve formation or its transcriptional targets. Therefore, we mapped putative SOX9 binding sites by ChIP-Seq in E12.5 heart valves, a stage at which the valve mesenchyme is actively proliferating and initiating differentiation. Embryonic heart valves have been shown to express a high number of genes that are associated with chondrogenesis, including several extracellular matrix proteins and transcription factors that regulate chondrogenesis. Therefore, we compared regions of putative SOX9 DNA binding between E12.5 heart valves and E12.5 limb buds. We identified context-dependent and context-independent SOX9-interacting regions throughout the genome. Analysis of context-independent SOX9 binding suggests an extensive role for SOX9 across tissues in regulating proliferation-associated genes including key components of the AP-1 complex. Integrative analysis of tissue-specific SOX9-interacting regions and gene expression profiles on Sox9-deficient heart valves demonstrated that SOX9 controls the expression of several transcription factors with previously identified roles in heart valve development, including Twist1, Sox4, Mecom and Pitx2. Together, our data identify SOX9-coordinated transcriptional hierarchies that control cell proliferation and differentiation during valve formation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Time and technology will tell: the pathophysiologic basis of neurohormonal modulation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Brent N; Street, Sarah E; Jensen, Brian C

    2014-10-01

    The central roles of neurohormonal abnormalities in the pathobiology of heart failure have been defined in recent decades. Experiments have revealed both systemic involvement and intricate subcellular regulation by circulating effectors of the sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and others. Randomized clinical trials substantiated these findings, establishing neurohormonal antagonists as cornerstones of heart failure pharmacotherapy, and occasionally offering further insight on mode of benefit. This review discusses the use of β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone receptor antagonists in the treatment of heart failure, with particular attention to the pathophysiologic basis and mechanisms of action.

  10. Radiation-induced transmissable chromosomal instability in haemopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Wright, E. G.

    Heritable radiation-induced genetic alterations have long been assumed to be ``fixed'' within the first cell division. However, there is a growing body of evidence that a considerable fraction of cells surviving radiation exposure appear normal, but a variety of mutational changes arise in their progeny due to a transmissible genomic instability. In our investigations of G-banded metaphases, non-clonal cytogenetic aberrations, predominantly chromatid-type aberrations, have been observed in the clonal descendants of murine and human haemopoietic stem cells surviving low doses (~1 track per cell) of alpha-particle irradiations. The data are consistent with a transmissible genetic instability induced in a stem cell resulting in a diversity of chromosomal aberrations in its clonal progeny many cell divisions later. Recent studies have demonstrated that the instability phenotype persists in vivo and that the expression of chromosomal instability has a strong dependence on the genetic characteristics of the irradiated cell. At the time when cytogenetic aberrations are detected, an increased incidence of hprt mutations and apoptotic cells have been observed in the clonal descendants of alpha-irradiated murine haemopoietic stem cells. Thus, delayed chromosomal abnormalities, delayed cell death by apoptosis and late-arising specific gene mutations may reflect diverse consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability. The relationship, if any, between these effects is not established. Current studies suggest that expression of these delayed heritable effects is determined by the type of radiation exposure, type of cell and a variety of genetic factors.

  11. Radiation-induced dural fibrosarcoma with unusually short latent period

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, N.R.; Aydin, F.; Leshner, R.T. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA )

    1993-05-01

    Although rare, the occurrence of radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms of various types is well known. Among these tumors, fibrosarcomas, especially in the region of seila turcica, seem to be the most common type. These tumors characteristically occur after a long latent period, usually several years, following radiation therapy. The authors now report a case of apparently radiation-induced fibrosarcoma with some unusual features in a 10-year-old boy who was treated with radiation for medulloblastoma. He received a total dose of 53.2 Gy radiation delivered at 1.8 per fraction with 6 MV acceleration using the standard craniospinal technique. An MRI at 15 months after the completion of radiotherapy showed a mass over the cerebral convexity, which increased two-fold in size within a period of 4 months. A well circumscribed tumor was removed from the fronto-parietal convexity. The tumor measured 5x4.5x1.5 cm and was attached to the dura with invasion of the overlying bone. Histologically, it displayed the characteristic features of a low-grade fibrosarcoma. The patient remains free of tumor 18 months after the surgery. This case emphasizes the potential risk for the development of a second neoplasm following therapeutic radiation and also documents, to the authors' knowledge, the shortest latent period reported so far between administration of radiotherapy and development of an intracranial tumor.

  12. Radiation-induced recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.L.; Anuras, S.

    1981-06-01

    The syndrome of intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a complex of signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction without evidence of mechanical obstruction of the intestinal lumen. A patient with radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction is described. The patient is a 74-year old woman with a history of chronic diarrhea, recurrent episodes of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since receiving a 13,000 rad radiation dose to the pelvis in 1954. She has been hospitalized on many occasions for symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal contrast roentgenograms with small bowel follow-through done during these episodes revealed multiple dilated loops of small bowel with no obstructing lesion. Barium enemas revealed no obstructing lesion. Each episode resolved with conservative therapy. Other secondary causes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction were ruled out in our patient. She gave no history of familial gastrointestinal disorders. Although postirradiation motility abnormalities have been demonstrated experimentally this is the first report of radiation induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  13. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  14. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  15. Genetic variation in radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Denis A; Brady, Lauren; Halasa, Krzysztof; Morley, Michael; Solomon, Sonia; Cheung, Vivian G

    2012-02-01

    Radiation exposure through environmental, medical, and occupational settings is increasingly common. While radiation has harmful effects, it has utility in many applications such as radiotherapy for cancer. To increase the efficacy of radiation treatment and minimize its risks, a better understanding of the individual differences in radiosensitivity and the molecular basis of radiation response is needed. Here, we integrated human genetic and functional genomic approaches to study the response of human cells to radiation. We measured radiation-induced changes in gene expression and cell death in B cells from normal individuals. We found extensive individual variation in gene expression and cellular responses. To understand the genetic basis of this variation, we mapped the DNA sequence variants that influence expression response to radiation. We also identified radiation-responsive genes that regulate cell death; silencing of these genes by small interfering RNA led to an increase in radiation-induced cell death in human B cells, colorectal and prostate cancer cells. Together these results uncovered DNA variants that contribute to radiosensitivity and identified genes that can be targeted to increase the sensitivity of tumors to radiation.

  16. Sensitivity to Radiation-Induced Cancer in Hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bull. Richard J.; Anderson, Larry E.

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this pilot project using HFE-knockout homozygotes and heterozygotes are to (1) determine whether the knock-out mice have greater sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer of the colon, liver and breast, (2) establish the dependence of this sensitivity on the accumulation of iron, (3) determine the extent to which cell replication and apoptosis occur in these target tissues with varying iron load, and (4) correlate the increases in sensitivity with changes in insulin-related signaling in tumors and normal tissue from each target organ. Three experimental designs will be used in the pilot project. The sequence of experiments is designed to first explore the influence of iron load on the response and demonstrate that HFE knockout mice are more sensitive than the wild type to radiation-induced cancer in one or more of three target tissues (liver, colon and breast). The dose response relationships with a broader set of radiation doses will be explored in the second experiment. The final experiment is designed to explore the extent to which heterozygotes display the increased susceptibility to cancer induction and to independently assess the importance of iron load to the initiation versus promotion of tumors.

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-09

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  18. Nature of radiation-induced defects in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bu; Yu, Yingtian; Bauchy, Mathieu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-07-14

    Although quartz (α-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage has not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si–O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si–O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on E′ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  19. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  20. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  1. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, T.; Allard, T.; Beaufort, D.; Cantin, J.-L.; von Bardeleben, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    High-purity illite specimens from the Mesoproterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits of Kiggavik, Thelon basin, Nunavut (Canada), and Shea Creek (Athabasca basin, Saskatchewan, Canada) have been studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the thermal stability of the main radiation-induced defects and question the potential of using illite as a natural dosimeter. The observed spectra are complex as they can show in the same region several contributions: (1) an unstable native defect, (2) the main stable defect named Ai by reference to a previous study (Morichon et al. in Phys Chem Minerals 35:339-346, 2008), (3) a signal at g = 2.063 assigned to a new defect, not yet fully characterized, named Ai2 center and (4) impurities such as vanadyl complex or divalent manganese. Isochronal heating shows that the new signal corresponds to a stable species. Isothermal heating experiments at 400 and 450 °C provide values of half-life extrapolated at room temperature and activation energy of 1.9-29,109 years and 1.3-1.4 eV, respectively, corresponding to the Ai center. These parameters allow the use of stable radiation-induced defects as a record of radioactivity down to the Paleoproterozoic period.

  2. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral cobalt 60 gamma radiation at 100 cGy min at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED 50 was calculated as 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms /kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n=4) or 401 (n=4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCi-injected-irradiated controls (n=8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.

  3. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.L.

    1988-06-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral /sup 60/Co gamma radiation at 100 cGy min-1 at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED50 was calculated at 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms/kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n = 4) or 401 (n = 4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCl-injected-irradiated controls (n = 8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.

  4. [Radiation-induced genomic instability: phenomenon, molecular mechanisms, pathogenetic significance].

    PubMed

    Mazurik, V K; Mikhaĭlov, V F

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the radiation-induced genome instability as a special state of progeny of cells irradiated in vitro as well as after a whole body exposure to ionizing radiation, that make these cells considerably different from normal, unirradiated cells, were considered. This state presents a number of cytogenetical, molecular-biological, cytological and biochemical manifestations untypical for normal cells. The state is controlled by the mechanisms of regulation of checkpoints of cell cycle, and apoptosis, that is under gene p53 control. The proof has been found that this state transfers from irradiated maternal cells to their surviving progeny by the epigenetical mechanisms and would exist until the cells restore the original state of response on the DNA damage. From the point of view of the genome instability conception, that considers the chromatine rearrangement as the adaptive-evolution mechanism of adaptation of the species to changeable environmental conditions, the radiation-induced genome instability may be considered as transition of irradiated progeny to the state of read these to adaptation changes with two alternative pathways. The first leads to adaptation to enviromental conditions and restoring of normal cell functions. The second presents the cell transition into the transformed state with remain genome instability and with increase of tumour growth probability.

  5. Radiation Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Kuefner, M A; Brand, M; Engert, C; Schwab, S A; Uder, M

    2015-10-01

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the prinicple of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations. Radiologic examinations including CT and angiography induce DNA double-strand breaks. Even after mammography a slight but significant increase is detectable in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The number of radiation induced double-strand breaks correlates well with the radiation dose. Individual factors including radiation sensitivity, DNA repair capacity and the application of iodinated contrast media has an influence on the DNA damage level. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Image guidance during breast radiotherapy: a phantom dosimetry and radiation-induced second cancer risk study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Holloway, L.; Metcalfe, P.

    2013-06-01

    Imaging procedures utilised for patient position verification during breast radiotherapy can add a considerable dose to organs surrounding the target volume on top of therapeutic scatter dose. This study investigated the dose from a breast kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), a breast megavoltage fan-beam CT (MV-FBCT), and a TomoDirectTM breast treatment. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed within a female anthropomorphic phantom were utilised to measure the dose to various organs and tissues. The contralateral breast, lungs and heart received 0.40 cGy, 0.45 cGy and 0.40 cGy from the kV-CBCT and 1.74 cGy, 1.39 cGy and 1.73 cGy from the MV-FBCT. In comparison to treatment alone, daily imaging would increase the contralateral breast, contralateral lung and heart dose by a relative 12%, 24% and 13% for the kV-CBCT, and 52%, 101% and 58% for the MV-FBCT. The impact of the imaging dose relative to the treatment dose was assessed with linear and linear-quadratic radiation-induced secondary cancer risk models for the contralateral breast. The additional imaging dose and risk estimates presented in this study should be taken into account when considering an image modality and frequency for patient position verification protocols in breast radiotherapy.

  7. Modulation of the Sympatho-Vagal Balance during Sleep: Frequency Domain Study of Heart Rate Variability and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Cerutti, Sergio; Viardot, Geoffrey; Werner, Sandra; Bianchi, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is a complex state characterized by important changes in the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular activity. Heart rate variability (HRV) greatly changes during different sleep stages, showing a predominant parasympathetic drive to the heart during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and an increased sympathetic activity during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Respiration undergoes important modifications as well, becoming deeper and more regular with deep sleep and shallower and more frequent during REM sleep. The aim of the present study is to assess both autonomic cardiac regulation and cardiopulmonary coupling variations during different sleep stages in healthy subjects, using spectral and cross-spectral analysis of the HRV and respiration signals. Polysomnographic sleep recordings were performed in 11 healthy women and the HRV signal and the respiration signal were obtained. The spectral and cross-spectral parameters of the HRV signal and of the respiration signal were computed at low frequency and at breathing frequency (high frequency, HF) during different sleep stages. Results attested a sympatho-vagal balance shift toward parasympathetic modulation during NREM sleep and toward sympathetic modulation during REM sleep. Spectral analysis of the HRV signal and of the respiration signal indicated a higher respiration regularity during deep sleep, and a higher parasympathetic drive was also confirmed by an increase in the coherence between the HRV and the respiration signal in the HF band during NREM sleep. Our findings about sleep stage-dependent variations in the HRV signal and in the respiratory activity are in line with previous evidences and confirm spectral analysis of the HRV and the respiration signal to be a suitable tool for investigating cardiac autonomic modulation and cardio-respiratory coupling during sleep. PMID:22416233

  8. Simultaneous measurement and modulation of multiple physiological parameters in the isolated heart using optical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter; Yan, Ping; Ewart, Paul; Kohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Whole-heart multi-parametric optical mapping has provided valuable insight into the interplay of electro-physiological parameters, and this technology will continue to thrive as dyes are improved and technical solutions for imaging become simpler and cheaper. Here, we show the advantage of using improved 2nd-generation voltage dyes, provide a simple solution to panoramic multi-parametric mapping, and illustrate the application of flash photolysis of caged compounds for studies in the whole heart. For proof of principle, we used the isolated rat whole-heart model. After characterising the blue and green isosbestic points of di-4-ANBDQBS and di-4-ANBDQPQ, respectively, two voltage and calcium mapping systems are described. With two newly custom-made multi-band optical filters, (1) di-4-ANBDQBS and fluo-4 and (2) di-4-ANBDQPQ and rhod-2 mapping are demonstrated. Furthermore, we demonstrate three-parameter mapping using di-4-ANBDQPQ, rhod-2 and NADH. Using off-the-shelf optics and the di-4-ANBDQPQ and rhod-2 combination, we demonstrate panoramic multi-parametric mapping, affording a 360° spatiotemporal record of activity. Finally, local optical perturbation of calcium dynamics in the whole heart is demonstrated using the caged compound, o-nitrophenyl ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (NP-EGTA), with an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (LED). Calcium maps (heart loaded with di-4-ANBDQPQ and rhod-2) demonstrate successful NP-EGTA loading and local flash photolysis. All imaging systems were built using only a single camera. In conclusion, using novel 2nd-generation voltage dyes, we developed scalable techniques for multi-parametric optical mapping of the whole heart from one point of view and panoramically. In addition to these parameter imaging approaches, we show that it is possible to use caged compounds and ultraviolet LEDs to locally perturb electrophysiological parameters in the whole heart. PMID:22886365

  9. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  10. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    repair of radiation-induced damage. Furthermore, cells possessing a mutated copy of this gene are more radiosensitive than cells from individuals with...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0503 TITLE: ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast...2005 Annual 1 Jul 2004 - 30 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity

  11. Hydrogen Protects Mice from Radiation Induced Thymic Lymphoma in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhou, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Fu; Li, Bailong; Chuai, Yunhai; Liu, Cong; Cai, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-known carcinogen, however the mechanism of radiation induced thymic lymphoma is not well known. Moreover, an easy and effective method to protect mice from radiation induced thymic lymphoma is still unknown. Hydrogen, or H2, is seldom regarded as an important agent in medical usage, especially as a therapeutic gas. Here in this study, we found that H2 protects mice from radiation induced thymic lymphoma in BALB/c mice. PMID:21448340

  12. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-09-22

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)(+)/vimentin(+) and EGFP(+)/α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)(+) coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P < .05; 69.0% vs 57.1%, P < .001) and ameliorated EMT at 2 and 4 weeks. Pectin also modulated the intestinal microbiota composition and increased the luminal SCFA concentration. The soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  14. Radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulva : First report in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lisa R; Privette, Emily D; Patterson, James W; Tchernev, Georgi; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Wilson, Barbara B

    2017-03-01

    A 67-year-old woman presented with a firm plaque in the perineal region, 16 months after diagnosis of a high-grade basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina and treatment by external beam radiation therapy and vaginal cuff brachytherapy. The differential diagnosis included radiation-induced morphea, radiation dermatitis, or, possibly, radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. Biopsy findings, including special staining, confirmed the diagnosis of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulvar region.

  15. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (P<0.001). For the HRV analysis, HRV-BF significantly reduced the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (the LF/HF ratio, P<0.001) and increased the normalized high-frequency power (HFnm) (P<0.001) during the stress tests, and an added benefit over SAB by improving HRV was also observed. In the 3-month follow-up study, similar effects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular

  16. Effects of Patrol Operation on Hydration Status and Autonomic Modulation of Heart Rate of Brazilian Peacekeepers in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Antonio F A; Morgado, Jairo J M

    2015-11-01

    The stress of operational missions may challenge the maintenance of body homeostasis, affecting soldiers' cardiac autonomic control, promoting dehydration, and compromising performance. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of peacekeeper patrol operation in Haiti on soldiers' hydration status and cardiac autonomic modulation, and to determine whether fluctuations in autonomic modulation were associated with changes in hydration status, energy expenditure (EE), and aerobic fitness (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). A group of 20 soldiers (23.5 ± 4.7 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 52.9 ± 4.5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) completed an operational patrol mission with a mean duration of 160.6 ± 28.6 minutes. Before (Pre) and after (Post) the operation, the soldiers' body masses (BMs) were measured and 5-minute heart rate interbeat (R-R) intervals were recorded at rest to estimate heart rate variability (low-frequency [LF] and high-frequency [HF] power, and sympathovagal balance [LF/HF]). During the mission, EE was estimated using heart rate (HR) monitors. Changes from Pre to Post in BM (%BM loss) and LF/HF (ΔLF/HF) were used to evaluate the soldiers' dehydration levels and autonomic modulation, respectively. The mean EE was 711.0 ± 208.7 kcal. From pre to post, increases (p < 0.01) were noted in LF normalized units (n.u.) and LF/HF and decreases (p < 0.01) were noted in BM, R-R interval, and HF n.u. The variation in ΔLF/HF correlated with EE (r = 0.49; p = 0.02), V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (r = -0.42; p = 0.05), and %BM loss (r = 0.53; p = 0.02). The results demonstrated that an operational peacekeeper patrol with an approximate duration of 160 minutes promoted both dehydration and an imbalance in the autonomic modulation of soldiers' HR. The reduction in sympathovagal balance correlated with EE, dehydration, and aerobic conditioning.

  17. Calculation of radiation-induced creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakawa, Johsei

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculation based on a computer simulation of point defect kinetics under stress was performed to predict radiation-induced deformation in an Inconel X-750 bolt in a LWR core and for a 316 stainless steel blanket in experimental fusion reactors with the water-coolant scenario. Although the displacement rate is rather low, modest irradiation creep with nearly linear stress dependence was predicted below 200 MPa at 300°C in the LWR core. This low stress dependence causes significant stress relaxation, which coincides with the experimental data to 2 dpa. An almost equal amount of enhanced irradiation creep strain was predicted at 60°C in both solution annealed and cold worker 316 stainless steel in the water-cooled blanket. The stress relaxation is practically not expected without irradiation in both the cases, but the calculation predicts that it is definitely expected under irradiation.

  18. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  19. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  20. Radiation Induced Cystitis and Proctitis - Prediction, Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Madan, Renu; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2015-01-01

    Cystitis and proctitis are defined as inflammation of bladder and rectum respectively. Haemorrhagic cystitis is the most severe clinical manifestation of radiation and chemical cystitis. Radiation proctitis and cystitis are major complications following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis has been investigated using various oral agents with minimal benefit. Bladder irrigation remains the most frequently adopted modality followed by intra-vesical instillation of alum or formalin. In intractable cases, surgical intervention is required in the form of diversion ureterostomy or cystectomy. Proctitis is more common in even low dose ranges but is self-limiting and improves on treatment interruption. However, treatment of radiation proctitis is broadly non-invasive or invasive. Non-invasive treatment consists of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anti-oxidants, sucralfate, short chain fatty acids and hyperbaric oxygen. Invasive treatment consists of ablative procedures like formalin application, endoscopic YAG laser coagulation or argon plasma coagulation and surgery as a last resort.

  1. Radiatively induced breaking of conformal symmetry in a superpotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  2. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  3. Dose-dependent radiation-induced hypotension in the canine

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Hampton, J.D.; Doyle, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-induced early transient incapacitation (ETI) is often accompanied by severe systemic hypotension. However, postradiation hypotension does not occur with equal frequency in all species and is not reported with consistency in the canine. In an attempt to clarify the differences in reported canine post-radiation blood pressures, canine systemic blood pressures were determined both before and after exposure to gamma radiation of either 80 or 100 Gy. Data obtained from six sham-radiated beagles and 12 radiated beagles indicated that 100-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation produced a decrease in systemic mean blood pressure while 80-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation did not. Analysis of this data could be consistent with a quantal response to a gamma radiation dose between 80 Gy and 100 Gy.

  4. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, A B; Shalit, M N; Cohen, M L; Zandbank, U; Reichenthal, E

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  5. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  6. Study of radiation induced cancers in a breast screening programme.

    PubMed

    León, A; Verdú, G; Cuevas, M D; Salas, M D; Villaescusa, J I; Bueno, F

    2001-01-01

    It is demonstrated that screening mammography programmes reduce breast cancer mortality considerably. Nevertheless, radiology techniques have an intrinsic risk, the most important being the late somatic effect of the induction of cancer. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the risk to the population produced by the Comunidad Valenciana Breast Screening Programme. All the calculations are carried out for two risk models, UNSCEAR 94 and NRPB 93. On the one hand, screening series detriments are investigated as a function of doses delivered and other parameters related to population structure and X ray equipment. On the other hand the radiation induced cancer probability for a woman who starts at 45 years and remains in the programme until 65 years old is calculated as a function of mammography units' doses and average compression breast thickness. Finally, risk comparison between a screening programme starting at 45 years old and another one starting at 50 years old is made.

  7. [Radiation-induced and therapy-related AML/MDS].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-10-01

    Radiation induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was recognized a century ago, soon after mankind found radiation. Atomic bomb survivors developed de novo AML with relatively short latency with very high frequency. By contrast, excess occurrence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) as well as solid tumors was found decades late. This difference may be due to etiology that many de novo AML patients harbor chimeric leukemogenic genes caused by chromosomal translocations, while MDS patients rarely carry chimeras. In addition, epigenetic change would play important roles. Therapy related leukemia is mainly caused by topoisomerase II inhibitors that cause de novo AML with an 11q23 translocation or by alkyrating agents that induce MDS/AML with an AML1 point mutation and monosomy 7.

  8. Modification of microcrystalline cellulose by gamma radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-10-01

    Modified microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was prepared through gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). Simultaneous grafting was employed wherein MCC with GMA in methanol was irradiated with gamma radiation in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of different experimental factors such as monomer concentration, type of solvent and absorbed dose on the degree of grafting, Dg, were studied. The amount of grafted GMA, expressed as Dg, was determined gravimetrically. Information from grafted samples subjected to Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) mode showed peaks corresponding to GMA which indicates successful grafting. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the crystalline region of MCC was not adversely affected after grafting with GMA. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data showed that the decomposition of grafted MCC occurred at higher temperature compared to the base MCC polymer.

  9. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  10. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  11. Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In addition, fits of their post-radiation recovery were made to the geminate recombination model, from which the recombination-rate and generation constants, characteristic of this theory, were determined. These parameters should be useful in determining the response of the fibers to radiation conditions other than those encountered here. 18 refs.

  12. Radiation-induced degradation of 4-chloroaniline in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, M.; Wolfger, H.; Getoff, N.

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of 4-chloroaniline (4-ClA) was studied under steady-state conditions using aqueous solutions saturated with air, pure oxygen, N 2O, argon and argon in the presence of t-Butanol. Using HPLC-method, the initial G-values of the substrate degradation as well as of a number of radiolytic products were determined. The formation of aminophenols, chlorophenols, aniline and phenol in addition to chloride, ammonia, formaldehyde and mixture of aldehydes as well as carboxylic acids was studied as a function of absorbed dose. Based on the experimental data, probable reaction mechanisms for the degradation of 4-ClA by γ-rays and the formation of the identified products are presented.

  13. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario.

  14. [Nonsurgical treatment of chronic radiation-induced hemorrhagic proctitis].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Bauer, Pierre; Marteau, Philippe; Chauveinc, Laurent; Bouillet, Thierry; Atienza, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of radiation-induced chronic hemorrhagic proctitis is less than 10 to 20%. The onset of this proctitis is delayed relative to the radiation therapy and generally develops from 6 to 24 months later. There are numerous predisposing factors, the most important of which is the radiation therapy dose: risk increases exponentially above 40-45 Gy. Its pathophysiology involves progressive obliterating endarteritis and transmural interstitial fibrosis, which induce chronic ischemia that is irreversible and progressive during the years after radiation therapy. Its diagnosis depends most often on the combination of clinical history and typical endoscopic appearance (congestive mucosa and/or telangiectases). Topical administrative of sucralfate or corticosteroids as well as argon plasma coagulation, with formalin treatment if necessary, provides relief for most patients.

  15. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of. beta. -pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, A.M.; Williams, F.

    1981-03-01

    The radiation-induced polymerization of ..beta..-pinene carried out in bulk at ca.25/sup 0/ has been studied for different methods of monomer drying. It has been confirmed that the polymerization is sensitive to adventitious moisture and that substantial polymer yields (ca. 10% conversion per Mrad) can only be obtained under extremely dry conditions. Complete inhibition of the reaction by added tripropylamine corroborates the view that the polymerization is cationic. About half of the polymer formed is insoluble in the monomer. The number-average molecular weights for the soluble poly(..beta..-pinene) fraction have been measured by vapor pressure osmometry and are in the narrow range from 1700 to 2400 with little or no dependence on the degree of monomer conversion to polymer, at least up to 80%. The results are compared with literature reports on the polymerization of ..beta..-pinene by catalytic initiators.

  16. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  17. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  18. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  19. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  20. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  1. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jeffrey M; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-11-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords "Radiation-Induced Fibrosis," "Radiotherapy Complications," "Fibrosis Therapy," and other closely related terms. RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies.

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  3. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  4. [Radiation-induced cancers: state of the art in 1997].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J M

    1997-01-01

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing with radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patients given well-known doses in well-defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of "clusters" of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low doses delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these "high" doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tabacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both in medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonably expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation-induced

  5. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  6. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  7. Aminergic modulation of the myogenic heart in the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    Although crustaceans typically have a neurogenic heart, the primitive crustacean Triops longicaudatus has a myogenic heart with the heartbeat arising from the endogenous rhythmic activity of the myocardium. In the present investigation, the effects of six biogenic amines, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, octopamine, serotonin and histamine, on the myogenic heart of T. longicaudatus were examined. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and octopamine accelerated the heartbeat, increasing both the frequency and amplitude of the action potential of the myocardium in a concentration dependent manner. The ability of epinephrine and norepinephrine to produce the acceleratory effects was more potent than that of dopamine and octopamine; the threshold concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were approximately 10(-10) M and those of dopamine and octopamine approximately 10(-7) M. Serotonin weakly inhibited the heartbeat, decreasing both the frequency and amplitude of the myocardial action potential in a concentration dependent manner with a threshold concentration of approximately 10(-6) M. Histamine exhibited no effect on the heartbeat. The results provide the first evidence for direct effects of amines on the crustacean myocardium and suggest neurohormonal regulation of the myogenic heart in T. longicaudatus.

  8. A dual-input nonlinear system analysis of autonomic modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, K. H.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Linear analyses of fluctuations in heart rate and other hemodynamic variables have been used to elucidate cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The role of nonlinear contributions to fluctuations in hemodynamic variables has not been fully explored. This paper presents a nonlinear system analysis of the effect of fluctuations in instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) on heart rate (HR) fluctuations. To successfully employ a nonlinear analysis based on the Laguerre expansion technique (LET), we introduce an efficient procedure for broadening the spectral content of the ILV and ABP inputs to the model by adding white noise. Results from computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of broadening the spectral band of input signals to obtain consistent and stable kernel estimates with the use of the LET. Without broadening the band of the ILV and ABP inputs, the LET did not provide stable kernel estimates. Moreover, we extend the LET to the case of multiple inputs in order to accommodate the analysis of the combined effect of ILV and ABP effect on heart rate. Analyzes of data based on the second-order Volterra-Wiener model reveal an important contribution of the second-order kernels to the description of the effect of lung volume and arterial blood pressure on heart rate. Furthermore, physiological effects of the autonomic blocking agents propranolol and atropine on changes in the first- and second-order kernels are also discussed.

  9. Exercise mediated protection of diabetic heart through modulation of microRNA mediated molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Lew, Jason Kar Sheng; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Katare, Rajesh

    2017-01-13

    Hyperglycaemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance collectively impact on the myocardium of people with diabetes, triggering molecular, structural and myocardial abnormalities. These have been suggested to aggravate oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, myocardial lipotoxicity and impaired myocardial substrate utilization. As a consequence, this leads to the development of a spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, which may include but not limited to coronary endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular remodelling and dysfunction. Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is the term used to describe the presence of heart disease specifically in diabetic patients. Despite significant advances in medical research and long clinical history of anti-diabetic medications, the risk of heart failure in people with diabetes never declines. Interestingly, sustainable and long-term exercise regimen has emerged as an effective synergistic therapy to combat the cardiovascular complications in people with diabetes, although the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying this protection remain unclear. This review provides an overview of the underlying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia- and insulin resistance-mediated DHD with a detailed discussion on the role of different intensities of exercise in mitigating these molecular alterations in diabetic heart. In particular, we provide the possible role of exercise on microRNAs, the key molecular regulators of several pathophysiological processes.

  10. Heart rate response after emotional picture presentation is modulated by interoceptive awareness.

    PubMed

    Pollatos, Olga; Herbert, Beate M; Matthias, Ellen; Schandry, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The perception of visceral signals plays a crucial role in many theories of emotions. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between interoceptive awareness, emotional experience and heart rate responses in an emotional stimulation paradigm. Based on their performance in a heartbeat perception task 38 participants (16 males, 22 females) were classified as subjects with either high (n=19; 8 males) or low interoceptive awareness (n=19; 8 males). 120 pictures (40 pleasant, 40 unpleasant, 40 neutral slides) from the International Affective Picture System served as emotional stimuli. Heart rate changes were recorded during baseline and during slide presentation. After each slide, the subjects had to rate emotional valence and arousal on a 9-point self-report scale. Statistical analyses revealed significantly stronger heart rate responses to pleasant and unpleasant stimuli in subjects with high interoceptive awareness. Furthermore, subjects with high interoceptive awareness rated pleasant and unpleasant slides as significantly more arousing; no differences were found in the emotional valence ratings. Heartbeat perception scores correlated significantly positive with both the mean arousal rating and with the mean heart rate changes. Our results demonstrate a strong relationship between the perception of cardiac signals and the peripheral processing of emotional stimuli.

  11. A dual-input nonlinear system analysis of autonomic modulation of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, K. H.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Linear analyses of fluctuations in heart rate and other hemodynamic variables have been used to elucidate cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The role of nonlinear contributions to fluctuations in hemodynamic variables has not been fully explored. This paper presents a nonlinear system analysis of the effect of fluctuations in instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) on heart rate (HR) fluctuations. To successfully employ a nonlinear analysis based on the Laguerre expansion technique (LET), we introduce an efficient procedure for broadening the spectral content of the ILV and ABP inputs to the model by adding white noise. Results from computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of broadening the spectral band of input signals to obtain consistent and stable kernel estimates with the use of the LET. Without broadening the band of the ILV and ABP inputs, the LET did not provide stable kernel estimates. Moreover, we extend the LET to the case of multiple inputs in order to accommodate the analysis of the combined effect of ILV and ABP effect on heart rate. Analyzes of data based on the second-order Volterra-Wiener model reveal an important contribution of the second-order kernels to the description of the effect of lung volume and arterial blood pressure on heart rate. Furthermore, physiological effects of the autonomic blocking agents propranolol and atropine on changes in the first- and second-order kernels are also discussed.

  12. A dual-input nonlinear system analysis of autonomic modulation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H; Mullen, T J; Cohen, R J

    1996-05-01

    Linear analyses of fluctuations in heart rate and other hemodynamic variables have been used to elucidate cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The role of nonlinear contributions to fluctuations in hemodynamic variables has not been fully explored. This paper presents a nonlinear system analysis of the effect of fluctuations in instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) on heart rate (HR) fluctuations. To successfully employ a nonlinear analysis based on the Laguerre expansion technique (LET), we introduce an efficient procedure for broadening the spectral content of the ILV and ABP inputs to the model by adding white noise. Results from computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of broadening the spectral band of input signals to obtain consistent and stable kernel estimates with the use of the LET. Without broadening the band of the ILV and ABP inputs, the LET did not provide stable kernel estimates. Moreover, we extend the LET to the case of multiple inputs in order to accommodate the analysis of the combined effect of ILV and ABP effect on heart rate. Analyzes of data based on the second-order Volterra-Wiener model reveal an important contribution of the second-order kernels to the description of the effect of lung volume and arterial blood pressure on heart rate. Furthermore, physiological effects of the autonomic blocking agents propranolol and atropine on changes in the first- and second-order kernels are also discussed.

  13. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod (FTY720) Attenuates Myocardial Fibrosis in Post-heterotopic Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naseer; Linardi, Daniele; Muhammad, Nazeer; Chiamulera, Cristiano; Fumagalli, Guido; Biagio, Livio San; Gebrie, Mebratu A; Aslam, Muhammad; Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Faggian, Giuseppe; Rungatscher, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and S1P receptor modulator fingolimod have been suggested to play important cardioprotective role in animal models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injuries. To understand the cardioprotective function of S1P and its mechanism in vivo, we analyzed apoptotic, inflammatory biomarkers, and myocardial fibrosis in an in vivo heterotopic rat heart transplantation model. Methods: Heterotopic heart transplantation is performed in 60 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (350-400 g). The heart transplant recipients (n = 60) are categorized into Group A (control) and Group B (fingolimod treated 1 mg/kg intravenous). At baseline with 24 h after heart transplantation, blood and myocardial tissue are collected for analysis of myocardial biomarkers, apoptosis, inflammatory markers, oxidative stress, and phosphorylation of Akt/Erk/STAT-3 signaling pathways. Myocardial fibrosis was investigated using Masson's trichrome staining and L-hydroxyline. Results: Fingolimod treatment activates both Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) and Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathways as evident from activation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory pathways. Fingolimod treatment caused a reduction in myocardial oxidative stress and hence cardiomyocyte apoptosis resulting in a decrease in myocardial reperfusion injury. Moreover, a significant (p < 0.001) reduction in collagen staining and hydroxyproline content was observed in fingolimod treated animals 30 days after transplantation demonstrating a reduction in cardiac fibrosis. Conclusion: S1P receptor activation with fingolimod activates anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory pathways, leading to improved myocardial salvage causing a reduction in cardiac fibrosis.

  14. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 2D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Martinez, Laura; Saiz, Javier; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is operationally defined as the inability of the heart to maintain blood flow to meet the needs of the body and it is the final common pathway of various cardiac pathologies. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling and a pro-fibrotic response have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure. Objective In this study we investigate vulnerability to reentry under heart failure conditions by incorporating established electrophysiological and anatomical remodeling using computer simulations. Methods The electrical activity of human transmural ventricular tissue (5 cm×5 cm) was simulated using the human ventricular action potential model Grandi et al. under control and heart failure conditions. The MacCannell et al. model was used to model fibroblast electrical activity, and their electrotonic interactions with myocytes. Selected degrees of diffuse fibrosis and variations in intercellular coupling were considered and the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry was evaluated following cross-field stimulation. Results No reentry was observed in normal conditions or in the presence of HF ionic remodeling. However, defined amount of fibrosis and/or cellular uncoupling were sufficient to elicit reentrant activity. Under conditions where reentry was generated, HF electrophysiological remodeling did not alter the width of the VW. However, intermediate fibrosis and cellular uncoupling significantly widened the VW. In addition, biphasic behavior was observed, as very high fibrotic content or very low tissue conductivity hampered the development of reentry. Detailed phase analysis of reentry dynamics revealed an increase of phase singularities with progressive fibrotic components. Conclusion Structural remodeling is a key factor in the genesis of vulnerability to reentry. A range of intermediate levels of fibrosis and intercellular uncoupling can combine to favor reentrant activity. PMID:25054335

  15. Utility of a Novel Biofeedback Device for Within-Breath Modulation of Heart Rate in Rats: A Quantitative Comparison of Vagus Nerve vs. Right Atrial Pacing

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, Erin L.; Chauhan, Ashok S.; Zhao, Le; Lataro, Renata M.; Salgado, Helio C.; Nogaret, Alain; Paton, Julian F. R.

    2016-01-01

    In an emerging bioelectronics era, there is a clinical need for physiological devices incorporating biofeedback that permits natural and demand-dependent control in real time. Here, we describe a novel device termed a central pattern generator (CPG) that uses cutting edge analog circuitry producing temporally controlled, electrical stimulus outputs based on the real time integration of physiological feedback. Motivated by the fact that respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), which is the cyclical changes in heart rate every breath, is an essential component of heart rate variability (HRV) (an indicator of cardiac health), we have explored the versatility and efficiency of the CPG for producing respiratory modulation of heart rate in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. Diaphragmatic electromyographic activity was used as the input to the device and its output connected to either the right cervical vagus nerve or the right atrium for pacing heart rate. We found that the CPG could induce respiratory related heart rate modulation that closely mimicked RSA. Whether connected to the vagus nerve or right atrium, the versatility of the device was demonstrated by permitting: (i) heart rate modulation in any phase of the respiratory cycle, (ii) control of the magnitude of heart rate modulation, and (iii) instant adaptation to changes in respiratory frequency. Vagal nerve pacing was only possible following transection of the nerve limiting its effective use chronically. Pacing via the right atrium permitted better flexibility and control of heart rate above its intrinsic level. This investigation now lays the foundation for future studies using this biofeedback technology permitting closer analysis of both the function and dysfunction of RSA. PMID:26869940

  16. Potential force dynamics of heart rate variability reflect cardiac autonomic modulation with respect to posture, age, and breathing pattern.

    PubMed

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2015-09-01

    Various physiological and pathological conditions are correlated with cardiac autonomic function. Heart rate variability is a marker of cardiac autonomic modulation and can be measured by several methods. However, the available methods are sensitive to breathing patterns. To quantify cardiac autonomic modulation by observing the potential force dynamics of the R-R interval time series in healthy individuals. We propose two "potentials of unbalanced complex kinetic" (PUCK) parameters to quantify the characteristics of the potential force dynamics of R-R interval time series: potential strength (slope) and fluctuation size (slope standard deviations [SSD1, SSD2]). We applied this method to the series of R-R intervals obtained from 30 healthy subjects in an experimental condition that elicited cardiac autonomic (i.e., sympathetic and vagal) activation (in supine, sitting, and standing positions). Subjects were categorized into three groups by decade (i.e., 20 s, 30 s, and 40 s) to verify the cardiac autonomic differences by age. Two respiration patterns were introduced to check the influence of the pattern into the analytical results. Sympathetic modulation activation significantly increased the slope and reduced SSD1 and SSD2; these trends were confirmed in all groups. The slope is concordant with the result of the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in frequency components as an indicator of sympathetic modulation. No trend was observed in slope among age groups. However, SSD1 and SSD2 in the 40 s group were significantly decreased in the supine and sitting positions. The results with respect to respiration frequency showed lower sympathetic modulation as shown in the LF/HF ratio and slope, whereas higher vagal modulation as shown in the HF appeared with a longer breathing rate. PUCK can quantify the cardiac autonomic modulation in the experimental conditions of different postures. SSD1 and SSD2 are more sensitive to age than frequency components and are

  17. Cardiac resynchronization therapy modulation of exercise left ventricular function and pulmonary O₂ uptake in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Corey R; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Lawrance, Richard; Martellotto, Andres; Pantano, Alfredo; Gulamhusein, Sajad; Haennel, Robert G

    2012-06-15

    To better understand the mechanisms contributing to improved exercise capacity with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), we studied the effects of 6 mo of CRT on pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, exercise left ventricular (LV) function, and peak Vo(2) in 12 subjects (age: 56 ± 15 yr, peak Vo(2): 12.9 ± 3.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), ejection fraction: 18 ± 3%) with heart failure. We hypothesized that CRT would speed Vo(2) kinetics due to an increase in stroke volume secondary to a reduction in LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and that the increase in peak Vo(2) would be related to an increase in cardiac output reserve. We found that Vo(2) kinetics were faster during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise after CRT (pre-CRT: 69 ± 21 s vs. post-CRT: 54 ± 17 s, P < 0.05). During moderate-intensity exercise, LV ESV reserve (exercise - resting) increased 9 ± 7 ml (vs. a 3 ± 9-ml decrease pre-CRT, P < 0.05), and steady-state stroke volume increased (pre-CRT: 42 ± 8 ml vs. post-CRT: 61 ± 12 ml, P < 0.05). LV end-diastolic volume did not change from rest to steady-state exercise post-CRT (P > 0.05). CRT improved heart rate, measured as a lower resting and steady-state exercise heart rate and as faster heart rate kinetics after CRT (pre-CRT: 89 ± 12 s vs. post-CRT: 69 ± 21 s, P < 0.05). For peak exercise, cardiac output reserve increased significantly post-CRT and was 22% higher at peak exercise post-CRT (both P < 0.05). The increase in cardiac output was due to both a significant increase in peak and reserve stroke volume and to a nonsignificant increase in heart rate reserve. Similar patterns in LV volumes as moderate-intensity exercise were observed at peak exercise. Cardiac output reserve was related to peak Vo(2) (r = 0.48, P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate the chronic CRT-mediated cardiac factors that contribute, in part, to the speeding in Vo(2) kinetics and increase in peak Vo(2) in clinically stable heart failure patients.

  18. Grape seed pro-anthocyanidins ameliorates radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijuan; Liu, Wen; Liu, Hu; Yang, Yanyong; Cui, Jianguo; Zhang, Pei; Zhao, Hainan; He, Feng; Cheng, Ying; Ni, Jin; Cai, Jianming; Li, Bailong; Gao, Fu

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a potentially fatal and dose-limiting complication of thoracic radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the protective effects of grape seed pro-anthocyanidins (GSPs), an efficient antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic agent, on RILI. In our study, it was demonstrated that acute and late RILI was ameliorated after GSPs treatment possibly through suppressing TGF-β1/Smad3/Snail signalling pathway and modulating the levels of cytokines (interferon-γ, IL-4 and IL-13) derived from Th1/Th2 cells. In addition, a sustained high level of PGE2 was also maintained by GSPs treatment to limited fibroblast functions. As shown by electron spin resonance spectrometry, GSPs could scavenge hydroxyl radical (•OH) in a dose-dependent manner, which might account for the mitigation of lipid peroxidation and consequent apoptosis of lung cells. In vitro, GSPs radiosensitized lung cancer cell A549 while mitigating radiation injury on normal alveolar epithelial cell RLE-6TN. In conclusion, the results showed that GSPs protects mice from RILI through scavenging free radicals and modulating RILI-associated cytokines, suggesting GSPs as a novel protective agent in RILI. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events (SPEs), as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials Ferrets were exposed to 0 – 2 Gray (Gy) of whole body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population, known as the LD50, of ferrets was established at ~ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 post-irradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early times post-irradiation when coagulopathies were present and progressively becoming more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions The data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is solely due to the cell killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. PMID:24495588

  20. Evidence for radiation-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation as a major cause of radiation-induced death in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Savage, Alexandria R; Billings, Paul C; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-03-15

    The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD50) of the ferrets was established at ∼ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  2. Temperature modulation of α- and β-adrenoceptors in the isolated frog heart

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, G. A.; Jordan, C. C.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effects of adrenaline on the isolated frog's heart at 27° C are not antagonized by phentolamine (1·5 × 10-6M) but are abolished at 7° C. 2. At 27° C isoprenaline was more potent than noradrenaline, but at 7° C noradrenaline was more potent than isoprenaline. 3. Phenoxybenzamine (1·5 × 10-5M) or dibenamine (1·5 × 10-5M) at 7° C abolished the work output induced by adrenaline. When the temperature was raised to 24° C, adrenaline caused an increase in work output. 4. It is concluded that in the isolated frog heart there are at least two pools of adrenoceptors, the availability of which can be governed by temperature. PMID:5417862

  3. Calcium-activated potassium current modulates ventricular repolarization in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ingrid M; Long, Victor P; Vargas-Pinto, Pedro; Wright, Patrick; Belevych, Andriy; Lou, Qing; Mowrey, Kent; Yoo, Jae; Binkley, Philip F; Fedorov, Vadim V; Györke, Sandor; Janssen, Paulus M L; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Carnes, Cynthia A

    2014-01-01

    The role of I(KCa) in cardiac repolarization remains controversial and varies across species. The relevance of the current as a therapeutic target is therefore undefined. We examined the cellular electrophysiologic effects of I(KCa) blockade in controls, chronic heart failure (HF) and HF with sustained atrial fibrillation. We used perforated patch action potential recordings to maintain intrinsic calcium cycling. The I(KCa) blocker (apamin 100 nM) was used to examine the role of the current in atrial and ventricular myocytes. A canine tachypacing induced model of HF (1 and 4 months, n = 5 per group) was used, and compared to a group of 4 month HF with 6 weeks of superimposed atrial fibrillation (n = 7). A group of age-matched canine controls were used (n = 8). Human atrial and ventricular myocytes were isolated from explanted end-stage failing hearts which were obtained from transplant recipients, and studied in parallel. Atrial myocyte action potentials were unchanged by I(KCa) blockade in all of the groups studied. I(KCa) blockade did not affect ventricular myocyte repolarization in controls. HF caused prolongation of ventricular myocyte action potential repolarization. I(KCa) blockade caused further prolongation of ventricular repolarization in HF and also caused repolarization instability and early afterdepolarizations. SK2 and SK3 expression in the atria and SK3 in the ventricle were increased in canine heart failure. We conclude that during HF, I(KCa) blockade in ventricular myocytes results in cellular arrhythmias. Furthermore, our data suggest an important role for I(KCa) in the maintenance of ventricular repolarization stability during chronic heart failure. Our findings suggest that novel antiarrhythmic therapies should have safety and efficacy evaluated in both atria and ventricles.

  4. Calcium-Activated Potassium Current Modulates Ventricular Repolarization in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Long, Victor P.; Vargas-Pinto, Pedro; Wright, Patrick; Belevych, Andriy; Lou, Qing; Mowrey, Kent; Yoo, Jae; Binkley, Philip F.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Györke, Sandor; Janssen, Paulus M. L.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of IKCa in cardiac repolarization remains controversial and varies across species. The relevance of the current as a therapeutic target is therefore undefined. We examined the cellular electrophysiologic effects of IKCa blockade in controls, chronic heart failure (HF) and HF with sustained atrial fibrillation. We used perforated patch action potential recordings to maintain intrinsic calcium cycling. The IKCa blocker (apamin 100 nM) was used to examine the role of the current in atrial and ventricular myocytes. A canine tachypacing induced model of HF (1 and 4 months, n = 5 per group) was used, and compared to a group of 4 month HF with 6 weeks of superimposed atrial fibrillation (n = 7). A group of age-matched canine controls were used (n = 8). Human atrial and ventricular myocytes were isolated from explanted end-stage failing hearts which were obtained from transplant recipients, and studied in parallel. Atrial myocyte action potentials were unchanged by IKCa blockade in all of the groups studied. IKCa blockade did not affect ventricular myocyte repolarization in controls. HF caused prolongation of ventricular myocyte action potential repolarization. IKCa blockade caused further prolongation of ventricular repolarization in HF and also caused repolarization instability and early afterdepolarizations. SK2 and SK3 expression in the atria and SK3 in the ventricle were increased in canine heart failure. We conclude that during HF, IKCa blockade in ventricular myocytes results in cellular arrhythmias. Furthermore, our data suggest an important role for IKCa in the maintenance of ventricular repolarization stability during chronic heart failure. Our findings suggest that novel antiarrhythmic therapies should have safety and efficacy evaluated in both atria and ventricles. PMID:25271970

  5. Modulation of sympathetic actions on the heart by opioid receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, T M; Shan, J

    2001-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system, the most important extrinsic regulatory mechanism of the heart, is inhibited postsynaptically and presynaptically by opioid peptides produced in the heart via their respective receptors. The cardiac actions of beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) stimulation are attenuated by activation of the opioid receptor (OR) with OR agonist at ineffective concentrations, implying cross-talk between the OR and beta-AR. This cross-talk results from inhibition of the Gs protein and adenylyl cyclase of the beta-AR pathway by the pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein of the opioid pathway. Alterations in cross-talk between these two receptors occur in pathological situations to meet bodily needs. In myocardial ischemia, when the sympathetic activity is increased, the inhibition of beta-AR stimulation by kappa-opioid stimulation is also enhanced, thus reducing the workload, oxygen consumption and cardiac injury. Whereas cardiac responsiveness to sympathetic discharges is also reduced after chronic hypoxia, the cross-talk between kappa-OR and beta-AR is reduced to prevent undue suppression of the sympathetic influence on the heart. On the other hand, impairment of the cross-talk may result in abnormality. A lack or a significant reduction in the inhibition of beta-AR stimulation by kappa-OR stimulation may lead to an excessive increase in cardiac activities, which contribute to the maintenance of high arterial blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Other than opioid peptides, female sex hormone and adenosine also inhibit the sympathetic actions on the heart. In addition, sympathetic action is also inhibited presynaptically by kappa-opioid peptides via their receptor. Copyright 2001 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. The integral pulse frequency modulation model with time-varying threshold: application to heart rate variability analysis during exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Bailón, Raquel; Laouini, Ghailen; Grao, César; Orini, Michele; Laguna, Pablo; Meste, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, an approach for heart rate variability analysis during exercise stress testing is proposed based on the integral pulse frequency modulation (IPFM) model, where a time-varying threshold is included to account for the nonstationary mean heart rate. The proposed technique allows the estimation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulating signal using the methods derived for the IPFM model with constant threshold plus a correction, which is shown to be needed to take into account the time-varying mean heart rate. On simulations, this technique allows the estimation of the ANS modulation on the heart from the beat occurrence time series with lower errors than the IPFM model with constant threshold (1.1% ± 1.3% versus 15.0% ± 14.9%). On an exercise stress testing database, the ANS modulation estimated by the proposed technique is closer to physiology than that obtained from the IPFM model with constant threshold, which tends to overestimate the ANS modulation during the recovery and underestimate it during the initial rest.

  7. Gene silencing of Tead3 abrogates radiation-induced adaptive response in cultured mouse limb bud cells.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Shang, Yi; Taki, Keiko; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    There is a crucial need to better understand the effects of low-doses of ionizing radiation in fetal models. Radiation-induced adaptive response (AR) was described in mouse embryos pre-exposed in utero to low-doses of X-rays, which exhibited lower apoptotic levels in the limb bud. We previously described AR-specific gene modulations in the mouse embryo. In this study, we evaluated the role of three candidate genes in the apoptotic AR in a micromass culture of limb bud cells: Csf1, Cacna1a and Tead3. Gene silencing of these three genes abrogated AR. Knowing that TEAD3 protein levels are significantly higher in adapted cells and that YAP/TAZ/TEAD are involved in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis, we suggest that modulation of Tead3 could play a role in the induction of AR in our model, seen as a reduction of radiation-induced apoptosis and a stimulation of proliferation and differentiation in limb bud cells.

  8. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  9. Identification of gene co-regulatory modules and associated cis-elements involved in degenerative heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathies, degenerative diseases of cardiac muscle, are among the leading causes of death in the developed world. Microarray studies of cardiomyopathies have identified up to several hundred genes that significantly alter their expression patterns as the disease progresses. However, the regulatory mechanisms driving these changes, in particular the networks of transcription factors involved, remain poorly understood. Our goals are (A) to identify modules of co-regulated genes that undergo similar changes in expression in various types of cardiomyopathies, and (B) to reveal the specific pattern of transcription factor binding sites, cis-elements, in the proximal promoter region of genes comprising such modules. Methods We analyzed 149 microarray samples from human hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies of various etiologies. Hierarchical clustering and Gene Ontology annotations were applied to identify modules enriched in genes with highly correlated expression and a similar physiological function. To discover motifs that may underly changes in expression, we used the promoter regions for genes in three of the most interesting modules as input to motif discovery algorithms. The resulting motifs were used to construct a probabilistic model predictive of changes in expression across different cardiomyopathies. Results We found that three modules with the highest degree of functional enrichment contain genes involved in myocardial contraction (n = 9), energy generation (n = 20), or protein translation (n = 20). Using motif discovery tools revealed that genes in the contractile module were found to contain a TATA-box followed by a CACC-box, and are depleted in other GC-rich motifs; whereas genes in the translation module contain a pyrimidine-rich initiator, Elk-1, SP-1, and a novel motif with a GCGC core. Using a naïve Bayes classifier revealed that patterns of motifs are statistically predictive of expression patterns, with odds ratios of 2

  10. The effect of tianeptine in the prevention of radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Akyurek, Serap; Senturk, Vesile; Oncu, Bedriye; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Yilmaz, Sercan; Gokce, Saban Cakir

    2008-12-01

    Radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment is an undesirable radiation-induced toxicity and a common health problem in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumor. It greatly impairs quality of life for long-term brain tumor survivors. Hippocampus is the most important brain structure for neurocognitive functions. It has been shown that radiation affects the hippocampal neurogenesis due to either induce the apoptosis or reduce the precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Radiation-induced microglial inflammatory response is also negative regulator of neurogenesis. Tianeptine is a clinically effective antidepressant that induces neurogenesis. It has also been shown that tianeptine is able to reduce apoptosis and cytoprotective against the effects of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Given the putative role of impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment we think that tianeptine can be effective for preventing radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W.; Komarnicky, Lydia T.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  12. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Cultured Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Mykyta V.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The radiation-induced “bystander effect” (RIBE) was shown to occur in a number of experimental systems both in vitro and in vivo as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). RIBE manifests itself by intercellular communication from irradiated cells to non-irradiated cells which may cause DNA damage and eventual death in these bystander cells. It is known that human stem cells (hSC) are ultimately involved in numerous crucial biological processes such as embryologic development; maintenance of normal homeostasis; aging; and aging-related pathologies such as cancerogenesis and other diseases. However, very little is known about radiation-induced bystander effect in hSC. To mechanistically interrogate RIBE responses and to gain novel insights into RIBE specifically in hSC compartment, both medium transfer and cell co-culture bystander protocols were employed. Methodology/Principal Findings Human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and embryonic stem cells (hESC) were irradiated with doses 0.2 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy of X-rays, allowed to recover either for 1 hr or 24 hr. Then conditioned medium was collected and transferred to non-irradiated hSC for time course studies. In addition, irradiated hMSC were labeled with a vital CMRA dye and co-cultured with non-irradiated bystander hMSC. The medium transfer data showed no evidence for RIBE either in hMSC and hESC by the criteria of induction of DNA damage and for apoptotic cell death compared to non-irradiated cells (p>0.05). A lack of robust RIBE was also demonstrated in hMSC co-cultured with irradiated cells (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that hSC might not be susceptible to damaging effects of RIBE signaling compared to differentiated adult human somatic cells as shown previously. This finding could have profound implications in a field of radiation biology/oncology, in evaluating radiation risk of IR exposures, and for the safety and efficacy of hSC regenerative

  13. Cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated by heart interval variability is unaltered but subtly widespread in the indeterminate Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Correia, Dalmo; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando; Molina, Rodrigo Juliano; Prata, Aluízio

    2007-06-01

    Cardiac autonomic function in the indeterminate chronic form of Chagas' disease deserves better clearing-up and understanding, since the existing findings are scarce and controversial. This work analyzed the short-term heart interval variability in order to verify the cardiac autonomic modulation in indeterminate Chagas' disease subjects examined in a Brazilian endemic area. Variability in time and frequency domain of 5-minute electrocardiogram (ECG) series of R-R intervals in supine and active standing positions were obtained from 18 age-, gender-, body mass index-, lifestyle-, and physical activity-matched chagasics and 18 control healthy subjects examined in Agua Comprida city, MG, Brazil. Mann-Whitney test was used for analysis of the data and spread of the individual indices in both groups. The median of the all variability indices in the chagasic group were statistically similar (P= 0.17-0.87) to that in the control group. A wide dispersion of the almost all individual indices values, ranging from normal to variably reduced or increased ones, was noted in the majority of the chagasics in relation to the control interquartile range, in both postural positions. As a group, indeterminate Chagas' disease subjects showed unaltered short-term heart interval variability. Individual somewhat widespread of majority of time- and frequency-domain indices, from depressed to exacerbated ones appears to exist. This conforms to a variable cardiac autonomic modulation in this form of disease, suggesting that the majority of chagasics has no lesions, and a minority has subtle lesions of the efferent innervation-sinus node complex.

  14. Structure and Function of Cardiac Troponin C (TNNC1): Implications for Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathies, and Troponin Modulating Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Monica X.; Hwang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    In striated muscle, the protein troponin complex turns contraction on and off in a calcium-dependent manner. The calcium-sensing component of the complex is troponin C, which is expressed from the TNNC1 gene in both cardiac muscle and slow-twitch skeletal muscle (identical transcript in both tissues) and the TNNC2 gene in fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is made up of two globular EF-hand domains connected by a flexible linker. The structural C-domain (cCTnC) contains two high affinity calcium-binding sites that are always occupied by Ca2+ or Mg2+ under physiologic conditions, stabilizing an open conformation that remains anchored to the rest of the troponin complex. In contrast, the regulatory N-domain (cNTnC) contains a single low affinity site that is largely unoccupied at resting calcium concentrations. During muscle activation, calcium binding to cNTnC favors an open conformation that binds to the switch region of troponin I, removing adjacent inhibitory regions of troponin I from actin and allowing muscle contraction to proceed. Regulation of the calcium binding affinity of cNTnC is physiologically important, because it directly impacts the calcium sensitivity of muscle contraction. Calcium sensitivity can be modified by drugs that stabilize the open form of cNTnC, post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of troponin I, or downstream thin filament protein interactions that impact the availability of the troponin I switch region. Recently, mutations in cTnC have been associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy. A detailed understanding of how calcium sensitivity is regulated through the troponin complex is necessary for explaining how mutations perturb its function to promote cardiomyopathy and how post-translational modifications in the thin filament affect heart function and heart failure. Troponin modulating drugs are being developed for the treatment of cardiomyopathies and heart failure. PMID:26232335

  15. Immune Modulation of Cardiac Repair and Regeneration: The Art of Mending Broken Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zlatanova, Ivana; Pinto, Cristina; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of immune cells is among the earliest responses that manifest in the cardiac tissue after injury. Both innate and adaptive immunity coordinate distinct and mutually non-exclusive events governing cardiac repair, including elimination of the cellular debris, compensatory growth of the remaining cardiac tissue, activation of resident or circulating precursor cells, quantitative and qualitative modifications of the vascular network, and formation of a fibrotic scar. The present review summarizes the mounting evidence suggesting that the inflammatory response also guides the regenerative process following cardiac damage. In particular, recent literature has reinforced the central role of monocytes/macrophages in poising the refreshment of cardiomyocytes in myocardial infarction- or apical resection-induced cardiac insult. Macrophages dictate cardiac myocyte renewal through stimulation of preexisting cardiomyocyte proliferation and/or neovascularization. Nevertheless, substantial efforts are required to identify the nature of these macrophage-derived factors as well as the molecular mechanisms engendered by the distinct subsets of macrophages pertaining in the cardiac tissue. Among the growing inflammatory intermediaries that have been recognized as essential player in heart regeneration, we will focus on the role of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13. Finally, it is likely that within the mayhem of the injured cardiac tissue, additional types of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils, will enter the dance to ignite and refresh the broken heart. However, the protective and detrimental inflammatory pathways have been mainly deciphered in animal models. Future research should be focused on understanding the cellular effectors and molecular signals regulating inflammation in human heart to pave the way for the development of factual therapies targeting the inflammatory compartment in cardiac diseases. PMID:27790620

  16. Modulation of the heart's electrical properties by the anticonvulsant drug retigabine.

    PubMed

    Rubi, Lena; Kovar, Michael; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva; Koenig, Xaver; Dominguez-Rodriguez, Manuel; Todt, Hannes; Kubista, Helmut; Boehm, Stefan; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2017-08-15

    Retigabine, currently used as antiepileptic drug, has a wide range of potential medical uses. Administration of the drug in patients can lead to QT interval prolongation in the electrocardiogram and to cardiac arrhythmias in rare cases. This suggests that the drug may perturb the electrical properties of the heart, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated here. Effects of retigabine on currents through human cardiac ion channels, heterologously expressed in tsA-201 cells, were studied in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments. In addition, the drug's impact on the cardiac action potential was tested. This was done using ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts and cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Further, to unravel potential indirect effects of retigabine on the heart which might involve the autonomic nervous system, membrane potential and noradrenaline release from sympathetic ganglionic neurons were measured in the absence and presence of the drug. Retigabine significantly inhibited currents through hKv11.1 potassium, hNav1.5 sodium, as well as hCav1.2 calcium channels, but only in supra-therapeutic concentrations. In a similar concentration range, the drug shortened the action potential in both guinea pig and human cardiomyocytes. Therapeutic concentrations of retigabine, on the other hand, were sufficient to inhibit the activity of sympathetic ganglionic neurons. We conclude that retigabine- induced QT interval prolongation, and the reported cases of cardiac arrhythmias after application of the drug in a typical daily dose range, cannot be explained by a direct modulatory effect on cardiac ion channels. They are rather mediated by indirect actions at the level of the autonomic nervous system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Role of Platelet-Derived Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Reactive Oxygen Species in Radiation-Induced Organ Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    This review evaluates the role of platelet-derived transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in oxidative stress-linked pathologic fibrosis, with an emphasis on the heart and kidney, by using ionizing radiation as a clinically relevant stimulus. Current radiation-induced organ fibrosis interventions focus on pan-neutralization of TGF-β or the use of anti-oxidants and anti-proliferative agents, with limited clinical efficacy. Recent Advances: Pathologic fibrosis represents excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix (ECM) components after dysregulation of a balance between ECM synthesis and degradation. Targets based on endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) pathways and the use of redox modulators such as N-acetylcysteine present promising alternatives to current therapeutic regimens. Ionizing radiation leads to direct DNA damage and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with TGF-β1 activation via ROS, thrombin generation, platelet activation, and pro-inflammatory signaling promoting myofibroblast accumulation and ECM production. Feed-forward loops, as TGF-β1 promotes ROS, amplify these profibrotic signals, and persistent low-grade inflammation insures their perpetuation. We highlight differential roles for platelet- versus monocyte-derived TGF-β1, establishing links between canonical and noncanonical TGF-β1 signaling pathways in relationship to macrophage polarization and autophagy, and define points where pharmacologic agents can intervene. Additional studies are needed to understand mechanisms underlying the anti-fibrotic effects of current and proposed therapeutics, based on limiting platelet TGF-β1 activity, promotion of macrophage polarization, and facilitation of collagen autophagy. Models incorporating endogenous CO and selective TGF-β1 pathways that impact the initiation and progression of pathologic fibrosis, including nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and redox, are of particular interest. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27

  18. Acute Radiation-Induced Nocturia in Prostate Cancer Patients Is Associated With Pretreatment Symptoms, Radical Prostatectomy, and Genetic Markers in the TGF{beta}1 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    De Langhe, Sofie; De Ruyck, Kim; Ost, Piet; Fonteyne, Valerie; Werbrouck, Joke; De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy for prostate cancer, approximately 50% of the patients experience acute genitourinary symptoms, mostly nocturia. This may be highly bothersome with a major impact on the patient's quality of life. In the past, nocturia is seldom reported as a single, physiologically distinct endpoint, and little is known about its etiology. It is assumed that in addition to dose-volume parameters and patient- and therapy-related factors, a genetic component contributes to the development of radiation-induced damage. In this study, we investigated the association among dosimetric, clinical, and TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia in prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Data were available for 322 prostate cancer patients treated with primary or postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five genetic markers in the TGF{beta}1 gene (-800 G>A, -509 C>T, codon 10 T>C, codon 25 G>C, g.10780 T>G), and a high number of clinical and dosimetric parameters were considered. Toxicity was scored using an symptom scale developed in-house. Results: Radical prostatectomy (P<.001) and the presence of pretreatment nocturia (P<.001) are significantly associated with the occurrence of radiation-induced acute toxicity. The -509 CT/TT (P=.010) and codon 10 TC/CC (P=.005) genotypes are significantly associated with an increased risk for radiation-induced acute nocturia. Conclusions: Radical prostatectomy, the presence of pretreatment nocturia symptoms, and the variant alleles of TGF{beta}1 -509 C>T and codon 10 T>C are identified as factors involved in the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia. These findings may contribute to the research on prediction of late nocturia after IMRT for prostate cancer.

  19. Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Modulate Autonomic Control of Heart Rate and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Eitan; Griffioen, Kathleen J.; Sarah, Rothman; Wan, Ruiqian; Cong, Wei-Na; De Cabo, Rafael; Montalvo, Alejandro Martin; Levette, Andrew; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Mattson, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are innate immune receptors typically activated by microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) during infection or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) as a result of tissue injury. Recent findings suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 signaling play important roles in developmental and adult neuroplasticity, and in learning and memory. In addition, activation of TLR2 and TLR4 worsens ischemic injury to the heart and brain in animal models of myocardial infarction and stroke. TLR activation is also implicated in thermoregulation and fever in response to infection. However, it is not known whether TLRs participate in the regulation of the sympathetic and/or parasympathetic components of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Here we provide evidence that TLR2 and TLR4 influence autonomic regulation of heart rate (HR) body temperature and energy metabolism in mice. We show that mice lacking TLR2 or TLR4 exhibit reduced basal HR, which results from an increase of parasympathetic tone. In addition, thermoregulatory responses to stress are altered in TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice, and brown fat-dependent thermoregulation is altered in TLR4−/− mice. Moreover, TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice consume less food and exhibit a greater mass compared to wild type mice. Collectively, our findings suggest important roles for TLR2 and TLR4 in the ANS regulation of cardiovascular function, thermoregulation, and energy metabolism. PMID:24145051

  20. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  1. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. PMID:27672101

  2. Radiation-induced conductivity control in polyaniline blends/composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güven, Olgun

    2007-08-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) blends with chlorine-containing polymers and copolymers and composites with HCl-releasing compounds were prepared to investigate their radiation response in terms of induced conductivities. Blends of non-conductive PANI with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(vinylidene chloride- co-vinyl acetate), [P(VDC- co-VAc)], poly(vinylidene chloride- co-vinyl chloride), [P(VDC- co-VC)] were prepared in the form of as-cast films. A number of blends which are different in composition were exposed to gamma radiation and accelerated electrons to various doses, and the effects of irradiation type and composition of polymers on the conductivity of films were investigated by using conductivity measurements and UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results clearly showed that ionizing radiation is an effective tool to induce and control conductivity in the blends of PANI-base with chlorine-carrying polymers as well as its composites prepared from HCl-releasing compounds such as chloral hydrate. The main mechanism behind this radiation-induced conductivity is in situ doping of PANI-base with HCl released from partner polymers and low molecular weight compounds by the effect of radiation.

  3. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  4. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  5. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  6. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  7. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  8. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  9. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated.

  10. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Chromosome and chromatid aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co gamma rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  11. Radiation-induced removal of sulphadiazine antibiotics from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuankun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Jianlong

    2014-08-01

    The radiation-induced removal of sulphadiazine (SD) belonging to the heterocyclic sulphonamides pharmaceuticals was investigated by gamma irradiation at different conditions in laboratory scale. The influence of initial SD concentrations, pH values, 02 and N2 on SD degradation was determined. The experimental results showed that gamma-ray irradiation was efficient for removing SD from wastewater. SD could be completely removed at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy. The degradation kinetics of SD conformed to the first-order kinetic equation. When SD concentration was in the range of 10-30 mg/L, the dose constant (d) decreased with an increasing initial SD concentration. The mineralization of SD, in terms of total organic carbon removal, was not obvious at a low absorbed dose, but it increased to more than 75% at 100 kGy. The biodegradability of SD was improved after irradiation, suggesting that irradiation could be used as a pretreatment technology for treating SD-containing wastewater. The possible degradation pathway of SD was tentatively proposed based on the analysis of intermediate products during gamma irradiation.

  12. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  13. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  14. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Souba, W.W.; McKenna, R.J. Jr.; Meis, J.; Benjamin, R.; Raymond, A.K.; Mountain, C.F.

    1986-02-01

    Sixteen patients are presented who had sarcomas of the chest wall at a site where a prior malignancy had been irradiated. The first malignancies included breast cancer (ten cases), Hodgkin's disease (four cases), and others (two cases). Radiation doses varied from 4200 to 5500 R (mean, 4900 R). The latency period ranged from 5 to 28 years (mean, 13 years). The histologic types of the radiation-induced sarcomas were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, nine cases; osteosarcoma, six cases; and malignant mesenchymoma, one case. The only long-term survivor is alive and well 12 years after resection of a clavicular chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Three cases were recently diagnosed. Despite aggressive multimodality treatment, the remaining 13 patients have all died from their sarcomas (mean survival, 13.5 months). All patients have apparently been cured of their first malignancies. Chemotherapy was ineffective. No treatment, including forequarter amputation, appeared to palliate the patients with supraclavicular soft tissue sarcomas. Major chest wall resection offered good palliation for seven of eight patients with sarcomas arising in the sternum or lateral chest wall. Close follow-up is needed to detect signs of these sarcomas in the ever-increasing number of patients receiving therapeutic irradiation.

  15. Radiation-Induced Sarcoma of the Breast: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Grishma R.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Grasso-LeBeau, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a rare, aggressive malignancy. Breast cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy constitute a large fraction of RIS patients. To evaluate evidenced-based practices for RIS treatment, we performed a systematic review of the published English-language literature. Methods. We performed a systematic keyword search of PubMed for original research articles pertaining to RIS of the breast. We classified and evaluated the articles based on hierarchal levels of scientific evidence. Results. We identified 124 original articles available for analysis, which included 1,831 patients. No randomized controlled trials involving RIS patients were found. We present the best available evidence for the etiology, comparative biology to primary sarcoma, prognostic factors, and treatment options for RIS of the breast. Conclusion. Although the evidence to guide clinical practice is limited to single institutional cohort studies, registry studies, case–control studies, and case reports, we applied the available evidence to address clinically relevant questions related to best practice in patient management. Surgery with widely negative margins remains the primary treatment of RIS. Unfortunately, the role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy remains uncertain. This systematic review highlights the need for additional well-designed studies to inform the management of RIS. PMID:22334455

  16. Radiation induced destruction of thebaine, papaverine and noscapine in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoğlu, Ömer; Ergun, Ece

    2016-07-01

    The presence of methanol decreases the efficiency of radiation-induced decomposition of alkaloids in wastewater. Intermediate products were observed before the complete degradation of irradiated alkaloids. In order to identify the structure of the by-products and the formation pathway, thebaine, papaverine and noscapine solutions were prepared in pure methanol and irradiated using a 60Co gamma cell at absorbed doses of 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 30, 50 and 80 kGy. The dose-dependent alkaloid degradation and by-product formation were monitored by ESI mass spectrometer. Molecular structures of the by-products and reaction pathways were proposed. Oxygenated and methoxy group containing organic compounds was observed in the mass spectra of irradiated alkaloids. At initial dose values oxygenated by-products were formed due to the presence of dissolved oxygen in solutions. After the consumption of dissolved oxygen with radicals, the main mechanism was addition of solvent radicals to alkaloid structure. However, it was determined that alkaloids and by-products were completely degraded at doses higher than 50 kGy. The G-value and degradation efficiency of alkaloids were also evaluated.

  17. [Radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ducray, J; Vignot, S; Lacout, A; Pougnet, I; Marcy, P-Y; Chapellier, C; Foray, N; Creisson, A; Thariat, J

    2017-04-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia is an inflammatory reaction that can occur as a consequence of various pulmonary affections. Radiotherapy is not the sole and systematic cause of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia. Radiation-induced should not be confused with post-radiation, dose-dependent, inflammatory pulmonary fibrosis, which is non-immunological and located within the irradiation field. The role of immunity, local inflammation and individual radiosensitivity in bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia is not well defined. Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia represents 1% of irradiated patients with breast cancer. It results in fever (flu-like symptoms), a rather dry cough and dyspnea. In the post-radiation context, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia may be diagnosed several months and up to a year after breast irradiation. The treatment consists of prolonged steroids or immunosuppressants, which do not prevent chronicity in 15% of patients and death in up to 5% of cases, the remaining 80% of patients healing without sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cataract in Interventional Cardiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Noohi, Feridoun; Hashemi, Hassan; Haghjoo, Majid; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Rastgou, Fereydon; Malek, Hadi; Faghihi, Hoshang; Firouzabadi, Hassan; Asgari, Soheila; Rezvan, Farhad; Khosravi, Hamidreza; Soroush, Sara; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of ionizing radiation has led to advances in medical diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of radiation cataractogenesis in the interventionists and staff performing various procedures in different interventional laboratories. Patients and Methods: This cohort study included 81 interventional cardiology staff. According to the working site, they were classified into 5 groups. The control group comprised 14 professional nurses who did not work in the interventional sites. Participants were assigned for lens assessment by two independent trained ophthalmologists blinded to the study. Results: The electrophysiology laboratory staff received higher doses of ionizing radiation (17.2 ± 11.9 mSv; P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the years of working experience and effective dose in the lens (P < 0.001). In general, our findings showed that the incidence of lens opacity was 79% (95% CI, 69.9-88.1) in participants with exposure (the case group) and our findings showed that the incidence of lenses opacity was 7.1% (95% CI:2.3-22.6) with the relative risk (RR) of 11.06 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: We believe that the risk of radiation-induced cataract in cardiology interventionists and staff depends on their work site. As the radiation dose increases, the prevalence of posterior eye changes increases. PMID:25789258

  19. Radiation-induced thymine base damage in replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Childers, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    The efficiency of radiation-induced production of 5',6'-dihydroxydihydrothymine (t/sup ..gamma../)-type damage was determined in nascent and mature chromatin DNA for the dose range of 50 to 150 krad. These large doses affected neither the total fraction of nuclear DNA in chromatin subunits nor the nucleosome subunit repeat length. The DNA in nascent chromatin, however, was found to be 3.3 times more sensitive than mature chromatin DNA to ..gamma..-ray (/sup 137/Cs)-induced t/sup ..gamma../-type damage, while thymine damage of this type was uniformly distributed in the nucleosomal DNA of mature chromatin (i.e., in the nucleosome core and spacer DNA). The half-time for the transition of nascent DNA sensitivity to mature chromatin DNA sensitivity levels was the same as the half-time at 37/sup 0/C for the maturation of nascent into mature chromatin structure. The rate at which nascent chromatin matured was unaffected by radiation doses as large as 150 krad. The most logical explanation for the greater sensitivity of nascent DNA to radiation is the decreased concentration of histone chromosomal proteins in nascent chromatin.

  20. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  1. Epigenetic determinants of space radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Baddour, Al Anoud D.; Kawashita, Takumi; Allen, Barrett D.; Syage, Amber R.; Nguyen, Thuan H.; Yoon, Nicole; Giedzinski, Erich; Yu, Liping; Parihar, Vipan K.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2017-01-01

    Among the dangers to astronauts engaging in deep space missions such as a Mars expedition is exposure to radiations that put them at risk for severe cognitive dysfunction. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments are accompanied by functional and structural changes including oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and degradation of neuronal architecture. The molecular mechanisms that dictate CNS function are multifaceted and it is unclear how irradiation induces persistent alterations in the brain. Among those determinants of cognitive function are neuroepigenetic mechanisms that translate radiation responses into altered gene expression and cellular phenotype. In this study, we have demonstrated a correlation between epigenetic aberrations and adverse effects of space relevant irradiation on cognition. In cognitively impaired irradiated mice we observed increased 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels in the hippocampus that coincided with increased levels of the DNA methylating enzymes DNMT3a, TET1 and TET3. By inhibiting methylation using 5-iodotubercidin, we demonstrated amelioration of the epigenetic effects of irradiation. In addition to protecting against those molecular effects of irradiation, 5-iodotubercidin restored behavioral performance to that of unirradiated animals. The findings of this study establish the possibility that neuroepigenetic mechanisms significantly contribute to the functional and structural changes that affect the irradiated brain and cognition. PMID:28220892

  2. Radiation induced degradation of dyes--an overview.

    PubMed

    Rauf, M A; Ashraf, S Salman

    2009-07-15

    Synthetic dyes are a major part of our life. Products ranging from clothes to leather accessories to furniture all depend on extensive use of organic dyes. An unfortunate side effect of extensive use of these chemicals is that huge amounts of these potentially carcinogenic compounds enter our water supplies. Various advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) including the use of high-energy radiation have been developed to degrade these compounds. In this review, dye decoloration and degradation as a result of its exposure to high energy radiation such as gamma radiation and pulsed electron beam are discussed in detail. The role of various transient species such as H, OH and e(aq)(-) are taken into account as reported by various researchers. Literature citations in this area show that e(aq)(-) is very effective in decolorization but is less active in the further degradation of the products formed. The degradation of the dyes is initiated exclusively by OH attack on electron-rich sites of the dye molecules. Additionally, various parameters that affect the efficiency of radiation induced degradation of dyes, such as effect of radiation dose, oxygen, pH, hydrogen peroxide, added ions and dye classes are also reviewed and summarized. Lastly, pilot plant application of radiation for wastewater treatment is briefly discussed.

  3. Low dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction.

    PubMed

    Kantak, S S; Diglio, C A; Onoda, J M

    1993-09-01

    We characterized in vitro the effects of gamma-radiation (12.5-100 cGy) on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMEC) morphology and F-actin organization. Cellular retraction was documented by phase-contrast microscopy and the organization of actin microfilaments was determined by immunofluorescence. Characterization included radiation dose effects, their temporal duration and reversibility of the effects. A dose-dependent relationship between the level of exposure (12.5-100 cGy) and the rate and extent of endothelial retraction was observed. Moreover, analysis of radiation-induced depolymerization of F-actin microfilament stress fibres correlated positively with the changes in PMEC morphology. The depolymerization of the stress fibre bundles was dependent on radiation dose and time. Cells recovered from exposure to reform contact inhibited monolayers > or = 24 h post-irradiation. Concomitantly, the depolymerized microfilaments reorganized to their preirradiated state as microfilament stress fibres arrayed parallel to the boundaries of adjacent contact-inhibited cells. The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Our data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema.

  4. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  5. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  6. Radiation induced oxidation of liquid alkanes as a polymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soebianto, Yanti S.; Katsumura, Yosuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Kubo, Junichi; Hamakawa, Satoshi; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao

    1996-10-01

    Radiation induced oxidation of liquid n-hexadecane ( n-C 16H 34) and squalene (C 30H 62) as a polymer model has been investigated by the measurements of the gas evolution and O 2 uptake, and analyses of the oxidation products. Low O 2 uptake [G(-O 2 ≈ 6.0] in liquid alkanes, indicates in solid oxidation reaction does not exhibit chain kinetics, which is a big contrast to the process observed in solid, G(-O 2) ≫ 10. H 2 is the main gas product. More than 90% of the consumed O 2 are converted into the oxidation products in liquid phase, mainly carboxylic acids, which is also a big contrast to the results of the radiolysis of liquid cyclohexane in the presence of O 2 and thermal oxidation of hexadecene at elevated temperatures, where ketones and alcohols are major products at the initial stage. In the presence of aromatic additives, energy and charge transfer to the additives taking place despite the presence of O 2 reduce the H 2 evolution and the acid formation in parallel. Although hydroaromatic compounds act as an energy and charge scavenger, the are selectively oxidized through the donation of hydrogen in cyclic alkyl part attached to the phenyl ring, leading to large O 2 uptake and corresponding ketone formation. From the comparison of the G-values of the O 2 uptake, it was found that the oxidation reactions of liquid alkanes reflect well the oxidation of amorphous part in polymers.

  7. A new view of radiation-induced cancer.

    PubMed

    Shuryak, I; Sachs, R K; Brenner, D J

    2011-02-01

    Biologically motivated mathematical models are important for understanding the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Existing models fall into two categories: (1) short-term formalisms, which focus on the processes taking place during and shortly after irradiation (effects of dose, radiation quality, dose rate and fractionation), and (2) long-term formalisms, which track background cancer risks throughout the entire lifetime (effects of age at exposure and time since exposure) but make relatively simplistic assumptions about radiation effects. Grafting long-term mechanisms on to short-term models is badly needed for modelling radiogenic cancer. A combined formalism was developed and applied to cancer risk data in atomic bomb survivors and radiotherapy patients and to background cancer incidence. The data for nine cancer types were described adequately with a set of biologically meaningful parameters for each cancer. These results suggest that the combined short-long-term approach is a potentially promising method for predicting radiogenic cancer risks and interpreting the underlying biological mechanisms.

  8. Interleukin-32 Positively Regulates Radiation-Induced Vascular Inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Lin, P. Charles

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To study the role of interleukin-32 (IL-32), a novel protein only detected in human tissues, in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced vascular inflammation. Methods and Materials: Irradiated (0-6 Gy) human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with or without various agents-a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor, or lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs)-were used to assess IL-32 expression by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cells was also analyzed. Results: Ionizing radiation dramatically increased IL-32 expression in vascular endothelial cells through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation induced IL-32 expression through nuclear factor {kappa}B activation, through induction of cPLA2 and LPC, as well as induction of Cox-2 and subsequent conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. Conversely, blocking nuclear factor {kappa}B, cPLA2, and Cox-2 activity impaired IR-induced IL-32 expression. Importantly, IL-32 significantly enhanced IR-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells. Conclusion: This study identifies IL-32 as a positive regulator in IR-induced vascular inflammation, and neutralization of IL-32 may be beneficial in protecting from IR-induced inflammation.

  9. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-18

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  10. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna

    2014-01-01

    With improved outcomes associated with radiotherapy, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS) are increasingly seen in long-term survivors of head and neck cancers, with an estimated risk of up to 0.3%. They exhibit no subsite predilection within the head and neck and can arise in any irradiated tissue of mesenchymal origin. Common histologic subtypes of RIS parallel their de novo counterparts and include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/sarcoma nitricoxide synthase, and fibrosarcoma. While imaging features of RIS are not pathognomonic, large size, extensive local invasion with bony destruction, marked enhancement within a prior radiotherapy field, and an appropriate latency period are suggestive of a diagnosis of RIS. RIS development may be influenced by factors such as radiation dose, age at initial exposure, exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and genetic tendency. Precise pathogenetic mechanisms of RIS are poorly understood and both directly mutagenizing effects of radiotherapy as well as changes in microenvironments are thought to play a role. Management of RIS is challenging, entailing surgery in irradiated tissue and a limited scope for further radiotherapy and chemotherapy. RIS is associated with significantly poorer outcomes than stage-matched sarcomas that arise independent of irradiation and surgical resection with clear margins seems to offer the best chance for cure. PMID:25493233

  11. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated.

  13. Mechanism of Hydrophilicity by Radiation-Induced Surface Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, Yoshio; Furuya, Masahiro; Takamasa, Tomoji; Okamoto, Koji

    When a metal oxide is irradiated by gamma rays, the irradiated surface becomes hydrophilic. This surface phenomenon is called as radiation-induced surface activation (RISA) hydrophilicity. In order to investigate gamma ray-induced and photoinduced hydrophilicity, the contact angles of water droplets on a titanium dioxide surface were measured in terms of irradiation intensity and time for gamma rays of cobalt-60 and for ultraviolet rays. Reciprocals of the contact angles increased in proportion to the irradiation time before the contact angles reached its super-hydrophilic state. The irradiation time dependency is equal to each other qualitatively. In addition, an effect of ambient gas was investigated. In pure argon gas, the contact angle remains the same against the irradiation time. This clearly indicates that certain humidity is required in ambient gas to take place of RISA hydrophilicity. A single crystal titanium dioxide (100) surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). After irradiation with gamma rays, a peak was found in the O1s spectrum, which indicates the adsorption of dissociative water to a surface 5-fold coordinate titanium site, and the formation of a surface hydroxyl group. We conclude that the RISA hydrophilicity is caused by chemisorption of the hydroxyl group on the surface.

  14. Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

  15. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  17. Temporal distributions of risk for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Land, C E

    1987-01-01

    Observations of cancer risk in irradiated human populations over time after exposure suggest that there are at least two, and perhaps more, very different patterns of temporal distribution of risk for radiation-induced cancer. The first, exemplified by bone sarcoma following therapeutic injection of 224Ra and chronic granulocytic leukemia in Japanese A-bomb survivors, is an early, wave-like pulse consisting of an increase in risk followed by a gradual decline back to baseline levels. The second, exemplified by breast cancer following a brief exposure to external gamma ray or X ray, and by lung cancer and stomach cancer in A-bomb survivors, is an increase in relative risk over about 10 years to a value which appears to remain constant over time thereafter. The first pattern suggests that tumor growth kinetics may play a central role in the temporal distribution of risk following exposure, while the second seems more consistent with multi-event models for carcinogenesis, in which radiation or some other cause of early events must be followed by one or more later events whose frequencies depend mainly on attained age. There are, however, other data that appear to conform to neither of the two models just mentioned. Influences of other cancer causes, like tobacco smoking, are potentially serious confounding factors in studies of induction period.

  18. Improvement of long-term survival by cardiac contractility modulation in heart failure patients: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Fang, Fang; Luo, Xiu Xia; Shlomo, Ben-Haim; Burkhoff, Daniel; Chan, Joseph Y S; Chan, Chin-Pang; Cheung, Lili; Rousso, Benny; Gutterman, David; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) has been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and cardiac function in heart failure (HF). However, there is limited data on the role of CCM on long-term survival, which was explored in the present study. Forty-one consecutive HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) <40% received CCM and were followed for approximately 6 years. They were compared with another 41 HF patients who were enrolled into the HF registry in the same period, and had similar age, gender, EF and etiology of HF. The primary end-point was all cause-mortality. This was stratified by EF. Secondary end-points included HF hospitalization, cardiovascular death, and the composite outcome of death or heart failure hospitalization. The CCM and control groups were well balanced for demographic data, medications and baseline left ventricular EF (27 ± 6 vs 27 ± 7%, p=NS). The mean follow-up duration was 75 ± 19 months in the CCM group and 69 ± 17 months in the control group. All-cause mortality was lower in the CCM group than the control group (39% vs. 71%, respectively; Log-rank χ(2)=11.23, p=0.001). Of note, the improvement of all-cause mortality is more dramatic in patients with EF ≥ 25-40% (36% vs. 80%, Log-rank χ(2)=15.8, p<0.001) than those with EF<25% (50% vs. 56%, p=NS), CCM vs. control respectively. Similar results were shown for the benefit of CCM in the secondary endpoints of cardiovascular death, and the composite outcome of death or heart failure hospitalization. The occurrence of HF hospitalization showed no significant difference between CCM and control groups in the whole cohort (41% vs. 49%, p=NS), but was significantly lower with CCM in subjects with EF ≥ 25-40% at baseline (36% vs. 64%, Log-rank χ(2)=7.79, p=0.005). CCM resulted in significant improvement of long-term survival, in particular in those with EF ≥ 25-40%. A reduction in heart failure hospitalizations was also seen in this group of patients with less

  19. Can geometric indices of heart rate variability predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Alice Soares Dos; Ricci-Vitor, Ana Laura; Bragatto, Vanessa Santa Rosa; Santos, Ana Paula Soares Dos; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with autonomic dysfunctions that can be evaluated through heart rate variability (HRV). Resistance training promotes improvement in autonomic modulation; however, studies that evaluate this scenario using geometric indices, which include nonlinear evaluation, thus providing more accurate information for physiological interpretation of HRV, are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of resistance training on autonomic modulation, using geometric indices of HRV, and peripheral muscle strength in individuals with COPD. Fourteen volunteers with COPD were submitted to resistance training consisting of 24 sessions lasting 60 min each, with a frequency of three times a week. The intensity was determined as 60% of one maximum repetition and was progressively increased until 80% for the upper and lower limbs. The HRV and dynamometry were performed at two moments, the beginning and the end of the experimental protocol. Significant increases were observed in the RRtri (4·81 ± 1·60 versus 6·55 ± 2·69, P = 0·033), TINN (65·36 ± 35·49 versus 101·07 ± 63·34, P = 0·028), SD1 (7·48 ± 3·17 versus 11·04 ± 6·45, P = 0·038) and SD2 (22·30 ± 8·56 versus 32·92 ± 18·78, P = 0·022) indices after the resistance training. Visual analysis of the Poincare plot demonstrated greater dispersion beat-to-beat and in the long-term interval between consecutive heart beats. Regarding muscle strength, there was a significant increase in the shoulder abduction and knee flexion. In conclusion, geometric indices of HRV can predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in individuals with COPD; improvement in peripheral muscle strength in patients with COPD was also observed.

  20. Autophagy promotes radiation-induced senescence but inhibits bystander effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Huei; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chuah, Qiu-Yu; Lee, Yi-Jang; Hsieh, Yi-Fen; Peng, Chih-Wen; Chiu, Shu-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Ionizing radiation induces cellular senescence to suppress cancer cell proliferation. However, it also induces deleterious bystander effects in the unirradiated neighboring cells through the release of senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) that promote tumor progression. Although autophagy has been reported to promote senescence, its role is still unclear. We previously showed that radiation induces senescence in PTTG1-depleted cancer cells. In this study, we found that autophagy was required for the radiation-induced senescence in PTTG1-depleted breast cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy caused the cells to switch from radiation-induced senescence to apoptosis. Senescent cancer cells exerted bystander effects by promoting the invasion and migration of unirradiated cells through the release of CSF2 and the subsequently activation of the JAK2-STAT3 and AKT pathways. However, the radiation-induced bystander effects were correlated with the inhibition of endogenous autophagy in bystander cells, which also resulted from the activation of the CSF2-JAK2 pathway. The induction of autophagy by rapamycin reduced the radiation-induced bystander effects. This study reveals, for the first time, the dual role of autophagy in radiation-induced senescence and bystander effects.

  1. Cell Therapy in Ischemic Heart Disease: Interventions That Modulate Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schaun, Maximiliano I.; Eibel, Bruna; Kristocheck, Melissa; Sausen, Grasiele; Machado, Luana; Koche, Andreia; Markoski, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe ischemic heart disease caused by coronary obstruction has progressively increased. Alternative forms of treatment have been studied in an attempt to regenerate myocardial tissue, induce angiogenesis, and improve clinical conditions. In this context, cell therapy has emerged as a promising alternative using cells with regenerative potential, focusing on the release of paracrine and autocrine factors that contribute to cell survival, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. Evidence of the safety, feasibility, and potential effectiveness of cell therapy has emerged from several clinical trials using different lineages of adult stem cells. The clinical benefit, however, is not yet well established. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of cell therapy in terms of regenerative and angiogenic capacity after myocardial ischemia. In addition, we addressed nonpharmacological interventions that may influence this therapeutic practice, such as diet and physical training. This review brings together current data on pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to improve cell homing and cardiac repair. PMID:26880938

  2. Anatomic Localization and Autonomic Modulation of AV Junctional Rhythm in Failing Human Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Hucker, William J.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Moazami, Nader; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The structure-function relationship in the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) of various animal species has been investigated in detail, however less is known about the human AVJ. In this study, we performed high-resolution optical mapping of the human AVJ (n=6) to define its pacemaker properties and response to autonomic stimulation. Methods and Results Isolated, coronary-perfused AVJ preparations from failing human hearts (n=6, 53±6 years) were optically mapped using the near-infrared, voltage-sensitive dye, di-4-ANBDQBS, with isoproterenol (Iso, 1 μM) and acetylcholine (ACh, 1μM). An algorithm detecting multiple components of optical action potentials was used to reconstruct multi-layered intramural AVJ activation and to identify specialized slow and fast conduction pathways (SP and FP). The anatomical origin and propagation of pacemaker activity was verified via histology. Spontaneous AVJ rhythms of 29±11 bpm (n=6) originated in the nodal-His region (NH, n=3) and/or the proximal His bundle (H, n=4). Iso accelerated the AVJ rhythm to 69±12 bpm (n=5); shifted the leading pacemaker to the transitional cell (TC) regions near the FP and SP (n=4) and/or coronary sinus (n=2); and triggered reentrant arrhythmias (n=2). ACh (n=4) decreased the AVJ rhythm to 18±4 bpm; slowed FP/SP conduction leading to block between the AVJ and atrium; and shifted the pacemaker to either the TC or TC/NH (bifocal activation). Conclusions We have demonstrated that the AVJ pacemaker in failing human hearts is located in the NH or H-regions and can be modified with autonomic stimulation. Moreover, we found that both the FP and SP are involved in anterograde and retrograde conduction. PMID:21646375

  3. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality From Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Lee, Christoph I; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-02-16

    Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening while considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation among women. 2 simulation-modeling approaches. U.S. population. Women aged 40 to 74 years. Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 years until age 74 years. Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (harms) per 100,000 women screened. Annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancer cases (95% CI, 88 to 178) leading to 16 deaths (CI, 11 to 23), relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete examination (8% of population) were projected to have greater radiation-induced breast cancer risk (266 cancer cases and 35 deaths per 100,000 women) than other women (113 cancer cases and 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 years reduced risk for radiation-induced cancer 5-fold. Life-years lost from radiation-induced breast cancer could not be estimated. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are affected by dose variability from screening, resultant diagnostic work-up, initiation age, and screening frequency. Women with large breasts may have a greater risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Cancer Institute.

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis of radiation-induced non-healing dermal wounds of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Frank; Philipp, Katrin; Sadick, Haneen; Goessler, Ullrich; Hörmann, Karl; Verse, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Persistent, poorly healing wounds are a significant clinical problem in patients who have had previous irradiation. The pathology of chronic dermal ulcers is characterised by excessive proteolytic activity which degrades the extracellular matrix (required for cell migration) and growth factors and their receptors. Interestingly, the molecular basis of radiation-induced dermal wounds is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of the endothelial marker vWF, of angiogenic bFGF, VEGF and IL-8, of collagenases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and their inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, in tissue samples from radiation-induced chronic dermal wounds and healthy control skin. Performing immunohistochemical detection of microvessels, an equivalent density of microvessels was observed within tissue samples from normal healthy skin and from radiation-induced non-healing cutaneous wounds. Investigation of angiogenic bFGF and VEGF demonstrated a decreased expression of both factors in the radiation-induced dermal wounds. The expression of angiogenic IL-8 was weak in both the healthy skin samples and the radiation-induced wounds. In addition, an increased expression of collagenases MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein within the radiation-induced wounds was demonstrated. While the expression of TIMP-1 showed no difference of expression between normal control skin and tissue samples from radiation-induced wounds, TIMP-2 expression was slightly increased compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that radiation-induced dermal injuries often fail to heal because of decreased angiogenesis and persistently high concentrations of MMPs with an imbalance of their tissue inhibitors. The basic mechanisms of wound healing in radiation-induced dermal wounds at the molecular level need to be understood further for the development of innovative treatment strategies.

  5. Calcium-ion movement and contractility in atrial strips of frog heart are not affected by low-frequency-modulated, 1 GHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J L; Mealing, G A

    1993-01-01

    Calcium efflux from electrically stimulated, 45Ca(2+)-preloaded atrial strips of the frog heart was measured from samples of the rinsing perfusate collected at 2-min intervals for 32 min in a continuous perfusion chamber. Contractile force was simultaneously monitored. The specimen chamber was located in a stripline apparatus in which the atrial strips were exposed for 32 min to constant (CW) or amplitude-modulated (AM), 1 GHz electromagnetic (EM) fields at specific absorption rates (SAR) ranging from 3.2 microW/kg to 1.6 W/kg. Amplitude modulation was either at 0.5 Hz, in synchrony with the electrical stimulus applied to the preparation, or at 16 Hz. Neither unmodulated nor 0.5 Hz or 16 Hz modulated 1 GHz waves affected the movement of calcium ions or the contractile force in isolated atrial strips of the frog heart.

  6. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; GLANZMANN, CHRISTOPH; YOUSEFI, BITA; LOEWENICH, KARL; HUBER, GERHARD; SCHMID, STEPHAN; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves of interest. So far, one of the assessed 151 IMRT patients at risk exhibited symptoms of RICNP after 6 years. The mean/median FU of the entire cohort was 71/68 months (range, 27–145). The results were compared with literature reports. In conclusion, RICNP appears to be a rare complication. However, a longer FU and a larger sample size are required to draw reliable conclusions on the incidence of RICNP in the era of IMRT. PMID:26171186

  7. Ionizing radiation-induced mutant frequencies increase transiently in male germ cells of older mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; McMahan, C Alex; Hildreth, Kim; Garcia, Rebecca A; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2012-05-15

    Spontaneous mutant frequency in the male germline increases with age, thereby increasing the risk of siring offspring with genetic disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of age on ionizing radiation-induced male germline mutagenesis. lacI transgenic mice were treated with ionizing radiation at 4-, 15- and 26-month-old, and mutant frequencies were determined for pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids at 15 days or 49 days after ionizing radiation treatment. Cells collected 15 days after treatment were derivatives of irradiated differentiating spermatogenic cells while cells collected 49 days later were derivatives of spermatogonial stem cells. The results showed that (1) spontaneous mutant frequency increased in spermatogenic cells recovered from nonirradiated old mice (26-months-old), particularly in the round spermatids; (2) mutant frequencies were significantly increased in round spermatids obtained from middle-aged mice (15-months-old) and old age mice (26-months-old) at 15 and 49 days after irradiation compared to the sham-treated old mice; and (3) pachytene spermatocytes obtained from 15- or 26-month-old mice displayed a significantly increased mutant frequency at 15 days post irradiation. This study indicates that age modulates the mutagenic response to ionizing radiation in the male germline.

  8. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage.

  9. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shangcheng; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Xubu; Li, Maoquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhong, Min

    2010-01-22

    Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress may be involved in the adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the brain. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are closely associated with various nervous system diseases and mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation can cause oxidative damage to mtDNA. In this study, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to pulsed RF electromagnetic fields at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. At 24 h after exposure, we found that RF radiation induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG), a common biomarker of DNA oxidative damage, in the mitochondria of neurons. Concomitant with this finding, the copy number of mtDNA and the levels of mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts showed an obvious reduction after RF exposure. Each of these mtDNA disturbances could be reversed by pretreatment with melatonin, which is known to be an efficient antioxidant in the brain. Together, these results suggested that 1800 MHz RF radiation could cause oxidative damage to mtDNA in primary cultured neurons. Oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of RF radiation in the brain.

  10. Role of ROS-mediated autophagy in radiation-induced bystander effect of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jianghong; Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Ye, Shuang; Liu, Weili; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular response to ionizing radiation, but it is unclear whether autophagy can modulate radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Here, we investigated the relationship between bystander damage and autophagy in human hepatoma cells of HepG2. HepG2 cells were treated with conditioned medium (CM) collected from 3 Gy γ-rays irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells for 4, 12, or 24 h, followed by the measurement of micronuclei (MN), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and protein expressions of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and Beclin-1 in the bystander HepG2 cells. In some experiments, the bystander HepG2 cells were respectively transfected with LC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA), Beclin-1 siRNA or treated with 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Additional MN and mitochondrial dysfunction coupled with ROS were induced in the bystander cells. The expressions of protein markers of autophagy, LC3-II/LC3-I and Beclin-1, increased in the bystander cells. The inductions of bystander MN and overexpressions of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly diminished by DMSO. However, when the bystander cells were transfected with LC3 siRNA or Beclin-1 siRNA, the yield of bystander MN was significantly enhanced. The elevated ROS have bi-functions in balancing the bystander effects. One is to cause MN and the other is to induce protective autophagy.

  11. Mitigation of Radiation Induced Pulmonary Vascular Injury by Delayed Treatment with Captopril

    PubMed Central

    MOLTHEN, Robert C.; WU, Qingping; FISH, Brian L.; MOULDER, John E.; JACOBS, Elizabeth R.; MEDHORA, Meetha M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective A single dose of 10 Gy radiation to the thorax of rats results in decreased total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, pulmonary artery distensibility and distal vascular density while increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at 2-months post-exposure. In this study we evaluate the potential of a renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulator, the ACE inhibitor captopril, to mitigate this pulmonary vascular damage. Methods Rats exposed to 10 Gy thorax only irradiation and age-matched controls were studied 2-months after exposure, during the development of radiation pneumonitis. Rats were treated, either immediately or 2-weeks after radiation exposure, with 2 doses of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, dissolved in their drinking water. To determine pulmonary vascular responses, we measured pulmonary hemodynamics, lung ACE activity, pulmonary arterial distensibility, and peripheral vessel density. Results Captopril, given at a vasoactive but not a lower dose, mitigated radiation-induced pulmonary vascular injury. More importantly these beneficial effects were observed even if drug therapy was delayed for up to two weeks after exposure. Conclusions Captopril resulted in a reduction in pulmonary vascular injury that supports its use as a radiomitigator after an unexpected radiological event such as a nuclear accident. PMID:22882664

  12. Cardiac energetic impairment in heart disease and the potential role of metabolic modulators: a review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satnam; Schwarz, Konstantin; Horowitz, John; Frenneaux, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac energetic impairment is a frequent finding in patients with both inherited and acquired diseases of heart muscle. In this review the mechanisms of energy generation in the healthy heart and their disturbances in heart muscle diseases are described. Therapeutic agents targeted at correcting cardiac energetic impairment are discussed. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Use of pentoxifylline and tocopherol in radiation-induced fibrosis and fibroatrophy.

    PubMed

    Patel, V; McGurk, M

    2017-04-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis in the head and neck is a well-established pathophysiological process after radiotherapy. Recently pentoxifylline and tocopherol have been proposed as treatments to combat the late compli