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Sample records for modulator cdb4124 inhibits

  1. An antiprogestin, CDB4124, blocks progesterone's attenuation of the negative effects of a mild stress on sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Uphouse, Lynda; Hiegel, Cindy

    2013-03-01

    These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that a progesterone receptor antagonist would block progesterone's ability to reduce the negative effects of a 5 min restraint on female rat sexual behavior. Ovariectomized Fischer rats were injected with 10 μg estradiol benzoate. Two days later, rats were injected subcutaneously (sc) with the progesterone receptor antagonist, CDB4124 (17α-acetoxy-21-methoxy-11β-[4-N,N-dimethyaminopheny]-19-norpregna-4,9-dione-3,20-dione) (60 mg/kg), or vehicle (20% DMSO+propylene glycol). One hour later, rats were injected sc with 500 μg progesterone or vehicle (sesame seed oil). Rats were assigned to one of three different treatment conditions: (1) (ECV) estradiol benzoate, CDB4124, sesame seed oil vehicle, (2) (ECP) estradiol benzoate, CDB4124, progesterone, and (3) (EVP) estradiol benzoate, DMSO/propylene glycol vehicle, progesterone. That afternoon sexual behavior was examined before and after a 5 min restraint experience. Before restraint, lordosis behavior was comparable across treatment conditions but only progesterone-treated rats exhibited proceptive behavior. CDB4124 did not block progesterone's induction of proceptivity. However, after restraint, CDB4124 attenuated the positive effects of progesterone on all sexual behaviors examined. The restraint experience inhibited sexual behavior in rats treated with estradiol benzoate and CDB4124 and in rats treated with estradiol benzoate, CDB4124, and progesterone but not in rats given estradiol benzoate and progesterone without CDB4124. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone receptors mediate progesterone's ability to reduce the negative sexual behavioral effects of a mild stressor.

  2. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Ethan H.; Scibelli, Angela C.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone’s GABAA receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role of progesterone receptors. We administered the classic progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU-38486) and the specific progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 to mice that had been primed with progesterone for five days, and found that both compounds induced FST immobility reliably, robustly, and in a dose-dependent fashion. Although CDB-4124 increased FST immobility, it did not suppress initial activity in a locomotor test. These findings suggest that decreased progesterone receptor activity contributes to depression-like behavior in mice, consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone withdrawal may contribute to the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. PMID:21163582

  3. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Ethan H; Scibelli, Angela C; Finn, Deborah A

    2011-07-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone's GABA(A) receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role of progesterone receptors. We administered the classic progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU-38486) and the specific progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 to mice that had been primed with progesterone for five days, and found that both compounds induced FST immobility reliably, robustly, and in a dose-dependent fashion. Although CDB-4124 increased FST immobility, it did not suppress initial activity in a locomotor test. These findings suggest that decreased progesterone receptor activity contributes to depression-like behavior in mice, consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone withdrawal may contribute to the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  5. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  6. Wnt modulating agents inhibit human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Arun; He, Ran; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Forman, Michael; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2013-06-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited anti-HCMV therapies are available, development of new agents is desired. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic and cancer stem cell development and is targeted by gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). HCMV infects stem cells, including neural progenitor cells, during embryogenesis. To investigate the role of Wnt in HCMV replication in vitro, we tested monensin, nigericin, and salinomycin, compounds that inhibit cancer stem cell growth by modulating the Wnt pathway. These compounds inhibited the replication of HCMV Towne and a clinical isolate. Inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication but persisted throughout the full replication cycle. There was a significant decrease in expression of IE2, UL44, and pp65 proteins. HCMV infection resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in expression of phosphorylated and total lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (pLRP6 and LRP6, respectively), Wnt 5a/b, and β-catenin and a modest decrease in Dvl2/3, while levels of the negative regulator axin 1 were increased. Nigericin decreased the expression of pLRP6, LRP6, axin 1, and Wnt 5a/b in noninfected and HCMV-infected cells. For all three compounds, a correlation was found between expression levels of Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 and HCMV inhibition. The decrease in Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 expression was more significant in HCMV-infected cells than noninfected cells. These data illustrate the complex effects of HCMV on the Wnt pathway and the fine balance between Wnt and HCMV, resulting in abrogation of HCMV replication. Additional studies are required to elucidate how HCMV targets Wnt for its benefit.

  7. Wnt Modulating Agents Inhibit Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; He, Ran; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Forman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited anti-HCMV therapies are available, development of new agents is desired. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic and cancer stem cell development and is targeted by gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). HCMV infects stem cells, including neural progenitor cells, during embryogenesis. To investigate the role of Wnt in HCMV replication in vitro, we tested monensin, nigericin, and salinomycin, compounds that inhibit cancer stem cell growth by modulating the Wnt pathway. These compounds inhibited the replication of HCMV Towne and a clinical isolate. Inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication but persisted throughout the full replication cycle. There was a significant decrease in expression of IE2, UL44, and pp65 proteins. HCMV infection resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in expression of phosphorylated and total lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (pLRP6 and LRP6, respectively), Wnt 5a/b, and β-catenin and a modest decrease in Dvl2/3, while levels of the negative regulator axin 1 were increased. Nigericin decreased the expression of pLRP6, LRP6, axin 1, and Wnt 5a/b in noninfected and HCMV-infected cells. For all three compounds, a correlation was found between expression levels of Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 and HCMV inhibition. The decrease in Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 expression was more significant in HCMV-infected cells than noninfected cells. These data illustrate the complex effects of HCMV on the Wnt pathway and the fine balance between Wnt and HCMV, resulting in abrogation of HCMV replication. Additional studies are required to elucidate how HCMV targets Wnt for its benefit. PMID:23571549

  8. Speech-induced modulation of interhemispheric inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kano, Tadashige; Kobayashi, Masahito; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2012-12-07

    This study aimed to determine the effects of speech and mastication on interhemispheric inhibition between the right and left primary motor areas (M1s) by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the first dorsal interossei (FDIs) of each hand of 10 healthy right-handed subjects under 3 conditions: at rest (control), during mastication (non-verbal oral movement), and during speech (reading aloud). Test TMS was delivered following conditioning TMS of the contralateral M1 at various interstimulus intervals. Under all conditions, the MEPs in the left FDIs were significantly inhibited after conditioning of the left M1 (i.e. inhibition of the right M1 by TMS of the left hemisphere). In contrast, the left M1 was significantly inhibited by the right hemisphere only during the control and mastication tasks, but not speech task. These results suggest that speech may facilitate the activity of the dominant M1 via functional connectivity between the speech area and the left M1, or may modify the balance of interhemispheric interactions, by suppressing inhibition of the dominant hemisphere by the non-dominant hemisphere. Our findings show a novel aspect of interhemispheric dominance and may improve therapeutic strategies for recovery from stroke.

  9. Modulation of motor cortex inhibition during motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin W X; Stinear, Cathy M

    2017-04-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is similar to overt movement, engaging common neural substrates and facilitating the corticomotor pathway; however, it does not result in excitatory descending motor output. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to assess inhibitory networks in the primary motor cortex via measures of 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI), and late cortical disinhibition (LCD). These measures are thought to reflect extrasynaptic GABAA tonic inhibition, postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, and presynaptic GABAB disinhibition, respectively. The behavior of 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD during MI has not yet been explored. This study aimed to investigate how 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD are modulated during MI and voluntary relaxation (VR) of a target muscle. Twenty-five healthy young adults participated. TMS was used to assess nonconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, 1-ms SICI, 100- (LICI100) and 150-ms LICI, and LCD in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and right abductor digiti minimi during rest, MI, and VR of the hand. Compared with rest, MEP amplitudes were facilitated in APB during MI. SICI was not affected by task or muscle. LICI100 decreased in both muscles during VR but not MI, whereas LCD was recruited in both muscles during both tasks. This indicates that VR modulates postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, whereas both tasks modulate presynaptic GABAB inhibition in a non-muscle-specific way. This study highlights further neurophysiological parallels between actual and imagined movement, which may extend to voluntary relaxation.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to investigate how 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition, long-interval intracortical inhibition, and late cortical disinhibition are modulated during motor imagery and voluntary muscle relaxation. We present novel findings of decreased 100-ms long-interval intracortical inhibition during voluntary muscle

  10. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N.; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K+) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K+ channel modulating agents demonstrated that K+ channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K+ channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) were identified as the K+ channel family mediating BUNV K+ channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. PMID:26677217

  11. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-02-12

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K(+)) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K(+) channel modulating agents demonstrated that K(+) channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K(+) channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K(+) channels (K2P) were identified as the K(+) channel family mediating BUNV K(+) channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Intracortical modulation, and not spinal inhibition, mediates placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, M; Lee, M C H; Valentini, E; Iannetti, G D

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of spinal responses to noxious stimulation has been detected using spinal fMRI during placebo analgesia, which is therefore increasingly considered a phenomenon caused by descending inhibition of spinal activity. However, spinal fMRI is technically challenging and prone to false-positive results. Here we recorded laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) during placebo analgesia in humans. LEPs allow neural activity to be measured directly and with high enough temporal resolution to capture the sequence of cortical areas activated by nociceptive stimuli. If placebo analgesia is mediated by inhibition at spinal level, this would result in a general suppression of LEPs rather than in a selective reduction of their late components. LEPs and subjective pain ratings were obtained in two groups of healthy volunteers - one was conditioned for placebo analgesia while the other served as unconditioned control. Laser stimuli at three suprathreshold energies were delivered to the right hand dorsum. Placebo analgesia was associated with a significant reduction of the amplitude of the late P2 component. In contrast, the early N1 component, reflecting the arrival of the nociceptive input to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), was only affected by stimulus energy. This selective suppression of late LEPs indicates that placebo analgesia is mediated by direct intracortical modulation rather than inhibition of the nociceptive input at spinal level. The observed cortical modulation occurs after the responses elicited by the nociceptive stimulus in the SI, suggesting that higher order sensory processes are modulated during placebo analgesia.

  13. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  14. Proactive modulation of long-interval intracortical inhibition during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Hayley J.; Cirillo, John

    2016-01-01

    Daily activities often require sudden cancellation of preplanned movement, termed response inhibition. When only a subcomponent of a whole response must be suppressed (required here on Partial trials), the ensuing component is markedly delayed. The neural mechanisms underlying partial response inhibition remain unclear. We hypothesized that Partial trials would be associated with nonselective corticomotor suppression and that GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition within primary motor cortex might be responsible for the nonselective corticomotor suppression contributing to Partial trial response delays. Sixteen right-handed participants performed a bimanual anticipatory response inhibition task while single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to elicit motor evoked potentials in the left first dorsal interosseous muscle. Lift times, amplitude of motor evoked potentials, and long-interval intracortical inhibition were examined across the different trial types (Go, Stop-Left, Stop-Right, Stop-Both). Go trials produced a tight distribution of lift times around the target, whereas those during Partial trials (Stop-Left and Stop-Right) were substantially delayed. The modulation of motor evoked potential amplitude during Stop-Right trials reflected anticipation, suppression, and subsequent reinitiation of movement. Importantly, suppression was present across all Stop trial types, indicative of a “default” nonselective inhibitory process. Compared with blocks containing only Go trials, inhibition increased when Stop trials were introduced but did not differ between trial types. The amount of inhibition was positively correlated with lift times during Stop-Right trials. Tonic levels of inhibition appear to be proactively modulated by task context and influence the speed at which unimanual responses occur after a nonselective “brake” is applied. PMID:27281744

  15. Glycinergic transmission modulates GABAergic inhibition in the avian auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fischl, Matthew J.; Burger, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    For all neurons, a proper balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition is crucial to effect computational precision. Achievement of this balance is remarkable when one considers factors that modulate synaptic strength operate on multiple overlapping time scales and affect both pre- and postsynaptic elements. Recent studies have shown that inhibitory transmitters, glycine and GABA, are co-released in auditory nuclei involved in the computation of interaural time disparities (ITDs), a cue used to process sound source location. The co-release expressed at these synapses is heavily activity dependent, and generally occurs when input rates are high. This circuitry, in both birds and mammals, relies on inhibitory input to maintain the temporal precision necessary for ITD encoding. Studies of co-release in other brain regions suggest that GABA and glycine receptors (GlyRs) interact via cross-suppressive modulation of receptor conductance. We performed in vitro whole-cell recordings in several nuclei of the chicken brainstem auditory circuit to assess whether this cross-suppressive phenomenon was evident in the avian brainstem. We evaluated the effect of pressure-puff applied glycine on synaptically evoked inhibitory currents in nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and the superior olivary nucleus (SON). Glycine pre-application reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked during a 100 Hz train stimulus in both nuclei. This apparent glycinergic modulation was blocked in the presence of strychnine. Further experiments showed that this modulation did not depend on postsynaptic biochemical interactions such as phosphatase activity, or direct interactions between GABA and GlyR proteins. Rather, voltage clamp experiments in which we manipulated Cl− flux during agonist application suggest that activation of one receptor will modulate the conductance of the other via local changes in Cl− ion concentration within microdomains of the postsynaptic membrane

  16. Impaired modulation of intracortical inhibition in focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Cathy M; Byblow, Winston D

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracortical inhibition (ICI) plays an important role in shaping the output from primary motor cortex, and that ICI may be impaired in people with Focal Hand Dystonia (FHD). This study explored the muscle-specificity and temporal modulation of ICI during the performance of a phasic index finger flexion task. Eight control subjects and seven with FHD were asked to rest their dominant hand upon a computer mouse, and depress the mouse button using their index finger in time with a 1 Hz auditory metronome, while keeping the rest of their hand as relaxed as possible. Responses to single and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles while subjects were at rest and during 'on' and 'off' phases of the task. For control subjects during the movement (i). FDI motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and pretrigger EMG increased, and ICI decreased, as expected, and (ii). there was no significant facilitation of MEP amplitude or pretrigger EMG for APB, which was associated with a significant increase in ICI during the movement. This may have helped prevent the unwanted activation of this muscle. While FHD subjects demonstrated the same patterns of modulation of both MEP amplitude and pretrigger EMG for both FDI and APB, their levels of ICI were not modulated by task performance. This was despite no difference between subject groups in the level of ICI observed at rest. These findings suggest that FHD is associated with impaired modulation of ICI during performance of a precise manual task, which may contribute to a lack of specificity in the output from M1 and the development of dystonic symptoms.

  17. Modulation of taste peripheral signal through interpapillar inhibition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurélie; Pillias, Anne-Marie; Faurion, Annick

    2004-03-25

    Single taste buds from fungiform papillae were iontophoretically stimulated with chemicals filling glass microelectrodes while a single unit was recorded in the taste pore of a neighbor papilla. High signal-to-noise ratio responses were observed in the recorded papilla as antidromic action potentials. These responses were possibly modulated by the simultaneous stimulation of another adjacent papilla. A decrease in the frequency of firing and/or both decrementing spikes were observed during such dual papillae stimulations. These inhibitory effects were not modified by the section of the chordo-lingual nerve, suggesting the tongue is able to process the gustatory information thanks to interpapillar negative feedback, prior to transmitting the signal to the central nervous system. Branched chorda tympani fibers can account for responses observed for single papillae stimulations; inhibitions and decrementing spikes may suggest the contribution of another mechanism of interaction between two different single fibers.

  18. Temporal expectancy modulates inhibition of return in a discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Shai; Henik, Avishai

    2010-02-01

    This research examined the influence of cue temporal predictability on inhibition of return (IOR) in a discrimination task. In exogenous attention experiments, the cue that summons attention is noninformative as to where the target will appear. However, it is predictive as to when it will appear. In previous work, it was demonstrated that temporal predictability does not influence IOR in detection tasks. In this work, it is shown that IOR is influenced by temporal predictability in discrimination tasks. Predictability was manipulated by using three stimulus onset asynchrony distributions: nonaging, aging, and accelerated aging. IOR was found when the cue predicted target appearance and was modulated by temporal information. In the nonaging distribution (in which the cue did not predict target appearance), there was no IOR.

  19. Prepulse inhibition modulation by contextual conditioning of dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed

    Mena, Auxiliadora; De la Casa, Luis G

    2013-09-01

    When a neutral stimulus is repeatedly paired with a drug, an association is established between them that can induce two different responses: either an opponent response that counteracts the effect of the drug, or a response that is similar to that induced by the drug. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of the associations that can be established between the contextual cues and the administration of dopamine agonists or antagonists. Our hypothesis suggests that repeated administration of drugs that modulate dopaminergic activity in the presence of a specific context leads to the establishment of an association that subsequently results in a conditioned response to the context that is similar to that induced by the drug. To test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments that revealed that contextual cues acquired the property to modulate pre-pulse inhibition by prior pairings of such context with the dopamine antagonist haloperidol (Experiment 1), and with the dopamine agonist d-amphetamine (Experiment 2). The implications of these results are discussed both at a theoretical level, and attending to the possibilities that could involve the use of context cues for the therapeutic administration of dopaminergic drugs.

  20. Acute aerobic exercise modulates primary motor cortex inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Ronan A; Coxon, James P; Cirillo, John; Glenny, Helen; Gant, Nicholas; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-12-01

    Aerobic exercise can enhance neuroplasticity although presently the neural mechanisms underpinning these benefits remain unclear. One possible mechanism is through effects on primary motor cortex (M1) function via down-regulation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The aim of the present study was to examine how corticomotor excitability (CME) and M1 intracortical inhibition are modulated in response to a single bout of moderate intensity aerobic exercise. Ten healthy right-handed adults were participants. Single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over left M1 to obtain motor-evoked potentials in the right flexor pollicis brevis. We examined CME, cortical silent period (SP) duration, short- and long-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI, LICI), and late cortical disinhibition (LCD), before and after acute aerobic exercise (exercise session) or an equivalent duration without exercise (control session). Aerobic exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at a workload equivalent to 60 % of maximal cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak; heart rate reserve = 75 ± 3 %, perceived exertion = 13.5 ± 0.7). LICI was reduced at 10 (52 ± 17 %, P = 0.03) and 20 min (27 ± 8 %, P = 0.03) post-exercise compared to baseline (13 ± 4 %). No significant changes in CME, SP duration, SICI or LCD were observed. The present study shows that GABAB-mediated intracortical inhibition may be down-regulated after acute aerobic exercise. The potential effects this may have on M1 plasticity remain to be determined.

  1. Learning to integrate versus inhibiting information is modulated by age.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Pikkat, Helen; Upstill, Emily; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Walsh, Vincent

    2015-02-04

    Cognitive training aiming at improving learning is often successful, but what exactly underlies the observed improvements and how these differ across the age spectrum are currently unknown. Here we asked whether learning in young and older people may reflect enhanced ability to integrate information required to perform a cognitive task or whether it may instead reflect the ability to inhibit task-irrelevant information for successful task performance. We trained 30 young and 30 aging human participants on a numerosity discrimination task known to engage the parietal cortex and in which cue-integration and inhibitory abilities can be distinguished. We coupled training with parietal, motor, or sham transcranial random noise stimulation, known for modulating neural activity. Numerosity discrimination improved after training and was maintained long term, especially in the training + parietal stimulation group, regardless of age. Despite the quantitatively similar improvement in the two age groups, the content of learning differed remarkably: aging participants improved more in inhibitory abilities, whereas younger subjects improved in cue-integration abilities. Moreover, differences in the content of learning were reflected in different transfer effects to untrained but related abilities: in the younger group, improvements in cue integration paralleled improvements in continuous quantity (time and space), whereas in the elderly group, improvements in numerosity-based inhibitory abilities generalized to other measures of inhibition and corresponded to a decline in space discrimination, possibly because conflicting learning resources are used in numerosity and continuous quantity processing. These results indicate that training can enhance different, age-dependent cognitive processes and highlight the importance of identifying the exact processes underlying learning for effective training programs.

  2. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity.

    PubMed

    Vanrell, María C; Cueto, Juan A; Barclay, Jeremías J; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Romano, Patricia S

    2013-07-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings.

  3. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, María C.; Cueto, Juan A.; Barclay, Jeremías J.; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Romano, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings. PMID:23697944

  4. Spectral broadening and inhibition of amplitude and frequency modulation in Nd: glass regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Pan, Xue; Wang, Jiangfeng; Li, Xuechun

    2014-11-01

    In order to broaden the spectrum of laser pulse and reduce the gain narrowing effect in Nd:glass regenerative amplifier to realize the ambition of inhibiting amplitude and frequency modulation, proper quartz birefringence crystal plate is inserted into the cavity. The influence factors of central wavelength, depth of modulation and range of modulation are obtained theoretically. The width of the spectrum is broadened by controlling all the factors. Two kinds of thickness, 5mm and 6mm, are inserted into the regenerative amplifier cavity. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment both show that the effect of spectrum widening is evident, which reduces the gain narrowing effect to some extent. The amplitude and frequency modulation resulted from gain narrowing effect is inhibited when the central wavelength deflects. The simulated results show that inhibited effect of amplitude and frequency modulation is remarkable. And the method is a potential effective technique for amplitude and frequency modulation inhibition.

  5. Inhibition of light tunneling for multichannel excitations in longitudinally modulated waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Lobanov, Valery E.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.

    2010-02-15

    We consider the evolution of multichannel excitations in longitudinally modulated waveguide arrays where the refractive index either oscillates out-of-phase in all neighboring waveguides or when it is modulated in phase in several central waveguides surrounded by out-of-phase oscillating neighbors. Both types of modulations allow resonant inhibition of light tunneling, but only the modulation of the latter type conserves the internal structure of multichannel excitations. We show that parameter regions where light tunneling inhibition is possible depend on the symmetry and structure of multichannel excitations. Antisymmetric multichannel excitations are more robust than their symmetric counterparts and experience nonlinearity-induced delocalization at higher amplitudes.

  6. Emotional Content Modulates Perceptual and Response Inhibition Processing

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUYONG; LUO, WENBO; ZHU, XIANGRU; BROSTER, LUCAS S.; CHEN, TAOLIN; LI, JINZHEN; LUO, YUEJIA

    2015-01-01

    In this study, event-related potentials were used to investigate the effect of emotion on response inhibition. Participants performed an emotional go/no-go task that required responses to human faces associated with a “go” valence (i.e., emotional, neutral) and response inhibition to human faces associated with a “no-go” valence. Emotional content impaired response inhibition, as evidenced by decreased response accuracy and N2 amplitudes in no-go trials. More importantly, emotional expressions elicited larger N170 amplitudes than neutral expressions, and this effect was larger in no-go than in go trials, indicating that the perceptual processing of emotional expression had priority in inhibitory trials. In no-go trials, correlation analysis showed that increased N170 amplitudes were associated with decreased N2 amplitudes. Taken together, our findings suggest that that emotional content impairs response inhibition due to the prioritization of emotional content processing. PMID:24942597

  7. N2 and P3 modulation during partial inhibition in a modified go/nogo task.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An T; Moyle, Jonson J; Fox, Allison M

    2016-09-01

    The neural response following the partial inhibition of responses can provide insight into the processes underlying response inhibition. We examined the N2 and P3 on trials where participants correctly responded to go stimuli, successfully inhibited their response to nogo stimuli, and nogo trials where they initiated but did not complete their response (partial inhibitions) in an adult sample (N=24, M(age)=21.17, SD(age)=3.52). An enhanced and delayed N2 was observed on partially inhibited compared to successfully inhibited nogo trials. Further analysis showed that this modulation was error-related. An enhanced central P3 was observed following successful inhibitions compared to correct go trials, but not following partial inhibitions. The results suggest that the central P3 enhancement is specific to the complete and successful inhibition of responses. Therefore, the absence of a central P3 on partial inhibitions could reflect insufficient inhibition or a monitored failure in inhibiting the response. Although, our findings provide support for the role of P3 in response inhibition, it raises questions about the processes involved in the subsequent inhibition or correction of the erroneous response. Further research examining the neural response following both partial and unsuccessful inhibitions could provide insight regarding these processes.

  8. Simulating Cortical Feedback Modulation as Changes in Excitation and Inhibition in a Cortical Circuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John D.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical feedback pathways are hypothesized to distribute context-dependent signals during flexible behavior. Recent experimental work has attempted to understand the mechanisms by which cortical feedback inputs modulate their target regions. Within the mouse whisker sensorimotor system, cortical feedback stimulation modulates spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness, leading to enhanced sensory representations. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study we use a simplified neural circuit model, which includes two recurrent excitatory populations and global inhibition, to simulate cortical modulation. First, we demonstrate how changes in the strengths of excitation and inhibition alter the input–output processing responses of our model. Second, we compare these responses with experimental findings from cortical feedback stimulation. Our analyses predict that enhanced inhibition underlies the changes in spontaneous and sensory evoked activity observed experimentally. More generally, these analyses provide a framework for relating cellular and synaptic properties to emergent circuit function and dynamic modulation. PMID:27595137

  9. Central Inhibition Ability Modulates Attention-Induced Motion Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milders, Maarten; Hay, Julia; Sahraie, Arash; Niedeggen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Impaired motion perception can be induced in normal observers in a rapid serial visual presentation task. Essential for this effect is the presence of motion distractors prior to the motion target, and we proposed that this attention-induced motion blindness results from high-level inhibition produced by the distractors. To investigate this, we…

  10. Androgen inhibition of sexual receptivity is modulated by estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Meg E.; Clark, Ann S.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual receptivity induced in ovariectomized rats by the long-term administration of estradiol benzoate (EB) can be inhibited by concurrent administration of androgens. Experiment 1 examined the role of time course and dose of androgens in the inhibition of estrogen-induced sexual receptivity. Ovariectomized rats were treated with EB (2.0 µg per rat per day) for 6 days and tested for sexual receptivity (Test Day I). EB treatment continued for 15 days concomitant with daily administration of one of three doses of dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP; 7.5, 0.75, 0.075 mg/kg) or 3α-androstanediol (3α-Adiol; 3.75, 1.0, 0.375 mg/kg). Four tests for sexual receptivity were conducted on days 3, 6, 14, and 15 of the androgen/vehicle treatment period (Test Days II – V). On Day 15 (Test Day V), the rats received progesterone (1.0 mg per rat) 4 h before testing. Using the same experimental design, Experiment 2 examined the effect of increasing the dose of estrogen on the androgenic inhibition of sexual receptivity. Ovariectomized rats were treated with one of two doses of EB (2.0 or 10.0 µg per rat per day) concomitant with daily administration of DHTP (7.5 mg/kg) or 3α-Adiol (3.75 mg/kg). In Experiment 1, the highest doses of both DHTP and 3α-Adiol significantly inhibited estrogen-induced sexual receptivity. Data from Experiment 2 indicate that the inhibitory effects of DHTP but not 3α-Adiol can be moderated by an increased dose of EB. PMID:21130793

  11. Concurrent information affects response inhibition processes via the modulation of theta oscillations in cognitive control networks.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Mückschel, Moritz; Dippel, Gabriel; Beste, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Inhibiting responses is a challenge, where the outcome (partly) depends on the situational context. In everyday situations, response inhibition performance might be altered when irrelevant input is presented simultaneously with the information relevant for response inhibition. More specifically, irrelevant concurrent information may either brace or interfere with response-relevant information, depending on whether these inputs are redundant or conflicting. The aim of this study is to investigate neurophysiological mechanisms and the network underlying such modulations using EEG beamforming as method. The results show that in comparison to a baseline condition without concurrent information, response inhibition performance can be aggravated or facilitated by manipulating the extent of conflict via concurrent input. This depends on whether the requirement for cognitive control is high, as in conflicting trials, or whether it is low, as in redundant trials. In line with this, the total theta frequency power decreases in a right hemispheric orbitofrontal response inhibition network including the SFG, MFG, and SMA, when concurrent redundant information facilitates response inhibition processes. Vice versa, theta activity in a left-hemispheric response inhibition network (i.e., SFG, MFG, and IFG) increases, when conflicting concurrent information compromises response inhibition processes. We conclude that concurrent information bi-directionally shifts response inhibition performance and modulates the network architecture underlying theta oscillations which are signaling different levels of the need for cognitive control.

  12. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well using small parametric modulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, R.; Balibrea, F.; Lopez, M.A.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown theoretically for the first time that, depending on its period, amplitude, and initial phase, a periodic parametric modulation can suppress a chaotic escape from a potential well. The instance of the Helmholtz oscillator is used to demonstrate, by means of Melnikov{close_quote}s method, that parametric modulations of the linear or quadratic potential terms inhibit chaotic escape when certain resonance conditions are met. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Synthesis and SAR study of modulators inhibiting tRXRα-dependent AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Liqun; Chen, Jiebo; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Gao, Weiwei; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Xiao-kun; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Su, Ying

    2013-01-01

    RXRα represents an intriguing and unique target for pharmacologic interventions. We recently showed that Sulindac and a designed analog could bind to RXRα and modulate its biological activity, including inhibition of the interaction of an N-terminally truncated RXRα (tRXRα) with the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K). Here we report the synthesis, testing and SAR of a series of novel analogs of Sulindac as potential modulators for inhibiting tRXRα-dependent AKT activation. A new compound 30 was identified to have improved biological activity. PMID:23434637

  14. Modulation of motor inhibition by subthalamic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kibleur, A; Gras-Combe, G; Benis, D; Bastin, J; Bougerol, T; Chabardès, S; Polosan, M; David, O

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can be used to treat severe obsessive-compulsive disorders that are refractory to conventional treatments. The mechanisms of action of this approach possibly rely on the modulation of associative-limbic subcortical–cortical loops, but remain to be fully elucidated. Here in 12 patients, we report the effects of high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on behavior, and on electroencephalographic responses and inferred effective connectivity during motor inhibition processes involved in the stop signal task. First, we found that patients were faster to respond and had slower motor inhibition processes when stimulated. Second, the subthalamic stimulation modulated the amplitude and delayed inhibition-related electroencephalographic responses. The power of reconstructed cortical current densities decreased in the stimulation condition in a parietal–frontal network including cortical regions of the inhibition network such as the superior parts of the inferior frontal gyri and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Finally, dynamic causal modeling revealed that the subthalamic stimulation was more likely to modulate efferent connections from the basal ganglia, modeled as a hidden source, to the cortex. The connection from the basal ganglia to the right inferior frontal gyrus was significantly decreased by subthalamic stimulation. Beyond motor inhibition, our study thus strongly suggests that the mechanisms of action of high-frequency subthalamic stimulation are not restricted to the subthalamic nucleus, but also involve the modulation of distributed subcortical–cortical networks. PMID:27754484

  15. Estrogens modulate ventrolateral ventromedial hypothalamic glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ammy M; Clegg, Deborah J; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    Brain regulation of glucose homeostasis is sexually dimorphic; however, the impact sex hormones have on specific neuronal populations within the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN), a metabolically sensitive brain region, has yet to be fully characterized. Glucose-excited (GE) and -inhibited (GI) neurons are located throughout the VMN and may play a critical role in glucose and energy homeostasis. Within the ventrolateral portion of the VMN (VL-VMN), glucose sensing neurons and estrogen receptor (ER) distributions overlap. We therefore tested the hypothesis that VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons were sexually dimorphic and regulated by 17β-estradiol (17βE). Electrophysiological recordings of VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons in brain slices isolated from age- and weight-matched female and male mice were performed in the presence and absence of 17βE. We found a new class of VL-VMN GI neurons whose response to low glucose was transient despite continued exposure to low glucose. Heretofore, we refer to these newly identified VL-VMN GI neurons as 'adapting' or AdGI neurons. We found a sexual dimorphic response to low glucose, with male nonadapting GI neurons, but not AdGI neurons, responding more robustly to low glucose than those from females. 17βE blunted the response of both nonadapting GI and AdGI neurons to low glucose in both males and females, which was mediated by activation of estrogen receptor β and inhibition of AMP-activated kinase. In contrast, 17βE had no impact on GE or non-glucose sensing neurons in either sex. These data suggest sex differences and estrogenic regulation of VMN hypothalamic glucose sensing may contribute to the sexual dimorphism in glucose homeostasis.

  16. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients. ©2014 AACR.

  17. Attentional modulation of medial olivocochlear inhibition: evidence for immaturity in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K

    2014-12-01

    Efferent feedback shapes afferent auditory processing. Auditory attention has been shown to modulate medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent activity in human adults. Since auditory attention continues to develop throughout childhood, the present study explored whether attentional control of medial-efferent inhibition in 5-10 year-old children is adult-like. MOC inhibition was measured in adults (n = 14) and children (n = 12) during no-task (contralateral broadband noise), passive (contralateral noise with tone-pips) and active listening conditions (attended tone-pips embedded in contralateral broadband noise). A stronger MOC inhibition was observed when measured during the active listening condition for adults which is consistent with past work. However, the effect of auditory attention on MOC inhibition in children was not robust and was significantly lower compared to that observed for adults. These findings suggest the potential immaturity of the attentional mediation of MOC inhibition in tested children.

  18. Cue and Target Processing Modulate the Onset of Inhibition of Return

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabay, Shai; Chica, Ana B.; Charras, Pom; Funes, Maria J.; Henik, Avishai

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is modulated by task set and appears later in discrimination tasks than in detection tasks. Several hypotheses have been suggested to account for this difference. We tested three of these hypotheses in two experiments by examining the influence of cue and target level of processing on the onset of IOR. In the first…

  19. Genomic agonism and phenotypic antagonism between estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Tarulli, Gerard; Zarnke, Allison L.; Bourgo, Ryan J.; Laine, Muriel; Chang, Ya-Fang; Ma, Shihong; Dembo, Anna G.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Hickey, Theresa E.; Tilley, Wayne D.; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of progesterone receptor (PR) and its impact on estrogen signaling in breast cancer remain controversial. In primary ER+ (estrogen receptor–positive)/PR+ human tumors, we report that PR reprograms estrogen signaling as a genomic agonist and a phenotypic antagonist. In isolation, estrogen and progestin act as genomic agonists by regulating the expression of common target genes in similar directions, but at different levels. Similarly, in isolation, progestin is also a weak phenotypic agonist of estrogen action. However, in the presence of both hormones, progestin behaves as a phenotypic estrogen antagonist. PR remodels nucleosomes to noncompetitively redirect ER genomic binding to distal enhancers enriched for BRCA1 binding motifs and sites that link PR and ER/PR complexes. When both hormones are present, progestin modulates estrogen action, such that responsive transcriptomes, cellular processes, and ER/PR recruitment to genomic sites correlate with those observed with PR alone, but not ER alone. Despite this overall correlation, the transcriptome patterns modulated by dual treatment are sufficiently different from individual treatments, such that antagonism of oncogenic processes is both predicted and observed. Combination therapies using the selective PR modulator/antagonist (SPRM) CDB4124 in combination with tamoxifen elicited 70% cytotoxic tumor regression of T47D tumor xenografts, whereas individual therapies inhibited tumor growth without net regression. Our findings demonstrate that PR redirects ER chromatin binding to antagonize estrogen signaling and that SPRMs can potentiate responses to antiestrogens, suggesting that cotargeting of ER and PR in ER+/PR+ breast cancers should be explored. PMID:27386569

  20. Effect of low frequency magnetic fields on melanoma: tumor inhibition and immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously found that the low frequency magnetic fields (LF-MF) inhibited gastric and lung cancer cell growth. We suppose that exposure to LF-MF may modulate immune function so as to inhibit tumor. We here investigated whether LF-MF can inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma and influence immune function. Methods The effect of MF on the proliferation, cell cycle and ultrastracture of B16-F10 in vitro was detected by cell counting Kit-8 assay, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Lung metastasis mice were prepared by injection of 2 × 105 B16-F10 melanoma cells into the tail vein in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were then exposed to an LF-MF (0.4 T, 7.5 Hz) for 43 days. Survival rate, tumor markers and the innate and adaptive immune parameters were measured. Results The growth of B16-F10 cells was inhibited after exposure to the LF-MF. The inhibition was related to induction of cell cycle arrest and decomposition of chromatins. Moreover, the LF-MF prolonged the mouse survival rate and inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 in melanoma metastasis mice model. Furthermore, the LF-MF modulated the immune response via regulation of immune cells and cytokine production. In addition, the number of Treg cells was decreased in mice with the LF-MF exposure, while the numbers of T cells as well as dendritic cells were significantly increased. Conclusion LF-MF inhibited the growth and metastasis of melanoma cancer cells and improved immune function of tumor-bearing mice. This suggests that the inhibition may be attributed to modulation of LF-MF on immune function and LF-MF may be a potential therapy for treatment of melanoma. PMID:24314291

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibition modulates response inhibition in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Altena, Ellemarije; Nombela, Cristina; Housden, Charlotte R.; Maxwell, Helen; Rittman, Timothy; Huddleston, Chelan; Rae, Charlotte L.; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is common in Parkinson’s disease even in the absence of impulse control disorders. It is likely to be multifactorial, including a dopaminergic ‘overdose’ and structural changes in the frontostriatal circuits for motor control. In addition, we proposed that changes in serotonergic projections to the forebrain also contribute to response inhibition in Parkinson’s disease, based on preclinical animal and human studies. We therefore examined whether the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram improves response inhibition, in terms of both behaviour and the efficiency of underlying neural mechanisms. This multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study used a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design with an integrated Stop-Signal and NoGo paradigm. Twenty-one patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (46–76 years old, 11 male, Hoehn and Yahr stage 1.5–3) received 30 mg citalopram or placebo in addition to their usual dopaminergic medication in two separate sessions. Twenty matched healthy control subjects (54–74 years old, 12 male) were tested without medication. The effects of disease and drug on behavioural performance and regional brain activity were analysed using general linear models. In addition, anatomical connectivity was examined using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics. We confirmed that Parkinson’s disease caused impairment in response inhibition, with longer Stop-Signal Reaction Time and more NoGo errors under placebo compared with controls, without affecting Go reaction times. This was associated with less stop-specific activation in the right inferior frontal cortex, but no significant difference in NoGo-related activation. Although there was no beneficial main effect of citalopram, it reduced Stop-Signal Reaction Time and NoGo errors, and enhanced inferior frontal activation, in patients with relatively more severe disease (higher Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale

  2. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Inhibits Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Roxana; Döhrmann, Simon; Schaal, Christina; Hakkim, Abdul; Nizet, Victor; Corriden, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator typically prescribed for the prevention/treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although raloxifene is known to have anti-inflammatory properties, its effects on human neutrophils, the primary phagocytic leukocytes of the immune system, remain poorly understood. Here, through a screen of pharmacologically active small molecules, we find that raloxifene prevents neutrophil cell death in response to the classical activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a compound known to induce formation of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Inhibition of PMA-induced NET production by raloxifene was confirmed using quantitative and imaging-based assays. Human neutrophils from both male and female donors express the nuclear estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, known targets of raloxifene. Similar to raloxifene, selective antagonists of these receptors inhibit PMA-induced NET production. Furthermore, raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced ERK phosphorylation, but not reactive oxygen species production, pathways known to be key modulators of NET production. Finally, we found that raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced, NET-based killing of the leading human bacterial pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Our results reveal that raloxifene is a potent modulator of neutrophil function and NET production. PMID:28003814

  3. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  4. Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Stacie L.; Crocker, Laura D.; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Engels, Anna S.; Banich, Marie T.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Miller, Gregory A.; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG) and worry (BA10). Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology. PMID:23781192

  5. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  6. Neuropeptides Function in a Homeostatic Manner to Modulate Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance. PMID:23658528

  7. GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition modulate monaural auditory response properties in the avian superior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W L; Fischl, M J; Weimann, S R; Burger, R M

    2011-05-01

    The superior olivary nucleus (SON) is the primary source of inhibition in the avian auditory brainstem. While much is known about the role of inhibition at the SON's target nuclei, little is known about how the SON itself processes auditory information or how inhibition modulates these properties. Additionally, the synaptic physiology of inhibitory inputs within the SON has not been described. We investigated these questions using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry in the chicken, an organism for which the auditory brainstem has otherwise been well characterized. We provide a thorough characterization of monaural response properties in the SON and the influence of inhibitory input in shaping these features. We found that the SON contains a heterogeneous mixture of response patterns to acoustic stimulation and that in most neurons these responses are modulated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs. Interestingly, many SON neurons tuned to low frequencies have robust phase-locking capability and the precision of this phase locking is enhanced by inhibitory inputs. On the synaptic level, we found that evoked and spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) within the SON are also mediated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in all neurons tested. Analysis of spontaneous IPSCs suggests that most SON cells receive a mixture of both purely GABAergic terminals, as well as terminals from which GABA and glycine are coreleased. Evidence for glycinergic signaling within the SON is a novel result that has important implications for understanding inhibitory function in the auditory brainstem.

  8. GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition modulate monaural auditory response properties in the avian superior olivary nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, W. L.; Fischl, M. J.; Weimann, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    The superior olivary nucleus (SON) is the primary source of inhibition in the avian auditory brainstem. While much is known about the role of inhibition at the SON's target nuclei, little is known about how the SON itself processes auditory information or how inhibition modulates these properties. Additionally, the synaptic physiology of inhibitory inputs within the SON has not been described. We investigated these questions using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry in the chicken, an organism for which the auditory brainstem has otherwise been well characterized. We provide a thorough characterization of monaural response properties in the SON and the influence of inhibitory input in shaping these features. We found that the SON contains a heterogeneous mixture of response patterns to acoustic stimulation and that in most neurons these responses are modulated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory inputs. Interestingly, many SON neurons tuned to low frequencies have robust phase-locking capability and the precision of this phase locking is enhanced by inhibitory inputs. On the synaptic level, we found that evoked and spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) within the SON are also mediated by both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition in all neurons tested. Analysis of spontaneous IPSCs suggests that most SON cells receive a mixture of both purely GABAergic terminals, as well as terminals from which GABA and glycine are coreleased. Evidence for glycinergic signaling within the SON is a novel result that has important implications for understanding inhibitory function in the auditory brainstem. PMID:21368002

  9. Modulation of cortical excitability and interhemispheric inhibition prior to rhythmic unimanual contractions.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Simon A; Kalmar, Jayne M

    2012-09-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate premotor modulation of motor cortical excitability between rhythmic unimanual finger contractions. Applying TMS at rest prior to an anticipated contraction provides a measure of cortical excitability that reflects premotor modulatory drive and is uncontaminated by the alterations in spinal and cortical excitability that occur during muscle activation. We hypothesized that premotor structures contribute to unimanual movement through the modulation of intracortical and interhemispheric inhibitory circuits within the primary motor cortex and that this premotor modulation would be evident at rest between contractions. Thus, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) in a 500-ms epoch prior to a planned contraction of the right FDI in 10 participants (21.4±1.9 years). These measures of inhibition were made in three different states: (1) at complete rest (with no plan to contract), (2) at rest between rhythmic contractions, and (3) during low level contractions. Cortical excitability was enhanced prior to a contraction and during a contraction compared to at rest (F₂,₁₈=758.3, p<0.001). IHI was also increased prior to a contraction compared to at rest and during a contraction while SICI was only reduced during a contraction (F₂,₃₈=30.3, p<0.001).We used this pre-contraction protocol to investigate the cortical mechanisms of unimanual control. However, this protocol would be a useful tool to investigate any neuromuscular adaptation that may occur as a result of altered premotor modulation of cortical excitability, such as neuromuscular fatigue, training and movement disorders.

  10. Orai1 internalization and STIM1 clustering inhibition modulate SOCE inactivation during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Sun, Lu; Machaca, Khaled

    2009-10-13

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) influx pathway activated in response to depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. SOCE is a primary modulator of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics, which specify cellular responses. Interestingly, SOCE inactivates during M phase but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. SOCE is mediated by clustering of the ER Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 in response to Ca(2+) store depletion, leading to gating of the plasma membrane SOCE channel Orai1. Here we show that SOCE inactivation in meiosis is the result of internalization of Orai1 into an intracellular vesicular compartment and to the inability of STIM1 to cluster in response to store depletion. At rest, Orai1 continuously recycles between the cell membrane and an endosomal compartment. We further show that STIM1-STIM1 interactions are inhibited during meiosis, which appears to mediate the inability of STIM1 to form puncta following store depletion. In contrast, STIM1-Orai1 interactions remain functional during meiosis. Combined, the removal of Orai1 from the cell membrane and STIM1 clustering inhibition effectively uncouple store depletion from SOCE activation in meiosis. Although STIM1 is phosphorylated during meiosis, phosphomimetic and alanine substitution mutations do not modulate STIM1 clustering, arguing that phosphorylation does not mediate STIM1 clustering inhibition during meiosis.

  11. PIN1 inhibits apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma through modulation of the antiapoptotic function of survivin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Wai; Chow, Ariel K M; Pang, Roberta; Fok, Elaine W S; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Tse, Eric

    2013-03-01

    PIN1, a peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase, binds a specific motif comprising a phosphorylated serine or threonine preceding a proline (p-Ser/Thr-Pro) residue in proteins. Through cis-trans isomerization, it induces conformational changes and modulates functions of many proteins that are involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and oncogenesis. PIN1 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the role of PIN1 and the significance of its interaction with the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin in evading apoptosis in HCC cells. Using cell line and xenograft models, we determined that PIN1 overexpression inhibits apoptosis through suppression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity. In addition, down-regulation of survivin in PIN1-overexpressing cells attenuated the antiapoptotic effect induced by PIN1, suggesting that the inhibition of apoptosis is mediated through PIN1-survivin interaction. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that PIN1 interacted with survivin via the phosphorylated Thr34-Pro35 motif and enhanced binding among survivin phosphorylated at Thr34, hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP), and pro-caspase-9. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibition of apoptosis by PIN1 in HCC cells is mediated through modulation of the antiapoptotic function of survivin by increasing its binding to pro-caspase-9 via HBXIP. Such functional interaction between PIN1 and survivin may therefore play an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis and chemoresistance. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, 4, and 5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, 4, or 5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. PMID:28178529

  13. Startle response and prepulse inhibition modulation by positive- and negative-induced affect.

    PubMed

    De la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Mena, Auxiliadora; Puentes, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The startle response, a set of reflex behaviours intended to prepare the organism to face a potentially threatening stimulus, can be modulated by several factors as, for example, changes in affective state, or previous presentation of a weak stimulus (a phenomenon termed Pre-Pulse Inhibition [PPI]). In this paper we analyse whether the induction of positive or negative affective states in the participants modulates the startle response and the PPI phenomenon. The results revealed a decrease of the startle response and an increase of the PPI effect when registered while the participants were exposed to pleasant images (Experiment 1), and an increase of the startle response and of the PPI effect when they were exposed to a video-clip of unpleasant content (Experiment 2). These data are interpreted considering that changes in affective states correlate with changes in the startle reflex intensity, but changes in PPI might be the result of an attentional process. © 2013.

  14. Aerobic exercise modulates intracortical inhibition and facilitation in a nonexercised upper limb muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite growing interest in the relationship between exercise and short-term neural plasticity, the effects of exercise on motor cortical (M1) excitability are not well studied. Acute, lower-limb aerobic exercise may potentially modulate M1 excitability in working muscles, but the effects on muscles not involved in the exercise are unknown. Here we examined the excitability changes in an upper limb muscle representation following a single session of lower body aerobic exercise. Investigating the response to exercise in a non-exercised muscle may help to determine the clinical usefulness of lower-body exercise interventions for upper limb neurorehabilitation. Methods In this study, transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess input–output curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the extensor carpi radialis muscle in twelve healthy individuals following a single session of moderate stationary biking. Additionally, we examined whether the presence of a common polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene would affect the response of these measures to exercise. Results We observed significant increases in ICF and decreases in SICI following exercise. No changes in LICI were detected, and no differences were observed in input–output curves following exercise, or between BDNF groups. Conclusions The current results demonstrate that the modulation of intracortical excitability following aerobic exercise is not limited to those muscles involved in the exercise, and that while exercise does not directly modulate the excitability of motor neurons, it may facilitate the induction of experience-dependent plasticity via a decrease in intracortical inhibition and increase in intracortical facilitation. These findings indicate that exercise may create favourable conditions for adaptive plasticity in M1 and may be an effective adjunct to

  15. Osthole inhibits histamine-dependent itch via modulating TRPV1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Niu-Niu; Shi, Hao; Yu, Guang; Wang, Chang-Ming; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Lin; Tang, Min; Wang, Zhong-li; Gegen, Tana; He, Qian; Tang, Kehua; Lan, Lei; Wu, Guan-Yi; Tang, Zong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Osthole, an active coumarin isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, has long been used in China as an antipruritic herbal medicine; however, the antipruitic mechanism of osthole is unknown. We studied the molecular mechanism of osthole in histamine-dependent itch by behavioral test, Ca2+ imaging, and electrophysiological experiments. First, osthole clearly remitted the scratching behaviors of mice induced with histamine, HTMT, and VUF8430. Second, in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, osthole showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect to histamine. On the same neurons, osthole also decreased the response to capsaicin and histamine. In further tests, the capsaicin-induced inward currents were inhibited by osthole. These results revealed that osthole inhibited histamine-dependent itch by modulating TRPV1 activity. This study will be helpful in understanding how osthole exerts anti-pruritus effects and suggests that osthole may be a useful treatment medicine for histamine-dependent itch. PMID:27160770

  16. Effects of cigarette smoking on prepulse inhibition, its attentional modulation, and vigilance performance.

    PubMed

    Rissling, Anthony J; Dawson, Michael E; Schell, Anne M; Nuechterlein, Keith H

    2007-07-01

    Startle eyeblink modification was measured during a degraded stimulus continuous performance test following both smoking and overnight abstinence among student smokers to measure the effects of smoking on both early and late attentional processes. A group of nonsmokers was tested twice without nicotine manipulation. A startling noise was presented either 240 or 1200 ms following target and nontarget stimuli presented during the task. Startle inhibition at 240 ms was greater following targets than nontargets following smoking and during both nonsmoker tests, but this attentional modulation was absent following abstinence. At the 1200-ms probe position, target and nontarget stimuli produced nondifferential inhibition during both tests for both groups. Abstinence among smokers produced reliably lower vigilance performance compared to ad lib smoking. The results indicate that smoking abstinence affects the early stages of stimulus processing.

  17. A small molecule modulates Jumonji histone demethylase activity and selectively inhibits cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chang, Jianjun; Varghese, Diana; Dellinger, Michael; Kumar, Subodh; Best, Anne M.; Ruiz, Julio; Bruick, Richard; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Xu, Junjie; Babinski, David J.; Frantz, Doug E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Simeonov, Anton; Easmon, Johnny; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of general transcriptional regulators has the potential to block growth through targeting multiple tumorigenic signaling pathways simultaneously. Here, using an innovative cell-based screen, we identify a structurally unique small molecule (named JIB-04) which specifically inhibits the activity of the Jumonji family of histone demethylases in vitro, in cancer cells, and in tumors in vivo. Unlike known inhibitors, JIB-04 is not a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate. In cancer but not in patient-matched normal cells, JIB-04 alters a subset of transcriptional pathways and blocks viability. In mice, JIB-04 reduces tumor burden and prolongs survival. Importantly, we find that patients with breast tumors that overexpress Jumonji demethylases have significantly lower survival. Thus JIB-04, a novel inhibitor of Jumonji demethylases in vitro and in vivo, constitutes a unique potential therapeutic and research tool against cancer, and validates the use of unbiased cellular screens to discover chemical modulators with disease relevance. PMID:23792809

  18. Reward-Modulated Response Inhibition, Cognitive Shifting, and the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Zu Wei; Pajtek, Stefan; Luna, Beatriz; Geier, Charles F.; Ridenour, Ty A.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2014-01-01

    Immaturities in cognitive shifting are associated with adolescent risk behaviors. The orbital frontal cortex (OFC) regulates reward processing and response inhibition. This study tested the relationship between cognitive shifting, OFC activity, and reward-modulated response inhibition in young adolescents. An fMRI antisaccade (AS) paradigm examined the effects of reward conditions on inhibitory response and OFC processing. A validated self-report inventory assessed cognitive shifting. Compared to neutral, reward trials showed better AS performance and increased OFC activation. Cognitive shifting positively associated with AS performance in reward and neutral trials. Poorer cognitive shifting predicted greater OFC activation. Results indicate lower OFC efficiency, as greater activation to achieve correct performance, underlies cognitive shifting problems. These neurocognitive impairments are relevant for understanding adolescent risk behaviors. PMID:26755891

  19. An Iridium(III) Complex Inhibits JMJD2 Activities and Acts as a Potential Epigenetic Modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Juan; Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Kwong, Daniel W J; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-08-27

    A novel iridium(III) complex was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to target JMJD2 enzymatic activity. The iridium(III) complex 1 can inhibit JMJD2 activity and was selective for JMJD2 activity over JARID, JMJD3, and HDAC activities. Moreover, 1 suppressed the trimethylation of the p21 promoter on H3K9me3 and interrupted the JMJD2D-H3K9me3 interactions in human cells, suggesting that it could act as an epigenetic modulator. To our knowledge, 1 represents the first metal-based JMJD2 inhibitor reported in the literature.

  20. How Does Emotional Context Modulate Response Inhibition in Alexithymia: Electrophysiological Evidence from an ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fengqiong; Cao, Zhaolun; Zhu, Chunyan; Cai, Zhu; Hu, Panpan; Pu, Hui; Wang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Background Alexithymia, characterized by difficulties in identifying and describing feelings, is highly indicative of a broad range of psychiatric disorders. Several studies have also discovered the response inhibition ability impairment in alexithymia. However, few studies on alexithymic individuals have specifically examined how emotional context modulates response inhibition procedure. In order to investigate emotion cognition interaction in alexithymia, we analyzed the spatiao-temporal features of such emotional response inhibition by the approaches of event-related potentials and neural source-localization. Method The study participants included 15 subjects with high alexithymia scores on the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (alexithymic group) and 15 matched subjects with low alexithymia scores (control group). Subjects were instructed to perform a modified emotional Go/Nogo task while their continuous electroencephalography activities were synchronously recorded. The task includes 3 categories of emotional contexts (positive, negative and neutral) and 2 letters (“M” and “W”) centered in the screen. Participants were told to complete go and nogo actions based on the letters. We tested the influence of alexithymia in this emotional Go/Nogo task both in behavioral level and related neural activities of N2 and P3 ERP components. Results We found that negatively valenced context elicited larger central P3 amplitudes of the Nogo–Go difference wave in the alexithymic group than in the control group. Furthermore, source-localization analyses implicated the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as the neural generator of the Nogo-P3. Conclusion These findings suggest that difficulties in identifying feelings, particularly in negative emotions, is a major feature of alexithymia, and the ACC plays a critical role in emotion-modulated response inhibition related to alexithymia. PMID:23227242

  1. Amnestic Concentrations of Etomidate Modulate GABAA, slow Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Background γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor-mediated inhibition in the central nervous system exists in two forms: phasic (inhibitory postsynaptic currents, IPSCs) and tonic (non-synaptic). Phasic inhibition is further subdivided into fast (GABAA, fast) and slow (GABAA, slow) IPSCs. By virtue of its dendritic location and kinetics, GABAA, slow has been proposed to control synaptic plasticity and memory. Etomidate is a non-barbiturate, intravenous anesthetic that selectively modulates GABAA receptors and produces amnesia at low doses in vivo. Here we have tested whether correspondingly low concentrations of etomidate in vitro alter GABAA, fast and GABAA, slow phasic inhibition. Methods Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from hippocampal slices prepared from postnatal day 3–8 mice and maintained in organotypic culture for 10–14 days. Etomidate was applied at concentrations corresponding to one-half to four times the half maximal effective concentration that impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory – i.e. 0.125 to 1 μM. Results Etomidate 0.25 μM (the half maximal effective concentration) doubled the time constant of decay of GABAA, slow IPSCs but had no detectable effect on GABAA, fast IPSCs. Higher concentrations of etomidate had stronger effects on both types of phasic inhibition: 0.5 and 1 μM etomidate prolonged the time constant of decay by 310% and 410% for GABAA, slow and by 25% and 78% for GABAA, fast. Concentrations of etomidate up to 1 μM had no significant effects on the amplitudes of either GABAA, fast or GABAA, slow IPSCs. Conclusions At concentrations that impair hippocampus-dependent memory, etomidate modulates GABAA, slow more strongly than GABAA, fast IPSCs. Effects of etomidate on GABAA, slow IPSCs may contribute to etomidate-induced amnesia. PMID:19741493

  2. Plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xiao, J; Wu, X; Li, W; Yang, Z; Xie, J; Xu, L; Cai, X; Lin, Z; Guo, W; Luo, J; Liu, M

    2012-09-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and serious consequence of breast cancer. Bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment drives a so-called 'vicious cycle' that promotes tumor cell malignancy and stimulates osteolysis. Targeting these interactions and pathways in the tumor-bone microenvironment has been an encouraging strategy for bone metastasis therapy. In the present study, we examined the effects of plumbagin on breast cancer bone metastasis. Our data indicated that plumbagin inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, suppressed the expression of osteoclast-activating factors, altered the cancer cell induced RANKL/OPG ratio in osteoblasts, and blocked both cancer cell- and RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. In mouse model of bone metastasis, we further demonstrated that plumbagin significantly repressed breast cancer cell metastasis and osteolysis, inhibited cancer cell induced-osteoclastogenesis and the secretion of osteoclast-activating factors in vivo. At the molecular level, we found that plumbagin abrogated RANKL-induced NF-κB and MAPK pathways by blocking RANK association with TRAF6 in osteoclastogenesis, and by inhibiting the expression of osteoclast-activating factors through the suppression of NF-κB activity in breast cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment and that plumbagin may serve as a novel agent in the treatment of tumor bone metastasis.

  3. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibition Reduces Vascular Damage and Modulates Innate Immune Responses in Murine Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Luo, Wei; O’Dell, Alexander A.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Zhao, Wenpu; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Guo, Chiao; Grenn, Robert C.; Thompson, Paul R.; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation promotes vascular damage, thrombosis, and activation of interferon-α-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells in diseased arteries. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is a strategy that can decrease in vivo NET formation. Objective To test whether peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition, a novel approach to targeting arterial disease, can reduce vascular damage and inhibit innate immune responses in murine models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-E (Apoe)−/− mice demonstrated enhanced NET formation, developed autoantibodies to NETs, and expressed high levels of interferon-α in diseased arteries. Apoe−/− mice were treated for 11 weeks with daily injections of Cl-amidine, a peptidylarginine deiminase inhibitor. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition blocked NET formation, reduced atherosclerotic lesion area, and delayed time to carotid artery thrombosis in a photochemical injury model. Decreases in atherosclerosis burden were accompanied by reduced recruitment of netting neutrophils and macrophages to arteries, as well as by reduced arterial interferon-α expression. Conclusions Pharmacological interventions that block NET formation can reduce atherosclerosis burden and arterial thrombosis in murine systems. These results support a role for aberrant NET formation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through modulation of innate immune responses. PMID:24425713

  4. Modulation of Short-Latency Afferent Inhibition Depends on Digit and Task-Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Asmussen, Michael J.; Zapallow, Christopher M.; Jacobs, Mark F.; Lee, Kevin G. H.; Tsang, Philemon; Nelson, Aimee J.

    2014-01-01

    Short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) occurs when a single transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse delivered over the primary motor cortex is preceded by peripheral electrical nerve stimulation at a short inter-stimulus interval (∼20–28 ms). SAI has been extensively examined at rest, but few studies have examined how this circuit functions in the context of performing a motor task and if this circuit may contribute to surround inhibition. The present study investigated SAI in a muscle involved versus uninvolved in a motor task and specifically during three pre-movement phases; two movement preparation phases between a “warning” and “go” cue and one movement initiation phase between a “go” cue and EMG onset. SAI was tested in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in twelve individuals. In a second experiment, the origin of SAI modulation was investigated by measuring H-reflex amplitudes from FDI and ADM during the motor task. The data indicate that changes in SAI occurred predominantly in the movement initiation phase during which SAI modulation depended on the specific digit involved. Specifically, the greatest reduction in SAI occurred when FDI was involved in the task. In contrast, these effects were not present in ADM. Changes in SAI were primarily mediated via supraspinal mechanisms during movement preparation, while both supraspinal and spinal mechanisms contributed to SAI reduction during movement initiation. PMID:25118700

  5. Human iPSC-MSC-Derived Xenografts Modulate Immune Responses by Inhibiting the Cleavage of Caspases.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Lin; Leng, Yun; Zhao, Bin; Gao, Chang; Du, Fei-Fei; Jin, Ning; Lian, Qi-Zhou; Xu, Shuang-Yue; Yan, Guo-Liang; Xia, Jun-Jie; Zhuang, Guo-Hong; Fu, Qing-Ling; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) negatively modulate immune properties. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived MSCs are alternative source of MSCs. However, the effects of iPSC-MSCs on T cells phenotypes in vivo remain unclear. We established an iPSC-MSC-transplanted host versus graft reaction mouse model using subcapsular kidney injection. Th1, Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg), and Th17 phenotypes and their cytokines were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The role of caspases and the soluble factors involved in the effects of MSCs were examined. We found that iPSC-MSC grafts led to more cell survival and less infiltration of inflammatory cells in mice. iPSC-MSC transplantation inhibited T cell proliferation, decreased Th1 and Th2 phenotypes and cytokines, upregulated Th17 and Treg subsets. Moreover, iPSC-MSCs inhibited the cleavage of caspases 3 and 8 and inhibition of caspases downregulated Th1, Th2 responses and upregulated Th17, Treg responses. Soluble factors were determined using protein array and TGF-β1/2/3, IL-10, and MCP-1 were found to be highly expressed in iPSC-MSCs. The administration of the soluble factors decreased Th1/2 response, upregulated Treg response and inhibited the cleavage of caspases. Our results demonstrate that iPSC-MSCs regulate T cell responses as a result of a combined action of the above soluble factors secreted by iPSC-MSCs. These factors suppress T cell responses by inhibiting the cleavage of caspases. These data provide a novel immunomodulatory mechanism for the underlying iPSC-MSC-based immunomodulatory effects on T cell responses. Stem Cells 2017;35:1719-1732. © 2017 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Neuronal correlates and serotonergic modulation of behavioural inhibition and reward in healthy and antisocial individuals.

    PubMed

    Völlm, Birgit; Richardson, Paul; McKie, Shane; Reniers, Renate; Elliott, Rebecca; Anderson, Ian M; Williams, Steve; Dolan, Mairead; Deakin, Bill

    2010-02-01

    Individuals with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are impulsive and show impairment in reinforcement processing. There is increasing evidence for a neurobiological basis of psychopathy, which shares some of the characteristics of ASPD, but research on the neuronal correlates of neuropsychological processes in ASPD remains limited. Furthermore, no research has examined the effects of serotonergic manipulation on brain activations in antisocial groups. In this study, 25 male participants with ASPD (mean age 42.1) and 32 male control participants (mean age 30.5; 25 participants providing usable scans) were randomly allocated to receive the 5-HT(2C)-agonist mCPP or placebo. Participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a behavioural inhibition (Go/NoGo) and a reward task. In comparison to healthy controls the ASPD group showed reduced task related activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) but increased signal in the pre/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the Go/No-Go task and increased activation in OFC in the reward task. mCPP modulated brain responses in both tasks in the whole group. Interactions between group and drug occured in bilateral OFC, caudate and ventral pallidum during the reward task but no significant interactions were found in the Go/No-Go task. This suggests that ASPD involves altered serotonin modulation of reward, but not motor inhibition pathways. These findings suggest that ASPD involves altered DLPFC, ACC and OFC function. Altered serotonergic modulation of reward pathways seen in the ASPD group raises the possibility that targeting serotonin systems may be therapeutic.

  7. Delayed grip relaxation and altered modulation of intracortical inhibition with aging

    PubMed Central

    Motawar, Binal; Stinear, James W.; Lauer, Abigail W.; Ramakrishnan, V. Viswanathan; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-01-01

    Grip relaxation is a voluntary action that requires an increase in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) in healthy young adults, rather than a simple termination of excitatory drive. The way aging affects this voluntary inhibitory action and timing of grip relaxation is currently unknown. The objective of this study was to examine aging-related delays in grip relaxation and SICI modulation for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle during grip relaxation. The main finding was that young adults increased SICI to relax their grips, whereas older adults did not increase SICI with a prolonged grip relaxation time (p<0.05 for both SICI modulation and grip relaxation time). A secondary experiment showed that both young and older adults did not change H reflex excitability during grip relaxation. Our data suggest that grip relaxation is mediated by increased cortical inhibitory output in young adults, and aging-related impairment in increasing cortical inhibitory output may hamper timely cessation of muscle activity. Our data also suggest a lesser role of the spinal circuits in grip muscle relaxation. This knowledge may contribute to understanding of aging-related movement deterioration and development of interventions for improving modulation of SICI to improve muscle relaxation and movement coordination. PMID:26686531

  8. Continuous theta-burst stimulation over primary somatosensory cortex modulates short-latency afferent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Philemon; Jacobs, Mark F; Lee, Kevin G H; Asmussen, Michael J; Zapallow, Christopher M; Nelson, Aimee J

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the effects of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) over primary somatosensory (SI) and motor (M1) cortices on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI). MEPs and SAI were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the right hand following 30Hz cTBS over left-hemisphere SI and M1 delivered to the same participants in separate sessions. Measurements were taken before and up to 60min following cTBS. CTBS over M1 suppressed MEPs and did not alter SAI. In contrast cTBS over SI facilitated MEPs and decreased median and digital nerve evoked SAI. These findings indicate that SAI amplitude is influenced by cTBS over SI but not M1, suggesting an important role for SI in the modulation of this circuit. These data provide further evidence that cTBS over SI versus M1 has opposite effects on corticospinal excitability. To date, plasticity-inducing TMS protocols delivered over M1 have failed to modulate SAI, and the present research continues to support these findings. However, in young adults, cTBS over SI acts to reduce SAI and simultaneously increase corticospinal excitability. Future studies may investigate the potential to modulate SAI via targeting neural activity within SI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Task- and time-dependent modulation of Ia presynaptic inhibition during fatiguing contractions performed by humans.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Stéphane; Maerz, Adam H; Gould, Jeffrey R; Enoka, Roger M

    2011-07-01

    Presynaptic modulation of Ia afferents converging onto the motor neuron pool of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) was compared during contractions (20% of maximal force) sustained to failure as subjects controlled either the angular position of the wrist while supporting an inertial load (position task) or exerted an equivalent force against a rigid restraint (force task). Test Hoffmann (H) reflexes were evoked in the ECR by stimulating the radial nerve above the elbow. Conditioned H reflexes were obtained by stimulating either the median nerve above the elbow or at the wrist (palmar branch) to assess presynaptic inhibition of homonymous (D1 inhibition) and heteronymous Ia afferents (heteronymous Ia facilitation), respectively. The position task was briefer than the force task (P = 0.001), although the maximal voluntary force and electromyograph for ECR declined similarly at failure for both tasks. Changes in the amplitude of the conditioned H reflex were positively correlated between the two conditioning methods (P = 0.02) and differed between the two tasks (P < 0.05). The amplitude of the conditioned H reflex during the position task first increased (129 ± 20.5% of the initial value, P < 0.001) before returning to its initial value (P = 0.22), whereas it increased progressively during the force task to reach 122 ± 17.4% of the initial value at failure (P < 0.001). Moreover, changes in conditioned H reflexes were associated with the time to task failure and force fluctuations. The results suggest a task- and time-dependent modulation of presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents during fatiguing contractions.

  10. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M. James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer. PMID:28275095

  11. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-03-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer.

  12. Cigarette Smoke inhibits ROCK2 activation in T cells and modulates IL-22 production

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chien-Huan; Gupta, Sanjay; Geraghty, Patrick; Foronjy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions are known to play a key role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is one of the strongest environmental risk factors associated with RA and has been shown to mediate a range of complex immunomodulatory effects from decreased T and B cell activation to depressed phagocytic function. The effects of CS on the function of TH17 cells, one of the key TH effector subsets implicated in RA pathogenesis, are not fully understood. IRF4 is one of the crucial transcription factors involved in TH-17 differentiation and is absolutely required for the production of IL-17 and IL-21 but, interestingly, inhibits the synthesis of IL-22. The production of IL-17 and IL-21 by IRF4 can be augmented by its phosphorylation by the serine-threonine kinase ROCK2. Given that CS has been reported to increase ROCK activity in endothelial cells, here we investigated the effects of CS on the ROCK2-IRF4 axis in T cells. Surprisingly, we found that CS leads to decreased ROCK2 activation and IRF4 phosphorylation in T cells. This effect was associated with increased IL-22 production. Using a GEF pull-down assay we furthermore identify ARHGEF1 as a key upstream regulator of ROCK2 whose activity in T cells is inhibited by CS. Thus CS can inhibit the ROCK2-IRF4 axis and modulate T cell production of IL-22. PMID:26882474

  13. Metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors modulate fear-conditioning induced enhancement of prepulse inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Huang, Juan; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2007-02-01

    Non-startling acoustic events presented shortly before an intense startling sound can inhibit the acoustic startle reflex. This phenomenon is called prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is widely used as a model of sensorimotor gating. The present study investigated whether PPI can be modulated by fear conditioning, whose acquisition can be blocked by the specific antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). The results show that a gap embedded in otherwise continuous noise sounds, which were delivered by two spatially separated loudspeakers, could inhibit the startle reflex induced by an intense sound that was presented 50 ms after the gap. The inhibitory effect depended on the duration of the gap, and was enhanced by fear conditioning that was introduced by temporally pairing the gap with footshock. Intraperitoneal injection of MPEP (0.5 or 5mg/kg) 30 min before fear conditioning blocked the enhancing effect of fear conditioning on PPI, but did not affect either the baseline startle magnitude or PPI if no fear conditioning was introduced. These results indicate that PPI is enhanced when the prepulse signifies an aversive event after fear conditioning. Also, mGlu5Rs play a role in preserving the fear-conditioning-induced enhancement of PPI.

  14. Altered Dopamine Modulation of Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex of Cocaine-Sensitized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kroener, Sven; Lavin, Antonieta

    2010-01-01

    A functionally hypoactive prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to contribute to decreased cognitive inhibitory control over drug-seeking behavior in cocaine addicts. Alterations in PFC dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission are involved in the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine, and repeated exposure to cocaine decreases DA D2 receptor (D2R) function in the PFC. We used recordings in PFC slices from adult rats to investigate how repeated cocaine treatment followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal affects DA modulation of GABA transmission and interneuron firing. In agreement with previous results in drug-naïve animals we found that in saline-treated control animals DA (20 μM) modulated evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a biphasic, time- and receptor-dependent manner. Activation of D2Rs transiently reduced, whereas D1 receptor activation persistently increased the amplitude of eIPSCs. In cocaine-sensitized animals the D2R-dependent modulation of eIPSCs was abolished and the time course of DA effects was altered. In both saline- and cocaine-treated animals the effects of DA on eIPSCs were paralleled by distinct changes in spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs). In cocaine-treated animals the alterations in DA modulation of eIPSCs and sIPSCs correlated with a lack of D2R-specific reduction in action potential-independent GABA release, which might normally oppose D1-dependent increases in GABA transmission. Recordings from interneurons furthermore show that D2R activation can increase current-evoked spike firing in saline, but not in cocaine-treated animals. Altered DA regulation of inhibition during cocaine withdrawal could disturb normal cortical processing and contribute to a hypoactive PFC. PMID:20664581

  15. Altered dopamine modulation of inhibition in the prefrontal cortex of cocaine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Sven; Lavin, Antonieta

    2010-10-01

    A functionally hypoactive prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to contribute to decreased cognitive inhibitory control over drug-seeking behavior in cocaine addicts. Alterations in PFC dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission are involved in the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine, and repeated exposure to cocaine decreases DA D2 receptor (D2R) function in the PFC. We used recordings in PFC slices from adult rats to investigate how repeated cocaine treatment followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal affects DA modulation of GABA transmission and interneuron firing. In agreement with previous results in drug-naïve animals we found that in saline-treated control animals DA (20 μM) modulated evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a biphasic, time- and receptor-dependent manner. Activation of D2Rs transiently reduced, whereas D1 receptor activation persistently increased the amplitude of eIPSCs. In cocaine-sensitized animals the D2R-dependent modulation of eIPSCs was abolished and the time course of DA effects was altered. In both saline- and cocaine-treated animals the effects of DA on eIPSCs were paralleled by distinct changes in spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs). In cocaine-treated animals the alterations in DA modulation of eIPSCs and sIPSCs correlated with a lack of D2R-specific reduction in action potential-independent GABA release, which might normally oppose D1-dependent increases in GABA transmission. Recordings from interneurons furthermore show that D2R activation can increase current-evoked spike firing in saline, but not in cocaine-treated animals. Altered DA regulation of inhibition during cocaine withdrawal could disturb normal cortical processing and contribute to a hypoactive PFC.

  16. Iron Inhibits Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase Enzymatic Activity and Modulates Immunoglobulin Class Switch DNA Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guideng; Pone, Egest J.; Tran, Daniel C.; Patel, Pina J.; Dao, Lisa; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) are critical for the maturation of the antibody response. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates CSR and SHM by deaminating deoxycytidines (dCs) in switch (S) and V(D)J region DNA, respectively, to generate deoxyuracils (dUs). Processing of dUs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) yields abasic sites, which are excised by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, eventually generating double strand DNA breaks, the obligatory intermediates of CSR. Here, we found that the bivalent iron ion (Fe2+, ferrous) suppressed CSR, leading to decreased number of switched B cells, decreased postrecombination Iμ-CH transcripts, and reduced titers of secreted class-switched IgG1, IgG3, and IgA antibodies, without alterations in critical CSR factors, such as AID, 14-3-3γ, or PTIP, or in general germline IH-S-CH transcription. Fe2+ did not affect B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Rather, it inhibited AID-mediated dC deamination in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition of intrinsic AID enzymatic activity by Fe2+ was specific, as shown by lack of inhibition of AID-mediated dC deamination by other bivalent metal ions, such as Zn2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, or Ni2+, and the inability of Fe2+ to inhibit UNG-mediated dU excision. Overall, our findings have outlined a novel role of iron in modulating a B cell differentiation process that is critical to the generation of effective antibody responses to microbial pathogens and tumoral cells. They also suggest a possible role of iron in dampening AID-dependent autoimmunity and neoplastic transformation. PMID:22556412

  17. Crebinostat: a novel cognitive enhancer that inhibits histone deacetylase activity and modulates chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Fass, Daniel M; Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hennig, Krista M; Joseph, Nadine F; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Nieland, Thomas J F; Guan, Ji-Song; Kuhnle, Chelsea E Groves; Tang, Weiping; Barker, Douglas D; Mazitschek, Ralph; Schreiber, Stuart L; Tsai, Li-Huei; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Long-term memory formation is known to be critically dependent upon de novo gene expression in the brain. As a consequence, pharmacological enhancement of the transcriptional processes mediating long-term memory formation provides a potential therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders involving aberrant neuroplasticity. Here we focus on the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) as enhancers of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein)-regulated transcription and modulators of chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity. Using a CREB reporter gene cell line, we screened a library of small molecules structurally related to known HDAC inhibitors leading to the identification of a probe we termed crebinostat that produced robust activation of CREB-mediated transcription. Further characterization of crebinostat revealed its potent inhibition of the deacetylase activity of recombinant class I HDACs 1, 2, 3, and class IIb HDAC6, with weaker inhibition of the class I HDAC8 and no significant inhibition of the class IIa HDACs 4, 5, 7, and 9. In cultured mouse primary neurons, crebinostat potently induced acetylation of both histone H3 and histone H4 as well as enhanced the expression of the CREB target gene Egr1 (early growth response 1). Using a hippocampus-dependent, contextual fear conditioning paradigm, mice systemically administered crebinostat for a ten day time period exhibited enhanced memory. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of memory enhancement by HDAC inhibitors, whole genome transcriptome profiling of cultured mouse primary neurons treated with crebinostat, combined with bioinformatic analyses of CREB-target genes, was performed revealing a highly connected protein-protein interaction network reflecting modules of genes important to synaptic structure and plasticity. Consistent with these findings, crebinostat treatment increased the density of synapsin-1 punctae along dendrites in cultured

  18. Modulation of interhemispheric inhibition by volitional motor activity: an ipsilateral silent period study.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Balestrieri, Fabrizio; Zaccara, Gaetano; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo; Ziemann, Ulf

    2009-11-15

    Brief interruption of voluntary EMG in a hand muscle by focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1), the so-called ipsilateral silent period (ISP), is a measure of interhemispheric motor inhibition. However, little is known about how volitional motor activity would modulate the ISP. Here we tested in 30 healthy adults to what extent and under what conditions voluntary activation of the stimulated right M1 by moving the left hand strengthens interhemispheric inhibition as indexed by an enhancement of the ISP area in the maximally contracting right first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Left index finger abduction, already at low levels of contraction, significantly enhanced the ISP compared to left hand at rest. Even imagination of left index finger movement enhanced the ISP compared to rest or mental calculation. This enhancement occurred in the absence of motor-evoked potential amplitude modulation in the left FDI, thus excluding a non-specific contribution from an increase in right M1 corticospinal excitability. Contraction of the left extensor indicis, but not contraction of more proximal left upper limb or left or right lower limb muscles also enhanced the ISP. A reaction time experiment showed that the ISP enhancement developed at a late stage of movement preparation just before or at movement onset. Interhemispheric inhibition of the motor-evoked potential as tested by a bifocal paired-pulse TMS protocol and thought to be mediated via a neuronal circuit different to the ISP was not enhanced when tested under identical motor task conditions. Finally, ISP enhancement by contraction of the left FDI correlated inversely with EMG mirror activity in the right FDI during phasic abductions of the left index finger. Our findings strongly suggest that voluntary M1 activation by real or imagined movement of the contralateral hand increases interhemispheric motor inhibition of the opposite M1. This phenomenon shows substantial

  19. Modulation of interhemispheric inhibition by volitional motor activity: an ipsilateral silent period study

    PubMed Central

    Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Balestrieri, Fabrizio; Zaccara, Gaetano; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo; Ziemann, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Brief interruption of voluntary EMG in a hand muscle by focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1), the so-called ipsilateral silent period (ISP), is a measure of interhemispheric motor inhibition. However, little is known about how volitional motor activity would modulate the ISP. Here we tested in 30 healthy adults to what extent and under what conditions voluntary activation of the stimulated right M1 by moving the left hand strengthens interhemispheric inhibition as indexed by an enhancement of the ISP area in the maximally contracting right first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Left index finger abduction, already at low levels of contraction, significantly enhanced the ISP compared to left hand at rest. Even imagination of left index finger movement enhanced the ISP compared to rest or mental calculation. This enhancement occurred in the absence of motor-evoked potential amplitude modulation in the left FDI, thus excluding a non-specific contribution from an increase in right M1 corticospinal excitability. Contraction of the left extensor indicis, but not contraction of more proximal left upper limb or left or right lower limb muscles also enhanced the ISP. A reaction time experiment showed that the ISP enhancement developed at a late stage of movement preparation just before or at movement onset. Interhemispheric inhibition of the motor-evoked potential as tested by a bifocal paired-pulse TMS protocol and thought to be mediated via a neuronal circuit different to the ISP was not enhanced when tested under identical motor task conditions. Finally, ISP enhancement by contraction of the left FDI correlated inversely with EMG mirror activity in the right FDI during phasic abductions of the left index finger. Our findings strongly suggest that voluntary M1 activation by real or imagined movement of the contralateral hand increases interhemispheric motor inhibition of the opposite M1. This phenomenon shows substantial

  20. Selective inhibition of Ebola entry with selective estrogen receptor modulators by disrupting the endolysosomal calcium

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hanlu; Du, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jingyuan; Zheng, Han; Lu, Xiaohui; Wu, Qihui; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Han; Shi, Yi; Gao, George; Zhou, Zhuan; Tan, Dun-Xian; Li, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    The Ebola crisis occurred in West-Africa highlights the urgency for its clinical treatments. Currently, no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics are available. Several FDA-approved drugs, including selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), possess selective anti-Ebola activities. However, the inhibitory mechanisms of these drugs remain elusive. By analyzing the structures of SERMs and their incidental biological activity (cholesterol accumulation), we hypothesized that this incidental biological activity induced by SERMs could be a plausible mechanism as to their inhibitory effects on Ebola infection. Herein, we demonstrated that the same dosages of SERMs which induced cholesterol accumulation also inhibited Ebola infection. SERMs reduced the cellular sphingosine and subsequently caused endolysosomal calcium accumulation, which in turn led to blocking the Ebola entry. Our study clarified the specific anti-Ebola mechanism of SERMs, even the cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs), this mechanism led to the endolysosomal calcium as a critical target for development of anti-Ebola drugs. PMID:28117364

  1. Engineering Cel7A carbohydrate binding module and linker for reduced lignin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-06-01

    Non-productive binding of cellulases to lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, increasing enzyme requirements and the cost of biofuels. This study used site-directed mutagenesis of the Trichoderma Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and linker to investigate the mechanisms of adsorption to lignin and engineer a cellulase with increased binding specificity for cellulose. CBM mutations that added hydrophobic or positively charged residues decreased the specificity for cellulose, while mutations that added negatively charged residues increased the specificity. Linker mutations that altered predicted glycosylation patterns selectively impacted lignin affinity. Beneficial mutations were combined to generate a mutant with 2.5-fold less lignin affinity while fully retaining cellulose affinity. This mutant was uninhibited by added lignin during hydrolysis of Avicel and generated 40% more glucose than the wild-type enzyme from dilute acid-pretreated Miscanthus. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1369-1374. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. To fold or not to fold: modulation and consequences of Hsp90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Laura B; Blagg, Brian SJ

    2009-01-01

    Background The 90-kDa heat-shock proteins (Hsp90) have rapidly evolved into promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of several diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that aids in the conformational maturation of nascent polypeptides, as well as the rematuration of denatured proteins. Discussion Many of the Hsp90-dependent client proteins are associated with cellular growth and survival and, consequently, inhibition of Hsp90 represents a promising approach for the treatment of cancer. Conversely, stimulation of heat-shock protein levels has potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that result from misfolded and aggregated proteins. Conclusion Hsp90 modulation exhibits the potential to treat unrelated disease states, from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases, and, thus, to fold or not to fold, becomes a question of great value. PMID:20161407

  3. TRPV1 attenuates intracranial arteriole remodeling through inhibiting VSMC phenotypic modulation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Liu, Yun; Hu, Zi-Cheng; Zhou, Yi; Pi, Yan; Guo, Lu; Wang, Xu; Chen, Xue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2017-04-01

    The phenotypic modulation of contractile vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) is widely accepted as the pivotal process in the arterial remodeling induced by hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the potential role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) on regulating VSMC plasticity and intracranial arteriole remodeling in hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and TRPV1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6J background were used. By microscopic observation of the histopathological sections of vessels from hypertensive SHR and age-matched normotensive WKY control rats, we found that hypertension induced arterial remodeling. Decreased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α while increased osteopontin (OPN) were observed in aorta and VSMCs derived from SHR compared with those in WKY, and VSMCs derived from SHR upregulated inflammatory factors. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin significantly increased expression of α-SMA and SM22α, reduced expression of OPN, retarded proliferative and migratory capacities and inhibited inflammatory status in VSMCs from SHR, which was counteracted by TRPV1 antagonist 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin (iRTX) combined with capsaicin. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin ameliorated intracranial arteriole remodeling in SHR and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive mice. However, the attenuation of arteriole remodeling by capsaicin was not observed in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, TRPV1 activation significantly decreased the activity of PI3K and phosphorylation level of Akt in SHR-derived VSMCs. Taken together, we provide evidence that TRPV1 activation by capsaicin attenuates intracranial arteriole remodeling through inhibiting VSMC phenotypic modulation during hypertension, which may be at least partly attributed to the suppression PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings highlight the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of hypertension.

  4. Kaempferol inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by modulating BMP-mediated miR-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangho; Kim, Sunghwan; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kang, Hara

    2015-09-01

    Bioflavonoids are known to induce cardioprotective effects by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit VSMC proliferation. However, little is known about the effect of kaempferol on VSMC migration and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our studies provide the first evidence that kaempferol inhibits VSMC migration by modulating the BMP4 signaling pathway and microRNA expression levels. Kaempferol activates the BMP signaling pathway, induces miR-21 expression and downregulates DOCK4, 5, and 7, leading to inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, kaempferol antagonizes the PDGF-mediated pro-migratory effect. Therefore, our study uncovers a novel regulatory mechanism of VSMC migration by kaempferol and suggests that miRNA modulation by kaempferol is a potential therapy for cardiovascular diseases.

  5. miR-25 modulates NSCLC cell radio-sensitivity through directly inhibiting BTG2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhiwei Liu, Yi Xiao, Bing Qian, Xiaosen

    2015-02-13

    A large proportion of the NSCLC patients were insensitive to radiotherapy, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study explored the role of miR-25 in regulating sensitivity of NSCLC cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and its downstream targets. Based on measurement in tumor samples from NSCLC patients, this study found that miR-25 expression is upregulated in both NSCLC and radio-resistant NSCLC patients compared the healthy and radio-sensitive controls. In addition, BTG expression was found negatively correlated with miR-25a expression in the both tissues and cells. By applying luciferase reporter assay, we verified two putative binding sites between miR-25 and BTG2. Therefore, BTG2 is a directly target of miR-25 in NSCLC cancer. By applying loss-and-gain function analysis in NSCLC cell lines, we demonstrated that miR-25-BTG2 axis could directly regulated BTG2 expression and affect radiotherapy sensitivity of NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • miR-25 is upregulated, while BTG2 is downregulated in radioresistant NSCLC patients. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiation induced apoptosis. • miR-25 directly targets BTG2 and suppresses its expression. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiotherapy through inhibiting BTG2 expression.

  6. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-02-07

    Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, ETV4, or ETV5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of mesangial cell migration by extracellular matrix components. Inhibition by heparinlike glycosaminoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Person, J.M.; Lovett, D.H.; Raugi, G.J.

    1988-12-01

    Extension of mesangial cells (MC) into the pericapillary space is a pathologic response seen in several forms of glomerulonephritis. This process may involve both cytoplasmic extension by MC and actual cellular migration. For investigation of whether extracellular matrix factors could modulate this process, the migratory responses of rat MC were quantitatively examined using a cell culture model. Denuding (wounding) a portion of a confluent culture of MC was followed by migration of mesangial cells into the denuded area. The expected proliferative response to this treatment was blocked by irradiation. The migratory response began within 8 hours of wounding and continued for at least 80 hours. The MC migratory response was specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent and reversible manner by heparin and heparinlike glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Chondroitin sulfates and hyaluronic acid did not significantly inhibit MC migration. Glomerular basement membrane heparinlike GAGs may normally prevent MC extension into the pericapillary space. Changes in the density or composition of these substances during glomerular inflammatory processes could permit the development of MC pericapillary extensions and thereby lead to further alterations in basement membrane integrity.

  8. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase and tyrosine kinase inhibition modulate airway pressure-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Parker, J C; Ivey, C L; Tucker, A

    1998-11-01

    We determined whether drugs which modulate the state of protein tyrosine phosphorylation could alter the threshold for high airway pressure-induced microvascular injury in isolated perfused rat lungs. Lungs were ventilated for successive 30-min periods with peak inflation pressures (PIP) of 7, 20, 30, and 35 cmH2O followed by measurement of the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), a sensitive index of hydraulic conductance. In untreated control lungs, Kfc increased by 1.3- and 3.3-fold relative to baseline (7 cmH2O PIP) after ventilation with 30 and 35 cmH2O PIP. However, in lungs treated with 100 microM phenylarsine oxide (a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor), Kfc increased by 4.7- and 16.4-fold relative to baseline at these PIP values. In lungs treated with 50 microM genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), Kfc increased significantly only at 35 cmH2O PIP, and the three groups were significantly different from each other. Thus phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibition increased the susceptibility of rat lungs to high-PIP injury, and tyrosine kinase inhibition attenuated the injury relative to the high-PIP control lungs.

  9. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2) cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) in murine dendritic and macrophage-like cells. More importantly, RGE intranasal pre-treatment prevented loss of mouse body weight after RSV infection. RGE treatment improved lung viral clearance and enhanced the production of interferon (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells upon RSV infection of mice. Analysis of cellular phenotypes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids showed that RGE treatment increased the populations of CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ dendritic cells upon RSV infection of mice. Taken together, these results provide evidence that ginseng has protective effects against RSV infection through multiple mechanisms, which include improving cell survival, partial inhibition of viral replication and modulation of cytokine production and types of immune cells migrating into the lung. PMID:25658239

  10. Apigenin inhibits enterovirus 71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaowen; Qiu, Min; Chen, Deyan; Zheng, Nan; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a member of genus Enterovirus in Picornaviridae family, which is one of the major causative agents for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and sometimes associated with severe central nervous system diseases in children. Currently there are no effective therapeutic medicines or vaccines for the disease. In this report, we found that apigenin and luteolin, two flavones that differ only in the number of hydroxyl groups could inhibit EV71-mediated cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and EV71 replication with low cytotoxicity. Both molecules also showed inhibitory effect on the viral polyprotein expression. They prevented EV71-induced cell apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytokines up-regulation. Time-of-drug addition study demonstrated that apigenin and luteolin acted after viral entry. We examined the effect of apigenin and luteolin on 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) activity, two viral proteases responsible for viral polyprotein processing, and found that they showed less inhibitory activity on 2A(pro) or 3C(pro). Further studies demonstrated that apigenin, but not luteolin could interfere with viral IRES activity. Also, apigenin inhibited EV71-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation which is critical for viral replication, in contrast to luteolin that did not. This study demonstrated that apigenin may inhibit EV71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway. It also provided evidence that one hydroxyl group difference in the B ring between apigenin and luteolin resulted in the distinct antiviral mechanisms. This study will provide the basis for better drug development and further identification of potential drug targets.

  11. Mesalamine modulates intercellular adhesion through inhibition of p-21 activated kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Vineeta; Lyakhovich, Alex; Dammann, Kyle; Lang, Michaela; Borgmann, Melanie; Tichy, Boris; Pospisilova, Sarka; Luciani, Gloria; Campregher, Christoph; Evstatiev, Rayko; Pflueger, Maren; Hundsberger, Harald; Gasche, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Mesalamine (5-ASA) is widely used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis, a remitting condition characterized by chronic inflammation of the colon. Knowledge about the molecular and cellular targets of 5-ASA is limited and a clear understanding of its activity in intestinal homeostasis and interference with neoplastic progression is lacking. We sought to identify molecular pathways interfered by 5-ASA, using CRC cell lines with different genetic background. Microarray was performed for gene expression profile of 5-ASA-treated and untreated cells (HCT116 and HT29). Filtering and analysis of data identified three oncogenic pathways interfered by 5-ASA: MAPK/ERK pathway, cell adhesion and β-catenin/Wnt signaling. PAK1 emerged as a consensus target of 5-ASA, orchestrating these pathways. We further investigated the effect of 5-ASA on cell adhesion. 5-ASA increased cell adhesion which was measured by cell adhesion assay and transcellular-resistance measurement. Moreover, 5-ASA treatment restored membranous expression of adhesion molecules E-cadherin and β-catenin. Role of PAK1 as a mediator of mesalamine activity was validated in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of PAK1 by RNA interference also increased cell adhesion. PAK1 expression was elevated in APCmin polyps and 5-ASA treatment reduced its expression. Our data demonstrates novel pharmacological mechanism of mesalamine in modulation of cell adhesion and role of PAK1 in APCmin polyposis. We propose that inhibition of PAK1 expression by 5-ASA can impede with neoplastic progression in colorectal carcinogenesis. The mechanism of PAK1 inhibition and induction of membranous translocation of adhesion proteins by 5-ASA might be independent of its known anti-inflammatory action. PMID:23146664

  12. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila; Kumar, Atul; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  13. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex induces opposite modulation of reciprocal inhibition in wrist extensor and flexor.

    PubMed

    Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Klomjai, Wanalee; Bussel, Bernard; Katz, Rose; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is used as a noninvasive tool to modulate brain excitability in humans. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that tDCS applied over the motor cortex also modulates spinal neural network excitability and therefore can be used to explore the corticospinal control acting on spinal neurons. Previously, we showed that reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist flexor motoneurons is enhanced during contralateral anodal tDCS, but it is likely that the corticospinal control acting on spinal networks controlling wrist flexors and extensors is not similar. The primary aim of the study was to explore the effects of anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist extensor motoneurons. To further examine the supraspinal control acting on the reciprocal inhibition between wrist flexors and extensors, we also explored the effects of the tDCS applied to the ipsilateral hand motor area. In healthy volunteers, we tested the effects induced by sham and anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition pathways innervating wrist muscles. Reciprocal inhibition directed from flexor to extensor muscles and the reverse situation, i.e., reciprocal inhibition, directed from extensors to flexors were studied in parallel with the H reflex technique. Our main finding was that contralateral anodal tDCS induces opposing effects on reciprocal inhibition: it decreases reciprocal inhibition directed from flexors to extensors, but it increases reciprocal inhibition directed from extensors to flexors. The functional result of these opposite effects on reciprocal inhibition seems to favor wrist extension excitability, suggesting an asymmetric descending control onto the interneurons that mediate reciprocal inhibition.

  14. Cholinergic Activation of M2 Receptors Leads to Context-Dependent Modulation of Feedforward Inhibition in the Visual Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Pressler, R. Todd; Blitz, Dawn M.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2010-01-01

    In many brain regions, inhibition is mediated by numerous classes of specialized interneurons, but within the rodent dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), a single class of interneuron is present. dLGN interneurons inhibit thalamocortical (TC) neurons and regulate the activity of TC neurons evoked by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), thereby controlling the visually evoked signals reaching the cortex. It is not known whether neuromodulation can regulate interneuron firing mode and the resulting inhibition. Here, we examine this in brain slices. We find that cholinergic modulation regulates the output mode of these interneurons and controls the resulting inhibition in a manner that is dependent on the level of afferent activity. When few RGCs are activated, acetylcholine suppresses synaptically evoked interneuron spiking, and strongly reduces disynaptic inhibition. In contrast, when many RGCs are coincidently activated, single stimuli promote the generation of a calcium spike, and stimulation with a brief train evokes prolonged plateau potentials lasting for many seconds that in turn lead to sustained inhibition. These findings indicate that cholinergic modulation regulates feedforward inhibition in a context-dependent manner. PMID:20386723

  15. Copper Inhibits NMDA Receptor-Independent LTP and Modulates the Paired-Pulse Ratio after LTP in Mouse Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Weber, Nina L.; Smith, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Copper misregulation has been implicated in the pathological processes underlying deterioration of learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Supporting this, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) by copper (II) has been well established, but the exact mechanism is poorly characterized. It is thought that an interaction between copper and postsynaptic NMDA receptors is a major part of the mechanism; however, in this study, we found that copper (II) inhibited NMDA receptor-independent LTP in the CA3 region of hippocampal slices. In addition, in the CA3 and CA1 regions, copper modulated the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) in an LTP-dependent manner. Combined, this suggests the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism in the modulation of synaptic plasticity by copper. Inhibition of the copper-dependent changes in the PPR with cyclothiazide suggested that this may involve an interaction with the presynaptic AMPA receptors that regulate neurotransmitter release. PMID:22028985

  16. Orexin A induces bidirectional modulation of synaptic plasticity: Inhibiting long-term potentiation and preventing depotentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Chia-Hsu; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-08-01

    The orexin system consists of two peptides, orexin A and B and two receptors, OX1R and OX2R. It is implicated in learning and memory regulation while controversy remains on its role in modulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we investigated effects of orexin A on two forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), at the Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapse of mouse hippocampal slices. Orexin A (≧30 nM) attenuated LTP induced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) in a manner antagonized by an OX1R (SB-334867), but not OX2R (EMPA), antagonist. Conversely, at 1 pM, co-application of orexin A prevented the induction of depotentiation induced by low frequency stimulation (LFS), i.e. restoring LTP. This re-potentiation effect of sub-nanomolar orexin A occurred at LFS of 1 Hz, but not 2 Hz, and with LTP induced by either TBS or tetanic stimulation. It was significantly antagonized by SB-334867, EMPA and TCS-1102, selective OX1R, OX2R and dual OXR antagonists, respectively, and prevented by D609, SQ22536 and H89, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), respectively. LFS-induced depotentiation was antagonized by blockers of NMDA, A1-adenosine and type 1/5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1/5) receptors, respectively. However, orexin A (1 pM) did not affect chemical-induced depotentiation by agonists of these receptors. These results suggest that orexin A bidirectionally modulates hippocampal CA1 synaptic plasticity, inhibiting LTP via OX1Rs at moderate concentrations while inducing re-potentiation via OX1Rs and OX2Rs, possibly through PLC and AC-PKA signaling at sub-nanomolar concentrations.

  17. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Azkue, Jon J.; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP61 inactivation and increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  18. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  19. Met/HGF receptor modulates bcl-w expression and inhibits apoptosis in human colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, S; Kondo, S; Shinomura, Y; Kanayama, S; Miyazaki, Y; Kiyohara, T; Hiraoka, S; Matsuzawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    The met proto-oncogene is the tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor for hepatocyte growth factor. In the present study, we investigated the role of met expression on the modulation of apoptosis in colorectal tumours. The gene expressions of c- met and the anti-apoptotic bcl -2 family, including bcl -2, bcl -x L and bcl-w, were analysed in human colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas by using a quantitative polymerase chain-reaction combined with reverse transcription. In seven of 12 adenomas and seven of 11 carcinomas, the c- met gene was overexpressed. The bcl -w, bcl -2 and bcl -x L genes were over-expressed in nine, five and six of 12 adenomas and in five, two and seven of 11 carcinomas, respectively. The c- met mRNA level in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas was correlated with bcl -w but not with bcl -2 or with bcl -x L mRNA level. The administration of c- met -antisense oligonucleotides decreased Met protein levels in the LoVo human colon cancer cell line. In the case of c- met -antisense-treated cells, apoptotic cell death induced by serum deprivation was more prominent, compared to control or c- met -nonsense-treated cells. Treatment with c- met -antisense oligonucleotides inhibits the gene expression of bcl -w in LoVo cells. On the other hand, the gene expression of bcl -2 or bcl -x L was not affected by treatment with c- met -antisense oligonucleotides. These findings suggest that Met expression modulates apoptosis through bcl -w expression in colorectal tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10944610

  20. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them.

  1. Modulators of estrogen receptor inhibit proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Piccolella, Margherita; Crippa, Valeria; Messi, Elio; Tetel, Marc J; Poletti, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    In the initial stages, human prostate cancer (PC) is an androgen-sensitive disease, which can be pharmacologically controlled by androgen blockade. This therapy often induces selection of androgen-independent PC cells with increased invasiveness. We recently demonstrated, both in cells and mice, that a testosterone metabolite locally synthetized in prostate, the 5α-androstane-3β, 17β-diol (3β-Adiol), inhibits PC cell proliferation, migration and invasion, acting as an anti-proliferative/anti-metastatic agent. 3β-Adiol is unable to bind androgen receptor (AR), but exerts its protection against PC by specifically interacting with estrogen receptor beta (ERβ). Because of its potential retro-conversion to androgenic steroids, 3β-Adiol cannot be used "in vivo", thus, the aims of this study were to investigate the capability of four ligands of ERβ (raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin) to counteract PC progression by mimicking the 3β-Adiol activity. Our results demonstrated that raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin decreased DU145 and PC3 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner; in addition, all four compounds significantly decreased the detachment of cells seeded on laminin or fibronectin. Moreover, raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin-treated DU145 and PC3 cells showed a significant decrease in cell migration. Notably, all these effects were reversed by the anti-estrogen, ICI 182,780, suggesting that their actions are mediated by the estrogenic pathway, via the ERβ, the only isoform present in these PCs. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that by selectively activating the ERβ, raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin inhibit human PC cells proliferation and migration favoring cell adesion. These synthetic and natural modulators of ER action may exert a potent protective activity against the progression of PC even in its androgen-independent status.

  2. 'Pain inhibits pain' mechanisms: Is pain modulation simply due to distraction?

    PubMed

    Moont, Ruth; Pud, Dorit; Sprecher, Elliot; Sharvit, Gil; Yarnitsky, David

    2010-07-01

    'Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls' (DNIC), a form of supraspinal descending endogenous analgesia, requires a noxious conditioning stimulus for pain attenuation. This may be partly dependent on a distraction effect. The term "conditioned pain modulation" (CPM) has recently been introduced to describe the psychophysical paradigm to test DNIC. The present study aimed to determine whether distraction and tonic heat stimulation inhibit pain through the same or different mechanisms by looking at whether there is a similar or even an additive effect on pain attenuation. Test pain was brief heat stimulation applied to the left volar of 34 healthy volunteers. For conditioning, the right hand was immersed in 46.5 degrees C water. Distraction was provided by three different difficulty levels of continuous cognitive visual tasks. Experimental blocks consisted of test pain: (1) alone; 'baseline', (2) with conditioning pain; 'CPM', (3) with distraction; 'distraction' and (4) with conditioning pain and distraction; 'combined'. They were randomized and repeated three times and pain intensity and unpleasantness rated. Results showed an overall effect of experimental block on test pain intensity (P=0.0125). Post-hoc tests revealed a significant reduction in pain intensity ratings under Combined (21.2+/-2.3; mean+/-SEM) compared to CPM alone (16.0+/-2.3) (P<0.05). Furthermore, at all levels of distraction there were always a few subjects who were not distracted despite expressing CPM. Based on the additive effect of CPM and distraction on pain inhibition, and the cases of no distraction despite CPM, we suggest that CPM acts independently from distraction. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Melatonin modulates permeability transition pore and 5-hydroxydecanoate induced KATP channel inhibition in isolated brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the magnitude of mitochondria in neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria play a key role in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Melatonin (Mel), an indoleamine produced in several organs including the pineal gland has been known for its neuroprotective actions. In our study, we have investigated whether the mitochondrial ATP sensitive potassium (mtKATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and calcium (Ca(2+)) affects permeability transition pore (PTP) alterations in isolated brain mitochondria treated with melatonin (Mel) and cyclosporin A (CsA). Mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated in isolated brain mitochondria. In our results, mitochondrial swelling stimulated by exposing Ca(2+) ions and 5-HD associated by mPTP opening as depicted by modulation of CsA and Mel. In addition, Ca(2+) and 5-HD decreased Δψm, depleted intracellular ROS, and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (state 3 and state 4) in isolated brain mitochondria. Addition of Mel and CsA has shown significant restoration in mitochondrial swelling, Δψm, intracellular ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration in isolated brain mitochondria. Therefore, we speculate the modulatory effect of Mel and CsA in mitochondria treated with 5-HD and Ca(2+) hinders the mPTP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular oxidative stress. We conclude that inhibition of mPT is one likely mechanism of CsA's and its neuroprotective actions. Development of neuroprotective agents including Mel targeting the mPTP therefore bears hope for future treatment of severe neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of SNARE complex modulators that inhibit exocytosis from an alpha-helix-constrained combinatorial library.

    PubMed Central

    Blanes-Mira, Clara; Pastor, Maria T; Valera, Elvira; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Merino, Jaime M; Gutierrez, Luis M; Perez-Payá, Enrique; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic peptides patterned after the proteins involved in vesicle fusion [the so-called SNARE (soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) proteins] are potent inhibitors of SNARE complex assembly and neuronal exocytosis. It is noteworthy that the identification of peptide sequences not related to the SNARE proteins has not been accomplished yet; this is due, in part, to the structural constraints and the specificity of the protein interactions that govern the formation of the SNARE complex. Here we have addressed this question and used a combinatorial approach to identify peptides that modulate the assembly of the SNARE core complex and inhibit neuronal exocytosis. An alpha-helix-constrained, mixture-based, 17-mer combinatorial peptide library composed of 137180 sequences was synthesized in a positional scanning format. Peptide mixtures were assayed for their ability to prevent the formation of the in vitro -reconstituted SDS-resistant SNARE core complex. Library deconvolution identified eight peptides that inhibited the assembly of the SNARE core complex. Notably, the most potent 17-mer peptide (acetyl-SAAEAFAKLYAEAFAKG-NH2) abolished both Ca2+-evoked catecholamine secretion from detergent-permeabilized chromaffin cells and L-glutamate release from intact hippocampal primary cultures. Collectively, these findings indicate that amino acid sequences that prevent SNARE complex formation are not restricted to those that mimic domains of SNARE proteins, thus expanding the diversity of molecules that target neuronal exocytosis. Because of the implication of neurosecretion in the aetiology of several human neurological disorders, these newly identified peptides may be considered hits for the development of novel anti-spasmodic drugs. PMID:12852787

  5. FDA-Approved Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Inhibit Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Lisa M.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Delos, Sue E.; Shoemaker, Charles J.; Stossel, Andrea; Lear, Calli; Hoffstrom, Benjamin G.; DeWald, Lisa Evans; Schornberg, Kathryn L.; Scully, Corinne; Lehár, Joseph; Hensley, Lisa E.; White, Judith M.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses remain a substantial threat to both civilian and military populations as bioweapons, during sporadic outbreaks, and from the possibility of accidental importation from endemic regions by infected individuals. Currently, no approved therapeutics exist to treat or prevent infection by Ebola viruses. Therefore, we performed an in vitro screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)– and ex–US-approved drugs and selected molecular probes to identify drugs with antiviral activity against the type species Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV). From this screen, we identified a set of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), including clomiphene and toremifene, which act as potent inhibitors of EBOV infection. Anti-EBOV activity was confirmed for both of these SERMs in an in vivo mouse infection model. This anti-EBOV activity occurred even in the absence of detectable estrogen receptor expression, and both SERMs inhibited virus entry after internalization, suggesting that clomiphene and toremifene are not working through classical pathways associated with the estrogen receptor. Instead, the response appeared to be an off-target effect where the compounds interfere with a step late in viral entry and likely affect the triggering of fusion. These data support the screening of readily available approved drugs to identify therapeutics for the Ebola viruses and other infectious diseases. The SERM compounds described in this report are an immediately actionable class of approved drugs that can be repurposed for treatment of filovirus infections. PMID:23785035

  6. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    PubMed

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis.

  7. Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition Phases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Aneta; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a range of transcription factors that modulate retrograde regulation of mitochondrial and chloroplast functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the relative importance of these regulators and whether they act downstream of separate or overlapping signaling cascades is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that multiple stress-related signaling pathways, with distinct kinetic signatures, converge on overlapping gene sets involved in energy organelle function. The transcription factor ANAC017 is almost solely responsible for transcript induction of marker genes around 3 to 6 h after chemical inhibition of organelle function and is a key regulator of mitochondrial and specific types of chloroplast retrograde signaling. However, an independent and highly transient gene expression phase, initiated within 10 to 30 min after treatment, also targets energy organelle functions, and is related to touch and wounding responses. Metabolite analysis demonstrates that this early response is concurrent with rapid changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and large changes in transcript abundance of genes encoding mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier proteins. It was further demonstrated that transcription factors AtWRKY15 and AtWRKY40 have repressive regulatory roles in this touch-responsive gene expression. Together, our results show that several regulatory systems can independently affect energy organelle function in response to stress, providing different means to exert operational control. PMID:27208304

  8. Dopamine in nucleus accumbens: salience modulation in latent inhibition and overshadowing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A J D; Thur, K E; Marsden, C A; Cassaday, H J

    2011-12-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) is demonstrated when non-reinforced pre-exposure to a to-be-conditioned stimulus retards later learning. Learning is similarly retarded in overshadowing, in this case using the relative intensity of competing cues to manipulate associability. Electrolytic/excitotoxic lesions to shell accumbens (NAc) and systemic amphetamine both reliably abolish LI. Here a conditioned emotional response procedure was used to demonstrate LI and overshadowing and to examine the role of dopamine (DA) within NAc. Experiment 1 showed that LI but not overshadowing was abolished by systemic amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p.). In Experiment 2, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was used to lesion DA terminals within NAc: both shell- and core- (plus shell-)lesioned rats showed normal LI and overshadowing. Experiment 3 compared the effects of amphetamine microinjected at shell and core coordinates prior to conditioning: LI, but not overshadowing, was abolished by 10.0 but not 5.0 µg/side amphetamine injected in core but not shell NAc. These results suggest that the abolition of LI produced by NAc shell lesions is not readily reproduced by regionally restricted DA depletion within NAc; core rather than shell NAc mediates amphetamine-induced abolition of LI; overshadowing is modulated by different neural substrates.

  9. A Legionella effector modulates host cytoskeletal structure by inhibiting actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhua; Stephenson, Robert; Qiu, Jiazhang; Zheng, Shijun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2014-03-01

    Successful infection by the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila requires the collective activity of hundreds of virulence proteins delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. These virulence proteins, also called effectors modulate distinct host cellular processes to create a membrane-bound niche called the Legionella containing vacuole (LCV) supportive of bacterial growth. We found that Ceg14 (Lpg0437), a Dot/Icm substrate is toxic to yeast and such toxicity can be alleviated by overexpression of profilin, a protein involved in cytoskeletal structure in eukaryotes. We further showed that mutations in profilin affect actin binding but not other functions such as interactions with poly-l-proline or phosphatidylinositol, abolish its suppressor activity. Consistent with the fact the profilin suppresses its toxicity, expression of Ceg14 but not its non-toxic mutants in yeast affects actin distribution and budding of daughter cells. Although Ceg14 does not detectably interact with profilin, it co-sediments with filamentous actin and inhibits actin polymerization, causing the accumulation of short actin filaments. Together with earlier studies, these results reveal that multiple L. pneumophila effectors target components of the host cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. ATM modulates transcription in response to histone deacetylase inhibition as part of its DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Ryoung; Choi, Jae Duk; Park, Mi Ae; Jeong, Gajin; Cho, Hyeseong; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-03-31

    Chromatin structure has a crucial role in a diversity of physiological processes, including development, differentiation and stress responses, via regulation of transcription, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors regulate chromatin structure and activate the DNA damage checkpoint pathway involving Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Herein, we investigated the impact of histone acetylation/deacetylation modification on the ATM-mediated transcriptional modulation to provide a better understanding of the transcriptional function of ATM. The prototype HDAC inhibitor trichostain A (TSA) reprograms expression of the myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL1) and Gadd45 genes via the ATM-mediated signal pathway. Transcription of MCL1 and Gadd45alpha is enhanced following TSA treatment in ATM(+) cells, but not in isogenic ATM(-) or kinase-dead ATM expressing cells, in the ATM-activated E2F1 or BRCA1- dependent manner, respectively. These findings suggest that ATM and its kinase activity are essential for the TSA-induced regulation of gene expression. In summary, ATM controls the transcriptional upregulation of MCL1 and Gadd45 through the activation of the ATM-mediated signal pathway in response to HDAC inhibition. These findings are important in helping to design combinatory treatment schedules for anticancer radio- or chemo-therapy with HDAC inhibitors.

  11. Both neuropeptide Y knockdown and Y1 receptor inhibition modulate CART-mediated appetite control.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Chen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Ho, Ying-Jui; Yu, Ching-Han; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH)-induced appetite suppression has been attributed to its inhibition of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-containing neurons in the hypothalamus. This study examined whether hypothalamic cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)-containing neurons and NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) were involved in the action of AMPH. Rats were treated daily with AMPH for four days, and changes in feeding behavior and expression levels of NPY, CART, and POMC were assessed and compared. The results showed that both feeding behavior and NPY expression decreased during AMPH treatment, with the biggest reduction occurring on Day 2. By contrast, the expression of CART and melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R), a member of the POMC neurotransmission, increased with the maximum response on Day 2, directly opposite to the NPY expression results. The intracerebroventricular infusion of NPY antisense or Y1R inhibitor both modulated AMPH-induced anorexia and the expression levels of MC3R and CART. The results suggest that in the hypothalamus both POMC- and CART-containing neurons participate in regulating NPY-mediated appetite control during AMPH treatment. These results may advance the knowledge of molecular mechanism of anorectic drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulatory T Cell Modulation by CBP/EP300 Bromodomain Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Taylor, Alexander; Chin, Melissa; Huang, Hon-Ren; Conery, Andrew R.; Mertz, Jennifer A.; Salmeron, Andres; Dakle, Pranal J.; Mele, Deanna; Cote, Alexandre; Jayaram, Hari; Setser, Jeremy W.; Poy, Florence; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; DeAlmeida-Nagata, Denise; Sandy, Peter; Hatton, Charlie; Romero, F. Anthony; Chiang, Eugene; Reimer, Thornik; Crawford, Terry; Pardo, Eneida; Watson, Venita G.; Tsui, Vickie; Cochran, Andrea G.; Zawadzke, Laura; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; Audia, James E.; Bryant, Barbara M.; Cummings, Richard T.; Magnuson, Steven R.; Grogan, Jane L.; Bellon, Steve F.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Sims, Robert J.; Lora, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent modification of histones is a fundamental mechanism of regulated gene expression in eukaryotes, and interpretation of histone modifications is an essential feature of epigenetic control. Bromodomains are specialized binding modules that interact with acetylated histones, linking chromatin recognition to gene transcription. Because of their ability to function in a domain-specific fashion, selective disruption of bromodomain:acetylated histone interactions with chemical probes serves as a powerful means for understanding biological processes regulated by these chromatin adaptors. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors for the bromodomains of CREBBP/EP300 that engage their target in cellular assays. We use these tools to demonstrate a critical role for CREBBP/EP300 bromodomains in regulatory T cell biology. Because regulatory T cell recruitment to tumors is a major mechanism of immune evasion by cancer cells, our data highlight the importance of CREBBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition as a novel, small molecule-based approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27056325

  13. Drosophila TRPA channel painless inhibits male-male courtship behavior through modulating olfactory sensation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyu; Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Fei; Wang, Zuoren

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster TRPA family member painless, expressed in a subset of multidendritic neurons embeding in the larval epidermis, is necessary for larval nociception of noxious heat or mechanical stimuli. However, the function of painless in adult flies remains largely unknown. Here we report that mutation of painless leads to a defect in male-male courtship behavior and alteration in olfaction sensitivity in adult flies. Specific downregulation of the expression of the Painless protein in the olfactory projection neurons (PNs) of the antennal lobes (ALs) resulted in a phenotype resembling that found in painless mutant flies, whereas overexpression of Painless in PNs of painless mutant males suppressed male-male courtship behavior. The downregulation of Painless exclusively during adulthood also resulted in male-male courtship behavior. In addition, mutation of the painless gene in flies caused changes in olfaction, suggesting a role for this gene in olfactory processing. These results indicate that functions of painless in the adult central nervous system of Drosophila include modulation of olfactory processing and inhibition of male-male courtship behavior.

  14. On the strategic modulation of the time course of facilitation and inhibition of return.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez, J; Milliken, B; Solano, C; Weaver, B; Tipper, S P

    2001-08-01

    In studies of exogenous attentional orienting, response times for targets at previously cued locations are often longer than those for targets at previously uncued locations. This effect is known widely as inhibition of return (IOR). There has been debate as to whether IOR can be observed in discrimination as well as detection tasks. The experiments reported here confirm that IOR can be observed when target discrimination is required and that the cue-target interval at which IOR is observed is often longer in discrimination than in detection tasks. The results also demonstrate that the later emergence of IOR is related to perceptual discrimination rather than to response selection differences between discrimination and detection tasks. More difficult discrimination tasks lengthen the SOA at which IOR emerges. In contrast, increasing task difficulty by adding a distractor to the location opposite the target shortens the SOA at which IOR emerges. Together, the results reveal an adaptive interaction between exogenous and endogenous attentional systems, in which the action of the orienting (exogenous) system is modulated endogenously in accord with task demands.

  15. Sulindac-derived RXRα modulators inhibit cancer cell growth by binding to a novel site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Aleshin, Alexander E; Chen, Fan; Chen, Jiebo; Jiang, Fuquan; Alitongbieke, Gulimiran; Zeng, Zhiping; Ma, Yue; Huang, Mingfeng; Zhou, Hu; Cadwell, Gregory; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Liddington, Robert C; Zhang, Xiao-kun; Su, Ying

    2014-05-22

    Retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα), an intriguing and unique drug target, can serve as an intracellular target mediating the anticancer effects of certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including sulindac. We report the synthesis and characterization of two sulindac analogs, K-8008 and K-8012, which exert improved anticancer activities over sulindac in a RXRα-dependent manner. The analogs inhibit the interaction of the N-terminally truncated RXRα (tRXRα) with the p85α subunit of PI3K, leading to suppression of AKT activation and induction of apoptosis. Crystal structures of the RXRα ligand-binding domain (LBD) with K-8008 or K-8012 reveal that both compounds bind to tetrameric RXRα LBD at a site different from the classical ligand-binding pocket. Thus, these results identify K-8008 and K-8012 as tRXRα modulators and define a binding mechanism for regulating the nongenomic action of tRXRα. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Respiration drives network activity and modulates synaptic and circuit processing of lateral inhibition in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew E.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Willhite, David C.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2012-01-01

    Respiration produces rhythmic activity in the entire olfactory system, driving neurons in the olfactory epithelium, bulb (OB) and cortex. The rhythmic nature of this activity is believed to be a critical component of sensory processing. OB projection neurons, mitral and tufted cells, exhibit both spiking and subthreshold membrane potential oscillations rhythmically coupled to respiration. Yet, the network and synaptic mechanisms that produce respiration-coupled activity, and the effects of respiration on lateral inhibition, a major component of sensory processing in OB circuits, are not known. Is respiration-coupled activity in mitral and tufted cells produced by sensory synaptic inputs from nasal airflow alone, cortico-bulbar feedback, or intrinsic membrane properties of the projection neurons? Does respiration facilitate or modulate the activity of inhibitory lateral circuits in the OB? Here, in vivo intracellular recordings from identified mitral and tufted cells in anesthetized rats demonstrate that nasal airflow provides excitatory synaptic inputs to both cell types and drives respiration-coupled spiking. Lateral inhibition, inhibitory post-synaptic potentials evoked by intrabulbar microstimulation, was modulated by respiration. In individual mitral and tufted cells inhibition was larger at specific respiratory phases. However, lateral inhibition was not uniformly larger during a particular respiratory phase in either cell type. Removing nasal airflow abolished respiration-coupled spiking in both cell types and nearly eliminated spiking in mitral, but not tufted cells. In the absence of nasal airflow, lateral inhibition was weaker in mitral cells and less modulated in tufted cells. Thus, respiration drives distinct network activities that functionally modulate sensory processing in the OB. PMID:22219272

  17. Inhibition of angiogenesis by selective estrogen receptor modulators through blockade of cholesterol trafficking rather than estrogen receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Li, Ruo-Jing; Lv, Junfang; Head, Sarah A; Yang, Eun Ju; Liu, Jun O

    2015-06-28

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) including tamoxifen are known to inhibit angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism, which is independent of their action on the estrogen receptor (ER), has remained largely unknown. In the present study, we found that tamoxifen and other SERM inhibited cholesterol trafficking in endothelial cells, causing a hyper-accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. Inhibition of cholesterol trafficking by tamoxifen was accompanied by abnormal subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and inhibition of the terminal glycosylation of the receptor. Tamoxifen also caused perinuclear positioning of lysosomes, which in turn trapped the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the perinuclear region of endothelial cells. Abnormal distribution of VEGFR2 and mTOR and inhibition of VEGFR2 and mTOR activities by tamoxifen were significantly reversed by addition of cholesterol-cyclodextrin complex to the culture media of endothelial cells. Moreover, high concentrations of tamoxifen inhibited endothelial and breast cancer cell proliferation in a cholesterol-dependent, but ER-independent, manner. Together, these results unraveled a previously unrecognized mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition by tamoxifen and other SERM, implicating cholesterol trafficking as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII Modulates Tumour Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saraireh, Yousef M. J.; Sutherland, Mark; Springett, Bradley R.; Freiberger, Friedrich; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.; Fukuda, Minoru; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.; Falconer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia), an α-2,8-glycosidically linked polymer of sialic acid, is a developmentally regulated post-translational modification predominantly found on NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule). Whilst high levels are expressed during development, peripheral adult organs do not express polySia-NCAM. However, tumours of neural crest-origin re-express polySia-NCAM: its occurrence correlates with aggressive and invasive disease and poor clinical prognosis in different cancer types, notably including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. In neuronal development, polySia-NCAM biosynthesis is catalysed by two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV, but it is ST8SiaII that is the prominent enzyme in tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ST8SiaII inhibition by a small molecule on tumour cell migration, utilising cytidine monophosphate (CMP) as a tool compound. Using immunoblotting we showed that CMP reduced ST8iaII-mediated polysialylation of NCAM. Utilizing a novel HPLC-based assay to quantify polysialylation of a fluorescent acceptor (DMB-DP3), we demonstrated that CMP is a competitive inhibitor of ST8SiaII (Ki = 10 µM). Importantly, we have shown that CMP causes a concentration-dependent reduction in tumour cell-surface polySia expression, with an absence of toxicity. When ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells (SH-SY5Y and C6-STX) were evaluated in 2D cell migration assays, ST8SiaII inhibition led to significant reductions in migration, while CMP had no effect on cells not expressing ST8SiaII (DLD-1 and C6-WT). The study demonstrates for the first time that a polysialyltransferase inhibitor can modulate migration in ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells. We conclude that ST8SiaII can be considered a druggable target with the potential for interfering with a critical mechanism in tumour cell dissemination in metastatic cancers. PMID:23951351

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 chemokine receptors modulates paraquat-induced intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Kesiane M; Maciel, Izaque S; Kist, Luiza W; Campos, Maria M; Bogo, Maurício R

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is an agrochemical agent commonly used worldwide, which is allied to potential risks of intoxication. This herbicide induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ends up compromising various organs, particularly the lungs and the brain. This study evaluated the deleterious effects of paraquat on the central nervous system (CNS) and peripherally, with special attempts to assess the putative protective effects of the selective CXCR2 receptor antagonist SB225002 on these parameters. PQ-toxicity was induced in male Wistar rats, in a total dose of 50 mg/kg, and control animals received saline solution at the same schedule of administration. Separate groups of animals were treated with the selective CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 (1 or 3 mg/kg), administered 30 min before each paraquat injection. The major changes found in paraquat-treated animals were: decreased body weight and hypothermia, nociception behavior, impairment of locomotor and gait capabilities, enhanced TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the striatum, and cell migration to the lungs and blood. Some of these parameters were reversed when the antagonist SB225002 was administered, including recovery of physiological parameters, decreased nociception, improvement of gait abnormalities, modulation of striatal TNF-α and IL-1β expression, and decrease of neutrophil migration to the lungs and blood. Taken together, our results demonstrate that damage to the central and peripheral systems elicited by paraquat can be prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 chemokine receptors. The experimental evidence presented herein extends the comprehension on the toxicodynamic aspects of paraquat, and opens new avenues to treat intoxication induced by this herbicide.

  20. Pharmacological Inhibition of CXCR2 Chemokine Receptors Modulates Paraquat-Induced Intoxication in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kesiane M.; Maciel, Izaque S.; Kist, Luiza W.; Campos, Maria M.; Bogo, Maurício R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Paraquat (PQ) is an agrochemical agent commonly used worldwide, which is allied to potential risks of intoxication. This herbicide induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ends up compromising various organs, particularly the lungs and the brain. This study evaluated the deleterious effects of paraquat on the central nervous system (CNS) and peripherally, with special attempts to assess the putative protective effects of the selective CXCR2 receptor antagonist SB225002 on these parameters. PQ-toxicity was induced in male Wistar rats, in a total dose of 50 mg/kg, and control animals received saline solution at the same schedule of administration. Separate groups of animals were treated with the selective CXCR2 antagonist SB225002 (1 or 3 mg/kg), administered 30 min before each paraquat injection. The major changes found in paraquat-treated animals were: decreased body weight and hypothermia, nociception behavior, impairment of locomotor and gait capabilities, enhanced TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the striatum, and cell migration to the lungs and blood. Some of these parameters were reversed when the antagonist SB225002 was administered, including recovery of physiological parameters, decreased nociception, improvement of gait abnormalities, modulation of striatal TNF-α and IL-1β expression, and decrease of neutrophil migration to the lungs and blood. Taken together, our results demonstrate that damage to the central and peripheral systems elicited by paraquat can be prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 chemokine receptors. The experimental evidence presented herein extends the comprehension on the toxicodynamic aspects of paraquat, and opens new avenues to treat intoxication induced by this herbicide. PMID:25153082

  1. Short-term monocular occlusion produces changes in ocular dominance by a reciprocal modulation of interocular inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chadnova, Eva; Reynaud, Alexandre; Clavagnier, Simon; Hess, Robert F

    2017-02-02

    Ocular dominance can be modulated by short-term monocular deprivation. This changes the contribution that each eye makes to binocular vision, an example of adult cortical neuroplasticity. Optical imaging in primates and psychophysics in humans suggest these neuroplastic changes occur in V1. Here we use brain imaging (MEG) in normal adults to better understand the nature of these neuroplastic changes. The results suggest that short-term monocular deprivation, whether it be by an opaque or translucent patch, modulates dichoptic inhibitory interactions in a reciprocal fashion; the unpatched eye is inhibited, the patched eye is released from inhibition. These observations locate the neuroplastic changes to a level of visual processing where there are interocular inhibitory interactions prior to binocular combination and help to explain why both binocular rivalry and fusional tasks reveal them.

  2. Short-term monocular occlusion produces changes in ocular dominance by a reciprocal modulation of interocular inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chadnova, Eva; Reynaud, Alexandre; Clavagnier, Simon; Hess, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Ocular dominance can be modulated by short-term monocular deprivation. This changes the contribution that each eye makes to binocular vision, an example of adult cortical neuroplasticity. Optical imaging in primates and psychophysics in humans suggest these neuroplastic changes occur in V1. Here we use brain imaging (MEG) in normal adults to better understand the nature of these neuroplastic changes. The results suggest that short-term monocular deprivation, whether it be by an opaque or translucent patch, modulates dichoptic inhibitory interactions in a reciprocal fashion; the unpatched eye is inhibited, the patched eye is released from inhibition. These observations locate the neuroplastic changes to a level of visual processing where there are interocular inhibitory interactions prior to binocular combination and help to explain why both binocular rivalry and fusional tasks reveal them. PMID:28150723

  3. The celiac ganglion modulates LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione release in late pregnant rat ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia M; Sosa, Zulema; Telleria, Carlos M; Rastrilla, Ana M

    2006-01-01

    Background Although the control of ovarian production of steroid hormones is mainly of endocrine nature, there is increasing evidence that the nervous system also influences ovarian steroidogenic output. The purpose of this work was to study whether the celiac ganglion modulates, via the superior ovarian nerve, the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the rat ovary. Using mid- and late-pregnant rats, we set up to study: 1) the influence of the noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion on the ovarian production of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione; 2) the modulatory effect of noradrenaline at the celiac ganglion on the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the ovary; and 3) the involvement of catecholaminergic neurotransmitters released in the ovary upon the combination of noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion and LH treatment of the ovary. Methods The ex vivo celiac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve-ovary integrated system was used. This model allows studying in vitro how direct neural connections from the celiac ganglion regulate ovarian steroidogenic output. The system was incubated in buffer solution with the ganglion and the ovary located in different compartments and linked by the superior ovarian nerve. Three experiments were designed with the addition of: 1) noradrenaline in the ganglion compartment; 2) LH in the ovarian compartment; and 3) noradrenaline and LH in the ganglion and ovarian compartments, respectively. Rats of 15, 19, 20 and 21 days of pregnancy were used, and, as an end point, the concentration of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione was measured in the ovarian compartment by RIA at various times of incubation. For some of the experimental paradigms the concentration of various catecholamines (dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline) was also measured in the ovarian compartment by HPLC. Results The most relevant result concerning the action of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion was found on day 21

  4. Modulation of cartilage differentiation by melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP).

    PubMed

    Schubert, Thomas; Schlegel, Jacqueline; Schmid, Rainer; Opolka, Alfred; Grassel, Susanne; Humphries, Martin; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2010-03-31

    Melanoma inhibiting activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP) is a small soluble protein secreted from malignant melanoma cells and from chondrocytes. Recently, we revealed that MIA/CD-RAP can modulate bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2-induced osteogenic differentiation into a chondrogenic direction. In the current study we aimed to find the molecular details of this MIA/CD-RAP function. Direct influence of MIA on BMP2 by protein-protein-interaction or modulating SMAD signaling was ruled out experimentally. Instead, we revealed inhibition of ERK signaling by MIA/CD-RAP. This inhibition is regulated via binding of MIA/CD-RAP to integrin alpha5 and abolishing its activity. Active ERK signaling is known to block chondrogenic differentiation and we revealed induction of aggrecan expression in chondrocytes by treatment with MIA/CD-RAP or PD098059, an ERK inhibitor. In in vivo models we could support the role of MIA/CD-RAP in influencing osteogenic differentiation negatively. Further, MIA/CD-RAP-deficient mice revealed an enhanced calcified cartilage layer of the articular cartilage of the knee joint and disordered arrangement of chondrocytes. Taken together, our data indicate that MIA/CD-RAP stabilizes cartilage differentiation and inhibits differentiation into bone potentially by regulating signaling processes during differentiation.

  5. SRPK1 inhibition in prostate cancer: A novel anti-angiogenic treatment through modulation of VEGF alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Mavrou, Athina; Oltean, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Prostate cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer death in men around the world, regardless of intense research and development of novel therapies in the last 10 years. One of the new avenues that has been tested - inhibition of angiogenesis - has been disappointing so far in clinical studies in spite of strong evidence that determinants of angiogenesis (e.g. vascular endothelial growth factor) are strongly associated with disease progression. One of the reasons for these outcomes may be our poor understanding of the biology of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (and probably other cancers as well) resulting in inhibition of both detrimental and favourable molecules. We discuss here novel targeted and more specific approaches to inhibit angiogenesis in prostate cancer as well as a completely new therapeutic modality to do this - modulation of alternative splicing - that may be applicable to other molecules/biological processes as well.

  6. Monoclonal antibody AE-2 modulates carbamate and organophosphate inhibition of fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.D.; Chiang, P.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Fryar, N.; Rhee, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    The monoclonal antibody AE-2 raised against the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) dimer (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7), binds to other mammalian AChEs, including the tetramer that occurs in fetal bovine serum (FBS). AE2 partially inhibited the rate of hydrolysis of the charged substrate acetylthiocholine by FBS AChE, whereas it increased the rate of hydrolysis of the neutral substrate indophenyl acetate. Present results show that AE-2 decreases the rate of inhibition of FBS AChE by the positively charged organophosphate amition-p-toluene sulfonate and the positively charged carbamates pyridostigmine and neostigmine but accelerate inhibition of FBS AChE by neutral organophosphates paraoxon and diisopropylfluorophosphate. Results suggest that AE-2 may allosterically modulate an anionic site in the catalytic center of FBS AChE.

  7. Pharmacological modulation of transmitter release by inhibition of pressure-dependent potassium currents in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Haasler, Thorsten; Homann, Georg; Duong Dinh, Thien An; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2009-12-01

    Vestibular vertigo may be induced by increases in the endolymphatic pressure that activate pressure-dependent K(+) currents (I(K,p)) in vestibular hair cells. I(K,p) have been demonstrated to modulate transmitter release and are inhibited by low concentrations of cinnarizine. Beneficial effects against vestibular vertigo of cinnarizine have been attributed to its inhibition of calcium currents. Our aim was to determine the extent by which the inhibition of I(K,p) by cinnarizine may alter the voltage response to stimulating currents and to analyze whether such alterations may be sufficient to modulate the activation of Ca(2+) currents and transmitter release. Vestibular type II hair cells from guinea pigs were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In current clamp, voltage responses to trains of stimulating currents were recorded. In voltage clamp, transmitter release was assessed from changes in the cell capacitance, as calculated from the phase shift during application of sine waves. Cinnarizine (0.05-3 microM) concentration dependently reversed the depressing effects of increases in the hydrostatic pressure (from 0.2 to 0.5 cm H(2)O) on the voltage responses to stimulating currents. Voltage protocols that simulated these responses were applied in voltage clamp and revealed a significantly enhanced transmitter release in conditions mimicking an inhibition of I(K,p). Cinnarizine (< or =0.5 microM) did not inhibit calcium currents. We conclude that cinnarizine, in pharmacologically relevant concentrations, enhances transmitter release in the presence of elevated hydrostatic pressure by an indirect mechanism, involving inhibition of I(K,p), enhancing depolarization, and increasing the voltage-dependent activation of Ca(2+) currents, without directly affecting Ca(2+) current.

  8. Influence of intramuscular heat stimulation on modulation of nociception: complex role of central opioid receptors in descending facilitation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    You, Hao-Jun; Lei, Jing; Ye, Gang; Fan, Xiao-Li; Li, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that the threshold to activate 'silent' or inactive descending facilitation of nociception is lower than that of descending inhibition. Thus, the development of pain therapy to effectively drive descending inhibition alone, without the confounding influences of facilitation is a challenge. To address this issue we investigated the effects of intramuscular stimulation with a heating-needle on spinal nociception, assessed by measuring nociceptive paw withdrawal reflex in rats. Additionally, involvement of the thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' (thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei), and opioid-mediated mechanisms were further explored. Descending facilitation and inhibition were elicited by 46°C noxious heating-needle stimulation, and were regulated by thalamic MD and VM nuclei, respectively. In contrast, innocuous heating-needle stimulation at a temperature of 43°C elicited descending inhibition modulated by the thalamic VM nucleus alone. Microinjection of μ/δ/κ-opioid receptor antagonists β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride/naltrindole/nor-binaltorphimine, into the VM nucleus attenuated the 46°C intramuscular heating-needle stimulation-evoked descending inhibition, whereas treatment of the MD nucleus with β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride significantly decreased the descending facilitation. By contrast, descending inhibition evoked by 43°C heating-needle stimulation was only depressed by naltrindole, as opposed to μ- and κ-opioid receptor antagonists, which failed to influence descending inhibition. The present study reveals distinct roles of μ-opioid receptors in the function of thalamic MD and VM nuclei,which exert facilitatory and inhibitory actions on nociception. Furthermore, innocuous, but not noxious, intramuscular heating-needle stimulation targeting δ-opioid receptors is suggested to be a promising avenue for the effective inhibition of pain.

  9. Efficacy and mechanism of action of Proellex, an antiprogestin in aromatase overexpressing and Letrozole resistant T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akash; Mehta, Rajeshwari; Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Murillo, Genoveva; Wiehle, Ronald; Mehta, Rajendra G

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI) are considered as a first line therapy for ER+PR+ breast cancers. However, many patients acquire resistance to AI. In this study, we determined the response of antiprogestin CDB-4124 (Proellex) on the aromatase overexpressing and Letrozole resistant cell lines and also studies its mechanism of action in inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation. For these studies we generated aromatase overexpressing T47D (T47Darom) and respective control (T47Dcon) breast cancer cell lines by stable transfection with plasmid containing CYP19A1 gene, or empty vector respectively. Letrozole resistant cell line (T47DaromLR) was generated by incubating T47Darom for 75 weeks in the presence of 10 μM Letrozole. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT or crystal violet assays. Gene expressions were quantified by QRT-PCR whereas proteins were identified by western blot analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining. Aromatase activity was determined by estradiol ELISA. The effects of Proellex on the anchorage independent growth were measured by soft agar colony formation. Statistical differences between the various groups were determined by Student's 't' test or ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. Results showed that T47Darom and T47DaromLR cell lines had significantly higher aromatase expression (mRNA; 80-90 fold and protein) and as a result exhibited increased aromatization of testosterone to estradiol as compared to T47Dcon. Both these cell lines showed enhanced growth in the presence of Testosterone (50-60%). In T47DaromLR cells increased PR-B and EGFR expression as compared to T47Dcon cells was observed. Proellex and other known aromatase inhibitors (Letrozole, Anastrozole, and Exemestane) inhibited testosterone induced cell proliferation and anchorage independent growth of T47Darom cells. Cell growth inhibition was significantly greater when cells were treated with Proellex alone or in combination with other AIs as compared to AIs

  10. Atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotypic modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs via down-regulation the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Liu, Baoqin; Kong, Dehui; Li, Si; Li, Chao; Wang, Huaqin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the onset and progression of proliferative vascular diseases. In adult tissue, VSMCs exist in a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype, which is defined by lack of the ability of proliferation and migration, while high expression of contractile marker proteins. After injury to the vessel, VSMC shifts from a contractile phenotype to a pathological synthetic phenotype, associated with increased proliferation, migration and matrix secretion. It has been demonstrated that PDGF-BB is a critical mediator of VSMCs phenotypic switch. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl l coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, exhibits various protective effects against VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin calcium on phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and the related intracellular signal transduction pathways. Treatment of VSMCs with atorvastatin calcium showed dose-dependent inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced proliferation. Atorvastatin calcium co-treatment inhibited the phenotype modulation and cytoskeleton rearrangements and improved the expression of contractile phenotype marker proteins such as α-SM actin, SM22α and calponin in comparison with PDGF-BB alone stimulated VSMCs. Although Akt phosphorylation was strongly elicited by PDGF-BB, Akt activation was attenuated when PDGF-BB was co-administrated with atorvastatin calcium. In conclusion, atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, indicating that Akt might play a vital role in the modulation of phenotype.

  11. Modulation of cellular response to anticancer treatment by caffeine: inhibition of cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and more.

    PubMed

    Sabisz, Michal; Skladanowski, Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Caffeine and other methylxanthines produce multiple physiologic effects throughout the human body, many of these effects could potentially modulate the activity of anticancer therapy. Caffeine may directly interfere with drug transport to tumor cells by formation of mixed stacking complexes with polyaromatic drugs. If formed in cells, these complexes may also prevent of intercalating drugs from DNA binding and, in this way, lower their antitumor activity. Since many of potent carcinogens are polyaromatic compounds, formation of stacking complexes with carcinogens could be associated with anti-genotoxic activity of caffeine and its use in cancer chemoprevention. Caffeine has also been reported to inhibit ATM and ATR kinases which leads to the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints and greatly sensitizes tumor cells to antitumor agents which induce genotoxic stress. Caffeine may inhibit repair of DNA lesions through a direct interference with DNA-PK activity and other repair enzymes. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that caffeine modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses via inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-phosphodiesterase. Finally, another group of effects induced by caffeine is mediated through its inhibitory action on adenosine receptors. This may modulate the stability of HIF1 alpha as well as VEGF and interleukin-8 expression in tumor cells, which could have a direct impact on neovascularization of human tumors. In this review, we present different molecular mechanisms by which caffeine and other methylxanthines may directly or indirectly modulate the effect of antitumor treatment in tumor cells and in cancer patients.

  12. Raloxifene and antiestrogenic gonadorelin inhibits intestinal tumorigenesis by modulating immune cells and decreasing stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Brewer, Misty; Bryant, Taylor; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Pathuri, Gopal; Gali, Hariprasad; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2014-03-01

    Studies suggest that estrogen plays a contributing role in colorectal cancer. This project examined the preventive effects of raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and gonadorelin, an antiestrogenic drug, in female Apc(Min/+) mouse intestinal tumorigenesis. Six-week-old Apc(Min/+)mice were fed diet containing 1 ppm raloxifene or control diet. Gonadorelin (150 ng/mouse) was injected subcutaneously into one treatment group. Intestinal tumors were evaluated for tumor multiplicity and size. Mice treated with raloxifene and gonadorelin showed colon tumor inhibition of 80% and 75%, respectively. Both drugs significantly inhibited small intestinal tumor multiplicity and size (75%-65%, P < 0.0001). Raloxifene and gonadorelin showed significant tumor inhibition with 98% and 94% inhibition of polyps >2 mm in size. In mice fed with raloxifene or injected with gonadorelin, tumors showed significantly reduced proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (58%-65%, P < 0.0001). Raloxifene treatment decreased β-catenin, cyclin D1, laminin 1β, Ccl6, and stem-like cells (Lgr 5, EpCAM, CD44/CD24), as well as suppressed inflammatory genes (COX-2, mPGES-1, 5-LOX,). Gonadorelin showed significant decrease in COX-2, mPGES-1, iNOS, and stem-like cells or increased NK cells and chemokines required for NK cells. Both drugs were effective in suppressing tumor growth albeit with different mechanisms. These observations show that either suppression of estrogen levels or modulation of estrogen receptor dramatically suppresses small intestinal and colonic tumor formation in female Apc(Min/+) mice. These results support the concept of chemoprevention by these agents in reducing endogenous levels of estrogen or modulating ER signaling.

  13. Taurine chloramine modulates the expression of adipokines through inhibition of the STAT-3 signaling pathway in differentiated human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Ji, Hye-In; Chung, Hyunju; Kim, Chakyeun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hong, Seung Jae

    2013-12-01

    To examine the possible role of taurine chloramine (TauCl) in modulating the expression of adipokines in adipose tissue associated with obesity, we evaluated the effect of TauCl in human differentiated adipocytes in response to IL-1β. To study the physiological effects of TauCl on adipokine expression, differentiated adipocytes were treated with IL-1β in the presence or absence of TauCl at concentrations ranging from 200 to 600 μM for 7 days. Cell culture supernatants and total RNA were analyzed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively, to determine protein and mRNA levels of adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin, IL-6, and IL-8. Levels of proteins involved in relevant signaling pathways were investigated by western blotting. Stimulation with IL-1β significantly decreased levels of adiponectin and leptin in adipocytes, but increased levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with TauCl significantly reversed the modulation of adipokine expression by inhibiting STAT-3 signaling in IL-1β-stimulated adipocytes, independent of MAPK signaling. TauCl treatment more significantly modulated the expression of adipokines in adipocytes stimulated with IL-1β than that of non-stimulated adipocytes, suggesting that TauCl plays a significant role in modulating the expression of adipokines under inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, TauCl and other taurine derivatives that inhibit the STAT-3 signaling pathway can modulate expression of adipokines and thus may be useful as therapeutic agents for obesity-related diseases.

  14. Tonic inhibition of accumbal spiny neurons by extrasynaptic α4βδ GABAA receptors modulates the actions of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Edward P; Macpherson, Tom; Swinny, Jerome D; Dixon, Claire I; Herd, Murray B; Belelli, Delia; Stephens, David N; King, Sarah L; Lambert, Jeremy J

    2014-01-15

    Within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate phasic inhibition of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and influence behavioral responses to cocaine. We demonstrate that both dopamine D1- and D2-receptor-expressing MSNs (D-MSNs) additionally harbor extrasynaptic GABAARs incorporating α4, β, and δ subunits that mediate tonic inhibition, thereby influencing neuronal excitability. Both the selective δ-GABAAR agonist THIP and DS2, a selective positive allosteric modulator, greatly increased the tonic current of all MSNs from wild-type (WT), but not from δ(-/-) or α4(-/-) mice. Coupling dopamine and tonic inhibition, the acute activation of D1 receptors (by a selective agonist or indirectly by amphetamine) greatly enhanced tonic inhibition in D1-MSNs but not D2-MSNs. In contrast, prolonged D2 receptor activation modestly reduced the tonic conductance of D2-MSNs. Behaviorally, WT and constitutive α4(-/-) mice did not differ in their expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Importantly, however, mice with the α4 deletion specific to D1-expressing neurons (α4(D1-/-)) showed increased CPP. Furthermore, THIP administered systemically or directly into the NAc of WT, but not α4(-/-) or α4(D1-/-) mice, blocked cocaine enhancement of CPP. In comparison, α4(D2-/-) mice exhibited normal CPP, but no cocaine enhancement. In conclusion, dopamine modulation of GABAergic tonic inhibition of D1- and D2-MSNs provides an intrinsic mechanism to differentially affect their excitability in response to psychostimulants and thereby influence their ability to potentiate conditioned reward. Therefore, α4βδ GABAARs may represent a viable target for the development of novel therapeutics to better understand and influence addictive behaviors.

  15. Tonic Inhibition of Accumbal Spiny Neurons by Extrasynaptic α4βδ GABAA Receptors Modulates the Actions of Psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Edward P.; Macpherson, Tom; Swinny, Jerome D.; Dixon, Claire I.; Herd, Murray B.; Belelli, Delia; Stephens, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate phasic inhibition of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and influence behavioral responses to cocaine. We demonstrate that both dopamine D1- and D2-receptor-expressing MSNs (D-MSNs) additionally harbor extrasynaptic GABAARs incorporating α4, β, and δ subunits that mediate tonic inhibition, thereby influencing neuronal excitability. Both the selective δ-GABAAR agonist THIP and DS2, a selective positive allosteric modulator, greatly increased the tonic current of all MSNs from wild-type (WT), but not from δ−/− or α4−/− mice. Coupling dopamine and tonic inhibition, the acute activation of D1 receptors (by a selective agonist or indirectly by amphetamine) greatly enhanced tonic inhibition in D1-MSNs but not D2-MSNs. In contrast, prolonged D2 receptor activation modestly reduced the tonic conductance of D2-MSNs. Behaviorally, WT and constitutive α4−/− mice did not differ in their expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Importantly, however, mice with the α4 deletion specific to D1-expressing neurons (α4D1−/−) showed increased CPP. Furthermore, THIP administered systemically or directly into the NAc of WT, but not α4−/− or α4D1−/− mice, blocked cocaine enhancement of CPP. In comparison, α4D2−/− mice exhibited normal CPP, but no cocaine enhancement. In conclusion, dopamine modulation of GABAergic tonic inhibition of D1- and D2-MSNs provides an intrinsic mechanism to differentially affect their excitability in response to psychostimulants and thereby influence their ability to potentiate conditioned reward. Therefore, α4βδ GABAARs may represent a viable target for the development of novel therapeutics to better understand and influence addictive behaviors. PMID:24431441

  16. A dynamic view to the modulation of phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation by inhibition of O-GlcNAcase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cuyue; Welty, Devin F

    2013-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation are reciprocally regulated. As hyperphosphorylation is implicated in tau pathology, approaches have been exploited to reduce the magnitude of tau phosphorylation by increasing the level of tau O-GlcNAcylation. With mathematic models constructed to describe different kinetic scenarios, we analyzed the temporal change of an O-GlcNAcylated protein in contrast to that of the phosphorylated form upon inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). The analyses indicate that when degradation of the modified protein is negligible relative to the naked one, the magnitude of O-GlcNAcylated protein increase is proportional to the level of inhibition, while the extent of phosphorylated protein decline varies due to other factors. Furthermore, the increase of O-GlcNAcylated protein parallels with the decrease of phosphorylated form upon acute or short-term inhibition of OGA, as observed in many in vitro and short term in vivo studies. However, phosphorylated protein is predicted to return to its initial level while O-GlcNAcylated protein to achieve a higher steady level under sustained inhibition. This simulated result is in line with a recent report on long-term inhibition of OGA in transgenic mice. Noticeably, inhibition withdrawal is anticipated to cause a transient rise of phosphorylated protein. If degradation of modified proteins proceeds in addition to the naked one, the characteristic temporal profiles of each form in response to OGA inhibition would depend on the relative importance of individual degradation pathways. The models described herein may serve as a useful investigational tool that will provide insight into pharmacological intervention for tauopathies in particular and for reciprocally modulated reactions in general. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  18. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  19. Modulation of spinal GABAergic analgesia by inhibition of chloride extrusion capacity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, M. N.; Mejia, G.; Ossipov, M. K.; Malan, T. P.; Kaila, K.; Price, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal GABAA receptor modulation with agonists and allosteric modulators evokes analgesia and antinociception. Changes in KCC2 expression or function that occur after peripheral nerve injury can result in an impairment in the Cl− extrusion capacity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. This, in turn, alters Cl− mediated hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation contributing to allodynia or hypersensitivity associated with nerve injury or inflammation. A gap in knowledge exists concerning how this loss of spinal KCC2 activity differentially impacts the analgesic efficacy or potency of GABAA agonists and allosteric modulators. We utilized intrathecal drug administration in the tail flick assay to measure the analgesic effects of general GABAA agonists muscimol and ZAPA, the ∂-subunit preferring agonist THIP and allosteric modulators of the benzodiazepine (midazolam) and neurosteroid (ganaxolone) class, alone, or in the presence of KCC blockade. Intrathecal muscimol, ZAPA, THIP midazolam and ganaxolone all evoked significant analgesia in the tail flick test. Co-administration of either agonists or allosteric modulators with DIOA (a drug that blocks KCC2) had no effect on agonist or allosteric modulator potency. On the other hand, the analgesic efficacy of muscimol and ZAPA and the allosteric modulator ganaxolone were markedly reduced while THIP and midazolam were unaffected. Finally, In the spared nerve injury (SNI) model, midazolam significantly reversed tactile hypersensitivity whilst ganaxolone had no effect. These results indicate that the KCC2-dependent Cl− extrusion capacity differentially regulates the analgesic efficacy of agonists and allosteric modulators at the GABAA receptor complex. Perspective Our work suggests that drug discovery efforts for the treatment of chronic pain disorders should target benzodiazepine or ∂-subunit-containing sites at the GABAA complex. PMID:22537560

  20. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology via Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Luessi, Felix; Bendix, Ivo; Paterka, Magdalena; Prozorovski, Timour; Treue, Denise; Luenstedt, Sarah; Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Zipp, Frauke; Waiczies, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The maturation status of dendritic cells determines whether interacting T cells are activated or if they become tolerant. Previously we could induce T cell tolerance by applying a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (HMGCRI) atorvastatin, which also modulates MHC class II expression and has therapeutic potential in autoimmune disease. Here, we aimed at elucidating the impact of this therapeutic strategy on T cell differentiation as a consequence of alterations in dendritic cell function. We investigated the effect of HMGCRI during differentiation of peripheral human monocytes and murine bone marrow precursors to immature DC in vitro and assessed their phenotype. To examine the stimulatory and tolerogenic capacity of these modulated immature dendritic cells, we measured proliferation and suppressive function of CD4+ T cells after stimulation with the modulated immature dendritic cells. We found that an HMGCRI, atorvastatin, prevents dendrite formation during the generation of immature dendritic cells. The modulated immature dendritic cells had a diminished capacity to take up and present antigen as well as to induce an immune response. Of note, the consequence was an increased capacity to differentiate naïve T cells towards a suppressor phenotype that is less sensitive to proinflammatory stimuli and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of T effector cells in vitro. Thus, manipulation of antigen-presenting cells by HMGCRI contributes to an attenuated immune response as shown by promotion of T cells with suppressive capacities. PMID:25013913

  1. Electrochemical activation and inhibition of neuromuscular systems through modulation of ion concentrations with ion-selective membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Melik, Rohat; Rabie, Amr N.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Moses, David; Tan, Ara; Han, Jongyoon; Lin, Samuel J.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional functional electrical stimulation aims to restore functional motor activity of patients with disabilities resulting from spinal cord injury or neurological disorders. However, intervention with functional electrical stimulation in neurological diseases lacks an effective implantable method that suppresses unwanted nerve signals. We have developed an electrochemical method to activate and inhibit a nerve by electrically modulating ion concentrations in situ along the nerve. Using ion-selective membranes to achieve different excitability states of the nerve, we observe either a reduction of the electrical threshold for stimulation by up to approximately 40%, or voluntary, reversible inhibition of nerve signal propagation. This low-threshold electrochemical stimulation method is applicable in current implantable neuroprosthetic devices, whereas the on-demand nerve-blocking mechanism could offer effective clinical intervention in disease states caused by uncontrolled nerve activation, such as epilepsy and chronic pain syndromes.

  2. Proteomics indicates modulation of tubulin polymerization by L-menthol inhibiting human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Uzma; Sisodia, Brijesh S; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shukla, Rakesh K; Darokar, Mahendra P; Dwivedi, Upendra N; Shasany, Ajit K

    2011-05-01

    Menthol is a naturally occurring cyclic monoterpene used in oral hygiene products, confectionary, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, pesticides, and as a flavoring agent. In the present study, we analyzed the differentially expressing proteome in L-menthol-treated Caco-2 cell line as it was found to inhibit cell proliferation. Interestingly, free tubulin proteins were observed to be limited after menthol treatment. Semiquantitative RT-PCR with α-tubulin primers showed no change in the level of RNA expression in menthol-treated cell line. However, tubulin polymerization assay with menthol indicated a trend similar to taxol in promoting microtubule assembly. Further, physical counting of apoptotic nuclei and active caspase-3 assays confirmed onset of apoptosis though the rate was slower as compared with that of taxol treatment. This study is the first report of a monoterpene L-menthol modulating tubulin polymerization and apoptosis to inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

  3. Proteasomal inhibition after injury prevents fibrosis by modulating TGF-β(1) signalling.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Wu, Minghua; Lam, Anna P; Zirk, Aaron; Rivera, Stephanie; Urich, Daniela; Chiarella, Sergio E; Go, Leonard H T; Ghosh, Asish K; Selman, Moises; Pardo, Annie; Varga, John; Kamp, David W; Chandel, Navdeep S; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha; Jain, Manu

    2012-02-01

    The development of organ fibrosis after injury requires activation of transforming growth factor β(1) which regulates the transcription of profibrotic genes. The systemic administration of a proteasomal inhibitor has been reported to prevent the development of fibrosis in the liver, kidney and bone marrow. It is hypothesised that proteasomal inhibition would prevent lung and skin fibrosis after injury by inhibiting TGF-β(1)-mediated transcription. Bortezomib, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor in widespread clinical use, was administered to mice beginning 7 days after the intratracheal or intradermal administration of bleomycin and lung and skin fibrosis was measured after 21 or 40 days, respectively. To examine the mechanism of this protection, bortezomib was administered to primary normal lung fibroblasts and primary lung and skin fibroblasts obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and scleroderma, respectively. Bortezomib promoted normal repair and prevented lung and skin fibrosis when administered beginning 7 days after the initiation of bleomycin. In primary human lung fibroblasts from normal individuals and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and in skin fibroblasts from a patient with scleroderma, bortezomib inhibited TGF-β(1)-mediated target gene expression by inhibiting transcription induced by activated Smads. An increase in the abundance and activity of the nuclear hormone receptor PPARγ, a repressor of Smad-mediated transcription, contributed to this response. Proteasomal inhibition prevents lung and skin fibrosis after injury in part by increasing the abundance and activity of PPARγ. Proteasomal inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic alternative in patients with dysregulated tissue repair and fibrosis.

  4. Amniotic fluid stem cells inhibit the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis via CCL2 modulation in bronchoalveolar lavage.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Orquidea; Carraro, Gianni; Turcatel, Gianluca; Hall, Marisa; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Roche, Tyler; Buckley, Sue; Driscoll, Barbara; Perin, Laura; Warburton, David

    2013-01-01

    The potential for amniotic fluid stem cell (AFSC) treatment to inhibit the progression of fibrotic lung injury has not been described. We have previously demonstrated that AFSC can attenuate both acute and chronic-fibrotic kidney injury through modification of the cytokine environment. Fibrotic lung injury, such as in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), is mediated through pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokine activity. Thus, we hypothesized that AFSC treatment might inhibit the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis through cytokine modulation. In particular, we aimed to investigate the effect of AFSC treatment on the modulation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine CCL2, which is increased in human IPF patients and is correlated with poor prognoses, advanced disease states and worse fibrotic outcomes. The impacts of intravenous murine AFSC given at acute (day 0) or chronic (day 14) intervention time-points after bleomycin injury were analyzed at either day 3 or day 28 post-injury. Murine AFSC treatment at either day 0 or day 14 post-bleomycin injury significantly inhibited collagen deposition and preserved pulmonary function. CCL2 expression increased in bleomycin-injured bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), but significantly decreased following AFSC treatment at either day 0 or at day 14. AFSC were observed to localize within fibrotic lesions in the lung, showing preferential targeting of AFSC to the area of fibrosis. We also observed that MMP-2 was transiently increased in BAL following AFSC treatment. Increased MMP-2 activity was further associated with cleavage of CCL2, rendering it a putative antagonist for CCL2/CCR2 signaling, which we surmise is a potential mechanism for CCL2 reduction in BAL following AFSC treatment. Based on this data, we concluded that AFSC have the potential to inhibit the development or progression of fibrosis in a bleomycin injury model during both acute and chronic remodeling events.

  5. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells Inhibit the Progression of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis via CCL2 Modulation in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Orquidea; Carraro, Gianni; Turcatel, Gianluca; Hall, Marisa; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Roche, Tyler; Buckley, Sue; Driscoll, Barbara; Perin, Laura; Warburton, David

    2013-01-01

    The potential for amniotic fluid stem cell (AFSC) treatment to inhibit the progression of fibrotic lung injury has not been described. We have previously demonstrated that AFSC can attenuate both acute and chronic-fibrotic kidney injury through modification of the cytokine environment. Fibrotic lung injury, such as in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), is mediated through pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokine activity. Thus, we hypothesized that AFSC treatment might inhibit the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis through cytokine modulation. In particular, we aimed to investigate the effect of AFSC treatment on the modulation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine CCL2, which is increased in human IPF patients and is correlated with poor prognoses, advanced disease states and worse fibrotic outcomes. The impacts of intravenous murine AFSC given at acute (day 0) or chronic (day 14) intervention time-points after bleomycin injury were analyzed at either day 3 or day 28 post-injury. Murine AFSC treatment at either day 0 or day 14 post-bleomycin injury significantly inhibited collagen deposition and preserved pulmonary function. CCL2 expression increased in bleomycin-injured bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), but significantly decreased following AFSC treatment at either day 0 or at day 14. AFSC were observed to localize within fibrotic lesions in the lung, showing preferential targeting of AFSC to the area of fibrosis. We also observed that MMP-2 was transiently increased in BAL following AFSC treatment. Increased MMP-2 activity was further associated with cleavage of CCL2, rendering it a putative antagonist for CCL2/CCR2 signaling, which we surmise is a potential mechanism for CCL2 reduction in BAL following AFSC treatment. Based on this data, we concluded that AFSC have the potential to inhibit the development or progression of fibrosis in a bleomycin injury model during both acute and chronic remodeling events. PMID:23967234

  6. Selective estrogen receptor modulators inhibit hepatitis C virus infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yuko; Fukasawa, Masayoshi; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Fukazawa, Hidesuke

    2013-01-01

    We screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibitors using the JFH-1 viral culture system and found that selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen, clomifene, raloxifene, and other estrogen receptor α (ERα) antagonists, inhibited HCV infection. Treatment with SERMs for the first 2 h and treatment 2-24 h after viral inoculation reduced the production of HCV RNA. Treating persistently JFH-1 infected cells with SERMs resulted in a preferential inhibition of extracellular HCV RNA compared to intracellular HCV RNA. When we treated two subgenomic replicon cells, which harbor HCV genome genotype 2a (JFH-1) or genotype 1b, SERMs reduced HCV genome copies and viral protein NS5A. SERMs inhibited the entry of HCV pseudo-particle (HCVpp) genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b and 4 but did not inhibit vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) entry. Further experiment using HCVpp indicated that tamoxifen affected both viral binding to cell and post-binding events including endocytosis. Taken together, SERMs seemed to target multiple steps of HCV viral life cycle: attachment, entry, replication, and post replication events. SERMs may be potential candidates for the treatment of HCV infection. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A simultaneous modulation of reactive and proactive inhibition processes by anodal tDCS on the right inferior frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cunillera, Toni; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Brignani, Debora; Cucurell, David; Miniussi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Proactive and reactive inhibitory processes are a fundamental part of executive functions, allowing a person to stop inappropriate responses when necessary and to adjust performance in in a long term in accordance to the goals of a task. In the current study, we manipulate, in a single task, both reactive and proactive inhibition mechanisms, and we investigate the within-subjects effect of increasing, by means of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), the involvement of the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC). Our results show a simultaneous enhancement of these two cognitive mechanisms when modulating the neural activity of rIFC. Thus, the application of anodal tDCS increased reaction times on Go trials, indicating a possible increase in proactive inhibition. Concurrently, the stop-signal reaction time, as a covert index of the inhibitory process, was reduced, demonstrating an improvement in reactive inhibition. In summary, the current pattern of results validates the engagement of the rIFC in these two forms of inhibitory processes, proactive and reactive inhibition and it provides evidence that both processes can operate concurrently in the brain.

  8. Intracortical inhibition is modulated by phase of prosthetic rehabilitation in transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Hordacre, Brenton; Bradnam, Lynley V; Barr, Christopher; Patritti, Benjamin L; Crotty, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of primary motor cortex (M1) is well-described in long-term lower limb amputees. In contrast cortical reorganization during the rehabilitation period after amputation is poorly understood. Thirteen transtibial amputees and 13 gender matched control participants of similar age were recruited. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticomotor and intracortical excitability of M1 bilaterally. Neurophysiological assessments were conducted at admission, prosthetic casting, first walk and discharge. Gait variability at discharge was assessed as a functional measure. Compared to controls, amputees had reduced short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) for the ipsilateral M1 at admission (p = 0.01). Analysis across rehabilitation revealed SICI was reduced for the contralateral M1 at first walk compared to discharge (p = 0.003). For the ipsilateral M1 both short and long-latency intracortical inhibition were reduced at admission (p < 0.05) and prosthetic casting (p < 0.02). Analysis of the neurophysiology and gait function revealed several interesting relationships. For the contralateral M1, reduced inhibition at admission (p = 0.04) and first walk (p = 0.05) was associated with better gait function. For the ipsilateral M1, reduced inhibition at discharge (p = 0.05) was associated with poor gait function. This study characterized intracortical excitability in rehabilitating amputees. A dichotomous relationship between reduced intracortical inhibition for each M1 and gait function was observed at different times. Intracortical inhibition may be an appropriate cortical biomarker of gait function in lower limb amputees during rehabilitation, but requires further investigation. Understanding M1 intracortical excitability of amputees undertaking prosthetic rehabilitation provides insight into brain reorganization in the sub-acute post-amputation period and may guide future studies seeking to improve rehabilitation outcomes.

  9. Intracortical inhibition is modulated by phase of prosthetic rehabilitation in transtibial amputees

    PubMed Central

    Hordacre, Brenton; Bradnam, Lynley V.; Barr, Christopher; Patritti, Benjamin L.; Crotty, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of primary motor cortex (M1) is well-described in long-term lower limb amputees. In contrast cortical reorganization during the rehabilitation period after amputation is poorly understood. Thirteen transtibial amputees and 13 gender matched control participants of similar age were recruited. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticomotor and intracortical excitability of M1 bilaterally. Neurophysiological assessments were conducted at admission, prosthetic casting, first walk and discharge. Gait variability at discharge was assessed as a functional measure. Compared to controls, amputees had reduced short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) for the ipsilateral M1 at admission (p = 0.01). Analysis across rehabilitation revealed SICI was reduced for the contralateral M1 at first walk compared to discharge (p = 0.003). For the ipsilateral M1 both short and long-latency intracortical inhibition were reduced at admission (p < 0.05) and prosthetic casting (p < 0.02). Analysis of the neurophysiology and gait function revealed several interesting relationships. For the contralateral M1, reduced inhibition at admission (p = 0.04) and first walk (p = 0.05) was associated with better gait function. For the ipsilateral M1, reduced inhibition at discharge (p = 0.05) was associated with poor gait function. This study characterized intracortical excitability in rehabilitating amputees. A dichotomous relationship between reduced intracortical inhibition for each M1 and gait function was observed at different times. Intracortical inhibition may be an appropriate cortical biomarker of gait function in lower limb amputees during rehabilitation, but requires further investigation. Understanding M1 intracortical excitability of amputees undertaking prosthetic rehabilitation provides insight into brain reorganization in the sub-acute post-amputation period and may guide future studies seeking to improve rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:26042015

  10. Plumbagin Inhibits Proliferative and Inflammatory Responses of T Cells Independent of ROS Generation But by Modulating Intracellular Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K.; Subrahmanyam, G.; Krishnan, Sunil; Poduval, T.B.; Sainis, K.B.

    2011-01-01

    Plumbagin inhibited activation, proliferation, cytokine production, and graft-versus-host disease in lymphocytes and inhibited growth of tumor cells by suppressing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Plumbagin was also shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in tumor cells via an unknown mechanism. Present report describes a novel role of cellular redox in modulation of immune responses in normal lymphocytes by plumbagin. Plumbagin depleted glutathione (GSH) levels that led to increase in ROS generation. The decrease in GSH levels was due to direct reaction of plumbagin with GSH as evinced by mass spectrometric and HPLC analysis. Further, addition of plumbagin to cells resulted in decrease in free thiol groups on proteins and increase in glutathionylation of proteins. The suppression of mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation and cytokine (IL-2/IL-4/IL-6/IFN-γ) production by plumbagin was abrogated by thiol antioxidants but not by non-thiol antioxidants confirming that thiols but not ROS play an important role in biological activity of plumbagin. Plumbagin also abrogated mitogen-induced phosphorylation of ERK, IKK, and degradation of IκB-α. However, it did not affect phosphorylation of P38, JNK, and AKT. Our results for the first time show that antiproliferative effects of plumbagin are mediated by modulation of cellular redox. These results provide a rationale for application of thiol-depleting agents as anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:20564204

  11. Estradiol augments while progesterone inhibits arginine transport in human endothelial cells through modulation of cationic amino acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Bentur, Ohad S; Schwartz, Doron; Chernichovski, Tamara; Ingbir, Merav; Weinstein, Talia; Chernin, Gil; Schwartz, Idit F

    2015-08-15

    Decreased generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) characterizes endothelial dysfunction (ECD). Delivery of arginine to eNOS by cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) was shown to modulate eNOS activity. We found in female rats, but not in males, that CAT-1 activity is preserved with age and in chronic renal failure, two experimental models of ECD. In contrast, during pregnancy CAT-1 is inhibited. We hypothesize that female sex hormones regulate arginine transport. Arginine uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined following incubation with either 17β-estradiol (E2) or progesterone. Exposure to E2 (50 and 100 nM) for 30 min resulted in a significant increase in arginine transport and reduction in phosphorylated CAT-1 (the inactive form) protein content. This was coupled with a decrease in phosphorylated MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Progesterone (1 and 100 pM for 30 min) attenuated arginine uptake and increased phosphorylated CAT-1, phosphorylated protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein content. GO-6976 (PKCα inhibitor) prevented the progesterone-induced decrease in arginine transport. Coincubation with both progesterone and estrogen for 30 min resulted in attenuated arginine transport. While estradiol increases arginine transport and CAT-1 activity through modulation of constitutive signaling transduction pathways involving ERK, progesterone inhibits arginine transport and CAT-1 via both PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect that predominates over estradiol.

  12. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MicroRNA-365 accelerates cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting autophagy via the modulation of Skp2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibo; Wang, Yuncan; Wang, Xuechao; Li, Ruyi; Yin, Deyun

    2017-03-04

    Evidence is emerging of a tight link between cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy (CH). Sustained exposure to stress leads CH to progress to heart failure. Several miRNAs have been described in heart failure, and miRNA-based therapeutic approaches are being pursued. Although microRNA-365 (miR-365) has been testified as a positive modulator of CH, the specific mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that miR-365 expression was up-regulated in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes both in vivo and in vitro, and was accompanied by dysregulation of autophagy. We found that miR-365 negatively modulates autophagy in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes by targeting Skp2. Overexpression of Skp2 promoted autophagy and rescued CH induced by Ang-II; conversely, Skp2 knockdown further inhibited autophagy and CH. Furthermore, we found that the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling was regulated by Skp2 following Ang-II treatment, as indicated by the up-regulation of p-S6K and p-4EBP1 levels. The inactivation of mTOR by rapamycin completely abolished the Ang-II-induced inhibition of autophagy. In conclusion, our study provides substantial evidence that miR-365 and its target gene Skp2 play a functional role in CH and suggests the development of novel therapeutic options based on miR-365 and Skp2.

  14. Role of GABAA inhibition in modulation of pyramidal tract neuron activity during postural corrections

    PubMed Central

    Tamarova, Zinaida A; Sirota, Mikhail G; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that the activity of pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) of the motor cortex is modulated in relation to postural corrections evoked by periodical tilts of the animal. The modulation included an increase in activity in one phase of the tilt cycle and a decrease in the other phase. It is known that the motor cortex contains a large population of inhibitory GABAergic neurons. How do these neurons participate in periodic modulation of PTNs? The goal of this study was to investigate the role of GABAA inhibitory neurons of the motor cortex in the modulation of postural-related PTN activity. Using extracellular electrodes with attached micropipettes, we recorded the activity of PTNs in cats maintaining balance on a tilting platform both before and after iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor antagonists gabazine or bicuculline. The tilt-related activity of 93% of PTNs was affected by GABAA receptor antagonists. In 88% of cells, peak activity increased by 75 ± 50% (mean ± SD). In contrast, the trough activity changed by a much smaller value and almost as many neurons showed a decrease as showed an increase. In 73% of the neurons, the phase position of the peak activity did not change or changed by no more than 0.1 of a cycle. We conclude that the GABAergic system of the motor cortex reduces the posture-related responses of PTNs but has little role in determining their response timing. PMID:17425574

  15. Enriched inhibition of cancer and stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulating niclocelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Jensen, Tor W.; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-04-01

    We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation.We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00403a

  16. Tetracycline inhibits local inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia via modulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongjun; Zhu, Juehua; Wu, Li; Xu, Gelin; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Tetracycline exerts neuroprotection via suppressing the local inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear. The mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and the number of activated microglia were measured to detect the inflammatory process in the ischemic hemisphere. The key proteins of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and the binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B were also measured. Two key components of autophagy, Beclin 1 and LC3, were detected by western blotting. Pretreatment with tetracycline inhibited the mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and decreased the numbers of activated and phagocytotic microglia. Tetracycline down regulated the total and phosphorylated expressions of IKK, IκB and p65 (P<0.05). The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, inhibited inflammation and activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway. The levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 were decreased by 3-methyladenine and tetracycline. Our data suggested that pretreatment of tetracycline may inhibit autophagy in the ischemic stroke brain and then suppress the inflammatory process via inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway.

  17. Tetracycline Inhibits Local Inflammation Induced by Cerebral Ischemia via Modulating Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongjun; Zhu, Juehua; Wu, Li; Xu, Gelin; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background Tetracycline exerts neuroprotection via suppressing the local inflammation induced by cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely clear. Methodology/Principal Findings The mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and the number of activated microglia were measured to detect the inflammatory process in the ischemic hemisphere. The key proteins of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and the binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B were also measured. Two key components of autophagy, Beclin 1 and LC3, were detected by western blotting. Pretreatment with tetracycline inhibited the mRNA and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 and decreased the numbers of activated and phagocytotic microglia. Tetracycline down regulated the total and phosphorylated expressions of IKK, IκB and p65 (P<0.05). The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, inhibited inflammation and activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway. The levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 were decreased by 3-methyladenine and tetracycline. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggested that pretreatment of tetracycline may inhibit autophagy in the ischemic stroke brain and then suppress the inflammatory process via inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway. PMID:23144925

  18. Atypical effect of dopamine in modulating the functional inhibition of NMDA receptors of cultured retina cells.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, J L; Kubrusly, R C; Reis, R A; De Mello, M C; De Mello, F G

    1998-02-05

    Cultured retina cells released accumulated [3H]GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) when stimulated by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate. In the absence of Mg2+, dopamine at 200 microM (IC50 60 microM), inhibited in more than 50% the release of [3H]GABA induced by L-glutamate and NMDA, but not by kainate. This effect was not blocked by the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist, R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl- -phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro- H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH 23390), neither by haloperidol nor spiroperidol (dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists). The dopamine D1-like receptor agonist R(+)-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,diol hydrochloride (SKF 38393) at 50 microM, but not its enantiomer, also inhibited the release of [3H]GABA induced by NMDA, but not by kainate; an effect that was not prevented by the antagonists mentioned above. (+/-)-6-Chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepin e hydrobromide (SKF 812497) had no effect. Neither 8BrcAMP (5 mM) nor forskolin (10 microM) inhibited the release of [3H]GABA. Our results suggest that dopamine and (+)-SKF 38393 inhibit the glutamate and NMDA-evoked [3H]GABA release through mechanisms that seem not to involve known dopaminergic receptor systems.

  19. HDAC inhibition modulates hippocampus-dependent long-term memory for object location in a CBP-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Haettig, Jakob; Stefanko, Daniel P.; Multani, Monica L.; Figueroa, Dario X.; McQuown, Susan C.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of genes required for long-term memory not only involves transcription factors, but also enzymatic protein complexes that modify chromatin structure. Chromatin-modifying enzymes, such as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB (cyclic-AMP response element binding) binding protein (CBP), are pivotal for the transcriptional regulation required for long-term memory. Several studies have shown that CBP and histone acetylation are necessary for hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, every genetically modified Cbp mutant mouse exhibits long-term memory impairments in object recognition. However, the role of the hippocampus in object recognition is controversial. To better understand how chromatin-modifying enzymes modulate long-term memory for object recognition, we first examined the role of the hippocampus in retrieval of long-term memory for object recognition or object location. Muscimol inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus prior to retrieval had no effect on long-term memory for object recognition, but completely blocked long-term memory for object location. This was consistent with experiments showing that muscimol inactivation of the hippocampus had no effect on long-term memory for the object itself, supporting the idea that the hippocampus encodes spatial information about an object (such as location or context), whereas cortical areas (such as the perirhinal or insular cortex) encode information about the object itself. Using location-dependent object recognition tasks that engage the hippocampus, we demonstrate that CBP is essential for the modulation of long-term memory via HDAC inhibition. Together, these results indicate that HDAC inhibition modulates memory in the hippocampus via CBP and that different brain regions utilize different chromatin-modifying enzymes to regulate learning and memory. PMID:21224411

  20. Fourth-Generation Progestins Inhibit 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 and Modulate the Biosynthesis of Endogenous Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Louw-du Toit, Renate; Perkins, Meghan S.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz; Africander, Donita

    2016-01-01

    Progestins used in contraception and hormone replacement therapy are synthetic compounds designed to mimic the actions of the natural hormone progesterone and are classed into four consecutive generations. The biological actions of progestins are primarily determined by their interactions with steroid receptors, and factors such as metabolism, pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and the regulation of endogenous steroid hormone biosynthesis are often overlooked. Although some studies have investigated the effects of select progestins on a few steroidogenic enzymes, studies comparing the effects of progestins from different generations are lacking. This study therefore explored the putative modulatory effects of progestins on de novo steroid synthesis in the adrenal by comparing the effects of select progestins from the respective generations, on endogenous steroid hormone production by the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis showed that the fourth-generation progestins, nestorone (NES), nomegestrol acetate (NoMAC) and drospirenone (DRSP), unlike the progestins selected from the first three generations, modulate the biosynthesis of several endogenous steroids. Subsequent assays performed in COS-1 cells expressing human 3βHSD2, suggest that these progestins modulate the biosynthesis of steroid hormones by inhibiting the activity of 3βHSD2. The Ki values determined for the inhibition of human 3βHSD2 by NES (9.5 ± 0.96 nM), NoMAC (29 ± 7.1 nM) and DRSP (232 ± 38 nM) were within the reported concentration ranges for the contraceptive use of these progestins in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that newer, fourth-generation progestins may exert both positive and negative physiological effects via the modulation of endogenous steroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:27706226

  1. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  2. Phospholipids and calmodulin modulate the inhibition of PMCA activity by tau.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María; Corbacho, Isaac; Sepulveda, M Rosario; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos; Mata, Ana M

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of Ca(2+) signaling in neurons, together with a failure to keep optimal intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, have been proposed as significant factors for neuronal dysfunction in the Ca(2+) hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau is a protein that plays an essential role in axonal transport and can form abnormal structures such as neurofibrillary tangles that constitute one of the hallmarks of AD. We have recently shown that plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), a key enzyme in the maintenance of optimal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells, is inhibited by tau in membrane vesicles. In the present study we show that tau inhibits synaptosomal PMCA purified from pig cerebrum, and reconstituted in phosphatidylserine-containing lipid bilayers, with a Ki value of 1.5±0.2nM tau. Noteworthy, the inhibitory effect of tau is dependent on the charge of the phospholipid used for PMCA reconstitution. In addition, nanomolar concentrations of calmodulin, the major endogenous activator of PMCA, protects against inhibition of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by tau. Our results in a cellular model such as SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells yielded an inhibition of PMCA by nanomolar tau concentrations and protection by calmodulin against this inhibition similar to those obtained with purified synaptosomal PMCA. Functional studies were also performed with native and truncated versions of human cerebral PMCA4b, an isoform that has been showed to be functionally regulated by amyloid peptides, whose aggregates constitutes another hallmark of AD. Kinetic assays point out that tau binds to the C-terminal tail of PMCA, at a site distinct but close to the calmodulin binding domain. In conclusion, PMCA can be seen as a molecular target for tau-induced cytosolic calcium dysregulation in synaptic terminals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A tale of switched functions: from cyclooxygenase inhibition to M-channel modulation in new diphenylamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Asher; Degani-Katzav, Nurit; Talmon, Maya; Danieli, Eyal; Gopin, Anna; Malka, Eti; Nachman, Rachel; Raz, Amiram; Shabat, Doron; Attali, Bernard

    2007-12-26

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are molecular targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most used medication worldwide. However, the COX enzymes are not the sole molecular targets of NSAIDs. Recently, we showed that two NSAIDs, diclofenac and meclofenamate, also act as openers of Kv7.2/3 K(+) channels underlying the neuronal M-current. Here we designed new derivatives of diphenylamine carboxylate to dissociate the M-channel opener property from COX inhibition. The carboxylate moiety was derivatized into amides or esters and linked to various alkyl and ether chains. Powerful M-channel openers were generated, provided that the diphenylamine moiety and a terminal hydroxyl group are preserved. In transfected CHO cells, they activated recombinant Kv7.2/3 K(+) channels, causing a hyperpolarizing shift of current activation as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. In sensory dorsal root ganglion and hippocampal neurons, the openers hyperpolarized the membrane potential and robustly depressed evoked spike discharges. They also decreased hippocampal glutamate and GABA release by reducing the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic currents. In vivo, the openers exhibited anti-convulsant activity, as measured in mice by the maximal electroshock seizure model. Conversion of the carboxylate function into amide abolished COX inhibition but preserved M-channel modulation. Remarkably, the very same template let us generating potent M-channel blockers. Our results reveal a new and crucial determinant of NSAID-mediated COX inhibition. They also provide a structural framework for designing novel M-channel modulators, including openers and blockers.

  4. Epoxy Fatty Acids and Inhibition of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Selectively Modulate GABA Mediated Neurotransmission to Delay Onset of Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Inceoglu, Bora; Zolkowska, Dorota; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Wagner, Karen M.; Yang, Jun; Hackett, Edward; Hwang, Sung Hee; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Rogawski, Michael A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, seizures lead to release of large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (ARA). ARA is a substrate for three major enzymatic routes of metabolism by cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes. These enzymes convert ARA to potent lipid mediators including prostanoids, leukotrienes and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). The prostanoids and leukotrienes are largely pro-inflammatory molecules that sensitize neurons whereas EETs are anti-inflammatory and reduce the excitability of neurons. Recent evidence suggests a GABA-related mode of action potentially mediated by neurosteroids. Here we tested this hypothesis using models of chemically induced seizures. The level of EETs in the brain was modulated by inhibiting the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), the major enzyme that metabolizes EETs to inactive molecules, by genetic deletion of sEH and by direct administration of EETs into the brain. All three approaches delayed onset of seizures instigated by GABA antagonists but not seizures through other mechanisms. Inhibition of neurosteroid synthesis by finasteride partially blocked the anticonvulsant effects of sEH inhibitors while the efficacy of an inactive dose of neurosteroid allopregnanolone was enhanced by sEH inhibition. Consistent with earlier findings, levels of prostanoids in the brain were elevated. In contrast, levels of bioactive EpFAs were decreased following seizures. Overall these results demonstrate that EETs are natural molecules which suppress the tonic component of seizure related excitability through modulating the GABA activity and that exploration of the EET mediated signaling in the brain could yield alternative approaches to treat convulsive disorders. PMID:24349022

  5. A Tale of Switched Functions: From Cyclooxygenase Inhibition to M-Channel Modulation in New Diphenylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Asher; Degani-Katzav, Nurit; Talmon, Maya; Danieli, Eyal; Gopin, Anna; Malka, Eti; Nachman, Rachel; Raz, Amiram; Shabat, Doron; Attali, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are molecular targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most used medication worldwide. However, the COX enzymes are not the sole molecular targets of NSAIDs. Recently, we showed that two NSAIDs, diclofenac and meclofenamate, also act as openers of Kv7.2/3 K+ channels underlying the neuronal M-current. Here we designed new derivatives of diphenylamine carboxylate to dissociate the M-channel opener property from COX inhibition. The carboxylate moiety was derivatized into amides or esters and linked to various alkyl and ether chains. Powerful M-channel openers were generated, provided that the diphenylamine moiety and a terminal hydroxyl group are preserved. In transfected CHO cells, they activated recombinant Kv7.2/3 K+ channels, causing a hyperpolarizing shift of current activation as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. In sensory dorsal root ganglion and hippocampal neurons, the openers hyperpolarized the membrane potential and robustly depressed evoked spike discharges. They also decreased hippocampal glutamate and GABA release by reducing the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic currents. In vivo, the openers exhibited anti-convulsant activity, as measured in mice by the maximal electroshock seizure model. Conversion of the carboxylate function into amide abolished COX inhibition but preserved M-channel modulation. Remarkably, the very same template let us generating potent M-channel blockers. Our results reveal a new and crucial determinant of NSAID-mediated COX inhibition. They also provide a structural framework for designing novel M-channel modulators, including openers and blockers. PMID:18159230

  6. GABAergic inhibition modulates intensity sensitivity of temporally patterned pulse trains in the inferior collicular neurons in big brown bats.

    PubMed

    Luan, Rui-Hong; Wu, Fei-Jian; Jen, Philip H-S; Sun, Xin-De

    2007-12-25

    The echolocating big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) emit trains of frequency-modulated (FM) biosonar signals with duration, amplitude, repetition rate, and sweep structure changing systematically during interception of their prey. In the present study, the sound stimuli of temporally patterned pulse trains at three different pulse repetition rates (PRRs) were used to mimic the sounds received during search, approach, and terminal stages of echolocation. Electrophysiological method was adopted in recordings from the inferior colliculus (IC) of midbrain. By means of iontophoretic application of bicuculline, the effect of GABAergic inhibition on the intensity sensitivity of IC neurons responding to three different PRRs of 10, 30 and 90 pulses per second (pps) was examined. The rate-intensity functions (RIFs) were acquired. The dynamic range (DR) of RIFs was considered as a criterion of intensity sensitivity. Comparing the average DR of RIFs at different PRRs, we found that the intensity sensitivity of some neurons improved, but that of other neurons decayed when repetition rate of stimulus trains increased from 10 to 30 and 90 pps. During application of bicuculline, the number of impulses responding to the different pulse trains increased under all stimulating conditions, while the DR differences of RIFs at different PRRs were abolished. The results indicate that GABAergic inhibition was involved in modulating the intensity sensitivity of IC neurons responding to pulse trains at different PRRs. Before and during bicuculline application, the percentage of changes in responses was maximal in lower stimulus intensity near to the minimum threshold (MT), and decreased gradually with the increment of stimulus intensity. This observation suggests that GABAergic inhibition contributes more effectively to the intensity sensitivity of the IC neurons responding to pulse trains at lower sound level.

  7. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  8. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8(+) Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL.

  9. Adaptability to pain is associated with potency of local pain inhibition, but not conditioned pain modulation: a healthy human study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Kelun; Yao, Dongyuan; Xue, Charlie C L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pain sensitivity, adaptability, and potency of endogenous pain inhibition, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local pain inhibition. Forty-one healthy volunteers (20 male, 21 female) received conditioning stimulation (CS) over 2 sessions in a random order: tonic heat pain (46 °C) on the right leg for 7 minutes and cold pressor pain (1 °C to 4 °C) on the left hand for 5 minutes. Participants rated the intensity of pain continuously using a 0 to 10 electronic visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPT) measured at the heterotopic and homotopic location to the CS sites before, during, and 20 minutes after CS. Two groups of participants, pain adaptive and pain nonadaptive, were identified based on their response to pain in the cold pressor test. Pain-adaptive participants showed a pain reduction between peak pain and pain at end of the test by at least 2 of 10 (n=16); whereas the pain-nonadaptive participants reported unchanged peak pain during 5-minute CS (n=25). Heterotopic PPTs during the CS did not differ between the 2 groups. However, increased homotopic PPTs measured 20 minutes after CS correlated with the amount of pain reduction during CS. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to pain does not correlate with the potency of CPM. Adaptability to pain is associated with longer-lasting local pain inhibition.

  10. Modulation of Microglial Activity by Rho-Kinase (ROCK) Inhibition as Therapeutic Strategy in Parkinson's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roser, Anna-Elisa; Tönges, Lars; Lingor, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive degeneration of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS, PNS), resulting in a reduced innervation of target structures and a loss of function. A shared characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases is the infiltration of microglial cells into affected brain regions. During early disease stages microglial cells often display a rather neuroprotective phenotype, but switch to a more pro-inflammatory neurotoxic phenotype in later stages of the disease, contributing to the neurodegeneration. Activation of the Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway appears to be instrumental for the modulation of the microglial phenotype: increased ROCK activity in microglia mediates mechanisms of the inflammatory response and is associated with improved motility, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of inflammatory cytokines. Recently, several studies suggested inhibition of ROCK signaling as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review article, we discuss the contribution of microglial activity and phenotype switch to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two devastating neurodegenerative diseases without disease-modifying treatment options. Furthermore, we describe how ROCK inhibition can influence the microglial phenotype in disease models and explore ROCK inhibition as a future treatment option for PD and ALS.

  11. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves acne in humans by modulating intracellular molecular targets and inhibiting P. acnes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Hyuck Hoon; Min, Seong Uk; Thiboutot, Diane M; Suh, Dae Hun

    2013-02-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent skin disorder characterized by hyperseborrhea, inflammation, and Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth. Only isotretinoin and hormonal therapy reduce sebum production. To identify a new drug candidate that modulates sebum, we examined the effects of EGCG, the major polyphenol in green tea, on human SEB-1 sebocytes and in patients with acne. In SEB-1 sebocytes, we found that EGCG reduced sebum by modulating the AMPK-SREBP-1 signaling pathway. EGCG also reduces inflammation by suppressing the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. EGCG also induces cytotoxicity of SEB-1 sebocytes via apoptosis and decreases the viability of P. acnes, thus targeting almost all the pathogenic features of acne. Finally, and most importantly, EGCG significantly improved acne in an 8-week randomized, split-face, clinical trial, and was well tolerated. Our data provide a therapeutic rationale for the use of EGCG in acne.

  12. Endothelial Cells Inhibit the Angiotensin II Induced Phenotypic Modulation of Rat Vascular Adventitial Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Ying; Chang, Neng-Bin; Li, Tao; Jiang, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Lei; He, Yan-Zheng; Jiang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The phenotypic modulation of vascular adventitial fibroblasts plays an important role in vascular remodeling. Evidence have shown that endothelial cells and adventitial fibroblasts interact under certain conditions. In this study, we investigated the influence of endothelial cells on the phenotypic modulation of adventitial fibroblasts. Endothelial cells and adventitial fibroblasts from rat thoracic aorta were cultivated in a co-culture system and adventitial fibroblasts were induced with angiotensin II (Ang II). Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and migration of adventitial fibroblasts were analyzed. Ang II upregulated the expression of collagen I and α-SMA and the migration of adventitial fibroblasts. Adventitial fibroblasts-endothelial cells co-culturing attenuated the effects of Ang II. Homocysteine-treated endothelial cells, which are functionally impaired, were less inhibitory of the phenotypic modulation of adventitial fibroblasts. Supplementation of endothelial cells with L-arginine (L-Arg) or 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) enhanced the trends, while with L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) the opposite effect was observed. Under the influence of Ang II, adventitial fibroblasts were prone to undergo phenotypic modulation, which was closely related to vascular remodeling. Our study showed that endothelial cells influenced fibroblast phenotypic transformation and such effect would be mediated through the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1921-1927, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Salidroside inhibits hypoxia-induced phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Lü, Bo-Dong; Chen, Shi-Tao; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Yang, Ke-Bing

    2013-08-01

    To explore the effects of salidroside on the phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMC) in hypoxic SD rats. CCSMCs were cultured in vitro and identified by immunohistochemistry. The cells were divided into six groups: normal control (21% O2), hypoxia (1% O2), hypoxia + salidroside 1 mg/L, hypoxia + salidroside 3 mg/L, hypoxia + salidroside 5 mg/L and hypoxia + PGE1 0.4 microg/L, and then cultured for 48 hours. The relative expressions of alpha-actin and osteopontin (OPN) in each group were determined by RT-PCR. The in vitro cultured CCSMCs grew well, with anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin monoclonal antibodies immunohistochemically positive. The relative expression of alpha-actin was markedly decreased while that of OPN remarkably increased in the hypoxia group as compared with the normal control group (P < 0.01). The hypoxia + salidroside 5 mg/L group showed a significantly higher expression of alpha-actin and lower expression of OPN than the hypoxia group (P < 0.01), but exhibited no significant differences from the hypoxia + PGE group (P > 0.05). Hypoxia can reduce the relative expression level of alpha-actin and increase that of OPN in the CCSMCs of SD rats, namely, induce their phenotypic modulation from the contraction to the non-contraction type. Salidroside can restrain hypoxia-induced phenotypic modulation of CCSMCs, and its inhibitory effect at 5 mg/L is similar to that of PGE1.

  14. Sclareol modulates the Treg intra-tumoral infiltrated cell and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Noori, Shokoofe; Hassan, Zuhair M; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Habibi, Zohre; Sohrabi, Nooshin; Bayanolhagh, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    A regulatory or suppressor T cell is functionally defined as a T cell that inhibits an immune response by influencing the activity of another cell type. On the other hand, Th1 cells express IFN-gamma and mediate cellular immunity. Sclareol exhibits growth inhibition and cytotoxic activity against a variety of human cancer cell lines. In the first set of experiments, Sclareol was isolated from the plant Salvia sclarea and our study assessed the immuno-therapeutic effectiveness of Sclareol by direct intra-tumoral injection. Secondly, several immunological parameters such as splenocytes proliferation, intra-tumor CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, IFN-gamma and IL-4 secretion and tumor size were assessed to evaluate the anti-tumoral immune response. By all means, the findings confirmed that the activity of Sclareol could reduce the tumor growth in vivo against breast cancer. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  16. GABAA-Mediated Inhibition Modulates Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, David; Hernández, Olga; Covey, Ellen; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect novel sounds in a complex acoustic context is crucial for survival. Neurons from midbrain through cortical levels adapt to repetitive stimuli, while maintaining responsiveness to rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The site of origin and mechanism of SSA are currently unknown. We used microiontophoretic application of gabazine to examine the role of GABAA-mediated inhibition in SSA in the inferior colliculus, the midbrain center for auditory processing. We found that gabazine slowed down the process of adaptation to high probability stimuli but did not abolish it, with response magnitude and latency still depending on the probability of the stimulus. Blocking GABAA receptors increased the firing rate to high and low probability stimuli, but did not completely equalize the responses. Together, these findings suggest that GABAA-mediated inhibition acts as a gain control mechanism that enhances SSA by modifying the responsiveness of the neuron. PMID:22479591

  17. Triethylenetetramine modulates polyamine and energy metabolism and inhibits cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Ucal, Sebahat; Pasanen, Markku; Peräniemi, Sirpa; Weisell, Janne; Khomutov, Maxim; Khomutov, Alex R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2016-05-15

    Polyamine metabolism is an attractive anticancer drug target, since polyamines are absolutely required for cellular proliferation, and increased levels of polyamines and their biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are associated with cancer. Triethylenetetramine (TETA) is a charge-deficient isosteric analogue of the polyamine spermidine (Spd) and a Cu(II)-chelating compound used for the treatment of Wilson's disease, and it has been implicated as a potential anticancer therapeutic drug. In the present study, we studied the effects of TETA in comparison with two other Cu(II)-chelators, D-penicillamine (PA) and tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), on polyamine metabolism in DU145 prostate carcinoma, MCF-7 breast carcinoma and JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. TETA induced antizyme, down-regulated ODC and inhibited [(14)C] Spd uptake. Moreover, it completely prevented α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-induced increase in [(14)C] Spd uptake, and inhibited [(14)C] putrescine (Put) uptake and ODC activity in vivo Seven-day treatment of DU145 cells with TETA caused growth cessation by reducing intracellular polyamine levels and suppressing the formation of hypusinated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). TETA or its N-acetylated metabolites also inhibited spermine (Spm), diamine and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases and decreased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Moreover, TETA inhibited the utilization of Put as energy source via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, as indicated by decreased production of (14)CO2 from [(14)C] Put. These results indicate that TETA attacks multiple proven anticancer drug targets not attributed to copper chelation, which warrants further studies to reveal its potential in cancer chemoprevention and cure. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K7 modulates Rubicon-mediated inhibition of autophagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiming; Chang, Brian; Brulois, Kevin F; Castro, Kamilah; Min, Chan-Ki; Rodgers, Mary A; Shi, Mude; Ge, Jianning; Feng, Pinghui; Oh, Byung-Ha; Jung, Jae U

    2013-11-01

    Autophagy is an important innate safeguard mechanism for protecting an organism against invasion by pathogens. We have previously discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) evades this host defense through tight suppression of autophagy by targeting multiple steps of autophagy signal transduction. Here, we report that KSHV K7 protein interacts with Rubicon autophagy protein and inhibits the autophagosome maturation step by blocking Vps34 enzymatic activity, further highlighting how KSHV deregulates autophagy-mediated host immunity for its life cycle.

  19. Shigella flexneri modulates stress granule composition and inhibits stress granule aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vonaesch, Pascale; Campbell-Valois, François-Xavier; Dufour, Alexandre; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Schnupf, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Invasion and multiplication of the facultative, cytosolic, enteropathogen Shigella flexneri within the colonic epithelial lining leads to an acute inflammatory response, fever and diarrhea. During the inflammatory process, infected cells are subjected to numerous stresses including heat, oxidative stress and genotoxic stress. The evolutionarily conserved pathway of cellular stress management is the formation of stress granules that store translationally inactive cellular mRNAs and interfere with cellular signalling pathways by sequestering signalling components. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. flexneri-infected cells to form stress granules in response to exogenous stresses. We found that S. flexneri infection inhibits movement of the stress granule markers eIF3 and eIF4B into stress granules and prevents the aggregation of G3BP1 and eIF4G-containing stress granules. This inhibition occurred only with invasive, but not with non-invasive bacteria and occurred in response to stresses that induce translational arrest through the phosphorylation of eIF2α and by treating cells with pateamine A, a drug that induces stress granules by inhibiting the eIF4A helicase. The S. flexneri-mediated stress granule inhibition could be largely phenocopied by the microtubule-destabilizing drug nocodazole and while S. flexneri infection did not lead to microtubule depolymerization, infection greatly enhanced acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Our data suggest that qualitative differences in the microtubule network or subversion of the microtubule-transport machinery by S. flexneri may be involved in preventing the full execution of this cellular stress response.

  20. Dehydration-induced modulation of kappa-opioid inhibition of vasopressin neurone activity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Victoria; Bishop, Valerie R; Leng, Gareth; Brown, Colin H

    2009-12-01

    Dehydration increases vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) secretion from the posterior pituitary gland to reduce water loss in the urine. Vasopressin secretion is determined by action potential firing in vasopressin neurones, which can exhibit continuous, phasic (alternating periods of activity and silence), or irregular activity. Autocrine kappa-opioid inhibition contributes to the generation of activity patterning of vasopressin neurones under basal conditions and so we used in vivo extracellular single unit recording to test the hypothesis that changes in autocrine kappa-opioid inhibition drive changes in activity patterning of vasopressin neurones during dehydration. Dehydration increased the firing rate of rat vasopressin neurones displaying continuous activity (from 7.1 +/- 0.5 to 9.0 +/- 0.6 spikes s(1)) and phasic activity (from 4.2 +/- 0.7 to 7.8 +/- 0.9 spikes s(1)), but not those displaying irregular activity. The dehydration-induced increase in phasic activity was via an increase in intraburst firing rate. The selective -opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine increased the firing rate of phasic neurones in non-dehydrated rats (from 3.4 +/- 0.8 to 5.3 +/- 0.6 spikes s(1)) and dehydrated rats (from 6.4 +/- 0.5 to 9.1 +/- 1.2 spikes s(1)), indicating that kappa-opioid feedback inhibition of phasic bursts is maintained during dehydration. In a separate series of experiments, prodynorphin mRNA expression was increased in vasopressin neurones of hyperosmotic rats, compared to hypo-osmotic rats. Hence, it appears that dynorphin expression in vasopressin neurones undergoes dynamic changes in proportion to the required secretion of vasopressin so that, even under stimulated conditions, autocrine feedback inhibition of vasopressin neurones prevents over-excitation.

  1. APP modulates KCC2 expression and function in hippocampal GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Jinxiang; Zheng, Xingzhi; Justice, Nicholas J; Wang, Kun; Ran, Xiangqian; Li, Yi; Huo, Qingwei; Zhang, Jiajia; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Nannan; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2017-01-05

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is enriched at the synapse, but its synaptic function is still poorly understood. We previously showed that GABAergic short-term plasticity is impaired in App knock-out (App(-/-)) animals, but the precise mechanism by which APP regulates GABAergic synaptic transmission has remained elusive. Using electrophysiological, biochemical, moleculobiological, and pharmacological analysis, here we show that APP can physically interact with KCC2, a neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter that is essential for Cl(-) homeostasis and fast GABAergic inhibition. APP deficiency results in significant reductions in both total and membrane KCC2 levels, leading to a depolarizing shift in the GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Simultaneous measurement of presynaptic action potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hippocampal neurons reveals impaired unitary IPSC amplitudes attributable to a reduction in α1 subunit levels of GABAAR. Importantly, restoration of normal KCC2 expression and function in App(-/-) mice rescues EGABA, GABAAR α1 levels and GABAAR mediated phasic inhibition. We show that APP functions to limit tyrosine-phosphorylation and ubiquitination and thus subsequent degradation of KCC2, providing a mechanism by which APP influences KCC2 abundance. Together, these experiments elucidate a novel molecular pathway in which APP regulates, via protein-protein interaction with KCC2, GABAAR mediated inhibition in the hippocampus.

  2. Chloroquine inhibits human CD4+ T-cell activation by AP-1 signaling modulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Jutz, Sabrina; Goldhahn, Katrin; Witzeneder, Nadine; Gerner, Marlene C.; Trapin, Doris; Greiner, Georg; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Guenter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Burgmann, Heinz; Steinberger, Peter; Ratzinger, Franz; Schmetterer, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic for rheumatic diseases. Although its modes of action on the innate immune system are well described, there is still insufficient knowledge about its direct effects on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we evaluated the influence of CQ on activation parameters of human CD4+ T-cells. CQ directly suppressed proliferation, metabolic activity and cytokine secretion of T-cells following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation. In contrast, CQ showed no effect on up-regulation of T-cell activation markers. CQ inhibited activation of all T helper cell subsets, although IL-4 and IL-13 secretion by Th2 cells were less influenced compared to other Th-specific cytokines. Up to 10 μM, CQ did not reduce cell viability, suggesting specific suppressive effects on T-cells. These properties of CQ were fully reversible in re-stimulation experiments. Analyses of intracellular signaling showed that CQ specifically inhibited autophagic flux and additionally activation of AP-1 by reducing phosphorylation of c-JUN. This effect was mediated by inhibition of JNK catalytic activity. In summary, we characterized selective and reversible immunomodulatory effects of CQ on human CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide new insights into the biological actions of JNK/AP-1 signaling in T-cells and may help to expand the therapeutic spectrum of CQ. PMID:28169350

  3. APP modulates KCC2 expression and function in hippocampal GABAergic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Jinxiang; Zheng, Xingzhi; Justice, Nicholas J; Wang, Kun; Ran, Xiangqian; Li, Yi; Huo, Qingwei; Zhang, Jiajia; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Nannan; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is enriched at the synapse, but its synaptic function is still poorly understood. We previously showed that GABAergic short-term plasticity is impaired in App knock-out (App-/-) animals, but the precise mechanism by which APP regulates GABAergic synaptic transmission has remained elusive. Using electrophysiological, biochemical, moleculobiological, and pharmacological analysis, here we show that APP can physically interact with KCC2, a neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter that is essential for Cl- homeostasis and fast GABAergic inhibition. APP deficiency results in significant reductions in both total and membrane KCC2 levels, leading to a depolarizing shift in the GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Simultaneous measurement of presynaptic action potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hippocampal neurons reveals impaired unitary IPSC amplitudes attributable to a reduction in α1 subunit levels of GABAAR. Importantly, restoration of normal KCC2 expression and function in App-/- mice rescues EGABA, GABAAR α1 levels and GABAAR mediated phasic inhibition. We show that APP functions to limit tyrosine-phosphorylation and ubiquitination and thus subsequent degradation of KCC2, providing a mechanism by which APP influences KCC2 abundance. Together, these experiments elucidate a novel molecular pathway in which APP regulates, via protein-protein interaction with KCC2, GABAAR mediated inhibition in the hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20142.001 PMID:28054918

  4. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A.; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-03-30

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity.

  5. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A.; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity. PMID:25819761

  6. Psoralen Inhibited Apoptosis of Osteoporotic Osteoblasts by Modulating IRE1-ASK1-JNK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuqing; Wang, Yongqian; Yang, Yubin; Xiang, Ting; Liu, Jiahui

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease causing fracture in older populations. Abnormal apoptosis of osteoblasts contributes to the genesis of osteoporosis. Inhibiting apoptosis of osteoblasts provides a promising strategy to prevent osteoporosis. The proliferation of osteoblasts isolated from osteoporotic patients or healthy subjects was determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined by Annexin V/PI assay. Protein expression was measured by western blot. The proliferation of osteoblasts isolated from osteoporotic patients was inhibited and the apoptosis level of these cells was higher than the osteoblasts from healthy subjects. Incubation with psoralen or estradiol significantly enhanced the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis level of osteoporotic osteoblasts. Western blot demonstrated that psoralen or estradiol treatment downregulated the expression of IRE1, p-ASK, p-JNK, and Bax. Meanwhile, expression of Bcl-2 was upregulated. Pretreatment by IRE1 agonist tunicamycin or JNK agonist anisomycin attenuated the effect of psoralen on osteoporotic osteoblasts. Psoralen inhibited apoptosis of osteoporotic osteoblasts by regulating IRE1-ASK1-JNK pathway.

  7. Mangiferin Inhibits Renal Urate Reabsorption by Modulating Urate Transporters in Experimental Hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Gao, Lihui; Niu, Yanfen; Zhou, Yuanfang; Lin, Hua; Jiang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfu; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Mangiferin, a natural glucosyl xanthone from the leaves of Mangifera indica L., was previously shown to exert potent hypouricemic effects associated with inhibition of the activity of xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. The present study aimed to evaluate its uricosuric effect and possible molecular mechanisms underlying the renal urate transporters responsible for urate reabsorption in vivo. Mangiferin (1.5-24.0 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically to hyperuricemic mice and rats induced by the intraperitoneal injection of uric acid and potassium oxonate, respectively. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum and urinary urate levels as well as fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA). The mRNA and protein levels of renal urate-anion transporter 1 (URAT1), organic anion transporter 10 (OAT10), glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9), and PDZ domain-containing protein (PDZK1) were analyzed. The administration of mangiferin significantly decreased the serum urate levels in hyperuricemic mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In hyperuricemic rats, mangiferin also reduced the serum urate levels and increased the urinary urate levels and FEUA. These results indicate that mangiferin has uricosuric effects. Further examination showed that mangiferin markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of renal URAT1, OAT10, and GLUT9 in hyperuricemic rats, but did not interfere with PDZK1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that mangiferin promotes urate excretion by the kidney, which may be related to the inhibition of urate reabsorption via downregulation of renal urate transporters.

  8. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments. PMID:27764095

  9. Population Density Modulates Drug Inhibition and Gives Rise to Potential Bistability of Treatment Outcomes for Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Karslake, Jason; Maltas, Jeff; Brumm, Peter; Wood, Kevin B

    2016-10-01

    The inoculum effect (IE) is an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic as a function of the initial size of a microbial population. The IE has been observed in a wide range of bacteria, implying that antibiotic efficacy may depend on population density. Such density dependence could have dramatic effects on bacterial population dynamics and potential treatment strategies, but explicit measures of per capita growth as a function of density are generally not available. Instead, the IE measures MIC as a function of initial population size, and population density changes by many orders of magnitude on the timescale of the experiment. Therefore, the functional relationship between population density and antibiotic inhibition is generally not known, leaving many questions about the impact of the IE on different treatment strategies unanswered. To address these questions, here we directly measured real-time per capita growth of Enterococcus faecalis populations exposed to antibiotic at fixed population densities using multiplexed computer-automated culture devices. We show that density-dependent growth inhibition is pervasive for commonly used antibiotics, with some drugs showing increased inhibition and others decreased inhibition at high densities. For several drugs, the density dependence is mediated by changes in extracellular pH, a community-level phenomenon not previously linked with the IE. Using a simple mathematical model, we demonstrate how this density dependence can modulate population dynamics in constant drug environments. Then, we illustrate how time-dependent dosing strategies can mitigate the negative effects of density-dependence. Finally, we show that these density effects lead to bistable treatment outcomes for a wide range of antibiotic concentrations in a pharmacological model of antibiotic treatment. As a result, infections exceeding a critical density often survive otherwise effective treatments.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase modulates ethanol inhibition of cell adhesion mediated by the L1 neural cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaowei; Wilkemeyer, Michael F.; Menkari, Carrie E.; Parnell, Scott E.; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Charness, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    There is a genetic contribution to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), but the identification of candidate genes has been elusive. Ethanol may cause FASD in part by decreasing the adhesion of the developmentally critical L1 cell adhesion molecule through interactions with an alcohol binding pocket on the extracellular domain. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic knockdown of ERK2 did not alter L1 adhesion, but markedly decreased ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion in NIH/3T3 cells and NG108-15 cells. Likewise, leucine replacement of S1248, an ERK2 substrate on the L1 cytoplasmic domain, did not decrease L1 adhesion, but abolished ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion. Stable transfection of NIH/3T3 cells with human L1 resulted in clonal cell lines in which L1 adhesion was consistently sensitive or insensitive to ethanol for more than a decade. ERK2 activity and S1248 phosphorylation were greater in ethanol-sensitive NIH/3T3 clonal cell lines than in their ethanol-insensitive counterparts. Ethanol-insensitive cells became ethanol sensitive after increasing ERK2 activity by transfection with a constitutively active MAP kinase kinase 1. Finally, embryos from two substrains of C57BL mice that differ in susceptibility to ethanol teratogenesis showed corresponding differences in MAPK activity. Our data suggest that ERK2 phosphorylation of S1248 modulates ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion by inside-out signaling and that differential regulation of ERK2 signaling might contribute to genetic susceptibility to FASD. Moreover, identification of a specific locus that regulates ethanol sensitivity, but not L1 function, might facilitate the rational design of drugs that block ethanol neurotoxicity. PMID:23431142

  11. Spatial frequency information modulates response inhibition and decision-making processes.

    PubMed

    Jahfari, Sara; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Scholte, H Steven

    2013-01-01

    We interact with the world through the assessment of available, but sometimes imperfect, sensory information. However, little is known about how variance in the quality of sensory information affects the regulation of controlled actions. In a series of three experiments, comprising a total of seven behavioral studies, we examined how different types of spatial frequency information affect underlying processes of response inhibition and selection. Participants underwent a stop-signal task, a two choice speed/accuracy balance experiment, and a variant of both these tasks where prior information was given about the nature of stimuli. In all experiments, stimuli were either intact, or contained only high-, or low- spatial frequencies. Overall, drift diffusion model analysis showed a decreased rate of information processing when spatial frequencies were removed, whereas the criterion for information accumulation was lowered. When spatial frequency information was intact, the cost of response inhibition increased (longer SSRT), while a correct response was produced faster (shorter reaction times) and with more certainty (decreased errors). When we manipulated the motivation to respond with a deadline (i.e., be fast or accurate), removal of spatial frequency information slowed response times only when instructions emphasized accuracy. However, the slowing of response times did not improve error rates, when compared to fast instruction trials. These behavioral studies suggest that the removal of spatial frequency information differentially affects the speed of response initiation, inhibition, and the efficiency to balance fast or accurate responses. More generally, the present results indicate a task-independent influence of basic sensory information on strategic adjustments in action control.

  12. Thiol-modulated mechanisms of the cytotoxicity of thimerosal and inhibition of DNA topoisomerase II alpha.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing; Liang, Hong; O'Hara, Kimberley A; Yalowich, Jack C; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2008-02-01

    Thimerosal is an organic mercury compound that is widely used as a preservative in vaccines and other solution formulations. The use of thimerosal has caused concern about its ability to cause neurological abnormalities due to mercury accumulation during a normal schedule of childhood vaccinations. While the chemistry and the biological effects of methylmercury have been well-studied, those of thimerosal have not. Thimerosal reacted rapidly with cysteine, GSH, human serum albumin, and single-stranded DNA to form ethylmercury adducts that were detectable by mass spectrometry. These results indicated that thimerosal would be quickly metabolized in vivo because of its reactions with protein and nonprotein thiols. Thimerosal also potently inhibited the decatenation activity of DNA topoisomerase II alpha, likely through reaction with critical free cysteine thiol groups. Thimerosal, however, did not act as a topoisomerase II poison and the lack of cross-resistance with a K562 cell line with a decreased level of topoisomerase II alpha (K/VP.5 cells) suggested that inhibition of topoisomerase II alpha was not a significant mechanism for the inhibition of cell growth. Depletion of intracellular GSH with buthionine sulfoximine treatment greatly increased the K562 cell growth inhibitory effects of thimerosal, which showed that intracellular glutathione had a major role in protecting cells from thimerosal. Pretreatment of thimerosal with glutathione did not, however, change its K562 cell growth inhibitory effects, a result consistent with the rapid exchange of the ethylmercury adduct among various thiol-containing cellular reactants. Thimerosal-induced single and double strand breaks in K562 cells were consistent with a rapid induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, these studies have elucidated some of the chemistry and biological activities of the interaction of thimerosal with topoisomerase II alpha and protein and nonprotein thiols and with DNA.

  13. Guggulsterone modulates MAPK and NF-κB pathways and inhibits skin tumorigenesis in SENCAR mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaraz, Sami; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Afaq, Farrukh; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Guggulsterone (GUG), a resin of the Commiphora mukul tree, has been used in ayurvedic medicine for centuries to treat a variety of ailments. Recent studies have suggested that GUG may also possess anticancer effects. In the present study, we show that GUG possesses antitumor-promoting effects in SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model. We first determined the effect of topical application of GUG to mice against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced conventional markers and other novel markers of skin tumor promotion. We found that topical application of GUG (1.6 μmol per mouse) 30 min prior to TPA (3.2 nmol per mouse) application onto the skin of mice afforded significant inhibition against TPA-mediated increase in skin edema and hyperplasia. Topical application of GUG was also found to result in substantial inhibition against TPA-induced epidermal (i) ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity; (ii) ODC, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expressions; (iii) phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinases and p38; (iv) activation of NF-κB/p65 and IKKα/β and (v) phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. We next assessed the effect of topically applied GUG on TPA-induced skin tumor promotion in 7,12-dimethyl benz[a]anthracene-initiated mice. Compared with non-GUG-pretreated mice, animals pretreated with GUG showed significantly reduced tumor incidence, lower tumor body burden and a significant delay in the latency period for tumor appearance from 5 to 11 weeks. These results provide the first evidence that GUG possesses anti-skin tumor-promoting effects in SENCAR mice and inhibits conventional as well as novel biomarkers of tumor promotion. In summary, GUG could be useful for delaying tumor growth in humans. PMID:18684729

  14. Low dose of propranolol down-modulates bone resorption by inhibiting inflammation and osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, WF; Madeira, MFM; da Silva, TA; Clemente-Napimoga, JT; Miguel, CB; Dias-da-Silva, VJ; Barbosa-Neto, O; Lopes, AH; Napimoga, MH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bones are widely innervated, suggesting an important role for the sympathetic regulation of bone metabolism, although there are controversial studies. We investigated the effects of propranolol in a model of experimental periodontal disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were assigned as follows: animals without ligature; ligated animals receiving vehicle and ligated animals receiving 0.1, 5 or 20 mg·kg−1 propranolol. After 30 days, haemodynamic parameters were measured by cardiac catheterization. Gingival tissues were removed and assessed for IL-1β, TNF-α and cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) by elisa, or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), receptor activator of NF-κ B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by Western blot analysis. Sections from the mandibles were evaluated for bone resorption. Also, we analysed the ability of propranolol to inhibit osteoclastogenesis in vitro. RESULTS Propranolol at 0.1 and 5 mg·kg−1 reduced the bone resorption as well as ICAM-1 and RANKL expression. However, only 0.1 mg·kg−1 reduced IL-1β, TNF-α and CTX levels as well as increased the expression of OPG, but did not alter any of the haemodynamic parameters. Propranolol also suppressed in vitro osteoclast differentiation and resorptive activity by inhibiting the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc)1 pathway and the expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K and MMP-9. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Low doses of propranolol suppress bone resorption by inhibiting RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis as well as inflammatory markers without affecting haemodynamic parameters. PMID:21950592

  15. Low dose of propranolol down-modulates bone resorption by inhibiting inflammation and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, W F; Madeira, M F M; da Silva, T A; Clemente-Napimoga, J T; Miguel, C B; Dias-da-Silva, V J; Barbosa-Neto, O; Lopes, A H; Napimoga, M H

    2012-04-01

    Bones are widely innervated, suggesting an important role for the sympathetic regulation of bone metabolism, although there are controversial studies. We investigated the effects of propranolol in a model of experimental periodontal disease. Rats were assigned as follows: animals without ligature; ligated animals receiving vehicle and ligated animals receiving 0.1, 5 or 20 mg·kg(-1) propranolol. After 30 days, haemodynamic parameters were measured by cardiac catheterization. Gingival tissues were removed and assessed for IL-1β, TNF-α and cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) by elisa, or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), receptor activator of NF-κ B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by Western blot analysis. Sections from the mandibles were evaluated for bone resorption. Also, we analysed the ability of propranolol to inhibit osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Propranolol at 0.1 and 5 mg·kg(-1) reduced the bone resorption as well as ICAM-1 and RANKL expression. However, only 0.1 mg·kg(-1) reduced IL-1β, TNF-α and CTX levels as well as increased the expression of OPG, but did not alter any of the haemodynamic parameters. Propranolol also suppressed in vitro osteoclast differentiation and resorptive activity by inhibiting the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc)1 pathway and the expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K and MMP-9. Low doses of propranolol suppress bone resorption by inhibiting RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis as well as inflammatory markers without affecting haemodynamic parameters. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Nitric Oxide Modulates Histone Acetylation at Stress Genes by Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mengel, Alexander; Ageeva, Alexandra; Durner, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Histone acetylation, which is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression, is controlled by the opposing action of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In animals, several HDACs are subjected to regulation by nitric oxide (NO); in plants, however, it is unknown whether NO affects histone acetylation. We found that treatment with the physiological NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increased the abundance of several histone acetylation marks in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which was strongly diminished in the presence of the NO scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. This increase was likely triggered by NO-dependent inhibition of HDAC activity, since GSNO and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine significantly and reversibly reduced total HDAC activity in vitro (in nuclear extracts) and in vivo (in protoplasts). Next, genome-wide H3K9/14ac profiles in Arabidopsis seedlings were generated by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, and changes induced by GSNO, GSNO/2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide or trichostatin A (an HDAC inhibitor) were quantified, thereby identifying genes that display putative NO-regulated histone acetylation. Functional classification of these genes revealed that many of them are involved in the plant defense response and the abiotic stress response. Furthermore, salicylic acid, which is the major plant defense hormone against biotrophic pathogens, inhibited HDAC activity and increased histone acetylation by inducing endogenous NO production. These data suggest that NO affects histone acetylation by targeting and inhibiting HDAC complexes, resulting in the hyperacetylation of specific genes. This mechanism might operate in the plant stress response by facilitating the stress-induced transcription of genes. PMID:27980017

  17. Delphinidin inhibits cell proliferation and invasion via modulation of Met receptor phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Deeba N.; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami; Khan, Naghma; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2008-08-15

    The HGF/Met signaling pathway is deregulated in majority of cancers and is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Delphinidin, present in pigmented fruits and vegetables possesses potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic properties. Here, we assessed the anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of delphinidin on HGF-mediated responses in the immortalized MCF-10A breast cell line. Treatment of cells with delphinidin prior to exposure to exogenous HGF resulted in the inhibition of HGF-mediated (i) tyrosyl-phosphorylation and increased expression of Met receptor, (ii) phosphorylation of downstream regulators such as FAK and Src and (iii) induction of adaptor proteins including paxillin, Gab-1 and GRB-2. In addition, delphinidin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of HGF-activated (i) Ras-ERK MAPKs and (ii) PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathways. Delphinidin was found to repress HGF-activated NF{kappa}B transcription with a decrease in (i) phosphorylation of IKK{alpha}/{beta} and I{kappa}B{alpha}, and (ii) activation and nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B/p65. Inhibition of HGF-mediated membrane translocation of PKC{alpha} as well as decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 was further observed in delphinidin treated cells. Finally, decreased cell viability of Met receptor expressing breast cancer cells treated with delphinidin argues for a potential role of the agent in the prevention of HGF-mediated activation of various signaling pathways implicated in breast cancer.

  18. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents.

  19. Almond Skin Inhibits HSV-2 Replication in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Modulating the Cytokine Network.

    PubMed

    Arena, Adriana; Bisignano, Carlo; Stassi, Giovanna; Filocamo, Angela; Mandalari, Giuseppina

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the effect of almond skin extracts on the production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were either infected or not by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), with and without prior treatment with almond skin extracts. Production of IL-17 induced by HSV-2 was inhibited by natural skins (NS) treatment. NS triggered PBMC in releasing IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 in cellular supernatants. These results may explain the antiviral potential of almond skins.

  20. The structure of the Lingo-1 ectodomain, a module implicated in central nervous system repair inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mosyak, Lidia; Wood, Andrew; Dwyer, Brian; Buddha, Madhavan; Johnson, Mark; Aulabaugh, Ann; Zhong, Xiaotian; Presman, Eleonora; Benard, Susan; Kelleher, Kerry; Wilhelm, James; Stahl, Mark L; Kriz, Ron; Gao, Ying; Cao, Zixuan; Ling, Huai-Ping; Pangalos, Menelas N; Walsh, Frank S; Somers, William S

    2006-11-24

    Nogo receptor (NgR)-mediated control of axon growth relies on the central nervous system-specific type I transmembrane protein Lingo-1. Interactions between Lingo-1 and NgR, along with a complementary co-receptor, result in neurite and axonal collapse. In addition, the inhibitory role of Lingo-1 is particularly important in regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, suggesting that pharmacological modulation of Lingo-1 function could be a novel approach for nerve repair and remyelination therapies. Here we report on the crystal structure of the ligand-binding ectodomain of human Lingo-1 and show it has a bimodular, kinked structure composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules. The structure, together with biophysical analysis of its solution properties, reveals that in the crystals and in solution Lingo-1 persistently associates with itself to form a stable tetramer and that it is its LRR-Ig-composite fold that drives such assembly. Specifically, in the crystal structure protomers of Lingo-1 associate in a ring-shaped tetramer, with each LRR domain filling an open cleft in an adjacent protomer. The tetramer buries a large surface area (9,200 A2) and may serve as an efficient scaffold to simultaneously bind and assemble the NgR complex components during activation on a membrane. Potential functional binding sites that can be identified on the ectodomain surface, including the site of self-recognition, suggest a model for protein assembly on the membrane.

  1. Resveratrol modulates murine collagen-induced arthritis by inhibiting Th17 and B-cell function.

    PubMed

    Xuzhu, Gao; Komai-Koma, Mousa; Leung, Bernard P; Howe, Hwee Siew; McSharry, Charles; McInnes, Iain B; Xu, Damo

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol intake is inversely related to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease incidence and severity. Resveratrol, a safe, well-described plant-derived compound, possesses anti-inflammation and immune-regulatory properties and is present in red wine. As such, it could mediate anti-inflammatory properties of the latter and offer novel therapeutic utility in is own right. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of resveratrol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and its putative immune modulation in mice. CIA was induced in DBA1 mice by immunisation with collagen II. Different doses of resveratrol were administered before or after the development of CIA. The levels of antibody and cytokines in serum or in draining lymph node (DLN) lymphocyte culture supernatants were measured by ELISA and Th17 cell development in DLN was monitored by flow cytometry. Either prophylactic or therapeutic administration of resveratrol attenuated clinical parameters and bone erosion in CIA mice. The arthritis-protective effects were associated with markedly reduced serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen-specific, but not total, IgG, and with reduced numbers of Th17 cells and the production of IL-17 in DLN. Resveratrol modulates inflammatory arthritis in rodents by selectively suppressing key cellular and humoral responses necessary for disease development. This may partly explain the protective effects of red wine but importantly may offer a novel, effective and safe pathway whereby novel agents could be developed to treat RA.

  2. Knockdown or inhibition of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma growth via modulating Kras-E-cadherin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanying; Li, Haonan; Yang, Yihe; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2014-12-28

    Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) has relatively specific lipid substrates including carbonyls, retinal and farnesal/geranylgeranial. Metabolizing these lipid substrates appears crucial to carcinogenesis, particularly for farnesal/geranylgeranial that involves protein prenylation. Mutant Kras is a most common active oncogene in pancreatic cancer, and its activation requires protein prenylation. To directly determine the role of AKR1B10 in pancreatic carcinogenesis, we knocked down AKR1B10 in CD18 human pancreatic carcinoma cells using shRNA approach. Silencing AKR1B10 resulted in a significant inhibition of anchor-dependent growth (knockdown cells vs. vector-control cells: 67 ± 9.5 colonies/HPF vs. 170 ± 3.7 colonies/HPF, p < 0.01), invasion index (0.27 vs. 1.00, p < 0.05), and cell migration (at 16 hours 9.2 ± 1.2% vs. 14.0 ± 1.8%, at 24 hours 21.0 ± 1.1% vs. 30.5 ± 3.5%, and at 48 hours 51.9 ± 5.7% vs. 88.9 ± 3.0%, p < 0.01). Inhibition of AKR1B10 by oleanolic acid (OA) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth with IC50 at 30 µM. Kras pull-down and Western blot analysis revealed a significant down-regulation of active form Kras and phosphorylated C-Raf, and Erk, as well as an up-regulation of E-cadherin. A significant reduction of in vivo tumor growth was observed in nude mice implanted with the CD18 pancreatic carcinoma cells with AKR1B10 knockdown (tumor weight: 0.25 ± 0.06 g vs. 0.52 ± 0.07 g, p = 0.01), and with OA treatment (tumor weight: 0.35 ± 0.05 g vs. 0.52 ± 0.07 g, p = 0.05). Our findings indicate AKR1B10 is a unique enzyme involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis via modulation of the Kras-E-cadherin pathway.

  3. Inhibition of damage-regulated autophagy modulator-1 (DRAM-1) impairs neutrophil differentiation of NB4 APL cells.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Magali; Mueller, Chantal; Fey, Martin F; Tschan, Mario P

    2012-12-01

    The damage-regulator autophagy modulator 1 (DRAM-1) is a lysosomal protein that positively regulates autophagy in a p53-dependent manner. We aimed at analyzing the role of DRAM-1 in granulocytic differentiation of APL cells. We observed a significant increase of DRAM-1 expression during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced neutrophil differentiation of NB4 APL cells but not in ATRA-resistant NB4-R2 cells. Next, knocking down DRAM-1 in NB4 APL cells was sufficient to impair neutrophil differentiation. Given that DRAM-1 is a transcriptional target of p53, we tested if DRAM-1 is regulated by the p53 relative p73. Indeed, inhibiting p73 prevented neutrophil differentiation and DRAM-1 induction of NB4 cells. In conclusion, we show for the first time that p73-regulated DRAM-1 is functionally involved in neutrophil differentiation of APL cells.

  4. Laser modulation of human immune system: inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation by a gallium-arsenide laser at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, A.; Abergel, R.P.; Uitto, J.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured human lymphocytes were subjected to irradiation with a gallium-arsenide laser at energy fluence varying from 2.17 to 651 mJ/cm2, and the cell proliferation was assessed by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. Both mitogenic proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and spontaneous cell proliferation were markedly inhibited by the laser irradiation at energy fluence as low as 10.85 mJ/cm2. Similarly, the functional response of cells to antigen stimulation in a one-way mixed-lymphocyte reaction was also diminished as a result of laser irradiation. The results indicate that laser irradiation at low energy can interfere with immune system in vitro, and similar modulation could potentially occur in human subjects exposed to laser irradiation in vivo.

  5. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production.

  6. Tumor Suppressor WWOX inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis by modulating RUNX2 function.

    PubMed

    Del Mare, Sara; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-08-10

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. This malignant osteoid forming tumor is characterized by its metastatic potential, mainly to lungs. We recently demonstrated that WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is frequently inactivated in human OS and that WWOX restoration in WWOX-negative OS cells suppresses tumorigenicity. Of note, WWOX levels are reduced in paired OS samples of post-treatment metastastectomies as compared to pre-treatment biopsies suggesting that decreased WWOX levels are associated with a more aggressive phenotype at the metastatic site. Nevertheless, little is known about WWOX function in OS metastasis. Here, we investigated the role of tumor suppressor WWOX in suppressing pulmonary OS metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of WWOX in OS cells, HOS and LM-7, inhibits OS invasion and cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, WWOX expression reduced tumor burden in vivo and inhibited metastases' seeding and colonization. Mechanistically, WWOX function is associated with reduced levels of RUNX2 metastatic target genes implicated in adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that WWOX plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of OS, and its expression could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease.

  7. Tumor Suppressor WWOX inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis by modulating RUNX2 function

    PubMed Central

    Del Mare, Sara; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. This malignant osteoid forming tumor is characterized by its metastatic potential, mainly to lungs. We recently demonstrated that WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is frequently inactivated in human OS and that WWOX restoration in WWOX-negative OS cells suppresses tumorigenicity. Of note, WWOX levels are reduced in paired OS samples of post-treatment metastastectomies as compared to pre-treatment biopsies suggesting that decreased WWOX levels are associated with a more aggressive phenotype at the metastatic site. Nevertheless, little is known about WWOX function in OS metastasis. Here, we investigated the role of tumor suppressor WWOX in suppressing pulmonary OS metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of WWOX in OS cells, HOS and LM-7, inhibits OS invasion and cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, WWOX expression reduced tumor burden in vivo and inhibited metastases’ seeding and colonization. Mechanistically, WWOX function is associated with reduced levels of RUNX2 metastatic target genes implicated in adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that WWOX plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of OS, and its expression could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease. PMID:26256646

  8. Spermidine inhibits MMP-2 via modulation of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase in HDFs.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hwan; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, aging has been reported to be regulated by HAT. In this study, the inhibitory effects of spermidine on the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity and expression were investigated in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). It was observed that spermidine inhibits MMP-2 activity and expression. In addition, the expression levels of histone acetyltransferase (HAT), phospho-extracellular-signal related kinase (p-ERK), phospho-c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) are decreased in the presence of spermidine. In contrast, the expression levels of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), phospho-p38 (p-p38) are increased by spermidine. In conclusion, our results suggest that spermidine could have a therapeutic potential in inhibition of metastasis through the inhibitory effects on activity and expression of MMP-2 via regulation of HAT and HDAC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs. PMID:28239143

  10. Calcium channel currents and their inhibition by (-)-baclofen in rat sensory neurones: modulation by guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Dolphin, A C; Scott, R H

    1987-01-01

    1. The effect of intracellular application of the hydrolysis-resistant GTP and GDP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate (GTP-gamma-S), and guanosine 5'-O-2-thiodiphosphate (GDP-beta-S) has been examined on voltage-activated calcium-channel currents and the ability of the gamma-aminobutyric acid B agonist baclofen to inhibit them, in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (d.r.g.) neurones. 2. Under control conditions, the calcium-channel current, recorded using the whole-cell patch technique with Ba2+ rather than Ca2+ as the permeant divalent cation, consists of an inactivating and a sustained current. In the presence of 500 microM-GTP-gamma-S included in the patch pipette, the calcium-channel current was activated more slowly and was largely non-inactivating during the 100 ms depolarization voltage step. The effects of GTP-gamma-S were abolished by pre-treatment of cells with pertussis toxin. 3. The calcium-channel current recorded in the presence of 500 microM-GDP-beta-S had a more marked transient component than the control calcium-channel current. The proportion of transient calcium-channel current in the presence of GDP-beta-S was not reduced in Na+-free medium. 4. No statistically significant effects of GTP-gamma-S and GDP-beta-S were observed on the calcium-activated potassium current IK(Ca), the transient outward potassium current activated in Ca2+-free medium, or on the inwardly rectifying current (Ih) activated by hyperpolarization. 5. GTP-gamma-S increased the ability of baclofen to inhibit calcium-channel currents, whereas this was decreased by GDP-beta-S and by pre-treatment of cells with pertussis toxin. The half-maximal effective dose (EC50) for baclofen was 2 microM in the presence of GTP-gamma-S, 15 microM for control and 50 microM in the presence of GDP-beta-S. Comparable results were obtained using a single concentration of the adenosine agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA, 0.05 microM) to inhibit calcium-channel currents; its effect was

  11. Carbohydrate ingestion induces sex-specific cardiac vagal inhibition, but not vascular sympathetic modulation, in healthy older women.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Graham, Stuart L; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    The role of vagal function in cardiovascular risk in older women remains unclear. Autonomic modulation following carbohydrate ingestion (CI) and postural stress (PS) were investigated in 14 healthy men and 21 age-matched postmenopausal women (age: 65.0 ± 2.1 vs. 64.1 ± 1.6 years), with normal and comparable insulin sensitivity. Continuous noninvasive finger arterial pressure and ECG were recorded in the lying and the standing positions before and after ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal (600 kcal, carbohydrate 78%, protein 13%, and fat 8%). Low-frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) components (ms(2)) of heart rate variability (HRV), low-frequency power (mmHg(2)) of systolic blood pressure variability (SBP LF power), and the sequence method for spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, ms/mmHg) were used to quantify autonomic modulation. In response to CI and PS, mean arterial pressure maintained stable, and heart rate increased in women and men in the lying and standing positions. Following CI (60, 90, and 120 min postprandially) in the standing position, SBP LF power increased by 40% in men (P = 0.02), with unchanged HRV parameters; in contrast, in women, HRV HF power halved (P = 0.02), with unaltered SBP LF power. During PS before and after CI, similar magnitude of SBP LF power, HRV, and BRS changes was observed in men and women. In conclusion, CI induces sex-specific vascular sympathetic activation in healthy older men, and cardiac vagal inhibition in healthy older women; this CI-mediated efferent vagal inhibition may suggest differential cardiovascular risk factors in women, irrespective of insulin resistance, and impairment of autonomic control. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The Number of Genomic Copies at the 16p11.2 Locus Modulates Language, Verbal Memory, and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hippolyte, Loyse; Maillard, Anne M; Rodriguez-Herreros, Borja; Pain, Aurélie; Martin-Brevet, Sandra; Ferrari, Carina; Conus, Philippe; Macé, Aurélien; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Metspalu, Andres; Reigo, Anu; Kolk, Anneli; Männik, Katrin; Barker, Mandy; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric; Mignot, Cyril; Schneider, Laurence; Mottron, Laurent; Keren, Boris; David, Albert; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Gérard, Marion; Bernier, Raphael; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Hanson, Ellen; Green Snyder, LeeAnne; Ramus, Franck; Beckmann, Jacques S; Draganski, Bogdan; Reymond, Alexandre; Jacquemont, Sébastien

    2016-07-15

    Deletions and duplications of the 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus are prevalent copy number variations (CNVs), highly associated with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. Beyond language and global cognition, neuropsychological assessments of these two CNVs have not yet been reported. This study investigates the relationship between the number of genomic copies at the 16p11.2 locus and cognitive domains assessed in 62 deletion carriers, 44 duplication carriers, and 71 intrafamilial control subjects. IQ is decreased in deletion and duplication carriers, but we demonstrate contrasting cognitive profiles in these reciprocal CNVs. Deletion carriers present with severe impairments of phonology and of inhibition skills beyond what is expected for their IQ level. In contrast, for verbal memory and phonology, the data may suggest that duplication carriers outperform intrafamilial control subjects with the same IQ level. This finding is reminiscent of special isolated skills as well as contrasting language performance observed in autism spectrum disorder. Some domains, such as visuospatial and working memory, are unaffected by the 16p11.2 locus beyond the effect of decreased IQ. Neuroimaging analyses reveal that measures of inhibition covary with neuroanatomic structures previously identified as sensitive to 16p11.2 CNVs. The simultaneous study of reciprocal CNVs suggests that the 16p11.2 genomic locus modulates specific cognitive skills according to the number of genomic copies. Further research is warranted to replicate these findings and elucidate the molecular mechanisms modulating these cognitive performances. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RF positivity has substantial influence on the peripheral memory B-cell compartment and its modulation by TNF inhibition.

    PubMed

    Roll, P; Muhammad, K; Schumann, M; Kleinert, S; Tony, H-P

    2012-05-01

    The role of B cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been well established with the advent of B-cell targeted therapies. Alterations of peripheral B-cell subsets in RA and heterogeneous modulations of the B-cell compartment under tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibition have been described. In this study we examined the influence of rheumatoid factor (RF) positivity on the peripheral B-cell compartment and its modulation under TNF blockade. Consecutive patients with RA and inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) were stratified according to RF status and a subset of them was included in a prospective study of weekly etanercept treatment. At baseline, RF-negative patients had a significant higher percentage of overall CD27+ B cells compared to healthy controls (HC) and RF-positive patients. In detail, RF-negative patients had 46.6% (range 15.7-86.8%) CD27+ B cells compared to 31.3% (12.9-56.9%, p = 0.026) in HC and 29.8% (19-73.3%, p = 0.04) in RF-positive patients. Within the CD27+ compartment, CD27+/immunoglobulin (Ig)D+ memory B cells were significantly increased to 26.4% (range 5.9-54.7%) in RF-negative patients compared to 14.9% (4.1-27.3%, p = 0.006) in HC and 10.5% (3.4-41.1%, p = 0.003) in RF-positive patients. During anti-TNF therapy, memory B cells increased significantly in relative and absolute numbers only in RF-negative patients. In RF-negative patients, we observed an enhanced frequency of peripheral memory B cells and an accumulation of pre-switch memory B cells. During anti-TNF therapy, memory B cells increased significantly only in RF-negative patients, suggesting that the peripheral memory B-cell compartment is more amenable to TNF inhibition in these patients.

  14. Modulation of the inhibition of respiratory burst in mouse macrophages by cyclosporin A: effect of in vivo treatment, glucocorticoids and the state of activation of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiara, M D; Sobrino, F

    1991-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressor without myelotoxicity. It is thought that its effect is mediated by inhibition of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor expression in lymphocytes. We have recently described that CsA reduces phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-dependent superoxide anion and H2O2 production by resident mice macrophages in vitro. The present work provides evidence that the capacity of CsA to produce this inhibition is abolished when macrophages are in the activated state. We also show that peritoneal macrophages from CsA-treated mice retain the capacity to inhibit O2- production. The interaction between CsA and glucocorticoids in vitro shows a co-operative effect between both agents. These studies demonstrate a novel action of CsA related to its modulation of the inhibition of the respiratory burst. The physiological role of these CsA effects and modulation need further exploration. PMID:1847692

  15. Modulation of Prepulse Inhibition and Startle Reflex by Emotions: A Comparison between Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Le Duc, Jolyanne; Fournier, Philippe; Hébert, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether or not the acoustic startle response and sensorimotor gating may be modulated by emotions differentially between young and older adults. Two groups of participants (mean age Young: 24 years old; Elderly: 63.6 years old) were presented with three types of auditory stimuli (Startle alone, High or Low frequency Prepulse) while viewing pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant images. Electromyographic activity of the eyeblink response was measured. Results show that older adults displayed diminished eyeblink responses whereas younger adults displayed enhanced eyeblink responses when viewing negative images. Sensorimotor gating also differed between young and older adults, with enhanced sensorimotor gating abilities while viewing positive pictures in older adults and diminished abilities while viewing negative pictures among younger adults. These results argue in favor of a differential emotional influence on the sensorimotor abilities of young and older adults, with a positivity bias among the latter. PMID:26941643

  16. Diet-derived polyphenols inhibit angiogenesis by modulating the interleukin-6/STAT3 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Sylvie; Akla, Naoufal; Ouanouki, Amira; Lord-Dufour, Simon; Beliveau, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Several epidemiological studies have indicated that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with a reduced risk of developing several types of cancers. This chemopreventive effect is related to the high content of these foods in phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, that interfere with several processes involved in cancer progression including tumor cell growth, survival and angiogenesis. In addition to the low intake of plant-based foods, increased body mass and physical inactivity have recently emerged as other important lifestyle factors influencing cancer risk, leading to the generation of low-grade chronic inflammatory conditions which are a key process involved in tumor progression. The objectives of the current study are to investigate the inhibitory effects of these polyphenols on angiogenesis triggered by an inflammatory cytokine (IL-6) and to determine the mechanisms underlying this action. We found that, among the tested polyphenols, apigenin and luteolin were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on the inflammatory cytokine IL-6/STAT3 pathway. These effects resulted in modulation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 signaling triggered by IL-6, as well as in a marked reduction in the proliferation, migration and morphogenic differentiation of endothelial cells. Interestingly, these polyphenols also modulated the expression of IL-6 signal transducing receptor (IL-6R{alpha}) and the secretion of the extracellular matrix degrading enzyme MMP-2 as well as the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS3) protein. Overall, these results may provide important new information on the role of diet in cancer prevention.

  17. Association of anxiety with intracortical inhibition and descending pain modulation in chronic myofascial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to answer three questions related to chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS): 1) Is the motor cortex excitability, as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters (TMS), related to state-trait anxiety? 2) Does anxiety modulate corticospinal excitability changes after evoked pain by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST)? 3) Does the state-trait anxiety predict the response to pain evoked by QST if simultaneously receiving a heterotopic stimulus [Conditional Pain Modulation (CPM)]? We included females with chronic MPS (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 11), aged 19 to 65 years. Motor cortex excitability was assessed by TMS, and anxiety was assessed based on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The disability related to pain (DRP) was assessed by the Profile of Chronic Pain scale for the Brazilian population (B:PCP:S), and the psychophysical pain measurements were measured by the QST and CPM. Results In patients, trait-anxiety was positively correlated to intracortical facilitation (ICF) at baseline and after QST evoked pain (β = 0.05 and β = 0.04, respectively) and negatively correlated to the cortical silent period (CSP) (β = -1.17 and β = -1.23, respectively) (P <0.05 for all comparisons). After QST evoked pain, the DRP was positively correlated to ICF (β = 0.02) (P < 0.05). Pain scores during CPM were positively correlated with trait-anxiety when it was concurrently with high DRP (β = 0.39; P = 0.02). Controls’ cortical excitability remained unchanged after QST. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in chronic MPS, the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory descending systems of the corticospinal tract is associated with higher trait-anxiety concurrent with higher DRP. PMID:24645677

  18. Silencing profilin-1 inhibits gastric cancer progression via integrin β1/focal adhesion kinase pathway modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Jun; Zhu, Zhen-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Hu, Zun-Qi; Zhang, Jian-Peng; Cai, Qing-Ping; Wang, Liang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of profilin-1 (PFN1) in gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were performed to detect PFN1 expression in clinical gastric carcinoma and adjacent tissues, and the association of PFN1 expression with patient clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. PFN1 was knocked down to investigate the role of this protein in cell proliferation and metastasis in the SGC-7901 cell line. To explore the underlying mechanisms, the expression of integrin β1 and the activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the downstream proteins extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were measured through Western blot or qRT-PCR analysis. Fibronectin (FN), a ligand of integrin β1, was used to verify the correlation between alterations in the integrin β1/FAK pathway and changes in tumor cell aggressiveness upon PFN1 perturbation. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical, Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that PFN1 expression was higher at both the protein and mRNA levels in gastric carcinoma tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. In addition, high PFN1 expression (53/75, 70.4%) was correlated with tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and TNM stage in gastric cancer, but not with gender, age, location, tumor size, or histological differentiation. In vitro experiments showed that PFN1 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells through the induction G0/G1 arrest. Silencing PFN1 inhibited cell migration and invasion and down-regulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP9. Moreover, silencing PFN1 reduced the expression of integrin β1 at the protein level and inhibited the activity of FAK, and the downstream effectors ERK1/2, P38MAPK, PI3K, AKT and mTOR. FN-promoted cell

  19. Modulation of long-latency afferent inhibition by the amplitude of sensory afferent volley.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia V; El-Sayes, Jenin; Fassett, Hunter J; Chen, Robert; Nelson, Aimee J

    2017-07-01

    Long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) is the inhibition of the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by the sensory afferent volley following electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve. It is unknown how the activation of sensory afferent fibers relates to the magnitude of LAI. This study investigated the relationship between LAI and the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the median nerve (MN) and the digital nerves (DN) of the second digit. LAI was obtained by delivering nerve stimulation 200 ms before a TMS pulse delivered over the motor cortex. Experiment 1 assessed the magnitude of LAI following stimulation of the contralateral MN or DN using nerve stimulus intensities relative to the maximum SNAP (SNAPmax) of that nerve and two TMS intensities (0.5- and 1-mV MEP). Results indicate that MN LAI is maximal at ~50% SNAPmax, when presumably all sensory afferents are recruited for TMS of 0.5-mV MEP. For DN, LAI appears at ~50% SNAPmax and does not increase with further recruitment of sensory afferents. Experiment 2 investigated the magnitude of LAI following ipsilateral nerve stimulation at intensities relative to SNAPmax Results show minimal LAI evoked by ipsilateral MN and no LAI following ipsilateral DN stimulation. Implications for future studies investigating LAI include adjusting nerve stimulation to 50% SNAPmax to obtain maximal LAI. Additionally, MN LAI can be used as a marker for neurological disease or injury by using a nerve stimulation intensity that can evoke a depth of LAI capable of increasing or decreasing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation of the relationship between long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) and the sensory afferent volley. Differences exist between median and digital nerve LAI. For the median nerve, LAI increases until all sensory fibers are presumably recruited. In contrast, digital nerve LAI does not increase with the recruitment of additional sensory fibers but rather is

  20. Nitric oxide signaling modulates synaptic inhibition in the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) via cGMP-dependent suppression of KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Lina; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Asraf, Hila; Grothe, Benedikt; Hershfinkel, Michal; Forsythe, Ian D.; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Glycinergic inhibition plays a central role in the auditory brainstem circuitries involved in sound localization and in the encoding of temporal action potential firing patterns. Modulation of this inhibition has the potential to fine-tune information processing in these networks. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the auditory brainstem (where activity-dependent generation of NO is documented) modulates the strength of inhibition by changing the chloride equilibrium potential. Recent evidence demonstrates that large inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in neurons of the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) are enhanced by a very low intracellular chloride concentration, generated by the neuronal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expressed in the postsynaptic neurons. Our data show that modulation by NO caused a 15 mV depolarizing shift of the IPSC reversal potential, reducing the strength of inhibition in SPN neurons, without changing the threshold for action potential firing. Regulating inhibitory strength, through cGMP-dependent changes in the efficacy of KCC2 in the target neuron provides a postsynaptic mechanism for rapidly controlling the inhibitory drive, without altering the timing or pattern of the afferent spike train. Therefore, this NO-mediated suppression of KCC2 can modulate inhibition in one target nucleus (SPN), without influencing inhibitory strength of other target nuclei (MSO, LSO) even though they are each receiving collaterals from the same afferent nucleus (a projection from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, MNTB). PMID:24987336

  1. Slit2N Inhibits Transmission of HIV-1 from Dendritic Cells to T-cells by Modulating Novel Cytoskeletal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Prasad, Anil; Kuzontkoski, Paula M.; Yu, Jinlong; Groopman, Jerome E.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells are among the first cells to encounter sexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), in the mucosa, and they can transmit HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells via an infectious synapse. Recent studies reveal that actin-rich membrane extensions establish direct contact between cells at this synapse and facilitate virus transmission. Genesis of these contacts involves signaling through c-Src and Cdc42, which modulate actin polymerization and filopodia formation via the Arp2/3 complex and Diaphanous 2 (Diaph2). We found that Slit2N, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptors, blocked HIV-1-induced signaling through Arp2/3 and Diaph2, decreased filopodial extensions on dendritic cells, and inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 in a Robo1-dependent manner. Employing proteomic analysis, we identified Flightless-1 as a novel, Robo1-interacting protein. Treatment with shRNAs reduced levels of Flightless-1 and demonstrated its role in efficient cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1. These results suggest a novel strategy to limit viral infection in the host by targeting the Slit/Robo pathway with modulation of cytoskeletal elements previously unrecognized in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26582347

  2. OSU-A9 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell lines by modulating p38-JAK-STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chi; Bai, Li-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Jin; Chu, Po-Chen; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Sargeant, Aaron M; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2017-04-25

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy that is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Since there is a dire need for novel and effective therapies to improve the poor survival rates of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, we analyzed the antitumor effects of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol derivative, on pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. OSU-A9 exhibited a stronger antitumor effect than gemcitabine on two pancreatic cancer cell lines, including gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. OSU-A9 treatment induced apoptosis, the down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation, up-regulation of p38 phosphorylation and decreased phosphorylation of JAK and STAT3. Cell migration and invasiveness assays showed that OSU-A9 reduced cancer cell aggressiveness and inhibited BxPC-3 xenograft growth in nude mice. These results suggest that OSU-A9 modulates the p38-JAK-STAT3 signaling module, thereby inducing cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells. Continued evaluation of OSU-A9 as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer thus appears warrented.

  3. The Natural Flavonoid Fisetin Inhibits Cellular Proliferation of Hepatic, Colorectal, and Pancreatic Cancer Cells through Modulation of Multiple Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mаhmoud; Abdel Halim Hegazy, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Digestive cancers are major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been previously shown anti-proliferative, anti-cancer, neuroprotective, and antioxidant activities. In our study, the anti-tumor activities in addition to regulatory effects of fisetin on some cancer cell lines were investigated. Data presented here showed that fisetin induces growth inhibition, and apoptosis in hepatic (HepG-2), colorectal (Caco-2) and pancreatic (Suit-2) cancer cell lines. Gene expression results showed that 1307 genes were significantly regulated in their expression in hepatic and pancreatic cell lines. 350 genes were commonly up-regulated and 353 genes were commonly down-regulated. Additionally, 604 genes were oppositely expressed in both tumor cells. CDK5 signaling, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, glucocorticoid signaling, and ERK/MAPK signaling were among most prominent signaling pathways modulating the growth inhibitory effects of fisetin on hepatic and pancreatic cancer cells. The present analysis showed, for the first time, that the anti-tumor effect of fisetin was mediated mainly through modulation of multiple signaling pathways and via activation of CDKN1A, SEMA3E, GADD45B and GADD45A and down-regulation of TOP2A, KIF20A, CCNB2 and CCNB1 genes.

  4. The Natural Flavonoid Fisetin Inhibits Cellular Proliferation of Hepatic, Colorectal, and Pancreatic Cancer Cells through Modulation of Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Youns, Mаhmoud; Abdel Halim Hegazy, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Digestive cancers are major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been previously shown anti-proliferative, anti-cancer, neuroprotective, and antioxidant activities. In our study, the anti-tumor activities in addition to regulatory effects of fisetin on some cancer cell lines were investigated. Data presented here showed that fisetin induces growth inhibition, and apoptosis in hepatic (HepG-2), colorectal (Caco-2) and pancreatic (Suit-2) cancer cell lines. Gene expression results showed that 1307 genes were significantly regulated in their expression in hepatic and pancreatic cell lines. 350 genes were commonly up-regulated and 353 genes were commonly down-regulated. Additionally, 604 genes were oppositely expressed in both tumor cells. CDK5 signaling, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, glucocorticoid signaling, and ERK/MAPK signaling were among most prominent signaling pathways modulating the growth inhibitory effects of fisetin on hepatic and pancreatic cancer cells. The present analysis showed, for the first time, that the anti-tumor effect of fisetin was mediated mainly through modulation of multiple signaling pathways and via activation of CDKN1A, SEMA3E, GADD45B and GADD45A and down-regulation of TOP2A, KIF20A, CCNB2 and CCNB1 genes. PMID:28052097

  5. CCR5 as a natural and modulated target for inhibition of HIV.

    PubMed

    Burke, Bryan P; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Hütter, Gero

    2013-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection-this without detrimental effects to the host-and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV ("Berlin patient") achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  6. Modulating carnitine levels by targeting its biosynthesis pathway – selective inhibition of γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Rydzik, Anna M.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Kochan, Grazyna T.; Williams, Sophie T.; McDonough, Michael A.; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for fatty acid metabolism, but is associated with both health benefits and risks, especially heart diseases. We report the identification of potent, selective and cell active inhibitors of γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBOX), which catalyses the final step of carnitine biosynthesis in animals. A crystal structure of BBOX in complex with a lead inhibitor reveals that it binds in two modes, one of which adopts an unusual ‘U-shape’ conformation stabilised by inter- and intra-molecular π-stacking interactions. Conformational changes observed on binding of the inhibitor to BBOX likely reflect those occurring in catalysis; they also rationalise the inhibition of BBOX by high levels of its substrate γ-butyrobetaine (GBB), as observed both with isolated BBOX protein and in cellular studies. PMID:26682037

  7. Repetition suppression in transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potentials is modulated by cortical inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kallioniemi, E; Pääkkönen, A; Julkunen, P

    2015-12-03

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be applied to modulate cortical phenomena. The modulation effect is dependent on the applied stimulation frequency. Repetition suppression (RS) has been demonstrated in the motor system using TMS with short suprathreshold 1-Hz stimulation trains repeated at long inter-train intervals. RS has been reported to occur in the resting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) with respect to the first pulse in a train of stimuli. Although this RS in the motor system has been described in previous studies, the neuronal origin of the phenomenon is still poorly understood. The present study evaluated RS in three TMS-induced motor responses; resting and active MEPs as well as corticospinal silent periods (SPs) in order to clarify the mechanism behind TMS-induced RS. We studied 10 healthy right-handed subjects using trains of four stimuli with stimulation intensities of 120% of the resting motor threshold (rMT) and 120% of the silent period threshold for an SP duration of 30 ms (SPT30). Inter-trial interval was 20s, with a 1-s inter-stimulus interval within the trains. We confirmed that RS appears in resting MEPs (p < 0.001), whereas active MEPs did not exhibit RS (p > 0.792). SPs, on the contrary, lengthened (p < 0.001) indicating modulation of cortical inhibition. The effects of the two stimulation intensities exhibited a similar trend; however, the SPT30 evoked a more profound inhibitory effect compared to that achieved by rMT. Moreover, the resting MEP amplitudes and SP durations correlated (rho ⩽ -0.674, p < 0.001) and the pre-TMS EMG level did not differ between stimuli in resting MEPs (F = 0.0, p ⩾ 0.999). These results imply that the attenuation of response size seen in resting MEPs might originate from increasing activity of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons which relay the characteristics of SPs.

  8. Nitric oxide inhibition in paraventricular nucleus on cardiovascular and autonomic modulation after exercise training in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Mastelari, Rosiane Batista; de Souza, Hugo Celso Dutra; Lenhard, Adriane; de Aguiar Corrêa, Fernando Morgan; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2011-02-23

    It is well known that regular physical exercise alter cardiac function and autonomic modulation of heart rate variability (HRV). The paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) is an important site of integration for autonomic and cardiovascular responses, where nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role. The aim of our study was to evaluate the cardiovascular parameters and autonomic modulation by means of spectral analysis after nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in the PVN in conscious sedentary (S) or swimming trained (ST) rats. After swimming training protocol, adult male Wistar rats, instrumented with guide cannulas to PVN and femoral artery and vein catheters were submitted to mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recording. At baseline, the physical training induced a resting bradycardia (S: 374±5, ST: 346±1bpm) and promoted adaptations in HRV characterized by an increase in high-frequency oscillations (HF; 26.43±6.91 to 88.96±2.44) and a decrease in low-frequency oscillations (LF; 73.57±6.91 to 11.04±2.44) in normalized units. The microinjection of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) in the PVN of sedentary and trained rats promoted increase in MAP and HR. l-NAME in the PVN did not significantly alter the spectral parameters of HRV of sedentary animals, however in the trained rats increased LF oscillations (11.04±2.44 to 27.62±6.97) and decreased HF oscillations (88.96±2.44 to 72.38±6.97) in normalized units compared with baseline. Our results suggest that NO in the PVN may collaborate to cardiac autonomic modulation after exercise training.

  9. Novel tumor growth inhibition mechanism by cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 involves anti-angiogenesis modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator protein cdk2-associating protein1 (cdk2ap1) in inhibiting growth of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Expression of cdk2ap1 correlated with reduction in several SCC malignant cell phenotypes, including reduced angiogenesis. We observed several alterations in gene expression consistent with classical functions of cdk2ap1, including upregulation of cell cycle inhibitory genes, and an upregulation in expression of genes belonging to both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cascades. Interestingly, we also uncovered a profile of gene expression and activation of signaling pathways that may suggest new tumor-suppressive functions for cdk2ap1 through downregulation of invasion/metastasis and modulation of antiangiogenesis by upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Blocking of the TGFβ1 pathway resulted in inhibition of the cdk2ap1 antiangiogenesis phenotype. In combination, these data support the role of cdk2ap1 as a tumor suppressor gene that can regulate SCC tumor growth in a cell autonomous manner through decreases in invasiveness and a non cell-autonomous manner through decreases in angiogenesis phenotypes, and these are novel phenotypes induced by cdk2ap1. PMID:20541561

  10. Emotional modulation of motor response inhibition in women with borderline personality disorder: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Gitta A; Zvonik, Kerstin; Kamphausen, Susanne; Sebastian, Alexandra; Maier, Simon; Philipsen, Alexandra; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Lieb, Klaus; Tüscher, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Both emotion regulation and impulsivity are core aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD) pathology. Although both problems may be combined specifically in BPD, few studies to date have investigated the emotional modulation of impulsivity in BPD. Women with BPD and matched healthy controls performed go/no-go tasks after induction of anger, joy or a neutral mood by vocally presented short stories. Dependent variables were the behavioural results and functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We included 17 women with BPD and 18 controls in our study. No behavioural group differences were found. However, patients with BPD showed stronger activation of the left amygdala and weaker activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate during anger induction than controls. Inhibition in the go/no-go task after anger induction increased activity in the left inferior frontal cortex in controls, but not in women with BPD, who, in turn, showed increased activation in the subthalamic nucleus. Findings cannot be generalized to men, and 4 patients were taking antidepressant medication (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). In addition, no patient control group was investigated, thus we do not know whether findings are specific to BPD compared with other disorders. Our findings are consistent with the view that a disturbed amygdala-prefrontal network in patients with BPD is compensated by a subcortical loop involving the subthalamic nucleus, leading to normal behavioural inhibition in these patients.

  11. MitoTEMPO Prevents Oxalate Induced Injury in NRK-52E Cells via Inhibiting Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Modulating Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Liu, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    As one of the major risks for urolithiasis, hyperoxaluria can be caused by genetic defect or dietary intake. And high oxalate induced renal epithelial cells injury is related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether MitoTEMPO, a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, could protect against oxalate mediated injury in NRK-52E cells via inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction and modulating oxidative stress. MitoSOX Red was used to determine mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) production. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and quantification of ATP synthesis were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function. The protein expression of Nox4, Nox2, and p22 was also detected to explore the effect of oxalate and MitoTEMPO on NADPH oxidase. Our results revealed that pretreatment with MitoTEMPO significantly inhibited oxalate induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) release and decreased oxalate induced mtROS generation. Further, MitoTEMPO pretreatment restored disruption of Δψm and decreased ATP synthesis mediated by oxalate. In addition, MitoTEMPO altered the protein expression of Nox4 and p22 and decreased the protein expression of IL-6 and osteopontin (OPN) induced by oxalate. We concluded that MitoTEMPO may be a new candidate to protect against oxalate induced kidney injury as well as urolithiasis. PMID:28116040

  12. Emotional modulation of motor response inhibition in women with borderline personality disorder: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Gitta A.; Zvonik, Kerstin; Kamphausen, Susanne; Sebastian, Alexandra; Maier, Simon; Philipsen, Alexandra; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz; Lieb, Klaus; Tüscher, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Background Both emotion regulation and impulsivity are core aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD) pathology. Although both problems may be combined specifically in BPD, few studies to date have investigated the emotional modulation of impulsivity in BPD. Methods Women with BPD and matched healthy controls performed go/no-go tasks after induction of anger, joy or a neutral mood by vocally presented short stories. Dependent variables were the behavioural results and functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Results We included 17 women with BPD and 18 controls in our study. No behavioural group differences were found. However, patients with BPD showed stronger activation of the left amygdala and weaker activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate during anger induction than controls. Inhibition in the go/no-go task after anger induction increased activity in the left inferior frontal cortex in controls, but not in women with BPD, who, in turn, showed increased activation in the subthalamic nucleus. Limitations Findings cannot be generalized to men, and 4 patients were taking antidepressant medication (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). In addition, no patient control group was investigated, thus we do not know whether findings are specific to BPD compared with other disorders. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the view that a disturbed amygdala–prefrontal network in patients with BPD is compensated by a subcortical loop involving the subthalamic nucleus, leading to normal behavioural inhibition in these patients. PMID:23046830

  13. Inhibition of diabetic-cataract by vitamin K1 involves modulation of hyperglycemia-induced alterations to lens calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai Varsha, M K N; Raman, Thiagarajan; Manikandan, Ramar

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the potential of vitamin K1 against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in Wistar rats. A single, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, accumulation of sorbitol and formation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) in eye lens. Hyperglycemia in lens also resulted in superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation and less reduced glutathione suggesting oxidative stress in lens. Hyperglycemia also resulted in increase in lens Ca2+ and significant inhibition of lens Ca2+ ATPase activity. These changes were associated with cataract formation in diabetic animals. By contrast treatment of diabetic rats with vitamin K1 (5 mg/kg, sc, twice a week) resulted in animals with partially elevated blood glucose and with transparent lenses having normal levels of sorbitol, AGE, Ca2+ ATPase, Ca2+, and oxidative stress. Vitamin K 1 may function to protect against cataract formation in the STZ induced diabetic rat by affecting the homeostasis of blood glucose and minimizing subsequent oxidative and osmotic stress. Thus, these results show that Vitamin K1 inhibits diabetic-cataract by modulating lens Ca2+ homeostasis and its hypoglycemic effect through its direct action on the pancreas.

  14. Nanoscale amphiphilic macromolecules with variable lipophilicity and stereochemistry modulate inhibition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Poree, Dawanne E; Zablocki, Kyle; Faig, Allison; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2013-08-12

    Amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) based on carbohydrate domains functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) can inhibit the uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and counteract foam cell formation, a key characteristic of early atherogenesis. To investigate the influence of lipophilicity and stereochemistry on the AMs' physicochemical and biological properties, mucic acid-based AMs bearing four aliphatic chains (2a) and tartaric acid-based AMs bearing two (2b and 2l) and four aliphatic chains (2g and 2k) were synthesized and evaluated. Solution aggregation studies suggested that both the number of hydrophobic arms and the length of the hydrophobic domain impact AM micelle sizes, whereas stereochemistry impacts micelle stability. 2l, the meso analogue of 2b, elicited the highest reported oxLDL uptake inhibition values (89%), highlighting the crucial effect of stereochemistry on biological properties. This study suggests that stereochemistry plays a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake and must be considered when designing biomaterials for potential cardiovascular therapies.

  15. Light-Limited Growth Rate Modulates Nitrate Inhibition of Dinitrogen Fixation in the Marine Unicellular Cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nathan S.; Hutchins, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation is the dominant supply of new nitrogen (N) to the oceans, but is often inhibited in the presence of fixed N sources such as nitrate (NO3−). Anthropogenic fixed N inputs to the ocean are increasing, but their effect on marine N2 fixation is uncertain. Thus, global estimates of new oceanic N depend on a fundamental understanding of factors that modulate N source preferences by N2-fixing cyanobacteria. We examined the unicellular diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii (strain WH0003) to determine how the light-limited growth rate influences the inhibitory effects of fixed N on N2 fixation. When growth (µ) was limited by low light (µ = 0.23 d−1), short-term experiments indicated that 0.4 µM NH4+ reduced N2-fixation by ∼90% relative to controls without added NH4+. In fast-growing, high-light-acclimated cultures (µ = 0.68 d−1), 2.0 µM NH4+ was needed to achieve the same effect. In long-term exposures to NO3−, inhibition of N2 fixation also varied with growth rate. In high-light-acclimated, fast-growing cultures, NO3− did not inhibit N2-fixation rates in comparison with cultures growing on N2 alone. Instead NO3− supported even faster growth, indicating that the cellular assimilation rate of N2 alone (i.e. dinitrogen reduction) could not support the light-specific maximum growth rate of Crocosphaera. When growth was severely light-limited, NO3− did not support faster growth rates but instead inhibited N2-fixation rates by 55% relative to controls. These data rest on the basic tenet that light energy is the driver of photoautotrophic growth while various nutrient substrates serve as supports. Our findings provide a novel conceptual framework to examine interactions between N source preferences and predict degrees of inhibition of N2 fixation by fixed N sources based on the growth rate as controlled by light. PMID:25503244

  16. Light-limited growth rate modulates nitrate inhibition of dinitrogen fixation in the marine unicellular cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nathan S; Hutchins, David A

    2014-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation is the dominant supply of new nitrogen (N) to the oceans, but is often inhibited in the presence of fixed N sources such as nitrate (NO3-). Anthropogenic fixed N inputs to the ocean are increasing, but their effect on marine N2 fixation is uncertain. Thus, global estimates of new oceanic N depend on a fundamental understanding of factors that modulate N source preferences by N2-fixing cyanobacteria. We examined the unicellular diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii (strain WH0003) to determine how the light-limited growth rate influences the inhibitory effects of fixed N on N2 fixation. When growth (µ) was limited by low light (µ = 0.23 d-1), short-term experiments indicated that 0.4 µM NH4+ reduced N2-fixation by ∼90% relative to controls without added NH4+. In fast-growing, high-light-acclimated cultures (µ = 0.68 d-1), 2.0 µM NH4+ was needed to achieve the same effect. In long-term exposures to NO3-, inhibition of N2 fixation also varied with growth rate. In high-light-acclimated, fast-growing cultures, NO3- did not inhibit N2-fixation rates in comparison with cultures growing on N2 alone. Instead NO3- supported even faster growth, indicating that the cellular assimilation rate of N2 alone (i.e. dinitrogen reduction) could not support the light-specific maximum growth rate of Crocosphaera. When growth was severely light-limited, NO3- did not support faster growth rates but instead inhibited N2-fixation rates by 55% relative to controls. These data rest on the basic tenet that light energy is the driver of photoautotrophic growth while various nutrient substrates serve as supports. Our findings provide a novel conceptual framework to examine interactions between N source preferences and predict degrees of inhibition of N2 fixation by fixed N sources based on the growth rate as controlled by light.

  17. Nanotherapeutics for inhibition of atherogenesis and modulation of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; York, Adam W.; Ahuja, Sonali; Chae, Hoonbyung; Joseph, Laurie B.; Rahimi, Saum; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Haser, Paul B.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Atherosclerotic development is exacerbated by two coupled pathophysiological phenomena in plaque-resident cells: modified lipid trafficking and inflammation. To address this therapeutic challenge, we designed and investigated the efficacy in vitro and ex vivo of a novel ‘composite’ nanotherapeutic formulation with dual activity, wherein the nanoparticle core comprises the antioxidant α-tocopherol and the shell is based on sugar-derived amphiphilic polymers that exhibit scavenger receptor binding and counteract atherogenesis. Methods and results Amphiphilic macromolecules were kinetically fabricated into serum-stable nanoparticles (NPs) using a core/shell configuration. The core of the NPs comprised either of a hydrophobe derived from mucic acid, M12, or the antioxidant α-tocopherol (α-T), while an amphiphile based on PEG-terminated M12 served as the shell. These composite NPs were then tested and validated for inhibition of oxidized lipid accumulation and inflammatory signalling in cultures of primary human macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Next, the NPs were evaluated for their athero-inflammatory effects in a novel ex vivo carotid plaque model and showed similar effects within human tissue. Incorporation of α-T into the hydrophobic core of the NPs caused a pronounced reduction in the inflammatory response, while maintaining high levels of anti-atherogenic efficacy. Conclusions Sugar-based amphiphilic macromolecules can be complexed with α-T to establish new anti-athero-inflammatory nanotherapeutics. These dual efficacy NPs effectively inhibited key features of atherosclerosis (modified lipid uptake and the formation of foam cells) while demonstrating reduction in inflammatory markers based on a disease-mimetic model of human atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26472131

  18. Inhibition of oncogenic Pim-3 kinase modulates transformed growth and chemosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dapeng; Cobb, Michael G.; Gavilano, Lily; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Williams, Daniel; White, Catherine D.; Taverna, Pietro; Bednarski, Brian K.; Kim, Hong Jin; Baldwin, Albert S.; Baines, Antonio T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of only 6%. Although the cytosine analog gemcitabine is the drug commonly used to treat PDAC, chemoresistance unfortunately renders the drug ineffective. Thus, strategies that can decrease this resistance will be essential for improving the dismal outcome of patients suffering from this disease. We previously observed that oncogenic Pim-1 kinase was aberrantly expressed in PDAC tissues and cell lines and was responsible for radioresistance. Furthermore, members of the Pim family have been shown to reduce the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer. Therefore, we attempted to evaluate the role of Pim-3 in chemoresistance of PDAC cells. We were able to confirm upregulation of the Pim-3 oncogene in PDAC tissues and cell lines vs. normal samples. Biological consequences of inhibiting Pim-3 expression with shRNA-mediated suppression included decreases in anchorage-dependent growth, invasion through Matrigel and chemoresistance to gemcitabine as measured by caspase-3 activity. Additionally, we were able to demonstrate that Pim-1 and Pim-3 play overlapping but non-identical roles as it relates to gemcitabine sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells. To further support the role of Pim-3 suppression in sensitizing PDAC cells to gemcitabine, we used the pharmacological Pim kinase inhibitor SGI-1776. Treatment of PDAC cells with SGI-1776 resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bad and cell cycle changes. When SGI-1776 was combined with gemcitabine, there was a greater decrease in cell viability in the PDAC cells vs. cells treated with either of the drugs separately. These results suggest combining drug therapies that inhibit Pim kinases, such as Pim-3, with chemotherapeutic agents, to aid in decreasing chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23760491

  19. Hsp90β inhibition modulates nitric oxide production and nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hsp90β is a member of the Hsp90 family of protein chaperones. This family plays essential roles in the folding, maturation and activity of many proteins that are involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. The role of this protein in chondrocytes is not well understood, although its increase in osteoarthritic cells has been reported. The present study aimed to explore the role of Hsp90β in key aspects of OA pathogenesis. Methods Human OA chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage obtained from patients undergoing joint replacement surgery, and primary cultured. Cells were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β or TNF-α) and nitric oxide donors (NOC-12 or SNP). For Hsp90β inhibition, two different chemical inhibitors (Geldanamycin and Novobiocin) were employed, or siRNA transfection procedures were carried out. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry and ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by the Griess method. Indirect immunofluorescence assays were performed to evaluate the presence of Hsp90β in stimulated cells. Results Hsp90β was found to be increased by proinflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of Hsp90β by the chemicals Geldanamycin (GA) and Novobiocin (NB) caused a dose-dependent decrease of the NO production induced by IL-1β in chondrocytes, up to basal levels. Immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that the NO donors NOC-12 and SNP also increased Hsp90β. Chemical inhibition or specific gene silencing of this chaperone reduced the DNA condensation and fragmentation, typical of death by apoptosis, that is induced by NO donors in chondrocytes. Conclusions The present results show how Hsp90β modulates NO production and NO-mediated cellular death in human OA chondrocytes. PMID:22004293

  20. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by peptides targeting NF-kappa B essential modulator (nemo) oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Courtois, Gilles; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Baleux, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Traincard, François; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2004-12-24

    NF-kappa B essential modulator/IKK-gamma (NEMO/IKK-gamma) plays a key role in the activation of the NF-kappa B pathway in response to proinflammatory stimuli. Previous studies suggested that the signal-dependent activation of the IKK complex involves the trimerization of NEMO. The minimal oligomerization domain of this protein consists of two coiled-coil subdomains named Coiled-coil 2 (CC2) and leucine zipper (LZ) (Agou, F., Traincard, F., Vinolo, E., Courtois, G., Yamaoka, S., Israel, A., and Veron, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 27861-27869). To search for drugs inhibiting NF-kappa B activation, we have rationally designed cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the CC2 and LZ subdomains that mimic the contact areas between NEMO subunits. The peptides were tagged with the Antennapedia/Penetratin motif and delivered to cells prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Peptide transduction was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, and their effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation was quantified using an NF-kappa B-dependent beta-galactosidase assay in stably transfected pre-B 70Z/3 lymphocytes. We show that the peptides corresponding to the LZ and CC2 subdomains inhibit NF-kappa B activation with an IC(50) in the mum range. Control peptides, including mutated CC2 and LZ peptides and a heterologous coiled-coil peptide, had no inhibitory effect. The designed peptides are able to induce cell death in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells exhibiting constitutive NF-kappa B activity. Our results provide the "proof of concept" for a new and promising strategy for the inhibition of NF-kappa B pathway activation through targeting the oligomerization state of the NEMO protein.

  1. Modulation of cerebral RAGE expression following nitric oxide synthase inhibition in rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Greco, Rosaria; Demartini, Chiara; Zanaboni, Anna Maria; Blandini, Fabio; Amantea, Diana; Tassorelli, Cristina

    2017-04-05

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a key mediator of neuroinflammation following cerebral ischemia. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a dualistic role in cerebral ischemia, depending on whether it originates from neuronal, inducible or endothelial synthase. Although a dynamic interplay between RAGE and NO pathways exists, its relevance in ischemic stroke has not been investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on RAGE expression in rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). Full-length (fl-RAGE) gene expression was elevated in the striatum and, to a lesser extent, in the cortex of rats undergone tMCAo. The exacerbation of cortical damage caused by systemic administration of L-N-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine (L-NIO), a relatively selective inhibitor of endothelial NOS (eNOS), was associated with elevated mRNA levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and fl-RAGE in both the cortex and the striatum. Conversely, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-selective NOS inhibitor, decreased cortical damage, did not affect cerebral cytokine mRNA levels, while it increased fl-RAGE mRNA expression only in the striatum. Fl-RAGE striatal protein levels varied accordingly with observed mRNA changes in the striatum, while in the cortex, RAGE protein levels were reduced by tMCAo and further decreased following L-NIO treatment. Modulation of RAGE expression by different inhibitors of NOS may have opposite effects on transient cortical ischemia: the non selective inhibition of NOS activity is protective, while the selective inhibition of eNOS is harmful, probably via the activation of inflammatory pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential Modulation of Intracortical Inhibition in Human Motor Cortex during Selective Activation of an Intrinsic Hand Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zoghi, Maryam; Pearce, Sophie L; Nordstrom, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess the effectiveness of intracortical inhibition (ICI) acting on corticospinal neurons controlling three intrinsic hand muscles in humans. We hypothesised that the suppression of ICI with selective activation of a muscle would be restricted to corticospinal neurons controlling the muscle targeted for activation. Surface EMG was recorded from abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles of the left hand. Subjects were tested at rest and during weak selective activation of APB or ADM, while they attempted to keep the other muscles relaxed using visual feedback. Paired-pulse TMS was applied with a circular coil oriented to produce antero-posterior (AP) current flow in the right motor cortex (to preferentially evoke I3 waves in corticospinal neurons) and with postero-anterior (PA) currents (to preferentially evoke I1 waves). Paired-pulse TMS was less effective in suppressing the muscle evoked potential (MEP) when the muscle was targeted for selective activation, with both AP and PA stimulation. The mechanism for this includes effects on late I waves, as it was evident with a weak AP test TMS pulse that elicited negligible I1 waves in corticospinal neurons. ICI circuits activated by TMS, which exert their effects on late I waves but do not affect I1 waves, are strongly implicated in this modulation. With AP stimulation, paired-pulse inhibition was not significantly altered for corticospinal neurons controlling other muscles of the same hand which were required to be inactive during the selective activation task. This differential modulation was not seen with PA stimulation, which preferentially activates I1 waves and evokes a MEP that is less influenced by ICI. The observations with AP stimulation suggest that selective activation of a hand muscle is accompanied by a selective suppression of ICI effects on the corticospinal neurons controlling

  3. Equol inhibits proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells via modulating Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Yan; Huang, Fang; Chen, Jie; Yao, Ya-Hong; Li, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-tumor effects of equol in gastric cancer cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS: MGC-803 cells were employed for in vitro experiments in this study. Cells were treated with control (vehicle, 0.1% DMSO) or equol under specified dose titration or time courses. Cell viability was examined by MTS assay, and the levels of Ki67 were determined by qPCR and immunofluorescent assay. Changes in cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rate were detected by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of cyclin E1 and P21WAF1 was determined by qPCR. The protein levels of cell cycle regulators, PARP and Caspase-3 cleavage, and the phosphorylation of Akt were examined by Western blot. In addition, to characterize the role of elevated Akt activation in the anti-tumor effect exerted by equol, Ly294002, a PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor, was used to pretreat MGC-803 cells. RESULTS: Equol (5, 10, 20, 40, or 80 μmol/L) inhibited viability of MGC-803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment for 24, 36, or 48 h (P < 0.05 for all). Equol also decreased the mRNA (P < 0.05 for 12 and 24 h treatment) and protein levels of Ki67. Equol treatment significantly induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest (P < 0.05), with the percentages of G0/G1 cells of 32.23% ± 3.62%, 36.31% ± 0.24%, 45.58% ± 2.29%, and 65.10% ± 2.04% for equol (0, 10, 20, or 30 μmol/L) treatment, respectively, accompanied by a significant decrease of CDK2/4 (P < 0.05 for 24 and 48 h treatment) and Cyclin D1/Cyclin E1 (P < 0.05), and an increased level of P21WAF1 (P < 0.05). A marked increase of apoptosis was observed, with the percentages of apoptotic cells of 5.01% ± 0.91%, 14.57% ± 0.99%, 37.40% ± 0.58%, and 38.46% ± 2.01% for equol (0, 5, 10, or 20 μmol/L) treatment, respectively, accompanied by increased levels of cleaved PARP and caspase-3. In addition, we found that equol treatment increased P-Akt (Ser473 and Thr308) at 12 and 24 h compared to vehicle-treated control

  4. Modulation of Compartmentalised Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling via Local Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marcella; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the only enzymes that degrade the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP, and play a key role in modulating the amplitude and duration of the signal delivered by these two key intracellular second messengers. Defects in cyclic nucleotide signalling are known to be involved in several pathologies. As a consequence, PDEs have long been recognized as potential drug targets, and they have been the focus of intense research for the development of therapeutic agents. A number of PDE inhibitors are currently available for the treatment of disease, including obstructive pulmonary disease, erectile dysfunction, and heart failure. However, the performance of these drugs is not always satisfactory, due to a lack of PDE-isoform specificity and their consequent adverse side effects. Recent advances in our understanding of compartmentalised cyclic nucleotide signalling and the role of PDEs in local regulation of cAMP and cGMP signals offers the opportunity for the development of novel strategies for therapeutic intervention that may overcome the current limitation of conventional PDE inhibitors. PMID:27706091

  5. G Protein Signaling Modulator-3 Inhibits the Inflammasome Activity of NLRP3*

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Patrick M.; Gall, Bryan J.; Ezekwe, Ejiofor A. D.; Laroche, Geneviève; Buckley, Brian K.; Kebaier, Chahnaz; Wilson, Justin E.; Ting, Jenny P.; Siderovski, David P.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes that regulate maturation of the interleukin 1β-related cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 through activation of the cysteine proteinase caspase-1. NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) protein is a key component of inflammasomes that assemble in response to a wide variety of endogenous and pathogen-derived danger signals. Activation of the NLRP3-inflammasome and subsequent secretion of IL-1β is highly regulated by at least three processes: transcriptional activation of both NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β genes, non-transcriptional priming of NLRP3, and final activation of NLRP3. NLRP3 is predominantly expressed in cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the hematopoietic-restricted protein, G protein signaling modulator-3 (GPSM3), as a NLRP3-interacting protein and a negative regulator of IL-1β production triggered by NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activators. In monocytes, GPSM3 associates with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of NLRP3. Bone marrow-derived macrophages lacking GPSM3 expression exhibit an increase in NLRP3-dependent IL-1β, but not TNF-α, secretion. Furthermore, GPSM3-null mice have enhanced serum and peritoneal IL-1β production following Alum-induced peritonitis. Our findings suggest that GPSM3 acts as a direct negative regulator of NLRP3 function. PMID:25271165

  6. Modulation of breast cancer cell survival by aromatase inhibiting hop (Humulus lupulus L.) flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Faria, Ana; Azevedo, Isabel; Calhau, Conceição

    2007-01-01

    Hop flavonoids are being regarded as attractive molecules to prevent or treat certain forms of cancer. Studies have focused mainly on xanthohumol, the most abundant prenylated chalcone existing in hops extract. However, during the production of beer, or after its ingestion, xanthohumol originates different metabolites, among which isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the prenylflavonoids xanthohumol, isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin on the breast cancer Sk-Br-3 cell line proliferation, apoptosis and activity of the enzyme aromatase (estrogen synthase). Aromatase activity was determined by a tritiated water assay, cell proliferation was assessed by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, sulforhodamine B protein measurement and Ki-67 immunostaining and apoptosis was determined by TUNEL. Our results show that all tested prenylflavonoids were able to inhibit aromatase activity and thus, estrogen formation. Additionally, breast cancer cell line proliferation was decreased and apoptosis induced by all three compounds. The presence of 17beta-estradiol in treatment medium was able to revert the effect of the prenylflavonoids on cellular proliferation. These observations strengthen the idea that hop flavonoids may have anti-breast cancer effects and shed new light on a possible mechanism of action by which these effects occur, namely through their ability to decrease estrogen synthesis.

  7. Antioxidant modulation of skin inflammation: preventing inflammatory progression by inhibiting neutrophil influx

    PubMed Central

    McGilvray, Ian D.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that antioxidants might affect local inflammation by impairing inflammatory cell influx. Design A laboratory study using a Swiss–Webster mouse model of local inflammation. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Methods Intradermal injection of 30 μg of S. minnesota endotoxin (LPS) to Swiss–Webster mice initiates a local inflammatory reaction characterized by an early rise in vascular permeability and a later influx of neutrophils. Animals were pretreated intraperitoneally with either pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 2 mmol/kg), which inhibits free radical generation, or dimethylthiourea (DMTU, 450 mg/kg), a free radical scavenger. Main outcome measures Histologic findings of tissue samples taken at sites of injection; local changes in tissue vascular permeability (PI) determined by iodine-125 albumin injection before sacrifice; neutrophil accumulation quantified by tissue myeloperoxidase levels; tissue levels of the endothelial adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 protein (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 protein (VCAM-1) assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. Results Neither antioxidant had a significant effect on the early increase in PI, but both decreased the late rise in PI and reduced neutrophil influx. Both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were upregulated in response to LPS; however, only the increase in VCAM-1 was attenuated by antioxidant pretreatment. Conclusion These data suggest that antioxidants disrupt the propagation phase of an inflammatory response, possibly by altering neutrophil migration. PMID:10223071

  8. Is Inhibition of Return Modulated by Involuntary Orienting of Spatial Attention: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fada; Wu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is a mechanism that indicates individuals' faster responses or higher accuracy to targets appearing in the novel location relative to the cued location. According to the "reorienting hypothesis," disengagement from the cued location is necessary for the generation of IOR. However, more and more studies have questioned this theory because of dissociation between voluntary or involuntary spatial orienting and the IOR effect. To further explore the "reorienting hypothesis" of IOR, the present experiment employed an atypical cue-target paradigm which combined a spatially non-predictive peripheral cue that was presumed to trigger IOR with a spatially non-predictive central cue that was used to reflexively trigger a shift of attention. The results showed that a significant IOR effect did not interact with automatic spatial orienting as measured in mean RTs and accuracy as well as the Nd component. These findings suggested that the IOR effect triggered by peripheral cue was independent of automatic orienting generated by a central cue. Therefore, the present study provided evidence from location task and neural aspects, which again challenged the "reorienting hypothesis" of IOR.

  9. Is Inhibition of Return Modulated by Involuntary Orienting of Spatial Attention: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fada; Wu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is a mechanism that indicates individuals’ faster responses or higher accuracy to targets appearing in the novel location relative to the cued location. According to the “reorienting hypothesis,” disengagement from the cued location is necessary for the generation of IOR. However, more and more studies have questioned this theory because of dissociation between voluntary or involuntary spatial orienting and the IOR effect. To further explore the “reorienting hypothesis” of IOR, the present experiment employed an atypical cue-target paradigm which combined a spatially non-predictive peripheral cue that was presumed to trigger IOR with a spatially non-predictive central cue that was used to reflexively trigger a shift of attention. The results showed that a significant IOR effect did not interact with automatic spatial orienting as measured in mean RTs and accuracy as well as the Nd component. These findings suggested that the IOR effect triggered by peripheral cue was independent of automatic orienting generated by a central cue. Therefore, the present study provided evidence from location task and neural aspects, which again challenged the “reorienting hypothesis” of IOR. PMID:28197120

  10. DRD4 and striatal modulation of the link between childhood behavioral inhibition and adolescent anxiety.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Hardee, Jillian E; Guyer, Amanda E; Benson, Brenda E; Nelson, Eric E; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Fox, Nathan A; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2014-04-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI), a temperament characterized by vigilance to novelty, sensitivity to approach-withdrawal cues and social reticence in childhood, is associated with risk for anxiety in adolescence. Independent studies link reward hyper-responsivity to BI, adolescent anxiety and dopamine gene variants. This exploratory study extends these observations by examining the impact of DRD4 genotype and reward hyper-responsivity on the BI-anxiety link. Adolescents (N = 78) completed a monetary incentive delay task in the fMRI environment. Participants were characterized based on a continuous score of BI and the 7-repeat allele (7R+) of the DRD4 functional polymorphism. Parent-report and self-report measures of anxiety were also collected. Across the entire sample, striatal activation increased systematically with increases in the magnitude of anticipated monetary gains and losses. DRD4 status moderated the relation between BI and activation in the caudate nucleus. Childhood BI was associated with parent report of adolescent anxiety among 7R+ participants with elevated levels of striatal response to incentive cues. DRD4 genotype influenced the relations among neural response to incentives, early childhood BI and anxiety. The findings help refine our understanding of the role reward-related brain systems play in the emergence of anxiety in temperamentally at-risk individuals, building a foundation for future larger scale studies.

  11. miR-195 inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis through modulating IRS1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zou, Chao; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie C; Dress, Andreas; Wardle, Fiona; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Lai, Lihui

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis has been found as an attractive target for drug therapy as it is necessary for tumor growth. Accumulating evidences show that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are a group of highly conserved, single-stranded, short non-coding RNAs, play important roles through directly targeting angiogenic factors and protein kinases. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of miR-195 in breast cancer development and angiogenesis through targeting IRS1. We show that miR-195 is inversely related with Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) in both breast cancer cells and breast cancer tissues. Induction of miR-195 could suppress IRS1 protein expression through binding to its 3'UTR regions either by transfection with miR-195 oligo or by infection with lentivirus encoding miR-195 gene. Moreover, re-expression of IRS1 reverses miR-195-mediated repression of tumor cell growth and miR-195 inhibits tumor angiogenesis through suppressing IRS1-VEGF axis. These data suggest that miR-195 mimics are potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer diagnose.

  12. Bioavailability-enhanced Resveramax™ modulates quorum sensing and inhibits biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Vasavi, H S; Sudeep, H V; Lingaraju, H B; Shyam Prasad, K

    2017-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism present in many bacterial species plays a key role in regulating the virulence factor and biofilm formation in many pathogens, which causes severe public health risk. Therefore, interfering with QS mechanism offers an attractive strategy to combat bacterial infections. In the present study, anti-QS activity of a novel resveratrol formulation, Resveramax™, was detected using Chromobacterium violaceum biosensor bioassay and the effect of Resveramax on QS-regulated phenotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was assessed by standard protocols. Molecular docking analysis of resveratrol, the major active constituent of Resveramax, with LasR receptor protein was performed to evidence the QS-inhibitory potential of Resveramax. Results showed that Resveramax specifically inhibited the QS-mediated violacein pigment production in C. violaceum; pyocyanin production, proteolytic activity, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Biofilms treated with Resveramax showed increased susceptibility to antibiotics when compared with the antibiotic treatment alone. Molecular docking analysis proved that resveratrol binds more rigidly with LasR receptor protein with docking score of -8.55 kJ/mol. These findings suggest that Resveramax could be used as novel QS-based antibacterial/anti-biofilm agent for the management of bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bromelain Inhibits Allergic Sensitization and Murine Asthma via Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Szczepanek, Steven M.; Castater, Christine A.; Adami, Alexander J.; Matson, Adam P.; Rafti, Ektor T.; McNamara, Jeffrey T.; Schramm, Craig M.; Thrall, Roger S.; Silbart, Lawrence K.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of atopic conditions has increased in industrialized countries. Persisting symptoms and concern for drug side-effects lead patients toward adjunctive treatments such as phytotherapy. Previously, we have shown that Bromelain (sBr), a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple, Ananas comosus, inhibits ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). However, sBr's effect on development of AAD when treatment is administered throughout OVA-alum sensitization was unknown and is the aim of the present study. C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with OVA/alum and challenged with 7 days OVA aerosol. sBr 6 mg/kg/0.5 ml or PBS vehicle were administered throughout sensitization. Lung, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), spleen, and lymph nodes were processed for flow cytometry and OVA-specific IgE was determined via ELISA. sBr treatment throughout OVA-alum sensitization significantly reduced the development of AAD (BAL eosinophils and lymphocytes). OVA-specific IgE and OVA TET+ cells were decreased. sBr reduced CD11c+ dendritic cell subsets, and in vitro treatment of DCs significantly reduced CD44, a key receptor in both cell trafficking and activation. sBr was shown to reduce allergic sensitization and the generation of AAD upon antigen challenge. These results provide additional insight into sBr's anti-inflammatory and antiallergic properties and rationale for translation into the clinical arena. PMID:24381635

  14. Enterostatin inhibition of dietary fat intake is modulated through the melanocortin system.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ling; Park, MieJung; York, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Enterostatin injected into the amygdala selectively reduces dietary fat intake by an action that involves a serotonergic component in the paraventricular nucleus. We have investigated the role of melanocortin signaling in the response to enterostatin by studies in melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) knockout mice and by the use of the MC4R and MC3R antagonist SHU9119, and by neurochemical phenotyping of enterostatin activated cells. We also determined the effect of enterostatin in vivo on the expression of AgRP in the hypothalamus and amygdala of rats and in culture on a GT1-7 neuronal cell line. Enterostatin had no effect on food intake in MC4R knock out mice. SHU9119 icv blocked the feeding response to amygdala enterostatin in rats. Amygdala enterostatin induced fos activation in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) neurons in the arcuate nucleus. Enterostatin also reduced the expression of AgRP in the hypothalamus and amygdala and in GT1-7 cells. These data suggest enterostatin inhibits dietary fat intake through a melanocortin signaling pathway. PMID:17113194

  15. Prefrontal Cortical GABA Transmission Modulates Discrimination and Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear: Relevance for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Piantadosi, Patrick T; Floresco, Stan B

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulates numerous functions, and perturbations in GABAergic transmission within this region have been proposed to contribute to some of the cognitive and behavioral abnormalities associated with disorders such as schizophrenia. These abnormalities include deficits in emotional regulation and aberrant attributions of affective salience. Yet, how PFC GABA regulates these types of emotional processes are unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the contribution of PFC GABA transmission to different aspects of Pavlovian emotional learning in rats using translational discriminative fear conditioning and latent inhibition (LI) assays. Reducing prelimbic PFC GABAA transmission via infusions of the antagonist bicuculline before the acquisition or expression of fear conditioning eliminated the ability to discriminate between an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS+) paired with footshock vs a neutral CS–, resembling similar deficits observed in schizophrenic patients. In a separate experiment, blockade of PFC GABAA receptors before CS preexposure (PE) and conditioning did not affect subsequent expression of LI, but did enhance fear in rats that were not preexposed to the CS. In contrast, PFC GABA-blockade before a fear expression test disrupted the recall of learned irrelevance and abolished LI. These data suggest that normal PFC GABA transmission is critical for regulating and mitigating multiple aspects of aversive learning, including discrimination between fear vs safety signals and recall of information about the irrelevance of stimuli. Furthermore, they suggest that similar deficits in emotional regulation observed in schizophrenia may be driven in part by deficient PFC GABA activity. PMID:24784549

  16. Modulation of the fibrillogenesis inhibition properties of two transthyretin ligands by halogenation.

    PubMed

    Cotrina, Ellen Y; Pinto, Marta; Bosch, Lluís; Vilà, Marta; Blasi, Daniel; Quintana, Jordi; Centeno, Nuria B; Arsequell, Gemma; Planas, Antoni; Valencia, Gregorio

    2013-11-27

    The amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR) is thought to aggregate into amyloid fibrils by tetramer dissociation which can be inhibited by a number of small molecule compounds. Our analysis of a series of crystallographic protein-inhibitor complexes has shown no clear correlation between the observed molecular interactions and the in vitro activity of the inhibitors. From this analysis, it emerged that halogen bonding (XB) could be mediating some key interactions. Analysis of the halogenated derivatives of two well-known TTR inhibitors has shown that while flufenamic acid affinity for TTR was unchanged by halogenation, diflunisal gradually improves binding up to 1 order of magnitude after iodination through interactions that can be interpreted as a suboptimal XB (carbonyl Thr106: I...O distance 3.96-4.05 Å; C-I...O angle 152-156°) or as rather optimized van der Waals contacts or as a mixture of both. These results illustrate the potential of halogenation strategies in designing and optimizing TTR fibrillogenesis inhibitors.

  17. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulation inhibits cytokine responses in a canine model of mild endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Bartko, Johann; Derhaschnig, Ulla; Neels, Tania; Nabozny, Gerald H; Harcken, Christian; Leuschner, Jost; De Vries, Frerich; Jilma, Bernd

    2017-09-18

    Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators (GRMs) promise to reduce adverse events of glucocorticoids while maintaining anti-inflammatory potency. The present study tested the anti-inflammatory activity of two novel non-steroidal GRMs (GRM1: BI 607812 BS, GRM2: BI 653048 BS*H3PO4) in comparison to prednisolone in a canine model of low dose endotoxemia. This study compared the anti-inflammatory and pharmacokinetic profile of escalating daily oral doses of GRM1 (1, 2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg) and GRM2 (0.1, 0.25 and 1mg/kg) with prednisolone (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg) and placebo after intravenous infusion of endotoxin (0.1μg/kg) to Beagle dogs. This was followed by a 14-day evaluation study of safety and pharmacokinetics. Endotoxin challenge increased TNF-α ∼2000-fold and interleukin-6 (IL-6) 100-fold. Prednisolone and both GRMs suppressed peak TNF-α and IL-6 by 71-82% as compared with placebo. The highest doses of GRM1 and GRM2 reduced the mean body temperature increase by ∼30%. The endotoxin-induced rise in plasma cortisol was strongly suppressed in all treatment groups. Pharmacokinetics of both GRMs were non-linear. Adverse effects of endotoxemia such as vomiting were mitigated by GRM2 and prednisolone, indicating an antiemetic effect. During the 14-day treatment period, the adverse event profile of both GRMs appeared to be similar to prednisolone. Both GRMs had anti-inflammatory effects comparable to prednisolone and showed good safety profiles. Compounds targeting the glucocorticoid receptor selectively may provide an alternative to traditional glucocorticoids in the treatment of inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Acacia ferruginea inhibits cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression and urotoxicity by modulating cytokines in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, K M; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX), commonly used as an anti-neoplastic drug, can cause adverse side-effects including immunotoxicity and urotoxicity. Increasingly, plants have become sources of therapeutics that can help to restore host immunity to normal. In this study, Acacia ferruginea was assessed for an ability to protect mice against/mitigate CTX-induced toxicity. Co-administration of an extract of A. ferruginea (10 mg/kg BW, IP daily) for 10 consecutive days reduced CTX (25 mg/kg BW, IP daily)-induced toxicity. Apart from improvements in bladder and small intestine morphology, there was marked improvement in anti-oxidant (glutathione) levels in the bladder, suggesting a role for the anti-oxidant in reducing CTX-induced urotoxicity. Moreover, use of the extract significantly increased total leukocyte counts and bone marrow cellularity/α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested a protective effect on the hematopoietic system. Co-treatment with the extract also prevented decreases in organ (liver, kidney, spleen, thymus) weight as well as body weight, thereby seemingly lessening the potential impact of CTX on the host immune system. Further, CTX-induced increases in serum aspartate transanimase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase were reversed by extract co-treatment, as were alterations in in situ formation/release of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Overall, this study indicated there were some protective effects from use of an extract of A. ferruginea against CTX-induced toxicities, in part through modulation of levels of anti-oxidants and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Eva; Layunta, Elena; Grasa, Laura; Castro, Marta; Pardo, Julián; Gomollón, Fernando; Alcalde, Ana I; Mesonero, José E

    2016-01-01

    TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT) has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system.

  20. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Layunta, Elena; Grasa, Laura; Castro, Marta; Pardo, Julián; Gomollón, Fernando; Mesonero, José E.

    2016-01-01

    TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT) has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system. PMID:28033388

  1. Modulation of immune tolerance with a Chinese traditional prescription inhibits allergic rhinitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min-Qiang; Liu, Jie; Long, Zhen; Tian, Dao-Fa; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Background: Allergic diseases substantially affect human health and social economy. The pathogenesis is to be further understood. The effect of current therapeutic remedies on allergic diseases is not satisfactory. Aims: This study aimed to inhibit allergic rhinitis in a mouse model with a Chinese traditional medical prescription, Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. Material and Methods: A mouse AR model was developed with ovalbumin (OVA) plus adjuvant alum. The AR clinical symptoms and immune pathology in the nasal mucosa were assessed with the AR mouse model. Some mice were treated with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang via gavage-fed. The immune tolerance status in the nasal mucosa was evaluated by counting the numbers of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) and regulatory T cells (Treg). Results: After exposure to the specific antigen, OVA, the sensitized mice had AR-like symptoms including nasal itch and sneeze. The frequency of mast cells, levels of IgE/IL-4 in nasal mucosa was markedly higher in sensitized mice than naïve controls; while the levels of integration alphavbeta6 (avb6), the number of tolerogenic DCs and Tregs in nasal mucosa were significantly lower than naïve control mice. The AR-like symptoms and immune pathology and immune tolerance status in the AR nasal mucosa were substantially improved by administration with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. Conclusions: The immune tolerance status is impaired in the AR nasal mucosa that can be improved by administering with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. PMID:22361496

  2. Troglitazone inhibits cell migration, adhesion, and spreading by modulating cytoskeletal rearrangement in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Shan; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Porchia, Leonardo; Saji, Motoyasu; Pinzone, Joseph J

    2008-12-01

    Metastatic tumors are the primary cause of death in patients with breast cancer. Recent data indicate that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), possess anti-invasive activities on human breast cancer cells. However, the effects of TZDs on other metastatic properties of breast cancer cells such as adhesion, spreading, and migration are not well established. In this study, we show that troglitazone (TG), a member of the TZD family, inhibits lamellipodia formation or membrane ruffling as well as actin polymerization at these structures in MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells. In addition, TG reduces migration, adhesion, and spreading on fibronectin (FN)-coated plates. These phenomena were associated with the dramatic decrease of Tyr397 and Tyr576 phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the detergent-insoluble Rac1. We also found that TG upregulates Tyr416 phosphorylation of Src, but downregulates the Src-FAK complex. Moreover, we use a PPARgamma-inactive derivative of TG (STG28) and a PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) to eliminate PPARgamma-mediated effects. We found that treatment with STG28 or GW9662 plus TG showed similar effects compared to TG treatment alone on tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK and Src, indicating that these effects are not the result of PPARgamma activation. Interestingly, we found that TG upregulates actin filament assembly at the point of cell-cell contact in T47D cells, indicating that TG may also upregulate cell-cell adhesion in breast cancer cells which express E-cadherin. These results suggested that TG should be investigated further for its therapeutic potential in metastatic breast cancer.

  3. Thymoquinone (TQ) inhibits the replication of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages and modulates nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Hafij Al; Seo, Hoonhee; Kim, Sukyung; Islam, Md Imtiazul; Nam, Kung-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Deuk; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2017-05-25

    Human tuberculosis, which is caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remains a major public health concern. Increasing drug resistance poses a threat of disease resurgence and continues to cause considerable mortality worldwide, which necessitates the development of new drugs with improved efficacy. Thymoquinone (TQ), an essential compound of Nigella sativa, was previously reported as an active anti-tuberculosis agent. In this study, the effects of TQ on intracellular mycobacterial replication are examined in macrophages. In addition, its effect on mycobacteria-induced NO production and pro-inflammatory responses were investigated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected Type II human alveolar and human myeloid cell lines. TQ at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 25 μg/mL and 6.25 to 12.5 μg/mL reduced intracellular M. tuberculosis H37Rv and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) 72 h post-infection in RAW 264.7 cells. TQ treatment also produced a concentration-dependent reduction in nitric oxide production in both H37Rv and XDR-TB infected RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, TQ reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and pro-inflammatory molecules such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) in H37Rv-infected cells and eventually reduced pathogen-derived stress in host cells. TQ inhibits intracellular H37Rv and XDR-TB replication and MTB-induced production of NO and pro-inflammatory molecules. Therefore, along with its anti-inflammatory effects, TQ represents a prospective treatment option to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

  4. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  5. Levofolene modulates apoptosis induced by 5-fluorouracil through autophagy inhibition: clinical and occupational implications.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Monica; Porto, Stefania; Zappavigna, Silvia; Stiuso, Paola; Tirino, Virginia; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Mele, Luigi; Caraglia, Michele

    2015-05-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), often used in combination with levofolene (LF), can induce, as an important side effect, the hand-foot syndrome (HFS) due to toxicity on keratinocytes. This can also damage workers involved in its handling. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of the toxicity induced by 5-FU alone or together with LF on human keratinocytes in culture. We found that the two drugs, as expected, had potentiating activity on keratinocyte growth inhibition and that this effect was mediated by induction of apoptosis. In our experimental model, an increased autophagic vacuole accumulation was observed in keratinocytes treated with 5-FU as a significant increase of the monodansylcadaverine (MDC) labeling (marker of late autophagy vacuoles) was recorded. However, the synergism of 5-FU with LF on apoptotic occurrence was not paralleled by a similar increase in autophagic vacuoles at 72 h suggesting an antagonistic effect of LF on autophagy elicited by 5-FU. Differential effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation in cells treated with 5-FU alone or the combination between 5-FU and LF were also observed. 5-FU induced a time-dependent increase of both O2- and lipid peroxidation while the combination of 5-FU and LF caused a stronger intracellular O2- increase only at 24 h while at 48 and 72 h its effect was lower when compared with that one of 5-FU alone. On the other hand, the addition of LF to 5-FU caused a stronger increase of lipid peroxidation at 48 and 72 h, but its effects were significantly lower at 24 h. These results suggest for the first time that LF potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-FU on keratinocytes likely through the antagonism on autophagy escape pathway and consequent apoptosis potentiation.

  6. Dietary phenolic compounds selectively inhibit the individual subunits of maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase with the potential of modulating glucose release

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, it was hypothesized that dietary phenolic compounds selectively inhibit the individual C- and N-terminal (Ct, Nt) subunits of the two small intestinal alpha-glucosidases, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI), for a modulated glycemic carbohydrate digestion. The inhi...

  7. Demands on response inhibition processes determine modulations of theta band activity in superior frontal areas and correlations with pupillometry - Implications for the norepinephrine system during inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Dippel, Gabriel; Mückschel, Moritz; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Beste, Christian

    2017-08-15

    Response inhibition processes are important for goal-directed behavior and particularly demanded when it is unlikely to inhibit automatically executed responses. It has been suggested that the norepinephrine (NE) system is important to consider for such likelihood effects. As an indirect measure of the NE system activity we used the pupil diameter and integrated this data with neurophysiological (EEG) data and beamforming analyses. The study shows that inhibitory control processes reflected by theta oscillations are strongly modulated by the likelihood to employ these processes and that these mechanisms were related to neural processes in the SMA and SFG. Probably, the modulations observed for theta band activity may reflect modulations in the encoding of a surprise, or conflict signal. Interestingly, correlation analyses of neuronal activity at the sensor and the source level with pupil diameter data revealed strong correlations that were only seen in the condition where inhibitory control processes were rarely demanded. On the basis of findings and theoretical models suggesting that the pupil diameter can be interpreted as a proximate of NE system activity the results may be interpreted that the NE system modulates inhibitory control processes via theta band activity in the SFB when the likelihood to inhibit a prepotent response tendency is low. From this it may be speculated that the NE system dynamically gains and loses relevance to modulate inhibitory control depending on boundary conditions that determine the mode of responding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Brief wake episodes modulate sleep-inhibited luteinizing hormone secretion in the early follicular phase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Janet E; Sullivan, Jason P; Richardson, Gary S

    2005-04-01

    To determine the influence of sleep, sleep stage, and time of day on the dynamics of pulsatile LH secretion in the early follicular phase (EFP) of the menstrual cycle, 11 normal women underwent simultaneous polysomnographic monitoring of sleep and measurement of LH in frequent sampling studies during a 40-h protocol that consisted of one night of normal sleep and one night of sleep deprivation followed by an afternoon nap. The interpulse interval of LH was longer during sleep than wake whether it occurred at night or during the day (P < 0.002), implying a decrease in GnRH pulse frequency associated with sleep in the EFP. LH pulse amplitude was greater during sleep than wake (P < 0.001) and greater pulse amplitudes were associated with longer interpulse intervals during sleep (P < 0.005), but not wake. An interaction between sleep and time of day was observed for mean LH, with lower mean LH levels during sleep than wake at night (P < 0.02), but not during the day. Wakefulness was more likely to be associated with an LH pulse than were stages I/II, III/IV (slow wave), or rapid eye movement sleep (P < 0.005). In addition, the probability of wakefulness within the sleep episode increased 5-15 min before the onset of LH pulses (relative to randomly selected nonpulse LH; P < 0.05), suggesting that wakefulness was the primary event. In the absence of sleep, there was an effect of time of day on mean LH (P < 0.02) and LH pulse amplitude (P < 0.03), with greatest values seen during the evening. In conclusion, in the EFP, inhibition of LH pulse frequency is related to sleep rather than time of day. During periods of sleep, LH pulses occur most commonly in association with brief awakenings, suggesting that interruptions from sleep allow escape from the inhibitory effect of sleep on pulsatile GnRH secretion. A separate effect of time of day on LH pulse dynamics in the absence of sleep was also observed with evening augmentation of LH pulse amplitude and mean level; however

  9. Serotonin, Dopamine and Noradrenaline Adjust Actions of Myelinated Afferents via Modulation of Presynaptic Inhibition in the Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, David L.; Calvo, Jorge R.; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N.

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  10. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García-Ramírez, David L; Calvo, Jorge R; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  11. Environmental CO2 inhibits Caenorhabditis elegans egg-laying by modulating olfactory neurons and evokes widespread changes in neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Fenk, Lorenz A.; de Bono, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gradients are ubiquitous and provide animals with information about their environment, such as the potential presence of prey or predators. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans avoids elevated CO2, and previous work identified three neuron pairs called “BAG,” “AFD,” and “ASE” that respond to CO2 stimuli. Using in vivo Ca2+ imaging and behavioral analysis, we show that C. elegans can detect CO2 independently of these sensory pathways. Many of the C. elegans sensory neurons we examined, including the AWC olfactory neurons, the ASJ and ASK gustatory neurons, and the ASH and ADL nociceptors, respond to a rise in CO2 with a rise in Ca2+. In contrast, glial sheath cells harboring the sensory endings of C. elegans’ major chemosensory neurons exhibit strong and sustained decreases in Ca2+ in response to high CO2. Some of these CO2 responses appear to be cell intrinsic. Worms therefore may couple detection of CO2 to that of other cues at the earliest stages of sensory processing. We show that C. elegans persistently suppresses oviposition at high CO2. Hermaphrodite-specific neurons (HSNs), the executive neurons driving egg-laying, are tonically inhibited when CO2 is elevated. CO2 modulates the egg-laying system partly through the AWC olfactory neurons: High CO2 tonically activates AWC by a cGMP-dependent mechanism, and AWC output inhibits the HSNs. Our work shows that CO2 is a more complex sensory cue for C. elegans than previously thought, both in terms of behavior and neural circuitry. PMID:26100886

  12. IL-6 Inhibits the Targeted Modulation of PDCD4 by miR-21 in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biao; Shi, Zhihao; Wang, Jiaping; Wu, Jing; Yang, Zhaoqing; Fang, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the Unites States. The cytokine IL-6 activates several prostate cancer pathways, but its upstream trans-signaling pathway remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the role of IL-6 in PDCD4 gene expression and how the microRNA miR-21 regulates this process in prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. The expression pattern of PDCD4 from samples from human prostate cancer, precancerous lesions, and benign prostatic hyperplasia was investigated by immunohistochemistry. PDCD4 transcription and translation were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. The targeted modulation of PDCD4 by miR-21 was analyzed in PC-3 and LNCaP cells, and the effect of IL-6 on the expression of PDCD4 was studied in vitro. PDCD4 expression in samples from the 3 tissue types progressively increased, and the expression levels of PDCD4 and prostate-specific antigen were negatively correlated. The levels of PDCD4 mRNA and protein in PC-3 and LNCaP cells transfected with anti-miR-21 constructs were lower than those in control cells. The expression of PDCD4 was inhibited by IL-6, but this effect was weakened in cell lines with low expression of miR-21. Our study demonstrates that the regulation of PDCD4 by miR-21 is targeted and IL-6 inhibits expression of the PDCD4 gene in PC-3 and LNCaP cells through the targeted function of miR-21 on PDCD4. These findings support the feasibility of future efforts for diagnosis and gene therapy for prostate cancer that are based on IL-6, miR-21, and PDCD4.

  13. Contact inhibition modulates intracellular levels of miR-223 in a p27kip1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Armenia, Joshua; Fabris, Linda; Lovat, Francesca; Berton, Stefania; Segatto, Ilenia; D'Andrea, Sara; Ivan, Cristina; Cascione, Luciano; Calin, George A.; Croce, Carlo M.; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Belletti, Barbara; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are a large class of small regulatory RNAs that function as nodes of signaling networks. This implicates that miRs expression has to be finely tuned, as observed during cell cycle progression. Here, using an expression profiling approach, we provide evidence that the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1 regulates miRs expression following cell cycle exit. By using wild type and p27KO cells harvested in different phases of the cell cycle we identified several miRs regulated by p27Kip1 during the G1 to S phase transition. Among these miRs, we identified miR-223 as a miR specifically upregulated by p27Kip1 in G1 arrested cells. Our data demonstrate that p27Kip1 regulated the expression of miR-223, via two distinct mechanisms. p27Kip1 directly stabilized mature miR-223 expression, acting as a RNA binding protein and it controlled E2F1 expression that, in turn, regulated miR-223 promoter activity. The resulting elevated miR-223 levels ultimately participated to arresting cell cycle progression following contact inhibition. Importantly, this mechanism of growth control was conserved in human cells and deranged in breast cancers. Here, we identify a novel and conserved function of p27Kip1 that, by modulating miR-223 expression, contributes to proper regulation of cell cycle exit following contact inhibition. Thus we propose a new role for miR-223 in the regulation of breast cancer progression. PMID:24727437

  14. Contact inhibition modulates intracellular levels of miR-223 in a p27kip1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Armenia, Joshua; Fabris, Linda; Lovat, Francesca; Berton, Stefania; Segatto, Ilenia; D'Andrea, Sara; Ivan, Cristina; Cascione, Luciano; Calin, George A; Croce, Carlo M; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Belletti, Barbara; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2014-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are a large class of small regulatory RNAs that function as nodes of signaling networks. This implicates that miRs expression has to be finely tuned, as observed during cell cycle progression. Here, using an expression profiling approach, we provide evidence that the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1 regulates miRs expression following cell cycle exit. By using wild type and p27KO cells harvested in different phases of the cell cycle we identified several miRs regulated by p27Kip1 during the G1 to S phase transition. Among these miRs, we identified miR-223 as a miR specifically upregulated by p27Kip1 in G1 arrested cells. Our data demonstrate that p27Kip1 regulated the expression of miR-223, via two distinct mechanisms. p27Kip1 directly stabilized mature miR-223 expression, acting as a RNA binding protein and it controlled E2F1 expression that, in turn, regulated miR-223 promoter activity. The resulting elevated miR-223 levels ultimately participated to arresting cell cycle progression following contact inhibition. Importantly, this mechanism of growth control was conserved in human cells and deranged in breast cancers. Here, we identify a novel and conserved function of p27Kip1 that, by modulating miR-223 expression, contributes to proper regulation of cell cycle exit following contact inhibition. Thus we propose a new role for miR-223 in the regulation of breast cancer progression.

  15. Cannabidiol Modulates the Immunophenotype and Inhibits the Activation of the Inflammasome in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Marchisio, Marco; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-01-01

    Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hGMSCs) are multipotential cells that can expand and differentiate in culture under specific and standardized conditions. In the present study, we have investigated whether in vitro pre-treatment of hGMSCs with Cannabidiol (CBD) can influence their expression profile, improving the therapeutic potential of this cell culture. Following CBD treatment (5 μM) for 24 h, gene expression analysis through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revealed several genes differentially expressed between CBD-treated hGMSCs (CBD-hGMSCs) and control cells (CTR-hGMSCs) that were linked to inflammation and apoptosis. In particular, we have demonstrated that CBD treatment in hGMSCs prevented the activation of the NALP3-inflammasome pathway by suppressing the levels of NALP3, CASP1, and IL18, and in parallel, inhibited apoptosis, as demonstrated by the suppression of Bax. CBD treatment was also able to modulate the expression of the well-known mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, and CD166), and other surface antigens. Specifically, CBD led to the downregulation of genes codifying for antigens involved in the activation of the immune system (CD109, CD151, CD40, CD46, CD59, CD68, CD81, CD82, CD99), while it led to the upregulation of those implicated in the inhibition of the immune responses (CD47, CD55, CD276). In conclusion, the present study will provide a new simple and reproducible method for preconditioning hGMSCs with CBD, before transplantation, as an interesting strategy for improving the hGMSCs molecular phenotype, reducing the risk of immune or inflammatory reactions in the host, and in parallel, for increasing their survival and thus, their long-term therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Cannabidiol Modulates the Immunophenotype and Inhibits the Activation of the Inflammasome in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Libro, Rosaliana; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Marchisio, Marco; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-01-01

    Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hGMSCs) are multipotential cells that can expand and differentiate in culture under specific and standardized conditions. In the present study, we have investigated whether in vitro pre-treatment of hGMSCs with Cannabidiol (CBD) can influence their expression profile, improving the therapeutic potential of this cell culture. Following CBD treatment (5 μM) for 24 h, gene expression analysis through Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revealed several genes differentially expressed between CBD-treated hGMSCs (CBD-hGMSCs) and control cells (CTR-hGMSCs) that were linked to inflammation and apoptosis. In particular, we have demonstrated that CBD treatment in hGMSCs prevented the activation of the NALP3-inflammasome pathway by suppressing the levels of NALP3, CASP1, and IL18, and in parallel, inhibited apoptosis, as demonstrated by the suppression of Bax. CBD treatment was also able to modulate the expression of the well-known mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD13, CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, and CD166), and other surface antigens. Specifically, CBD led to the downregulation of genes codifying for antigens involved in the activation of the immune system (CD109, CD151, CD40, CD46, CD59, CD68, CD81, CD82, CD99), while it led to the upregulation of those implicated in the inhibition of the immune responses (CD47, CD55, CD276). In conclusion, the present study will provide a new simple and reproducible method for preconditioning hGMSCs with CBD, before transplantation, as an interesting strategy for improving the hGMSCs molecular phenotype, reducing the risk of immune or inflammatory reactions in the host, and in parallel, for increasing their survival and thus, their long-term therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27932991

  17. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M3 Modulates Odorant Receptor Activity via Inhibition of β-Arrestin-2 Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Li, Yun Rose; Tian, Huikai; Ma, Minghong; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory system in rodents serves a critical function in social, reproductive, and survival behaviors. Processing of chemosensory signals in the brain is dynamically regulated in part by an animal's physiological state. We previously reported that type 3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M3-Rs) physically interact with odorant receptors (ORs) to promote odor-induced responses in a heterologous expression system. However, it is not known how M3-Rs affect the ability of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) to respond to odors. Here, we show that an M3-R antagonist attenuates odor-induced responses in OSNs from wild-type, but not M3-R-null mice. Using a novel molecular assay, we demonstrate that the activation of M3-Rs inhibits the recruitment of β-arrestin-2 to ORs, resulting in a potentiation of odor-induced response in OSNs. These results suggest a role for acetylcholine in modulating olfactory processing at the initial stages of signal transduction in the olfactory system. PMID:25800153

  18. Sulindac-derived RXRα modulators inhibit cancer cell growth by binding to a novel site of RXRα

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Aleshin, Alexander; Chen, Fan; Chen, Jiebo; Jiang, Fuquan; Alitongbieke, Gulimiran; Zeng, Zhiping; Ma, Yue; Huang, Mingfeng; Zhou, Hu; Cadwell, Gregory; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Liddington, Robert; Zhang, Xiao-kun; Su, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Summary Retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα), an intriguing and unique drug target, can serve as an intracellular target mediating the anti-cancer effects of certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including Sulindac. We report the synthesis and characterization of two new Sulindac analogs, K-8008 and K-8012, which exert improved anti-cancer activities over Sulindac in a RXRα- dependent manner. The new analogs inhibit the interaction of the N-terminally truncated RXRα (tRXRα) with the p85α subunit of PI3K, leading to suppression of AKT activation and induction of apoptosis. Crystal structures of the RXRα ligand-binding domain (LBD) with K-8008 or K-8012 reveal that both compounds bind to tetrameric RXRα LBD at a site different from the classical ligand-binding pocket. Thus, these results identify K-8008 and K-8012 as new tRXRα modulators and define a new binding mechanism for regulating the nongenomic action of tRXRα. PMID:24704507

  19. Influenza virus adaptation PB2-627K modulates nucleocapsid inhibition by the pathogen sensor RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaela; Sediri, Hanna; Felgenhauer, Ulrike; Binzen, Ina; Bänfer, Sebastian; Jacob, Ralf; Brunotte, Linda; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kochs, Georg; Schwemmle, Martin; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Weber, Friedemann

    2015-03-11

    The cytoplasmic RNA helicase RIG-I mediates innate sensing of RNA viruses. The genomes of influenza A virus (FLUAV) are encapsidated by the nucleoprotein and associated with RNA polymerase, posing potential barriers to RIG-I sensing. We show that RIG-I recognizes the 5'-triphosphorylated dsRNA on FLUAV nucleocapsids but that polymorphisms at position 627 of the viral polymerase subunit PB2 modulate RIG-I sensing. Compared to mammalian-adapted PB2-627K, avian FLUAV nucleocapsids possessing PB2-627E are prone to increased RIG-I recognition, and RIG-I-deficiency partially restores PB2-627E virus infection of mammalian cells. Heightened RIG-I sensing of PB2-627E nucleocapsids correlates with previously established lower affinity of 627E-containing PB2 for nucleoprotein and is increased by further nucleocapsid instability. The effect of RIG-I on PB2-627E nucleocapsids is independent of antiviral signaling, suggesting that RIG-I-nucleocapsid binding alone can inhibit infection. These results indicate that RIG-I is a direct avian FLUAV restriction factor and highlight nucleocapsid disruption as an antiviral strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphatase-1 and -2A inhibition modulates apoptosis in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes independently of nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Armada, M; Carames, B; Cillero-Pastor, B; Lires-Dean, M; Maneiro, E; Fuentes, I; Ruiz, C; Galdo, F; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Methods: Human OA chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage obtained from the femoral heads of patients undergoing joint replacement surgery. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptosis was quantified by ELISA, which measures DNA fragmentation. Nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by the Greiss method, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein synthesis was studied by western blotting. Results: Inhibition of PP1/2A by the specific inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) dose and time dependently caused a reduction of cell viability (OKA at 50 nmol/l: a reduction to 60% and 43% at 48 and 72 hours, respectively). Genomic DNA from chondrocytes treated with OKA at 50 and 100 nmol/l for 48 hours displayed increased internucleosomal DNA fragmentation by 11 and 13 fields, respectively. Light microscopy and DAPI studies showed that OKA induced DNA condensation and fragmentation, typical of death by apoptosis. The caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK increased cell viability, reduced by OKA at 50 nmol/l to 87% and 73%, respectively. OKA did not increase iNOS protein synthesis or NO production. Conclusion: PP1/2A modulate apoptosis in human OA chondrocytes; this is independent of NO production but dependent on caspases. PMID:15958763

  1. Stimulus sequence context differentially modulates inhibition-related theta and delta band activity in a go/no-go task.

    PubMed

    Harper, Jeremy; Malone, Stephen M; Bachman, Matthew D; Bernat, Edward M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work suggests that dissociable activity in theta and delta frequency bands underlies several common ERP components, including the no-go N2/P3 complex, which can better index separable functional processes than traditional time-domain measures. Reports have also demonstrated that neural activity can be affected by stimulus sequence context information (i.e., the number and type of preceding stimuli). Stemming from prior work demonstrating that theta and delta index separable processes during response inhibition, the current study assessed sequence context in a go/no-go paradigm in which the number of go stimuli preceding each no-go was selectively manipulated. Principal component analysis of time-frequency representations revealed differential modulation of evoked theta and delta related to sequence context, where delta increased robustly with additional preceding go stimuli, while theta did not. Findings are consistent with the view that theta indexes simpler initial salience-related processes, while delta indexes more varied and complex processes related to a variety of task parameters. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  2. Laminin 211 inhibits protein kinase A in Schwann cells to modulate neuregulin 1 type III-driven myelination

    PubMed Central

    Ghidinelli, Monica; Poitelon, Yannick; Shin, Yoon Kyoung; Ameroso, Dominique; Williamson, Courtney; Ferri, Cinzia; Pellegatta, Marta; Espino, Kevin; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly; Podini, Paola; Taveggia, Carla; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Park, Hwan Tae

    2017-01-01

    Myelin is required for proper nervous system function. Schwann cells in developing nerves depend on extrinsic signals from the axon and from the extracellular matrix to first sort and ensheathe a single axon and then myelinate it. Neuregulin 1 type III (Nrg1III) and laminin α2β1γ1 (Lm211) are the key axonal and matrix signals, respectively, but how their signaling is integrated and if each molecule controls both axonal sorting and myelination is unclear. Here, we use a series of epistasis experiments to show that Lm211 modulates neuregulin signaling to ensure the correct timing and amount of myelination. Lm211 can inhibit Nrg1III by limiting protein kinase A (PKA) activation, which is required to initiate myelination. We provide evidence that excessive PKA activation amplifies promyelinating signals downstream of neuregulin, including direct activation of the neuregulin receptor ErbB2 and its effector Grb2-Associated Binder-1 (Gab1), thereby elevating the expression of the key transcription factors Oct6 and early growth response protein 2 (Egr2). The inhibitory effect of Lm211 is seen only in fibers of small caliber. These data may explain why hereditary neuropathies associated with decreased laminin function are characterized by focally thick and redundant myelin. PMID:28636612

  3. RNF146 Inhibits Excessive Autophagy by Modulating the Wnt-β-Catenin Pathway in Glutamate Excitotoxicity Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefan; Luo, Peng; Xu, Haoxiang; Dai, Shuhui; Rao, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Ma, Wenke; Wang, Jiu; Xu, Hongyu; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Sai; Fei, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate induced excitotoxicity is common in diverse neurological disorders. RNF146 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase protects neurons against excitotoxicity via interfering with Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer-induced cell death (parthanatos). However, the neuroprotective role of RNF146 has not been fully understood. We aimed to investigate the role of RNF146 in modulating autophagy in HT22 cells under glutamate excitotoxicity injury. Here we found that induction of RNF146 decreased the cellular damage and excitotoxicity induced by glutamate. RNF146 also suppressed the excessive autophagy, which is detrimental to HT22 cells survival, induced by glutamate or rapamycin treatment. In addition, we find that Wnt/β-catenin was a negative regulation factor for autophagy in glutamate excitotoxicity. Over-expression of RNF146 promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which was related to destabilization of β-catenin destruction complex. These results indicated that RNF146 acted as a neuroprotective agent against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection might be at least partly dependent on the inhibition of excessive autophagy by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  4. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside attenuates MPP+-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by inhibiting ROS generation and modulating JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Li, Yan; Chen, Jianzong; Sun, Jing; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xin; Kang, Xiaogang

    2010-10-08

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a major role in the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have suggested that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-D-glucoside (TSG), an active component extracted from a traditional Chinese herb Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., has significant antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities. This is the first study that investigated the protective effects of TSG against MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and determined the underlying mechanism. The results showed that incubation of PC12 cells with TSG before exposing them to MPP(+) could significantly decrease cell viability loss and reverse cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The anti-apoptotic effects of TSG were probably mediated via the inhibition of ROS generation and modulation of JNK activation because TSG blocked ROS increase and JNK phosphorylation induced by MPP(+). Taken together, these results indicated that TSG may provide a useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD.

  5. Laminin 211 inhibits protein kinase A in Schwann cells to modulate neuregulin 1 type III-driven myelination.

    PubMed

    Ghidinelli, Monica; Poitelon, Yannick; Shin, Yoon Kyoung; Ameroso, Dominique; Williamson, Courtney; Ferri, Cinzia; Pellegatta, Marta; Espino, Kevin; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly; Podini, Paola; Taveggia, Carla; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Park, Hwan Tae; Feltri, Maria Laura

    2017-06-01

    Myelin is required for proper nervous system function. Schwann cells in developing nerves depend on extrinsic signals from the axon and from the extracellular matrix to first sort and ensheathe a single axon and then myelinate it. Neuregulin 1 type III (Nrg1III) and laminin α2β1γ1 (Lm211) are the key axonal and matrix signals, respectively, but how their signaling is integrated and if each molecule controls both axonal sorting and myelination is unclear. Here, we use a series of epistasis experiments to show that Lm211 modulates neuregulin signaling to ensure the correct timing and amount of myelination. Lm211 can inhibit Nrg1III by limiting protein kinase A (PKA) activation, which is required to initiate myelination. We provide evidence that excessive PKA activation amplifies promyelinating signals downstream of neuregulin, including direct activation of the neuregulin receptor ErbB2 and its effector Grb2-Associated Binder-1 (Gab1), thereby elevating the expression of the key transcription factors Oct6 and early growth response protein 2 (Egr2). The inhibitory effect of Lm211 is seen only in fibers of small caliber. These data may explain why hereditary neuropathies associated with decreased laminin function are characterized by focally thick and redundant myelin.

  6. Apple Polysaccharide inhibits microbial dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulates gut permeability in HFD-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Qian; Zang, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Nan; Wang, Yifei; Xu, Xiaotao; Liu, Li; Mei, Qibing

    2017-02-24

    The saying "An apple a day keeps the doctor away" has been known for over 150 years, and numerous studies have shown that apple consumption is closely associated with reduced risks of chronic diseases. It has been well accepted that dysbiosis is the reflection of various chronic diseases. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of apple polysaccharides (AP) on gut dysbiosis. High-fat diet (HFD) fed rats were treated for 14 weeks with AP. The microbiota composition, microbiota-generated short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), gut permeability and chronic inflammation were analyzed. AP treatment showed higher abundance of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus while lower Firmicutes and Fusobacteium. AP significantly increased total SCFAs level that contributed by acetic acid and isobutyric acid. Moreover, AP dramatically alleviated dysbiosis-associated gut permeability and chronic inflammation with decreased plasma LBP, up-regulation of Occludin, down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL-1) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β). The potential mechanism is due to the fact that AP reduces gut permeability, which involves the induction of autophagy in goblet cells. Therefore, AP exerts health benefits through inhibiting gut dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulating gut permeability in HFD-induced dysbiosis rats.

  7. Influenza virus adaptation PB2-627K modulates nucleocapsid inhibition by the pathogen sensor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michaela; Sediri, Hanna; Felgenhauer, Ulrike; Binzen, Ina; Bänfer, Sebastian; Jacob, Ralf; Brunotte, Linda; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L.; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kochs, Georg; Schwemmle, Martin; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Weber, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cytoplasmic RNA helicase RIG-I mediates innate sensing of RNA viruses. The genomes of influenza A virus (FLUAV) are encapsidated by the nucleoprotein and associated with RNA polymerase, posing potential barriers to RIG-I sensing. We show that RIG-I recognizes the 5’-triphosphorylated dsRNA on FLUAV nucleocapsids but that polymorphisms at position 627 of the viral polymerase subunit PB2 modulate RIG-I sensing. Compared to mammalian-adapted PB2-627K, avian FLUAV nucleocapsids possessing PB2-627E are prone to increased RIG-I recognition, and RIG-I-deficiency partially restores PB2-627E virus infection of mammalian cells. Heightened RIG-I sensing of PB2-627E nucleocapsids correlates with previously established lower affinity of 627E-containing PB2 for nucleoprotein and is increased by further nucleocapsid instability. The effect of RIG-I on PB2-627E nucleocapsids is independent of antiviral signaling, suggesting that RIG-I-nucleocapsid binding alone can inhibit infection. These results indicate that RIG-I is a direct avian FLUAV restriction factor and highlight nucleocapsid disruption as an antiviral strategy. PMID:25704008

  8. EEG theta/beta ratio in relation to fear-modulated response-inhibition, attentional control, and affective traits.

    PubMed

    Putman, Peter; van Peer, Jacobien; Maimari, Ioulia; van der Werff, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Power density-ratios of fast and slow frequency spectrum-bands can be calculated from resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. A well-established phenomenon is that slow wave/fast wave ratios (SW/FW) are increased in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Several researchers have also begun to study relationships between SW/FW and affect. This work suggests that increased SW/FW may reflect reduced frontal cortical control over subcortical affective approach drive. The present study (n=28) aimed to further examine this notion by testing several predictions derived from it. In line with these predictions, SW/FW was found to correlate negatively with fearful modulation of response inhibition in an emotional go/no-go task and with self-reported attentional control. Results also suggested a positive relation between SW/FW and trait approach motivation and a negative relation to anxiety, as predicted. These results are consistent with previous studies and support the notion that SW/FW may provide a useful tool in the study of affect and emotion regulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RNF146 Inhibits Excessive Autophagy by Modulating the Wnt-β-Catenin Pathway in Glutamate Excitotoxicity Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuefan; Luo, Peng; Xu, Haoxiang; Dai, Shuhui; Rao, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Ma, Wenke; Wang, Jiu; Xu, Hongyu; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Sai; Fei, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate induced excitotoxicity is common in diverse neurological disorders. RNF146 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase protects neurons against excitotoxicity via interfering with Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer-induced cell death (parthanatos). However, the neuroprotective role of RNF146 has not been fully understood. We aimed to investigate the role of RNF146 in modulating autophagy in HT22 cells under glutamate excitotoxicity injury. Here we found that induction of RNF146 decreased the cellular damage and excitotoxicity induced by glutamate. RNF146 also suppressed the excessive autophagy, which is detrimental to HT22 cells survival, induced by glutamate or rapamycin treatment. In addition, we find that Wnt/β-catenin was a negative regulation factor for autophagy in glutamate excitotoxicity. Over-expression of RNF146 promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which was related to destabilization of β-catenin destruction complex. These results indicated that RNF146 acted as a neuroprotective agent against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection might be at least partly dependent on the inhibition of excessive autophagy by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:28321181

  10. Interaction of inhibition and triplets of excitatory spikes modulates the NMDA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity in a computational model of spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) experiments have shown that a synapse is strengthened when a presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic one and depressed vice versa. The canonical form of STDP has been shown to have an asymmetric shape with the peak long-term potentiation at +6 ms and the peak long-term depression at -5 ms. Experiments in hippocampal cultures with more complex stimuli such as triplets (one presynaptic spike combined with two postsynaptic spikes or one postsynaptic spike with two presynaptic spikes) have shown that pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. The sign and magnitude of STDP have also been experimentally hypothesized to be modulated by inhibition. Recently, a computational study showed that the asymmetrical form of STDP in the CA1 pyramidal cell dendrite when two spikes interact switches to a symmetrical one in the presence of inhibition under certain conditions. In the present study, I investigate computationally how inhibition modulates STDP in the CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrite when it is driven by triplets. The model uses calcium as the postsynaptic signaling agent for STDP and is shown to be consistent with the experimental triplet observations in the absence of inhibition: simulated pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas simulated post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. When inhibition is bounded by the onset and offset of the triplet stimulation, then the strength of the synapse is decreased as the strength of inhibition increases. When inhibition arrives either few milliseconds before or at the onset of the last spike in the pre-post-pre triplet stimulation, then the synapse is potentiated. Variability in the frequency of inhibition (50 vs. 100 Hz) produces no change in synaptic strength. Finally, a 5% variation in model's calcium parameters (calcium thresholds

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury via differential, cell-specific modulation of SOD-1 in the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Bahnson, Edward S M; Koo, Nathaniel; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Tsui, Aaron Y; Havelka, George E; Vercammen, Janet M; Jiang, Qun; Kelley, Eric E; Kibbe, Melina R

    2015-01-30

    Superoxide (O2(•-)) promotes neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Conversely, nitric oxide ((•)NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia through various cell-specific mechanisms, including redox regulation. What remains unclear is whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific regulation of the vascular redox environment following arterial injury to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific, differential modulation of O2(•-) levels throughout the arterial wall, establish the mechanism of such modulation, and determine if it regulates (•)NO-dependent inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. In vivo, (•)NO increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) levels following carotid artery balloon injury in a rat model. In vitro, (•)NO increased SOD-1 levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but had no effect on SOD-1 in endothelial cells or adventitial fibroblasts. This SOD-1 increase was associated with an increase in sod1 gene expression, increase in SOD-1 activity, and decrease in O2(•-) levels. Lastly, to determine the role of SOD-1 in (•)NO-mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, we performed the femoral artery wire injury model in wild type and SOD-1 knockout (KO) mice, with and without (•)NO. Interestingly, (•)NO inhibited neointimal hyperplasia only in wild type mice, with no effect in SOD-1 KO mice. In conclusion, these data show the cell-specific modulation of O2(•-) by (•)NO through regulation of SOD-1 in the vasculature, highlighting its importance on the inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. These results also shed light into the mechanism of (•)NO-dependent redox balance, and suggest a novel VSMC redox target to prevent neointimal hyperplasia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Nitric oxide inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury via differential, cell-specific modulation of SOD-1 in the arterial wall

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, Edward S.M.; Koo, Nathaniel; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Tsui, Aaron Y.; Havelka, George E.; Vercammen, Janet M.; Jiang, Qun; Kelley, Eric E.; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide (O2•−) promotes neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Conversely, nitric oxide (•NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia through various cell-specific mechanisms, including redox regulation. What remains unclear is whether •NO exerts cell-specific regulation of the vascular redox environment following arterial injury to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether •NO exerts cell-specific, differential modulation of O2•− levels throughout the arterial wall, establish the mechanism of such modulation, and determine if it regulates •NO-dependent inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. In vivo, •NO increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) levels following carotid artery balloon injury in a rat model. In vitro, •NO increased SOD-1 levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but had no effect on SOD-1 in endothelial cells or adventitial fibroblasts. This SOD-1 increase was associated with an increase in sod1 gene expression, increase in SOD-1 activity, and decrease in O2•− levels. Lastly, to determine the role of SOD-1 in •NO-mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, we performed the femoral artery wire injury model in wild type and SOD-1 knockout (KO) mice, with and without •NO. Interestingly, •NO inhibited neointimal hyperplasia only in wild type mice, with no effect in SOD-1 KO mice. In conclusion, these data show the cell-specific modulation of O2•− by •NO through regulation of SOD-1 in the vasculature, highlighting its importance on the inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. These results also shed light into the mechanism of •NO-dependent redox balance, and suggest a novel VSMC redox target to prevent neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:25460325

  13. Dietary phenolic compounds selectively inhibit the individual subunits of maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase with the potential of modulating glucose release.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Meric; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Nichols, Buford L; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2015-04-22

    In this study, it was hypothesized that dietary phenolic compounds selectively inhibit the individual C- and N-terminal (Ct, Nt) subunits of the two small intestinal α-glucosidases, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI), for a modulated glycemic carbohydrate digestion. The inhibition by chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, (+)-catechin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on individual recombinant human Nt-MGAM and Nt-SI and on mouse Ct-MGAM and Ct-SI was assayed using maltose as the substrate. Inhibition constants, inhibition mechanisms, and IC50 values for each combination of phenolic compound and enzymatic subunit were determined. EGCG and chlorogenic acid were found to be more potent inhibitors for selectively inhibiting the two subunits with highest activity, Ct-MGAM and Ct-SI. All compounds displayed noncompetitive type inhibition. Inhibition of fast-digesting Ct-MGAM and Ct-SI by EGCG and chlorogenic acid could lead to a slow, but complete, digestion of starch for improved glycemic response of starchy foods with potential health benefit.

  14. Polyphenols from Lonicera caerulea L. Berry Inhibit LPS-Induced Inflammation through Dual Modulation of Inflammatory and Antioxidant Mediators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shusong; Yano, Satoshi; Chen, Jihua; Hisanaga, Ayami; Sakao, Kozue; He, Xi; He, Jianhua; Hou, De-Xing

    2017-06-28

    Lonicera caerulea L. berry polyphenols (LCBP) are considered as major components for bioactivity. This study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms by monitoring inflammatory and antioxidant mediator actions in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse paw edema and macrophage cell model. LCBP significantly attenuated LPS-induced paw edema (3.0 ± 0.1 to 2.8 ± 0.1 mm, P < 0.05) and reduced (P < 0.05) serum levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, 100.9 ± 2.3 to 58.3 ± 14.5 ng/mL), interleukin (IL)-10 (1596.1 ± 424.3 to 709.7 ± 65.7 pg/mL), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (1761.9 ± 208.3 to 1369.1 ± 56.4 pg/mL), IL-6 (1262.8 ± 71.7 to 499.0 ± 67.1 pg/mL), IL-4 (93.3 ± 25.7 to 50.7 ± 12.5 pg/mL), IL-12(p-70) (580.4 ± 132.0 to 315.2 ± 35.1 pg/mL), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 2045.5 ± 264.9 to 1270.7 ± 158.6 pg/mL). Cell signaling analysis revealed that LCBP inhibited transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1)-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways, and enhanced the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in earlier response. Moreover, cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G) and (-)-epicatechin (EC), two major components of LCBP, directly bound to TAK1. These data demonstrated that LCBP might inhibit LPS-induced inflammation by modulating both inflammatory and antioxidant mediators.

  15. Modulation of antioxidant defense by Alpinia galanga and Curcuma aromatica extracts correlates with their inhibition of UVA-induced melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panich, Uraiwan; Kongtaphan, Kamolratana; Onkoksoong, Tassanee; Jaemsak, Kannika; Phadungrakwittaya, Rattana; Thaworn, Athiwat; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak

    2010-04-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is suggested to contribute to melanogenesis through promoting cellular oxidative stress and impairing antioxidant defenses. An overproduction of melanin can be associated with melanoma skin cancer and hyperpigmentation. Therefore, developing effective antimelanogenic agents is of importance. Alpinia galanga (AG) and Curcuma aromatica (CA) are traditional medicinal plants widely used for skin problems. Hence, this study investigated the antimelanogenic effects of AG and CA extracts (3.8-30 microg/ml) by assessing tyrosinase activity, tyrosinase mRNA levels, and melanin content in human melanoma cells (G361) exposed to UVA. The roles in protecting against melanogenesis were examined by evaluating their inhibitory effects on UVA-induced cellular oxidative stress and modulation of antioxidant defenses including antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and intracellular glutathione (GSH). In addition, possible active compounds accountable for biological activities of the extracts were identified by thin layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometric analysis. Our study demonstrated that UVA (8 J/cm(2)) induced both tyrosinase activity and mRNA levels and UVA (16 J/cm(2))-mediated melanin production were suppressed by the AG or CA extracts at noncytotoxic concentrations. Both extracts were able to protect against UVA-induced cellular oxidant formation and depletion of CAT and GPx activities and GSH content in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, TLC-densitometric analysis detected the presence of eugenol and curcuminoids in AG and CA, respectively. This is the first report representing promising findings on AG and CA extract-derived antityrosinase properties correlated with their antioxidant potential. Inhibiting cellular oxidative stress and improving antioxidant defenses might be the mechanisms by which the extracts yield the protective effects on UVA-dependent melanogenesis.

  16. Corneal surface glycosylation is modulated by IL-1R and Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge but is insufficient for inhibiting bacterial binding.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Amber L; Agarwal, Paresh; Metruccio, Matteo M E; Spiciarich, David R; Evans, David J; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Fleiszig, Suzanne M J

    2017-02-21

    Cell surface glycosylation is thought to be involved in barrier function against microbes at mucosal surfaces. Previously we showed that the epithelium of healthy mouse corneas becomes vulnerable to P. aeruginosa adhesion if it lacks the innate defense protein MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88), or after superficial injury by blotting with tissue paper. Here we explored their effect on corneal surface glycosylation using a metabolic label, tetra-acetylated N-azidoacetylgalactosamine (Ac4GalNAz). Ac4GalNAz treatment labeled the surface of healthy mouse corneas, leaving most cells viable, and bacteria preferentially associated with GalNAz-labeled regions. Surprisingly, corneas from MyD88(-/-) mice displayed similar GalNAz labeling to wild-type corneas, but labeling was reduced and patchy on IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-knockout mouse corneas (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Tissue paper blotting removed GalNAz-labeled surface cells, causing DAPI labeling (permeabilization) of underlying cells. MS of material collected on the tissue paper blots revealed 67 GalNAz-labeled proteins, including intracellular proteins. These data show that the normal distribution of surface glycosylation requires IL-1R, but not MyD88, and is not sufficient to prevent bacterial binding. They also suggest increased P. aeruginosa adhesion to MyD88(-/-) and blotted corneas is not due to reduction in total surface glycosylation, and for tissue paper blotting is likely due to cell permeabilization.-Jolly, A. L., Agarwal, P., Metruccio, M. M. E., Spiciarich, D. R., Evans, D. J., Bertozzi, C. R., Fleiszig, S. M. J. Corneal surface glycosylation is modulated by IL-1R and Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge but is insufficient for inhibiting bacterial binding.

  17. Kaempferol inhibits the production of ROS to modulate OPN-αvβ3 integrin pathway in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong-Bo; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Zi-Kui; Luo, Zhi-Feng

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that aldosterone regulates osteopontin (OPN)-related signaling pathways to promote nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, blocks those changes. Aldosterone induced productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), OPN, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase 4 (Nox4), NF-κB, OPN, alphavbeta3 (αvβ3) integrin, and inhibitor of NF-κB alpha phosphorylation (P-IκBα) in HUVEC. HUVECs were pretreated with kaempferol (0, 1, 3, or 10 μM) for 1 h and exposed to aldosterone (10(-6) M) for 24 h. Kaempferol reduced ROS, OPN, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α levels; Nox4, αvβ3 integrin; and P-IκBα expressions. The effect of aldosterone was also abrogated by spironolactone (10(-6) M). In addition, vitamin C (20 mmol/L) reduced ROS production. Vitamin C and LM609 (10 μg/mL) treatment decreased expressions of OPN, αvβ3 integrin, and NF-κB (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The present results suggest that kaempferol may modulate OPN-αvβ3 integrin pathway to inhibit NF-κB activation in HUVECs.

  18. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  19. Effects of methylglyoxal and glyoxalase I inhibition on breast cancer cells proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis through modulation of MAPKs, MMP9, and Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Zhang, Yuning; Yang, Xunjun; Lu, Panpan; Yan, Xijuan; Xiao, Fanglan; Zhou, Huaibin; Wen, Chaowei; Shi, Mengru; Lu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that methylglyoxal (MG) can inhibit tumorigenesis. Glyoxalase I (GLOI), a MG degradation enzyme, is implicated in the progression of human malignancies. However, little is known about the roles of MG and GLOI in breast cancer. Our purpose was to investigate the anticancer effects of MG and inhibition of GLOI on breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms of these effects. Our findings demonstrate that cell viability, migration, invasion, colony formation, and tubule formation were significantly restrained by addition of MG or inhibition of GLOI, while apoptosis was significantly increased. Furthermore, the expression of p-JNK, p-ERK, and p-p38 was markedly upregulated by addition of MG or inhibition of GLOI, whereas MMP-9 and Bcl-2 expression levels were dramatically decreased. These effects were augmented by combined treatment with MG and inhibition of GLOI. Collectively, these data indicate that MG or inhibition of GLOI induces anticancer effects in breast cancer cells and that these effects are potentiated by combination of the 2. These effects were modulated by activation of the MAPK family and downregulation of Bcl-2 and MMP-9. These findings may provide a new approach for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Anti-progestins suppress the growth of established tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene: comparison between RU486 and a new 21-substituted-19-nor-progestin.

    PubMed

    Wiehle, Ronald D; Christov, Konstantin; Mehta, Rajendra

    2007-07-01

    In this report, we evaluate the effects of a 21-substituted-19-nor-progestin, CDB-4124, on 7,12,-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats in comparison with RU486. Sprague-Dawley female rats were treated with DMBA at 50 days of age in order to induce mammary tumors. When the tumors reached the size of 10-12 mm, the animals were treated for 28 days with the vehicle, RU486, progesterone, CDB-4124 at various doses, or CDB-4124 plus progesterone. Anti-progestins resulted in the regression in the size of the existing tumors, and in the suppressed development of new tumors and tumor multiplicity. Progesterone treatment, however, increased the size and multiplicity. Progesterone rendered an increased number of growing tumors as compared to the regression in the anti-progesterone treatment groups. The combination of CDB-4124 and high doses of progesterone opposed the efficacy of CDB-4124. The growth inhibitory effects of the anti-progestins were correlated with increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation. These results indicate that anti-progestins should be developed for the chemoprevention and treatment of hormone-responsive breast cancer.

  1. Protective role of 5-azacytidine on myocardial infarction is associated with modulation of macrophage phenotype and inhibition of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Sook; Kang, Wan Seok; Kwon, Jin Sook; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hye-yun; Jeong, Hae Chang; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether a shift in macrophage phenotype could be therapeutic for myocardial infarction (MI). The mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was stimulated with peptidoglycan (PGN), with or without 5-azacytidine (5AZ) treatment. MI was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats, and the rats were divided into two groups; a saline-injection group and a 5AZ-injection group (2.5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal injection). LV function was evaluated and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 2 weeks after MI. Cardiac fibrosis was induced by angiotensin II (AngII) infusion with or without 5AZ (5 mg/kg/day) in mice. Nitric oxide was produced by PGN, which was reduced by 77.87% after 5AZ treatment. Both induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and iNOS promoter activity by PGN were inhibited by 5AZ. Ejection fraction (59.00 ± 8.03% versus 42.52 ± 2.58%), contractility (LV dP/dt-max, 8299.76 ± 411.56 mmHg versus 6610.36 ± 282.37 mmHg) and relaxation indices (LV dP/dt-min, −4661.37 ± 210.73 mmHg versus −4219.50 ± 162.98 mmHg) were improved after 5AZ administration. Cardiac fibrosis in the MI+5AZ was 8.14 ± 1.00%, compared with 14.93 ± 2.98% in the MI group (P < 0.05). Arginase-1(+)CD68(+) macrophages with anti-inflammatory phenotype were predominant in the infarct border zone of the MI+5AZ group, in comparison with the MI group. AngII-induced cardiac fibrosis was also attenuated after 5AZ administration. In cardiac fibroblasts, pro-fibrotic mediators and cell proliferation were increased by AngII, and these increases were attenuated after 5AZ treatment. 5AZ exerts its cardiac protective role through modulation of macrophages and cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:24571348

  2. Paris saponin II inhibits human ovarian cancer cell-induced angiogenesis by modulating NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zou, Juan; Zhu, Hongmei; Liu, Shanling; Wang, He; Bai, Peng; Xiao, Xue

    2015-05-01

    The clinical applications of Rhizoma paridis in traditional Chinese medicine are well known. However, the therapeutic potential of Rhizoma paridis and its active component such as Paris saponin I (polyphyllin D) and Paris saponin II (PSII) (formosanin C) in cancer treatments have not yet been fully explored. Recent studies have demonstrated that PSII and chemoagents exhibit comparable inhibitory affects against human ovarian cancer cell growth. Since NF-κB, a ubiquitous transcription factor that plays an important role in cancer biology, is often associated with gynecological cancers, in the present study, we evaluated the possibility that PSII modulates NF-κB activity and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis and elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects. We assessed the effects of PSII on NF-κB activity in SKOV3 tumor cells and on tumor cell induced-angiogenesis using standardized angiogenesis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays, western blot analysis and kinase assay. We also assessed the effect of the super-engineered repressor of IĸBα and its effect, in combination with PSII treatment on tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft athymic mouse models of ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SKOV3/mutant IĸBα cells) using color Doppler ultrasound and traditional immunohistochemistry. We showed that PSII suppressed NF-κB activation as a result of the reduction in IKKβ kinase activity on its substrate IκBα and the expression of IKKβ. Compromising NF-κB activation reduced the expression of NF-κB-downstream targets such as VEGF, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Such inhibitory effects at molecular levels appear to compromise tumor growth and angiogenesis. Most importantly, the combination of PSII treatment and constitutive repression of IĸBα activity exhibited marked inhibitory effects against human ovarian cancer cell growth in a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. For the first time, we provide evidence showing that PSII potently inhibits angiogenesis

  3. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  4. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  5. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  6. Inhibition of the BET family of epigenetic reader proteins: A novel principle for modulating gene expression in IgE-activated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Rönnberg, Elin; Grujic, Mirjana; Pejler, Gunnar

    2017-06-01

    The BET family of bromodomain-containing proteins constitute epigenetic readers that bind to acetylated lysine residues of core histones, thereby translating epigenetic histone marks to effects on gene expression. BET inhibitors are currently emerging as promising therapeutic agents for treatment of various pathological conditions. Here, we explored the potential of using BET inhibition to modulate IgE-mediated responses in mast cells. We assessed the effects of BET inhibitors PFI-1, I-BET151, and I-BET762 on responses downstream of mast cell activation through IgE receptor cross-linking. BET inhibitors were neither toxic for mast cells (at doses up to 20 μM), nor did they prevent IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, we found that BET inhibition, in particular by I-BET151, suppressed IL-6 gene expression and IL-6 protein release in response to IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This was observed in both bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and in mature peritoneal-cell derived mast cells. Further analysis showed that BET inhibition also suppressed the expression of a number of additional genes of those that were upregulated by IgE receptor cross-linking, including IL-3, IL-7R, CCR1, and ADAMTS9. However, BET inhibition was selective, i.e., several genes that were upregulated by IgE receptor cross-linking were not affected by BET inhibitors. These findings suggest that BET inhibition can interfere with the upregulated expression of selected genes in mast cells activated by IgE receptor cross-linking. Further, our findings introduce the concept of utilizing epigenetic mechanisms for modulating mast cell function in the context of IgE-driven disease. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Modulation of the tumor microenvironment and inhibition of EGF/EGFR pathway: novel anti-tumor mechanisms of Cannabidiol in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Mohamad; Nasser, Mohd W; Ravi, Janani; Wani, Nissar A; Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Zhao, Helong; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Shilo, Konstantin; Carson, William E; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor role and mechanisms of Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid compound, are not well studied especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the present study, we analyzed CBD's anti-tumorigenic activity against highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines including TNBC subtype. We show here -for the first time-that CBD significantly inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation and chemotaxis of breast cancer cells. Further studies revealed that CBD inhibits EGF-induced activation of EGFR, ERK, AKT and NF-kB signaling pathways as well as MMP2 and MMP9 secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that CBD inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in different mouse model systems. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CBD significantly inhibits the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in primary tumor stroma and secondary lung metastases. Similarly, our in vitro studies showed a significant reduction in the number of migrated RAW 264.7 cells towards the conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells. The conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells also showed lower levels of GM-CSF and CCL3 cytokines which are important for macrophage recruitment and activation. In summary, our study shows -for the first time-that CBD inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through novel mechanisms by inhibiting EGF/EGFR signaling and modulating the tumor microenvironment. These results also indicate that CBD can be used as a novel therapeutic option to inhibit growth and metastasis of highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes including TNBC, which currently have limited therapeutic options and are associated with poor prognosis and low survival rates.

  8. Pomegranate fruit extract inhibits UVB-induced inflammation and proliferation by modulating NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in mouse skin†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Syed, Deeba N.; Pal, Harish Chandra; Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the identification of natural agents capable of affording protection to skin from the adverse effects of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L) fruit possess strong anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Recently, we have shown that oral feeding of pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) to mice afforded substantial protection from the adverse effects of single UVB radiation via modulation in early biomarkers of photocarcinogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the photochemopreventive effects of PFE (0.2%, w/v) after multiple UVB irradiations (180 mJ/cm2; on alternative day; for a total of seven treatments) to the skin of SKH-1 hairless mice. Oral feeding of PFE to SKH-1 mice inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia, infiltration of leukocytes, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that oral feeding of PFE to mice inhibited UVB-induced (i) nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of NF-κB/p65, (ii) phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, (iii) activation of IKKα/IKKβ, and (iv) phosphorylation of MAPK proteins and c-Jun. PFE consumption also inhibited UVB-induced protein expression of (i) COX-2 and iNOS, (ii) PCNA and cyclin D1, and (iii) matrix metalloproteinases-2,-3 and -9 in mouse skin. Taken together, these data show that PFE consumption afforded protection to mouse skin against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating UVB-induced signaling pathways. PMID:22181855

  9. EGCG inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumors orthotopically implanted in Balb C Nude mice through modulation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a and neuropilin

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Sharmila; Marsh, Luke; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human pancreatic cancer is currently one of the fifth-leading causes of cancer-related mortality with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, there is a strong medical need for the development of novel and innovative cancer preventive strategies. The forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXO) play a major role in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of this study were to examine whether FKHRL1/FOXO3a modulates antitumor activity of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an active ingredient in green tea, in pancreatic cancer model in vivo. Methods PANC-1 cells were orthotopically implanted into Balb c nude mice and gavaged with EGCG after tumor formation. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of PI3K, AKT, ERK, and FOXO3a / FKHRL1 and its target genes were measured by the Western blot analysis and/or q-RT-PCR. FOXO-DNA binding were measured by gelshift assay. Results EGCG-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, PI3K, AKT, and FKHRL1/FOXO3a, and modulation of FOXO target genes. EGCG induced apoptosis by up-regulating Bim and activating caspase-3. EGCG modulated markers of cell cycle (p27/KIP1), angiogenesis (CD31, VEGF, IL-6, IL-8, SEMA3F and HIF1α), and metastasis (MMP2 and MMP7). The inhibition of VEGF by EGCG was associated with suppression of neuropilin. EGCG inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition by upregulating the expression of E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of N-cadherin, and Zeb1. These data suggest that EGCG inhibits pancreatic cancer orthotopic tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis which are associated with inhibition of PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways and activation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a. Conclusions EGCG can be used for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic

  10. EGCG inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumors orthotopically implanted in Balb C nude mice through modulation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a and neuropilin.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sharmila; Marsh, Luke; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is currently one of the fourth leading causes of cancer-related mortality with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5 %. Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, there is a strong medical need for the development of novel and innovative cancer preventive strategies. The forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXO) play a major role in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis, and tumorigenesis. The objectives of this study were to examine whether FKHRL1/FOXO3a modulates antitumor activity of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an active ingredient in green tea, in pancreatic cancer model in vivo. PANC-1 cells were orthotopically implanted into Balb c nude mice and gavaged with EGCG after tumor formation. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of PI3K, AKT, ERK, and FOXO3a/FKHRL1 and its target genes were measured by the western blot analysis and/or q-RT-PCR. FOXO-DNA binding was measured by gel shift assay. EGCG-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, PI3K, AKT, and FKHRL1/FOXO3a, and modulation of FOXO target genes. EGCG induced apoptosis by upregulating Bim and activating caspase-3. EGCG modulated markers of cell cycle (p27/KIP1), angiogenesis (CD31, VEGF, IL-6, IL-8, SEMA3F, and HIF1α), and metastasis (MMP2 and MMP7). The inhibition of VEGF by EGCG was associated with suppression of neuropilin. EGCG inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition by upregulating the expression of E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of N-cadherin and Zeb1. These data suggest that EGCG inhibits pancreatic cancer orthotopic tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which are associated with inhibition of PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways and activation of FKHRL1/FOXO3a. As a conclusion, EGCG can be used for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Modulation of olfactory bulb network activity by serotonin: synchronous inhibition of mitral cells mediated by spatially localized GABAergic microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Loren J.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles of mitral cells (MCs), a primary output neuron in the olfactory bulb, and recorded intracellularly from pairs of MCs to directly assay coincident inhibitory input. We find that 5-HT disynaptically depolarized granule cells (GCs) only slightly but robustly increased the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic inhibitory currents in MCs. Serotonin also triggered more coincident IPSCs in pairs of nearby MCs than expected by chance, including in MCs with truncated apical dendrites that lack glomerular synapses. That serotonin-triggered coincident inhibition in the absence of elevated GC somatic firing rates suggested that synchronized MC inhibition arose from glutamate receptor-mediated depolarization of GC dendrites or other (non-GC) interneurons outside the glomerular layer. Tetanic stimulation of GCL afferents to GCs triggered robust GC spiking, coincident inhibition in pairs of MCs, and recruited large-amplitude IPSCs in MCs. Enhancing neurotransmission through NMDARs by lowering the external Mg2+ concentration also increased inhibitory tone onto MCs but failed to promote synchronized inhibition. These results demonstrate that coincident MC inhibition can occur through multiple circuit pathways and suggests that the functional coordination between different GABAergic synapses in individual GCs can be dynamically regulated. PMID:25031366

  12. Alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase inhibition is differentially modulated by fucoidan obtained from Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Tae; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Turgeon, Sylvie L

    2014-02-01

    Fucoidan is a water-soluble, negatively charged, biologically active polysaccharide found in great abundance in brown marine algae. However, the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase by fucoidan derived from two algal species (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus) harvested at different periods (accounting for seasonal and yearly variations) has never been investigated. It was found that fucoidans inhibited α-glucosidase differently, depending on the algal species from which it was extracted and the algae's season of harvest. Fucoidan extracted from A. nodosum was a more potent inhibitor of α-glucosidase, with an IC50 ranging from 0.013 to 0.047 mg/mL, than the inhibition by fucoidan extracted from F. vesiculosus (IC50=0.049 mg/mL). In contrast, fucoidan extracted from F. vesiculosus did not inhibit α-amylase activity, while fucoidan from A. nodosum decreased α-amylase activity by 7-100% at 5 mg/mL depending upon the algae harvest period. An IC50 of 0.12-4.64 mg/mL for fucoidan from A. nodosum was found for the α-amylase inhibition. The ability of fucoidan to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase thus varies according to the algae species and harvest period. A. nodosum is more suitable than F. vesiculosus as a source of fucoidan to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. Their potential benefits towards Type 2 diabetes management should be further investigated.

  13. Correction for Inhibition Leads to an Allosteric Co-Agonist Model for Pentobarbital Modulation and Activation of α1β3γ2L GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Alexis M.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentobarbital, like propofol and etomidate, produces important general anesthetic effects through GABAA receptors. Photolabeling also indicates that pentobarbital binds to some of the same sites where propofol and etomidate act. Quantitative allosteric co-agonist models for propofol and etomidate account for modulatory and agonist effects in GABAA receptors and have proven valuable in establishing drug site characteristics and for functional analysis of mutants. We therefore sought to establish an allosteric co-agonist model for pentobarbital activation and modulation of α1β3γ2L receptors, using a novel approach to first correct pentobarbital activation data for inhibitory effects in the same concentration range. Methods Using oocyte-expressed α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors and two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, we quantified modulation of GABA responses by a low pentobarbital concentration and direct effects of high pentobarbital concentrations, the latter displaying mixed agonist and inhibitory effects. We then isolated and quantified pentobarbital inhibition in activated receptors using a novel single-sweep “notch” approach, and used these results to correct steady-state direct activation for inhibition. Results Combining results for GABA modulation and corrected direct activation, we estimated receptor open probability and optimized parameters for a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric co-agonist model. Inhibition by pentobarbital was consistent with two sites with IC50s near 1 mM, while co-agonist model parameters suggest two allosteric pentobarbital agonist sites characterized by KPB ≈ 5 mM and high efficacy. The results also indicate that pentobarbital may be a more efficacious agonist than GABA. Conclusions Our novel approach to quantifying both inhibitory and co-agonist effects of pentobarbital provides a basis for future structure-function analyses of GABAA receptor mutations in putative pentobarbital binding sites. PMID:27110714

  14. Statin therapy exacerbates alcohol-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Simakova, Maria N; Bisen, Shivantika; Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N

    2017-09-01

    Statins constitute the most commonly prescribed drugs to decrease cholesterol (CLR). CLR is an important modulator of alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). Using rats on a high CLR diet (2% CLR) we set to determine whether atorvastatin administration (10mg/kg daily for 18-23weeks) modified AICAC. Middle cerebral arteries were pressurized in vitro at 60mmHg and AICAC was evoked by 50mM ethanol, that is within the range of blood alcohol detected in humans following moderate-to-heavy drinking. AICAC was evident in high CLR+atorvastatin group but not in high CLR diet+placebo. Statin exacerbation of AICAC persisted in de-endothelialized arteries, and was blunted by CLR enrichment in vitro. Fluorescence imaging of filipin-stained arteries showed that atorvastatin decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) CLR when compared to placebo, this difference being reduced by CLR enrichment in vitro. Voltage- and calcium-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) are known VSM targets of ethanol, with their beta1 subunit being necessary for ethanol-induced channel inhibition and resulting AICAC. Ethanol-induced BK inhibition in excised membrane patches from freshly isolated myocytes was exacerbated in the high CLR diet+atorvastatin group when compared to high CLR diet+placebo. Unexpectedly, atorvastatin decreased the amount and function of BK beta1 subunit as documented by immunofluorescence imaging and functional patch-clamp studies. Atorvastatin exacerbation of ethanol-induced BK inhibition disappeared upon artery CLR enrichment in vitro. Our study demonstrates for the first time statin's ability to exacerbate the vascular effect of a widely consumed drug of abuse, this exacerbation being driven by statin modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in the VSM via CLR-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Curcumin inhibits the invasion of lung cancer cells by modulating the PKCα/Nox-2/ROS/ATF-2/MMP-9 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhigang; Duan, Xiaoyi; Cai, Hui; Wang, Li; Li, Min; Qu, Jingkun; Li, Wanjun; Wang, Yongheng; Wang, Jiansheng

    2015-08-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the major causes of tumor-related mortality in lung cancer. It is believed that curcumin is an effective drug possessing anti-invasive and anti-metastatic activities in the treatment of cancer. However, the specific mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the PKCα/Nox-2/ATF-2/MMP-9 signaling pathway is involved in the invasive behavior of lung cancer and whether curcumin could inhibit invasion by modulating this pathway. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin was evaluated by MTT assay and the capacity of invasion was assessed by Transwell assay. siRNA and plasmid transfection techniques were used to study the function of targeted genes. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis were used to evaluate the expression levels of PKCα, Nox-2, MMP-9 and the phosphorylation of ATF-2. The results showed that curcumin inhibited the proliferation and invasion of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of MMP-9 enhanced the invasion of A549 cells. However, inhibition of MMP-9 by siRNA or curcumin suppressed cell invasion. Moreover, we also demonstrated the catalytic role of PKCα in expression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion in A549 cells, which was dependent on the expression of Nox-2 and phosphorylation of ATF-2. Finally, we also showed that curcumin dose-dependently reduced the expression of PKCα, P47phox, Nox-2 and phosphorylated ATF-2, as well as intracellular ROS generation, suggesting the inhibitory effect of curcumin on the activation of the PKCα/Nox-2/ROS/ATF-2 pathway. In conclusion, the PKCα/Nox-2/ROS/ATF-2/MMP-9 signaling pathway is activated in lung cancer A549 cells, which could be modulated by curcumin to inhibit cell invasiveness.

  16. Clinically Relevant Doses of Candesartan Inhibit Growth of Prostate Tumor Xenografts In Vivo through Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alhusban, Ahmed; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Goc, Anna; Gao, Fei; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers (ARBs), widely used antihypertensive drugs, have also been investigated for their anticancer effects. The effect of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models compared with meta-analysis data from clinical trials is conflicting. Whereas this discrepancy might be due to the use of supratherapeutic doses of ARBs in cellular and animal models as compared with the clinical doses used in human trials, further investigation of the effects of clinical doses of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models is warranted. In the current study, we sought to determine the effects of candesartan on prostate cancer cellular function in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and characterize the underlying mechanisms. Our analysis indicated that clinically relevant doses of candesartan significantly inhibited growth of PC3 cell tumor xenografts in mice. Interestingly, the same concentrations of candesartan actually promoted prostate cancer cellular function in vitro, through a modest but significant inhibition in apoptosis. Inhibition of tumor growth by candesartan was associated with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, but normalization of tumor vasculature. Although candesartan did not impair PC3 cell viability, it inhibited endothelial-barrier disruption by tumor-derived factors. Furthermore, candesartan significantly inhibited expression of VEGF in PC3 and DU145 cell lines independent of angiotensin II type 2 receptor, but potentially via angiotensin II type 1 receptor inhibition. Our findings clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of candesartan for prostate cancer and establish a link between ARBs, VEGF expression, and prostate tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24990940

  17. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Del Valle, Luis; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSCs in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSCs remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSCs, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSCs and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSCs (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSCs and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSCs immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSCs in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSCs and enhance various cancer therapies. PMID:26025381

  18. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Valle, Luis Del; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSC in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSC remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSC, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSC and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSC (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSC and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T-cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSC immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSC in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSC and enhance various cancer therapies.

  19. Rooibos flavonoids inhibit the activity of key adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, modulating steroid hormone levels in H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Schloms, Lindie; Swart, Amanda C

    2014-03-24

    Major rooibos flavonoids--dihydrochalcones, aspalathin and nothofagin, flavones--orientin and vitexin, and a flavonol, rutin, were investigated to determine their influence on the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD2) and cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1), P450 21-hydroxylase (CYP21A2) and P450 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1). All the flavonoids inhibited 3βHSD2 and CYP17A1 significantly, while the inhibition of downstream enzymes, CYP21A2 and CYP11B1, was both substrate and flavonoid specific. The dihydrochalcones inhibited the activity of CYP21A2, but not that of CYP11B1. Although rutin, orientin and vitexin inhibited deoxycortisol conversion by CYP11B1 significantly, inhibition of deoxycorticosterone was <20%. These three flavonoids were unable to inhibit CYP21A2, with negligible inhibition of deoxycortisol biosynthesis only. Rooibos inhibited substrate conversion by CYP17A1 and CYP21A2, while the inhibition of other enzyme activities was <20%. In H295R cells, rutin had the greatest inhibitory effect on steroid production upon forskolin stimulation, reducing total steroid output 2.3-fold, while no effect was detected under basal conditions. Nothofagin and vitexin had a greater inhibitory effect on overall steroid production compared to aspalathin and orientin, respectively. The latter compounds contain two hydroxyl groups on the B ring, while nothofagin and vitexin contain a single hydroxyl group. In addition, all of the flavonoids are glycosylated, albeit at different positions--dihydrochalcones at C3' and flavones at C8 on ring A, while rutin, a larger molecule, has a rutinosyl moiety at C3 on ring C. Structural differences regarding the number and position of hydroxyl and glucose moieties as well as structural flexibility could indicate different mechanisms by which these flavonoids influence the activity of adrenal steroidogenic enzymes.

  20. Forskolin Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Modulation of MCP-1 and GPR120 in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes through an Inhibition of NFκB

    PubMed Central

    Chiadak, Jeanne Durendale; Arsenijevic, Tatjana; Verstrepen, Kevin; Gregoire, Françoise; Bolaky, Nargis; Delforge, Valérie; Flamand, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    In an obese state, Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) upregulates proinflammatory adipokines secretion including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in adipose tissue. In contrast, G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) mediates antiobesity effects. The aim of this study was to determine the signaling pathway by which Forskolin (FK), a cyclic adenosine monophosphate- (cAMP-) promoting agent causing positive changes in body composition in overweight and obese adult men, affects MCP-1 and GPR120 expression during an inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in adipocytes, such as in an obese state. 3T3-L1 cells differentiated into adipocytes (DC) were stimulated with LPS in the absence or presence of FK and inhibitors of TLR-4 and inhibitor of kappa B (IκBα). In DC, LPS increased MCP-1, TLR-4, and nuclear factor-κB1 (NFκB1) mRNA levels, whereas it decreased GPR120 mRNA levels. In DC, FK inhibited the LPS-induced increase in MCP-1, TLR-4, and NFκB1 mRNA levels and the LPS-induced decrease in GPR120 mRNA. BAY11-7082 and CLI-095 abolished these LPS-induced effects. In conclusion, FK inhibits LPS-induced increase in MCP-1 mRNA levels and decrease in GPR120 mRNA levels in adipocytes and may be a potential treatment for inflammation in obesity. Furthermore, TLR-4-induced activation of NFκB may be involved in the LPS-induced regulation of these genes. PMID:27881903

  1. D1 and D2 Inhibitions of the Soleus H-Reflex Are Differentially Modulated during Plantarflexion Force and Position Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Elias, Leonardo Abdala; da Silva, Cristiano Rocha; de Lima, Felipe Fava; de Toledo, Diana Rezende; Kohn, André Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition (PSI) has been shown to modulate several neuronal pathways of functional relevance by selectively gating the connections between sensory inputs and spinal motoneurons, thereby regulating the contribution of the stretch reflex circuitry to the ongoing motor activity. In this study, we investigated whether a differential regulation of Ia afferent inflow by PSI may be associated with the performance of two types of plantarflexion sensoriomotor tasks. The subjects (in a seated position) controlled either: 1) the force level exerted by the foot against a rigid restraint (force task, FT); or 2) the angular position of the ankle when sustaining inertial loads (position task, PT) that required the same level of muscle activation observed in FT. Subjects were instructed to maintain their force/position at target levels set at ~10% of maximum isometric voluntary contraction for FT and 90° for PT, while visual feedback of the corresponding force/position signals were provided. Unconditioned H-reflexes (i.e. control reflexes) and H-reflexes conditioned by electrical pulses applied to the common peroneal nerve with conditioning-to-test intervals of 21 ms and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively) were evoked in a random fashion. A significant main effect for the type of the motor task (FT vs PT) (p = 0.005, η2p = 0.603) indicated that PTs were undertaken with lower levels of Ia PSI converging onto the soleus motoneuron pool. Additionally, a significant interaction between the type of inhibition (D1 vs D2) and the type of motor task (FT vs PT) (p = 0.038, η2p = 0.395) indicated that D1 inhibition was associated with a significant reduction in PSI levels from TF to TP (p = 0.001, η2p = 0.731), whereas no significant difference between the tasks was observed for D2 inhibition (p = 0.078, η2p = 0.305). These results suggest that D1 and D2 inhibitions of the soleus H-reflex are differentially modulated during the performance of

  2. FtsZ inhibition and redox modulation with one chemical scaffold: Potential use of dihydroquinolines against mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Sridevi; Napoleon, John Victor; Nankar, Rakesh P; Senu Adeeba, V; Manheri, Muraleedharan K; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-11-10

    The dual effect of FtsZ inhibition and oxidative stress by a group of 1,2-dihydroquinolines that culminate in bactericidal effect on mycobacterium strains is demonstrated. They inhibited the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2) 155 with MIC as low as 0.9 μg/mL and induced filamentation. Detailed studies revealed their ability to inhibit polymerization and GTPase activity of MtbFtsZ (Mycobacterial filamentous temperature sensitive Z) with an IC50 value of ∼40 μM. In addition to such target specific effects, these compounds exerted a global cellular effect by causing redox-imbalance that was evident from overproduction of ROS in treated cells. Such multi-targeting effect with one chemical scaffold has considerable significance in this era of emerging drug resistance and could offer promise in the development of new therapeutic agents against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Specific maltose derivatives modulate the swarming motility of nonswarming mutant and inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shetye, Gauri S; Singh, Nischal; Jia, Changqing; Nguyen, Chan D K; Wang, Guirong; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2014-07-07

    We have demonstrated that specific synthetic maltose derivatives activate the swarming motility of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nonswarming mutant (rhlA) at low concentration, but inhibit it at high concentration. Although these molecules are not microbicidal, active maltose derivatives with bulky hydrocarbon groups inhibited bacterial adhesion, and exhibited biofilm inhibition and dispersion (IC50 ~20 μM and DC50 ~30 μM, respectively). Because the swarming motility of the rhlA mutant is abolished by the lack natural rhamnolipids, the swarming activation suggests that maltose derivatives are analogues of rhamnolipids. Together, these results suggest a new approach of controlling multiple bacterial activities (bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and swarming motility) by a set of disaccharide-based molecules.

  4. The anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam reverses the inhibition by negative allosteric modulators of neuronal GABA- and glycine-gated currents

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, J-M; Hans, G; Nguyen, L; Rocher, V; Belachew, S; Malgrange, B; Leprince, P; Moonen, G; Selak, I; Matagne, A; Klitgaard, H

    2002-01-01

    In this study in vitro and in vivo approaches were combined in order to investigate if the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra®) may involve modulation of inhibitory neurotransmission.GABA- and glycine-gated currents were studied in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques applied on cultured cerebellar granule, hippocampal and spinal neurons. Protection against clonic convulsions was assessed in vivo in sound-susceptible mice. The effect of LEV was compared with reference anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs): carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, clonazepam, phenobarbital and ethosuximide.LEV contrasted the reference AEDs by an absence of any direct effect on glycine-gated currents. At high concentrations, beyond therapeutic relevance, it induced a small reduction in the peak amplitude and a prolongation of the decay phase of GABA-gated currents. A similar action on GABA-elicited currents was observed with the reference AEDs, except ethosuximide.These minor direct effects contrasted with a potent ability of LEV (EC50=1 – 10 μM) to reverse the inhibitory effects of the negative allosteric modulators zinc and β-carbolines on both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated responses.Clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate showed a similar ability to reverse the inhibition of β-carbolines on GABA-gated currents. Blockade of zinc inhibition of GABA responses was observed with clonazepam and ethosuximide. Phenytoin was the only AED together with LEV that inhibited the antagonism of zinc on glycine-gated currents and only clonazepam and phenobarbital inhibited the action of DMCM.LEV (17 mg kg−1) produced a potent suppression of sound-induced clonic convulsions in mice. This protective effect was significantly abolished by co-administration of the β-carboline FG 7142, from a dose of 5 mg kg−1. In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (up to 10 mg kg−1) was without any effect on the protection

  5. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibition by ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, and modulates dyslipidemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, Geraldine; Greenwood, Jeremy; Bhat, Sathesh; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Ruiying; Paul, Debamita; Tong, Liang; Saha, Asish K.; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana; Harwood, H. James

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous inhibition of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) isozymes ACC1 and ACC2 results in concomitant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and may favorably affect the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Using structure-based drug design, we have identified a series of potent allosteric protein–protein interaction inhibitors, exemplified by ND-630, that interact within the ACC phosphopeptide acceptor and dimerization site to prevent dimerization and inhibit the enzymatic activity of both ACC isozymes, reduce fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in animals, and exhibit favorable drug-like properties. When administered chronically to rats with diet-induced obesity, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, reduces weight gain without affecting food intake, and favorably affects dyslipidemia. When administered chronically to Zucker diabetic fatty rats, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and reduces hemoglobin A1c (0.9% reduction). Together, these data suggest that ACC inhibition by representatives of this series may be useful in treating a variety of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and fatty liver disease. PMID:26976583

  6. Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract neurons by spinal glycine and GABA is modulated by guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Wu, J; Peng, Y B; Cui, M; Willis, W D

    1999-03-01

    Our recent work has suggested that the nitric oxide/guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (NO/cGMP) signal transduction system contributes to central sensitization of spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons in part by influencing the descending inhibition of nociception resulting from stimulation in the periaqueductal gray. This study was designed to examine further whether activation of the NO/cGMP cascade reduces the inhibition of the activity of STT neurons mediated by spinal inhibitory amino acid (IAA) receptors. Responses of STT cells to noxious cutaneous stimuli were inhibited by iontophoresis of glycine and GABA agonists in anesthetized monkeys. Administration of 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate sodium (8-bromo-cGMP), a membrane permeable analogue of cGMP, either by microdialysis or by iontophoresis reduced significantly the IAA-induced inhibition of wide dynamic range (WDR) STT cells in the deep layers of the dorsal horn. The reduction in inhibition lasted for up to 1-1.5 h after the cessation of drug infusion. In contrast, IAA-induced inhibition of WDR STT cells in the superficial dorsal horn and high-threshold (HT) cells in superficial or deep layers was not significantly changed during 8-bromo-cGMP infusion. Iontophoresis of 8-bromo-cGMP onto STT cells produced the same actions as produced by microdialysis of this agent, but the effect was not as long-lasting nor as potent. Finally, an attenuation of the IAA receptor-mediated inhibition of STT cells produced by iontophoretic release of a NO donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine, could be blocked by pretreatment of the spinal cord with a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. These results suggest that an increased spinal cGMP level contributes to the sensitization of WDR STT neurons in the deep dorsal horn in part by down-regulating spinal IAA receptors. However, no evidence is provided in this study that the NO/cGMP cascade regulates IAA receptors on HT and superficial WDR

  7. Discovery of a novel allosteric modulator of 5-HT3 receptors: inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptor signaling through a conserved transmembrane intersubunit site.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Harpsøe, Kasper; Thygesen, Sarah B; Rahr, Louise M; Ahring, Philip K; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A

    2012-07-20

    The ligand-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor superfamily mediate the effects of neurotransmitters acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine. Cys-loop receptor signaling is susceptible to modulation by ligands acting through numerous allosteric sites. Here we report the discovery of a novel class of negative allosteric modulators of the 5-HT(3) receptors (5-HT(3)Rs). PU02 (6-[(1-naphthylmethyl)thio]-9H-purine) is a potent and selective antagonist displaying IC(50) values of ~1 μM at 5-HT(3)Rs and substantially lower activities at other Cys-loop receptors. In an elaborate mutagenesis study of the 5-HT(3)A receptor guided by a homology model, PU02 is demonstrated to act through a transmembrane intersubunit site situated in the upper three helical turns of TM2 and TM3 in the (+)-subunit and TM1 and TM2 in the (-)-subunit. The Ser(248), Leu(288), Ile(290), Thr(294), and Gly(306) residues are identified as important molecular determinants of PU02 activity with minor contributions from Ser(292) and Val(310), and we propose that the naphthalene group of PU02 docks into the hydrophobic cavity formed by these. Interestingly, specific mutations of Ser(248), Thr(294), and Gly(306) convert PU02 into a complex modulator, potentiating and inhibiting 5-HT-evoked signaling through these mutants at low and high concentrations, respectively. The PU02 binding site in the 5-HT(3)R corresponds to allosteric sites in anionic Cys-loop receptors, which emphasizes the uniform nature of the molecular events underlying signaling through the receptors. Moreover, the dramatic changes in the functional properties of PU02 induced by subtle changes in its binding site bear witness to the delicate structural discrimination between allosteric inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptors.

  8. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by a new estradiol receptor modulator compound LY-139478, comparative effect with other steroids.

    PubMed

    Rattan, A K; Arad, Y

    1998-02-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is postulated to be essential for the development of atherosclerosis. LY-139478 is a new non-steroidal potent estrogen analog, but its effects on in vitro LDL oxidation have not been completely elucidated. We investigated the ability of LY-139478 to inhibit in vitro copper sulfate-mediated LDL oxidation using several methods, including conjugated diene (CD) accumulation, relative electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay, and superoxide anions scavenging activity. The antioxidative potential of LY-139478 was compared to testosterone (T), 17-alpha-estradiol (17alphaE), 17-beta-estradiol (17betaE), dehydroepiandrosterone (D), and dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulfate (DS). LY-139478 was superior to 17alphaE and 17betaE in prolonging the lag phase and decreasing the slope and peak concentration of the conjugated diene accumulation, decreasing the rate of migration of LDL on agarose gel electrophoresis, and inhibiting the production of melonyldialdehyde (MDA) in the TBARS assay. T, D and DS were ineffective in all three assays. It was previously shown that when native LDL is oxidized by previously oxidized LDL (secondary oxidation) the lag phase is lost (Schnitzer et al. Free Rad Res 1995;23:137). LY-139478 was at least 15-fold more effective than 17alphaE, and 17betaE in slowing the propagation phase and reducing CD accumulation in this secondary oxidation, with 50% inhibition at 10 microM and 98% inhibition at 100 microM. However, none restored the lag phase. T, D and DS were ineffective. Superoxide anion generation was inhibited only by DS at high doses (500 microM). These results demonstrate that LY-139478 is an effective inhibitor of LDL oxidation and is superior to natural steroidal hormones, including 17betaE, in protecting against primary and secondary LDL oxidation.

  9. Diclofenac Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulation of VEGF Levels and Arginase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Background Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. Conclusion/Significance In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion. PMID:20856806

  10. Inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase modulates the expression of cell differentiation genes in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patnala, Radhika; Lee, Sung-Hun; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Ohms, Stephen; Chen, Long; Dheen, S Thameem; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (L1 elements) are biologically active retrotransposons that are capable of autonomous replication using their own reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Expression of the normally repressed RT has been implicated in cancer cell growth. However, at present, little is known about the expression of L1-encoded RT activity or the molecular changes that are associated with RT activity in the development of breast cancer. Here, we report that RT activity is widespread in breast cancer cells. The expression of RT protein decreased markedly in breast cancer cells after treatment with the antiretroviral drug, efavirenz. While the majority of cells showed a significant reduction in proliferation, inhibition of RT was also accompanied by cell-specific differences in morphology. MCF7 cells displayed elongated microtubule extensions that adhered tightly to their substrate, while a large fraction of the T47D cells that we studied formed long filopodia projections. These morphological changes were reversible upon cessation of RT inhibition, confirming their dependence on RT activity. We also carried out gene expression profiling with microarrays and determined the genes that were differentially expressed during the process of cellular differentiation. Genes involved in proliferation, cell migration, and invasive activity were repressed in RT-inhibited cells. Concomitantly, genes involved in cell projection, formation of vacuolar membranes, and cell-to-cell junctions were significantly upregulated in RT-inhibited cells. qRT-PCR examination of the mRNA expression of these genes in additional cell lines yielded close correlation between their differential expression and the degree of cellular differentiation. Our study demonstrates that the inhibition of L1-encoded RT can reduce the rate of proliferation and promote differentiation of breast cancer cells. Together, these results provide a direct functional link between the expression of L1 retrotransposons and

  11. Stimulation and inhibition of 5 ALA induced PplX fluorescence in the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma cultivated on the CAM using glucose versus ethanol as modulating agents.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    The fluorescence properties of biological tissues have been considered as intrinsic parameters to discriminate diseased from normal conditions. In vivo fluorescence diagnosis of cancer is based on special fluorescent dyes and their properties of tumour selective retention. The experimental in vivo model of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos was used for cultivating a murine tumourous system consisting of the SSK II fibrosarcoma. Proto porphyrine (PplX) synthesis in CAM inoculated tissues as well as in native CAM was induced by 5-ALA. The modulation effects of several biochemicals on the 5-ALA induced PplX production were tested. The fibrosarcoma cells have not revealed autofluorescence with distinctively higher signal intensities than the substrate tissue. Fibrosarcoma cells are clearly distinguished by higher xenofluorescence intensities compared to the CAM tissue in the background. 5-ALA induced xenofluorescence intensity in fibrosarcoma was significantly enhanced by glucose and inhibited by ethanol. It can be concluded that some chemical agents can modulate the intensity of 5-ALA induced xenofluorescence through their modulation the enzymatic cell activity and these can be used for improvement by varying both the diagnostic and the therapeutic effectiveness of the photosensitizers in its application in the photo therapy process.

  12. Compound A, a Dissociated Glucocorticoid Receptor Modulator, Inhibits T-bet (Th1) and Induces GATA-3 (Th2) Activity in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Palermo-Neto, Joao; Castro, Carla N.; Druker, Jimena; Holsboer, Florian; Perone, Marcelo J.; Gerlo, Sarah; De Bosscher, Karolien; Haegeman, Guy; Arzt, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background Compound A (CpdA) is a dissociating non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligand which has anti-inflammatory properties exerted by down-modulating proinflammatory gene expression. By favouring GR monomer formation, CpdA does not enhance glucocorticoid (GC) response element-driven gene expression, resulting in a reduced side effect profile as compared to GCs. Considering the importance of Th1/Th2 balance in the final outcome of immune and inflammatory responses, we analyzed how selective GR modulation differentially regulates the activity of T-bet and GATA-3, master drivers of Th1 and Th2 differentiation, respectively. Results Using Western analysis and reporter gene assays, we show in murine T cells that, similar to GCs, CpdA inhibits T-bet activity via a transrepressive mechanism. Different from GCs, CpdA induces GATA-3 activity by p38 MAPK-induction of GATA-3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. CpdA effects are reversed by the GR antagonist RU38486, proving the involvement of GR in these actions. ELISA assays demonstrate that modulation of T-bet and GATA-3 impacts on cytokine production shown by a decrease in IFN-γ and an increase in IL-5 production, respectively. Conclusions Taken together, through their effect favoring Th2 over Th1 responses, particular dissociated GR ligands, for which CpdA represents a paradigm, hold potential for the application in Th1-mediated immune disorders. PMID:22496903

  13. A synthetic peptide derived from A1 module in CRD4 of human TNF receptor-1 inhibits binding and proinflammatory effect of human TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingnan; Wang, Zhaohe; Bu, Xianzhang; Tang, Shu; Mei, Zhengrong; Liu, Peiqing

    2009-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine, which has been shown to be a causative factor in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and septic shock. Proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha is activated mainly through human TNF receptor-1 (TNF-R1). However, the role of the fourth cystein-rich domain (CRD4) of TNF-R1 extracellular portion in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1 is still unclear. In the present study, binding activity of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1 and protein levels of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 subunit in HeLa cells were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western-blot analysis. Pep 3 (LRENECVS) which was derived from the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 remarkably inhibited the binding of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1, and also reversed TNF-alpha-induced degradation of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit in HeLa cells. Our results confirmed that the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 participated in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1, and demonstrated the potential of small-molecule TNF-alpha extracellular inhibitors targeting at A1 module in CRD4 of TNF-R1 in suppressing proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha.

  14. Pomegranate fruit extract inhibits UVB-induced inflammation and proliferation by modulating NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naghma; Syed, Deeba N; Pal, Harish Chandra; Mukhtar, Hasan; Afaq, Farrukh

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the identification of natural agents capable of affording protection to skin from the adverse effects of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit possesses as strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties. Recently, we have shown that oral feeding of pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) to mice afforded substantial protection from the adverse effects of single UVB radiation via modulation in early biomarkers of photocarcinogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the photochemopreventive effects of PFE (0.2%, wt/vol) after multiple UVB irradiations (180 mJ cm(-2), on alternative day, for a total of seven treatments) to the skin of SKH-1 hairless mice. Oral feeding of PFE to SKH-1 mice inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia, infiltration of leukocytes, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that oral feeding of PFE to mice inhibited UVB-induced (1) nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B/p65, (2) phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, (3) activation of IKKα/ΙΚΚβ and (4) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins and c-Jun. PFE consumption also inhibited UVB-induced protein expression of (1) COX-2 and iNOS, (2) PCNA and cyclin D1 and (3) matrix metalloproteinases-2,-3 and -9 in mouse skin. Taken together, these data show that PFE consumption afforded protection to mouse skin against the adverse effects of UVB radiation by modulating UVB-induced signaling pathways.

  15. The GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, and the positive allosteric modulator, CGP7930, inhibit visceral pain-related responses to colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Brusberg, Mikael; Ravnefjord, Anna; Martinsson, Rakel; Larsson, Håkan; Martinez, Vicente; Lindström, Erik

    2009-02-01

    Activation of GABA(B) receptors by the selective agonist baclofen produces anti-nociceptive effects in animal models of somatic pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of baclofen and the GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulator CGP7930 on pseudo-affective responses to colorectal distension in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repeated, noxious colorectal distension (CRD) (12 distensions at 80 mmHg, for 30 s with 5 min intervals). The visceromotor response (VMR) and cardiovascular responses (mean arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR)) to CRD were monitored in conscious, telemetrized animals. Baclofen (0.3-3 micromol/kg, i.v.) reduced the VMR to CRD dose-dependently, reaching a 61% maximal inhibition (p < 0.001). The highest doses of baclofen attenuated CRD-evoked increases in ABP by 17% (p > 0.05) and reduced the change in HR by 48% (p < 0.01). CGP7930 (3-30 micromol/kg, i.v.) reduced the VMR to CRD in a dose-dependent fashion with a maximal inhibition of 31% (p < 0.05). The highest dose of CGP7930 also attenuated the increase in ABP by 18% (p > 0.05) and inhibited the increase in HR by 24% (p < 0.05) associated with CRD. Neither baclofen nor CGP7930 affected colorectal compliance. The results suggest that activation of GABA(B) receptors produces anti-nociceptive effects in a rat model of mechanically induced visceral pain. While CGP7930 was less efficacious than baclofen overall, positive allosteric modulation of GABA(B) receptors may represent a valid approach in the treatment of visceral pain conditions, with the possibility of an improved safety profile compared to full agonism.

  16. Cool-1-mediated inhibition of c-Cbl modulates multiple critical properties of glioblastomas, including the ability to generate tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brett M; Folts, Christopher J; Cui, Wanchang; Bardin, Addie L; Walter, Kevin; Carson-Walter, Eleanor; Vescovi, Angelo; Noble, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We discovered that glioblastoma (GBM) cells use Cool-1/β-pix to inhibit normal activation of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase via the redox/Fyn/c-Cbl pathway and that c-Cbl inhibition is critical for GBM cell function. Restoring normal c-Cbl activity by Cool-1 knockdown in vitro reduced GBM cell division, almost eliminated generation of adhesion-independent spheroids, reduced the representation of cells expressing antigens thought to identify tumor initiating cells (TICs), reduced levels of several proteins of critical importance in TIC function (such as Notch-1 and Sox2), and increased sensitivity to BCNU (carmustine) and temozolomide (TMZ). In vivo, Cool-1 knockdown greatly suppressed the ability of GBM cells to generate tumors, an outcome that was c-Cbl dependent. In contrast, Cool-1 knockdown did not reduce division or increase BCNU or TMZ sensitivity in primary glial progenitor cells and Cool-1/c-Cbl complexes were not found in normal brain tissue. Our studies provide the first evidence that Cool-1 may be critical in the biology of human tumors, that suppression of c-Cbl by Cool-1 may be critical for generation of at least a subset of GBMs and offer a novel target that appears to be selectively necessary for TIC function and modulates chemoresistance in GBM cells. Targeting such proteins that inhibit c-Cbl offers potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Effects of a novel estrogen-free, progesterone receptor modulator contraceptive vaginal ring on inhibition of ovulation, bleeding patterns and endometrium in normal women.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Williams, Alistair; Blithe, Diana; Croxatto, Horacio; Kumar, Narender; Kumar, Sushma; Tsong, Yun-Yen; Sivin, Irving; Nath, Anita; Sussman, Heather; Cochon, Leila; Miranda, Maria Jose; Reyes, Verónica; Faundes, Anibal; Mishell, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Progesterone receptor modulators (PRMs) delivered by contraceptive vaginal rings provide an opportunity for development of an estrogen-free contraceptive that does not require daily oral intake of steroids. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to determine whether continuous delivery of 600-800 mcg of ulipristal acetate (UPA) from a contraceptive vaginal ring could achieve 80% to 90% inhibition of ovulation. This was a prospective, controlled, open-labeled, multicenter international trial to examine the effectiveness and safety of this prototype vaginal ring. Thirty-nine healthy women, 21-40 years old and not at risk of pregnancy, were enrolled at three clinic sites. Volunteers participated in a control cycle, a 12-week treatment period and a post-treatment cycle. Pharmacodynamic effects on follicular function and inhibition of ovulation, effects on endometrium, bleeding patterns and serum UPA levels were evaluated. Mean UPA levels during treatment were nearly constant, approximately 5.1 ng/mL throughout the study. Ovulation was documented in 32% of 111 "4-week treatment cycles." A correlation was observed between serum UPA and degree of inhibition of ovarian activity. There was no evidence of hyperplasia of endometrium, but PRM-associated endometrial changes were frequently observed (41%). In this study, the minimum effective contraceptive dose was not established. Further studies are required testing higher doses of UPA to attain ovulation suppression in a higher percentage of subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. N-Acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline inhibits DNA synthesis in human mesangial cells via up-regulation of cell cycle modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Haneda, Masakazu; Sugimoto, Toshiro . E-mail: toshiro@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Shibuya, Kazuyuki; Isono, Motohide; Isshiki, Keiji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Uzu, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Koya, Daisuke

    2006-04-14

    N-Acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) was originally reported as a natural inhibitor of the proliferation of stem cells. To elucidate whether Ac-SDKP inhibits the proliferation of human mesangial cells, we examined the effect of Ac-SDKP on fetal calf serum (FCS)- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced DNA synthesis and a cell proliferation. Ac-SDKP inhibited PDGF-BB- or FCS-induced DNA synthesis without cellular toxicity. The protein expression of p53 and p27{sup kip1} was significantly increased by Ac-SDKP. Ac-SDKP also up-regulated the PDGF-BB-stimulated expression of p21{sup cip1} and suppressed PDGF-BB-induced cyclin D{sub 1} expression. In p53 knock-out human mesangial cells made with small interference RNA, the protein expression of p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} was also decreased and the inhibitory effect of Ac-SDKP on mesangial proliferation was completely abolished. Ac-SDKP increased the stability of p53 protein as demonstrated by pulse-chase experiment. These results suggest that p53 is the key mediator of Ac-SDKP-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis through the up-regulation of cell cycle modulators, highlighting a potential effect of Ac-SDKP on various progressive renal diseases.

  19. Wolfberry Water Soluble Phytochemicals Down-Regulate ER Stress Biomarkers and Modulate Multiple Signaling Pathways Leading To Inhibition of Proliferation and Induction of Apoptosis in Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Yunong; Wark, Logan; Ortiz, Edlin; Lim, Soyoung; He, Hui; Wang, Weiqun; Medeiros, Denis; Lin, Dingbo

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemicals have received much recent attention in cancer prevention through simultaneous targeting multiple pathways in the disease progression. Here we determined that wolfberry phytochemicals was chemopreventive on the leukemic Jurkat cell. The water soluble wolfberry fractions (i.e., wolfberry phytochemicals) were enriched in carbohydrates (73.4 ± 4.5 % (w/w)), polyphenolics (1555 ± 112 mg quercetin equivalent/100 g freeze dry powder, including 213 mg rutin/100 g freeze dry powder), and had enhanced antioxidant activity (7771 ± 207 μM Trolox equivalent/100 g freeze dry powder). Wolfberry phytochemicals, but not purified wolfberry polysaccharide fractions, inhibited Jurkat cell proliferation, induced cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in a dose dependent manner starting at 1 mg/ml for 48 h. Wolfberry phytochemicals eliminated cellular reactive oxygen species, declined expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarkers, including glucose regulated protein 78, inositol-requiring protein 1(IRE1), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), and c/EBP-homologous protein, and induced activation of AMP activated protein kinase, stabilization of β-catenin, and inhibition of NFκB, and AKT activity. Simultaneous siRNA knockdown of ATF6, IRE1 and PERK caused inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Data suggested that ER stress and multiple survival/apoptosis signaling pathways were modulated by wolfberry phytochemicals during the apoptotic progression. Consumption of wolfberry could be an efficacious dietary strategy for preventing leukemia. PMID:22685690

  20. Modulation of Microglial Activity by Rho-Kinase (ROCK) Inhibition as Therapeutic Strategy in Parkinson’s Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roser, Anna-Elisa; Tönges, Lars; Lingor, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive degeneration of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS, PNS), resulting in a reduced innervation of target structures and a loss of function. A shared characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases is the infiltration of microglial cells into affected brain regions. During early disease stages microglial cells often display a rather neuroprotective phenotype, but switch to a more pro-inflammatory neurotoxic phenotype in later stages of the disease, contributing to the neurodegeneration. Activation of the Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway appears to be instrumental for the modulation of the microglial phenotype: increased ROCK activity in microglia mediates mechanisms of the inflammatory response and is associated with improved motility, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of inflammatory cytokines. Recently, several studies suggested inhibition of ROCK signaling as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review article, we discuss the contribution of microglial activity and phenotype switch to the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two devastating neurodegenerative diseases without disease-modifying treatment options. Furthermore, we describe how ROCK inhibition can influence the microglial phenotype in disease models and explore ROCK inhibition as a future treatment option for PD and ALS. PMID:28420986

  1. Stem bark and flower extracts of Vismia cauliflora: modulation of oxidative burst in human neutrophils' and inhibition of oxidative damage in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Berto, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Chisté, Renan Campos; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-10-01

    Vismia cauliflora is an Amazonian plant traditionally used to treat dermatosis and inflammatory processes of the skin by indigenous population. Our research group showed that stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora are efficient in vitro scavengers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this study, we determined the activity of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora plant on the modulation of in vitro oxidative burst in human neutrophils and their potential to inhibit the oxidative damage in human erythrocytes. The oxidative burst in activated neutrophils were monitored by specific probes to detect the oxidizing effect of superoxide anion radical (MCLA), hydrogen peroxide (amplex red) and hypochlorous acid (APF), and both extracts were efficient to neutralize the oxidative burst (IC50 from 3 to 15µg/mL). These same extracts were also effective against oxidative damage in erythrocytes by inhibiting hemoglobin oxidation (IC50=18µg/mL) and lipid peroxidation (IC50=2.7 and 7.5µg/mL, flower and stem bark, respectively). In addition, stem bark extract (100µg/mL) inhibited the depletion of glutathione by 13%. These extracts have similar phenolic composition, but flower presents quercetin (14%) in its composition. Therefore, these results reinforce the potential therapeutic of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora to heal topical skin disease and requires further research targeted effectively to develop phytopharmaceutical drug based on this plant. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effects of a novel estrogen-free, progesterone receptor modulator contraceptive vaginal ring on inhibition of ovulation, bleeding patterns and endometrium in normal women

    PubMed Central

    Brache, Vivian; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Williams, Alistair; Blithe, Diana; Croxatto, Horacio; Kumar, Narender; Kumar, Sushma; Tsong, Yun-Yen; Sivin, Irving; Nath, Anita; Sussman, Heather; Cochon, Leila; Miranda, Maria Jose; Reyes, Verónica; Faundes, Anibal; Mishell, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Progesterone receptor modulators (PRMs) delivered by contraceptive vaginal rings provide an opportunity for development of an estrogen-free contraceptive that does not require daily oral intake of steroids. The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to determine whether continuous delivery of 600–800 mcg of ulipristal acetate (UPA) from a contraceptive vaginal ring could achieve 80% to 90% inhibition of ovulation. Study Design This was a prospective, controlled, open-labeled, multicenter international trial to examine the effectiveness and safety of this prototype vaginal ring. Thirty-nine healthy women, 21–40 years old and not at risk of pregnancy, were enrolled at three clinic sites. Volunteers participated in a control cycle, a 12-week treatment period and a post-treatment cycle. Pharmacodynamic effects on follicular function and inhibition of ovulation, effects on endometrium, bleeding patterns and serum UPA levels were evaluated. Results Mean UPA levels during treatment were nearly constant, approximately 5.1 ng/mL throughout the study. Ovulation was documented in 32% of 111 “4-week treatment cycles.” A correlation was observed between serum UPA and degree of inhibition of ovarian activity. There was no evidence of hyperplasia of endometrium, but PRM-associated endometrial changes were frequently observed (41%). Conclusion In this study, the minimum effective contraceptive dose was not established. Further studies are required testing higher doses of UPA to attain ovulation suppression in a higher percentage of subjects. PMID:22176795

  3. Modulation by stereoselective inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase of electromechanical coupling in the guinea-pig isolated renal pelvis.

    PubMed Central

    Santicioli, P; Carganico, G; Meini, S; Giuliani, S; Giachetti, A; Maggi, C A

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of the (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitor, ketoprofen, have been investigated on the spontaneous activity of the guinea-pig isolated renal pelvis and on electrical field stimulation-(EFS) induced contractions of the guinea-pig ureter in comparison with the effects of the achiral COX inhibitor, indomethacin. 2. (S)-ketoprofen (0.1-100 microM) produced a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous myogenic activity of the renal pelvis. The maximal inhibitory effect (% inhibition of motility index) averaged 29, 42, 47 and 56% inhibition of control values at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 microM. The (R)-enantiomer was ineffective up to 10 microM. 3. Indomethacin (0.1-100 microM) likewise produced a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of spontaneous motility of the isolated renal pelvis: its maximal inhibitory effect was larger than that produced by (S)-ketoprofen and averaged 21, 40, 69 and 95% inhibition of motility index at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 microM respectively. In the presence of a maximally effective (100 microM) concentration of (S)-ketoprofen, 100 microM indomethacin produced > 90% inhibition of residual motility. 4. In the guinea-pig isolated ureter, phasic contractions were induced by EFS (5 ms pulse width, 60 V): (S)-ketoprofen (100-500 microM) had no effect on the EFS-evoked contractions. Indomethacin (100-500 microM) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition and/or suppression of the EFS-evoked contractions. When contraction of the ureter was evoked by 80 mM KCl, indomethacin produced about 30 and 80% inhibition at 100 and 300 microM, respectively, while (S)-ketoprofen (300 microM) was ineffective. 5. The effect of (S)-ketoprofen or indomethacin (10 microM each) on the propagation of myogenic impulses along the ureter was determined by use of a three chamber organ bath. The renal end of the ureter was electrically stimulated while recording the mechanical activity of the renal and bladder

  4. Melanoma cells inhibit natural killer cell function by modulating the expression of activating receptors and cytolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Gabriella; Manzini, Claudia; Rivara, Silvia; Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Petretto, Andrea; Balsamo, Mirna; Conte, Romana; Benelli, Roberto; Minghelli, Simona; Solari, Nicola; Gualco, Marina; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2012-03-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in tumor immune surveillance. However, adoptive immunotherapy protocols using NK cells have shown limited clinical efficacy to date, possibly due to tumor escape mechanisms that inhibit NK cell function. In this study, we analyzed the effect of coculturing melanoma cells and NK cells on their phenotype and function. We found that melanoma cells inhibited the expression of major NK receptors that trigger their immune function, including NKp30, NKp44, and NKG2D, with consequent impairment of NK cell-mediated cytolytic activity against various melanoma cell lines. This inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Together, our findings suggest that immunosuppressive barriers erected by tumors greatly hamper the antitumor activity of human NK cells, thereby favoring tumor outgrowth and progression.

  5. The natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation inhibits melanin synthesis by modulating tyrosinase activity and downregulating melanosome transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Jin; Rhee, Do Young; Bang, Seung Hyun; Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Chong Hyun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Chang, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of EP-2, a natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on melanogenesis and to determine its underlying mechanism of action. Our results show that although EP-2 is not a direct tyrosinase inhibitor, when EP-2 was added to the culture media of B16F10 melanoma cells, intracellular tyrosinase activity was decreased. However, EP-2 had no effect on the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor or tyrosinase. EP-2 was found to inhibit melanogenesis and melanosome transfer when it was added to melanocytes and keratinocytes in coculture. In addition, protease-activated receptor 2, a key protein associated with melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes, was downregulated in the presence of EP-2. In conclusion, EP-2 is a potent inhibitor of melanogenesis and its hypomelanogenic effect is related to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity and transfer of melanosomes.

  6. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  7. Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and its attentional modulation in the human S-ketamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) models of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Heekeren, K; Neukirch, A; Daumann, J; Stoll, M; Obradovic, M; Kovar, K-A; Geyer, M A; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E

    2007-05-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit diminished prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex and deficits in the attentional modulation of PPI. Pharmacological challenges with hallucinogens are used as models for psychosis in both humans and animals. Remarkably, in contrast to the findings in schizophrenic patients and in animal hallucinogen models of psychosis, previous studies with healthy volunteers demonstrated increased levels of PPI after administration of low to moderate doses of either the antiglutamatergic hallucinogen ketamine or the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of moderate and high doses of the serotonergic hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist S-ketamine on PPI and its attentional modulation in humans. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included in a double-blind cross-over study with two doses of DMT and S-ketamine. Effects on PPI and its attentional modulation were investigated. Nine subjects completed both experimental days with the two doses of both drugs. S-ketamine increased PPI in both dosages, whereas DMT had no significant effects on PPI. S-ketamine decreased and DMT tended to decrease startle magnitude. There were no significant effects of either drug on the attentional modulation of PPI. In human experimental hallucinogen psychoses, and even with high, clearly psychotogenic doses of DMT or S-ketamine, healthy subjects failed to exhibit the predicted attenuation of PPI. In contrast, PPI was augmented and the startle magnitude was decreased after S-ketamine. These data point to important differences between human hallucinogen models and both animal hallucinogen models of psychosis and naturally occurring schizophrenia.

  8. LY2033298, a positive allosteric modulator at muscarinic M₄ receptors, enhances inhibition by oxotremorine of light-induced phase shifts in hamster circadian activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Robert L; Millan, Mark J

    2012-11-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms to the light-dark cycle is essential for restorative sleep, and abnormal sleep timing is implicated in central nervous system (CNS) disorders like depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Many transmitters, including acetylcholine, that exerts its actions via muscarinic receptors modulate the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master pacemaker. Since positive allosteric modulators of muscarinic M(4) receptors are candidates for treatment of mood and cognitive deficits of CNS disorders, it is important to evaluate their circadian actions. The effects of intraperitoneally applied muscarinic agents on circadian wheel-running rhythms were measured employing hamsters, a model organism for studying activity rhythms. Systemic administration of the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine (0.01-0.04 mg/kg) inhibited light-induced phase delays and advances of hamster circadian wheel-running rhythms. The M₄ positive allosteric modulator, LY2033298 (10-40 mg/kg), had no effect on light-induced phase shifts when administered alone, yet significantly enhanced (at 20 mg/kg) the inhibitory influence of oxotremorine on light-induced phase delays. In addition, the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, which was without effect on light-induced phase shifts when administered alone (0.001-0.1 mg/kg), antagonized (at 0.1 mg/kg) the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine and LY2033298 on light-induced phase delays. These results are the first to demonstrate that systemically applied muscarinic receptor agonists modulate circadian activity rhythms, and they also reveal a specific role for M₄ receptors. It will be of importance to evaluate circadian actions of psychotropic drugs acting via M₄ receptors, since they may display beneficial properties under pathological conditions.

  9. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits fungal growth and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis by modulating the oxidative stress response of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Shang, Bo; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CIN) is a promising natural preservative and generally recognized as safe for commodities as well as consumers. In this work, the antifungal effects of CIN on Aspergillus flavus were evaluated both in solid and in liquid culture conditions. Our results indicated that CIN effectively inhibited radial growth, spore production, mycelium formation, and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis by A. flavus in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentration of 104 mg L(-1), CIN exposure was able to completely inhibit fungal growth as well as aflatoxin B1 production. Furthermore, the inhibitory activities of CIN were closely connected with the treatment period and the tested fungal species. Compared with the control strains, CIN dose dependently changed the morphology and ultrastructure of mycelium in different degree. Especially, the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was considered to follow the destruction of mitochondrial. Meanwhile, CIN significantly cut the levels of lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione. The activity of total superoxide dismutase was significantly inhibited after CIN treatment at the end of incubation, whereas the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase were opposite. These results indicated that the inhibitory effect of CIN could attribute to oxidative stress alleviation possibly induced by modifications of cellular structure as well as redox status.

  10. A standardized bamboo leaf extract inhibits monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by modulating vascular cell adhesion protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunga; Park, Myoung Soo; Lee, Yu Ran; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Tae Woo; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Dong Seon

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo leaves (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel ex J. Houz (Poacea)) have a long history of food and medical applications in Asia, including Japan and Korea. They have been used as a traditional medicine for centuries. We investigated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of a bamboo leaf extract (BLE) on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced monocyte adhesion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to BLE did not inhibit cell viability or cause morphological changes at concentrations ranging from 1 µg/ml to 1 mg/ml. Treatment with 0.1 mg/ml BLE caused 63% inhibition of monocyte adhesion in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, which was associated with 38.4% suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species generation was decreased to 47.9% in BLE treated TNF-α-activated HUVECs. BLE (0.05 mg/ml) also caused about 50% inhibition of interleukin-6 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte. The results indicate that BLE may be clinically useful as an anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant for human cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. PMID:23422838

  11. Modulating chromatin structure and DNA accessibility by deacetylase inhibition enhances the anti-cancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Nóra; Kovács, Dávid; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered as novel therapeutic agents inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Inhibition of deacetylase activity results in a relaxed chromatin structure thereby rendering the genetic material more vulnerable to DNA targeting agents that could be exploited by combinational cancer therapy. The unique potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in tumor therapy relies on the generation of reactive radicals which trigger oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. The revolutionary application of AgNPs as chemotherapeutical drugs seems very promising, nevertheless the exact molecular mechanisms of AgNP action in combination with other anti-cancer agents have yet to be elucidated in details before clinical administrations. As a step towards this we investigated the combinational effect of HDAC inhibition and AgNP administration in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We identified synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth and migration upon combinational treatments. Here we report that the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A enhances the DNA targeting capacity and apoptosis inducing efficacy of AgNPs most probably due to its effect on chromatin condensation. These results point to the potential benefits of combinational application of HDAC inhibitors and AgNPs in novel cancer medication protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of Spinal GABAergic Inhibition and Mechanical Hypersensitivity following Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Chul; Nam, Taick Sang; Jung, Se Jung; Gwak, Young S.; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD) results in neuropathic pain. We investigated the role of spinal GABA in CCD-induced pain using rats with unilateral CCD. A stereological analysis revealed that the proportion of GABA-immunoreactive neurons to total neurons at L4/5 laminae I–III on the injured side decreased in the early phase of CCD (post-CCD week 1) and then returned to the sham-control level in the late phase (post-CCD week 18). In the early phase, the rats showed an increase in both mechanical sensitivity of the hind paw and spinal WDR neuronal excitability on the injured side, and such increase was suppressed by spinally applied muscimol (GABA-A agonist, 5 nmol) and baclofen (GABA-B agonist, 25 nmol), indicating the reduced spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In the late phase, the CCD-induced increase in mechanical sensitivity and neuronal excitability returned to pre-CCD levels, and such recovered responses were enhanced by spinally applied bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist, 15 nmol) and CGP52432 (GABA-B antagonist, 15 nmol), indicating the regained spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In conclusion, the alteration of spinal GABAergic inhibition following CCD and leading to a gradual reduction over time of CCD-induced mechanical hypersensitivity is most likely due to changes in GABA content in spinal GABA neurons. PMID:26451259

  13. Glatiramer Acetate (Copaxone) Modulates Platelet Activation and Inhibits Thrombin-Induced Calcium Influx: Possible Role of Copaxone in Targeting Platelets during Autoimmune Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Starossom, Sarah C.; Veremeyko, Tatyana; Dukhinova, Marina; Yung, Amanda W. Y.; Ponomarev, Eugene D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone, Copolymer-1) is an FDA approved drug for the treatment of MS and it is very effective in suppressing neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Although this drug was designed to inhibit pathogenic T cells, the exact mechanism of EAE/MS suppression by GA is still not well understood. Previously we presented evidence that platelets become activated and promote neuroinflammation in EAE, suggesting a possible pathogenic role of platelets in MS and EAE. We hypothesized that GA could inhibit neuroinflammation by affecting not only immune cells but also platelets. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effect of GA on the activation of human platelets in vitro: calcium influx, platelet aggregation and expression of activation markers. Our results in human platelets were confirmed by in-vitro and in-vivo studies of modulation of functions of platelets in mouse model. We found that GA inhibited thrombin-induced calcium influx in human and mouse platelets. GA also decreased thrombin-induced CD31, CD62P, CD63, and active form of αIIbβ3 integrin surface expression and formation of platelet aggregates for both mouse and human platelets, and prolonged the bleeding time in mice by 2.7-fold. In addition, we found that GA decreased the extent of macrophage activation induced by co-culture of macrophages with platelets. Conclusions GA inhibited the activation of platelets, which suggests a new mechanism of GA action in suppression of EAE/MS by targeting platelets and possibly preventing their interaction with immune cells such as macrophages. Furthermore, the reduction in platelet activation by GA may have additional cardiovascular benefits to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24788965

  14. Glatiramer acetate (copaxone) modulates platelet activation and inhibits thrombin-induced calcium influx: possible role of copaxone in targeting platelets during autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Starossom, Sarah C; Veremeyko, Tatyana; Dukhinova, Marina; Yung, Amanda W Y; Ponomarev, Eugene D

    2014-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone, Copolymer-1) is an FDA approved drug for the treatment of MS and it is very effective in suppressing neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Although this drug was designed to inhibit pathogenic T cells, the exact mechanism of EAE/MS suppression by GA is still not well understood. Previously we presented evidence that platelets become activated and promote neuroinflammation in EAE, suggesting a possible pathogenic role of platelets in MS and EAE. We hypothesized that GA could inhibit neuroinflammation by affecting not only immune cells but also platelets. We investigated the effect of GA on the activation of human platelets in vitro: calcium influx, platelet aggregation and expression of activation markers. Our results in human platelets were confirmed by in-vitro and in-vivo studies of modulation of functions of platelets in mouse model. We found that GA inhibited thrombin-induced calcium influx in human and mouse platelets. GA also decreased thrombin-induced CD31, CD62P, CD63, and active form of αIIbβ3 integrin surface expression and formation of platelet aggregates for both mouse and human platelets, and prolonged the bleeding time in mice by 2.7-fold. In addition, we found that GA decreased the extent of macrophage activation induced by co-culture of macrophages with platelets. GA inhibited the activation of platelets, which suggests a new mechanism of GA action in suppression of EAE/MS by targeting platelets and possibly preventing their interaction with immune cells such as macrophages. Furthermore, the reduction in platelet activation by GA may have additional cardiovascular benefits to prevent thrombosis.

  15. G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors inhibit Ca2+ channels and modulate transmitter release in descending turtle spinal cord terminal synapsing motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Aguilar, Justo; Elias, David; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2007-08-10

    Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) regulate transmitter release at many central synapses by inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. However, the mechanisms by which GABA(B)Rs modulate neurotransmission at descending terminals synapsing on motoneurons in the spinal cord remain unexplored. To address this issue, we characterized the effects of baclofen, an agonist of GABA(B)Rs, on the monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked in motoneurons by stimulation of the dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) terminals in a slice preparation from the turtle spinal cord. We found that baclofen depressed neurotransmission in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50) of approximately 2 microM). The membrane time constant of the motoneurons did not change, whereas the amplitude ratio of the evoked EPSPs in response to a paired pulse was altered in the presence of the drug, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Likewise, the use of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists (omega-conotoxin GVIA and omega-agatoxin IVA, respectively) also depressed EPSPs significantly. Therefore, these channels are likely involved in the Ca(2+) influx that triggers transmitter release from DLF terminals. To determine whether the N and P/Q channels were regulated by GABA(B)R activation, we analyzed the action of the toxins in the presence of baclofen. Interestingly, baclofen occluded omega-conotoxin GVIA action by approximately 50% without affecting omega-agatoxin IVA inhibition, indicating that the N-type channels are the target of GABA(B)Rs. Lastly, the mechanism underlying this effect was further assessed by inhibiting G-proteins with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Our data show that EPSP depression caused by baclofen was prevented by NEM, suggesting that GABA(B)Rs inhibit N-type channels via G-protein activation.

  16. Blocking the class I histone deacetylase ameliorates renal fibrosis and inhibits renal fibroblast activation via modulating TGF-beta and EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; He, Song; Ma, Li; Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Tang, Jinhua; Tolbert, Evelyn; Bayliss, George; Zhao, Ting C; Yan, Haidong; Zhuang, Shougang

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising anti-fibrosis drugs; however, nonselective inhibition of class I and class II HDACs does not allow a detailed elucidation of the individual HDAC functions in renal fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of MS-275, a selective class I HDAC inhibitor, on the development of renal fibrosis in a murine model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) and activation of cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts. The UUO model was established by ligation of the left ureter and the contralateral kidney was used as a control. At seven days after UUO injury, kidney developed fibrosis as indicated by deposition of collagen fibrils and increased expression of collagen I, fibronectin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Administration of MS-275 inhibited all these fibrotic responses and suppressed UUO-induced production of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta), increased expression of TGF-beta receptor I, and phosphorylation of Smad-3. MS-275 was also effective in suppressing phosphorylation and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling molecule, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. Moreover, class I HDAC inhibition reduced the number of renal tubular cells arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, a cellular event associated with TGF-beta1overproduction. In cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts, MS-275 treatment inhibited TGF-beta induced phosphorylation of Smad-3, differentiation of renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts and proliferation of myofibroblasts. These results demonstrate that class I HDACs are critically involved in renal fibrogenesis and renal fibroblast activation through modulating TGF-beta and EGFR signaling and suggest that blockade of class I HDAC may be a useful treatment for renal fibrosis.

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 inhibits TGF-beta2 stimulation of extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells: role of gremlin in ECM modulation.

    PubMed

    Zode, Gulab S; Clark, Abbot F; Wordinger, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The characteristic cupping of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma is associated with elevated TGF-beta2 and increased synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In addition to TGF-beta2, the human ONH also expresses bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and BMP receptors, which are members of the TGF-beta superfamily. We examined the potential effects of BMP4 and the BMP antagonist gremlin on TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. BMP-4 dose dependently inhibited TGF-beta2-induced fibronectin (FN) and PAI-1 expression in ONH astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells and also reduced TGF-beta2 stimulation of collagen I, collagen VI, and elastin. Addition of gremlin blocked this BMP-4 response, increasing cellular and secreted FN as well as PAI-1 levels in both cell types. Gremlin was expressed in ONH tissues and ONH cells, and gremlin protein levels were significantly increased in the LC region of human glaucomatous ONH tissues. Interestingly, recombinant gremlin dose dependently increased ECM protein expression in cultured ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Gremlin stimulation of ECM required activation of TGF-beta receptor and R-Smad3. TGF-beta2 increased gremlin mRNA expression and protein levels in ONH cells. Inhibition of either the type I TGF-beta receptor or Smad3 phosphorylation blocked TGF-beta2-induced gremlin expression. In conclusion, BMP4 blocked the TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. The BMP antagonist gremlin reversed this inhibition, allowing TGF-beta2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Increased expression of gremlin in the glaucomatous ONH may further exacerbate TGF-beta2 effects on ONH ECM metabolism by inhibiting BMP-4 antagonism of TGF-beta2 signaling. Modulation of the ECM via gremlin provides a novel therapeutic target for glaucoma.

  18. Modulation of the assay system for the sensory integration of 2 sensory stimuli that inhibit each other in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Xia; Wang, Yang; Hu, Ya-Ou; Zhong, Ji-Xiang; Wang, Da-Yong

    2011-04-01

    To perform the modulation of an assay system for the sensory integration of 2 sensory stimuli that inhibit each other. The assay system for assessing the integrative response to 2 reciprocally-inhibitory sensory stimuli was modulated by changing the metal ion barrier. Moreover, the hen-1, ttx-3 and casy-1 mutants having known defects in integrative response were used to evaluate the modulated assay systems. Based on the examined assay systems, new genes possibly involved in the sensory integration control were identified. In the presence of different metal ion barriers and diacetyl, locomotion behaviors, basic movements, pan-neuronal, cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal GFP expressions, neuronal development, structures of sensory neurons and interneurons, and stress response of nematodes in different regions of examined assay systems were normal, and chemotaxis toward different concentrations of diacetyl and avoidance of different concentrations of metal ions were inhibited. In the first group, most of the nematodes moved to diacetyl by crossing the barrier of Fe(2+), Zn(2+), or Mn(2+). In the second group, almost half of the nematodes moved to diacetyl by crossing the barrier of Ag(+), Cu(2+), Cr(2+), or Cd(2+). In the third group, only a small number of nematodes moved to diacetyl by crossing the barrier of Pb(2+) or Hg(2+). Moreover, when nematodes encountered different metal ion barriers during migration toward diacetyl, the percentage of nematodes moving back and then turning and that of nematodes moving straight to diacetyl were very different. With the aid of examined assay systems, it was found that mutations of fsn-1 that encodes a F-box protein, and its target scd-2 that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, caused severe defects in integrative response, and the sensory integration defects of fsn-1 mutants were obviously inhibited by scd-2 mutation. Based on the nematode behaviors in examined assay systems, 3 groups of assay systems were obtained. The first

  19. Mitochondria-targeted esculetin inhibits PAI-1 levels by modulating STAT3 activation and miR-19b via SIRT3: Role in acute coronary artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katta, Sujana; Karnewar, Santosh; Panuganti, Devayani; Jerald, Mahesh Kumar; Sastry, B K S; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar

    2018-01-01

    In this study we explored the microRNAs responsible for the regulation of PAI-1 during LPS-stimulated inflammation in human aortic endothelial cells and subsequently studied the effect of a newly synthesized mitochondria-targeted esculetin (Mito-Esc) that was shown for its anti-atherosclerotic potential, in modulating PAI-1 levels and its targeted miRs during angiotensin-II-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. LPS-stimulated PAI-1 was accompanied with an upregulation of miR-19b and down-regulation of miR-30c. These effects of LPS on PAI-1 were reversed in the presence of both parent esculetin and Mito-Esc. However, the effect of Mito-Esc was more pronounced in the regulation of PAI-1. In addition, LPS-stimulated PAI-1 expression was significantly decreased in cells treated with Anti-miR-19b, thereby suggesting that miR-19b co-expression plays a key role in PAI-1 regulation. The results also show that incubation of cells with Stattic, an inhibitor of STAT-3, inhibited LPS-stimulated PAI-1 expression. Interestingly, knockdown of SIRT3, a mitochondrial biogenetic marker, enhanced PAI-1 levels via modulation of miR-19b and -30c. Mito-Esc treatment significantly inhibited Ang-II-induced PAI-1, possibly via altering miR-19b and 30c in ApoE(-/-) mice. The association between PAI-1, miR-19b and -30c were further confirmed in plasma and microparticles isolated from patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome of various degrees. Taken together, LPS-induced PAI-1 involves co-expression of miR-19b and down regulation of miR-30c, and Mito-Esc treatment by modulating miR-19b and miR-30c through SIRT3 activation, inhibits PAI-1 levels that, in part, contribute to its anti-atherosclerotic effects. Moreover, there exists a strong positive correlation between miR-19b and PAI-1 in patients suffering from ST-elevated myocardial infarction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages.

  1. Exogenous H2S modulates mitochondrial fusion-fission to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in a hyperglycemic state.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aili; Wang, Yan; Liu, Jiaqi; Yu, Xiangjing; Sun, Yu; Yang, Fan; Dong, Shiyun; Wu, Jichao; Zhao, Yajun; Xu, Changqing; Lu, Fanghao; Zhang, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation in response to hyperglycemia is an important process in the development of arterial vessel hyperplasia. The shape change of mitochondria is dynamic and closely related to fission and fusion. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was confirmed to have anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, little it is known about its effects on mitochondrial morphology induced by hyperglycemia. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that H2S inhibits VSMC proliferation through regulating mitochondrial fission. We observe lower H2S levels as well as higher proliferative protein expression levels for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 and higher mitochondrial fusion-fission protein expression levels for dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1) in human kidney arteries and in db/db mouse aorta. Exogenous H2S (100 μM NaHS) inhibits vascular smooth muscle cells of human pulmonary aorta(HPASMC) proliferation and migration in response to high glucose using the BrdU and scratch wound repair assays, decreases proliferative protein (PCNA and cyclin D1) expression, and reduces ROS production in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. When HPASMCs proliferate with a high glucose treatment, the mitochondria become small spheres with a short rod-shaped structure, whereas NaHS, a mitochondrial division inhibitor and siDrp prevent VSMC proliferation and maintain mitochondria as stationary and randomly dispersed with fixed structures. Exogenous H2S aids in inhibiting mitochondrial fragmentation and affects proliferation in db/db mice and HPASMCs by decreasing Drp 1 expression.

  2. Inhibition of Hsp70 by Methylene Blue Affects Signaling Protein Function and Ubiquitination and Modulates Polyglutamine Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Adrienne M.; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M.; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client. PMID:20348093

  3. Inhibition of UVA-mediated melanogenesis by ascorbic acid through modulation of antioxidant defense and nitric oxide system.

    PubMed

    Panich, Uraiwan; Tangsupa-a-nan, Vanida; Onkoksoong, Tasanee; Kongtaphan, Kamolratana; Kasetsinsombat, Kanda; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak

    2011-05-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been well known as a skin whitening agent, although attempts have been made to evaluate its protective role against ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin hyperpigmentation or increased melanin production. While melanogenesis is a defense mechanism of the skin against UV irradiation, melanin overproduction may also contribute to melanoma initiation. UVA might play a role in melanogenesis through promoting oxidative stress, which occurs as the result of increased formation of oxidants and/or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) including nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, we investigated the antimelanogenic effect of AA (7.5-120 μM) in association with its inhibitory effect on UVA-induced oxidant formation, NO production through endothelial and inducible NO synthases (eNOS and iNOS) activation and impairment of antioxidant defense using G361 human melanoma cells. Our study demonstrated a comparable ability of AA with that of kojic acid, a well-known tyrosinase inhibitor in inhibiting mushroom tyrosinase. Melanin content was reduced by AA, but neither tyrosinase activity nor mRNA levels were reduced by AA at non-cytotoxic concentrations in UVA-irradiated G361 cells. AA was shown to inhibit UVA-mediated catalase (CAT) inactivation, glutathione (GSH) depletion, oxidant formation and NO production through suppression of eNOS and iNOS mRNA. We report herein that AA can protect against UVA-dependent melanogenesis possibly through the improvement of antioxidant defense capacity and inhibition of NO production through down-regulation of eNOS and iNOS mRNA.

  4. Inhibition of hsp70 by methylene blue affects signaling protein function and ubiquitination and modulates polyglutamine protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adrienne M; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Clapp, Kelly M; Peng, Hwei-Ming; Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2010-05-21

    The Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery regulates the activity and degradation of many signaling proteins. Cycling with Hsp90 stabilizes client proteins, whereas Hsp70 interacts with chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases to promote protein degradation. To probe these actions, small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70 would be extremely useful; however, few have been identified. Here we test the effects of methylene blue, a recently described inhibitor of Hsp70 ATPase activity, in three well established systems of increasing complexity. First, we demonstrate that methylene blue inhibits the ability of the purified Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery to enable ligand binding by the glucocorticoid receptor and show that this effect is due to specific inhibition of Hsp70. Next, we establish that ubiquitination of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by the native ubiquitinating system of reticulocyte lysate is dependent upon both Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and is blocked by methylene blue. Finally, we demonstrate that methylene blue impairs degradation of the polyglutamine expanded androgen receptor, an Hsp90 client mutated in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. In contrast, degradation of an amino-terminal fragment of the receptor, which lacks the ligand binding domain and, therefore, is not a client of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery, is enhanced through homeostatic induction of autophagy that occurs when Hsp70-dependent proteasomal degradation is inhibited by methylene blue. Our data demonstrate the utility of methylene blue in defining Hsp70-dependent functions and reveal divergent effects on polyglutamine protein degradation depending on whether the substrate is an Hsp90 client.

  5. Cannabidiol, among Other Cannabinoid Drugs, Modulates Prepulse Inhibition of Startle in the SHR Animal Model: Implications for Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Fernanda F.; Levin, Raquel; Almeida, Valéria; Zuardi, Antonio W.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Crippa, José A.; Abilio, Vanessa C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that involves positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Prepulse inhibition of startle reflex (PPI) is a paradigm that assesses the sensorimotor gating functioning and is impaired in schizophrenia patients as well as in animal models of this disorder. Recent data point to the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Here, we focus on the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the PPI deficit of animal models of schizophrenia, with greater focus on the SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) strain, and on the future prospects resulting from these findings. PMID:27667973

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid may inhibit deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by modulating mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C M; Fan, G; Wong, P Y; Kren, B T; Steer, C J

    1998-03-01

    The hydrophilic bile salt ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) inhibits injury by hydrophobic bile acids and is used to treat cholestatic liver diseases. Interestingly, hepatocyte cell death from bile acid-induced toxicity occurs more frequently from apoptosis than from necrosis. However, both processes appear to involve the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). In this study, we determined the inhibitory effect of UDCA on deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced MPT in isolated mitochondria by measuring changes in transmembrane potential (delta psi m) and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, we examined the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins in mitochondria isolated from livers of bile acid-fed animals. Adult male rats were maintained on standard diet supplemented with DCA and/or UDCA for 10 days. Mitochondria were isolated from livers by sucrose/percoll gradient centrifugation and MPT was measured using spectrophotometric and fluorimetric assays. delta psi m and ROS generation were determined by FACScan analysis. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein abundance were determined by Western blot analysis. DCA increased mitochondrial swelling 25-fold over controls (p < 0.001); UDCA reduced the swelling by > 40% (p < 0.001). Similarly, UDCA inhibited DCA-mediated release of calcein-loaded mitochondria by 50% (p < 0.001). delta psi m was significantly decreased in mitochondria incubated with DCA but not with UDCA. delta psi m disruption was followed closely by increased superoxide anion and peroxides production (p < 0.01). Coincubation of mitochondria with UDCA significantly inhibited the changes associated with DCA (p < 0.05). In vivo, DCA feeding was associated with a 4.5-fold increase in mitochondria-associated Bax protein levels (p < 0.001); combination feeding with UDCA almost totally inhibited this increase (p < 0.001). UDCA significantly reduces DCA-induced disruption of delta psi m, ROS production, and Bax protein abundance in mitochondria

  7. Behavioral-state modulation of inhibition is context-dependent and cell type specific in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pakan, Janelle MP; Lowe, Scott C; Dylda, Evelyn; Keemink, Sander W; Currie, Stephen P; Coutts, Christopher A; Rochefort, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Cortical responses to sensory stimuli are modulated by behavioral state. In the primary visual cortex (V1), visual responses of pyramidal neurons increase during locomotion. This response gain was suggested to be mediated through inhibitory neurons, resulting in the disinhibition of pyramidal neurons. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in layers 2/3 and 4 in mouse V1, we reveal that locomotion increases the activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), somatostatin (SST) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons during visual stimulation, challenging the disinhibition model. In darkness, while most VIP and PV neurons remained locomotion responsive, SST and excitatory neurons were largely non-responsive. Context-dependent locomotion responses were found in each cell type, with the highest proportion among SST neurons. These findings establish that modulation of neuronal activity by locomotion is context-dependent and contest the generality of a disinhibitory circuit for gain control of sensory responses by behavioral state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14985.001 PMID:27552056

  8. Ferulic acid inhibits UVB-radiation induced photocarcinogenesis through modulating inflammatory and apoptotic signaling in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ambothi, Kanagalakshmi; Prasad, N Rajendra; Balupillai, Agilan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the photochemopreventive effects of ferulic acid (FA) against chronic ultraviolet-B (290-320 nm) induced oxidative stress, inflammation and angiogenesis in the skin of Swiss albino mice. Chronic UVB exposure (180 mJ/cm(2) for 30 weeks; thrice in a week) induced tumor formation in the mice skin that showed increased expression of carcinogenic and inflammatory markers when compared with the control animals. The intraperitoneal (FAIP) and topical (FAT) administration of FA significantly reduced the incidence of UVB-induced tumor volume and tumor weight in the mice skin. Histopathological studies revealed that both FAIP and FAT administration prevented the UVB-induced hyperplasia, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and dysplastic feature in the mice skin. Further, it has been observed that FA treatment reverted chronic UVB-induced oxidative damage (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) accompanied with modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-6 in the mice skin tumor. FA treatment also modulates mutated p53, Bcl-2 and Bax expressions in the UVB-induced mice skin tumor. Thus, the results of the present study indicate ferulic acid has potential against UVB-induced carcinogenesis in the Swiss albino mice.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can inhibit deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis via modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunok; Martinez, Jesse D

    2004-02-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, is known as a cytoprotective agent. UDCA prevents apoptosis induced by a variety of stress stimuli including cytotoxic bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA). Here we examined the molecular mechanism by which UDCA can antagonize DCA-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. UDCA pretreatment decreases the number of apoptotic cells caused by exposure to DCA and UDCA. Further studies of the signaling pathway showed that UDCA pretreatment suppressed DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 and this was accompanied by downregulation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Raf-1 kinase activities stimulated by exposure to DCA. DCA was also found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity and UDCA inhibited this. Collectively, these findings suggest that the inhibitory effect of UDCA in DCA-induced apoptosis is partly mediated by modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling.

  10. Inhibition of reductase systems by 2-AAPA modulates peroxiredoxin oxidation and mitochondrial function in A172 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luiz Felipe; Schmitz, Ariana Ern; da Silva, Luana Caroline Schüler; de Oliveira, Karen Andrinéia; Nedel, Cláudia Beatriz; Tasca, Carla Inês; de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Farina, Marcelo; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2017-08-01

    Thiol homeostasis has a critical role in the maintenance of proper cellular functions and survival, being coordinated by the action of several reductive enzymes, including glutathione (GSH)/glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin (Trx)/thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) systems. Here, we investigated the effects of the GR inhibitor 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA) on the activity of thiol reductases (GR and TrxR), redox balance and mitochondrial function of A172 glioblastoma cells. 2-AAPA inhibited cell GR (IC50=6.7μM) and TrxR (IC50=8.7μM). A significant decrease in the cellular ability to decompose cumene hydroperoxide was observed and associated to a greater susceptibility to this peroxide. The redox state of peroxiredoxins (Prx1, Prx2 and Prx3) was markedly shifted to dimer 30min after treatment with 100μM 2-AAPA, an event preceding 2-AAPA-induced decrease in cell viability. Furthermore, mitochondrial function was also severely impaired, leading to a decrease in the respiratory control ratio, reserve capacity, and ATP synthesis-coupled respiration, as well as an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that inhibition of GR and TrxR activities, disruption of the ability to detoxify peroxides, increased oxidation of Prxs, as well as compromised mitochondrial function represent early events mediating 2-AAPA toxicity to A172 glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SENP1 inhibition induces apoptosis and growth arrest of multiple myeloma cells through modulation of NF-κB signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Gao, Chun-Ji; Guo, Zi-Kuan; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    SUMO/sentrin specific protease 1 (Senp1) is an important regulation protease in the protein sumoylation, which affects the cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation. The role of Senp1 mediated protein desumoylation in pathophysiological progression of multiple myeloma is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. Lentivirus-mediated Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces viability, proliferation and colony forming ability of MM cells. The NF-κB family members including P65 and inhibitor protein IkBα play important roles in regulation of MM cell survival and proliferation. We further demonstrated that Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation, leading to inactivation of NF-kB signaling in MM cells. These results delineate a key role for Senp1in IL-6 induced proliferation and survival of MM cells, suggesting it may be a potential new therapeutic target in MM. - Highlights: • Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. • Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces proliferation of MM cells. • Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation.

  12. Tamoxifen inhibits CDK5 kinase activity by interacting with p35/p25 and modulates the pattern of tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Caroline; Zhang, Bing; Le Parc, Annabelle; Baratte, Blandine; Colas, Pierre; Couturier, Cyril; Kosik, Kenneth S; Landrieu, Isabelle; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bach, Stéphane

    2015-04-23

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a multifunctional enzyme that plays numerous roles, notably in brain development. CDK5 is activated through its association with the activators, p35 and p39, rather than by cyclins. Proteolytic procession of the N-terminal part of its activators has been linked to Alzheimer's disease and various other neuropathies. The interaction with the proteolytic product p25 prolongs CDK5 activation and modifies the substrate specificity. In order to discover small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between CDK5 and p25, we have used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based screening assay. Among the 1,760 compounds screened, the generic drug tamoxifen has been identified. The inhibition of the CDK5 activity by tamoxifen was notably validated by monitoring the phosphorylation state of tau protein. The study of the molecular mechanism of inhibition indicates that tamoxifen interacts with p25 to block the CDK5/p25 interaction and pave the way for new treatments of tauopathies.

  13. LTP at Hilar Mossy Cell-Dentate Granule Cell Synapses Modulates Dentate Gyrus Output by Increasing Excitation/Inhibition Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Nasrallah, Kaoutsar; Jensen, Kyle R.; Chávez, Andrés E.; Carrera, Daniel; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Excitatory hilar mossy cells (MCs) in the dentate gyrus receive inputs from dentate granule cells (GCs) and project back to GCs locally, contralaterally, and along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, thereby establishing an associative positive-feedback loop and connecting functionally diverse hippocampal areas. MCs also synapse with GABAergic interneurons that mediate feed-forward inhibition onto GCs. Surprisingly, although these circuits have been implicated in both memory formation (e.g., pattern separation) and temporal lobe epilepsy, little is known about activity-dependent plasticity of their synaptic connections. Here, we report that MC-GC synapses undergo a presynaptic, NMDA-receptor-independent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that requires postsynaptic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB and presynaptic cyclic AMP (cAMP)/PKA signaling. This LTP is input specific and selectively expressed at MC-GC synapses, but not at the disynaptic inhibitory loop. By increasing the excitation/inhibition balance, MC-GC LTP enhances GC output at the associative MC-GC recurrent circuit and may contribute to dentate-dependent forms of learning and epilepsy. PMID:28817805

  14. LTP at Hilar Mossy Cell-Dentate Granule Cell Synapses Modulates Dentate Gyrus Output by Increasing Excitation/Inhibition Balance.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Nasrallah, Kaoutsar; Jensen, Kyle R; Chávez, Andrés E; Carrera, Daniel; Castillo, Pablo E

    2017-08-16

    Excitatory hilar mossy cells (MCs) in the dentate gyrus receive inputs from dentate granule cells (GCs) and project back to GCs locally, contralaterally, and along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, thereby establishing an associative positive-feedback loop and connecting functionally diverse hippocampal areas. MCs also synapse with GABAergic interneurons that mediate feed-forward inhibition onto GCs. Surprisingly, although these circuits have been implicated in both memory formation (e.g., pattern separation) and temporal lobe epilepsy, little is known about activity-dependent plasticity of their synaptic connections. Here, we report that MC-GC synapses undergo a presynaptic, NMDA-receptor-independent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that requires postsynaptic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB and presynaptic cyclic AMP (cAMP)/PKA signaling. This LTP is input specific and selectively expressed at MC-GC synapses, but not at the disynaptic inhibitory loop. By increasing the excitation/inhibition balance, MC-GC LTP enhances GC output at the associative MC-GC recurrent circuit and may contribute to dentate-dependent forms of learning and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aloe-emodin modulates PKC isozymes, inhibits proliferation, and induces apoptosis in U-373MG glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Russell, Christopher; Patel, Sapna; Patel, Rekha

    2004-12-20

    Aloe-emodin (1,8-dihydroy-3-[hydroxymethyl]-anthraquione) purified from Aloe vera leaves has been reported to have antitumor activity. The objectives of our research were to determine how aloe-emodin regulates the cell cycle, cell proliferation and protein kinase C (PKC) during glioma growth and development. To establish the cell cycle effects of aloe-emodin on brain cells [transformed glia cell line (SVG) and human glioma U-373MG cell line (U-373MG)], cells were treated with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO; control) or aloe-emodin (40 microM). Results from flow cytometry demonstrated that aloe-emodin delayed the number of cells entering and exiting DNA synthesis (S) phase in both SVG and U-373MG cells indicating that aloe-emodin may inhibit S phase progression. Assessment of cell viability demonstrated that SVG and U-373MG glioma cell were highly sensitive to aloe-emodin. The aloe-emodin-induced decreased proliferation was sustained at 48-96 h. A PKC activity assay was quantified to establish the role of PKC in aloe-emodin's mode of action. Exposure of SVG and U-373MG glioma cells to aloe-emodin suppressed PKC activity and reduced the protein content of most of the PKC isozymes. We determined that cancer growth inhibition by aloe-emodin was due to apoptosis (i.e., programmed cell death). Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that aloe-emodin represents a novel antitumor chemotherapeutic drug.

  16. The human nucleophosmin 1 mutation A inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells by modulating miR-10b

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qin; Tan, Shi; Yang, Zailin; Wang, Juan; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Jin, Hongjun; Yang, Liyuan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we showed that enforced expression of NPM1 mutation type A (NPM1-mA) inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells, whereas knockdown of NPM1-mA has the opposite effect. Our analyses of normal karyotype AML samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that miR-10b is commonly overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AMLs. We also found high expression of miR-10b in primary NPM1-mutated AML blasts and NPM1-mA positive OCI-AML3 cells. In addition, NPM1-mA knockdown enhanced myeloid differentiation, while induced expression of miR-10b reversed this effect. Finally, we showed that KLF4 is downregulated in NPM1-mutated AMLs. These results demonstrated that miR-10b exerts its effects by repressing the translation of KLF4 and that NPM1-mA inhibits myeloid differentiation through the miR-10b/KLF4 axis. This sheds new light on the effect of NPM1 mutations' on leukemogenesis. PMID:27669739

  17. Saturated fatty acids inhibit hepatic insulin action by modulating insulin receptor expression and post-receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, Mark W; Stein, Andrew; Landaker, Edwin; Park, Jun; Cooksey, Robert C; McClain, Donald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are proposed to play a pathogenic role in both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. We have examined the effect of saturated FFA on insulin signalling (100 nM) in two hepatocyte cell lines. Fao hepatoma cells were treated with physiological concentrations of sodium palmitate (0.25 mM) (16:0) for 0.25-48 h. Palmitate decreased insulin receptor (IR) protein and mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner (35% decrease at 12 h). Palmitate also reduced insulin-stimulated IR and IRS-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activity, and phosphorylation of Akt, p70 S6 kinase, GSK-3 and FOXO1A. Palmitate also inhibited insulin action in hepatocytes derived from wild-type IR (+/+) mice, but was ineffective in IR-deficient (-/-) cells. The effects of palmitate were reversed by triacsin C, an inhibitor of fatty acyl CoA synthases, indicating that palmitoyl CoA ester formation is critical. Neither the non-metabolized bromopalmitate alone nor the medium chain fatty acid octanoate (8:0) produced similar effects. However, the CPT-1 inhibitor (+/-)-etomoxir and bromopalmitate (in molar excess) reversed the effects of palmitate. Thus, the inhibition of insulin signalling by palmitate in hepatoma cells is dependent upon oxidation of fatty acyl-CoA species and requires intact insulin receptor expression.

  18. Ursolic acid promotes colorectal cancer cell apoptosis and inhibits cell proliferation via modulation of multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiumao; Chen, Youqin; Wei, Lihui; Shen, Aling; Sferra, Thomas J; Hong, Zhenfeng; Peng, Jun

    2013-10-01

    The development of colorectal cancer (CRC) is strongly correlated with the aberrant activation of multiple intracellular signaling transduction cascades including STAT3, ERK, JNK and p38 pathways which usually function redundantly. In addition, crosstalk between these pathways forms a complicated signaling network that is regulated by compensatory mechanisms. Therefore, most of the currently used and single-target-based antitumor agents might not always be therapeutically effective. Moreover, long-term use of these agents often generates drug resistance. These problems highlight the urgent need for the development of novel anticancer chemotherapies. Ursolic acid (UA) is a major active compound present in many medicinal herbs that have long been used for the clinical treatment of CRC. Although previous studies have demonstrated an antitumor effect for UA, the precise mechanisms of its tumoricidal activity are not well understood. In the present study, using CRC mouse xenograft model and the HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line, we evaluated the efficacy of UA against tumor growth in vivo and in vitro and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that UA inhibits cancer growth without apparent toxicity. Furthermore, UA significantly suppresses the activation of several CRC-related signaling pathways and alters the expression of critical target genes. These molecular effects lead to the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cellular proliferation. These data demonstrate that UA possesses a broad range of anticancer activities due to its ability to affect multiple intracellular targets, suggesting that UA could be a novel multipotent therapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  19. A novel biphenyl urea derivate inhibits the invasion of breast cancer through the modulation of CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yingzhuan; Zhang, Han; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Jie; He, Langchong

    2015-01-01

    The increased migration and invasion of breast carcinoma cells are key events in the development of metastasis to the lymph nodes and distant organs. CXCR4, the receptor for stromal-derived factor-1, is reportedly involved in breast carcinogenesis and invasion. In this study, we investigated a novel biphenyl urea derivate, TPD7 for its ability to affect CXCR4 expression as well as function in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that TPD7 inhibited the breast cancer proliferation and down-regulated the CXCR4 expression on breast cancer cells both over-expressing and low-expressing HER2, an oncogene known to induce the chemokine receptor. Treatments with pharmacological proteasome inhibitors partial suppressed TPD7-induced decrease in CXCR4 expression. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that down-regulation of CXCR4 by TPD7 also occurred at the translational level. Inhibition of CXCR4 expression by TPD7 further correlated with the suppression of SDF-1α-induced migration and invasion in breast tumour cells, knockdown of CXCR4 attenuated TPD7-inhibitory effects. In addition, TPD7 treatment significantly suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression, the downstream targets of CXCR4, perhaps via inactivation of the ERK signaling pathway. Overall, our results showed that TPD7 exerted its anti-invasive effect through the down-regulation of CXCR4 expression and thus had the potential for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25753200

  20. Cranberries (Oxycoccus quadripetalus) inhibit lipid metabolism and modulate leptin and adiponectin secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Katarzyna; Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2015-10-15

    It has previously been shown that lyophilized cranberries (LCB) decreased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells and inhibited preadipocyte differentiation by down-regulation of the expression of key transcription factors (PPARγ, C/EBPα, SREBP1) of the adipogenesis pathway. To elucidate the molecular basis of anti-lipogenic activity of LCB, the expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin 1 (PLIN1), was examined in the present study. Additionally, the effects of LCB on adiponectin and leptin expression and protein secretion were also investigated. LCB reduced lipid accumulation during preadipocyte differentiation by down-regulation of the mRNA level of aP2, FAS, LPL, HSL and PLIN1. Moreover, LCB decreased leptin gene expression and increased adiponectin gene expression and protein secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore cranberries could be considered as bioactive factors, which are effective in the inhibition of adipose tissue mass production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential modulation of repetitive firing and synchronous network activity in neocortical interneurons by inhibition of A-type K+ channels and Ih

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sidney B.; Hablitz, John J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons provide the main source of inhibition in the neocortex and are important in regulating neocortical network activity. In the presence 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), CNQX, and D-APV, large amplitude GABAA-receptor mediated depolarizing responses were observed in the neocortex. GABAergic networks are comprised of several types of interneurons, each with its own protein expression pattern, firing properties, and inhibitory role in network activity. Voltage-gated ion channels, especially A-type K+ channels, differentially regulate passive membrane properties, action potential (AP) waveform, and repetitive firing properties in interneurons depending on their composition and localization. HCN channels are known modulators of pyramidal cell intrinsic excitability and excitatory network activity. Little information is available regarding how HCN channels functionally modulate excitability of individual interneurons and inhibitory networks. In this study, we examined the effect of 4-AP on intrinsic excitability of fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) and Martinotti cells (MCs). 4-AP increased the duration of APs in both FS-BCs and MCs. The repetitive firing properties of MCs were differentially affected compared to FS-BCs. We also examined the effect of Ih inhibition on synchronous GABAergic depolarizations and synaptic integration of depolarizing IPSPs. ZD 7288 enhanced the amplitude and area of evoked GABAergic responses in both cell types. Similarly, the frequency and area of spontaneous GABAergic depolarizations in both FS-BCs and MCs were increased in presence of ZD 7288. Synaptic integration of IPSPs in MCs was significantly enhanced, but remained unaltered in FS-BCs. These results indicate that 4-AP differentially alters the firing properties of interneurons, suggesting MCs and FS-BCs may have unique roles in GABAergic network synchronization. Enhancement of GABAergic network synchronization by ZD 7288 suggests that HCN channels attenuate inhibitory

  2. EGFR-SGLT1 interaction does not respond to EGFR modulators, but inhibition of SGLT1 sensitizes prostate cancer cells to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiangong; Bollu, Lakshmi R; Su, Fei; Gao, Guang; Xu, Lei; Huang, Wei-Chien; Hung, Mien-Chie; Weihua, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with poor prognosis in malignant tumors. Sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) is an active glucose transporter that is overexpressed in many cancers including prostate cancer. Previously, we found that EGFR interacts with and stabilizes SGLT1 in cancer cells. In this study, we determined the micro-domain of EGFR that is required for its interaction with SGLT1 and the effects of activation/inactivation of EGFR on EGFR-SGLT1 interaction, measured the expression of EGFR and SGLT1 in prostate cancer tissues, and tested the effect of inhibition of SGLT1 on the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to EGFR tyrosine inhibitors. We found that the autophosphorylation region (978-1210 amino acids) of EGFR was required for its sufficient interaction with SGLT1 and that this interaction was independent of EGFR's tyrosine kinase activity. Most importantly, the EGFR-SGLT1 interaction does not respond to EGFR tyrosine kinase modulators (EGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors). EGFR and SGLT1 co-localized in prostate cancer tissues, and inhibition of SGLT1 by a SGLT1 inhibitor (Phlorizin) sensitized prostate cancer cells to EGFR inhibitors (Gefitinib and Erlotinib). These data suggest that EGFR in cancer cells can exist as either a tyrosine kinase modulator responsive status or an irresponsive status. SGLT1 is a protein involved in EGFR's functions that are irresponsive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and, therefore, the EGFR-SGLT1 interaction might be a novel target for prostate cancer therapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Natural and synthetic modulators of SK (Kca2) potassium channels inhibit magnesium-dependent activity of the kinase-coupled cation channel TRPM7

    PubMed Central

    Chubanov, V; Mederos y Schnitzler, M; Meißner, M; Schäfer, S; Abstiens, K; Hofmann, T; Gudermann, T

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a TRP ion channel segment linked to an α-type protein kinase domain. TRPM7 is essential for proliferation and cell growth. Up-regulation of TRPM7 function is involved in anoxic neuronal death, cardiac fibrosis and tumour cell proliferation. The goal of this work was to identify non-toxic inhibitors of the TRPM7 channel and to assess the effect of blocking endogenous TRPM7 currents on the phenotype of living cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We developed an aequorin bioluminescence-based assay of TRPM7 channel activity and performed a hypothesis-driven screen for inhibitors of the channel. The candidates identified were further assessed electrophysiologically and in cell biological experiments. KEY RESULTS TRPM7 currents were inhibited by modulators of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (KCa2.1–2.3; SK) channels, including the antimalarial plant alkaloid quinine, CyPPA, dequalinium, NS8593, SKA31 and UCL 1684. The most potent compound NS8593 (IC50 1.6 µM) specifically targeted TRPM7 as compared with other TRP channels, interfered with Mg2+-dependent regulation of TRPM7 channel and inhibited the motility of cultured cells. NS8593 exhibited full and reversible block of native TRPM7-like currents in HEK 293 cells, freshly isolated smooth muscle cells, primary podocytes and ventricular myocytes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study reveals a tight overlap in the pharmacological profiles of TRPM7 and KCa2.1–2.3 channels. NS8593 acts as a negative gating modulator of TRPM7 and is well-suited to study functional features and cellular roles of endogenous TRPM7. PMID:22242975

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Lisabeth, Erika M.; Wade, Susan M.; Haak, Andrew J.; Johnson, Craig N.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Neubig, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL) and serum response factor (SRF) drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B), which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB) showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis. PMID:27600078

  5. MicroRNA-210 Modulates Endothelial Cell Response to Hypoxia and Inhibits the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ligand Ephrin-A3*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Fasanaro, Pasquale; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Di Stefano, Valeria; Melchionna, Roberta; Romani, Sveva; Pompilio, Giulio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that function as negative gene expression regulators. In the present study, we investigated miRNAs role in endothelial cell response to hypoxia. We found that the expression of miR-210 progressively increased upon exposure to hypoxia. miR-210 overexpression in normoxic endothelial cells stimulated the formation of capillary-like structures on Matrigel and vascular endothelial growth factor-driven cell migration. Conversely, miR-210 blockade via anti-miRNA transfection inhibited the formation of capillary-like structures stimulated by hypoxia and decreased cell migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor. miR-210 overexpression did not affect endothelial cell growth in both normoxia and hypoxia. However, anti-miR-210 transfection inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis, in both normoxia and hypoxia. We determined that one relevant target of miR-210 in hypoxia was Ephrin-A3 since miR-210 was necessary and sufficient to down-modulate its expression. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays showed that Ephrin-A3 was a direct target of miR-210. Ephrin-A3 modulation by miR-210 had significant functional consequences; indeed, the expression of an Ephrin-A3 allele that is not targeted by miR-210 prevented miR-210-mediated stimulation of both tubulogenesis and chemotaxis. We conclude that miR-210 up-regulation is a crucial element of endothelial cell response to hypoxia, affecting cell survival, migration, and differentiation. PMID:18417479

  6. Inhibition of GSK3β by pharmacological modulation of sphingolipid metabolism occurs independently of ganglioside disturbance in a cellular model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Noel, Anastasia; Ingrand, Sabrina; Barrier, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates ganglioside and/or related-sphingolipid disturbance in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not known whether these lipidic alterations are connected with other important features of AD, such as deregulated insulin/Akt/GSK3 signaling. In this study, we have treated neuroglioma cells expressing the double Swedish mutation of human amyloid precursor protein (H4APPsw) with several glycosphingolipid (GSL)-modulating agents, and we have analyzed the impact of the aberrant ganglioside composition on the GSK3 activation state. We found that both ceramide analogs D- and L-PDMP (1-phenyl 2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol), which have opposite effects on ganglioside synthesis, selectively inhibited GSK3β via Ser9 phosphorylation independently of the upstream insulin/Akt pathway. Conversely, the iminosugar N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) which displayed similar reduction of gangliosides as D-PDMP, did not affect the phosphorylation state of GSK3β. Concurrently, while NB-DNJ did not modify the cellular ceramide content, both PDMP enantiomers strongly and equally reduced the levels of long-chain ceramide species. Altogether, our findings led us to hypothesize that the PDMP-induced altered ganglioside composition is not the principal mechanism involved in the inhibition of GSK3β, but seems to implicate, at least in part, their ability to reduce ceramide levels. Nevertheless, this study provides new information regarding the possibilities to target GSK3β through modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lateral/basolateral amygdala serotonin type-2 receptors modulate operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution via inhibition of principal neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Brian A.; Christian, Daniel T.; Fetzer, Jonathan A.; Chappell, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA) forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates “seeking” (exemplified as lever-press behaviors) from consumption (drinking) directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (α-m5HT) into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA α-m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that α-m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of α-m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that α-m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution

  8. HDAC inhibition prevents white matter injury by modulating microglia/macrophage polarization through the GSK3β/PTEN/Akt axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guohua; Shi, Yejie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Leak, Rehana K.; Hu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yun; Pu, Hongjian; Li, Wei-Wei; Tang, Bo; Wang, Yun; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits destruction of both gray and white matter, which is exacerbated by secondary proinflammatory responses. Although white matter injury (WMI) is strongly correlated with poor neurological status, the maintenance of white matter integrity is poorly understood, and no current therapies protect both gray and white matter. One candidate approach that may fulfill this role is inhibition of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor Scriptaid protects white matter up to 35 d after TBI, as shown by reductions in abnormally dephosphorylated neurofilament protein, increases in myelin basic protein, anatomic preservation of myelinated axons, and improved nerve conduction. Furthermore, Scriptaid shifted microglia/macrophage polarization toward the protective M2 phenotype and mitigated inflammation. In primary cocultures of microglia and oligodendrocytes, Scriptaid increased expression of microglial glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), which phosphorylated and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), thereby enhancing phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling and polarizing microglia toward M2. The increase in GSK3β in microglia and their phenotypic switch to M2 was associated with increased preservation of neighboring oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with recent findings that microglial phenotypic switching modulates white matter repair and axonal remyelination and highlight a previously unexplored role for HDAC activity in this process. Furthermore, the functions of GSK3β may be more subtle than previously thought, in that GSK3β can modulate microglial functions via the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and preserve white matter homeostasis. Thus, inhibition of HDACs in microglia is a potential future therapy in TBI and other neurological conditions with white matter destruction. PMID:25691750

  9. Periodically-modulated inhibition of living pacemaker neurons--III. The heterogeneity of the postsynaptic spike trains, and how control parameters affect it.

    PubMed

    Segundo, J P; Vibert, J F; Stiber, M

    1998-11-01

    Codings involving spike trains at synapses with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials on pacemakers were examined in crayfish stretch receptor organs by modulating presynaptic instantaneous rates periodically (triangles or sines; frequencies, slopes and depths under, respectively, 5.0 Hz, 40.0/s/s and 25.0/s). Timings were described by interspike and cross-intervals ("phases"); patterns (dispersions, sequences) and forms (timing classes) were identified using pooled graphs (instant along the cycle when a spike occurs vs preceding interval) and return maps (plots of successive intervals). A remarkable heterogeneity of postsynaptic intervals and phases characterizes each modulation. All cycles separate into the same portions: each contains a particular form and switches abruptly to the next. Forms differ in irregularity and predictability: they are (see text) "p:q alternations", "intermittent", "phase walk-throughs", "messy erratic" and "messy stammering". Postsynaptic cycles are asymmetric (hysteresis). This contrasts with the presynaptic homogeneity, smoothness and symmetry. All control parameters are, individually and jointly, strongly influential. Presynaptic slopes, say, act through a postsynaptic sensitivity to their magnitude and sign; when increasing, hysteresis augments and forms change or disappear. Appropriate noise attenuates between-train contrasts, providing modulations are under 0.5 Hz. Postsynaptic natural intervals impose critical time bases, separating presynaptic intervals (around, above or below them) with dissimilar consequences. Coding rules are numerous and have restricted domains; generalizations are misleading. Modulation-driven forms are trendy pacemaker-driven forms. However, dissimilarities, slight when patterns are almost pacemaker, increase as inhibition departs from pacemaker and incorporate unpredictable features. Physiological significance-(1) Pacemaker-driven forms, simple and ubiquitous, appear to be elementary building blocks of

  10. Administration of GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulators inhibit the expression of previously established methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Herrold, Amy A.; Riddle, Jennifer L.; Napier, T. Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the role of GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in the maintenance of memories associated with using abused substances. We have embarked on a series of studies designed to determine if enhancing the efficacy of GABA-occupied GABABRs with positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) can negate previously established conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by methamphetamine. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of acute administration of GABABR PAMs, GS39783 and CGP7930. We determined that post-conditioning treatments with these PAMs, administered in the home cage, blocked the subsequent expression of methamphetamine-induced CPP. These data indicate that selectively augmenting GABA-occupied GABABR signaling is sufficient to reduce memory maintenance and/or the salience of contextual cues previously associated with methamphetamine. PMID:20804788

  11. Media effects in modulating the conformational equilibrium of a model compound for tumor necrosis factor converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchelli, Martina; Guardiani, Carlo; Sandberg, Robert B.; Menichetti, Stefano; Procacci, Piero; Caminati, Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Converting Enzyme (TACE) are a promising therapeutic tool for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. Here we report on an extensive chemical-physical analysis of the media effects in modulating the conformational landscape of MBET306, the common scaffold and a synthetic precursor of a family of recently discovered tartrate-based TACE inhibitors. The structural features of this molecule with potential pharmaceutical applications have been disclosed by interpreting extensive photophysical measurements in various solvents with the aid of enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations and time dependent density functional calculations. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques, the paper provides a general protocol for studying the structure in solution of molecular systems characterized by the existence of conformational metastable states.

  12. ERBB activation modulates sensitivity to MEK1/2 inhibition in a subset of driver-negative melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Katherine E.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Johnson, Adam S.; Sanchez, Violeta; Kuba, Maria; Lu, Pengcheng; Chen, Xi; Kelley, Mark C.; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Kris, Mark; Berger, Michael F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Pao, William

    2015-01-01

    Melanomas are characterized by activating “driver” mutations in BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11. Resultant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling makes some melanomas susceptible to BRAF (BRAF V600 mutations), MEK1/2 (BRAF V600, L597, fusions; NRAS mutations), or other kinase inhibitors (KIT), respectively. Among driver-negative (“pan-negative”) patients, an unexplained heterogeneity of response to MEK1/2 inhibitors has been observed. Analysis of 16 pan-negative melanoma cell lines revealed that 8 (50%; termed Class I) are sensitive to the MEK1/2 inhibitor, trametinib, similar to BRAF V600E melanomas. A second set (termed Class II) display reduced trametinib sensitivity, paradoxical activation of MEK1/2 and basal activation of ERBBs 1, 2, and 3 (4 lines, 25%). In 3 of these lines, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathway signaling is abrogated using the ERBB inhibitor, afatinib, and proliferation is even further reduced upon the addition of trametinib. A potential mechanism of ERBB activation in Class II melanomas is minimal expression of the ERK1/2 phosphatase, DUSP4, as ectopic restoration of DUSP4 attenuated ERBB signaling through potential modulation of the ERBB ligand, amphiregulin (AREG). Consistent with these data, immunohistochemical analysis of patient melanomas revealed a trend towards lower overall DUSP4 expression in pan-negative versus BRAF- and NRAS-mutant tumors. This study is the first to demonstrate that differential ERBB activity in pan-negative melanoma may modulate sensitivity to clinically-available MEK1/2 inhibitors and provides rationale for the use of ERBB inhibitors, potentially in combination with MEK1/2 inhibitors, in subsets of this disease. PMID:26084293

  13. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. I. Modulation of stability and protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Ginsberg, David S; Day, Duane E; Verhamme, Ingrid M; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. Under physiological conditions, half of the inhibitor transitions to a latent state within 1–2 h. The interaction between PAI-1 and the plasma protein vitronectin prolongs this active lifespan by ∼50%. Previously, our group demonstrated that PAI-1 binds to resins using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (Day, U.S. Pat. 7,015,021 B2, March 21, 2006). In this study, the effect of these metals on function and stability was investigated by measuring the rate of the transition from the active to latent conformation. All metals tested showed effects on stability, with the majority falling into one of two types depending on their effects. The first type of metal, which includes magnesium, calcium and manganese, invoked a slight stabilization of the active conformation of PAI-1. A second category of metals, including cobalt, nickel and copper, showed the opposite effects and a unique vitronectin-dependent modulation of PAI-1 stability. This second group of metals significantly destabilized PAI-1, although the addition of vitronectin in conjunction with these metals resulted in a marked stabilization and slower conversion to the latent conformation. In the presence of copper and vitronectin, the half-life of active PAI-1 was extended to 3 h, compared to a half-life of only ∼30 min with copper alone. Nickel had the largest effect, reducing the half-life to ∼5 min. Together, these data demonstrate a heretofore-unknown role for metals in modulating PAI-1 stability. PMID:21280127

  14. ERBB activation modulates sensitivity to MEK1/2 inhibition in a subset of driver-negative melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Katherine E; Johnson, Douglas B; Johnson, Adam S; Sanchez, Violeta; Kuba, Maria; Lu, Pengcheng; Chen, Xi; Kelley, Mark C; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Kris, Mark; Berger, Michael F; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Pao, William

    2015-09-08

    Melanomas are characterized by activating "driver" mutations in BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11. Resultant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling makes some melanomas susceptible to BRAF (BRAF V600 mutations), MEK1/2 (BRAF V600, L597, fusions; NRAS mutations), or other kinase inhibitors (KIT), respectively. Among driver-negative ("pan-negative") patients, an unexplained heterogeneity of response to MEK1/2 inhibitors has been observed. Analysis of 16 pan-negative melanoma cell lines revealed that 8 (50%; termed Class I) are sensitive to the MEK1/2 inhibitor, trametinib, similar to BRAF V600E melanomas. A second set (termed Class II) display reduced trametinib sensitivity, paradoxical activation of MEK1/2 and basal activation of ERBBs 1, 2, and 3 (4 lines, 25%). In 3 of these lines, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathway signaling is abrogated using the ERBB inhibitor, afatinib, and proliferation is even further reduced upon the addition of trametinib. A potential mechanism of ERBB activation in Class II melanomas is minimal expression of the ERK1/2 phosphatase, DUSP4, as ectopic restoration of DUSP4 attenuated ERBB signaling through potential modulation of the ERBB ligand, amphiregulin (AREG). Consistent with these data, immunohistochemical analysis of patient melanomas revealed a trend towards lower overall DUSP4 expression in pan-negative versus BRAF- and NRAS-mutant tumors. This study is the first to demonstrate that differential ERBB activity in pan-negative melanoma may modulate sensitivity to clinically-available MEK1/2 inhibitors and provides rationale for the use of ERBB inhibitors, potentially in combination with MEK1/2 inhibitors, in subsets of this disease.

  15. 6-Gingerol inhibits Vibrio cholerae-induced proinflammatory cytokines in intestinal epithelial cells via modulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pallashri; Katarkar, Atul; Das, Bornita; Bhattacharyya, Aritra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2016-09-01

    Context The effect of 6-gingerol (6G), the bioactive component of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), in the reduction of Vibrio cholerae (Vibrionaceae)-induced inflammation has not yet been reported. Materials and methods Cell viability assay was performed to determine the working concentration of 6G. Elisa and RT-PCR were performed with Int 407 cells treated with 50 μM 6G and 100 multiplicity of infection (MOI) V. cholerae for 0, 2, 3, 3.5, 6 and 8 h to determine the concentration of IL-8, IL-6, IL-1α and IL-1β in both protein and RNA levels. Furthermore, the effect of 50 μM 6G on upstream MAP-kinases and NF-κB signalling pathways was evaluated at 0, 10, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min. Results The effective dose (ED50) value of 6G was found to be 50 μM as determined by cell viability assay. Pre-treatment with 50 μM 6G reduced V. cholerae infection-triggered levels of IL-8, IL-6, IL-1α and IL-1β by 3.2-fold in the protein level and two-fold in the RNA level at 3.5 h. The levels of MAP-kinases signalling molecules like p38 and ERK1/2 were also reduced by two- and three-fold, respectively, after 30 min of treatment. Additionally, there was an increase in phosphorylated IκBα and down-regulation of p65 resulting in down-regulation of NF-κB pathway. Conclusion Our results showed that 6G could modulate the anti-inflammatory responses triggered by V. cholerae-induced infection in intestinal epithelial cells by modulating NF-κB pathway.

  16. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (P<0.05), whereas incubation of cells with MM did not induce the expression of any of the mediators assessed. Interestingly, pre-incubation of HT-29 monolayer with MM produced an inhibition of S. flexneri-induced IL-8, CCL20 and TNF-α mRNA expression. In order to gain insight on the effect of MM (or the individual strains) on this pro-inflammatory response, a series of experiments using a HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP reporter system were performed. Pre-incubation of HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP cells with MM significantly dampened Shigella-induced activation. Our results showed that the contribution of yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus CIDCA 8154 seems to be crucial in the observed effect. In conclusion, results presented in this study demonstrate that pre-treatment with a microbial mixture containing bacteria and yeasts isolated from kefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the

  17. Plant-based Food Cyanidin-3-Glucoside Modulates Human Platelet Glycoprotein VI Signaling and Inhibits Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yanling; Chen, Yanqiu; Adili, Reheman; McKeown, Thomas; Chen, Pingguo; Zhu, Guangheng; Li, Dan; Ling, Wenhua; Ni, Heyu; Yang, Yan

    2017-08-30

    Background: Platelets play an important role in hemostasis, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a major platelet receptor that interacts with exposed collagen on injured vessel walls. Our previous studies have shown that anthocyanins (a type of natural plant pigment) attenuate platelet function; however, whether anthocyanins affect collagen-induced GPVI signaling remains unknown.Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the effects of cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy-3-g, one of the major bioactive compounds in anthocyanins) on platelet activation and thrombosis and the GPVI signaling pathway.Methods: Platelets from healthy men and women were isolated and incubated with different concentrations (0, 0.5, 5, and 50 μM) of Cy-3-g. The expression of activated integrin αIIbβ3, P-selectin, CD63, and CD40L, fibrinogen binding to platelets, and platelet aggregation were evaluated in vitro. Platelet adhesion and aggregation in whole blood under flow conditions were assessed in collagen-coated perfusion chambers. Thrombosis and hemostasis were assessed in 3-4-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice through FeCl3-induced intravital microscopy and tail bleeding time. The effect of Cy-3-g on collagen-induced human platelet GPVI signaling was explored with Western blot.Results: Cy-3-g attenuated platelet function in a dose-dependent manner. The 0.5-μM dose of Cy-3-g inhibited (P < 0.05) human platelet adhesion and aggregation to collagen at both venous (-54.02%) and arterial (-22.90%) shear stresses. The 5-μM dose inhibited (P < 0.05) collagen-induced human platelet activation (PAC-1: -48.21%, P-selectin: -50.63%), secretion (CD63: -73.89%, CD40L: -43.70%), fibrinogen binding (-56.79%), and aggregation (-17.81%). The 5-μM dose attenuated (P < 0.01) thrombus growth (-66.67%) without prolonging bleeding time in mice. The 50-μM dose downregulated (P < 0.05) collagen-induced GPVI signaling in human platelets and significantly decreased phosphorylation of Syk

  18. MicroRNA-212 negatively regulates starvation induced autophagy in prostate cancer cells by inhibiting SIRT1 and is a modulator of angiogenesis and cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ramalinga, Malathi; Roy, Arpita; Srivastava, Anvesha; Bhattarai, Asmita; Harish, Varsha; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean; Kumar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Among a number of non-coding RNAs, role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cell proliferation, cancer initiation, development and metastasis have been extensively studied and miRNA based therapeutic approaches are being pursued. Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health concern and several deregulated miRNAs have been described in PCa. miR-212 is differentially modulated in multiple cancers however its function remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-212 is downregulated in PCa tissues when compared with benign adjacent regions (n = 40). Also, we observed reduced levels of circulatory miR-212 in serum from PCa patients (n = 40) when compared with healthy controls (n = 32). Elucidating the functional role of miR-212, we demonstrate that miR-212 negatively modulates starvation induced autophagy in PCa cells by targeting sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Overexpression of miR-212 also leads to inhibition of angiogenesis and cellular senescence. In conclusion, our study indicates a functional role of miR-212 in PCa and suggests the development of miR-212 based therapies. PMID:26439987

  19. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure.

  20. Phospholipase A2 inhibits cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating regulatory T cells by the CD206 mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseong; Lee, Hyojung; Lee, Gihyun; Jang, Hyunil; Kim, Sung-Su; Yoon, Heera; Kang, Geun-Hyung; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-09-01

    Previously, we found that Foxp3-expressing CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells attenuate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice and that bee venom and its constituent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) are capable of modulating Treg cells. Here we tested whether PLA2 could inhibit cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. As a result of treatment with PLA2, the population of Treg cells was significantly increased, both in vivo and in vitro. PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal tissue damage, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production upon cisplatin administration. These renoprotective effects were abolished by depletion of Treg cells. Furthermore, PLA2 bound to CD206 mannose receptors on dendritic cells, essential for the PLA2-mediated protective effects on renal dysfunction. Interestingly, PLA2 treatment increased the secretion of IL-10 in the kidney from normal mice. Foxp3(+)IL-10(+) cells and CD11c(+)IL-10(+) cells were increased by PLA2 treatment. The anticancer effects of repeated administrations of a low dose of cisplatin were not affected by PLA2 treatment in a tumor-bearing model. Thus, PLA2 may prevent inflammatory responses in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating Treg cells and IL-10 through the CD206 mannose receptor.

  1. Naringenin reduces cholesterol-induced hepatic inflammation in rats by modulating matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 via inhibition of nuclear factor κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Yassine; Fetoui, Hamadi; Jemai, Raoua; Ben Slima, Ahlem; Makni, Mohamed; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2015-01-05

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of hepatic abnormalities that extends from isolated steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and steatofibrosis. NASH is the progressive form of the disease that can lead to fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Naringenin (NGEN), a healthful food, increases resistance to oxidative stress, inflammation and protects against multiple organ injury in various animal models. However, specific mechanisms responsible for such effects are poorly understood. Thus, this study investigates the effect of treatment with NGEN (50mg/kg) on oxidative events and the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammatory changes triggered in the rat liver by a high cholesterol diet for 90 days. NGEN significantly decreased the plasma fatty acid composition, the hepatic pro-inflammatory mediators and the expression of relevant genes including tumor necrosis factor-α, interlukin-6, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, 9), EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1 (macrophage F4/80-specific gene); which suggests a reduced macrophage infiltration, and inhibited oxidative stress related biomarker levels at the end point of the experiment. Mechanistically, studies showed that NGEN markedly reduced lipid and protein oxidations, recruited the anti-oxidative defense system and promoted extracellular matrix degradation by modulating the levels of necrotic inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of Notch Signaling Elicits Signature Tumors and Inhibits Hras1-Induced Oncogenesis in the Mouse Mammary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, Hippokratis; Politi, Katerina; Grimm, Lisa M.; Szabolcs, Matthias; Fisher, Peter; Efstratiadis, Argiris; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2004-01-01

    Deregulation of Notch signaling, which normally affects a broad spectrum of cell fates, has been implicated in various neoplastic conditions. Here we describe a transgenic mouse model, which demonstrates that expression of a constitutively active form of the Notch1 receptor in the mammary epithelium induces the rapid development of pregnancy/lactation-dependent neoplasms that consistently exhibit a characteristic histopathological pattern. These signature tumors retain the ability to respond to apoptotic stimuli and regress on initiation of mammary gland involution, but eventually appear to progress in subsequent pregnancies to nonregressing malignant adenocarcinomas. Additionally, we present evidence indicating that cyclin D1 is an in vivo target of Notch signals in the mammary glands and demonstrate that we can effectively inhibit Hras1-driven, cyclin D1-dependent mammary oncogenesis by transgenic expression of the Notch antagonist Deltex. PMID:15277242

  3. Pharmacological inhibition of FAAH modulates TLR-induced neuroinflammation, but not sickness behaviour: An effect partially mediated by central TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rebecca J; Kerr, Daniel M; Flannery, Lisa E; Killilea, Marykate; Hughes, Edel M; Corcoran, Louise; Finn, David P; Roche, Michelle

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), key components of the innate immune system, has been proposed to underlie and exacerbate a range of central nervous system disorders. Increasing evidence supports a role for the endocannabinoid system in modulating inflammatory responses including those mediated by TLRs, and thus this system may provide an important treatment target for neuroinflammatory disorders. However, the effect of modulating endocannabinoid tone on TLR-induced neuroinflammation in vivo and associated behavioural changes is largely unknown. The present study examined the effect of inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolyase (FAAH), the primary enzyme responsible for the metabolism of anandamide (AEA), in vivo on TLR4-induced neuroimmune and behavioural responses, and evaluated sites and mechanisms of action. Systemic administration of the FAAH inhibitor PF3845 increased levels of AEA, and related FAAH substrates N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, an effect associated with an attenuation in the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and mediators measured 2hrs following systemic administration of the TLR4 agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects were mimicked by central i.c.v. administration of PF3845, but not systemic administration of the peripherally-restricted FAAH inhibitor URB937. Central antagonism of TRPV1 significantly attenuated the PF3845-induced decrease in IL-6 expression, effects not observed following antagonism of CB1, CB2, PPARα, PPARγ or GPR55. LPS-induced a robust sickness-like behavioural response and increased the expression of markers of glial activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines over 24hrs. Systemic administration of PF3845 modulated the TLR4-induced expression of neuroimmune mediators and anhedonia without altering acute sickness behaviour. Overall, these findings support an important role for FAAH substrates directly within

  4. CyPPA, a Positive SK3/SK2 Modulator, Reduces Activity of Dopaminergic Neurons, Inhibits Dopamine Release, and Counteracts Hyperdopaminergic Behaviors Induced by Methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Herrik, Kjartan F; Redrobe, John P; Holst, Dorte; Hougaard, Charlotte; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Nielsen, Alexander N; Ji, Huifang; Holst, Nina M; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Strøbæk, Dorte; Shepard, Paul D; Christophersen, Palle

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) containing midbrain neurons play critical roles in several psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and the substantia nigra pars compacta neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease. Pharmacological modulation of DA receptors and transporters are well established approaches for treatment of DA-related disorders. Direct modulation of the DA system by influencing the discharge pattern of these autonomously firing neurons has yet to be exploited as a potential therapeutic strategy. Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels), in particular the SK3 subtype, are important in the physiology of DA neurons, and agents modifying SK channel activity could potentially affect DA signaling and DA-related behaviors. Here we show that cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine (CyPPA), a subtype-selective positive modulator of SK channels (SK3 > SK2 > > > SK1, IK), decreased spontaneous firing rate, increased the duration of the apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization, and caused an activity-dependent inhibition of current-evoked action potentials in DA neurons from both mouse and rat midbrain slices. Using an immunocytochemically and pharmacologically validated DA release assay employing cultured DA neurons from rats, we show that CyPPA repressed DA release in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal effect equal to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In vivo studies revealed that systemic administration of CyPPA attenuated methylphenidate-induced hyperactivity and stereotypic behaviors in mice. Taken together, the data accentuate the important role played by SK3 channels in the physiology of DA neurons, and indicate that their facilitation by CyPPA profoundly influences physiological as well as pharmacologically induced hyperdopaminergic behavior.

  5. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, modulates p53 pathway and inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, Luann K

    2013-05-01

    It is has been hypothesized that methylselenol is a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we used a protein array which contained 112 different antibodies known to be involved in the p53 pathway to investigate the molecular targets of methylselenol in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. The array analysis indicated that methylselenol exposure changed the expression of 11 protein targets related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Subsequently, we confirmed these proteins with the Western blotting approach, and found that methylselenol increased the expression of GADD 153 and p21 but reduced the level of c-Myc, E2F1 and Phos p38 MAP kinase. Similar to our previous report on human HCT116 colon cancer cells, methylselenol also inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase in mouse colon cancer MC26 cells. When the MC26 cells were transplanted to their immune-competent Balb/c mice, methylselenol-treated MC26 cells had significantly less tumor growth potential than that of untreated MC26 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that methylselenol modulates the expression of key genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis and inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Stuttering Interneurons Generate Fast and Robust Inhibition onto Projection Neurons with Low Capacity of Short Term Modulation in Mouse Lateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Xu, Xiao-Bin; He, Ye; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xin; Li, Bao-Ming; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2013-01-01

    The stuttering interneurons (STi) represent one minor subset of interneuron population and exhibit characteristic stuttering firing upon depolarization current injection. While it has been long held that the GABAergic inhibitory transmission largely varies with the subtype identity of presynaptic interneurons, whether such a rule also applies to STi is largely unknown. Here, by paired recording of interneuron and their neighboring projection neuron in lateral amygdala, we found that relative to the fast spiking and late spiking interneurons, the STi-evoked unitary postsynaptic currents onto the projection neurons had markedly larger amplitude, shorter onset latency and faster rising and decay kinetics. The quantal content and the number of vesicles in the readily releasable pool were also larger in synapses made by STi versus other interneurons. Moreover, the short-term plasticity, as reflected by the paired pulse depression and depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition, was the least prominent in the output synapses of STi. Thus, the fast and robust inhibition together with its low capacity of short term modulation may suggest an important role for STi in preventing the overexcitation of the projection neurons and thus gating the information traffic in amygdala. PMID:23527307

  7. BMP-2 Modulates β-Catenin Signaling Through Stimulation of Lrp5 Expression and Inhibition of β-TrCP Expression in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Yan, Ying; Lim, Yong-bin; Tang, Dezhi; Xie, Rong; Chen, Ann; Tai, Peter; Harris, Stephen E.; Xing, Lianping; Qin, Yi-Xian; Chen, Di

    2010-01-01

    Canonical BMP and Wnt signaling pathways play critical roles in regulation of osteoblast function and bone formation. Recent studies demonstrate that BMP-2 acts synergistically with β-catenin to promote osteoblast differentiation. To determine the molecular mechanisms of the signaling cross-talk between canonical BMP and Wnt signaling pathways, we have used primary osteoblasts and osteoblast precursor cell lines 2T3 and MC3T3-E1 cells to investigate the effect of BMP-2 on β-catenin signaling. We found that BMP-2 stimulates Lrp5 expression and inhibits the expression of β-TrCP, the F-box E3 ligase responsible for β-catenin degradation and subsequently increases β-catenin protein levels in osteoblasts. In vitro deletion of the β-catenin gene inhibits osteoblast proliferation and alters osteoblast differentiation and reduces the responsiveness of osteoblasts to the BMP-2 treatment. These findings suggest that BMP-2 may regulate osteoblast function in part through modulation of the β-catenin signaling. PMID:19795382

  8. Caffeine inhibits adipogenesis through modulation of mitotic clonal expansion and the AKT/GSK3 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah-Reum; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Park, Hyounkyoung; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoonjeong; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine has been proposed to have several beneficial effects on obesity and its related metabolic diseases; however, how caffeine affects adipocyte differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that caffeine suppressed 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, two main adipogenic transcription factors. Anti-adipogenic markers, such as preadipocyte secreted factor (Pref)-1 and Krüppel-like factor 2, remained to be expressed in the presence of caffeine. Furthermore, 3T3-L1 cells failed to undergo typical mitotic clonal expansion in the presence of caffeine. Investigation of hormonal signaling revealed that caffeine inhibited the activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3 in a dose-dependent manner, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our data show that caffeine is an anti-adipogenic bioactive compound involved in the modulation of mitotic clonal expansion during adipocyte differentiation through the AKT/GSK3 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 111-115].

  9. Caffeine inhibits adipogenesis through modulation of mitotic clonal expansion and the AKT/GSK3 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Park, Hyounkyoung; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoonjeong; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Kim, Jae-woo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine has been proposed to have several beneficial effects on obesity and its related metabolic diseases; however, how caffeine affects adipocyte differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that caffeine suppressed 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, two main adipogenic transcription factors. Anti-adipogenic markers, such as preadipocyte secreted factor (Pref)-1 and Krüppel-like factor 2, remained to be expressed in the presence of caffeine. Furthermore, 3T3-L1 cells failed to undergo typical mitotic clonal expansion in the presence of caffeine. Investigation of hormonal signaling revealed that caffeine inhibited the activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3 in a dose-dependent manner, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our data show that caffeine is an anti-adipogenic bioactive compound involved in the modulation of mitotic clonal expansion during adipocyte differentiation through the AKT/GSK3 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 111-115] PMID:26350746

  10. Thiamet G mediates neuroprotection in experimental stroke by modulating microglia/macrophage polarization and inhibiting NF-κB p65 signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Yating; Ma, Xiaofeng; Li, Daojing; Hao, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are accountable for secondary injury induced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Previous studies indicated that O-GlcNAc modification (O-GlcNAcylation) is involved in the pathology of AIS, and increase of O-GlcNAcylation by glucosamine attenuated the brain damage after ischemia/reperfusion. Inhibition of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (OGA) with thiamet G (TMG) is an alternative option for accumulating O-GlcNAcylated proteins. In this study, we investigate the neuroprotective effect of TMG in a mouse model of experimental stroke. Our results indicate that TMG administration either before or after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery dramatically reduced infarct volume compared with that in untreated controls. TMG treatment ameliorated the neurological deficits and improved clinical outcomes in neurobehavioral tests by modulating the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, TMG administration reduced the number of Iba1(+) cells in MCAO mice, decreased expression of the M1 markers, and increased expression of the M2 markers in vivo. In vitro, M1 polarization of BV2 cells was inhibited by TMG treatment. Moreover, TMG decreased the expression of iNOS and COX2 mainly by suppressing NF-κB p65 signaling. These results suggest that TMG exerts a neuroprotective effect and could be useful as an anti-inflammatory agent for ischemic stroke therapy.

  11. Methamphetamine inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells by modulating anti-HIV-1 miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Mantri, Jyoti V; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4(+) T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4(+) T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti-HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4(+) T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  12. Sulla carnosa modulates root invertase activity in response to the inhibition of long-distance sucrose transport under magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N; Smaoui, A; Maurousset, L; Porcheron, B; Lemoine, R; Abdelly, C; Rabhi, M

    2016-11-01

    Being the principal product of photosynthesis, sucrose is involved in many metabolic processes in plants. As magnesium (Mg) is phloem mobile, an inverse relationship between Mg shortage and sugar accumulation in leaves is often observed. Mg deficiency effects on carbohydrate contents and invertase activities were determined in Sulla carnosa Desf. Plants were grown hydroponically at different Mg concentrations (0.00, 0.01, 0.05 and 1.50 mM Mg) for one month. Mineral analysis showed that Mg contents were drastically diminished in shoots and roots mainly at 0.01 and 0.00 mM Mg. This decline was adversely associated with a significant increase of sucrose, fructose and mainly glucose in shoots of plants exposed to severe deficiency. By contrast, sugar contents were severely reduced in roots of these plants indicating an alteration of carbohydrate partitioning between shoots and roots of Mg-deficient plants. Cell wall invertase activity was highly enhanced in roots of Mg-deficient plants, while the vacuolar invertase activity was reduced at 0.00 mM Mg. This decrease of vacuolar invertase activity may indicate the sensibility of roots to Mg starvation resulting from sucrose transport inhibition. (14) CO2 labeling experiments were in accordance with these findings showing an inhibition of sucrose transport from source leaves to sink tissues (roots) under Mg depletion. The obtained results confirm previous findings about Mg involvement in photosynthate loading into phloem and add new insights into mechanisms evolved by S. carnosa to cope with Mg shortage in particular the increase of the activity of cell wall invertase.

  13. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4+ T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti–HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4+ T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:24434277

  14. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition reveals endogenous nicotinic modulation of glutamate inputs to CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Albuquerque, Edson X; Pereira, Edna F R

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the neurotoxicological effects of soman, a potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor and a chemical warfare agent, is not clear. This is partly due to a poor understanding of the role of AChE in brain nAChR-mediated functions. To test the hypothesis that AChE inhibition builds sufficient acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain and facilitates nAChR-dependent glutamate transmission, we used whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) from CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons (SRI) in hippocampal slices. First, the frequency, amplitude and kinetics of EPSCs recorded from slices of control guinea pigs were compared to those recorded from slices of guinea pigs after a single injection of the irreversible AChE inhibitor soman (25.2μg/kg, s.c.). Second, EPSCs were recorded from rat hippocampal slices before and after their superfusion with the reversible AChE inhibitor donepezil (100nM). The frequency of EPSCs was significantly higher in slices taken from guinea pigs 24h but not 7 days after the soman injection than in slices from control animals. In 52% of the rat hippocampal slices tested, bath application of donepezil increased the frequency of EPSCs. Further, exposure to donepezil increased both burst-like and large-amplitude EPSCs, and increased the proportion of short (20-100ms) inter-event intervals. Donepezil's effects were suppressed significantly in presence of 10μM mecamylamine or 10nM methyllycaconitine. These results support the concept that AChE inhibition is able to recruit nAChR-dependent glutamate transmission in the hippocampus and such a mechanism can contribute to the acute neurotoxicological actions of soman.

  15. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Xiaotong

    2016-03-10

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption.

  16. Astaxanthin Inhibits Acetaldehyde-Induced Cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells by Modulating Akt/CREB and p38MAPK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, mediates the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by chronic excessive alcohol consumption. In this study, the effect of astaxanthin, a marine bioactive compound, on acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that astaxanthin protected cells from apoptosis by ameliorating the effect of acetaldehyde on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins, preventing the reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bak induced by acetaldehyde. Further analyses showed that astaxanthin treatment inhibited acetaldehyde-induced reduction of the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Astaxanthin treatment also prevented acetaldehyde-induced increase of the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and decrease of the level of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Activation of Akt/CREB pathway promotes cell survival and is involved in the upregulation of Bcl-2 gene. P38MAPK plays a critical role in apoptotic events while ERKs mediates the inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, astaxanthin may inhibit acetaldehyde-induced apoptosis through promoting the activation of Akt/CREB and ERKs and blocking the activation of p38MAPK. In addition, astaxanthin treatment suppressed the oxidative stress induced by acetaldehyde and restored the antioxidative capacity of SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, astaxanthin may protect cells against acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity through maintaining redox balance and modulating apoptotic and survival signals. The results suggest that astaxanthin treatment may be beneficial for preventing neurotoxicity associated with acetaldehyde and excessive alcohol consumption. PMID:26978376

  17. Mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by sulforaphane through epigenetic modulation of microRNA-21 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Samantha L; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2017-02-05

    Epigenetic modulations such as histone modifications are becoming increasingly valued for their ability to modify genes without altering the DNA sequence. Many bioactive compounds have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles in various forms of 6 cancers. Of the many dietary phytochemicals, sulforaphane (SFN), found in cruciferous vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli sprouts, has been present as one of the most potent (histone deacetylase) HDAC inhibitors to date. Recently, it has been 9 identified that HDAC inhibitors may play a vital role in regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in many human cancers. Specifically, studies have reported that oncogene microRNA-21 (miR-21) is dysregulated in many forms of cancer, especially colorectal 12 cancer cells (CRC). Accordingly, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of dietary SFN in CRC and its impact on the regulatory gene of telomerase, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), which is elevated in 90% of cancers and essential for their 15 continued proliferation. We demonstrated the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of dietary SFN in both HCT 116 and RKO CRC cells, and showed for the first time that SFN treatment decreased cell density, significantly inhibited cell viability 18 and induced apoptosis of CRC cells. Our results suggest that SFN regulates mRNA levels by inhibition of HDAC1. We also demonstrate that SFN down-regulated miR-21, telomerase protein and enzymatic activity in RKO CRC cells. These findings suggest that 21 hTERT down-regulation by HDAC1 inhibition is a promising approach for delaying and/or preventing CRC and may be accomplished via consumption of SFN in cruciferous vegetables.

  18. cAMP-dependent insulin modulation of synaptic inhibition in neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus is altered in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Camille B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies in which insulin is dysregulated, including diabetes, can disrupt central vagal circuitry, leading to gastrointestinal and other autonomic dysfunction. Insulin affects whole body metabolism through central mechanisms and is transported into the brain stem dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), which mediate parasympathetic visceral regulation. The NTS receives viscerosensory vagal input and projects heavily to the DMV, which supplies parasympathetic vagal motor output. Normally, insulin inhibits synaptic excitation of DMV neurons, with no effect on synaptic inhibition. Modulation of synaptic inhibition in DMV, however, is often sensitive to cAMP-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that an effect of insulin on GABAergic synaptic transmission may be uncovered by elevating resting cAMP levels in GABAergic terminals. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings in brain stem slices from control and diabetic mice to identify insulin effects on inhibitory neurotransmission in the DMV in the presence of forskolin to elevate cAMP levels. In the presence of forskolin, insulin decreased the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked IPSCs in DMV neurons from control mice. This effect was blocked by brefeldin-A, a Golgi-disrupting agent, or indinavir, a GLUT4 blocker, indicating that protein trafficking and glucose transport were involved. In streptozotocin-treated, diabetic mice, insulin did not affect IPSCs in DMV neurons in the presence of forskolin. Results suggest an impairment of cAMP-induced insulin effects on GABA release in the DMV, which likely involves disrupted protein trafficking in diabetic mice. These findings provide insight into mechanisms underlying vagal dysregulation associated with diabetes. PMID:24990858

  19. The extracellular matrix molecule tenascin-R and its HNK-1 carbohydrate modulate perisomatic inhibition and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Saghatelyan, A K; Gorissen, S; Albert, M; Hertlein, B; Schachner, M; Dityatev, A

    2000-09-01

    Perisomatic inhibition of pyramidal cells regulates efferent signalling from the hippocampus. The striking presence of HNK-1, a carbohydrate expressed by neural adhesion molecules, on perisomatic interneurons and around somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons led us to apply monoclonal HNK-1 antibodies to acute murine hippocampal slices. Injection of these antibodies decreased GABAA receptor-mediated perisomatic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (pIPSCs) but did not affect dendritic IPSCs or excitatory postsynaptic currents. The decrease in the mean amplitude of evoked pIPSCs by HNK-1 antibodies was accompanied by an increase in the coefficient of variation of pIPSC amplitude, number of failures and changes in frequency but not amplitude of miniature IPSCs, suggesting that HNK-1 antibodies reduced efficacy of evoked GABA release. HNK-1 antibodies did not affect pIPSCs in knock-out mice deficient in the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin-R which carries the HNK-1 carbohydrate as analysed by immunoblotting in synaptosomal fractions prepared from the CA1 region of the hippocampus. For control, HNK-1 antibody was applied to acute sections of mice deficient in the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, another potential carrier of HNK-1, and resulted in decrease of pIPSCs as observed in wild-type mice. Reduction in perisomatic inhibition is expected to promote induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) by increasing the level of depolarization during theta-burst stimulation. Indeed, LTP was increased by HNK-1 antibody applied before stimulation. Moreover, LTP was reduced by an HNK-1 peptide mimic, but not control peptide. These results provide first evidence that tenascin-R and its associated HNK-1 carbohydrate modulate perisomatic inhibition and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  20. Auto-Inhibition and Partner Proteins, Core-Binding Factor β (CBFβ) and Ets-1, Modulate DNA Binding by CBFα2 (AML1)

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ting-Lei; Goetz, Tamara L.; Graves, Barbara J.; Speck, Nancy A.

    2000-01-01

    Core-binding factor α2 (CBFα2; otherwise known as AML1 or PEBP2αB) is a DNA-binding subunit in the family of core-binding factors (CBFs), heterodimeric transcription factors that play pivotal roles in multiple developmental processes in mamma