Science.gov

Sample records for modules descartes cider

  1. Preliminary design studies for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.

    1992-12-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project is developing several computer codes to model the release and transport of radionuclides into the environment. This preliminary design addresses two of these codes: Dynamic Estimates of Concentrations and Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments (DESCARTES) and Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides (CIDER). The DESCARTES code will be used to estimate the concentration of radionuclides in environmental pathways, given the output of the air transport code HATCHET. The CIDER code will use information provided by DESCARTES to estimate the dose received by an individual. This document reports on preliminary design work performed by the code development team to determine if the requirements could be met for Descartes and CIDER. The document contains three major sections: (i) a data flow diagram and discussion for DESCARTES, (ii) a data flow diagram and discussion for CIDER, and (iii) a series of brief statements regarding the design approach required to address each code requirement.

  2. Software Development Plan for DESCARTES and CIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-12-08

    This Software Development Plan (SDP) outlines all software activities required to obtain functional environmental accumulation and individual dose codes for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. The modeling activities addressed use the output of the air transport-code HATCHET to compute radionuclide concentrations in environmental pathways, and continue on through calculations of dose for individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has a deliverable in the June 1993 time frame to be able to start computing doses to individuals from nuclear-related activities on the Hanford Site during and following World War II. The CIDER code will compute doses and their uncertainties for individuals living in the contaminated environment computed by DESCARTES. The projected size of the code is 3000 lines.

  3. Benchmarking studies for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Envirorunental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project is developing several computer codes to model the airborne release, transport, and envirormental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In order to calculate the dose of radiation a person may have received in any given location, the geographic area addressed by the HEDR Project will be divided into a grid. The grid size suggested by the draft requirements contains 2091 units called nodes. Two of the codes being developed are DESCARTES and CIDER. The DESCARTES code will be used to estimate the concentration of radionuclides in environmental pathways from the output of the air transport code RATCHET. The CIDER code will use information provided by DESCARTES to estimate the dose received by an individual. The requirements that Battelle (BNW) set for these two codes were released to the HEDR Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in a draft document on November 10, 1992. This document reports on the preliminary work performed by the code development team to determine if the requirements could be met.

  4. Preliminary design studies for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.

    1992-12-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project is developing several computer codes to model the release and transport of radionuclides into the environment. This preliminary design addresses two of these codes: Dynamic Estimates of Concentrations and Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments (DESCARTES) and Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides (CIDER). The DESCARTES code will be used to estimate the concentration of radionuclides in environmental pathways, given the output of the air transport code HATCHET. The CIDER code will use information provided by DESCARTES to estimate the dose received by an individual. This document reports on preliminary design work performed by the code development team to determine if the requirements could be met for Descartes and CIDER. The document contains three major sections: (i) a data flow diagram and discussion for DESCARTES, (ii) a data flow diagram and discussion for CIDER, and (iii) a series of brief statements regarding the design approach required to address each code requirement.

  5. Data model description for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, T.B.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. One of the major objectives of the HEDR Project is to develop several computer codes to model the airborne releases. transport and envirorunental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In July 1992, the HEDR Project Manager determined that the computer codes being developed (DESCARTES, calculation of environmental accumulation from airborne releases, and CIDER, dose calculations from environmental accumulation) were not sufficient to create accurate models. A team of HEDR staff members developed a plan to assure that computer codes would meet HEDR Project goals. The plan consists of five tasks: (1) code requirements definition. (2) scoping studies, (3) design specifications, (4) benchmarking, and (5) data modeling. This report defines the data requirements for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes.

  6. Benchmarking studies for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Envirorunental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project is developing several computer codes to model the airborne release, transport, and envirormental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In order to calculate the dose of radiation a person may have received in any given location, the geographic area addressed by the HEDR Project will be divided into a grid. The grid size suggested by the draft requirements contains 2091 units called nodes. Two of the codes being developed are DESCARTES and CIDER. The DESCARTES code will be used to estimate the concentration of radionuclides in environmental pathways from the output of the air transport code RATCHET. The CIDER code will use information provided by DESCARTES to estimate the dose received by an individual. The requirements that Battelle (BNW) set for these two codes were released to the HEDR Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in a draft document on November 10, 1992. This document reports on the preliminary work performed by the code development team to determine if the requirements could be met.

  7. Data model description for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, T.B.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. One of the major objectives of the HEDR Project is to develop several computer codes to model the airborne releases. transport and envirorunental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In July 1992, the HEDR Project Manager determined that the computer codes being developed (DESCARTES, calculation of environmental accumulation from airborne releases, and CIDER, dose calculations from environmental accumulation) were not sufficient to create accurate models. A team of HEDR staff members developed a plan to assure that computer codes would meet HEDR Project goals. The plan consists of five tasks: (1) code requirements definition. (2) scoping studies, (3) design specifications, (4) benchmarking, and (5) data modeling. This report defines the data requirements for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes.

  8. Software Development Plan for DESCARTES and CIDER. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-12-08

    This Software Development Plan (SDP) outlines all software activities required to obtain functional environmental accumulation and individual dose codes for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. The modeling activities addressed use the output of the air transport-code HATCHET to compute radionuclide concentrations in environmental pathways, and continue on through calculations of dose for individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has a deliverable in the June 1993 time frame to be able to start computing doses to individuals from nuclear-related activities on the Hanford Site during and following World War II. The CIDER code will compute doses and their uncertainties for individuals living in the contaminated environment computed by DESCARTES. The projected size of the code is 3000 lines.

  9. Descartes' dreams.

    PubMed

    Withers, Robert

    2008-11-01

    René Descartes is often regarded as the 'father of modern philosophy'. He was a key figure in instigating the scientific revolution that has been so influential in shaping our modern world. He has been revered and reviled in almost equal measure for this role; on the one hand seen as liberating science from religion, on the other as splitting soul from body and man from nature. He dates the founding of his philosophical methods to the night of 10(th) November 1619 and in particular to three powerful dreams he had that night. This article utilizes Descartes' own interpretations of the dreams, supported by biographical material, as well as contemporary neuroscientific and psychoanalytic theory, to reach a new understanding of them. It is argued that the dreams can be understood as depicting Descartes' personal journey from a state of mind-body dissociation to one of mind-body deintegration. This personal journey may have implications for a parallel journey from Renaissance to modern culture and from modernity to post-modern culture.

  10. Parameters used in the environmental pathways and radiological dose modules (DESCARTES, CIDER, and CRD codes) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1994-05-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site during the period of 1944 to 1992. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  11. Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

  12. Biogenic amines in natural ciders.

    PubMed

    Garai, G; Dueñas, M T; Irastorza, A; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2006-12-01

    Biogenic amines play an important physiological role in mammals, and high amounts of some exogenous amines in human diet may contribute to a wide variety of toxic effects. These amines are commonly found in many foodstuffs, particularly in fermented products such as cheese, meat products, beer, wine, and ciders. Here, the level of biogenic amines in some natural ciders was examined. Twenty-four samples of cider purchased from commercial sources were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection after precolumn derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde. Amine levels were variable, ranging from not detected to 23 mg/liter. The average level of total biogenic amines in ciders was 5.94 +/- 8.42 mg/liter. Putrescine, histamine, and tyramine were the prevailing amines being present in 50.0, 37.5, and 33.3% of the ciders studied; very small amounts of ethylamine and phenylethylamine were observed in only one sample. Other cider parameters were analyzed to determine whether they affect the biogenic amine content in ciders, and the results were evaluated by applying cluster analysis and principal component analysis. Ciders that showed lower glycerol contents and higher amounts of 1,3-propanediol had much higher levels of histamine, tyramine, and putrescine, suggesting a high activity of lactic acid bacteria during cider making and thus the need for effective control of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:17186671

  13. Chemical characterization of asturian cider.

    PubMed

    Picinelli, A; Suárez, B; Moreno, J; Rodríguez, R; Caso-García, L M; Mangas, J J

    2000-09-01

    Ninety-four samples of Asturian natural cider were analyzed for titratable and volatile acidities, pH, alcoholic, total polyphenol, and acidic polysaccharide contents, nonvolatile acids, polyalcohols, residual sugars, and major volatile compounds. A partial least-squares regression analysis (PLR-1) was performed to correlate the chemical composition and the origin of the raw material, the cider samples being grouped into two categories: an "odd" class, cider made from foreign apples (1995 and 1997), and an "even" class, ciders made from Asturian apples (1996 and 1998). The mathematical model has a multiple linear correlation coefficient of 80%. PMID:10995303

  14. Angle Defect and Descartes' Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Rene Descartes lived from 1596 to 1650. His contributions to geometry are still remembered today in the terminology "Descartes' plane". This paper discusses a simple theorem of Descartes, which enables students to easily determine the number of vertices of almost every polyhedron. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)

  15. Young and Rover on the Descartes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Commander of the Apollo 16 mission, replaces tools in the hand tool carrier at the aft end of the 'Rover' Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. This photograph was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot. Smokey Mountain, with the large Ravine crater on its flank, is in the left background. This view is looking Northeast.

  16. About Descartes: Uses and Misuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sages, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In this Forum paper I examine how Orlander and Wickman represent Descartes philosophy, noting that while it might be tempting to apply one facet of a philosopher's argument, such as Descartes separation of mind and body, by doing that we do not capture the development of his thinking. I propose the phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl can…

  17. About Descartes: uses and misuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sages, Roger

    2011-09-01

    In this Forum paper I examine how Orlander and Wickman represent Descartes philosophy, noting that while it might be tempting to apply one facet of a philosopher's argument, such as Descartes separation of mind and body, by doing that we do not capture the development of his thinking. I propose the phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl can assist researchers to move beyond simple dichotomies.

  18. [Descartes and medicine].

    PubMed

    Jeune, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes (1596-1650) gave a high priority to medicine and dedicated a great deal of his life to medical studies. Nevertheless his relation to medicine has always been much discussed. However, a number of recent works have contributed to reassessing the earlier critique which nearly wrote him out from medical history. The recent biographical dismissal of a number of earlier allegations and the recent interpretations of the medical contents of his collected writings ought to result in Descartes' reinstatement in medical history. His novel anti-Aristotelian methodology had a crucial influence on the medicine of the subsequent decades. Also his early defense of Harvey's theory of blood circulation had great influence. Especially his thoughts about a mechanical physiology by means of which the functions of the body could be explained without involvement of "occult faculties" influenced that time. His empirical mistakes, including the central role which he ascribed to the corpus pineale, are offset, which already Steno noted, by his brilliant thoughts about the function and importance of the brain. Although he did not make any really new empirical discoveries within medicine, he advanced a number of concrete ideas which later lead to actual discoveries such as visual accommodation, the reflex concept and the reciprocal innervations of antagonistic muscles. Descartes' psychosomatic view of the importance of the interplay between sensations, "the passions of the soul", and the free will in the preservation of health shows in addition that his fundamental soul-body dualism was far more nuanced than is often claimed.

  19. Effects of sequential mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on apple cider fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mengqi; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong

    2014-09-01

    The fermentation of cider by mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was carried out to study their effect on the cider quality. The results showed that growth of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae was affected by each other during co-fermentation process. All the mixed cultures produced statistically the same level of ethanol as S. cerevisiae monoculture. The mixed fermentation could produce more variety and higher amounts of acetate esters, ethyl esters, higher alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that ciders obtained from co-fermentation with W. anomalus gained higher scores than ciders fermented by pure S. cerevisiae, especially the co-fermentation cultures WS3, WS4, WS6, and WS8. Only 3 days of fermentation with W. anomalus in sequential mixtures were enough to improve the quality of cider. Wickerhamomyces anomalus could be used in association with S. cerevisiae to improve the quality of cider. The modulation of inoculation time may provide an effective means of manipulating cider aroma for different characteristics.

  20. Effects of sequential mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on apple cider fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mengqi; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong

    2014-09-01

    The fermentation of cider by mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was carried out to study their effect on the cider quality. The results showed that growth of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae was affected by each other during co-fermentation process. All the mixed cultures produced statistically the same level of ethanol as S. cerevisiae monoculture. The mixed fermentation could produce more variety and higher amounts of acetate esters, ethyl esters, higher alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that ciders obtained from co-fermentation with W. anomalus gained higher scores than ciders fermented by pure S. cerevisiae, especially the co-fermentation cultures WS3, WS4, WS6, and WS8. Only 3 days of fermentation with W. anomalus in sequential mixtures were enough to improve the quality of cider. Wickerhamomyces anomalus could be used in association with S. cerevisiae to improve the quality of cider. The modulation of inoculation time may provide an effective means of manipulating cider aroma for different characteristics. PMID:24931623

  1. Screening of cider yeasts for sparkling cider production (Champenoise method).

    PubMed

    Suárez Valles, Belén; Pando Bedriñana, Rosa; Lastra Queipo, Ana; Mangas Alonso, Juan José

    2008-08-01

    A total of 350 colonies isolated from a cider cellar in Asturias (Spain) were identified by rDNA ITS-RFLP restriction analysis. Saccharomyces spp. strains were characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis. Fifty-four different Saccharomyces spp. strains were identified and tested to ascertain their capacity to carry out secondary fermentation of sparkling ciders. The screening of yeasts to determine their principal enological characteristics (tolerance to ethanol, production of volatile acidity and hydrogen sulphide) was accomplished by means of rapid, non-expensive assays (plate agar). As a result, 13 (24%) of the 54 initial Saccharomyces spp. yeast strains were eliminated. The technological properties assessed were flocculation capacity, ethanol and sulphite tolerance, and production of major volatiles. Ten Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were characterized as true flocculants; all of these strains were able to grow in ethanolic medium and in the presence of 200mg/l of sulphite. Applying cluster analysis to the production of amyl alcohols, isobutanol, propanol and 2-phenylethanol, the strains were classified in two natural groups. Two flocculent yeast strains referred to as 3' and 50', representative of the each statistical group, were selected together with two reference strains (Saccharomyces bayanus C6 and S. cerevisiae Levuline CHP) to elaborate four sparkling ciders by the Champenoise method. The analysis of variance (p<0.01) among ciders revealed that glycerol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, propanol, i-butanol and 2-phenylethanol were significantly influenced by the secondary yeast strain. The results of sensory analysis indicated that all the sparkling ciders were scored as good. No significant differences among sparkling ciders were found for odour attributes and taste intensity. PMID:18541168

  2. The analysis of cider phenolics.

    PubMed

    Lea, A G

    1978-01-01

    Four classes of phenolic compounds may be distinguished in ciders: 1. Phenolic acids; 2. Phloretin derivatives; 3. Catechins; 4. Procyanidins. Only the procyanidins can be classed as true tannins and only they make any contribution to the bitterness and astringency of the product. Traditional methods of tannin analysis, however, fail to estimate the procyanidins as a separate group from the other phenolics. It is now possible to isolate the procyanidin fraction from bittersweet ciders by adsorption onto Sephadex LH-20 and then to separate the individual procyanidins by counter-current distribution between ethyl acetate and water. In this way sufficient material may be obtained to allow structural studies, and we can now show that ciders contain a range of procyanidin polymers probably up to heptameric, based mostly on epicatechin. Tasing panel work on these fractions shows that bitterness is predominantly associated with oligomeric procyanidins and astringency with polymeric procyanidins. Analytical chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 in a water-methanol gradient also shows, for instance, the selective loss of up to 20% of organoleptically significant procyanidins during gelatin fining, and the useful gain in procyanidins which can occur with DDS diffuser extraction. These results are important because a certain amount of bitterness and astringency is considered desirable in blended English ciders, but the true bittersweet apples are in very short supply. PMID:754579

  3. User instructions for the CIDER Dose Code

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides user instructions for the CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides) computer code. The CIDER code computes estimates of annual doses estimated for both reference individuals with a known residence and food consumption history. This document also provides user instructions for four utility codes used to build input data libraries for CIDER. These utility codes are ENVFAC (environmental factors), FOOFAC (food factors), LIFFAC (lifestyle factors), and ORGFAC (organ factors). Finally, this document provides user instructions for the EXPAND utility code. The EXPAND code processes a result file from CIDER and extracts a summary of the dose information for reporting or plotting purposes.

  4. Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

  5. 27 CFR 24.76 - Tax exempt cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax exempt cider. 24.76... exempt cider. Cider, when produced solely from the noneffervescent fermentation of apple juice without... premises and sold or offered for sale as cider, and not as wine or as a substitute for wine, is not...

  6. 27 CFR 24.76 - Tax exempt cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax exempt cider. 24.76... exempt cider. Cider, when produced solely from the noneffervescent fermentation of apple juice without... premises and sold or offered for sale as cider, and not as wine or as a substitute for wine, is not...

  7. 27 CFR 24.76 - Tax exempt cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax exempt cider. 24.76... exempt cider. Cider, when produced solely from the noneffervescent fermentation of apple juice without... premises and sold or offered for sale as cider, and not as wine or as a substitute for wine, is not...

  8. Piaget's Clay and Descartes' Wax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, David W.

    1988-01-01

    Exploration of a coincidental similarity between the work of Rene Descartes and Jean Piaget relating to the contemporary pedagogical conception of understanding as an active construction of reality points out some of the images that coalesce around this conception and reflects upon alternatives to the conception. (CB)

  9. Gas chromatographic analysis of total fatty acids in cider.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, D; Alonso, J J; Cabrales, I M; Abrodo, P A

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports the composition of total fatty acids in an apple beverage, cider. Fatty acids are present in the free or esterified form and contribute to both the flavor and foam properties of cider. Fatty acids were separated and identified as methyl esters by GC-MS, and 12 of these were subsequently determined by GC-FID. The major fatty acids found in cider were caproic, caprylic, capric, and palmitic acid, the saturated acids predominating over the unsaturated ones. The proposed method was applied to 59 ciders from three consecutive harvests (1996, 1997, and 1998), which were made by 19 cider-makers from the region of Asturias (Spain). Linear discriminant analysis of fatty acids in these samples allowed selection of palmitoleic, pentadecanoic, linoleic, myristic, and linolenic acid as the most predictive variables to differentiate ciders made from apples grown in the Asturias region (1997 harvest) and ciders made from apples grown outside this region (1996 and 1998 harvests). PMID:11312846

  10. Flavonoid and hydroxycinnamate profiles of english apple ciders.

    PubMed

    Marks, Serena C; Mullen, William; Crozier, Alan

    2007-10-17

    Seventeen phenolic compounds in 23 English apple ciders were identified and quantified by HPLC-PDA-MS (2). The total phenolic content of the ciders varied greatly ranging from 44 to 1559 mg/L. Four groups of compounds were identified, flavan-3-ols, hydroxycinnamates, flavonols, and dihydrochalcones. Hydroxycinnamates were the predominant group of phenolics in the majority of the ciders. Procyanidins were analyzed by HPLC after thiolysis, and total procyanidin content ranged from 8 to 722 mg/L and an average degree of polymerization of 2.5-3.5. This investigation of a wide range of ciders has shown a substantial variation in the profile and quantity of the phenolics. The analysis of single variety ciders highlighted the importance of using an apple cultivar with a high phenolic content to produce a phenolic-rich cider. Adaptations to the cider-making process could be used to increase the phenolic content with potential health benefits. PMID:17867635

  11. Descartes and His Peculiar Sleep Pattern.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Milovanovic, Srdjan D; Trajanovic, Nikola N

    2015-01-01

    Rene Descartes (1596-1650) was a mathematician, philosopher, and scholar, whose work set a foundation for modern science. Among other interests, he focused on locating the "core and the seat of the soul" and concluded that the pineal gland was such a structure. Recent scientific findings validate Descartes' deep interest in pineal gland, appreciating its role as part of the circadian rhythm system. On the other hand, the biographical information suggests that Descartes had an aberration of the circadian rhythm (delayed sleep phase). Coincidentally, this meant that one of the most important things in his private life and one of the most significant areas of his research intersected in an overlooked way.

  12. Phenolic profile of Asturian (Spain) natural cider.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Picinelli Lobo, Anna; Suárez Valles, Belén

    2006-01-11

    The polyphenolic composition of natural ciders from the Asturian community (Spain), during 2 consecutive years, was analyzed by RP-HPLC and the photodiode-array detection system, without previous extraction (direct injection). A total of 16 phenolic compounds (catechol, tyrosol, protocatechuic acid, hydrocaffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, hydrocoumaric acid, ferulic acid, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, procyanidins B2 and B5, phloretin-2'-xyloglucoside, phloridzin, hyperin, avicularin, and quercitrin) were identified and quantified. A fourth quercetin derivative, one dihydrochalcone-related compound, two unknown procyanidins, three hydroxycinnamic derivatives, and two unknown compounds were also found. Among the low-molecular-mass polyphenols analyzed, hydrocaffeic acid was the most abundant compound, representing more than 80% of the total polyphenolic acids. Procyanidins were the most important family among the flavonoid compounds. Discriminant analysis was allowed to correctly classify more than 93% of the ciders, according to the harvest year; the most discriminant variables were an unknown procyanidin and quercitrin. PMID:16390187

  13. Descartes and His Peculiar Sleep Pattern.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Milovanovic, Srdjan D; Trajanovic, Nikola N

    2015-01-01

    Rene Descartes (1596-1650) was a mathematician, philosopher, and scholar, whose work set a foundation for modern science. Among other interests, he focused on locating the "core and the seat of the soul" and concluded that the pineal gland was such a structure. Recent scientific findings validate Descartes' deep interest in pineal gland, appreciating its role as part of the circadian rhythm system. On the other hand, the biographical information suggests that Descartes had an aberration of the circadian rhythm (delayed sleep phase). Coincidentally, this meant that one of the most important things in his private life and one of the most significant areas of his research intersected in an overlooked way. PMID:26291552

  14. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  15. 7 CFR 51.342 - U.S. Cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false U.S. Cider. 51.342 Section 51.342 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Grades § 51.342 U.S. Cider. “U.S. Cider” consists of...

  16. 10. Front (southwest) elevation: partial view of Cider Mill and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Front (southwest) elevation: partial view of Cider Mill and Woodworking Mill. Steam box for bending wood visible on roof of Cider Mill; wood-framed table saw visible in open doorway; cordwood saw in lower right beneath windows. - Ben Thresher's Mill, State Aid No. 1, Barnet, Caledonia County, VT

  17. 7 CFR 51.342 - U.S. Cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Cider. 51.342 Section 51.342 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Grades § 51.342 U.S. Cider. “U.S. Cider” consists of...

  18. 7 CFR 51.342 - U.S. Cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Cider. 51.342 Section 51.342 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Grades § 51.342 U.S. Cider. “U.S. Cider” consists of...

  19. Descartes' visit to the town library, or how Augustinian is Descartes' neurophysiology?

    PubMed

    Smith, C U

    1998-08-01

    Rene Descartes was early accused of taking his central philosophical proposition from St Augustine. Did he also take his central neurophysiological concept from the same source? This is the question which this paper sets out to answer. It is concluded that the foundational neurophysiology propounded in L'Homme does indeed show strong and interesting resemblences to Augustine's largely Erasistratean version. Descartes, however, working within the new paradigm of seventeenth-century physical science, introduced a new principle: whereas Augustine's neurophysiology is pervaded throughout by a vital factor, the pneuma, Descartes' theory involved only inanimate material forces. It is concluded, further, that in spite of the interesting similarities between Augustinian and Cartesian neurophysiology there is no evidence for any direct plagiarism. It seems more likely that Augustine's influence was filtered through the Galenical physiologists of Descartes' own time and of the preceding century.

  20. Descartes, René (1596-1650)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mathematician and philosopher, born in La Haye (now Descartes), Touraine, France, settled in Holland. His work, La Géométrie, formulated geometry in terms of algebra, from which comes the concept of Cartesian coordinates. Studied Aristotelian philosophy and was attracted to mathematics, and the purely logical analysis of practically everything. Wrote Discours de la Méthode pour bien Conduire sa R...

  1. Patulin surveillance in apple cider and juice marketed in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kerri L; Bobe, Gerd; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2009-06-01

    Patulin is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple juices. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of patulin in (i) apple cider produced and marketed by Michigan apple cider mills during the fall seasons of 2002 to 2003 and 2003 to 2004 and (ii) apple juice and cider, including shelf-stable products, marketed in retail grocery stores in Michigan throughout 2005 and 2006. End product samples (n=493) obtained from 104 Michigan apple cider mills were analyzed for patulin concentration by using solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Patulin was detected (> or =4 microg/liter) in 18.7% of all cider mill samples, with 11 samples (2.2%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. A greater percentage of cider samples obtained from mills using thermal pasteurization contained detectable patulin (28.4%) than did those from mills using UV light radiation (13.5%) or no pathogen reduction treatment (17.0%). Among retail grocery store samples (n=159), 23% of apple juice and cider samples contained detectable patulin, with 18 samples (11.3%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) action level for patulin is 50 microg/kg. Some apple juice samples obtained from retail grocery stores had exceptionally high patulin concentrations, ranging up to 2700 microg/liter. Collectively, these results indicate that most apple cider and juice test samples from Michigan were below the FDA action level for patulin but that certain apple cider and juice processors have inadequate controls over patulin concentrations in final products. The industry, overall, should focus on improved quality of fruit used in juice production and improve culling procedures to reduce patulin concentrations.

  2. Influence of Fatty acids on foaming properties of cider.

    PubMed

    Margolles Cabrales, Inmaculada; Arias Abrodo, Pilar; Blanco-Gomis, Domingo

    2003-10-01

    Seventy-seven ciders from four consecutive harvests, which were produced at industrial scale by cider-makers from the region of Asturias (northern Spain), were analyzed to evaluate their foam capacity. The Bikerman method for the evaluation of foaming characteristics was adapted to ciders. In foaming, there are two parameters, foam formation and foam stability, which are found to be related to each other. To determine the relationship between fatty acid content and foaming properties of cider, the multivariate analysis technique of canonical correlation analysis was applied. Foam stability is positively related to the content of caprylic acid. Foam height is positively related to linolenic, pentadecanoic, and palmitic acid and negatively related to stearic and linoleic acid. PMID:14518961

  3. Cider proteins and foam characteristics: a contribution to their characterization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, Domingo; Mangas-Alonso, Juan J; Junco-Corujedo, Sara; Gutiérrez-Alvarez, M Dolores

    2007-04-01

    A capillary sieving electrophoretic method for protein analysis and molecular weight determination was used to characterize ciders from Asturias, northern Spain. The total protein content (Bradford method) and the foam parameters (Bikerman method) were also analyzed to complete this characterization. The polypeptide profile, based on the molecular weight, together with exploratory and classification techniques, that is, principal component analysis (PCA) or linear discriminant analysis (LDA), allowed ciders to be differentiated on the basis of their foam assessment and the apple juice extraction technology used in the cidermaking process. In addition, the application of correlation analysis, that is, canonical correlations (CCA) or partial least-squares (PLS), revealed that the proteins with higher molecular weight were more relevant with respect to cider foamability. PLS analysis also provided a mathematical equation that is able to predict the stabilization time of foam from the polypeptide profile of the cider, because this is the foam parameter most influenced by these compounds. PMID:17328556

  4. 7 CFR 51.342 - U.S. Cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Grades § 51.342 U.S. Cider. “U.S. Cider” consists of apples which are free from decay, worm holes and internal...

  5. 7 CFR 51.342 - U.S. Cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Grades § 51.342 U.S. Cider. “U.S. Cider” consists of apples which are free from decay, worm holes and internal...

  6. Sensory and foaming properties of sparkling cider.

    PubMed

    Picinelli Lobo, Anna; Fernández Tascón, Norman; Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Suárez Valles, Belén

    2005-12-28

    The effect of yeast strain and aging time on the chemical composition, analytical, and sensory foam properties of sparkling ciders has been studied. The analytical foam parameters (foamability, HM; Bikerman coefficient, sigma; and foam stability time, T(s)) were significantly influenced by aging and yeast strain. The sensory attributes (initial foam, foam area persistence, bubble size, foam collar, and overall foam quality) improved with aging time. Likewise, the yeast strain positively influenced the assessment of initial foam, foam area persistence, number of bubble chains, and overall foam quality. Significant and positive correlations were found between alcoholic proof, dry extract, total and volatile acidities, total phenols and total proteins, and sigma, whereas HM was negatively correlated with specific gravity, alcoholic proof, dry extract, and total proteins. PMID:16366693

  7. Stable isotope and chemical compositions of European and Australasian ciders as a guide to authenticity.

    PubMed

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-01-28

    This paper presents a data set derived from the analysis of bottled and canned ciders that may be used for comparison with suspected counterfeit or substitute products. Isotopic analysis of the solid residues from ciders (predominantly sugar) provided a means to determine the addition of C4 plant sugars. The added sugars were found to comprise cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose, or combinations. The majority of ciders from Australia and New Zealand were found to contain significant amounts of added sugar, which provided a limited means to distinguish these ciders from European ciders. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole ciders (predominantly water) were shown to be controlled by two factors, the water available to the parent plant and evaporation. Analysis of data derived from both isotopic and chemical analysis of ciders provided a means to discriminate between regions and countries of manufacture.

  8. Stable isotope and chemical compositions of European and Australasian ciders as a guide to authenticity.

    PubMed

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-01-28

    This paper presents a data set derived from the analysis of bottled and canned ciders that may be used for comparison with suspected counterfeit or substitute products. Isotopic analysis of the solid residues from ciders (predominantly sugar) provided a means to determine the addition of C4 plant sugars. The added sugars were found to comprise cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose, or combinations. The majority of ciders from Australia and New Zealand were found to contain significant amounts of added sugar, which provided a limited means to distinguish these ciders from European ciders. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the whole ciders (predominantly water) were shown to be controlled by two factors, the water available to the parent plant and evaporation. Analysis of data derived from both isotopic and chemical analysis of ciders provided a means to discriminate between regions and countries of manufacture. PMID:25536876

  9. [Unhealthy weight loss. Erosion by apple cider vinegar].

    PubMed

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Veerman, E C I

    2012-12-01

    Erosive tooth wear was diagnosed in the dentition of a 15-year-old girl with a Moroccan background. After an anamnesis, extensive analysis of possible risk factors and a study of the pattern of erosion, it was concluded that the erosive tooth wear was induced by daily consumption of a glass of apple cider vinegar Further investigation revealed that in North-African culture, women have used apple cider vinegar to achieve weight loss for generations. Bodybuilders are also known to make use of this method of weight reduction. PMID:23373303

  10. Descartes' dogma and damage to Western psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Ventriglio, A; Bhugra, D

    2015-10-01

    René Descartes described the concept of mind-body dualism in the 16th century. This concept has been called his error but we prefer to call it his dogma because the error was recognised much later. We studied the original writings translated by various scholars. We believe that his dogma has caused tremendous amount of damage to Western psychiatry. This dualism has created boundaries between mind and body but as we know they are inextricably interlinked and influence each other. This has affected clinical practice and has increased the dichotomy between psychiatric services and the physical health care services in the West at least. This dualism has also contributed to stigma against mental illness, the mentally ill and the psychiatric services. We propose that it is time to abandon this mind-body dualism and to look at the whole patient and their illness experiences as is done in some other health care systems such as Ayurveda.

  11. Descartes the doctor: rationalism and its therapies.

    PubMed

    Shapin, S

    2000-06-01

    During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. Rene Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim, on that basis, he offered practical medical advice to others and advertised the expectation that, taking his own advice, he would live a very long time. This paper describes what Cartesian medicine looked like in practice and what that practice owed to the power of modernist Reason.

  12. Influence of controlled inoculation of malolactic fermentation on the sensory properties of industrial cider.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ainoa; de Revel, Gilles; Antalick, Guillaume; Herrero, Mónica; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Given the lack of research in the traditional cider making field when compared to the efforts devoted to winemaking, this work focused on the effects of controlled inoculation of the malolactic fermentation (MLF) on the sensory properties of cider. MLF develops spontaneously in cider making at industrial level. In this work, industrial cider samples were inoculated with selected indigenous Oenococcus oeni strains and the benefits on the aroma and flavour in cider production compared to non-inoculated ciders were evaluated. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR was used to monitor strain colonization ability, outnumbering the indigenous microbiota, after completion of the alcoholic fermentation at industrial scale (20,000 l). Aroma-active compounds of experimentally inoculated ciders were analysed by HPLC and GC-MS, and sensory profiles were determined by fractioning aroma extracts using reversed-phase HPLC. Principal component analysis allowed the identification of relationships and differences among ciders with or without inoculation, including several highly appreciated commercial ones obtained under spontaneous conditions. Under controlled inoculation conditions, not only could MLF be shortened by half but, interestingly, enhancement of aroma complexity and flavour resulted in ciders enriched with a higher fruity note. In addition, important aromatic groups analysed here had not been previously described, thus affording deeper knowledge on aroma characterization of apple cider. PMID:24633582

  13. Yeast ecology in French cider and black olive natural fermentations.

    PubMed

    Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Levert, Delphine; Casaregola, Serge; Sohier, Danièle

    2006-04-15

    In this study, rDNA ITS restriction analysis was used to identify yeasts from two naturally fermented products: French ciders and black olives. In cider musts and bottled ciders, the PCR-RFLP method generated 15 different ITS/RFLP profiles for a total of 208 isolates. The predominant yeasts corresponded to Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lachancea cidri and Dekkera anomala. Three identified species: Candida sake, Candida tropicalis and Kluyveromyces marxianus had never been described before in ciders. For the black olive fermentation, the method allowed for identification of 11 profiles for a total of 137 isolates. A sequential apparition of yeasts was observed with Pichia anomala, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces etchellsii being the predominant species. Four isolates did not correspond to any known species based on the sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene. By using the rDNA ITS method, valuable information on yeast population biodiversity and dynamics in the naturally fermented food products studied was obtained. PMID:16380183

  14. Production and composition of cider spirits distilled in "alquitara".

    PubMed

    Madrera, Roberto Rodríguez; Valles, Belén Suarez; Hevia, Ana García; Fernandez, Ovidio García; Tascón, Norman Fernandez; Alonso, Juan José Mangas

    2006-12-27

    The capacity of alquitara (a traditional distillation system) to produce cider brandies is evaluated. To do so, the chemical composition of 12 fractions obtained during the distillation process and the cider brandies obtained from five ciders were analyzed (alcohol strength, methanol, volatile substances, furfural, and metals), taking into account European and Spanish legislation. During the course of distillation, an important increase in methanol, furfural, 2-phenylethanol, and metals in the last fractions was observed, while fusel oils were more abundant in the first fractions collected. Only acetaldehyde behaved differently, showing a minimum concentration in the middle fractions that might be explained by its formation on the surface of alquitara. On the other hand, the final distillates obtained by means of this method complied with the considered regulations. Worth highlighting in this regard are the low levels of a potential toxin such as methanol, as well as the detection of a constant ratio for methanol, ethanol, and fusel oil for the pairs of cider/spirits analyzed, which could be interpreted as an indication of good uniformity in the distillation system and method, thus guaranteeing product quality. PMID:17177532

  15. CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, CARVED OUT OF A LARGE BOULDER AT THE RIVERS EDGE, PROBABLY DATES FROM THE LIFETIME OF JOHN BARTRAM, IF NOT TO THE SWEDISH SETTLERS BEFORE HIM. THE IRON FENCE IS A NINETEENTH-CENTURY ADDITION - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 27 CFR 24.76 - Tax exempt cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax exempt cider. 24.76 Section 24.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.76...

  17. 27 CFR 24.76 - Tax exempt cider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax exempt cider. 24.76 Section 24.76 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Tax Exempt Wine § 24.76...

  18. Characterization of Spanish ciders by means of chemical and olfactometric profiles and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Picinelli Lobo, Anna; Antón-Díaz, María José; Mangas Alonso, Juan José; Suárez Valles, Belén

    2016-12-15

    A comparative study of the aroma (volatile composition and olfactometric profiles) of Asturian and Basque still ciders in two maturation stages was conducted. Among the major volatile compounds, amyl alcohols, ethyl lactate and ethyl acetate were quantitatively relevant in all of the ciders studied. The minor fraction mainly consisted of fatty acids, volatile phenols and alcohols. Three PLS-discriminant models with low prediction errors were constructed. When the volatile composition was used, ciders could be differentiated by their maturation stage, 4-ethylcatechol being strongly associated to matured ciders. The olfactometric profiles allowed the classification of ciders according to both their origin and maturation stage. Odorants such as p-cresol and a sweet-character unknown component were correlated to origin of ciders, whereas 1-octen-3-one and one unknown spicy-vegetal odorant were highly correlated to the maturation stage. PMID:27451210

  19. Authenticity of carbon dioxide bubbles in French ciders through multiflow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Laetitia; Guyon, Francois; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    A procedure to detect whether carbon dioxide was added to French ciders has been developed. For this purpose, an optimised and simplified method is proposed to determine (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio of carbon dioxide (δ(13)C) in ciders. Three critical steps were checked: (1) influence of atmospheric CO2 remaining in the loaded vial, (2) impact of helium flush, (3) sampling speed. This study showed that atmospheric CO2 does not impact the measurement, that helium flush can lead to isotopic fractionation and finally, that a fractionation occurs only 5h after bottle opening. The method, without any other preparation, consists in sampling 0.2 mL of cold (4 °C) cider in a vial that is passed in an ultrasonic bath for 10 min at room temperature to enhance cider de-carbonation. The headspace CO2 is then analysed using the link Multiflow®-isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Each year, a data bank is developed by fermenting authentic apples juices in order to control cider authenticity. Over a four year span (2008-2011), the CO2 produced during the fermentation step was studied. This set of 61 authentic ciders, from various French production areas, was used to determine a δ(13)C value range of -22.59±0.92‰ for authentic ciders CO2 bubbles. 75 commercial ciders were analysed with this method. Most of the samples analysed present a gas δ(13)C value in the expected range. Nevertheless, some ciders have δ(13)C values outside the 3σ limit, revealing carbonation by technical CO2. This practice is not allowed for organic, "Controlled Appellation of Origin" ciders and ciders specifying natural carbonation on the label. PMID:23870934

  20. Chemometric characterisation of Basque and French ciders according to their polyphenolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Salces, R M; Guyot, S; Herrero, C; Berrueta, L A; Drilleau, J F; Gallo, B; Vicente, F

    2004-06-01

    Polyphenolic compositions of Basque and French ciders were determined by HPLC-DAD following thiolysis, in order to characterise and differentiate these beverages and then develop a classification system capable of confirming the authenticities of both kinds of cider. A data set consisting of 165 cider samples and 27 measured features was evaluated using multivariate chemometric techniques, such as cluster analysis and principal component analysis, in order to perform a preliminary study of data structure. Supervised pattern recognition techniques such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA), K-nearest neighbours (KNN), soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA), and multilayer feed-forward artificial neural networks (MLF-ANN) attained classification rules for the two categories using the chemical data, which produced satisfactory results. Authentication systems obtained by combining two of these techniques were proposed. We found that SIMCA and LDA or KNN models achieved 100% hit-rates, since LDA and KNN permit the detection of every Basque cider and SIMCA provides a model for Basque cider that excludes all French ciders. Polyphenolic profiles of the ciders provided enough information to be able to develop classification rules for identifying ciders according to their geographical origin (Basque or French regions). Chemical and organoleptic differences between these two types of cider are probably due to the original and distinctive cidermaking technologies used for their elaboration. Using polyphenic profiles, about 80% of French ciders could be distinguished according to their region of origin (Brittany or Normandy). Although their polyphenolic profiles did not provide enough information to achieve an authentication system for Breton and Norman ciders. PMID:15118797

  1. Authenticity of carbon dioxide bubbles in French ciders through multiflow-isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Laetitia; Guyon, Francois; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    A procedure to detect whether carbon dioxide was added to French ciders has been developed. For this purpose, an optimised and simplified method is proposed to determine (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio of carbon dioxide (δ(13)C) in ciders. Three critical steps were checked: (1) influence of atmospheric CO2 remaining in the loaded vial, (2) impact of helium flush, (3) sampling speed. This study showed that atmospheric CO2 does not impact the measurement, that helium flush can lead to isotopic fractionation and finally, that a fractionation occurs only 5h after bottle opening. The method, without any other preparation, consists in sampling 0.2 mL of cold (4 °C) cider in a vial that is passed in an ultrasonic bath for 10 min at room temperature to enhance cider de-carbonation. The headspace CO2 is then analysed using the link Multiflow®-isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Each year, a data bank is developed by fermenting authentic apples juices in order to control cider authenticity. Over a four year span (2008-2011), the CO2 produced during the fermentation step was studied. This set of 61 authentic ciders, from various French production areas, was used to determine a δ(13)C value range of -22.59±0.92‰ for authentic ciders CO2 bubbles. 75 commercial ciders were analysed with this method. Most of the samples analysed present a gas δ(13)C value in the expected range. Nevertheless, some ciders have δ(13)C values outside the 3σ limit, revealing carbonation by technical CO2. This practice is not allowed for organic, "Controlled Appellation of Origin" ciders and ciders specifying natural carbonation on the label.

  2. Descartes and the pineal gland in animals: a frequent misinterpretation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S

    1995-01-01

    René Descartes presented a number of reasons for his choice of the pineal gland as a logical place for the soul to interact with the physical machinery of the body. It is often stated that one of his reasons was that he believed animals do not have pineal glands, whereas humans alone possess a soul and this small structure. This is a misinterpretation of Descartes. The philosopher knew that barnyard and other animals possess pineal glands, having seen this with his own eyes. His point was that the pineal is unique in humans only because of a special function - acting as the seat for the rational soul. PMID:11619024

  3. Descartes and the pineal gland in animals: a frequent misinterpretation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S

    1995-01-01

    René Descartes presented a number of reasons for his choice of the pineal gland as a logical place for the soul to interact with the physical machinery of the body. It is often stated that one of his reasons was that he believed animals do not have pineal glands, whereas humans alone possess a soul and this small structure. This is a misinterpretation of Descartes. The philosopher knew that barnyard and other animals possess pineal glands, having seen this with his own eyes. His point was that the pineal is unique in humans only because of a special function - acting as the seat for the rational soul.

  4. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    PubMed

    Valles, Belén Suárez; Bedriñana, Rosa Pando; Tascón, Norman Fernández; Simón, Amparo Querol; Madrera, Roberto Rodríguez

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by pneumatic pressing were dominated by non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora genus and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) whereas in the apple juices obtained by traditional pressing Saccharomyces together with non-Saccharomyces, were always present. The species Saccharomyces present were S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Apparently S. bayanus, was the predominant species at the beginning and the middle fermentation steps of the fermentation process, reaching a percentage of isolation between 33% and 41%, whereas S. cerevisiae took over the process in the final stages of fermentation. During the 2001 harvest, with independence of cider-making technology, the species Hanseniaspora valbyensis was always isolated at the end of fermentations.

  5. Yeast vitality during cider fermentation: assessment by energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dinsdale, M G; Lloyd, D; McIntyre, P; Jarvis, B

    1999-03-15

    In an apple juice-based medium, an ethanol-tolerant Australian wine-yeast used for cider manufacture produced more than 10% ethanol over a 5 week period. Growth of the inoculum (10(6) organisms ml(-1)) occurred to a population of 3.1 x 10(7) ml(-1) during the first few days; at the end of the fermentation only 5 x 10(5) yeasts ml(-1) could be recovered as colony-forming units on plates. Respiratory and fermentative activities were measured by mass spectrometric measurements (O2 consumption and CO2 and ethanol production) of washed yeast suspensions taken from the cider fermentation at intervals. Both endogenous and glucose-supported energy-yielding metabolism declined, especially during the first 20 days. Levels of adenine nucleotides also showed decreases after day 1, as did adenylate energy charge, although in a prolonged (16.5 week) fermentation the lowest value calculated was 0.55. AMP was released into the medium. 31P-NMR spectra showed that by comparison with aerobically grown yeast, that from the later stages of the cider fermentation showed little polyphosphate. However, as previously concluded from studies of 'acidification power' and fluorescent oxonol dye exclusion (Dinsdale et al., 1995), repitching of yeast indicated little loss of viability despite considerable loss of vitality.

  6. Voltammetric classification of ciders with PLS-DA.

    PubMed

    Górski, Łukasz; Sordoń, Wanda; Ciepiela, Filip; Kubiak, Władysław W; Jakubowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Voltammograms recorded on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) may be a chemical fingerprints of food samples, enabled distinguishing the origin of the considered products. In this work the objects of the study was 5 Polish ciders of various brands. For each sample 10 scans were recorded by DPV in the potential range between -0.2 and 1.0 V in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 2.0. The signals preprocessing realized by baseline correction with 4-th degree polynomial and normalization (in 0 to 1 interval), performed to reduce problems with insufficient signal's repeatability associated with mechanical renovation of the electrode surface before each measurement. The PLS-DA classification models were built using the training set and then validated using the samples absent in the learning process. The final multi-class model with optimized complexity enables classification of the ciders with 100% sensitivity and specificity, with the exception of one cider, where specificity was 95% (for validation set). PMID:26695257

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus collinoides CUPV237, an Exopolysaccharide and Riboflavin Producer Isolated from Cider

    PubMed Central

    Puertas, Ana Isabel; Capozzi, Vittorio; Llamas, María Goretti; López, Paloma; Lamontanara, Antonella; Orrù, Luigi; Russo, Pasquale; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus collinoides CUPV237 is a strain isolated from a Basque cider. Lactobacillus collinoides is one of the most frequent species found in cider from Spain, France, or England. A notable feature of the L. collinoides CUPV237 strain is its ability to produce exopolysaccharides. PMID:27284133

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus collinoides CUPV237, an Exopolysaccharide and Riboflavin Producer Isolated from Cider.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Ana Isabel; Capozzi, Vittorio; Llamas, María Goretti; López, Paloma; Lamontanara, Antonella; Orrù, Luigi; Russo, Pasquale; Spano, Giuseppe; Dueñas, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus collinoides CUPV237 is a strain isolated from a Basque cider. Lactobacillus collinoides is one of the most frequent species found in cider from Spain, France, or England. A notable feature of the L. collinoides CUPV237 strain is its ability to produce exopolysaccharides. PMID:27284133

  9. Efficacy of supercritical carbon dioxide for nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) system with a gas-liquid porous metal contactor for eliminating Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider. Pasteurized, preservative-free apple cider was inoculated with E. coli K12 and processed using the SCCO2 system at CO2 conc...

  10. Descartes' Calculus of Subnormals: What Might Have Been

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory Mark; Walls, Jess E.

    2013-01-01

    Rene Descartes' method for finding tangents (equivalently, subnormals) depends on geometric and algebraic properties of a family of circles intersecting a given curve. It can be generalized to establish a calculus of subnormals, an alternative to the calculus of Newton and Leibniz. Here we prove subnormal counterparts of the well-known…

  11. Descartes highlands: Possible analogs around the Orientale Basin, part D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two possible analogs, although not entirely satisfactory, offer reasonable alternatives to the volcanic interpretation of the Descartes highlands. Reconsideration of this complex terrain, prompted by the preliminary results of the Apollo 16 mission, will lead to the revision of some theories on lunar volcanism and also to a better understanding of the landforms caused by the formation of multi-ring basins.

  12. Furan formation in sugar solution and apple cider upon ultraviolet treatment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Geveke, David J

    2007-09-19

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen induced by thermal processing of food. While ultraviolet C (UVC) is used to decontaminate apple cider and to sterilize sugar solutions, it is unknown whether UVC induces furan formation in cider or solutions of its major components. This study was conducted to investigate the possible formation of furan by UVC in apple cider and in solutions of common constituents of apple cider. Our results showed that UVC treatment induced furan formation in apple cider, and the major source of furan was apparently fructose. UVC treatment (at incident doses up to 9 J/cm (2)) of fructose solutions produced a higher amount of furan, while very low concentrations of furan were induced by UVC in glucose or sucrose solutions, and virtually no furan was induced by UVC from solutions of ascorbic acid or malic acid. When an isotope (d(4)-furan) of furan was treated with UVC, d(4)-furan was destroyed rapidly even at low doses in fructose solution, suggesting that the accumulation of furan is the balance between destruction and formation. The UV sensitivity of E. coli K12 (a surrogate of E. coli O157:H7) in two sources of apple cider was also determined. At UVC doses that could inactivate 5-log of E. coli, very low concentrations (<1 ppb) of furan were induced. Our results suggest that UVC could induce furan formation, but when used for the purpose of juice pasteurization, little furan was induced in apple cider.

  13. Polyphenol oxidase activity as a potential intrinsic index of adequate thermal pasteurization of apple cider.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Ingham, B H; Ingham, S C

    2004-05-01

    In response to increasing concerns about microbial safety of apple cider, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has mandated treatment of cider sufficient for a 5-log reduction of the target pathogen. Pasteurization has been suggested as the treatment most likely to achieve a 5-log reduction, with Escherichia coli O157:H7 as the target pathogen. Regulators and processors need a reliable method for verifying pasteurization, and apple cider polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity was studied as a potential intrinsic index for thermal pasteurization. The effect of pasteurization conditions and apple cider properties on PPO activity and survival of three pathogens (E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes) was studied using a Box-Behnken response surface design. Factors considered in the design were pasteurization conditions, i.e., hold temperature (60, 68, and 76 degrees C), preheat time (10, 20, 30 s), and hold time (0, 15, 30 s), pH, and sugar content ((o)Brix) of apple cider. Response surface contour plots were constructed to illustrate the effect of these factors on PPO activity and pathogen survival. Reduction in PPO activity of at least 50% was equivalent to a 5-log reduction in E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes for cider at pH 3.7 and 12.5 (o)Brix. Further studies, however, are needed to verify the relationship between PPO activity and pathogen reduction in cider with various pH and (o)Brix values.

  14. Immobilization of Microbial Cells for Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentation of Wine and Cider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Manojlović, Verica; Nedović, Viktor A.

    Wine- or cider-making is highly associated with biotechnology owing to the traditional nature of must fermentation.. Nowadays, there have been considerable developments in wine- or cider-making techniques affecting all phases of wine or cider production, but more importantly, the fermentation process. It is well-known that the transformation of grape must by microbial activity results in the production of wine, and the fermentation of apples (or sometimes pears) in the production of cider. In this process, a variety of compounds affecting the organoleptic profile of wine or cider are synthesized. It is also common sense that in wine- or cider-making, the main objective is to achieve an adequate quality of the product. The technological progress and the improved quality of the wines or ciders have been associated with the control of technical parameters. Herein, cell immobilization offers numerous advantages, such as enhanced fermentation productivity, ability for cell recycling, application of continuous configurations, enhanced cell stability and viability, and improvement of quality (Margaritis and Merchant 1984; Stewart and Russel 1986; Kourkoutas et al. 2004a).

  15. Impact of thermal and nonthermal processing technologies on unfermented apple cider aroma volatiles.

    PubMed

    Azhu Valappil, Zareena; Fan, Xuetong; Zhang, Howard Q; Rouseff, Russell L

    2009-02-11

    Aroma composition and microbial quality of identical lots of apple cider treated by pulsed electric field (PEF), ultraviolet irradiation (UV), or thermal pasteurization stored at 4 degrees C were compared at 0 and 4 weeks. Conditions were optimized to achieve identical 5 log reductions in Escherichia coli K12 for each treatment. PEF and thermal pasteurization maintained acceptable microbial quality for 4 weeks, but UV samples fermented after 2 weeks. Twenty-eight volatiles were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and odor activity values (OAV) determined. OAVs of 69:hexyl acetate, 41:hexanal, 25:2-methylbutyl acetate, 23:2-methyl ethyl butyrate, and 14:2-(E)-hexenal were observed for the control cider. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in the levels of these odorants were observed between treated apple ciders only after 4 weeks of storage. Thermal samples lost 30% of the major ester and aldehyde volatiles during storage with significant decreases (p < 0.05) in butyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate, hexanal, and 2-(E)-hexenal. In UV cider, hexanal and 2-(E)-hexenal were completely lost after 4 weeks of storage. Microbial spoilage in UV cider after 4 weeks of storage was chemically confirmed by the detection of the microbial metabolite 1,3-pentadiene. PEF cider lost <2% of its total ester and aldehydes after 4 weeks of storage and was preferred by 91% of the sensory panel over thermally treated cider. PMID:19154152

  16. The total margin of exposure of ethanol and acetaldehyde for heavy drinkers consuming cider or vodka.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Gill, Jan S; Chick, Jonathan; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Heavy drinkers in Scotland may consume 1600 g ethanol per week. Due to its low price, cider may be preferred over other beverages. Anecdotal evidence has linked cider to specific health hazards beyond other alcoholic beverages. To examine this hypothesis, nine apple and pear cider samples were chemically analysed for constituents and contaminants. None of the products exceeded regulatory or toxicological thresholds, but the regular occurrence of acetaldehyde in cider was detected. To provide a quantitative risk assessment, two collectives of exclusive drinkers of cider and vodka were compared and the intake of acetaldehyde was estimated using probabilistic Monte-Carlo type analysis. The cider consumers were found to ingest more than 200-times the amount of acetaldehyde consumed by vodka consumers. The margins of exposure (MOE) of acetaldehyde were 224 for the cider and over 220,000 for vodka consumers. However, if the effects of ethanol were considered in a cumulative assessment of the combined MOE, the effect of acetaldehyde was minor and the combined MOE for both groups was 0.3. We suggest that alcohol policy priority should be given on reducing ethanol intake by measures such as minimum pricing, rather than to focus on acetaldehyde.

  17. Analysis of polysaccharides in cider: their effect on sensory foaming properties.

    PubMed

    Mangas, J J; Moreno, J; Rodríguez, R; Picinelli, A; Suárez, B

    1999-01-01

    A feasible spectrophotometric method for determining acidic and neutral polysaccharides in cider is described, and the advantages of this method are examined with respect to precision, accuracy, and detection and quantitation limits. The concentration of nonvolatile and volatile components in cider, together with chemometric techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and partial least squares (PLS), allowed us to typify the ciders on the basis of their foaming properties. Acidic polysaccharide and 1-propanol were the most relevant variables for this purpose. PMID:10563864

  18. Welcome home, Descartes! rethinking the anthropology of the body.

    PubMed

    Ecks, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    For many scholars, the Cartesian mind/body split is one of the fundamental mistakes of the Western scientific tradition. Anthropologists who study notions of the body in cultures around the world regularly take Descartes as their point of departure. Many also suggest that breaking free from Descartes is politically liberating: if the mindful body could be rediscovered, society could move away from its materialist, positivist, and commodity-fetishizing ways. Beyond the Body Proper is anthropology's best and most comprehensive anti-Cartesian manifesto to date. This volume brings together some of the finest studies on the cultural and historical diversity of bodies and minds. Yet anthropologists' blanket rejection of the mind/body dualism seems politically self-defeating. If anthropologists want to criticize racism, gender hierarchies, or discrimination against disabled people, they need to believe that the mind is independent from the body. In other words, they need to uphold the Cartesian split.

  19. Descartes' Passions of the soul--seeds of psychiatry?

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Joy; Deshauer, Dorian; Grof, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Rene Descartes (1596-1650), often called the 'father of modern philosophy', aimed at rooting all knowledge in certainty so that our understanding of the world could progress without error. To achieve this, he needed at least one sure thing on which to build. Starting with the most basic knowledge, the fact of his own existence--cogito ergo sum (I think therefore I am), he systematically proceeded to explain the world. Such systematic understanding would be accessible to anyone who applied the Cartesian method, and in turn would lead to a good life. Descartes' Passions of the Soul was written according to his method of certainty and fits in with a meticulously refined worldview. It is one of the first systematic treatises to explain a wide array of emotions, both normal and abnormal. Based on the Cartesian dualistic model of mind and body, the work helps ground a long medical tradition of separating 'rational' consciousness from emotions. For Descartes, emotions arose from two sources, the intellect and the body (Passions of the Soul and Passions of the Body). The more subtle 'Passions of the Soul' were viewed as superior to coarser and often-troublesome emotions taking root in the body. It is interesting to note the absence of clarity, however, in Descartes' division of intellectual emotions from bodily emotions, perhaps revealing an enduring weakness in the dualistic model itself. The work grapples with the multi-causal nature of psychopathology and brings out complex interactions between temperament and life experience. While modern neuroscience makes ever-tighter associations between physiology and experience, many of the basic scientific challenges we face today are outlined in this 350-year-old book.

  20. The originality of Descartes' theory about the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Lokhorst, G J; Kaitaro, T T

    2001-03-01

    René Descartes thought that the pineal gland is the part of the body with which the soul is most immediately associated. Several prominent historians (such as Soury, Thorndike and Sherrington) have claimed that this idea was not very original. We re-examine the evidence and conclude that their assessment was wrong. We pay special attention to the thesis about the pineal gland which Jean Cousin defended in January, 1641.

  1. Novel 1,3-dioxanes from apple juice and cider.

    PubMed

    Kavvadias, D; Beuerle, T; Wein, M; Boss, B; König, T; Schwab, W

    1999-12-01

    Extracts obtained by XAD solid-phase extraction of apple juice and cider were separated by liquid chromatography on silica gel. Several new 1,3-dioxanes including the known 2-methyl-4-pentyl-1,3-dioxane and 2-methyl-4-[2'(Z)-pentenyl]-1,3-dioxane, were identified in the nonpolar fractions by GC/MS analysis and confirmed by chemical synthesis. The enantioselective synthesis of the stereoisomers of the 1,3-dioxanes was performed using (R)- and (R,S)-octane-1,3-diol and (R)- and (R,S)-5(Z)-octene-1,3-diol as starting material. Comparison with the isolated products indicated that the natural products consisted of a mixture of (2S,4R) and (2R,4R) stereoisomers in the ratio of approximately 10:1, except for 1,3-dioxanes generated from acetone and 2-butanone. It is assumed that the 1, 3-dioxanes are chemically formed in the apples and cider from the natural apple ingredients (R)-octane-1,3-diol, (R)-5(Z)-octene-1, 3-diol, (3R,7R)- and (3R,7S)-octane-1,3,7-triol, and the appropriate aldehydes and ketones, which are produced either by the apples or by yeast during fermentation of the apple juice.

  2. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in cider by flash pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Deng, M Q; Cliver, D O

    2001-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a well-recognized pathogen of significant medical importance, and cider (apple juice) has been associated with foodborne cryptosporidiosis. This study investigated the effect of flash pasteurization on the viability of contaminant C. parvum oocysts. Cider inoculated with oocysts was heated at 70 or 71.7 degrees C for 5, 10, or 20 s, and oocyst viability was measured by a semiquantitative in vitro infectivity assay. By infecting multiple wells of confluent Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells with serial dilutions of heat-treated oocysts and examining infected cells by indirect fluorescent antibody staining, the most probable number technique was applied to quantify log reduction of oocyst viability. Heating for 10 or 20 s at either temperature caused oocyst killing of at least 4.9 log (or 99.999%), whereas oocyst inactivation after pasteurization for 5 s at 70 and 71.7 degrees C was 3.0 log (99.9%) and 4.8 log (99.998%), respectively. Our results suggested that current practices of flash pasteurization in the juice industry are sufficient in inactivating contaminant oocysts.

  3. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Polish Apple Ciders.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A; Ruszkiewicz, M; Biskup, I

    2015-01-01

    The total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of three apple ciders produced in Poland were examined. The total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method and results were expressed in gallic acid equivalents with range from 0.21±0.003 to 0.30±0.004 mg/ml and Trolox equivalents ranging 0.88±0.012 to 1.24±0.015 mg/ml. The antioxidant activity was estimated by two methods: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay with results expressed as EC50(ml/assay) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid method with results expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant properties of tested ciders were correlated with total phenolic content. Additionally, the correlation between 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods was estimated. PMID:26798183

  4. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Polish Apple Ciders

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, A.; Ruszkiewicz, M.; Biskup, I.

    2015-01-01

    The total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of three apple ciders produced in Poland were examined. The total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method and results were expressed in gallic acid equivalents with range from 0.21±0.003 to 0.30±0.004 mg/ml and Trolox equivalents ranging 0.88±0.012 to 1.24±0.015 mg/ml. The antioxidant activity was estimated by two methods: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay with results expressed as EC50(ml/assay) and 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid method with results expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant properties of tested ciders were correlated with total phenolic content. Additionally, the correlation between 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods was estimated. PMID:26798183

  5. Characterization and structures of anthocyanin pigments generated in rosé cider during vinification.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Toshihiko; Goda, Yukihiro; Toyoda, Masatake; Yanagida, Akio; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2002-01-01

    Anthocyanin pigments, which are not found in apple juice, were detected in rosé cider. We confirmed by HPLC/DAD and LC/ESI-MS analyses that some of these anthocyanin pigments generated in rosé cider during vinification corresponded to those formed in model cider containing anthocyanin and flavan-3-ol in the presence of acetaldehyde. To confirm their structures, two anthocyanin pigments formed in a model cider containing cyanidin-3-galactoside and (-)-epicatechin in the presence of acetaldehyde were isolated and purified, and their structures were elucidated by high resolution FAB-MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR analyses. These two pigments were found to consist of cyanidin-3-galactoside and (-)-epicatechin linked by a CH(3)-CH bridge at the 8-position. They were diastereomers that differed in the configuration of the asymmetric methine carbon.

  6. Influence of yeast strain and aging time on free amino acid changes in sparkling ciders.

    PubMed

    Suárez Valles, Belén; Palacios García, Noemí; Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Picinelli Lobo, Anna

    2005-08-10

    An analytical method for the determination of free amino acids in ciders is reported. It is based on high-performance liquid chromatography with an automatic precolumn derivatization with o-phthaldehyde and 3-mercaptopropionic acid and diode array detection. The method was applied to monitor the amino acids during second fermentation of sparkling ciders. This paper reports the influence of yeast strains and aging time on the amino acid composition of sparkling ciders. The application of principal component analysis enables the ciders to be differentiated on the basis of the two factors considered (yeast strain and aging time). The first principal component, which accounts for 58% of the total variance, achieved the separation according to aging time with serine, glycine, alanine, valine, ornithine, leucine, and lysine as the most important variables. The second principal component, accounting for 28% of the explained variance, is closely related to aspartic acid and asparagine and separates the samples according to the yeast strain. PMID:16076126

  7. CIDER: a cross-disciplinary institute with educational mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewonski, A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research) is an emerging initiative within the solid Earth community in the US, designed to remedy the lack of satisfactory communication and cooperation among the geoscience fields dealing with the Earth's deep interior, defined here as anything between the crust and the Earth's center. It has been 35 years since the acceptance of plate tectonics theory, but no definitive agreement has yet been reached among geoscientists on the fundamental nature of the global dynamic processes that drive plate motions. There are still vigorous debates about the proportion of heat coming from the core, vs. radiogenic heating in the mantle, about the degree to which the 670 km discontinuity impedes whole mantle circulation, about the origin of mantle plumes, or the chemical or thermal nature of heterogeneity in the deepest mantle. The principal mission of Cider is to provide a long-range intellectual framework that will allow a more effective cross-fertilization of the different disciplines, whereby senior and junior scientists alike can be thoroughly educated about the approaches, the fundamental achievements, the future potential and limitations of the "other disciplines", in order to gain a common language. Given the enormous amount and diversity of observations becoming available across the relevant disciplines, a quantum leap in the understanding of our planet's interior - the constitution and evolution of the Earth - is about to take place if we can better understand the key issues and how to address them by fully utilizing complementary disciplinary data and modeling tools. This will be accomplished through a series of short and long courses, workshops, and interdisciplinary research programs focused on a specific topic. A related goal is to attract to geophysics more talented and better prepared graduate students.

  8. CIDER: Enabling Robustness-Power Tradeoffs on a Computational Eyeglass

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Addison; Tun, Yamin; Hu, Pan; Smith-Freedman, Duncan; Ganesan, Deepak; Marlin, Benjamin; Salthouse, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The human eye offers a fascinating window into an individual’s health, cognitive attention, and decision making, but we lack the ability to continually measure these parameters in the natural environment. The challenges lie in: a) handling the complexity of continuous high-rate sensing from a camera and processing the image stream to estimate eye parameters, and b) dealing with the wide variability in illumination conditions in the natural environment. This paper explores the power–robustness tradeoffs inherent in the design of a wearable eye tracker, and proposes a novel staged architecture that enables graceful adaptation across the spectrum of real-world illumination. We propose CIDER, a system that operates in a highly optimized low-power mode under indoor settings by using a fast Search-Refine controller to track the eye, but detects when the environment switches to more challenging outdoor sunlight and switches models to operate robustly under this condition. Our design is holistic and tackles a) power consumption in digitizing pixels, estimating pupillary parameters, and illuminating the eye via near-infrared, b) error in estimating pupil center and pupil dilation, and c) model training procedures that involve zero effort from a user. We demonstrate that CIDER can estimate pupil center with error less than two pixels (0.6°), and pupil diameter with error of one pixel (0.22mm). Our end-to-end results show that we can operate at power levels of roughly 7mW at a 4Hz eye tracking rate, or roughly 32mW at rates upwards of 250Hz. PMID:27042165

  9. Prevalent lactic acid bacteria in cider cellars and efficiency of Oenococcus oeni strains.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ainoa; Coton, Monika; Coton, Emmanuel; Herrero, Mónica; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) is an important step in cider production in order to allowing for improvement of microbiological stability and organoleptic characteristics of cider. Induction of this fermentation by using starter cultures enables a better control over this bioprocess, but although it is a common practice in winemaking, starters specifically focussed for cider MLF are not yet commercially available. Proper starter cultures need to present the ability to degrade l-malic acid conferring pleasing sensory characteristics while avoiding toxicological risks. In this work, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were first isolated from MLF industrial cider samples, obtained in a cellar in the main cider-producing region of Spain, Asturias. Isolates, identified by molecular tools, belonged to the Lactobacillus brevis and Oenococcus oeni species. After a phylogenetic analysis, representative strains of both identified species were evaluated in order to determine their fermentation capacity, showing O. oeni the best behaviour in this cider fermentation, as previously demonstrated for wine in the literature. Consequently, and with the aim to test the influence at strain level, selection of O. oeni isolates as starters for cider fermentation has been undergone. In order to check the influence of geography over biodiversity, O. oeni strains from six different industrial cellars representing the distinct producing areas in the region (located in a ratio of 30 km) were analyzed by using a specific RAPD method. In this way, isolates were typed in five distinct groups, mainly corresponding to each producing area. All strains isolated from the same cellar showed the same RAPD profile revealing the significance of geographical origin in the indigenous cider LAB. Molecular tools were applied to reject those isolates exhibiting presence of genes related to organoleptic spoilage (exopolysaccharides and acrolein production) or food safety (biogenic amine production), as key selection

  10. [Descartes' influence on the development of the anatomoclinical method].

    PubMed

    González Hernández, A; Domínguez Rodríguez, M V; Fabre Pi, O; Cubero González, A

    2010-01-01

    The development of the anatomical-clinical method was a huge advance for modern medicine since it revealed a new approach to understanding diagnostic procedures. This change in medical thinking towards a more scientific basis has gradually evolved over several centuries, reaching its brilliant zenith with the contributions of the French school. There are certain similarities between the guidelines of the anatomical-clinical method and René Descartes' philosophical principles, so it is fair to consider him as one of the major precursors in this new line of thinking that definitely influenced the historical course of medicine.

  11. [Psyche and soma--Descartes in our hearts?].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, J

    1993-10-20

    The essay deals with the mind-body problem. The first part describes the different views held by philosophers from Plato up to modern times, stressing the standpoint of René Descartes for medical philosophy and dualism. The author outlines the new research field of psychoneuroimmunology, and asks whether this could be one of the keys to the mind-body problem. The concept of anomaly is discussed, taking placebo and nocebo as prominent examples. Finally the author outlines modern holistic thinking based on a general systems theory, with biology as a dynamic interplay of culture, ecology, mind, and body in an open non-lineary system.

  12. Influence of fruit variety, harvest technique, quality sorting, and storage on the native microflora of unpasteurized apple cider.

    PubMed

    Keller, Susanne E; Chirtel, Stuart J; Merker, Robert I; Taylor, Kirk T; Tan, Hsu Ling; Miller, Arthur J

    2004-10-01

    Apple variety, harvest, quality sorting, and storage practices were assessed to determine their impact on the microflora of unpasteurized cider. Seven apple varieties were harvested from the tree or the ground. The apples were used fresh or were stored at 0 to 4 degrees C for < or = 5 months and were pressed with or without quality selection. Cider yield, pH, Brix value, and titratable acidity were measured. Apples, postpressing apple pomace, and cider samples were analyzed for aerobic bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Aerobic bacterial plate counts (APCs) of ciders from fresh ground-picked apples (4.89 log CFU/ml) were higher than those of ciders made from fresh, tree-picked apples (3.45 log CFU/ml). Quality sorting further reduced the average APC to 2.88 log CFU/ml. Differences among all three treatment groups were significant (P < 0.0001). Apple and pomace microbial concentrations revealed harvest and postharvest treatment-dependent differences similar to those found in cider. There were significant differences in APC among apple varieties (P = 0.0001). Lower counts were associated with varieties exhibiting higher Brix values and higher titratable acidity. Differences in APC for stored and fresh apples used for cider production were not significant (P > 0.05). Yeast and mold counts revealed relationships similar to those for APCs. The relationship between initial microbial load found on incoming fruit and final cider microbial population was curvilinear, with the weakest correlations for the lowest apple microflora concentrations. The lack of linearity suggests that processing equipment contributed to cider contamination. Tree-picked quality fruit should be used for unpasteurized cider production, and careful manufacturing practices at cider plants can impact both safety and quality of the final product. PMID:15508636

  13. Influence of fruit variety, harvest technique, quality sorting, and storage on the native microflora of unpasteurized apple cider.

    PubMed

    Keller, Susanne E; Chirtel, Stuart J; Merker, Robert I; Taylor, Kirk T; Tan, Hsu Ling; Miller, Arthur J

    2004-10-01

    Apple variety, harvest, quality sorting, and storage practices were assessed to determine their impact on the microflora of unpasteurized cider. Seven apple varieties were harvested from the tree or the ground. The apples were used fresh or were stored at 0 to 4 degrees C for < or = 5 months and were pressed with or without quality selection. Cider yield, pH, Brix value, and titratable acidity were measured. Apples, postpressing apple pomace, and cider samples were analyzed for aerobic bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Aerobic bacterial plate counts (APCs) of ciders from fresh ground-picked apples (4.89 log CFU/ml) were higher than those of ciders made from fresh, tree-picked apples (3.45 log CFU/ml). Quality sorting further reduced the average APC to 2.88 log CFU/ml. Differences among all three treatment groups were significant (P < 0.0001). Apple and pomace microbial concentrations revealed harvest and postharvest treatment-dependent differences similar to those found in cider. There were significant differences in APC among apple varieties (P = 0.0001). Lower counts were associated with varieties exhibiting higher Brix values and higher titratable acidity. Differences in APC for stored and fresh apples used for cider production were not significant (P > 0.05). Yeast and mold counts revealed relationships similar to those for APCs. The relationship between initial microbial load found on incoming fruit and final cider microbial population was curvilinear, with the weakest correlations for the lowest apple microflora concentrations. The lack of linearity suggests that processing equipment contributed to cider contamination. Tree-picked quality fruit should be used for unpasteurized cider production, and careful manufacturing practices at cider plants can impact both safety and quality of the final product.

  14. Malolactic bioconversion using a Oenococcus oeni strain for cider production: effect of yeast extract supplementation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Mónica; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2003-12-01

    Yeast extract addition to reconstituted apple juice had a positive impact on the development of the malolactic starter culture used to ensure malolactic fermentation in cider, using active but non-proliferating cells. In this work, the reuse of fermentation lees from cider is proposed as an alternative to the use of commercial yeast extract products. Malolactic enzymatic assays, both in whole cells and cell-free extracts, were carried out to determine the best time to harvest cells for use as an inoculum in cider. Cells harvested at the late exponential phase, the physiological stage of growth corresponding to the maximum values of specific malolactic activity, achieved a good rate of malic acid degradation in controlled cider fermentation. Under the laboratory conditions used, malic acid degradation rates in the fermentation media turned out to be near 2.0 and 2.5 times lower, compared with the rates obtained in whole-cell enzymatic assays, as useful data applicable to industrial cider production.

  15. Phylogenomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Specific Domestication of Strains to Cider and Wines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Sills, Hugo; El Khoury, Mariette; Favier, Marion; Romano, Andrea; Biasioli, Franco; Spano, Giuseppe; Sherman, David J.; Bouchez, Olivier; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Okada, Sanae; Tanaka, Naoto; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacteria species encountered particularly in wine, where it achieves the malolactic fermentation. Molecular typing methods have previously revealed that the species is made of several genetic groups of strains, some being specific to certain types of wines, ciders or regions. Here, we describe 36 recently released O. oeni genomes and the phylogenomic analysis of these 36 plus 14 previously reported genomes. We also report three genome sequences of the sister species Oenococcus kitaharae that were used for phylogenomic reconstructions. Phylogenomic and population structure analyses performed revealed that the 50 O. oeni genomes delineate two major groups of 12 and 37 strains, respectively, named A and B, plus a putative group C, consisting of a single strain. A study on the orthologs and single nucleotide polymorphism contents of the genetic groups revealed that the domestication of some strains to products such as cider, wine, or champagne, is reflected at the genetic level. While group A strains proved to be predominant in wine and to form subgroups adapted to specific types of wine such as champagne, group B strains were found in wine and cider. The strain from putative group C was isolated from cider and genetically closer to group B strains. The results suggest that ancestral O. oeni strains were adapted to low-ethanol containing environments such as overripe fruits, and that they were domesticated to cider and wine, with group A strains being naturally selected in a process of further domestication to specific wines such as champagne. PMID:25977455

  16. Genomic basis of the differences between cider and dessert apple varieties

    PubMed Central

    Leforestier, Diane; Ravon, Elisa; Muranty, Hélène; Cornille, Amandine; Lemaire, Christophe; Giraud, Tatiana; Durel, Charles-Eric; Branca, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the genomic processes at play during variety diversification is of fundamental interest for understanding evolution, but also of applied interest in crop science. It can indeed provide knowledge on the genetic bases of traits for crop improvement and germplasm diversity management. Apple is one of the most important fruit crops in temperate regions, having both great economic and cultural values. Sweet dessert apples are used for direct consumption, while bitter cider apples are used to produce cider. Several important traits are known to differentiate the two variety types, in particular fruit size, biennial versus annual fruit bearing, and bitterness, caused by a higher content in polyphenols. Here, we used an Illumina 8k SNP chip on two core collections, of 48 dessert and 48 cider apples, respectively, for identifying genomic regions responsible for the differences between cider and dessert apples. The genome-wide level of genetic differentiation between cider and dessert apples was low, although 17 candidate regions showed signatures of divergent selection, displaying either outlier FST values or significant association with phenotypic traits (bitter versus sweet fruits). These candidate regions encompassed 420 genes involved in a variety of functions and metabolic pathways, including several colocalizations with QTLs for polyphenol compounds. PMID:26240603

  17. Phylogenomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Specific Domestication of Strains to Cider and Wines.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Sills, Hugo; El Khoury, Mariette; Favier, Marion; Romano, Andrea; Biasioli, Franco; Spano, Giuseppe; Sherman, David J; Bouchez, Olivier; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Okada, Sanae; Tanaka, Naoto; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lucas, Patrick M

    2015-06-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacteria species encountered particularly in wine, where it achieves the malolactic fermentation. Molecular typing methods have previously revealed that the species is made of several genetic groups of strains, some being specific to certain types of wines, ciders or regions. Here, we describe 36 recently released O. oeni genomes and the phylogenomic analysis of these 36 plus 14 previously reported genomes. We also report three genome sequences of the sister species Oenococcus kitaharae that were used for phylogenomic reconstructions. Phylogenomic and population structure analyses performed revealed that the 50 O. oeni genomes delineate two major groups of 12 and 37 strains, respectively, named A and B, plus a putative group C, consisting of a single strain. A study on the orthologs and single nucleotide polymorphism contents of the genetic groups revealed that the domestication of some strains to products such as cider, wine, or champagne, is reflected at the genetic level. While group A strains proved to be predominant in wine and to form subgroups adapted to specific types of wine such as champagne, group B strains were found in wine and cider. The strain from putative group C was isolated from cider and genetically closer to group B strains. The results suggest that ancestral O. oeni strains were adapted to low-ethanol containing environments such as overripe fruits, and that they were domesticated to cider and wine, with group A strains being naturally selected in a process of further domestication to specific wines such as champagne. PMID:25977455

  18. Effects of apple cider vinegars produced with different techniques on blood lipids in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Budak, Nilgun H; Kumbul Doguc, Duygu; Savas, Cagri M; Seydim, Atif C; Kok Tas, Tugba; Ciris, Metin I; Guzel-Seydim, Zeynep B

    2011-06-22

    Red delicious apples were used to produce natural apple cider with and without inclusion of maceration. Traditional surface and industrial submersion methods were then applied to make vinegar from apple ciders. Apple cider vinegar samples produced with inclusion of maceration in the surface method had the highest total phenolic content, chlorogenic acid, ORAC, and TEAC levels. Cholesterol and apple vinegar samples were administered using oral gavage to all groups of rats except the control group. Apple cider vinegars, regardless of the production method, decreased triglyceride and VLDL levels in all groups when compared to animals on high-cholesterol diets without vinegar supplementation. Apple cider vinegars increased total cholesterol and HDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased liver function tests when compared to animals on a high-cholesterol diet without vinegar supplementation. A high-cholesterol diet resulted in hepatic steatosis. VSBM and VSB groups significantly decreased steatosis. PMID:21561165

  19. Continuous cider fermentation with co-immobilized yeast and Leuconostoc oenos cells.

    PubMed

    Nedovic; Durieuxb; Van Nedervelde L; Rosseels; Vandegans; Plaisant; Simon

    2000-06-01

    Ca-alginate matrix was used to co-immobilize Saccharomyces bayanus and Leuconostoc oenos in one integrated biocatalytic system in order to perform simultaneously alcoholic and malo-lactic fermentation of apple juice to produce cider, in a continuous packed bed bioreactor. The continuous process permitted much faster fermentation compared with the traditional batch process. The flavor formation was also better controlled. By adjusting the flow rate of feeding substrate through the bioreactor, i.e. its residence time, it was possible to obtain either "soft" or "dry" cider. However, the profile of volatile compounds in the final product was modified comparatively to the batch process, especially for higher alcohols, isoamylacetate, and diacetyl. This modification is due to different physiology states of yeast in two processes. Nevertheless, the taste of cider was quite acceptable.

  20. Aromatic profile of ciders by chemical quantitative, gas chromatography-olfactometry, and sensory analysis.

    PubMed

    Antón, María José; Suárez Valles, Belén; García Hevia, Ana; Picinelli Lobo, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Nine samples of Asturias cider have been analyzed for volatile, olfactometric, and sensorial profiles. The aromatic composition was mainly constituted by fusel alcohols and ethyl esters. Among the minor volatile compounds, fatty acids, volatile phenols, and alcohols were the main components. The olfactometric analysis revealed the existence of 55 aromatic areas, exhibiting a wide range of intensities. Components like amyl alcohols, 2-phenylethanol, ethyl esters such as 2-methylbutyrate, hexanoate and octanoate, hexanoic and octanoic acids 2-phenylethyl acetate, 4-ethyl guaiacol, and 4-ethyl phenol could be considered as being part of the structure of cider aroma. The extract dilution analysis of one extract identified 2 volatile phenols (4-ethyl guaiacol and 4-ethyl phenol) among the most powerful odorants in cider. These components gave significant correlations with the sensory attributes sweet, spicy, and lees. PMID:24313985

  1. Behavior of parathion in apple juice processed into cider and vinegar.

    PubMed

    Banna, A A; Kawar, N S

    1982-01-01

    Apple juice, fortified with 25 ppm (ug/g) of parathion, was processed into cider and vinegar. After the initial fermentation period of 12 days, the supernatant cider contained 7.4 ppm of parathion while the level in the sedimented lees was 88 ppm. Sorption to the sedimented matter was the main pathway for parathion residue reduction in the cider. Levels of aminoparathion and 4-nitrophenol, the only metabolites of parathion detected as confirmed by thin-layer chromatography, were 0.19 and 1.2 ppm, respectively, in the cider. The 56-day-old finished cider prior to bottling contained 2.2 ppm parathion, 0.15 ppm aminoparathion and 1.3 ppm 4-nitrophenol. Storage of the cider at 24, 12, 4 and -20 degrees C resulted in further reduction in the parathion levels. After one year, samples stored at 24 degrees C contained only 2.5% of the initial level added to the juice. Samples stored at the three other temperatures contained about 5% of the original level. Vinegar formed after 57 days of fermentation contained 5.1 ppm parathion, while the residue level in the lees was 76 ppm. Aminoparathion and 4-nitrophenol levels were 0.23 and 1.2 ppm, respectively in the vinegar. Storage of the vinegar at 24 degrees C for one year resulted in a gradual decline in the parathion level and at the end of the storage period, the remaining residue represented about 6% of the initial 24 ppm added to the juice.

  2. Fate of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple cider with and without preservatives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T; Doyle, M P; Besser, R E

    1993-08-01

    A strain of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 isolated from a patient in an apple cider-related outbreak was used to study the fate of E. coli O157:H7 in six different lots of unpasteurized apple cider. In addition, the efficacy of two preservatives, 0.1% sodium benzoate and 0.1% potassium sorbate, used separately and in combination was evaluated for antimicrobial effects on the bacterium. Studies were done at 8 or 25 degrees C with ciders having pH values of 3.6 to 4.0. The results revealed that E. coli O157:H7 populations increased slightly (ca. 1 log10 CFU/ml) and then remained stable for approximately 12 days in lots inoculated with an initial population of 10(5) E. coli O157:H7 organisms per ml and held at 8 degrees C. The bacterium survived from 10 to 31 days or 2 to 3 days at 8 or 25 degrees C, respectively, depending on the lot. Potassium sorbate had minimal effect on E. coli O157:H7 populations, with survivors detected for 15 to 20 days or 1 to 3 days at 8 or 25 degrees C, respectively. In contrast, survivors in cider containing sodium benzoate were detected for only 2 to 10 days or less than 1 to 2 days at 8 or 25 degrees C, respectively. The highest rates of inactivation occurred in the presence of a combination of 0.1% sodium benzoate and 0.1% potassium sorbate. The use of 0.1% sodium benzoate, an approved preservative used by some cider processors, will substantially increase the safety of apple cider in terms of E. coli O157:H7, in addition to suppressing the growth of yeasts and molds. PMID:8368839

  3. The Effect of Dietary Supplementation with Spent Cider Yeast on the Swine Distal Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Upadrasta, Aditya; O’Sullivan, Lisa; O’Sullivan, Orla; Sexton, Noel; Lawlor, Peadar G.; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for alternatives to antibiotics for promoting animal health, given the increasing problems associated with antibiotic resistance. In this regard, we evaluated spent cider yeast as a potential probiotic for modifying the gut microbiota in weanling pigs using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries. Methodology and Principal Findings Piglets aged 24–26 days were assigned to one of two study groups; control (n = 12) and treatment (n = 12). The control animals were fed with a basal diet and the treatment animals were fed with basal diet in combination with cider yeast supplement (500 ml cider yeast containing ∼7.6 log CFU/ml) for 21 days. Faecal samples were collected for 16s rRNA gene compositional analysis. 16S rRNA compositional sequencing analysis of the faecal samples collected from day 0 and day 21 revealed marked differences in microbial diversity at both the phylum and genus levels between the control and treatment groups. This analysis confirmed that levels of Salmonella and Escherichia were significantly decreased in the treatment group, compared with the control (P<0.001). This data suggest a positive influence of dietary supplementation with live cider yeast on the microbial diversity of the pig distal gut. Conclusions/Significance The effect of dietary cider yeast on porcine gut microbial communities was characterized for the first time using 16S rRNA gene compositional sequencing. Dietary cider yeast can potentially alter the gut microbiota, however such changes depend on their endogenous microbiota that causes a divergence in relative response to that given diet. PMID:24130736

  4. Apollo 16 exploration of descartes: a geologic summary.

    PubMed

    1973-01-01

    The Cayley Plains at the Apollo 16 landing site consist of crudely stratified breccias to a depth of at least 200 meters, overlain by a regolith 10 to 15 meters thick. Samples, photographs, and observations by the astronauts indicate that most of the rocks are impact breccias derived from an anorthositegabbro complex. The least brecciated members of the suite include coarse-grained anorthosite and finer-grained, more mafic rocks, some with igneous and some with metamorphic textures. Much of the traverse area is covered by ejecta from North Ray and South Ray craters, but the abundance of rock fragments increases to the south toward the younger South Ray crater. The Descartes highlands, a distinct morphologic entity, differ from the adjacent Cayley formation more in physiographic expression than in lithologic character. PMID:17731630

  5. Apollo 16 exploration of descartes: a geologic summary.

    PubMed

    1973-01-01

    The Cayley Plains at the Apollo 16 landing site consist of crudely stratified breccias to a depth of at least 200 meters, overlain by a regolith 10 to 15 meters thick. Samples, photographs, and observations by the astronauts indicate that most of the rocks are impact breccias derived from an anorthositegabbro complex. The least brecciated members of the suite include coarse-grained anorthosite and finer-grained, more mafic rocks, some with igneous and some with metamorphic textures. Much of the traverse area is covered by ejecta from North Ray and South Ray craters, but the abundance of rock fragments increases to the south toward the younger South Ray crater. The Descartes highlands, a distinct morphologic entity, differ from the adjacent Cayley formation more in physiographic expression than in lithologic character.

  6. Application of purge and trap extraction and gas chromatography for determination of minor esters in cider.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Palacios García, Noemí; García Hevia, Ana; Suárez Valles, Belén

    2005-04-01

    The validation of a method based on the purge and trap technique combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-flame ionization detection has been carried out in order to apply it to the analysis of ciders. Although 49 compounds were identified, our work was focused on the study of nine minor esters, obtaining recoveries ranging between 93% for ethyl decanoate and 117% for ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and a precision (RSDs) ranging between 2.2% for hexyl acetate and ethyl decanoate and 10.9% for isopentyl acetate. To demonstrate the feasibility of the procedure, the method was applied to the analysis of commercial ciders. PMID:15830951

  7. Beautiful Surfaces. Style and Substance in Florentius Schuyl's Illustrations for Descartes' Treatise on Man.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that the Cartesian bête-machine is the invention of René Descartes (1596-1650) is rarely contested. Close examination of Descartes' texts proves that this is a concept founded not on the basis of his own writings, but a subsequent critical interpretation, which developed and began to dominate his work after his death. Descartes' Treatise on Man, published posthumously in two rival editions, Florentius Schuyl's Latin translation De Homine (1662), and Claude Clerselier's Traité de l'homme, has proved particularly problematic. The surviving manuscript copies of the Treatise on Man left no illustrations, leaving both editors the daunting task of producing a set of images to accompany and clarify the fragmented text. In this intriguing case, the images can be seen to have spoken louder than the text which they illustrated. This paper assesses Schuyl's choice to represent Descartes' Man in a highly stylized manner, without superimposing Clerselier's intentions onto De Homine.

  8. Beautiful Surfaces. Style and Substance in Florentius Schuyl's Illustrations for Descartes' Treatise on Man.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that the Cartesian bête-machine is the invention of René Descartes (1596-1650) is rarely contested. Close examination of Descartes' texts proves that this is a concept founded not on the basis of his own writings, but a subsequent critical interpretation, which developed and began to dominate his work after his death. Descartes' Treatise on Man, published posthumously in two rival editions, Florentius Schuyl's Latin translation De Homine (1662), and Claude Clerselier's Traité de l'homme, has proved particularly problematic. The surviving manuscript copies of the Treatise on Man left no illustrations, leaving both editors the daunting task of producing a set of images to accompany and clarify the fragmented text. In this intriguing case, the images can be seen to have spoken louder than the text which they illustrated. This paper assesses Schuyl's choice to represent Descartes' Man in a highly stylized manner, without superimposing Clerselier's intentions onto De Homine. PMID:27356337

  9. Implications of Lactobacillus collinoides and Brettanomyces/Dekkera anomala in phenolic off-flavour defects of ciders.

    PubMed

    Buron, Nicolas; Coton, Monika; Legendre, Patrick; Ledauphin, Jérôme; Kientz-Bouchart, Valérie; Guichard, Hugues; Barillier, Daniel; Coton, Emmanuel

    2012-02-01

    Different Lactobacillus collinoides and Brettanomyces/Dekkera anomala cider strains were studied for their ability to produce volatile phenols in synthetic medium. All strains were able to produce 4-ethylcatechol (4-EC), 4-ethylphenol (4-EP) and 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG) from caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids, respectively. Interestingly, D. anomala and L. collinoides were also able to produce 4-EC, 4-EP and 4-EG in cider conditions. The quantities of ethylphenols produced by these two species were similar in both tested ciders. The impact of precursor quantities was studied and it showed that the addition of caffeic and p-coumaric acids in ciders allowed for higher 4-EC and 4-EP production by D. anomala and L. collinoides. In parallel, D. anomala and L. collinoides strains were isolated from a phenolic off-flavour defective bottled cider after ethylphenol production hence confirming the implication of these two species in this cider spoilage. Finally, detection thresholds of the main ethylphenols were determined in ciders by orthonasal and retronasal sampling. The 4-EC and 4-EP detection thresholds (close to 20-25mg/l and 1.5-2.0mg/l, respectively) were matrix dependant. PMID:22137683

  10. [From Descartes to fMRI. Pain theories and pain concepts].

    PubMed

    Handwerker, H O

    2007-08-01

    In the seventeenth century the philosopher Rene Descartes was the forerunner by establishing a scientific hypothesis on the origin of pain. Much later, in the nineteenth century, pain hypotheses emerged which explained the pain sensation either on the basis of intense stimulation of any kind of nerve fibers (intensity hypothesis) or on the basis of specific nociceptors (specificity hypothesis). The "gate control theory" established by Melzack and Wall (1964) offered an explanation of modulations of pain sensation by the interaction between nociceptive and non-nociceptive nerve fibers and by descending control in the central nervous system. Though this hypothesis is outdated in its original form, it had - in a more common formulation - a great influence on our understanding of pain. For building a bridge to our present knowledge, the molecular structure of the nociceptor membrane is of particular importance. On this basis also new pain therapies have been developed. On the other hand, the methods of functional imaging allow the identification of brain regions related to pain processing at a macroscopic level. This new technology opened up new ways of understanding chronic pain processes and new possibilities for the control of therapeutic effects.

  11. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of autochthonous cider yeasts in a cellar from Asturias.

    PubMed

    Pando Bedriñana, R; Querol Simón, A; Suárez Valles, B

    2010-06-01

    This paper analyses yeast diversity and dynamics during the production of Asturian cider. Yeasts were isolated from apple juice and at different stages of fermentation in a cellar in Villaviciosa during two Asturian cider-apple harvests. The species identified by ITS-RFLP corresponded to Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii/Saccharomyces mikatae. The species C. parapsilosis is reported here for the first time in cider. The analysis of Saccharomyces mtDNA patterns showed great diversity, sequential substitution and the presence of a small number of yeast patterns (up to 8), present in both harvests. Killer (patterns nos. 22' and 47), sensitive (patterns nos. 12, 15, 33 and 61) and neutral phenotypes were found among the S. cerevisiae isolates. The detection of beta-glucosidase activity, with arbutin as the sole carbon source, allowed two S. cerevisiae strains (patterns nos. 3' and 19') to be differentiated by means of this enzymatic activity. Yeast strains producing the killer toxin or with beta-glucosidase activity are reported for the first time in autochthonous cider yeasts.

  12. Thermal and non-thermal processing of apple cider: storage quality under equivalent process conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three processing techniques: heat, pulsed electric field (PEF) and ultraviolet light (UV) were optimized to achieve a similar 6 log reduction of inoculated Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider. PEF treatment at 23 kV/cm for a total treatment time of 150 us at 48C, UV exposure for 51 s at 15C and heat...

  13. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for direct determination of volatile phenols in cider.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Consuelo; Pérez-del-Notario, Nuria; González-Sáiz, José María

    2009-11-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was optimised and validated for the determination of 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-ethylphenol, 4-vinylguaiacol and 4-vinylphenol, involved in the presence of Brett character, in ciders. The influence of different parameters on extraction efficiency (fibre coating, salt addition, exposure time, extraction temperature and sample volume/total volume ratio) was evaluated. Divinylbenzene/carboxen/PDMS was selected as extraction fibre and the other optimised parameters were as follows: 10 mL of cider, temperature 70 degrees C, extraction time 60 min and addition of 0.4 g/mL of NaCl. The proposed method showed satisfactory linearity. The detection limits obtained were 0.01 microg/L for 4-ethylguaiacol, 0.02 microg/L for 4-ethylphenol, 0.08 microg/L for 4-vinylguaiacol and 0.03 microg/L for 4-vinylphenol. These detection limits were lower than those obtained in previous studies on the determination of volatile phenols in other alcoholic beverages. Good recoveries of over 95% were observed for all compounds, and the repeatability obtained was considered acceptable, ranging between 4 and 10%. To demonstrate the feasibility of the procedure, the method was applied to the analysis of commercial ciders. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the headspace solid-phase microextraction procedure has been optimised to determine specifically the Brett character responsible compounds in cider. PMID:20029909

  14. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of autochthonous cider yeasts in a cellar from Asturias.

    PubMed

    Pando Bedriñana, R; Querol Simón, A; Suárez Valles, B

    2010-06-01

    This paper analyses yeast diversity and dynamics during the production of Asturian cider. Yeasts were isolated from apple juice and at different stages of fermentation in a cellar in Villaviciosa during two Asturian cider-apple harvests. The species identified by ITS-RFLP corresponded to Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii/Saccharomyces mikatae. The species C. parapsilosis is reported here for the first time in cider. The analysis of Saccharomyces mtDNA patterns showed great diversity, sequential substitution and the presence of a small number of yeast patterns (up to 8), present in both harvests. Killer (patterns nos. 22' and 47), sensitive (patterns nos. 12, 15, 33 and 61) and neutral phenotypes were found among the S. cerevisiae isolates. The detection of beta-glucosidase activity, with arbutin as the sole carbon source, allowed two S. cerevisiae strains (patterns nos. 3' and 19') to be differentiated by means of this enzymatic activity. Yeast strains producing the killer toxin or with beta-glucosidase activity are reported for the first time in autochthonous cider yeasts. PMID:20417399

  15. Characterization of aroma compounds in apple cider using solvent-assisted flavor evaporation and headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Fan, Wenlai; Qian, Michael C

    2007-04-18

    The aroma-active compounds in two apple ciders were identified using gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. The volatile compounds were extracted using solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME). On the basis of odor intensity, the most important aroma compounds in the two apple cider samples were 2-phenylethanol, butanoic acid, octanoic acid, 2-methylbutanoic acid, 2-phenylethyl acetate, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, 4-ethylguaiacol, eugenol, and 4-vinylphenol. Sulfur-containing compounds, terpene derivatives, and lactones were also detected in ciders. Although most of the aroma compounds were common in both ciders, the aroma intensities were different. Comparison of extraction techniques showed that the SAFE technique had a higher recovery for acids and hydroxy-containing compounds, whereas the HS-SPME technique had a higher recovery for esters and highly volatile compounds. PMID:17355142

  16. [Where Descartes got it right: the implications for science, biomedicine, and public health].

    PubMed

    Mendonça, André Luis de Oliveira; Camargo, Kenneth Rochel de

    2016-01-01

    The "received view" of Descartes has shaped the image of a dualist thinker who radically separated mind and body and thus laid the foundations for a "divided modernity". Numerous epithets have been applied to Cartesian thinking, all of which now sound depreciative: mechanicism, determinism, and reductionism, among others. This article contends that Descartes was not the type of dualist that is normally assumed. Based on a rereading of two essential works (Discourse on Method and Metaphysical Meditations) and a dialogue with the new literature on the theme, we contend that overcoming the "received view" of Descartes can shed new light on discussions in (and of) the collective health field and highlight the so-called expanded health paradigm (including aspects beyond the biological or physiological, such as the psychological, social, economic, cultural, and political).

  17. User instructions for the DESCARTES environmental accumulation code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, T.B.; Eslinger, P.W.; Nichols, W.E.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project work is conducted under several technical and administrative tasks, among which is the Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates task. The staff on this task have developed a suite of computer codes which are used to estimate doses to individuals in the public. This document contains the user instructions for the DESCARTES (Dynamic estimates of concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments) suite of codes. In addition to the DESCARTES code, this includes two air data preprocessors, a database postprocessor, and several utility routines that are used to format input data needed for DESCARTES.

  18. Observations of Descartes ring stimulated Raman scattering in micrometer-sized water droplets.

    PubMed

    Xie, J G; Ruekgauer, T E; Gu, J; Armstrong, R L; Pinnick, R G

    1991-09-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from micrometer-sized droplets, which results from coupling of spontaneous Raman emission to droplet morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's), exhibits unique characteristics. Spatial patterns consist of bright SRS arcs on the droplet rim. A second source of SRS emission has recently been observed from a ringlike region encircling the droplet axis near the geometric focus (the Descartes ring). Investigation of the time and spectral characteristics of Descartes ring SRS and its suppression by the addition of absorptive dye to the droplet reveals it to be an additional manifestation of droplet MDR's. We conjecture that the Descartes ring results when the MDR light is scattered by refractive-index inhomogeneities produced by the intense pump field within the droplet.

  19. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument. PMID:26227234

  20. [Where Descartes got it right: the implications for science, biomedicine, and public health].

    PubMed

    Mendonça, André Luis de Oliveira; Camargo, Kenneth Rochel de

    2016-01-01

    The "received view" of Descartes has shaped the image of a dualist thinker who radically separated mind and body and thus laid the foundations for a "divided modernity". Numerous epithets have been applied to Cartesian thinking, all of which now sound depreciative: mechanicism, determinism, and reductionism, among others. This article contends that Descartes was not the type of dualist that is normally assumed. Based on a rereading of two essential works (Discourse on Method and Metaphysical Meditations) and a dialogue with the new literature on the theme, we contend that overcoming the "received view" of Descartes can shed new light on discussions in (and of) the collective health field and highlight the so-called expanded health paradigm (including aspects beyond the biological or physiological, such as the psychological, social, economic, cultural, and political). PMID:27192029

  1. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument.

  2. Unsupervised pattern recognition methods in ciders profiling based on GCE voltammetric signals.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Sordoń, Wanda; Ciepiela, Filip

    2016-07-15

    This work presents a complete methodology of distinguishing between different brands of cider and ageing degrees, based on voltammetric signals, utilizing dedicated data preprocessing procedures and unsupervised multivariate analysis. It was demonstrated that voltammograms recorded on glassy carbon electrode in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 2 are reproducible for each brand. By application of clustering algorithms and principal component analysis visible homogenous clusters were obtained. Advanced signal processing strategy which included automatic baseline correction, interval scaling and continuous wavelet transform with dedicated mother wavelet, was a key step in the correct recognition of the objects. The results show that voltammetry combined with optimized univariate and multivariate data processing is a sufficient tool to distinguish between ciders from various brands and to evaluate their freshness. PMID:26948640

  3. Liquid chromatographic method for quantifying polyphenols in ciders by direct injection.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Belén; Palacios, Noemí; Fraga, Natalia; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2005-02-25

    An analytical method for the quantitative determination of the principal phenolic compounds (benzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, 3-phenylpropionic acids, flavanols, procyanidins, dihydrochalcones, quercetin glycosides) in ciders, which successfully employs a RP-HPLC and photodiode-array detection system without prior treatment of the sample, is described. Parameters usually examined in the method validation were evaluated. Good linearity was obtained with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999 and the detection limits ranged from 0.07 mg/L (p-hydroxybenzoic acid) to 2 mg/L (hydrocaffeic acid). Recoveries ranging between 90 and 104% and the reproducibility of the method was always < 8% (RSD). The method was applied to a set of commercial samples and the results obtained may be helpful to establish a phenolic profile in Asturian cider. PMID:15794560

  4. Efficient reduction of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms from apple cider by combining microfiltration with UV treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongjun; Barrientos, Jessie Usaga; Wang, Qing; Markland, Sarah M; Churey, John J; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Worobo, Randy W; Kniel, Kalmia E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2015-04-01

    Thermal pasteurization can achieve the U. S. Food and Drug Administration-required 5-log reduction of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium parvum in apple juice and cider, but it can also negatively affect the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the treated products. In addition, thermal pasteurization is only marginally effective against the acidophilic, thermophilic, and spore-forming bacteria Alicyclobacillus spp., which is known to cause off-flavors in juice products. In this study, the efficiency of a combined microfiltration (MF) and UV process as a nonthermal treatment for the reduction of pathogenic and nonpathogenic E. coli, C. parvum, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris from apple cider was investigated. MF was used to physically remove suspended solids and microorganisms from apple cider, thus enhancing the effectiveness of UV and allowing a lower UV dose to be used. MF, with ceramic membranes (pore sizes, 0.8 and 1.4 μm), was performed at a temperature of 10 °C and a transmembrane pressure of 155 kPa. The subsequent UV treatment was conducted using at a low UV dose of 1.75 mJ/cm(2). The combined MF and UV achieved more than a 5-log reduction of E. coli, C. parvum, and A. acidoterrestris. MF with the 0.8-μm pore size performed better than the 1.4-μm pore size on removal of E. coli and A. acidoterrestris. The developed nonthermal hurdle treatment has the potential to significantly reduce pathogens, as well as spores, yeasts, molds, and protozoa in apple cider, and thus help juice processors improve the safety and quality of their products.

  5. Efficient reduction of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms from apple cider by combining microfiltration with UV treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongjun; Barrientos, Jessie Usaga; Wang, Qing; Markland, Sarah M; Churey, John J; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Worobo, Randy W; Kniel, Kalmia E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2015-04-01

    Thermal pasteurization can achieve the U. S. Food and Drug Administration-required 5-log reduction of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium parvum in apple juice and cider, but it can also negatively affect the nutritional and organoleptic properties of the treated products. In addition, thermal pasteurization is only marginally effective against the acidophilic, thermophilic, and spore-forming bacteria Alicyclobacillus spp., which is known to cause off-flavors in juice products. In this study, the efficiency of a combined microfiltration (MF) and UV process as a nonthermal treatment for the reduction of pathogenic and nonpathogenic E. coli, C. parvum, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris from apple cider was investigated. MF was used to physically remove suspended solids and microorganisms from apple cider, thus enhancing the effectiveness of UV and allowing a lower UV dose to be used. MF, with ceramic membranes (pore sizes, 0.8 and 1.4 μm), was performed at a temperature of 10 °C and a transmembrane pressure of 155 kPa. The subsequent UV treatment was conducted using at a low UV dose of 1.75 mJ/cm(2). The combined MF and UV achieved more than a 5-log reduction of E. coli, C. parvum, and A. acidoterrestris. MF with the 0.8-μm pore size performed better than the 1.4-μm pore size on removal of E. coli and A. acidoterrestris. The developed nonthermal hurdle treatment has the potential to significantly reduce pathogens, as well as spores, yeasts, molds, and protozoa in apple cider, and thus help juice processors improve the safety and quality of their products. PMID:25836396

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider by trans-cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Hoagland, Thomas; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2010-06-30

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effect of low concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider. A five-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated into apple juice or cider at approximately 6.0 log CFU/ml, followed by the addition of TC (0%v/v, 0.025%v/v, 0.075%v/v and 0.125%v/v). The inoculated apple juice samples were incubated at 23 degrees C and 4 degrees C for 21 days, whereas the cider samples were stored only at 4 degrees C. The pH of apple juice and cider, and E. coli O157:H7 counts were determined on days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21. TC was effective (P<0.05) in inactivating E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider. At 23 degrees C, 0.125 and 0.075%v/v TC completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice (negative by enrichment) on days 1 and 3, respectively. At 4 degrees C, 0.125 and 0.075%v/v TC decreased the pathogen counts in the juice and cider to undetectable levels on days 3 and 5, respectively. Results indicate that low concentrations of TC could be used as an effective antimicrobial to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice and apple cider.

  7. [Analysis of changes in minerals contents during cider fermentation process by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ye, Meng-qi; Yue, Tian-li; Gao, Zhen-peng; Yuan, Ya-hong; Nie, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The changes in mineral elements during cider fermentation process were determined using ICP-MS. The results showed that the main minerals in the fermentation liquor included K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Sr and B. The content of K was the highest in both the apple juice and the cider, being 1 853. 83 and 1 654. 38 mg . L-1 respectively. The content of minerals was in dynamic changes along with the fermentation process. As a whole, during 72-120 h and 144-216 h, most of the minerals contents underwent great fluctuation. Especially when fermented for 192 h, the content of most of the minerals reached peak value or valley value. The content of Fe and Zn achieved their peak value, while the content of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Mn and B achieved valley value. But during the following 24 h, the content of minerals underwent a sharp reversal. After fermentation, the content of K, Mg, Cu, Zn and B decreased significantly, while the content of Na, Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr did not change significantly. The correlational analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between the mineral elements, and the result showed that the correlation between Ca and Mn was the most significant, with the correlation index reaching 0. 924. The information of this study will supply sufficient data for the fermentation process control and quality improvement of cider.

  8. Gel permeation chromatography of anthocyanin pigments from Rosé cider and red wine.

    PubMed

    Shoji, T; Yanagida, A; Kanda, T

    1999-07-01

    Anthocyanin pigments from rosé cider and red wine, which is a sparkling wine made from apples, were separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) using a TSK-GEL Toyopearl HW-40 (F) column with a 6:4 mixture of acetone and 8 M urea (pH 2.0) as the eluent. Under this condition, all phenolic compounds containing monomeric anthocyanins (mainly, cyanidin-3-galactoside; Cyn-3-gal), oligomeric and polymeric anthocyanins, chlorogenic acid, catechin, epicatechin, procyanidin B2 (PB2), and procyanidin C1 (PC1) in the apples and rosé cider were found to elute according to molecular weight. Bleaching of the anthocyanin pigments by SO(2) was gradually effective in the fractions separated by GPC according to elution volume. In the case of rosé cider, the levels of Cyn-3-gal decreased markedly during fermentation and then decreased gradually during maturation. We confirmed that anthocyanin polymers are not detectable in apple juice; these polymers are produced during fermentation and maturation as determined by GPC. The polymeric anthocyanins from red wine could be separated by this method, too.

  9. The influence of the polyphenols of cider on plasmin and plasminogen activators.

    PubMed

    Ogston, D; Lea, A G; Langhorne, P; Wilson, S B

    1985-08-01

    Preliminary findings suggested that the inhibitory activity on fibrinolysis produced by most varieties of cider is due to their content of polyphenols. In particular, the inhibitory activity co-eluted with the brown coloration on gel filtration, was removed by adsorption with polyvinylpyrrolidine, and was greatly reduced in a type of cider with a low concentration of phenolic compounds. The individual polyphenols of apple juice and ciders were examined for their ability to inhibit tissue activator, urokinase and plasmin. Neither phloridzin nor chlorogenic acid had any inhibitory activity at concentrations of 500 micrograms/ml while epicatechin had only a slight inhibitory effect at this concentration. The procyanidin fractions were markedly inhibitory on urokinase-induced clot lysis, the amidolytic activity of plasmin and on the fibrinolytic activities of plasmin, urokinase and tissue activator on fibrin plates: inhibition was noted at concentrations as low as 0.25 micrograms/ml. The order of inhibition was polymer greater than oligomer greater than trimer greater than dimer. PMID:3161536

  10. Beyond Descartes and Newton: Recovering life and humanity.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A; Gare, Arran

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to 'naturalize' phenomenology challenge both traditional phenomenology and traditional approaches to cognitive science. They challenge Edmund Husserl's rejection of naturalism and his attempt to establish phenomenology as a foundational transcendental discipline, and they challenge efforts to explain cognition through mainstream science. While appearing to be a retreat from the bold claims made for phenomenology, it is really its triumph. Naturalized phenomenology is spearheading a successful challenge to the heritage of Cartesian dualism. This converges with the reaction against Cartesian thought within science itself. Descartes divided the universe between res cogitans, thinking substances, and res extensa, the mechanical world. The latter won with Newton and we have, in most of objective science since, literally lost our mind, hence our humanity. Despite Darwin, biologists remain children of Newton, and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow lawful entailment of the evolution of the biosphere. This dream is no longer tenable. We now have to recognize that science and scientists are within and part of the world we are striving to comprehend, as proponents of endophysics have argued, and that physics, biology and mathematics have to be reconceived accordingly. Interpreting quantum mechanics from this perspective is shown to both illuminate conscious experience and reveal new paths for its further development. In biology we must now justify the use of the word "function". As we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, a post-entailing law explanatory framework

  11. Beyond Descartes and Newton: Recovering life and humanity.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A; Gare, Arran

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to 'naturalize' phenomenology challenge both traditional phenomenology and traditional approaches to cognitive science. They challenge Edmund Husserl's rejection of naturalism and his attempt to establish phenomenology as a foundational transcendental discipline, and they challenge efforts to explain cognition through mainstream science. While appearing to be a retreat from the bold claims made for phenomenology, it is really its triumph. Naturalized phenomenology is spearheading a successful challenge to the heritage of Cartesian dualism. This converges with the reaction against Cartesian thought within science itself. Descartes divided the universe between res cogitans, thinking substances, and res extensa, the mechanical world. The latter won with Newton and we have, in most of objective science since, literally lost our mind, hence our humanity. Despite Darwin, biologists remain children of Newton, and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow lawful entailment of the evolution of the biosphere. This dream is no longer tenable. We now have to recognize that science and scientists are within and part of the world we are striving to comprehend, as proponents of endophysics have argued, and that physics, biology and mathematics have to be reconceived accordingly. Interpreting quantum mechanics from this perspective is shown to both illuminate conscious experience and reveal new paths for its further development. In biology we must now justify the use of the word "function". As we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, a post-entailing law explanatory framework

  12. Efficacy of Oral Curcuminoid Fraction from Curcuma xanthorrhiza and Curcuminoid Cider in High-cholesterol Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mauren, Flavia Maria; Yanti; Lay, Bibiana Widiati

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypercholesterolemia is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases. Objective: The present work was aimed to study the efficacy of curcuminoid fraction from Curcuma xanthorrhiza and its curcuminoid cider in reducing blood cholesterol level and four genes related to oxidative stress, including cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) in high-cholesterol fed rats in vivo. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, namely normal group diet, high-cholesterol diet (HCD) 2%, HCD + 100 mg/kg b.w. curcuminoid fraction, HCD + 300 mg/kg b.w. curcuminoid fraction, HCD + cider 1% v/v, and HCD + curcuminoid cider 2% v/v for 4 weeks. Total cholesterol levels were measured at day 1, 14, and 28. Vascular tissues and organs from lung and liver were collected for RNA extraction, followed by quantitative analysis using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Our results demonstrated that among all the treatment groups, curcuminoid cider at 2% v/v significantly lowered total cholesterol level compared to those of positive control. Real-time PCR data showed both curcuminoid fractions (100 and 300 mg/kg) and curcuminoid cider (1 and 2% v/v) inhibited the gene expression of CD44, ICAM-1, iNOS, and LOX-1, indicating their hypocholesterolemic effects via attenuating genes related to oxidative stress in rats in vivo. Conclusion: Oral administration of curcuminoid fraction and its cider product may exert potential inhibitory effects on oxidative stress related-genes for preventing hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in vivo. SUMMARY Curcuminoid and its cider significantly inhibited the gene expression of CD44, ICAM-1, iNOS, and LOX-1 in rats in vivoCurcuminoid and its cider suppressed oxidative stress

  13. Influence of apple cultivar and juice pasteurization on hard cider and eau-de-vie methanol content.

    PubMed

    Hang, Yong D; Woodams, Edward E

    2010-02-01

    Apple eau-de-vie is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in France by distillation of fermented apple juice (hard cider). The current research was undertaken to determine the methanol content of hard cider and apple eau-de-vie made from four apple cultivars grown in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. The methanol concentration of hard cider varied from 0.037% to approximately 0.091%, and the methanol content of apple eau-de-vie ranged from below 200 mg to more than 400 mg/100mL of 40% ethanol. The United States legal limit of methanol for fruit brandy is 0.35% by volume or 280 mg/100mL of 40% ethanol. Of the four apple cultivars examined, Crispin apples yielded significantly more methanol in hard cider and eau-de-vie than Empire, Jonagold or Pacific Rose apples. Pasteurization of Crispin apple juice prior to alcoholic fermentation significantly reduced the methanol content of hard cider and eau-de-vie.

  14. Apple Aminoacid Profile and Yeast Strains in the Formation of Fusel Alcohols and Esters in Cider Production.

    PubMed

    Eleutério Dos Santos, Caroline Mongruel; Pietrowski, Giovana de Arruda Moura; Braga, Cíntia Maia; Rossi, Márcio José; Ninow, Jorge; Machado Dos Santos, Tâmisa Pires; Wosiacki, Gilvan; Jorge, Regina Maria Matos; Nogueira, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The amino acid profile in dessert apple must and its effect on the synthesis of fusel alcohols and esters in cider were established by instrumental analysis. The amino acid profile was performed in nine apple musts. Two apple musts with high (>150 mg/L) and low (<75 mg/L) nitrogen content, and four enological yeast strains, were used in cider fermentation. The aspartic acid, asparagine and glutamic acid amino acids were the majority in all the apple juices, representing 57.10% to 81.95%. These three amino acids provided a high consumption (>90%) during fermentation in all the ciders. Principal component analysis (PCA) explained 81.42% of data variability and the separation of three groups for the analyzed samples was verified. The ciders manufactured with low nitrogen content showed sluggish fermentation and around 50% less content of volatile compounds (independent of the yeast strain used), which were mainly 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) and esters. However, in the presence of amino acids (asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine) there was a greater differentiation between the yeasts in the production of fusel alcohols and ethyl esters. High contents of these aminoacids in dessert apple musts are essential for the production of fusel alcohols and most of esters by aromatic yeasts during cider fermentation. PMID:25920613

  15. Biogenic amines content in Spanish and French natural ciders: application of qPCR for quantitative detection of biogenic amine-producers.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Coton, Monika; Fernández, María; Buron, Nicolas; Martín, M Cruz; Guichard, Hugues; Coton, Emmanuel; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2011-05-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are low molecular weight nitrogenous bases commonly found in fermented foods and beverages and their consumption can induce undesirable reactions. In this work, the BA content in natural cider from Spain and France was determined. Samples from commercially available cider or obtained during the elaboration process were analyzed. A different profile and BA concentration was observed depending on cider origin. qPCR tools developed for the quantitative detection of BA producers from cheese and wine were tested in the cider samples. A good connection between the BA content and the presence of BA-producing microorganisms was observed. Based on these tools, BA-producing bacteria were isolated from the analyzed cider samples, including new potential histamine- and putrescine-producing Lactobacillus paracollinoides strains. PMID:21356464

  16. [Odontology and the beginning of cartesianism (1673--1650) (Rene Descartes)].

    PubMed

    Gysel, C

    1979-01-01

    In the seventeenth century the universities of the Netherlands underwent the influence of Descartes in all the faculties. In medicine three periods can be distinguished: in the first, pathology and therapy are still galenic; the second, by the application of the cartesian method, triumphs in physiology; and the third, corrected by the views of Newton is integrated in a moderate biomechanism.

  17. [Cartesianism and Henricus Regius' dentistry (1598--1679--1979) (Henricus de Roy, René Descartes].

    PubMed

    Gysel, C

    1979-01-01

    Henricues Regius (1598--1679), professor at the University of Utrecht was the first physician who accepted the physiology of the philosopher Descartes (1596--1750) that he exposed in Fundamenta physices (1646) and in Fundamenta Medicinae (1647) but in Praxis Medica (1657) his therapy of the "odontalgia" is still mediaeval according to the principles of Galen.

  18. Addition of fumaric acid and sodium benzoate as an alternative method to achieve a 5-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Comes, Justin E; Beelman, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    A study was conducted to develop a preservative treatment capable of the Food and Drug Administration-mandated 5-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations in apple cider. Unpreserved apple cider was treated with generally recognized as safe acidulants and preservatives before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 in test tubes and subjected to mild heat treatments (25, 35, and 45 degrees C) followed by refrigerated storage (4 degrees C). Fumaric acid had significant (P < 0.05) bactericidal effect when added to cider at 0.10% (wt/vol) and adjusted to pH 3.3, but citric and malic acid had no effect. Strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.96) between increasing undissociated fumaric acid concentrations and increasing log reductions of E. coli O157:H7 in apple cider indicated the undissociated acid to be the bactericidal form. The treatment that achieved the 5-log reduction in three commercial ciders was the addition of fumaric acid (0.15%, wt/vol) and sodium benzoate (0.05%, wt/vol) followed by holding at 25 degrees C for 6 h before 24 h of refrigeration at 4 degrees C. Subsequent experiments revealed that the same preservatives added to cider in flasks resulted in a more than 5-log reduction in less than 5 and 2 h when held at 25 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The treatment also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced total aerobic counts in commercial ciders to populations less than those of pasteurized and raw ciders from the same source (after 5 and 21 days of refrigerated storage at 4 degrees C, respectively). Sensory evaluation of the same ciders revealed that consumers found the preservative-treated cider to be acceptable. PMID:11899046

  19. Detection of apple juice concentrate in the manufacture of natural and sparkling cider by means of HPLC chemometric sugar analyses.

    PubMed

    Blanco Gomis, Domingo; Muro Tamayo, Daysi; Suárez Valles, Belén; Mangas Alonso, Juan J

    2004-01-28

    An HPLC method for sugar analyses in cider was used in order to detect the presence of apple juice concentrate. Sugars, previously derivatized with p-aminobenzoic ethyl ester, were analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using a C(8) column and a mobile phase of citrate buffer pH 5.5/tetrahydrofuran/acetonitrile, operated in gradient mode. The use of this analytical procedure together with chemometric techniques, such as principal component analysis and Bayesean analysis, allowed the authors to establish the minimum concentration of apple juice concentrate obtained by liquefaction or press technology that can be detected in natural cider.

  20. Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (CIDER): Contributions to Education (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (http://www.deep-earth.org) began its activities in 2003 and has so far held four summer programs of duration ranging from 3 to 7 weeks, funded by the NSF/CSEDI program, with support from and at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara. CIDER's goals are twofold: (1) as a "synthesis center", to provide an environment for transformative studies of Earth's internal dynamics, requiring a concerted multi-disciplinary effort of leading researchers, and (2) to educate a new generation of Earth scientists with a breadth of competence across the disciplines required to understand the dynamic earth: mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry and geomagnetism. CIDER summer programs, so far, have focused on themes related to the Deep Earth: "Reconciling seismic and geochemical heterogeneity in the Earth", "The Earth's transition zone", "Boundary layers in the Earth" and "Fluids and volatiles in the Earth's mantle and core". These programs typically include three weeks of unstructured program designed for senior (assistant professor level and higher) researchers, and a 3-4 weeks "tutorial and workshop" part geared towards advanced graduate students and post-docs, but open also to more senior participants. The first two weeks of the tutorial part include lectures and practical exercises in the different disciplines aimed at providing participants with a basic understanding of the fundamentals and current challenges in disciplines other than their own. During the second week, topics related to the summer program's theme are proposed for further study in a workshop mode by multi-disciplinary groups formed on the fly, continued through the last week or two of the program. These activities often lead to the development of new collaborations and research proposals to the CSEDI program. In 2011, CIDER will hold a summer program at UC Berkeley on the theme "Mountain Building", expanding the scope of the Institute

  1. Attempts by Descartes and Roberval to evaluate the centre of oscillation of compound pendulums.

    PubMed

    Capecchi, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    This paper re-examines the first documented attempts to establish the quantitative law of motion for a body oscillating about a fixed axis (a compound pendulum). This is quite a complex problem as weight and motion are not concentrated in a point, but are spread over a volume. Original documents by René Descartes and Gilles Personne de Roberval, who made the first contributions to solving the problem, are discussed. The two scientists had important insights into the problem which, although they were incomplete, nevertheless somehow complemented each other - at least when seen from the viewpoint of modern mechanics. Descartes was right in considering only the absolute value of the inertia forces, Roberval was right in assuming that the force of gravity should also be taken into account.

  2. Validation of apple cider pasteurization treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Mak, P P; Ingham, B H; Ingham, S C

    2001-11-01

    Time and temperature pasteurization conditions common in the Wisconsin cider industry were validated using a six-strain cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 in pH- and degrees Brix-adjusted apple cider. Strains employed were linked to outbreaks (ATCC 43894 and 43895, C7927, and USDA-FSIS-380-94) or strains engineered to contain the gene for green fluorescent protein (pGFP ATCC 43894 and pGFP ATCC 43889) for differential enumeration. Survival of Salmonella spp. (CDC 0778. CDC F2833, and CDC H0662) and Listeria monocytogenes (H0222, F8027, and F8369) was also evaluated. Inoculated cider of pH 3.3 or 4.1 and 11 or 14 degrees Brix was heated under conditions ranging from 60 degrees C for 14 s to 71.1 degrees C for 14 s. A 5-log reduction of nonadapted and acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 was obtained at 68.1 degrees C for 14 s. Lower temperatures, or less time at 68.1 degrees C, did not ensure a 5-log reduction in E. coli O157:H7. A 5-log reduction was obtained at 65.6 degrees C for 14 s for Salmonella spp. L. monocytogenes survived 68.1 degrees C for 14 s, but survivors died in cider within 24 h at 4 degrees C. Laboratory results were validated with a surrogate E coli using a bench-top plate heat-exchange pasteurizer. Results were further validated using fresh unpasteurized commercial ciders. Consumer acceptance of cider pasteurized at 68.1 degrees C for 14 s (Wisconsin recommendations) and at 71.1 degrees C for 6 s (New York recommendations) was not significantly different. Hence, we conclude that 68.1 degrees C for 14 s is a validated treatment for ensuring adequate destruction of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and L. monocytogenes in apple cider. PMID:11726144

  3. Impact of different techniques involving contact with lees on the volatile composition of cider.

    PubMed

    Antón-Díaz, María José; Suárez Valles, Belén; Mangas-Alonso, Juan José; Fernández-García, Ovidio; Picinelli-Lobo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different treatments involving contact with natural lees on the aromatic profile of cider has been evaluated. Comparing with the untreated ciders, the contact with lees brought about a significant increase of the concentrations of most of the volatile compounds analysed, in particular fatty acids, alcohols, ethyl esters and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol. The opposite was observed among fusel acetate esters and 4-vinylguaiacol. The addition of β-glucanase enhanced the increase of ethyl octanoate, but produced a decrease in the contents of decanoic acid and all of the major volatiles excepting acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and acetoine, whereas the application of oxygen influenced the rise of the level of 3-ethoxy-1-propanol only. The olfactometric profiles also revealed significant effects of the treatment with lees for ethyl propionate, diacetyl, cis-3-hexenol, acetic acid, benzyl alcohol, and m-cresol, while the addition of oxygen significantly influenced the perception of ethyl hexanoate, 1-octen-3-one, 3-methyl-2-butenol, t-3-hexenol and c-3-hexenol. PMID:26213084

  4. Micellar electrokinetic capillary electrophoresis for rapid analysis of patulin in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Tsao, R; Zhou, T

    2000-11-01

    A micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) mode was applied to a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method, which was developed for detection and quantitation of patulin in apple ciders. This method used a small sample amount (2 mL) and consumed minimal organic solvent compared to the most commonly used HPLC methods. The sample preparation procedure of the CE method was also simpler than other chromatographic techniques developed for patulin analysis. Patulin was detected with a photodiode array detector at 273 nm. The standard curve was linear (r(2) = 0.9984) from 75 microgram/L to 121 microgram/mL with patulin working solutions corresponding to 3.8 microgram/L to 6.1 microgram/mL patulin in the sample. The linearity was better in a narrower range of concentrations (r(2) = 0.9999) from 75 microgram/L to 24.1 microgram/mL. The limit of detection of the method was 3.8 microgram/L. Patulin recoveries at 4 levels in spiked samples (10-121 microgram/L) ranged from 95.2 to 105.4%. The recoveries were 96. 9% and 99.2% for 2 levels (22.3 and 223 microgram/L, respectively) of patulin in infected apple samples. This method represents a unique alternative method for rapid and sensitive analysis of patulin in apple ciders. PMID:11087465

  5. An in vitro assessment of the erosive potential of conventional and white ciders.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jeremy S; Griffiths, Joanne

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the erosive potential of a range of traditional and white ciders using standard laboratory tests. It measured the pH, 'neutralisable acidity' and the amount of surface enamel lost following immersion over a period of 4 hours. The pH was measured with a digital pH meter and the 'neutralisable acidity' was measured as the volume of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide required to increase the pH to neutrality. Surface enamel loss was measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours using profilometry. The pH on opening ranged from 2.96 to 4.04 and the 'neutralisable acidity' ranged from 14.54 to 21.47 mls. The amount of surface enamel lost following four hours immersion ranged from 8.60-23.95 microns, compared to 12.85 microns for an orange juice control. All the ciders tested were acidic and had considerable erosive potential in vitro which was broadly similar to that of orange juice. A wide variation was found between different commercial brands and this information should be useful when counselling patients with tooth surface loss. PMID:12526274

  6. Use of flow cytometry to follow the physiological states of microorganisms in cider fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Mónica; Quirós, Covadonga; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2006-10-01

    The flow cytometry (FC) technique used with certain fluorescent dyes (ChemChrome V6 [CV6], DRAQ5, and PI) has proven useful to label and to detect different physiological states of yeast and malolactic bacterium starters conducting cider fermentation over time (by performing sequential inoculation of microorganisms). First, the technique was tested with pure cultures of both types of microorganisms grown in synthetic media under different induced stress conditions. Metabolically active cells detected by FC and by the standard plate-counting method for both types of microorganisms in fresh overnight pure cultures gave good correlations between the two techniques in samples taken at this stage. Otherwise, combining the results obtained by FC and plating during alcoholic and malolactic fermentation over time in the cider-making process, different subpopulations were detected, showing significant differences between the methods. A small number of studies have applied the FC technique to analyze fermentation processes and mixed cultures over time. The results were used to postulate equations explaining the different physiological states in cell populations taken from fresh, pure overnight cultures under nonstress conditions or cells subjected to stress conditions over time, either under a pure-culture fermentation process (in this work, corresponding to alcoholic fermentation) or under mixed-fermentation conditions (for the malolactic-fermentation phase), that could be useful to improve the control of the processes. PMID:17021224

  7. Prior storage conditions influence the destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during heating of apple cider and juice.

    PubMed

    Ingham, S C; Uljas, H E

    1998-04-01

    In apple beverage manufacture, cider and juice may be stored for a short time prior to pasteurization. Storage time and temperature may affect the subsequent thermotolerance of bacteria in these beverages. This study examined whether prior storage in pH 3.4 apple cider or apple juice affected the thermotolerance of two Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains in the same beverages at 61 degrees C. Both strains exhibited biphasic survivor curves. Strain ATCC 43894 was consistently more thermotolerant than strain ATCC 43889, with 33 to 153% greater D values derived from the linear portion of each survivor curve. Prior storage at 21 degrees C for 2 or 6 h hastened thermal destruction of both strains in apple cider, but not to a statistically significant extent. In apple juice, prior storage at 21 degrees C for 2 h significantly decreased thermotolerance of strain ATCC 43889, but not of strain ATCC 43894. During 6 h of storage in 21 degrees C apple juice, populations of strains ATCC 43889 and 43894 decreased by 2.1 and 0.5 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, and died rapidly during subsequent heating. Prior storage in apple juice at 4 degrees C for 24 h significantly decreased thermotolerance of both strains, but this effect was not seen after 2 h of storage at 4 degrees C. Experiments with filtered apple cider showed that presence of filterable pulp enhanced the thermotolerance of both strains. These results show that short-term (< or = 6h) room temperature storage of pH 3.4 apple cider and apple juice may enhance the lethality of subsequent pasteurization.

  8. Modeling of Combined Processing Steps for Reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Populations in Apple Cider

    PubMed Central

    Uljas, Heidi E.; Schaffner, Donald W.; Duffy, Siobain; Zhao, Lihui; Ingham, Steven C.

    2001-01-01

    Probabilistic models were used as a systematic approach to describe the response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations to combinations of commonly used preservation methods in unpasteurized apple cider. Using a complete factorial experimental design, the effect of pH (3.1 to 4.3), storage temperature and time (5 to 35°C for 0 to 6 h or 12 h), preservatives (0, 0.05, or 0.1% potassium sorbate or sodium benzoate), and freeze-thaw (F-T; −20°C, 48 h and 4°C, 4 h) treatment combinations (a total of 1,600 treatments) on the probability of achieving a 5-log10-unit reduction in a three-strain E. coli O157:H7 mixture in cider was determined. Using logistic regression techniques, pH, temperature, time, and concentration were modeled in separate segments of the data set, resulting in prediction equations for: (i) no preservatives, before F-T; (ii) no preservatives, after F-T; (iii) sorbate, before F-T; (iv) sorbate, after F-T; (v) benzoate, before F-T; and (vi) benzoate, after F-T. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significant (P < 0.0001) effect of all four variables, with cider pH being the most important, followed by temperature and time, and finally by preservative concentration. All models predicted 92 to 99% of the responses correctly. To ensure safety, use of the models is most appropriate at a 0.9 probability level, where the percentage of false positives, i.e., falsely predicting a 5-log10-unit reduction, is the lowest (0 to 4.4%). The present study demonstrates the applicability of logistic regression approaches to describing the effectiveness of multiple treatment combinations in pathogen control in cider making. The resulting models can serve as valuable tools in designing safe apple cider processes. PMID:11133437

  9. User Instructions for the CiderF Individual Dose Code and Associated Utility Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2013-08-30

    Historical activities at facilities producing nuclear materials for weapons released radioactivity into the air and water. Past studies in the United States have evaluated the release, atmospheric transport and environmental accumulation of 131I from the nuclear facilities at Hanford in Washington State and the resulting dose to members of the public (Farris et al. 1994). A multi-year dose reconstruction effort (Mokrov et al. 2004) is also being conducted to produce representative dose estimates for members of the public living near Mayak, Russia, from atmospheric releases of 131I at the facilities of the Mayak Production Association. The approach to calculating individual doses to members of the public from historical releases of airborne 131I has the following general steps: • Construct estimates of releases 131I to the air from production facilities. • Model the transport of 131I in the air and subsequent deposition on the ground and vegetation. • Model the accumulation of 131I in soil, water and food products (environmental media). • Calculate the dose for an individual by matching the appropriate lifestyle and consumption data for the individual to the concentrations of 131I in environmental media at their residence location. A number of computer codes were developed to facilitate the study of airborne 131I emissions at Hanford. The RATCHET code modeled movement of 131I in the atmosphere (Ramsdell Jr. et al. 1994). The DECARTES code modeled accumulation of 131I in environmental media (Miley et al. 1994). The CIDER computer code estimated annual doses to individuals (Eslinger et al. 1994) using the equations and parameters specific to Hanford (Snyder et al. 1994). Several of the computer codes developed to model 131I releases from Hanford are general enough to be used for other facilities. This document provides user instructions for computer codes calculating doses to members of the public from atmospheric 131I that have two major differences from the

  10. Kinetics of patulin degradation in model solution, apple cider and apple juice by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Warriner, Keith; Shao, Suqin; Zhou, Ting

    2013-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by a wide range of molds involved in fruit spoilage, most commonly by Penicillium expansum and is a health concern for both consumers and manufacturers. The current study evaluated feasibility of monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) radiation at 253.7 nm as a possible commercial application for the reduction of patulin in fresh apple cider and juice. The R-52G MINERALIGHT® UV bench top lamp was used for patulin destruction. It was shown that 56.5%, 87.5%, 94.8% and 98.6% reduction of patulin can be achieved, respectively, in the model solution, apple cider, apple juice without ascorbic acid addition and apple juice with ascorbic acid addition in 2-mm thickness sample initially spiked by 1 mg·L(-1) of patulin after UV exposure for 40 min at UV irradiance of 3.00 mW·cm(-2). A mathematic model to compare the degradation rate and effective UV dose was developed. The effective UV doses that were directly absorbed by patulin for photochemical reaction were 430, 674, 724 and 763 mJ·cm(-3), respectively. The fluence-based decimal reduction time was estimated to 309.3, 31.3, 28.9 and 5.1 mW·cm(-2)·min, respectively, in four media mentioned above. The degradation of patulin followed the first-order reaction model. The time-based and fluence-based reaction rate constants were determined to predict patulin degradation. The time-based reaction rate constant of samples treated in dynamic regime with constant stirring (model solution: 2.95E-4 s(-1), juice: 4.31E-4 s(-1)) were significantly higher than samples treated in static regime (model solution: 2.79E-4 s(-1), juice: 3.49E-4 s(-1), p < 0.05) when applied UV irradiance and sample thickness were consistent. The reaction rate constant of patulin degradation in apple juice was significantly higher than model solution (p < 0.05). Although further investigations are still needed, the results of this study demonstrated that UV radiation may be an effective method for

  11. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Todd Hittinger, Chris; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-06-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  12. A Gondwanan Imprint on Global Diversity and Domestication of Wine and Cider Yeast Saccharomyces uvarum

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum. PMID:24887054

  13. A Gondwanan imprint on global diversity and domestication of wine and cider yeast Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla; Teixeira, Sara; Libkind, Diego; Bontrager, Martin; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Albertin, Warren; Durrens, Pascal; Sherman, David James; Marullo, Philippe; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2014-01-01

    In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cryotolerant yeast species S. uvarum is also used for wine and cider fermentation but nothing is known about its natural history. Here we use a population genomics approach to investigate its global phylogeography and domestication fingerprints using a collection of isolates obtained from fermented beverages and from natural environments on five continents. South American isolates contain more genetic diversity than that found in the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, coalescence analyses suggest that a Patagonian sub-population gave rise to the Holarctic population through a recent bottleneck. Holarctic strains display multiple introgressions from other Saccharomyces species, those from S. eubayanus being prevalent in European strains associated with human-driven fermentations. These introgressions are absent in the large majority of wild strains and gene ontology analyses indicate that several gene categories relevant for wine fermentation are overrepresented. Such findings constitute a first indication of domestication in S. uvarum.

  14. QTL Analysis and Candidate Gene Mapping for the Polyphenol Content in Cider Apple

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, Cindy F.; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  15. QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for the polyphenol content in cider apple.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Cindy F; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  16. Mosaic of Apollo 16 Descartes landing site taken from TV transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A 360 degree field of view of the Apollo 16 Descartes landing site area composed of individual scenes taken from a color transmission made by the color RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. This panorama was made while the LRV was parked at the rim of Flag Crater (Station 1) during the first Apollo 16 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA-1) by Astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr. The overlay identifies the directions and the key lunar terrain features. The camera panned across the rear portion of the LRV in its 360 degree sweep.

  17. Redefining the role of experiment in Bacon's natural history: how Baconian was Descartes before emerging from his cocoon?

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Laura; Giurgea, Mădălina

    2012-01-01

    In this article we argue that the views that Francis Bacon and René Descartes held about the role of experiments in the process of discovery are closer than previously accepted. Looking at the way experiments and the heuristics of experimentation are embedded in Bacon's posthumous History of Dense and Rare and Descartes' Discourses 8, 9, 10 of the Meteorology, we will show that experiments help the investigator both in solving specific problems that could not have otherwise been foreseen and in generating relevant information that advances the scope of the investigation. PMID:22702170

  18. Redefining the role of experiment in Bacon's natural history: how Baconian was Descartes before emerging from his cocoon?

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Laura; Giurgea, Mădălina

    2012-01-01

    In this article we argue that the views that Francis Bacon and René Descartes held about the role of experiments in the process of discovery are closer than previously accepted. Looking at the way experiments and the heuristics of experimentation are embedded in Bacon's posthumous History of Dense and Rare and Descartes' Discourses 8, 9, 10 of the Meteorology, we will show that experiments help the investigator both in solving specific problems that could not have otherwise been foreseen and in generating relevant information that advances the scope of the investigation.

  19. Potential of lees from wine, beer and cider manufacturing as a source of economic nutrients: An overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bibbins, B; Torrado-Agrasar, A; Salgado, J M; Oliveira, R Pinheiro de Souza; Domínguez, J M

    2015-06-01

    Lees are the wastes generated during the fermentation and aging processes of different industrial activities concerning alcoholic drinks such as wine, cider and beer. They must be conveniently treated to avoid uncontrolled dumping which causes environmental problems due to their high content of phenols, pesticides, heavy metals, and considerable concentrations of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium as well as high organic content. The companies involved must seek alternative environmental and economic physicochemical and biological treatments for their revalorization consisting in the recovery or transformation of the components of the lees into high value-added compounds. After describing the composition of lees and market of wine, beer and cider industries in Spain, this work aims to review the recent applications of wine, beer and cider lees reported in literature, with special attention to the use of lees as an endless sustainable source of nutrients and the production of yeast extract by autolysis or cell disruption. Lees and/or yeast extract can be used as nutritional supplements with potential exploitation in the biotechnological industry for the production of natural compounds such as xylitol, organic acids, and biosurfactants, among others.

  20. Potential of lees from wine, beer and cider manufacturing as a source of economic nutrients: An overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bibbins, B; Torrado-Agrasar, A; Salgado, J M; Oliveira, R Pinheiro de Souza; Domínguez, J M

    2015-06-01

    Lees are the wastes generated during the fermentation and aging processes of different industrial activities concerning alcoholic drinks such as wine, cider and beer. They must be conveniently treated to avoid uncontrolled dumping which causes environmental problems due to their high content of phenols, pesticides, heavy metals, and considerable concentrations of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium as well as high organic content. The companies involved must seek alternative environmental and economic physicochemical and biological treatments for their revalorization consisting in the recovery or transformation of the components of the lees into high value-added compounds. After describing the composition of lees and market of wine, beer and cider industries in Spain, this work aims to review the recent applications of wine, beer and cider lees reported in literature, with special attention to the use of lees as an endless sustainable source of nutrients and the production of yeast extract by autolysis or cell disruption. Lees and/or yeast extract can be used as nutritional supplements with potential exploitation in the biotechnological industry for the production of natural compounds such as xylitol, organic acids, and biosurfactants, among others. PMID:25824282

  1. Paring down on Descartes: a review of brain noradrenaline and sympathetic nervous function.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G W

    2001-12-01

    1. The conceptual framework of mind-body interaction can be traced back to the seminal observations of the French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes (1596-1650). Descartes succeeded in eliminating the soul's apparent physiological role and established the brain as the body's control centre. 2. While the pivotal role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in the maintenance of physiological and psychological health has long been recognized, the development of methods designed for the direct examination of human CNS processes has only recently come to fruition. 3. There exists a substantial body of evidence derived from clinical and experimental studies indicating that CNS monoaminergic cell groups, in particular those using noradrenaline as their neurotransmitter, participate in the excitatory regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the development and maintenance of the hypertensive state. 4. In essential hypertension, particularly in younger patients, there occurs an activation of sympathetic nervous outflows to the kidneys, heart and skeletal muscle. The existence of a correlation between subcortical brain noradrenaline turnover and total body noradrenaline spillover to plasma, resting blood pressure and heart rate provides further support for the observation that elevated subcortical noradrenergic activity subserves a sympathoexcitatory role in the regulation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of the thorocolumbar cord.

  2. Inactivation of different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in various apple ciders treated with dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) as an alternative method.

    PubMed

    Basaran-Akgul, N; Churey, J J; Basaran, P; Worobo, R W

    2009-02-01

    Escherichia coli has been identified as the causative agent in numerous foodborne illness outbreaks associated with the consumption of fresh apple cider. Apple cider has a pH which is normally below 4.0 and would not be considered a medium capable of supporting the growth of foodborne pathogens. The association of unpasteurized apple cider with foodborne illness due to E. coli O157:H7 has however, led to increased interest in potential alternative methods to produce pathogen free cider. Apple cider was prepared from eight different apple cultivars, inoculated with approximately 10(6)-10(7) CFU of three strains of E. coli O157:H7 per ml (933, ATCC 43889, and ATCC 43895) and tested to determine the effectiveness of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC). Bacterial populations for treated and untreated samples were then enumerated by using non-selective media. Eight different ciders were treated with DMDC (125 and 250 ppm) and SO(2) (25, 50, 75, 100 ppm). Greater than a 5-log reduction was achieved at room temperature with 250 ppm of DMDC and 50 ppm of SO(2) after the incubation time of 6h and 24h, respectively. Addition of DMDC and/or SO(2) may offer an inexpensive alternative to thermal pasteurization for the production of safe apple cider for small apple cider producers. PMID:19028298

  3. Diversity of the microbiota involved in wine and organic apple cider submerged vinegar production as revealed by DHPLC analysis and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Mahnič, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-04-16

    Unfiltered vinegar samples collected from three oxidation cycles of the submerged industrial production of each, red wine and organic apple cider vinegars, were sampled in a Slovene vinegar producing company. The samples were systematically collected from the beginning to the end of an oxidation cycle and used for culture-independent microbial analyses carried out by denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene variable regions. Both approaches showed a very homogeneous bacterial structure during wine vinegar production but more heterogeneous during organic apple cider vinegar production. In all wine vinegar samples Komagataeibacter oboediens (formerly Gluconacetobacter oboediens) was a predominating species. In apple cider vinegar the acetic acid and lactic acid bacteria were two major groups of bacteria. The acetic acid bacterial consortium was composed of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter with the Komagataeibacter genus outcompeting the Acetobacter in all apple cider vinegar samples at the end of oxidation cycle. Among the lactic acid bacterial consortium two dominating genera were identified, Lactobacillus and Oenococcus, with Oenococcus prevailing with increasing concentration of acetic acid in vinegars. Unexpectedly, a minor genus of the acetic acid bacterial consortium in organic apple cider vinegar was Gluconobacter, suggesting a possible development of the Gluconobacter population with a tolerance against ethanol and acetic acid. Among the accompanying bacteria of the wine vinegar, the genus Rhodococcus was detected, but it decreased substantially by the end of oxidation cycles.

  4. An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections and haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with consumption of unpasteurized apple cider.

    PubMed

    Hilborn, E D; Mshar, P A; Fiorentino, T R; Dembek, Z F; Barrett, T J; Howard, R T; Cartter, M L

    2000-02-01

    During October 1996, an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections among Connecticut residents occurred. An epidemiologic investigation included enhanced surveillance and a case-control study. Clinical isolates of Escherichia coli O157:H7 were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Implicated cider samples were analysed by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Consumption of implicated cider was associated with illness; (matched odds ratio = undefined, 95 % confidence interval = 3.5-infinity). Ultimately, a total of 14 outbreak-associated patients were identified. All isolates analysed by PFGE yielded the outbreak-associated subtype. Escherichia coli O157:H7 was not cultured from three cider samples; PCR analysis detected DNA fragments consistent with Escherichia coli O157:H7 in one. This outbreak was associated with drinking one brand of unpasteurized apple cider. PFGE subtyping supported the epidemiologic association. PCR analysis detected microbial contaminants in the absence of live organisms. Washing and brushing apples did not prevent cider contamination. PMID:10722127

  5. Diversity of the microbiota involved in wine and organic apple cider submerged vinegar production as revealed by DHPLC analysis and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Mahnič, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-04-16

    Unfiltered vinegar samples collected from three oxidation cycles of the submerged industrial production of each, red wine and organic apple cider vinegars, were sampled in a Slovene vinegar producing company. The samples were systematically collected from the beginning to the end of an oxidation cycle and used for culture-independent microbial analyses carried out by denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene variable regions. Both approaches showed a very homogeneous bacterial structure during wine vinegar production but more heterogeneous during organic apple cider vinegar production. In all wine vinegar samples Komagataeibacter oboediens (formerly Gluconacetobacter oboediens) was a predominating species. In apple cider vinegar the acetic acid and lactic acid bacteria were two major groups of bacteria. The acetic acid bacterial consortium was composed of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter with the Komagataeibacter genus outcompeting the Acetobacter in all apple cider vinegar samples at the end of oxidation cycle. Among the lactic acid bacterial consortium two dominating genera were identified, Lactobacillus and Oenococcus, with Oenococcus prevailing with increasing concentration of acetic acid in vinegars. Unexpectedly, a minor genus of the acetic acid bacterial consortium in organic apple cider vinegar was Gluconobacter, suggesting a possible development of the Gluconobacter population with a tolerance against ethanol and acetic acid. Among the accompanying bacteria of the wine vinegar, the genus Rhodococcus was detected, but it decreased substantially by the end of oxidation cycles. PMID:26897250

  6. The New Alliance between Science and Education: Otto Neurath's Modernity beyond Descartes' "Adamitic" Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliverio, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Starting from a suggestion of Stephen Toulmin and through an interpretation of the criticism to which Neurath, one of the founders of the Vienna Circle, submits Descartes' views on science, the paper attempts to outline a pattern of modernity opposed to the Cartesian one, that has been obtaining over the last four centuries. In particular, it…

  7. [Innovations in medical undergraduate pathology education: The Paris Descartes medicine faculty experience].

    PubMed

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Verkarre, Virginie; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Rabant, Marion; Daniliuc, Cristina; Radenen, Brigitte; Harent, Marion; Cassanelli, Lucien; Cherel, Éric; Javaux, Hubert; Tesniere, Antoine; Terris, Benoît; Badoual, Cécile

    2016-08-01

    At the Paris Descartes medicine faculty, we tested some newly developed tools to enhance the pedagogic value of the pathology teaching. In our faculty, this teaching is largely multidisciplinary and integrated in various teaching units; a large part is dedicated to practice works with thirteen 90min sessions. Virtual slides have been used for years in numerous medicine faculties; we successfully implemented this tool by adding contextual annotations, which facilitate students revising. We showed that rewarding students' assiduity enhanced their exam success. To do so, we now propose a short continuous assessment exam at the beginning of each practice session in the form of electronic multi-choice questions. Finally, we now propose a completely computerized final exam, on touchpads, that enhanced its docimologic value. PMID:27475003

  8. Distribution of inert gases in fines from the Cayley-Descartes region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. R.; Lakatos, S.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    The inert gases in 14 different fines and in one sample of 2 to 4 mm fines from Apollo 16 were measured by mass spectroscopy with respect to trapped solar wind gases, cosmogenic gases, and 'parentless' Ar-40. Such studies are helpful for the understanding of regolith evolution, of transport of regolith fines, and of the lunar atmosphere. The Apollo 16 soils are unique because they represent, after Luna 20, the second and much more extensive record from the lunar highlands. The landing site presents the problem of materials from the Cayley Formation vs those from the Descartes Formation. There are two large, relatively fresh craters in the area, North Ray and South Ray, whose ejecta patterns may be recognized in the inert-gas record.

  9. Mosaic of Apollo 16 Descartes landing site taken from TV transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A 360 degree field of view of the Apollo 16 Descartes landing site area composed of individual scenes taken from a color transmission made by the color RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. This panorama was made while the LRV was parked at the rim of North Ray crater (Stations 11 and 12) during the third Apollo 16 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA-3) by Astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr. The overlay identifies the directions and the key lunar terrain features. The camera panned across the rear portion of the LRV in its 360 degree sweep. Note Young and Duke walking along the edge of the crater in one of the scenes. The TV camera was remotely controlled from a console in the Mission Control Center.

  10. Five early accounts of phantom limb in context: Paré, Descartes, Lemos, Bell, and Mitchell.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Hustwit, Meredith P

    2003-03-01

    PHANTOM LIMB WAS described long before American physician and surgeon Silas Weir Mitchell coined the term and drew attention to the disorder in the 1860s. The early descriptions of Ambroise Paré, René Descartes, Aaron Lemos, Charles Bell, and then Mitchell of this strange consequence of amputation are presented in historical and cultural context. These five men described phantom limbs for various reasons. They also differed when it came to explaining and dealing with these illusory sensations. The rich history of phantom limbs can begin to be appreciated by viewing the contributions of these individuals in perspective and by realizing that their writings represent only a fraction of what was published about phantom limbs more than 130 years ago.

  11. An Account of the Inaugural Tessier Skull Exhibition at the University of Paris Descartes.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, Joseph Richard; Firmin, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Paul Tessier is widely regarded as the father of modern craniofacial surgery. Upon his passing in 2008, his private collection of human skulls was purchased by the French Association of Facial Surgeons to ensure the collection would remain in France. The first public exhibition of the skulls was held in the medical museum of the University of Paris Descartes in April 2014. From this collection of skulls and the imagination of Tessier an entirely new specialty was created. Modern craniofacial surgery, now is an integral part of any pediatric plastic surgery department. Cranial and facial osteotomies have also become commonplace in both traumatic and aesthetic surgery. The goals for craniofacial deformity are now a return to completely normal appearance and function, as Tessier always believed they should be.

  12. An Account of the Inaugural Tessier Skull Exhibition at the University of Paris Descartes.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, Joseph Richard; Firmin, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Paul Tessier is widely regarded as the father of modern craniofacial surgery. Upon his passing in 2008, his private collection of human skulls was purchased by the French Association of Facial Surgeons to ensure the collection would remain in France. The first public exhibition of the skulls was held in the medical museum of the University of Paris Descartes in April 2014. From this collection of skulls and the imagination of Tessier an entirely new specialty was created. Modern craniofacial surgery, now is an integral part of any pediatric plastic surgery department. Cranial and facial osteotomies have also become commonplace in both traumatic and aesthetic surgery. The goals for craniofacial deformity are now a return to completely normal appearance and function, as Tessier always believed they should be. PMID:26468782

  13. [Innovations in medical undergraduate pathology education: The Paris Descartes medicine faculty experience].

    PubMed

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Verkarre, Virginie; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Rabant, Marion; Daniliuc, Cristina; Radenen, Brigitte; Harent, Marion; Cassanelli, Lucien; Cherel, Éric; Javaux, Hubert; Tesniere, Antoine; Terris, Benoît; Badoual, Cécile

    2016-08-01

    At the Paris Descartes medicine faculty, we tested some newly developed tools to enhance the pedagogic value of the pathology teaching. In our faculty, this teaching is largely multidisciplinary and integrated in various teaching units; a large part is dedicated to practice works with thirteen 90min sessions. Virtual slides have been used for years in numerous medicine faculties; we successfully implemented this tool by adding contextual annotations, which facilitate students revising. We showed that rewarding students' assiduity enhanced their exam success. To do so, we now propose a short continuous assessment exam at the beginning of each practice session in the form of electronic multi-choice questions. Finally, we now propose a completely computerized final exam, on touchpads, that enhanced its docimologic value.

  14. Influence of apple cultivars on inactivation of different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple cider by UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Basaran, N; Quintero-Ramos, A; Moake, M M; Churey, J J; Worobo, R W

    2004-10-01

    This study examined the effect of different apple cultivars upon the UV inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains within unfiltered apple cider. Apple cider was prepared from eight different apple cultivars, inoculated with approximately 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of three strains of E. coli O157:H7 per ml (933, ATCC 43889, and ATCC 43895), and exposed to 14 mJ of UV irradiation per cm(2). Bacterial populations for treated and untreated samples were then enumerated by using nonselective media. E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43889 showed the most sensitivity to this disinfection process with an average 6.63-log reduction compared to an average log reduction of 5.93 for both strains 933 and ATCC 43895. The highest log reduction seen, 7.19, occurred for strain ATCC 43889 in Rome cider. The same cider produced the lowest log reductions: 5.33 and 5.25 for strains 933 and ATCC 43895, respectively. Among the apple cultivars, an average log reduction range of 5.78 (Red Delicious) to 6.74 (Empire) was observed, with two statistically significant (alpha < or = 0.05) log reduction groups represented. Within the paired cultivar-strain analysis, five of eight ciders showed statistically significant (alpha < or = 0.05) differences in at least two of the E. coli strains used. Comparison of log reductions among the E. coli strains to the cider parameters of (o)Brix, pH, and malic acid content failed to show any statistically significant relationship (R(2) > or = 0.95). However, the results of this study indicate that regardless of the apple cultivar used, a minimum 5-log reduction is achieved for all of the strains of E. coli O157:H7 tested. PMID:15466551

  15. Influence of Apple Cultivars on Inactivation of Different Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Apple Cider by UV Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, N.; Quintero-Ramos, A.; Moake, M. M.; Churey, J. J.; Worobo, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different apple cultivars upon the UV inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains within unfiltered apple cider. Apple cider was prepared from eight different apple cultivars, inoculated with approximately 106 to 107 CFU of three strains of E. coli O157:H7 per ml (933, ATCC 43889, and ATCC 43895), and exposed to 14 mJ of UV irradiation per cm2. Bacterial populations for treated and untreated samples were then enumerated by using nonselective media. E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43889 showed the most sensitivity to this disinfection process with an average 6.63-log reduction compared to an average log reduction of 5.93 for both strains 933 and ATCC 43895. The highest log reduction seen, 7.19, occurred for strain ATCC 43889 in Rome cider. The same cider produced the lowest log reductions: 5.33 and 5.25 for strains 933 and ATCC 43895, respectively. Among the apple cultivars, an average log reduction range of 5.78 (Red Delicious) to 6.74 (Empire) was observed, with two statistically significant (α ≤ 0.05) log reduction groups represented. Within the paired cultivar-strain analysis, five of eight ciders showed statistically significant (α ≤ 0.05) differences in at least two of the E. coli strains used. Comparison of log reductions among the E. coli strains to the cider parameters of °Brix, pH, and malic acid content failed to show any statistically significant relationship (R2 ≥ 0.95). However, the results of this study indicate that regardless of the apple cultivar used, a minimum 5-log reduction is achieved for all of the strains of E. coli O157:H7 tested. PMID:15466551

  16. Influence of cinnamon and clove essential oils on the D- and z-values of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Knight, K P; McKellar, R C

    2007-09-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 has become a concern within the apple cider industry. The purpose of this study was to screen several essential oils and isolated components for antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7 in tryptic soy broth at neutral and acidic pH and to assess the effect of these additives on the D-value of E. coli O157:H7 in apple cider in combination with mild heat treatments. Cinnamon oil and clove oil strongly inhibited the growth of E. coli O157:H7 at neutral and acidic pH, (R)-(-)-carvone and (S)-(-)-perillaldehyde were moderately inhibitory at both pH 7.2 and pH 4.5, and citral and geraniol displayed moderate activity at pH 4.5 only. Lemon oil, methyl jasmonate, and p-anisaldehyde displayed little or no antibacterial activity. A synergistic effect between the essential oils and the lower pH of the growth medium was evident by consistently lower MICs at pH 4.5. Cinnamon and clove oils (0.01%, vol/vol) were further tested in apple cider in combination with mild heat treatments for the practical control of E. coli O157:H7 in apple cider. The addition of either essential oil resulted in lower D-values than those for cider alone, suggesting a synergistic effect and the potential efficacy of a mild heat treatment for apple cider. PMID:17900087

  17. Production and partial characterization of exopolysaccharides produced by two Lactobacillus suebicus strains isolated from cider.

    PubMed

    Ibarburu, Idoia; Puertas, Ana Isabel; Berregi, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Prieto, Alicia; Dueñas, Ma Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Many lactic acid bacteria synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, EPSs) with a large variation in structure and potential functional properties. Although EPS production can produce detrimental effects in alcoholic beverages, these polymers play an important role in the rheological behavior and texture of fermented products. In this work, EPS production by two Lactobacillus suebicus strains, which were isolated from ropy ciders, was examined in a semidefined medium. The existence of priming glycosyltransferase encoding genes was detected by PCR. In addition, the preliminary characterization of the polymers was undertaken. Molecular masses were determined by size exclusion chromatography revealing the presence of two peaks, corresponding to polymers of high- and low-molecular-weight in all fractions. The composition of the EPS fractions was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis, revealing that they contained glucose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and phosphate, although in different ratios, suggesting that a mixture of polysaccharides is being synthesized. We also examined the influence of the sugar source (glucose, ribose, xylose, or arabinose) and pH conditions on growth and EPS production. PMID:26241490

  18. Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from Spanish natural cider.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Ana Isabel; Arahal, David R; Ibarburu, Idoia; Elizaquível, Patricia; Aznar, Rosa; Dueñas, M Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 were isolated from ropy natural ciders of the Basque Country, Spain, in 2007. Cells are Gram-stain positive, non-spore-forming, motile rods, facultative anaerobes and catalase-negative. The strains are obligately homofermentative (final product dl-lactate) and produce exopolysaccharides from sucrose. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the highest similarity to both isolates corresponded to the type strain of Lactobacillus vini (99.1 %), followed by Lactobacillus satsumensis (96.4 %), and Lactobacillus oeni (96.2 %), and for all other established species, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities were below 96 %. The species delineation of strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 was evaluated through RAPD fingerprinting. In addition, a random partial genome pyrosequencing approach was performed on strain CUPV261(T) in order to compare it with the genome sequence of Lactobacillus vini DSM 20605(T) and calculate indexes of average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Results permit the conclusion that strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CUPV261(T) ( = CECT 8227(T) = KCTC 21012(T)). PMID:24899655

  19. Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from Spanish natural cider.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Ana Isabel; Arahal, David R; Ibarburu, Idoia; Elizaquível, Patricia; Aznar, Rosa; Dueñas, M Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 were isolated from ropy natural ciders of the Basque Country, Spain, in 2007. Cells are Gram-stain positive, non-spore-forming, motile rods, facultative anaerobes and catalase-negative. The strains are obligately homofermentative (final product dl-lactate) and produce exopolysaccharides from sucrose. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the highest similarity to both isolates corresponded to the type strain of Lactobacillus vini (99.1 %), followed by Lactobacillus satsumensis (96.4 %), and Lactobacillus oeni (96.2 %), and for all other established species, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities were below 96 %. The species delineation of strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 was evaluated through RAPD fingerprinting. In addition, a random partial genome pyrosequencing approach was performed on strain CUPV261(T) in order to compare it with the genome sequence of Lactobacillus vini DSM 20605(T) and calculate indexes of average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Results permit the conclusion that strains CUPV261(T) and CUPV262 represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus sicerae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CUPV261(T) ( = CECT 8227(T) = KCTC 21012(T)).

  20. Production and partial characterization of exopolysaccharides produced by two Lactobacillus suebicus strains isolated from cider.

    PubMed

    Ibarburu, Idoia; Puertas, Ana Isabel; Berregi, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Prieto, Alicia; Dueñas, Ma Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Many lactic acid bacteria synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, EPSs) with a large variation in structure and potential functional properties. Although EPS production can produce detrimental effects in alcoholic beverages, these polymers play an important role in the rheological behavior and texture of fermented products. In this work, EPS production by two Lactobacillus suebicus strains, which were isolated from ropy ciders, was examined in a semidefined medium. The existence of priming glycosyltransferase encoding genes was detected by PCR. In addition, the preliminary characterization of the polymers was undertaken. Molecular masses were determined by size exclusion chromatography revealing the presence of two peaks, corresponding to polymers of high- and low-molecular-weight in all fractions. The composition of the EPS fractions was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after acid hydrolysis, revealing that they contained glucose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and phosphate, although in different ratios, suggesting that a mixture of polysaccharides is being synthesized. We also examined the influence of the sugar source (glucose, ribose, xylose, or arabinose) and pH conditions on growth and EPS production.

  1. Comparison of aluminum thermal-death-time disks with a pilot-scale pasteurizer on the thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare thermal inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider using conventional glass tubes, aluminum thermal-death-time (TDT) disks, and a pilot-scale pasteurizer. D-values of E. coli K12 in glass tubes and TDT disks were determined at 56, 58, and 60C. D-...

  2. Characterization of the polyphenol composition of 20 cultivars of cider, processing, and dessert apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.) grown in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Witrick, Katherine A; Goodrich, Katheryn M; Neilson, Andrew P; Hurley, E Kenneth; Peck, Gregory M; Stewart, Amanda C

    2014-10-15

    Polyphenols and maturity parameters were determined in 20 apple cultivars with potential for hard cider production grown in Virginia, U.S.A. Concentrations of five classes of polyphenols were significantly different across cultivar for both peel and flesh. Total polyphenol concentration ranged from 0.9 μg/g wwb in flesh of Newtown Pippin to 453 μg/g wwb in peel of Red Delicious. Harrison, Granny Smith, Rome, Winesap, and Black Twig cultivars contained the highest concentration of total flavan-3-ols in flesh, indicating potential to impart desired astringency and bitterness to cider under processing conditions where extraction of polyphenols from peel is minimal. These results can inform selection of fruit juice, extracts, and byproducts for investigations of bioactivity and bioavailability of polyphenols, and provide baseline data for horticultural and processing research supporting the growing hard cider industry in Virginia. Based on these data, cultivars Harrison, Granny Smith, Rome, Winesap, and Black Twig show high potential for cider production in Virginia.

  3. Modeling of Escherichia coli inactivation by UV irradiation at different pH values in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Ramos, A; Churey, J J; Hartman, P; Barnard, J; Worobo, R W

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the effects and interactions of UV light dose (1,800 to 20,331 microJ/cm2) and apple cider pH (2.99 to 4.41) on the inactivation of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, a surrogate for E. coli O157:H7. A predictive model was developed to relate the log reduction factor of E. coli ATCC 25922 to the UV dose. Bacterial populations for treated and untreated samples were enumerated with the use of nonselective media. The results revealed that UV dose was highly significant in the inactivation of E. coli, whereas pH showed no significant effect at higher UV doses. Doses of 6,500 microJ/cm2 or more were sufficient to achieve a greater than 5-log reduction of E. coli. Experimental inactivation data were fitted adequately by a logistic regression model. UV irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional methods for reducing bacteria in unpasteurized apple cider.

  4. The effect of SO2 on the production of ethanol, acetaldehyde, organic acids, and flavor volatiles during industrial cider fermentation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Mónica; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2003-05-21

    SO(2) is widely used in cider fermentation but also in other alcoholic beverages such as wine. Although the authorized limit is 200 ppm total SO(2), the International Organizations recommend its total elimination or at least reduction due to health concerns. Addition of SO(2) to apple juice at levels frequently used in industrial cidermaking (100 mg/L) induced significantly higher acetaldehyde production by yeast than that obtained without SO(2). Although the practical implications of acetaldehyde evolution under cidermaking conditions has been overcome by research and few data are available, this compound reached levels in two 2000 L bioreactors that may have prevented the occurrence of simultaneous alcoholic and malolactic fermentation. It was observed that malolactic fermentation had a positive effect promoting reduction of acetaldehyde levels in cider fermented with juice, SO(2)-treated or not. The addition of SO(2) clearly delayed malolactic fermentation comparing to the control, affecting not the onset of the malolactic fermentation but the rate of malic acid degradation. This compound, however, had a stimulatory effect on alcoholic fermentation.

  5. Controlled formation of volatile components in cider making using a combination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora valbyensis yeast species.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhao, G A; Wang, L P

    2006-03-01

    The effect of pure and mixed fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora valbyensis on the formation of major volatile components in cider was investigated. When the interaction between yeast strains of S. cerevisiae and H. valbyensis was studied, it was found that the two strains each affected the cell growth of the other upon inoculation of S. cerevisiae during growth of H. valbyensis. The effects of pure and mixed cultures of S. cerevisiae and H. valbyensis on alcohol fermentation and major volatile compound formation in cider were assessed. S. cerevisiae showed a conversion of sugar to alcohol of 11.5%, while H. valbyensis produced alcohol with a conversion not exceeding 6%. Higher concentrations of ethyl acetate and phenethyl acetate were obtained with H. valbyensis, and higher concentrations of isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl were formed by S. cerevisiae. Consequently, a combination of these two yeast species in sequential fermentation was used to increase the concentration of ethyl esters by 7.41-20.96%, and to decrease the alcohol concentration by 25.06-51.38%. Efficient control of the formation of volatile compounds was achieved by adjusting the inoculation time of the two yeasts. PMID:16292558

  6. Primers and a specific DNA probe for detecting lactic acid bacteria producing 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde from glycerol in spoiled ciders.

    PubMed

    Claisse, O; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2001-06-01

    Of the 40 strains isolated from several spoiled ciders where glycerol was degraded, 36 were identified as Lactobacillus collinoides, three were Lactobacillus hilgardii, and one was Lactobacillus mali. However, only 30 L. collinoides and two L. hilgardii could degrade glycerol. The glycerol dehydratase activity was shown. The main product of the transformation was 1.3 propanediol. Two DNA primers GD1 and GD2 were chosen in the region encoding one of the subunits of glycerol dehydratase of Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium pasteurianum. A 279-bp amplicon in polymerase chain reaction amplification was obtained with the genomic L. collinoides IOEB 9527 DNA as template. The amino acid sequence deduced from the amplicon DNA sequence showed a very high similarity and identity with the gene of gram-negative and C. pasteurianum species. After labeling, the amplicon was used as DNA probe in dot-blot hybridization with the genomic DNA of all the tested strains. Only strains that could degrade glycerol hybridized. Moreover, polymerase chain reactions using GDI and GD2 revealed only glycerol dehydratase genes of positive L. collinoides and L. hilgardii strains. The primers and the amplicon proved to be suitable and reliable tools to detect the lactic acid bacteria involved in the deterioration of cider. PMID:11403134

  7. Evidence for Mini-Magnetospheres at four Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Reiner-Gamma, Airy, Descartes and Crozier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Hemingway, D.

    2014-12-01

    Lunar swirls are enigmatic high-albedo surface markings co-located with magnetic anomalies. The existence of mini-magnetospheres has been proposed as a formation mechanism, making small-scale magnetic field interactions with the solar wind of interest. Using data from the Lunar Prospector, Clementine, and Advanced Composition Explorer missions, we develop three metrics for the identification of mini-magnetospheres: 1) presence of coherent magnetism at low altitude for magnetic field measurements taken in the solar wind; 2) directional field distortions that are correlated with changes in incident solar wind azimuth; 3) intensification of total field strength. These metrics are applied to four lunar magnetic anomalies with various reflectances and magnetic field strengths, ranging from fully developed swirls (Reiner-Gamma, Airy) to diffuse albedo patches which may or may not be swirls (Descartes, Crozier). Specifically, we compare magnetic field measurements in the solar wind to source magnetization models constructed from observations in the lunar wake and Earth's magnetotail. By applying these criteria, we confirm previous findings of magnetosphere-like phenomena at Reiner-Gamma. We also find evidence of these phenomena at Descartes and Airy, and propose that mini-magnetospheres may exist here. At Airy, very large upwind distortions are observed, comparable to the length scale of the anomaly itself. At Reiner-Gamma and Descartes, this distortion is significantly smaller, yet the average field strengths are higher, implying that the scale of distortion is linked to the anomaly's field strength. Interestingly, at Crozier, the weakest anomaly considered, we do not observe this distortion. However, we do observe evidence of field intensification at high solar wind pressures (16 nPa). While Descartes and Reiner-Gamma are among the strongest anomalies on the Moon, and both exhibit magnetospheric properties, only Reiner-Gamma shows a well-developed swirl pattern

  8. An Alternative Analysis of the Discourse by Descartes, Kant and Hegel in terms of the Ethical Structure of the Kanun.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    The ethical structure of the Albanian customary code, the Kanun, is deemed to represent the ethical value system of a society without state power. In spite of the appearance of civilizations and the resultant advent of an incipient state power, humans seemed to have known only the ethical value system of a society without state power until Gotama, Socrates, Plato and Jesus proposed new religious and philosophical doctrines. The basic trait of these religious and philosophical doctrines, which try to antagonize the ethical value system of a society without state power by eliminating the emotional aspect of humanity from the ethical value system, has been inherited by western philosophers such as Descartes, Kant and Hegel. The discourses by Descartes, Kant and Hegel were reviewed while paying attention to how they dealt with the sensuous and emotional aspects of humanity. The metaphysical implications of the ethical structure of the Kanun surfaced through the critical reviewing of their philosophy, and a hypothesis concerning its origin was presented.

  9. Apollo 16 lunar module 'Orion' photographed from distance during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Lunar Module 'Orion' is photographed from a distance by Astronaut Chares M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, aboard the moving Lunar Roving Vehicle. Astronauts Duke and John W. Young, commander, were returning from the excursion to Stone Mountain during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The RCA color television camera mounted on the LRV is in the foreground. A portion of the LRV's high-gain antenna is at top left. Smoky Mountain rises behind the LM in this north-looking view at the Descartes landing site.

  10. A real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of 2-branched (1,3)-beta-D-glucan producing lactic acid bacteria in cider.

    PubMed

    Ibarburu, Idoia; Aznar, Rosa; Elizaquível, Patricia; García-Quintáns, Nieves; López, Paloma; Munduate, Arantza; Irastorza, Ana; Dueñas, María Teresa

    2010-09-30

    Ropiness in natural cider is a relatively frequent alteration, mainly found after bottling, leading to consumer rejection. It is derived from the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) by some lactic acid bacteria most of which synthesize a 2-branched (1,3)-beta-D-glucan and belong to the genera Pediococcus, Lactobacillus and Oenococcus. This polysaccharide synthesis is controlled by a single transmembrane glycosyltransferase (GTF). In this work, a method based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) and targeting the gtf gene was developed for detection and quantification of these bacteria in cider. The newly designed primers GTF3/GTF4 delimit a 151bp fragment within the 417bp amplicon previously designed for conventional PCR. The inclusivity and exclusivity of the qPCR assay were assessed with 33 cider isolates belonging to genus Lactobacillus, Oenoccocus and Pedioccocus, together with reference strains of 16 species and five genera including beta-glucan, alpha-glucan and heteropolysaccharide (HePS) producing strains and non-EPS producers. The qPCR assay, followed by the melting curve analysis, confirmed the generation of a single PCR product from the beta-glucan producers with a T(m) of 74.28+/-0.08 and C(T) values (10ng DNA) ranging between 8.46 and 16.88 (average 12.67+/-3.5). Some EPS(-) LAB strains rendered C(T) values ranging from 28.04 to 37.75 but they were significantly higher (P(C(T)<28.54)=0.05) than those of the beta-glucan producers. The assay showed a wide quantification range of 5 log units using calibrated cell suspensions of Pediococcus parvulus 2.6 and Oenococcus oeni I4. The linearity was extended over 7 log orders when calibration curves were obtained from DNA. The detection limit for beta-glucan producing LAB in artificially contaminated cider was about 3x10(2)CFU per ml. The newly developed qPCR assay was successfully applied to monitor the cidermaking process, in 13 tanks from two cider factories, revealing a decrease in C(T) values derived from an

  11. Combinations of Intervention Treatments Resulting in 5-Log10-Unit Reductions in Numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium DT104 Organisms in Apple Cider

    PubMed Central

    Uljas, Heidi E.; Ingham, Steven C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently mandated a warning statement on packaged fruit juices not treated to reduce target pathogen populations by 5 log10 units. This study describes combinations of intervention treatments that reduced concentrations of mixtures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (strains ATCC 43895, C7927, and USDA-FSIS-380-94) or Salmonella typhimurium DT104 (DT104b, U302, and DT104) by 5 log10 units in apple cider with a pH of 3.3, 3.7, and 4.1. Treatments used were short-term storage at 4, 25, or 35°C and/or freeze-thawing (48 h at −20°C; 4 h at 4°C) of cider with or without added organic acids (0.1% lactic acid, sorbic acid [SA], or propionic acid). Treatments more severe than those for S. typhimurium DT104 were always required to destroy E. coli O157:H7. In pH 3.3 apple cider, a 5-log10-unit reduction in E. coli O157:H7 cell numbers was achieved by freeze-thawing or 6-h 35°C treatments. In pH 3.7 cider the 5-log10-unit reduction followed freeze-thawing combined with either 6 h at 4°C, 2 h at 25°C, or 1 h at 35°C or 6 h at 35°C alone. A 5-log10-unit reduction occurred in pH 4.1 cider after the following treatments: 6 h at 35°C plus freeze-thawing, SA plus 12 h at 25°C plus freeze-thawing, SA plus 6 h at 35°C, and SA plus 4 h at 35°C plus freeze-thawing. Yeast and mold counts did not increase significantly (P < 0.05) during the 6-h storage at 35°C. Cider with no added organic acids treated with either 6 h at 35°C, freeze-thawing or their combination was always preferred by consumers over pasteurized cider (P < 0.05). The simple, inexpensive intervention treatments described in the present work could produce safe apple cider without pasteurization and would not require the FDA-mandated warning statement. PMID:10223981

  12. Evaluation of strontium isotope abundance ratios in combination with multi-elemental analysis as a possible tool to study the geographical origin of ciders.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Silvia; Moldovan, Mariella; Fortunato, Giuseppino; Wunderli, Samuel; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2007-05-01

    In order to evaluate alternative analytical methodologies to study the geographical origin of ciders, both multi-elemental analysis and Sr isotope abundance ratios in combination with multivariate statistical analysis were estimated in 67 samples from England, Switzerland, France and two Spanish regions (Asturias and the Basque Country). A methodology for the precise and accurate determination of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio in ciders by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) was developed. Major elements (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were measured by ICP-AES and minor and trace elements (Li, Be, B, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, W, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U) were measured by ICP-MS using a collision cell instrument operated in multitune mode. An analysis of variance (ANOVA test) indicated that group means for B, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Se, Cd, Cs, Ce, W, Pb, Bi and U did not show any significant differences at the 95% confidence level, so these elements were rejected for further statistical analysis. Another group of elements (Li, Be, Sc, Co, Ga, Y, Sn, Sb, La, Tl, Th) was removed from the data set because concentrations were close to the limits of detection for many samples. Therefore, the remaining elements (Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ba) together with (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio were considered for principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Finally, LDA was able to classify correctly 100% of cider samples coming from different Spanish regions, France, England and Switzerland when considering Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ba and (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio as original variables. PMID:17416223

  13. Patulin reduction in apple juice from concentrate by UV radiation and comparison of kinetic degradation models between apple juice and apple cider.

    PubMed

    Assatarakul, Kitipong; Churey, John J; Manns, David C; Worobo, Randy W

    2012-04-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several genera of fungi, including Byssochlamys, Aspergillus, and Penicillium, has been an important concern in apple cider and apple juice due to its toxicity and health consequences. In this study, the effects of UV on the patulin level, physical and chemical properties, and sensory attributes in apple juice from concentrate were investigated. Kinetic modeling of patulin reduction by UV radiation in apple juice from concentrate was calculated and compared with the degradation rate observed previously in apple cider. From an initial patulin contamination of approximately 1,000 ppb (μg/liter), the UV exposure, ranging from 14.2 mJ/cm(2) (one pass) to 99.4 mJ/cm(2) (seven passes), was successful in reducing patulin levels by 72.57% ± 2.76% to 5.14% ± 0.70%, respectively. Patulin reduction by UV radiation followed first-order kinetic modeling in a fashion similar to first-order microbial inactivation. An exponential correlation between UV exposure and the percentage of patulin remaining was observed, giving an r(2) value of 0.9950. Apple juice was repeatedly exposed to 14.2 mJ/cm(2) for each treatment, and patulin levels were significantly decreased when compared with the level obtained with the previous UV exposure treatment. While there were no significant differences in the percentages of titratable acidity and ascorbic acid (P > 0.05), there were minor yet random sampling differences in pH and degrees Brix (1 °Brix is 1 g of sucrose in 100 g of solution; the °Brix represents the soluble solids content of the solution as percentage by weight [%, wt/wt]) (P ≤ 0.05). A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) in sensory perception for the finished apple juice was detected between the control and the full seven-pass UV radiation treatment using an experienced consumer panel and a triangle test. Patulin reduction by UV radiation from both the current study and a previous study involving apple cider was compared, which showed that

  14. [Scientific revolution and embryology: rejection or transformation of antiquity? A comparison between the procreation teachings of Cesare Cremonini, William Harvey und René Descartes].

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I address the issue of the theoretical and epistemological status of embryology at the rise of the so-called "Scientific Revolution" (also in the first half of the seventeenth-century) and raise the question, in what sense and to what extent the historiographical concept of "Scientific Revolution" is applicable to the domain of embryology. To achieve this aim I compare the theories of three protagonists of the medical, scientific and philosophical debate of that age, namely Cesare Cremonini, William Harvey and René Descartes, who had very different views on the world structure and human nature and a very different concept of science, but who shared, as concerns embryological issues, an epigenetic conception of the development of the embryo. Their theories are discussed and compared in light of following questions: 1) What do Cremonini's, Harvey's and Descartes's embryological theories exactly aim to?; 2) In developing their theories, do these thinkers deal explicitly or implicitly with the Aristotelian and the Galenic embryological paradigm?; 3)Do they refer polemically to the Aristotelian and the Galenic tradition and what theoretical and/or rhetorical function have these polemical references?; 4) Do the embryological theories of Cremonini, Harvey and Descartes reflect the century-long dispute between "(Aristotelian) philosophers" and "(Galenic) doctors"?; 5) How is represented embryology as a 'scientific' and/or 'theoretical' domain? And what relationship between concepts of 'truth', 'research', 'tradition' and 'scientific progress' is implied or proposed in the embryological works of these three thinkers? What kind of use do Cremonini, Harvey and Descartes make of the argumenta ex ratione and of those ex experientia?

  15. Consequences of removing cheap, super-strength beer and cider: a qualitative study of a UK local alcohol availability intervention

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Elizabeth; Marks, Dalya; Sumpter, Colin; Egan, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increasingly, English local authorities have encouraged the implementation of an intervention called ‘Reducing the Strength’ (RtS) whereby off-licences voluntarily stop selling inexpensive ‘super-strength’ (≥6.5% alcohol by volume (ABV)) beers and ciders. We conceptualised RtS as an event within a complex system in order to identify pathways by which the intervention may lead to intended and unintended consequences. Design A qualitative study including a focus group and semistructured interviews. Setting An inner-London local authority characterised by a high degree of residential mobility, high levels of social inequality and a large homeless population. Intervention piloted in three areas known for street drinking with a high alcohol outlet density. Participants Alcohol service professionals, homeless hostel employees, street-based services managers and hostel dwelling homeless alcohol consumers (n=30). Results Participants describe a range of potential substitution behaviours to circumvent alcohol availability restrictions including consuming different drinks, finding alternative shops, using drugs or committing crimes to purchase more expensive drinks. Service providers suggested the intervention delivered in this local authority missed opportunities to encourage engagement between the council, alcohol services, homeless hostels and off-licence stores. Some participants believed small-scale interventions such as RtS may facilitate new forms of engagement between public and private sector interests and contribute to long-term cultural changes around drinking, although they may also entrench the view that ‘problem drinking’ only occurs in certain population groups. Conclusions RtS may have limited individual-level health impacts if the target populations remain willing and able to consume alternative means of intoxication as a substitute for super-strength products. However, RtS may also lead to wider system changes not directly related

  16. HPLC-DAD-MS Profiling of Polyphenols Responsible for the Yellow-Orange Color in Apple Juices of Different French Cider Apple Varieties.

    PubMed

    Le Deun, Erell; Van der Werf, Remmelt; Le Bail, Gildas; Le Quéré, Jean-Michel; Guyot, Sylvain

    2015-09-01

    The pigments responsible for the yellow-orange coloration of apple juices have remained largely unknown up to now. Four French cider apple juices were produced in conditions similar to those used in the cider-making industry. The oxidized juices, characterized using the CIE L a b parameters, displayed various colors depending on the apple variety and native phenolic composition. HPLC-DAD-MS revealed contrasting pigment profiles related to oxidized tanning and nontanning molecules. The latter were divided into two groups according to their polarity and their visible spectra. With regard to phenolic classes, flavanol monomers and hydroxycinnamic acids played an essential role in the formation of oxidation products. Interestingly, dihydrochalcones appeared to include precursors of some yellow compounds. Indeed, the yellow pigment phloretin xyloglucoside oxidation product (PXGOPj), derived from phloretin xyloglucoside, was clearly identified in apple juices as a xyloglucose analogue of the yellow pigment phloridzin oxidation product (POPj), previously characterized in a model solution by Le Guernevé et al. (Tetrahedron Lett. 2004, 45 (35), 6673-6677).

  17. HPLC-DAD-MS Profiling of Polyphenols Responsible for the Yellow-Orange Color in Apple Juices of Different French Cider Apple Varieties.

    PubMed

    Le Deun, Erell; Van der Werf, Remmelt; Le Bail, Gildas; Le Quéré, Jean-Michel; Guyot, Sylvain

    2015-09-01

    The pigments responsible for the yellow-orange coloration of apple juices have remained largely unknown up to now. Four French cider apple juices were produced in conditions similar to those used in the cider-making industry. The oxidized juices, characterized using the CIE L a b parameters, displayed various colors depending on the apple variety and native phenolic composition. HPLC-DAD-MS revealed contrasting pigment profiles related to oxidized tanning and nontanning molecules. The latter were divided into two groups according to their polarity and their visible spectra. With regard to phenolic classes, flavanol monomers and hydroxycinnamic acids played an essential role in the formation of oxidation products. Interestingly, dihydrochalcones appeared to include precursors of some yellow compounds. Indeed, the yellow pigment phloretin xyloglucoside oxidation product (PXGOPj), derived from phloretin xyloglucoside, was clearly identified in apple juices as a xyloglucose analogue of the yellow pigment phloridzin oxidation product (POPj), previously characterized in a model solution by Le Guernevé et al. (Tetrahedron Lett. 2004, 45 (35), 6673-6677). PMID:25984746

  18. Sexism and anatomy, as discerned in textbooks and as perceived by medical students at Cardiff University and University of Paris Descartes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Susan; Plaisant, Odile; Lignier, Baptiste; Moxham, Bernard J

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary textbooks of anatomy and surface anatomy were evaluated to ascertain whether they were gender-neutral. The evidence of this, and previous studies, suggests that, both in terms of imagery and text, many textbooks lack neutrality. To further investigate such matters, we provided second-year medical students studying at Cardiff University (n = 293) and at the Paris Descartes University (n = 142) during the 2011-2012 academic year with a questionnaire inviting them to address the possibility that social/gender factors hinder the dispassionate representation of anatomy. Ethical approval was obtained from both Cardiff and Paris universities. Eighty-six percent of the students at Cardiff and 39% at Paris Descartes responded and provided data for analysis. The hypothesis tested is that medical students perceive a gender bias that is reflected in the books they read and the tuition they receive. Our findings suggest that, while students recognise the importance of gender issues and do not wish to associate with sexism, most are unaware of the possible negative aspects of sexism within anatomy. In this respect, the findings do not support our hypothesis. Nevertheless, we recommended that teachers of anatomy and authors of anatomy textbooks should be aware of the possibility of adverse effects on professional matters relating to equality and diversity issues.

  19. Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., in shadow of Lunar Module behind ultraviolet camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot, stands in the shadow of the Lunar Module (LM) behind the ultraviolet (UV) camera which is in operation. This photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, mission commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The UV camera's gold surface is designed to maintain the correct temperature. The astronauts set the prescribed angles of azimuth and elevation (here 14 degrees for photography of the large Magellanic Cloud) and pointed the camera. Over 180 photographs and spectra in far-ultraviolet light were obtained showing clouds of hydrogen and other gases and several thousand stars. The United States flag and Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) are in the left background. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (lm) 'Orion' to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (csm) 'Casper' in lunar orbit.

  20. Descartes glare points in scattering by icicles: color photographs and a tilted dielectric cylinder model of caustic and glare-point evolution.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L

    1998-03-20

    Glare points associated with the Airy caustics of once and twice internally reflected rays are visible in the scattering by sunlit icicles. Supporting color photographs include an image of the far-field scattering. Relevant rays are analogous to the Descartes rays of primary and secondary rainbows of drops; however, the caustic conditions for the icicle are predicted to be affected by tilt of the illumination relative to the axis of the icicle. A model for the caustic evolution, given for a circular dielectric cylinder, manifests a transition in which the Airy caustic (and associated glare points) merge in the meridional plane at a critical tilt. At this critical tilt the merged glare point is predicted to be very bright. The calculations use the Bravais effective refractive index and generalized ray tracing. PMID:18268747

  1. Polyphasic study of Zymomonas mobilis strains revealing the existence of a novel subspecies Z. mobilis subsp. francensis subsp. nov., isolated from French cider.

    PubMed

    Coton, Monika; Laplace, Jean-Marie; Auffray, Yanick; Coton, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis strains recently isolated from French 'framboisé' ciders were compared with collection strains of the two defined subspecies, Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis and Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae, using a polyphasic approach. Six strains isolated from six different regions of France were compared with three strains of Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis, including the type strain LMG 404T, and four strains of Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae, including the type strain LMG 448T, using phenotypic and genotypic methods. For phenotypic characterization, both physiological tests and SDS-PAGE protein profiles revealed significant differences between the two known subspecies and the French isolates; three distinct groups were observed. These findings were further confirmed by random amplified polymorphic DNA and repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR genotyping methods in which the French isolates were clearly distinguished from the other two subspecies. Sequence analysis of a fragment ranging from 604 to 617 nucleotides corresponding to the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR), a 592 nucleotide HSP60 gene fragment and a 1044 nucleotide gyrB gene fragment confirmed the presence of three distinct groups. The French strains exhibited almost 94 % similarity to the ISR, 90 % to HSP60 and 86 % to gyrB sequences of the three collection strains of Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis and 87, 84 and 80 % sequence similarity, respectively, was observed with the four Z. mobilis subsp. pomaceae strains. Based on both the phenotypic and genotypic results, the French strains are proposed to represent a novel subspecies, Zymomonas mobilis subsp. francensis subsp. nov. Strain AN0101T (= LMG 22974T = CIP 108684T) was designated as the type strain. PMID:16403876

  2. Use of Descartes Folium Equation for Deriving a Relation between Total Aperture of Fractures after Uniaxial Compression and Strain Parameters of Different Rocks Exhibiting Negative Total Volumetric Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2014-11-01

    The axial, crack and total volumetric strains, porosity, elastic constants, crack damage stresses, uniaxial compressive strengths, as well as fracture apertures and number of fracture traces in rock samples surface after compression were defined for different chalk, basalt, dolomite, granite, limestone and sandstone samples exhibiting negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is established that the total (summed) aperture of vertical fractures obtained on the lateral surface of rock sample is related to three characteristic strain parameters: axial strain at the onset of negative total volumetric strain, axial failure strain and negative total volumetric strain at failure. The relation is based on Descartes folium equation, where the length of the loop of folium is equal to axial strain coordinate at the onset of negative total volumetric strain. This relation shows that the total aperture increases according to power law with increasing difference between axial failure strain and axial strain at the onset of negative total volumetric strain. Simultaneously, an increase in this difference leads to an increase in the value of negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is found that a direct correlation between total aperture of fractures and negative total volumetric strain at failure is relatively weak. Nevertheless, total aperture of fractures tends to increase with increasing absolute value of negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is revealed that there is no connection between the number of fracture traces and negative total volumetric strain at failure.

  3. Difficulties encountered at the beginning of professional life: results of a 2003 pilot survey among undergraduate students in Paris Rene Descartes University (France).

    PubMed

    Benbelaïd, R; Dot, D; Levy, G; Eid, N

    2006-11-01

    In addition to dental hospital clinical activity, dental students at Paris Rene Descartes University have the opportunity in their final year of study to practise clinically in a dental office, as associates. This paper outlines a pilot, experimental study designed to assess student reaction to this Vocational Clinical Activity (VCA) in order to identify relevant weaknesses of the undergraduate programme. Using questionnaires, data were collected for each of the following clinical or management skills: clinical difficulty, therapeutic decision-making, patient/practitioner relationship, time management, administrative matters and technical problems. Students were asked to rank each item in order of difficulty (1, high level to 6, low level). A high response rate was observed (90%) among the 50 undergraduate VCA students. The results pointed out three main difficulties encountered by undergraduate students during the VCA: time management (90% of the students), administrative matters (85% of the students) and clinical decision-making (80% of the students). These preliminary results need further investigation. However, they give us the incentive to carry on with this type of assessment and to extend it to young, qualified colleagues' perceptions and to other French Universities.

  4. Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2

    2013-10-08

    This program simulates the beam propagation of weather radar pulses under particular and realistic atmospheric conditions (without using the assumption of standard refraction conditions). It consists of two modules: radiosondings_refract_index_many.pro (MAIN MODULE) beam_propagation_function.pro(EXTERNAL FUNCTION) FOR THE MAIN MODULE, THE CODE DOES OUTPUT--INTO A FILE--THE BEAM HEIGHT AS A FUNCTION OF RANGE. THE RADIOSONDE INPUT FILES SHOULD BE ALREADY AVAILABLE BY THE USER. FOR EXAMPLE, RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION FILES CAN BE OBTAINED AT: RADIOSONDE OBSERVATIONS DOWNLOADED ATmore » "http://weather.uwyo.edu/upperair/soounding.html" OR "http://jervis.pyr.ec.gc.ca" THE EXTERNAL FUNCTION DOES THE ACTUAL COMPUTATION OF BEAM PROPAGATION. IT INCLUDES CONDITIONS OF ANOMALOUS PROPAGATION AND NEGATIVE ELEVATION ANGLES. THE EQUATIONS USED HERE WERE DERIVED BY EDWIN CAMPOS, BASED ON THE SNELL-DESCARTES LAW OF REFRACTION, CONSIDERING THE EARTH CURVATURE. THE PROGRAM REQUIRES A COMPILER FOR THE INTERACTIVE DATA LANGUAGE (IDL). DESCRIPTION AND VALIDATION DETAILS HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE PEER-REVIEWED SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, AS FOLLOWS: Campos E. 2012. Estimating weather radar coverage over complex terrain, pp.26-32, peer reviewed, in Weather Radar and Hydrology, edited by Moore RJ, Cole SJ and Illingworth AJ. International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) Press, IAHS Publ. 351. ISBN 978-1-907161-26-1.« less

  5. Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, Edwin Campos

    2013-10-08

    This program simulates the beam propagation of weather radar pulses under particular and realistic atmospheric conditions (without using the assumption of standard refraction conditions). It consists of two modules: radiosondings_refract_index_many.pro (MAIN MODULE) beam_propagation_function.pro(EXTERNAL FUNCTION) FOR THE MAIN MODULE, THE CODE DOES OUTPUT--INTO A FILE--THE BEAM HEIGHT AS A FUNCTION OF RANGE. THE RADIOSONDE INPUT FILES SHOULD BE ALREADY AVAILABLE BY THE USER. FOR EXAMPLE, RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION FILES CAN BE OBTAINED AT: RADIOSONDE OBSERVATIONS DOWNLOADED AT "http://weather.uwyo.edu/upperair/soounding.html" OR "http://jervis.pyr.ec.gc.ca" THE EXTERNAL FUNCTION DOES THE ACTUAL COMPUTATION OF BEAM PROPAGATION. IT INCLUDES CONDITIONS OF ANOMALOUS PROPAGATION AND NEGATIVE ELEVATION ANGLES. THE EQUATIONS USED HERE WERE DERIVED BY EDWIN CAMPOS, BASED ON THE SNELL-DESCARTES LAW OF REFRACTION, CONSIDERING THE EARTH CURVATURE. THE PROGRAM REQUIRES A COMPILER FOR THE INTERACTIVE DATA LANGUAGE (IDL). DESCRIPTION AND VALIDATION DETAILS HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE PEER-REVIEWED SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, AS FOLLOWS: Campos E. 2012. Estimating weather radar coverage over complex terrain, pp.26-32, peer reviewed, in Weather Radar and Hydrology, edited by Moore RJ, Cole SJ and Illingworth AJ. International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) Press, IAHS Publ. 351. ISBN 978-1-907161-26-1.

  6. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  7. We Have Not Understood Descartes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallias, Andras

    1996-01-01

    Describes a personal involvement with digital media and the origins of the conception of the "diagrammatic" poem. Reflects on what is considered to be a poem in tune with today's computerized society. (PA)

  8. Euclid and Descartes: A Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasdovich, Dorothy Hoy

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a method of reorganizing a high school geometry course to integrate coordinate geometry together with Euclidean geometry at an earlier stage in the course, thus enabling students to prove subsequent theorems from either perspective. Several examples contrasting different proofs from both perspectives are provided. (MDH)

  9. Firefighting Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  10. Firefighting Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  11. Thermionic modules

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  12. Firefighting Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Firefly II pump module is NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's commercial offshoot of a NASA/US Coast Guard program involving development of a lightweight, helicopter-transportable firefighting module for a quick response in combating shipboard or harbor fires. Operable on land or water, the Amphib One is equipped with 3 water cannons. When all 3 are operating, unit pumps more than 3,000 gallons a minute. Newly developed model used by U.S. Coast Guard can pump 5,000 gallons per minute. It was designed for applications such as firefighting onboard ship fires, emergency dockside water pumping, dewatering ships in danger of sinking, flood control, and emergency water supply at remote locations.

  13. Thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Kortier, William E.; Mueller, John J.; Eggers, Philip E.

    1980-07-08

    A thermoelectric module containing lead telluride as the thermoelectric mrial is encapsulated as tightly as possible in a stainless steel canister to provide minimum void volume in the canister. The lead telluride thermoelectric elements are pressure-contacted to a tungsten hot strap and metallurgically bonded at the cold junction to iron shoes with a barrier layer of tin telluride between the iron shoe and the p-type lead telluride element.

  14. Linear modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study of frequency division multiplexing (FDM) systems was made for the purpose of determining the system performance that can be obtained with available state of the art components. System performance was evaluated on the basis of past experience, system analysis, and component evaluation. The system study was specifically directed to the area of FDM systems using subcarrier channel frequencies from 4 kHz to 200 kHz and channel information bandwidths of dc to 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz. The evaluation also assumes that the demodulation will be from a tape recorder which produces frequency modulation of + or - 1% on the signal due to the tape recorder wow and flutter. For the modulation system it is assumed that the pilot and carrier channel frequencies are stable to within + or - .005% and that the FM on the channel carriers is negligible. The modulator system was evaluated for the temperature range of -20 degree to +85 degree while the demodulator system was evaluated for operation at room temperature.

  15. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2013-08-27

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame, The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  16. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  17. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  18. Lunar Module Ascent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Lunar Module 'Spider' ascent stage is photographed from the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The Lunar Module's descent stage had already been jettisoned.

  19. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  20. Module flammability research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimura, R. S.; Otth, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    New materials were developed which show promise of fabricating modules that can pass the Underwriter Laboratories Class A burning brand test for fire ratable solar cell modules. It is concluded that fire resistant module design require special high temperature materials and constructions to achieve Class B and Class A ratings. Also, synergisms exist between back surface materials and module configuration.

  1. Module utilization committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.; Praver, G.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules on a national basis and to act as a broker for requests for these modules originating outside of the National Photovoltaics Program.

  2. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  3. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.

  4. A mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract improves fructose consumption-induced insulin resistance in rats: modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and glucose transporter-4

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng; Yao, Ling; Lin, Xuemei; Gu, Tieguang; Rong, Xianglu; Batey, Robert; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the processing of apple for juice, cider or wine preparation. Rosemary is a herb commonly used as spice and flavoring agent in food processing. Evidence suggests that both apple pomace and rosemary have rich bioactive molecules with numerous metabolic effects. To provide more information for using apple pomace and rosemary as functional foods for management of metabolism-associated disorders, the present study investigated the insulin-sensitizing effect of a mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract (AR). The results showed that treatment with AR (500 mg/kg, daily, by gavage) for 5 weeks attenuated chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in fasting plasma insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index in rats. Mechanistically, AR suppressed fructose-induced acceleration of the clearance of plasma non-esterified fatty acids during oral glucose tolerance test, and decreased excessive triglyceride accumulation and the increased Oil Red O staining area in the gastrocnemius. Furthermore, AR restored fructose-induced overexpression of sarcolemmal CD36 that is known to contribute to etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake, and downregulation of sarcolemmal glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 that is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter. Thus, these results demonstrate that AR improves fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats via modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and GLUT-4. PMID:27725859

  5. Commerical module test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smokier, M. I.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented for a program of qualification testing of commercial crystalline silicon modules from nine manufacturers in five countries. The outcome demonstrated the effective role of the Block 5 Qualification Tests in the development of reliable modules.

  6. Integrated spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dong X.; Storti, George M.; Wrigley, Charles Y.

    1992-08-01

    We described here an integrated spatial light modulator (SLM) employing Quantex electron trapping (ET) materials. The light modulation is accomplished by emission of ET material, upon incident coherent infrared light, where a pattern is written to by previous visible light excitation. The ET based spatial light modulators offer unique advantages over other SLM devices, such as capability of converting incoherent input to coherent light output and of integrating the modulator, the photodetector, and the memory into a single, rugged unit.

  7. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  8. Modulating lignin in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  9. Rescue Manual. Module 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fifth of 10 modules contains information on hazardous materials. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive material in this module. In addition, the module contains a Department of Transportation guide chart on…

  10. Integrating Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Provides an overview of the complete National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

  11. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  12. Loadable Hypervisor Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Scott, Stephen L; Aderholdt, Ferrol

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a new hypervisor mechanism for loading dynamic shared objects (modules) at runtime. These loadable hypervisor modules (LHM) are modeled after the loadable kernel modules used in Linux. We detail the current LHM implementation based on the Xen hypervisor. Potential use cases for this LHM mechanism include dynamic hypervisor instrumentation for debug tracing or performance analysis. We discuss the initial LHM prototype and future plans.

  13. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  14. FASTBUS Snoop Diagnostic Module

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.; Downing, R.

    1980-11-01

    Development of the FASTBUS Snoop Module, undertaken as part of the prototype program for the new interlaboratory data bus standard, is described. The Snoop Module resides on a FASTBUS crate segment and provides diagnostic monitoring and testing capability. Communication with a remote host computer is handled independent of FASTBUS through a serial link. The module consists of a high-speed ECL front-end to monitor and single-step FASTBUS cycles, a master-slave interface, and a control microprocessor with serial communication ports. Design details and performance specifications of the prototype module are reported. 9 figures, 1 table.

  15. Bubble memory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohning, O. D.; Becker, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Design, fabrication and test of partially populated prototype recorder using 100 kilobit serial chips is described. Electrical interface, operating modes, and mechanical design of several module configurations are discussed. Fabrication and test of the module demonstrated the practicality of multiplexing resulting in lower power, weight, and volume. This effort resulted in the completion of a module consisting of a fully engineered printed circuit storage board populated with 5 of 8 possible cells and a wire wrapped electronics board. Interface of the module is 16 bits parallel at a maximum of 1.33 megabits per second data rate on either of two interface buses.

  16. Bracket for photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2014-06-24

    Brackets for photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. In one embodiment, a saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. The gusset can have a first leg and a second leg extending at an angle relative to the mounting surface. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets. The mounting feature can be coupled to the first gusset and configured to stand the one or more PV modules off the tube.

  17. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  18. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  19. Cosmetology. Computerized Learning Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnerty, Kathy, Ed.

    Intended to help reading-limited students meet course objectives, these 11 modules are based on instructional materials in cosmetology that have a higher readability equivalent. Modules cover bacteriology, chemical waving, scalp and hair massage, chemistry, hair shaping, hairstyling, chemical hair relaxing, hair coloring, skin and scalp,…

  20. Logs Perl Module

    2007-04-04

    A perl module designed to read and parse the voluminous set of event or accounting log files produced by a Portable Batch System (PBS) server. This module can filter on date-time and/or record type. The data can be returned in a variety of formats.

  1. Module Safety Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-02-01

    Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

  2. Lunar Module Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Apollo lunar module communications. It describes several changes in terminology from the Apollo era to more recent terms. It reviews: (1) Lunar Module Antennas and Functions (2). Earth Line of Sight Communications Links (3) No Earth Line of Sight Communications Links (4) Lunar Surface Communications Links (5) Signal-Processing Assembly (6) Instrumentation System (7) Some Communications Problems Encountered

  3. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  4. Principles of Teaching. Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Joseph W.

    This module on principles of teaching is 1 in a series of 10 modules written for vocational education teacher education programs. It is designed to enable the teacher to do the following: (1) identify subject matter and integrate that subject matter with thought-provoking questions; (2) organize and demonstrate good questioning techniques; and (3)…

  5. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  6. Solar energy modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, R. R. (Inventor); Mcdougal, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A module is described with a receiver having a solar energy acceptance opening and supported by a mounting ring along the optic axis of a parabolic mirror in coaxial alignment for receiving solar energy from the mirror, and a solar flux modulator plate for varying the quantity of solar energy flux received by the acceptance opening of the module. The modulator plate is characterized by an annular, plate-like body, the internal diameter of which is equal to or slightly greater than the diameter of the solar energy acceptance opening of the receiver. Slave cylinders are connected to the modulator plate for supporting the plate for axial displacement along the axis of the mirror, therby shading the opening with respect to solar energy flux reflected from the surface of the mirror to the solar energy acceptance opening.

  7. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    DOEpatents

    Wares, Brian S.

    2014-09-02

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame. A plurality of individual male alignment features and a plurality of individual female alignment features are included on each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by multiple individual male alignment features on a first module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules fitting into and being surrounded by corresponding individual female alignment features on a second module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  8. Optical modulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, J.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication, test, and delivery of an optical modulator system which will operate with a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser indicating at either 1.06 or 0.53 micrometers is discussed. The delivered hardware operates at data rates up to 400 Mbps and includes a 0.53 micrometer electrooptic modulator, a 1.06 micrometer electrooptic modulator with power supply and signal processing electronics with power supply. The modulators contain solid state drivers which accept digital signals with MECL logic levels, temperature controllers to maintain a stable thermal environment for the modulator crystals, and automatic electronic compensation to maximize the extinction ratio. The modulators use two lithium tantalate crystals cascaded in a double pass configuration. The signal processing electronics include encoding electronics which are capable of digitizing analog signals between the limit of + or - 0.75 volts at a maximum rate of 80 megasamples per second with 5 bit resolution. The digital samples are serialized and made available as a 400 Mbps serial NRZ data source for the modulators. A pseudorandom (PN) generator is also included in the signal processing electronics. This data source generates PN sequences with lengths between 31 bits and 32,767 bits in a serial NRZ format at rates up to 400 Mbps.

  9. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  10. Autonomous cotton module forming system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers often have difficulty finding adequate labor during harvest. Module builder operators are often inexperienced and may build poorly shaped modules. Equipment manufacturers have recently introduced harvesters with on-board module building capabilities to reduce labor requirements; h...

  11. Water heater control module

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  12. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOEpatents

    Beugelsdijk, Tony; Hollen, Robert M.; Erkkila, Tracy H.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.; Roybal, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Michael Leon

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  13. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  14. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  15. Module bay with directed flow

    DOEpatents

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  16. Basic memory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    Construction and electrical characterization of the 4096 x 2-bit Basic Memory Module (BMM) are reported for the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) program. The module uses four 2K x 1-bit N-channel FET, random access memory chips, called array chips, and two sense amplifier chips, mounted and interconnected on a ceramic substrate. Four 5% tolerance power supplies are required. At the Module, the address, chip select, and array select lines require a 0-8.5 V MOS signal level. The data output, read-strobe, and write-enable lines operate at TTl levels. Although the module is organized as 4096 x 2 bits, it can be used in a 8196 x 1-bit application with appropriate external connections. A 4096 x 1-bit organization can be obtained by depopulating chips.

  17. GREET Pretreatment Module

    SciTech Connect

    Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  18. Module encapsulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    The identification and development techniques for low-cost module encapsulation materials were reviewed. Test results were displayed for a variety of materials. The improved prospects for modeling encapsulation systems for life prediction were reported.

  19. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  20. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  1. Columbus pressurized module verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Comandatore, Emanuele

    1986-01-01

    The baseline verification approach of the COLUMBUS Pressurized Module was defined during the A and B1 project phases. Peculiarities of the verification program are the testing requirements derived from the permanent manned presence in space. The model philosophy and the test program have been developed in line with the overall verification concept. Such critical areas as meteoroid protections, heat pipe radiators and module seals are identified and tested. Verification problem areas are identified and recommendations for the next development are proposed.

  2. Firefighting module development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. A.

    1981-10-01

    The firefighting module is a lightweight, compact, self contained, helicopter-transportable unit for fighting harbor and other specialty fires as well as for use in emergency water pumping applications. Units were fabricated and tested. A production type unit is undergoing an inservice evaluation and demonstration program at the port of St Louis. The primary purpose is to promote enhanced harbor fire protection at inland and coastal ports. The module and its development are described.

  3. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  4. Second generation SLAC modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Cron, J.C.; Hanselman, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory has undertaken the construction of a single pass electron-positron collider. In order to reach required beam energy 235 new klystrons needed upgraded modulator systems. The collider will use 50 GeV electrons and positrons. The increase in accelerator energy from the present 30 GeV necessitates the replacement of existing 35 MW klystrons with new 67 MW units. The doubling of klystron output power required a redesign of the modulator system. The 67 MW klystron needs a 350 kV beam voltage pulse with a 3.7 ..mu..s pulse width. A new pulse transformer was designed to deliver the increased voltage and pulse width. Pulse cable design was evaluated to obtain increased reliability of that critical element. The modulator, with the exception of its power supply, was rebuilt to produce the required power increase while enhancing reliability and improving maintainability. An investigation of present thyratron switch tube performance under the new operating conditions resulted in agitation and some warranted panic but these conditions were mitigated after several successful experiments and some evolutionary narrowing of the klystron pulse width. The discussion will cover the upgraded modulator system specifications and some details of the new pulse transformer tank, pulse cable, modulator, and modulator switch tube.

  5. "Smart" Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    An assembly that contains a sensor, sensor-signal-conditioning circuitry, a sensor-readout analog-to-digital converter (ADC), data-storage circuitry, and a microprocessor that runs special-purpose software and communicates with one or more external computer(s) has been developed as a prototype of "smart" sensor modules for monitoring the integrity and functionality (the "health") of engineering systems. Although these modules are now being designed specifically for use on rocket-engine test stands, it is anticipated that they could also readily be designed to be incorporated into health-monitoring subsystems of such diverse engineering systems as spacecraft, aircraft, land vehicles, bridges, buildings, power plants, oilrigs, and defense installations. The figure is a simplified block diagram of the "smart" sensor module. The analog sensor readout signal is processed by the ADC, the digital output of which is fed to the microprocessor. By means of a standard RS-232 cable, the microprocessor is connected to a local personal computer (PC), from which software is downloaded into a randomaccess memory in the microprocessor. The local PC is also used to debug the software. Once the software is running, the local PC is disconnected and the module is controlled by, and all output data from the module are collected by, a remote PC via an Ethernet bus. Several smart sensor modules like this one could be connected to the same Ethernet bus and controlled by the single remote PC. The software running in the microprocessor includes driver programs for operation of the sensor, programs that implement self-assessment algorithms, programs that implement protocols for communication with the external computer( s), and programs that implement evolutionary methodologies to enable the module to improve its performance over time. The design of the module and of the health-monitoring system of which it is a part reflects the understanding that the main purpose of a health

  6. Universal enveloping crossed module of Leibniz crossed modules and representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Rafael F.; García-Martínez, Xabier; Ladra, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The universal enveloping algebra functor UL: Lb → Alg, defined by Loday and Pirashvili [1], is extended to crossed modules. Then we construct an isomorphism between the category of representations of a Leibniz crossed module and the category of left modules over its universal enveloping crossed module of algebras. Note that the procedure followed in the proof for the Lie case cannot be adapted, since the actor in the category of Leibniz crossed modules does not always exist.

  7. Direct spatial antenna modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Brecken H.

    This body of work seeks to define Direct Spatial Antenna Modulation (DSAM) as a new and unique approach to data symbol modulation and phased array control by comparing and contrasting the technique to conventional approaches. A rigorous development of the theoretical and practical implications of the DSAM technique as a general approach are presented. The theoretical development of several DSAM examples are included. Implementation and measurement results for several prototypes based on DSAM principles are analyzed. The work concludes with a summary of the impact of the present DSAM developments and a proposal for additional investigation. Results are included that show equivalent measured bit error rate performance for DSAM as compared to conventional modulation for both two-state and four-state phase modulation. Measured beam control accuracy of a DSAM phased array is included, along with several other example DSAM phased array analyses. Supported by an analysis linking a DSAM technique with complete complex-plane modulation control, the DSAM concept is applied to a commercial antenna and an experiment demonstrates wideband phase control. Analytical and simulation results demonstrate joint beamforming and modulation in a DSAM array. Several implications of the results of the investigation are important to consider: 1. The DSAM approach represents a new way to treat the conventional relationship between modulation and antennas, and has been demonstrated through a significant number and variety of analyses, simulations, and experiments. 2. The DSAM approach takes direct advantage of inherent antenna radiating properties to perform conventionally non-antenna functions; the approach is in this way both enabled and limited. 3. The DSAM approach has been shown in several examples to offer beneficial engineering performance trade-offs with respect to architecture options, as well as important performance parameters such as power consumption, breadth of frequency

  8. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  9. Intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Kooy, H M; Grassberger, C

    2015-07-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed "pencil beams" of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak-the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range-combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose "painting" within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the highest level of

  10. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  11. Spatial Terahertz Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Akalin, Tahsin; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is a developing and promising candidate for biological imaging, security inspection and communications, due to the low photon energy, the high transparency and the broad band properties of the THz radiation. However, a major encountered bottleneck is lack of efficient devices to manipulate the THz wave, especially to modulate the THz wave front. A wave front modulator should allow the optical or electrical control of the spatial transmission (or reflection) of an input THz wave and hence the ability to encode the information in a wave front. Here we propose a spatial THz modulator (STM) to dynamically control the THz wave front with photo-generated carriers. A computer generated THz hologram is projected onto a silicon wafer by a conventional spatial light modulator (SLM). The corresponding photo-generated carrier spatial distribution will be induced, which forms an amplitude hologram to modulate the wave front of the input THz beam. Some special intensity patterns and vortex beams are generated by using this method. This all-optical controllable STM is structure free, high resolution and broadband. It is expected to be widely used in future THz imaging and communication systems.

  12. Bunch identification module

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    This module provides bunch identification and timing signals for the PEP Interaction areas. Timing information is referenced to the PEP master oscillator, and adjusted in phase as a function of region. Identification signals are generated in a manner that allows observers in all interaction regions to agree on an unambiguous bunch identity. The module provides bunch identification signals via NIM level logic, upon CAMAC command, and through LED indicators. A front panel ''region select'' switch allows the same module to be used in all regions. The module has two modes of operation: a bunch identification mode and a calibration mode. In the identification mode, signals indicate which of the three bunches of electrons and positrons are interacting, and timing information about beam crossing is provided. The calibration mode is provided to assist experimenters making time of flight measurements. In the calibration mode, three distinct gating signals are referenced to a selected bunch, allowing three timing systems to be calibrated against a common standard. Physically, the bunch identifier is constructed as a single width CAMAC module. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. NREL module energy rating methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, C.; Newmiller, J.; Kroposki, B.

    1995-11-01

    The goals of this project were to develop a tool for: evaluating one module in different climates; comparing different modules; provide a Q&D method for estimating periodic energy production; provide an achievable module rating; provide an incentive for manufacturers to optimize modules to non-STC conditions; and to have a consensus-based, NREL-sponsored activity. The approach taken was to simulate module energy for five reference days of various weather conditions. A performance model was developed.

  14. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  15. Power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B.; Newson, Steve

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  16. Waveform Sampler CAMAC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, D.R.; Haller, G.M.; Kang, H.; Wang, J.

    1985-09-01

    A Waveform Sampler Module (WSM) for the measurement of signal shapes coming from the multi-hit drift chambers of the SLAC SLC detector is described. The module uses a high speed, high resolution analog storage device (AMU) developed in collaboration between SLAC and Stanford University. The AMU devices together with high speed TTL clocking circuitry are packaged in a hybrid which is also suitable for mounting on the detector. The module is in CAMAC format and provides eight signal channels, each recording signal amplitude versus time in 512 cells at a sampling rate of up to 360 MHz. Data are digitized by a 12-bit ADC with a 1 ..mu..s conversion time and stored in an on-board memory accessible through CAMAC.

  17. Reliability of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the reliability of photovoltaic modules, four categories of known array failure and degradation mechanisms are discussed, and target reliability allocations have been developed within each category based on the available technology and the life-cycle-cost requirements of future large-scale terrestrial applications. Cell-level failure mechanisms associated with open-circuiting or short-circuiting of individual solar cells generally arise from cell cracking or the fatigue of cell-to-cell interconnects. Power degradation mechanisms considered include gradual power loss in cells, light-induced effects, and module optical degradation. Module-level failure mechanisms and life-limiting wear-out mechanisms are also explored.

  18. Modulated infrared radiant source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, W. F.; Edwards, S. F.; Vann, D. S.; McCormick, R. F.

    1981-06-01

    A modulated, infrared radiant energy source was developed to calibrate an airborne nadir-viewing pressure modulated radiometer to be used to detect from Earth orbit trace gases in the troposphere. The technique used an 8 cm long, 0.005 cm diameter platinum-iridium wire as an isothermal, thin line radiant energy source maintained at 1200 K. A + or - 20 K signal, oscillating at controllable frequencies from dc to 20 Hz, was superimposed on it. This periodic variation of the line source energy was used to verify the pressure modulated radiometer's capability to distinguish between the signal variations caused by the Earth's background surface and the signal from the atmospheric gases of interest.

  19. Thin film module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jester, T.

    1985-01-01

    The design of ARCO Solar, Inc.'s Genesis G100 photovoltaic module was driven by several criteria, including environmental stability (both electrical and mechanical), consumer aesthetics, low materials costs, and manufacturing ease. The module circuitry is designed as a 12 volt battery charger, using monolithic patterning techniques on a glass superstrate. This patterning and interconnect method proves amenable to high volume, low cost production throughput, and the use of glass serves the dual role of handling ease and availability. The mechanical design of the module centers on environmental stability. Packaging of the glass superstrate circuit must provide good resistance to thermal and humidity exposure along with hi-pot insulation and hailstone impact resistance. The options considered are given. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is chosen as the pottant material for its excellent weatherability.

  20. Measuring PV module delamination

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.B.

    1980-09-22

    Delamination of the encapsulating pottant from both substrate and silicon cells in solar photovoltaic modules has been a common occurrence. While the extent of delamination is in some cases minor, there are other cases where appreciably large areas have been affected. At this time, most delaminated areas do not appear to cause electrical degradation of modules; however, keeping track of delamination growth and rate of growth is important and has been difficult. More accurate measurement of delamination has been achieved by using an acoustic digitizer to record the pattern of delamination. With the aid of a computer, software can be generated that shows the exact areas of delamination. By periodic measrement of those types of modules prone to delamination, growth rates can be documented.

  1. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  2. Modulated infrared radiant source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. F.; Edwards, S. F.; Vann, D. S.; Mccormick, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A modulated, infrared radiant energy source was developed to calibrate an airborne nadir-viewing pressure modulated radiometer to be used to detect from Earth orbit trace gases in the troposphere. The technique used an 8 cm long, 0.005 cm diameter platinum-iridium wire as an isothermal, thin line radiant energy source maintained at 1200 K. A + or - 20 K signal, oscillating at controllable frequencies from dc to 20 Hz, was superimposed on it. This periodic variation of the line source energy was used to verify the pressure modulated radiometer's capability to distinguish between the signal variations caused by the Earth's background surface and the signal from the atmospheric gases of interest.

  3. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  4. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  5. Printed Module Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Stockert, Talysa R.; Fields, Jeremy D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Mauger, Scott A.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2015-06-14

    Monolithic interconnects in photovoltaic modules connect adjacent cells in series, and are typically formed sequentially involving multiple deposition and scribing steps. Interconnect widths of 500 um every 10 mm result in 5% dead area, which does not contribute to power generation in an interconnected solar panel. This work expands on previous work that introduced an alternative interconnection method capable of producing interconnect widths less than 100 um. The interconnect is added to the module in a single step after deposition of the photovoltaic stack, eliminating the need for scribe alignment. This alternative method can be used for all types of thin film photovoltaic modules. Voltage addition with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells using a 2-scribe printed interconnect approach is demonstrated. Additionally, interconnect widths of 250 um are shown.

  6. Thin film module development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, T.

    1985-10-01

    The design of ARCO Solar, Inc.'s Genesis G100 photovoltaic module was driven by several criteria, including environmental stability (both electrical and mechanical), consumer aesthetics, low materials costs, and manufacturing ease. The module circuitry is designed as a 12 volt battery charger, using monolithic patterning techniques on a glass superstrate. This patterning and interconnect method proves amenable to high volume, low cost production throughput, and the use of glass serves the dual role of handling ease and availability. The mechanical design of the module centers on environmental stability. Packaging of the glass superstrate circuit must provide good resistance to thermal and humidity exposure along with hi-pot insulation and hailstone impact resistance. The options considered are given. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is chosen as the pottant material for its excellent weatherability.

  7. Flexible programmable logic module

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hutchinson, Robert L.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2001-01-01

    The circuit module of this invention is a VME board containing a plurality of programmable logic devices (PLDs), a controlled impedance clock tree, and interconnecting buses. The PLDs are arranged to permit systolic processing of a problem by offering wide data buses and a plurality of processing nodes. The board contains a clock reference and clock distribution tree that can drive each of the PLDs with two critically timed clock references. External clock references can be used to drive additional circuit modules all operating from the same synchronous clock reference.

  8. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    DOEpatents

    Wares, Brian S.

    2012-09-04

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  9. Drupal Contributed Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Samuel B.; French, Shelane

    2014-10-01

    These Drupal Modules extend the functionality of Drupal by including specific styles for dates and tabs, publishing options for scheduled and immediate publication of content modes, field visibility in content forms, keyword block filters (taxonomy based), adding content nodes to a specified queue for display in views, and status display of workflow settings.

  10. Rescue Manual. Module 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The eighth of 10 modules contains 6 chapters: (1) trench rescue; (2) shoring and tunneling techniques; (3) farm accident rescue; (4) wilderness search and rescue; (5) aircraft rescue; and (6) helicopter information. Key points, an…

  11. Coast Guard Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

  12. Rescue Manual. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fourth of 10 modules contains 8 chapters: (1) construction and characteristics of rescue rope; (2) knots, bends, and hitches; (3) critical angles; (4) raising systems; (5) rigging; (6) using the brake-bar rack for rope rescue; (7) rope…

  13. Formed photovoltaic module busbars

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Douglas; Daroczi, Shan; Phu, Thomas

    2015-11-10

    A cell connection piece for a photovoltaic module is disclosed herein. The cell connection piece includes an interconnect bus, a plurality of bus tabs unitarily formed with the interconnect bus, and a terminal bus coupled with the interconnect bus. The plurality of bus tabs extend from the interconnect bus. The terminal bus includes a non-linear portion.

  14. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  15. An Integrated Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Marie R.; Seiferth, Berniece B.

    This integrated teaching module provides elementary and junior high school teachers with a "hands-on" approach to studying the Anasazi Indian. Emphasis is on creative exploration that focuses on integrating art, music, poetry, writing, geography, dance, history, anthropology, sociology, and archaeology. Replicas of artifacts, contemporary Indian…

  16. Behavior Management: Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glen, Sally; McCoy, Youlonda

    This publication, the third in a series of modules designed for paraprofessionals working with handicapped children, presents objectives and related activities for three competencies in behavior management. The first competency, on the definition and underlying concepts of behavior management, focuses on the application of behavior management…

  17. Rescue Manual. Module 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The sixth of 10 modules contains 4 chapters: (1) industrial rescue; (2) rescue from a confined space; (3) extrication from heavy equipment; and (4) rescue operations involving elevators. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany…

  18. Coplanar interconnection module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, R. D.; Windsor, H. F.

    1970-01-01

    Module for interconnecting a semiconductor array to external leads or components incorporates a metal external heat sink for cooling the array. Heat sink, extending down from the molded block that supports the array, is immersed in a liquid nitrogen bath which is designed to maintain the desired array temperature.

  19. Rescue Manual. Module 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The ninth of 10 modules contains 7 chapters: (1) ice characteristics; (2) river characteristics and tactics for rescue; (3) water rescue techniques; (4) water rescue/recovery operations; (5) dive operations; (6) water rescue equipment; and…

  20. Packaging of electronic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1966-01-01

    Study of design approaches that are taken toward optimizing the packaging of electronic modules with respect to size, shape, component orientation, interconnections, and structural support. The study does not present a solution to specific packaging problems, but rather the factors to be considered to achieve optimum packaging designs.

  1. SPACE: Intermediate Level Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    These modules were developed to assist teachers at the intermediate level to move away from extensive skill practice and toward more meaningful interdisciplinary learning. This packet, to be used by teachers in the summer Extended Learning Program, provides detailed thematic lesson plans matched to the Indiana Curriculum Proficiency Guide. The…

  2. Product Module Rig Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Chiappetta, Louis, Jr.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ols, John T.; Padget, Frederick C., IV; Peschke, William O. T.; Shirley, John A.; Siskind, Kenneth S.

    2004-01-01

    The low emissions potential of a Rich-Quench-Lean (RQL) combustor for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) application was evaluated as part of Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.0.2.7 of the NASA Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) Program under Contract NAS3-27235. Combustion testing was conducted in cell 1E of the Jet Burner Test Stand at United Technologies Research Center. Specifically, a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor, utilizing reduced scale quench technology implemented in a quench vane concept in a product-like configuration (Product Module Rig), demonstrated the capability of achieving an emissions index of nitrogen oxides (NOx EI) of 8.5 gm/Kg fuel at the supersonic flight condition (relative to the program goal of 5 gm/Kg fuel). Developmental parametric testing of various quench vane configurations in the more fundamental flametube, Single Module Rig Configuration, demonstrated NOx EI as low as 5.2. All configurations in both the Product Module Rig configuration and the Single Module Rig configuration demonstrated exceptional efficiencies, greater than 99.95 percent, relative to the program goal of 99.9 percent efficiency at supersonic cruise conditions. Sensitivity of emissions to quench orifice design parameters were determined during the parametric quench vane test series in support of the design of the Product Module Rig configuration. For the rectangular quench orifices investigated, an aspect ratio (length/width) of approximately 2 was found to be near optimum. An optimum for orifice spacing was found to exist at approximately 0.167 inches, resulting in 24 orifices per side of a quench vane, for the 0.435 inch quench zone channel height investigated in the Single Module Rig. Smaller quench zone channel heights appeared to be beneficial in reducing emissions. Measurements were also obtained in the Single Module Rig configuration on the sensitivity of emissions to the critical combustor parameters of fuel/air ratio, pressure drop, and residence

  3. Method of monolithic module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Morgan, William P.; Worobey, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Methods for "monolithic module assembly" which translate many of the advantages of monolithic module construction of thin-film PV modules to wafered c-Si PV modules. Methods employ using back-contact solar cells positioned atop electrically conductive circuit elements affixed to a planar support so that a circuit capable of generating electric power is created. The modules are encapsulated using encapsulant materials such as EVA which are commonly used in photovoltaic module manufacture. The methods of the invention allow multiple cells to be electrically connected in a single encapsulation step rather than by sequential soldering which characterizes the currently used commercial practices.

  4. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  5. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  6. VERDE Analytic Modules

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates servedmore » within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.« less

  7. Modulators of decision making.

    PubMed

    Doya, Kenji

    2008-04-01

    Human and animal decisions are modulated by a variety of environmental and intrinsic contexts. Here I consider computational factors that can affect decision making and review anatomical structures and neurochemical systems that are related to contextual modulation of decision making. Expectation of a high reward can motivate a subject to go for an action despite a large cost, a decision that is influenced by dopamine in the anterior cingulate cortex. Uncertainty of action outcomes can promote risk taking and exploratory choices, in which norepinephrine and the orbitofrontal cortex appear to be involved. Predictable environments should facilitate consideration of longer-delayed rewards, which depends on serotonin in the dorsal striatum and dorsal prefrontal cortex. This article aims to sort out factors that affect the process of decision making from the viewpoint of reinforcement learning theory and to bridge between such computational needs and their neurophysiological substrates.

  8. Modulated Elliptical Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel modulated slot design has been proposed and tested. The proposed slot is aimed to replace the inefficient small dipoles used in conventional MST-based imaging systems. The developed slot is very attractive as MST array element due to its small size and high efficiency/modulation depth. In fact, the developed slot has been successfully used to implement the first prototype of a microwave camera operating at 24 GHZ. It is also being used in the design of the second generation of the camera. Finally, the designed elliptical slot can be used as an electronically controlled waveguide iris for many other purposes (for instance in constructing waveguide reflective phase shifters and multiplexers/switches).

  9. Parabolic dish module experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    A development test model of the 8-meter Solar Brayton Parabolic Dish Module has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The test model consists of five major subsystems: Sanders ceramic honeycomb solar receiver; LaJet LEC460 solar concentrator; AiRsearch SABC MKIIIA engine, Abacus 8 kW ac inverter; and a Sanders designed and built system controller. Goals of the tests were to integrate subsystem components into a working module, demonstrate the concept, and generate 5 kWe (hybrid) and 4.7 kWe (solar only) input. All subsystem integration goals were successfully achieved, but system performance efficiency was lower than expected. Contributing causes of the lower performance efficiencies have been identified. Modifications needed to restore performance to the required levels and improve the system life cycle cost have been addressed and are the subject of this final report.

  10. Lightweight Trauma Module - LTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Current patient movement items (PMI) supporting the military's Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) mission as well as the Crew Health Care System for space (CHeCS) have significant limitations: size, weight, battery duration, and dated clinical technology. The LTM is a small, 20 lb., system integrating diagnostic and therapeutic clinical capabilities along with onboard data management, communication services and automated care algorithms to meet new Aeromedical Evacuation requirements. The Lightweight Trauma Module is an Impact Instrumentation, Inc. project with strong Industry, DoD, NASA, and Academia partnerships aimed at developing the next generation of smart and rugged critical care tools for hazardous environments ranging from the battlefield to space exploration. The LTM is a combination ventilator/critical care monitor/therapeutic system with integrated automatic control systems. Additional capabilities are provided with small external modules.

  11. VERDE Analytic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates served within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.

  12. 30% CPV Module Milestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert; Kinsey, Geoff; Nayaak, Adi; Garboushian, Vahan

    2010-10-01

    Concentrating Photovoltaics has held out the promise of low cost solar electricity for now several decades. Steady progress towards this goal in the 80's and 90's gradually produced more efficient and reliable systems. System efficiency is regarded as the largest factor in lowering the electricity cost and the relatively recent advent of the terrestrial multi-junction solar cell has pressed this race forward dramatically. CPV systems are now exhibiting impressive AC field efficiencies of 25% and more, approximately twice that of the best flat plate systems available today. Amonix inc. has just tested their latest generation multi-junction module design, achieving over 31% DC efficiency at near PVUSA test conditions. Inculcating this design into their next MegaModule is forthcoming, but the expected AC system field efficiency should be significantly higher than current 25% levels.

  13. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  14. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  15. Thermal modulation for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest F. (Inventor); Libardoni, Mark (Inventor); Stewart, Kristine (Inventor); Waite, J. Hunter (Inventor); Block, Bruce P. (Inventor); Sacks, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal modulator device for gas chromatography and associated methods. The thermal modulator device includes a recirculating fluid cooling member, an electrically conductive capillary in direct thermal contact with the cooling member, and a power supply electrically coupled to the capillary and operable for controlled resistive heating of the capillary. The capillary can include more than one separate thermally modulated sections.

  16. Headstart German Program. Module 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This is the fifth module of 10 in the German Headstart program. Each of the 3 units in the module contains objectives, exercises, and a self-evaluation quiz. In addition, there are several supplementary exercises and self-evaluations. The objective of this module is to enable the student to use and understand: (1) courtesy expressions; (2) time…

  17. Headstart German Program. Module 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This is the ninth module of 10 in the German Headstart program. The single unit in the module contains objectives, exercises, and a self-evaluation quiz. In addition, there are several supplementary exercises and self-evaluations. The objective of this module is to familiarize the student with some of the terminology used by military personnel in…

  18. Assessing Current Status. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Phyllis

    This staff development module is part of one of three groups of career guidance modules developed, field-tested and revised by a six-state consortium coordinated by the American Institutes for Research. This module is the fourth in a series on developing a comprehensive career guidance program at the high school level, designed to aid guidance…

  19. Headstart German Program. Module 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This is the seventh module of 10 in the German Headstart program. Each of the 2 units in the module contains objectives, exercises, and a self-evaluation quiz. In addition, there are several supplementary exercises and self-evaluations. The objective of this module is to enable the student to use all the services of a German post-office, such as…

  20. Modulation instability: The beginning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  1. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  2. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  3. Packaging the MAMA module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seals, J. Dennis

    1994-10-01

    The MAMA (Mixed Arithmetic, Multiprocessing Array) module is being developed to evaluate new packaging technologies and processing paradigms for advanced military processing systems. The architecture supports a tight mix of signal, data,and I/O processing at GFLOP throughput rates. It is fabricated using only commercial-on-the-sehlf (COTS) chips and will provide a high level of durability. Its attributes are largely the result of two new interconnection and packaging technologies. Chip-in-board packaging is used to reduce local x-y communication delays and solder joints, while significantly improving board-level packaging density. A unique 3-D interconnection technology called a cross-over cell has been developed to reduce board-to-board communication delays, drive power, glue logic, and card-edge pin-outs. These technologies enable true 3-D structures that are form, fit and connector compatible with conventional line-replacable modules. The module's design rational, packaging technology, and basic architecture will be presented in this paper.

  4. Allosteric modulation of caspases.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Hans-Georg; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Caspases are proteolytic enzymes mainly involved in the induction and execution phases of apoptosis. This type of programmed cell death is an essential regulatory process required to maintain the integrity and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis is attributed a key role in many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic damage, autoimmune diseases and cancer. Allosteric modulation of the function of a protein occurs when the regulatory trigger, such as the binding of a small effector or inhibitor molecule, takes place some distance from the protein's active site. In recent years, several caspases have been identified that possess allosteric sites and binding of small molecule to these sites resulted in the modulation of enzyme activities. Regulation of caspase activity by small molecule allosteric modulators is believed to be of great therapeutic importance. In this review we give brief highlights on recent developments in identifying and characterizing natural and synthetic allosteric inhibitors as well as activators of caspases and discuss their potential in drug discovery and protein engineering. PMID:21807025

  5. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  6. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  7. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  8. Effects of modulation phase of ultrasound-modulated light on the ultrasound-modulated optical image in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Weng, Cuncheng; Zhang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, our investigations suggest that the modulation phase of ultrasound-modulated light escaping from the different locations in the ultrasonic field is different. In turbid media, the modulation phase causes the ultrasound-modulated light intensity collected outside the media to fluctuate. However, the ultrasound-modulated optical technology uses the ultrasound-modulated light signals to image. Consequently, the modulation phase affects the quality of ultrasound-modulated optical imaging.

  9. On staggered indecomposable Virasoro modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytölä, Kalle; Ridout, David

    2009-12-01

    In this article, certain indecomposable Virasoro modules are studied. Specifically, the Virasoro mode L0 is assumed to be nondiagonalizable, possessing Jordan blocks of rank 2. Moreover, the module is further assumed to have a highest weight submodule, the "left module," and that the quotient by this submodule yields another highest weight module, the "right module." Such modules, which have been called staggered, have appeared repeatedly in the logarithmic conformal field theory literature, but their theory has not been explored in full generality. Here, such a theory is developed for the Virasoro algebra using rather elementary techniques. The focus centers on two different but related questions typically encountered in practical studies: How can one identify a given staggered module, and how can one demonstrate the existence of a proposed staggered module. Given just the values of the highest weights of the left and right modules, themselves subject to simple necessary conditions, invariants are defined which together with the knowledge of the left and right modules uniquely identify a staggered module. The possible values of these invariants form a vector space of dimension 0, 1, or 2, and the structures of the left and right modules limit the isomorphism classes of the corresponding staggered modules to an affine subspace (possibly empty). The number of invariants and affine restrictions is purely determined by the structures of the left and right modules. Moreover, in order to facilitate applications, the expressions for the invariants and restrictions are given by formulas as explicit as possible (they generally rely on expressions for Virasoro singular vectors). Finally, the text is liberally peppered throughout with examples illustrating the general concepts. These have been carefully chosen for their physical relevance or for the novel features they exhibit.

  10. Managing Medical Logic Modules.

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, A. R.; Roderer, N. K.

    1991-01-01

    A key element of IAIMS development at the Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC) is the Medical Logic Module (MLM), designed to provide decision support to clinical users. A standard has been established for MLMs, and a number of institutions have agreed in principle to share them. At CPMC, MLMs are under development and MLMs from other institutions are being reviewed. The Columbia Health Sciences Library has developed a management system for MLMs which supports both internal development and sharing of MLMs among institutions. This paper describes the elements of the MLM management system. PMID:1807599

  11. Exothermic furnace module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An exothermic furnace module is disclosed for processing materials in space which includes an insulated casing and a sample support, carried within the casing which supports a sample container. An exothermic heat source includes a plurality of segments of exothermic material stacked one upon another to produce a desired temperature profile when ignited. The exothermic material segments are constructed in the form of an annular element having a recess opening which defines an open central core throughout the vertical axis of the stacked exothermic material. The sample container is arranged within the core of the stacked exothermic heating material.

  12. Modulation of whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon', V. P.; Bogdanov, V. V.; Druzhin, G. I.; Cherneva, N. V.; Kubyshkin, A. V.; Sannikov, D. V.; Agranat, I. V.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the experimental data obtained at Paratunka observatory (53.02° N, 158.65° E; L = 2.3) has revealed a nonstandard form of whistlers involving spectral lines that are symmetric with respect to the whistler. We have shown that this form is most likely due to the amplitude modulation of whistlers by electromagnetic pulses with a length of around 1 s and carrier frequency of around 1.1 kHz. We have suggested that these pulses could be emitted by the auroral electrojet modified by heating radiation from the HAARP facility (62.30° N, 145.30° W; L > 4.2).

  13. TASMANIAN Sparse Grids Module

    SciTech Connect

    and Drayton Munster, Miroslav Stoyanov

    2013-09-20

    Sparse Grids are the family of methods of choice for multidimensional integration and interpolation in low to moderate number of dimensions. The method is to select extend a one dimensional set of abscissas, weights and basis functions by taking a subset of all possible tensor products. The module provides the ability to create global and local approximations based on polynomials and wavelets. The software has three components, a library, a wrapper for the library that provides a command line interface via text files ad a MATLAB interface via the command line tool.

  14. TASMANIAN Sparse Grids Module

    2013-09-20

    Sparse Grids are the family of methods of choice for multidimensional integration and interpolation in low to moderate number of dimensions. The method is to select extend a one dimensional set of abscissas, weights and basis functions by taking a subset of all possible tensor products. The module provides the ability to create global and local approximations based on polynomials and wavelets. The software has three components, a library, a wrapper for the library thatmore » provides a command line interface via text files ad a MATLAB interface via the command line tool.« less

  15. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  16. Combining modules for movement.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, E; Cheung, V C K; d'Avella, A; Saltiel, P; Tresch, M

    2008-01-01

    We review experiments supporting the hypothesis that the vertebrate motor system produces movements by combining a small number of units of motor output. Using a variety of approaches such as microstimulation of the spinal cord, NMDA iontophoresis, and an examination of natural behaviors in intact and deafferented animals we have provided evidence for a modular organization of the spinal cord. A module is a functional unit in the spinal cord that generates a specific motor output by imposing a specific pattern of muscle activation. Such an organization might help to simplify the production of movements by reducing the degrees of freedom that need to be specified.

  17. 47 CFR 87.141 - Modulation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency modulated transmitter operating in the band 72.0-76.0 MHz must have a modulation limiter. (f) Each frequency modulated transmitter equipped with a modulation limiter must have a low pass filter between the modulation limiter and the modulated stage. At audio frequencies between 3 kHz and 15 kHz, the filter...

  18. 47 CFR 87.141 - Modulation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... frequency modulated transmitter operating in the band 72.0-76.0 MHz must have a modulation limiter. (f) Each frequency modulated transmitter equipped with a modulation limiter must have a low pass filter between the modulation limiter and the modulated stage. At audio frequencies between 3 kHz and 15 kHz, the filter...

  19. 47 CFR 87.141 - Modulation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... frequency modulated transmitter operating in the band 72.0-76.0 MHz must have a modulation limiter. (f) Each frequency modulated transmitter equipped with a modulation limiter must have a low pass filter between the modulation limiter and the modulated stage. At audio frequencies between 3 kHz and 15 kHz, the filter...

  20. Processing module operating methods, processing modules, and communications systems

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven Harvey; Derr, Kurt W.; Moore, Troy

    2014-09-09

    A processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a wireless communications device, requesting that the wireless communications device retrieve encrypted code from a web site and receiving the encrypted code from the wireless communications device. The wireless communications device is unable to decrypt the encrypted code. The method further includes using the processing module, decrypting the encrypted code, executing the decrypted code, and preventing the wireless communications device from accessing the decrypted code. Another processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a host device, executing an application within the processing module, allowing the application to exchange user interaction data communicated using a user interface of the host device with the host device, and allowing the application to use the host device as a communications device for exchanging information with a remote device distinct from the host device.

  1. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  2. View of Apollo 13 Lunar Module from the Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) was photographed from the Command Module (CM) just after the LM had been jettisoned. The jettisoning occurred a few minutes after 11 a.m., April 17, 1970, just over an hour prior to splashdown of the CM in the South Pacific Ocean. The apparent explosion of oxygen tank number two in the Apoll 13 Service Module caused the Apollo 13 crewmen to rely on the LM as a 'lifeboat'.

  3. Spacelab-1 Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This photograph shows the Spacelab-1 module and Spacelab access turnel being installed in the cargo bay of orbiter Columbia for the STS-9 mission. The oribiting laboratory, built by the European Space Agency, is capable of supporting many types of scientific research that can best be performed in space. The Spacelab access tunnel, the only major piece of Spacelab hardware made in the U.S., connects the module with the mid-deck level of the orbiter cabin. The first Spacelab mission, Spacelab-1, sponsored jointly and shared equally by NASA and the European Space Agency, was a multidisciplinary mission; that is, investigations were performed in several different fields of scientific research. The overall goal of the mission was to verify Spacelab performance through a variety of scientific experiments. The disciplines represented by these experiments were: astronomy and solar physics, earth observations, space plasma physics, materials sciences, atmospheric physics, and life sciences. International in nature, Spacelab-1 conducted experiments from the United States, Japan, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Beluga, France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland. Spacelab-1, was launched from the Kennedy Space Center on November 28, 1983 aboard the orbiter Columbia (STS-9). The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for managing the Spacelab missions.

  4. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S.; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites. PMID:24834381

  5. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  6. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites.

  7. Whole Module Offgas Test Report: Space-Xl Dragon Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    On September 26 and September 28,2012 a chemist from the JSC Toxicology Group acquired samples of air in 500 m1 evacuated canisters from the sealed Space-Xl Dragon Module. One sample was also acquired from Space-X Facility near the module at the start of the test. Samples of the module air were taken in triplicate once the module had been sealed, and then taken again in triplicate 1.98 days later. Ofthe triplicate samples, the first served as a line purge, and the last two were analyzed. The results of 5 samples are reported.

  8. Modulated preheating and isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: stanislav.rusak@helsinki.fi

    2013-03-01

    We consider a model of preheating where the coupling of the inflaton to the preheat field is modulated by an additional scalar field which is light during inflation. We establish that such a model produces the observed curvature perturbation analogously to the modulated reheating scenario. The contribution of modulated preheating to the power spectrum and to non-Gaussianity can however be significantly larger compared to modulated perturbative reheating. We also consider the implications of the current constraints on isocurvature perturbations in case where the modulating field is responsible for cold dark matter. We find that existing bounds on CDM isocurvature perturbations imply that modulated preheating is unlikely to give a dominant contribution to the curvature perturbation and that the same bounds suggest important constraints on non-Gaussianity and the amount of primordial gravitational waves.

  9. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. ); Hutchison, G. ); Nowlan, M.J. )

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. International Energy Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

  11. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  12. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  13. Adjustable extender for instrument module

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

    1975-11-01

    A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

  14. MoNetFamily: a web server to infer homologous modules and module-module interaction networks in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Yi-Wei; Yu, Shang-Wen; Lo, Yu-Shu; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2012-07-01

    A module is a fundamental unit forming with highly connected proteins and performs a certain kind of biological functions. Modules and module-module interaction (MMI) network are essential for understanding cellular processes and functions. The MoNetFamily web server can identify the modules, homologous modules (called module family) and MMI networks across multiple species for the query protein(s). This server first finds module candidates of the query by using BLASTP to search the module template database (1785 experimental and 1252 structural templates). MoNetFamily then infers the homologous modules of the selected module candidate using protein-protein interaction (PPI) families. According to homologous modules and PPIs, we statistically calculated MMIs and MMI networks across multiple species. For each module candidate, MoNetFamily identifies its neighboring modules and their MMIs in module networks of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Danio rerio. Finally, MoNetFamily shows the conserved proteins, PPI profiles and functional annotations of the module family. Our results indicate that the server can be useful for MMI network (e.g. 1818 modules and 9678 MMIs in H. sapiens) visualizations and query annotations using module families and neighboring modules. We believe that the server is able to provide valuable insights to determine homologous modules and MMI networks across multiple species for studying module evolution and cellular processes. The MoNetFamily sever is available at http://monetfamily.life.nctu.edu.tw.

  15. Light modulating device

    SciTech Connect

    Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

    1989-12-26

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

  16. Automatic routing module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Janice A.

    1987-01-01

    Automatic Routing Module (ARM) is a tool to partially automate Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) routing. For any accessible launch point or target pair, ARM creates flyable routes that, within the fidelity of the models, are optimal in terms of threat avoidance, clobber avoidance, and adherence to vehicle and planning constraints. Although highly algorithmic, ARM is an expert system. Because of the heuristics applied, ARM generated routes closely resemble manually generated routes in routine cases. In more complex cases, ARM's ability to accumulate and assess threat danger in three dimensions and trade that danger off with the probability of ground clobber results in the safest path around or through difficult areas. The tools available prior to ARM did not provide the planner with enough information or present it in such a way that ensured he would select the safest path.

  17. Fortran 90 Source Module

    1998-01-13

    A major advance contained in the new Fortran 90 language standard is the ability to define new data types and the operators associated with them. Writing computer code to implement computations with real and complex three domensional vectors and dyadics is greatly simplified if the equations can be implemented directly, without the need to code the vector arithmetic explicitly. The Fortran 90 module VECTORS contains source code which defines new data types for real andmore » complex 3-dimensional vectors and dyadics, along with the common operations needed to work with these objects. Routines to allow convenient initalization and output of the new types are also included. in keeping with the philosophy of data abstraction, the details of the implementation of the data types are maintained private, and the functions and operators are made generic to simplify the combining of real, complex, single and double precision vectors and dyadics.« less

  18. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

    2012-09-18

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  19. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N.; Holland, Rodney H.

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  20. Light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Rauh, R. David; Goldner, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

  1. 12. VIEW OF THE INSPECTION MODULE (MODULE D). THE GLOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF THE INSPECTION MODULE (MODULE D). THE GLOVE BOX IN THE FOREFRONT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH CONTAINS A DRILL PRESS; OTHER GLOVE BOXES ARE USED FOR PARTS INSPECTION. (5/70) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. Low-voltage differentially-signaled modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.; Hsia, Alexander H.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    Photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes at least one modulator section and differential drive circuitry. The at least one modulator section includes a P-type layer and an N-type layer forming a PN junction in the modulator section. The differential drive circuitry is electrically coupled to the P-type layer and the N-type layer of the at least one modulator section.

  3. Thermal modulation for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselbrink, Ernest F. (Inventor); Libardoni, Mark (Inventor); Stewart, Kristine (Inventor); Waite, J. Hunter (Inventor); Block, Bruce P. (Inventor); Sacks, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal modulator device for gas chromatography and associated methods. The thermal modulator device includes a cooling member, an electrically conductive capillary in direct thermal contact with the cooling member, and a power supply electrically coupled to the capillary and operable for controlled resistive heating of the capillary.

  4. Concentration-modulated absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Langley, A J; Beaman, R A; Baran, J; Davies, A N; Jones, W J

    1985-07-01

    Concentration modulation is demonstrated to be a technique capable of markedly extending sensitivity limits in absorption spectroscopy. The gain generated relates in such a manner to sample transmittance that for the first reported time direct spectroscopic concentration measurements become possible. When concentration modulation is used with picosecond lasers, state lifetimes can be determined to a limit of approximately 20 psec.

  5. Headstart German Program. Module 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This module provides additional material principally for women in the military and female dependents. The three dialogs in the module take place at a cleaner's, at a drugstore, and at the hairdresser's. The vocabulary and dialogs are intended to familiarize the student with words and phrases which might be needed in a situation when the post…

  6. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  7. Aligned natural inflation with modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Kim, Hyungjin

    2016-08-01

    The weak gravity conjecture applied for the aligned natural inflation indicates that generically there can be a modulation of the inflaton potential, with a period determined by sub-Planckian axion scale. We study the oscillations in the primordial power spectrum induced by such modulation, and discuss the resulting observational constraints on the model.

  8. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema

    Harper, Jason

    2016-07-12

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  9. Diagnosis And Prescription: Reinforcement Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, George W.

    This learning module has been designed to aid the teacher trainee in identifying ways in which he influences student behavior in the classroom and also explores means of selecting more meaningful reinforcers and their application. Terminal objectives of the module are the ability to (1) define the terms "reinforcement,""positive…

  10. Housing and Home Furnishings Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    These sixty-seven modules provide student materials for a home economics course in housing and home furnishings. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately--see note.) Each module contains an objective, student information, learning activities (and activity sheets as needed), student self-checks, student self-check answers, check-out…

  11. Curriculum Modules in Minority Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joan B.

    These two curriculum modules are self-contained units focusing on older women of color (primarily African-American) and rural minority elders. The modules were developed as a product of a Model Gerontology Career Development Program in Institutions of Higher Education in Rural Areas through a consortium of colleges, universities, and agencies…

  12. Receivers for modulated digital signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troendle, K.; Huber, J.

    The realization principles for coherent and incoherent receivers for modulated digital signal transmission are presented. From these principles, the digital amplitude, phase, and frequency modulation are treated. Expressions for the error probabilities in these systems are given, and their required bandwidths and noise sensitivities are compared. Principles of system realization for time-variant channels and methods of clock and carrier recovery are explained.

  13. Macroeconomic Activity Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2016 (AEO2016). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

  14. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  15. Telescoping Space-Station Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    New telescoping-space-station design involves module within a module. After being carried to orbit within payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter, outer module telescopically deployed to achieve nearly twice as much usable space-station volume per Space Shuttle launch. Closed-loop or "race-track" space-station configurations possible with this concept and provide additional benefits. One benefit involves making one of modules double-walled haven safe from debris, radiation, and like. Module accessible from either end, and readily available to all positions in space station. Concept also provides flexibility in methods in which Space Shuttle orbiter docked or berthed with space station and decrease chances of damage.

  16. Acceleration Recorder and Playback Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods and apparatus relating to an accelerometer electrical signal recorder and playback module. The recorder module may be manufactured in lightweight configuration and includes analog memory components to store data. Signal conditioning circuitry is incorporated into the module so that signals may be connected directly from the accelerometer to the recorder module. A battery pack may be included for powering both the module and the accelerometer. Timing circuitry is included to control the time duration within which data is recorded or played back so as to avoid overloading the analog memory components. Multiple accelerometer signal recordings may be taken simultaneously without analog to digital circuits, multiplexing circuitry or software to compensate for the effects of multiplexing the signals.

  17. Acceleration recorder and playback module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods and apparatus relating to an accelerometer electrical signal recorder and playback module. The recorder module may be manufactured in lightweight configuration and includes analog memory components to store data. Signal conditioning circuitry is incorporated into the module so that signals may be connected directly from the accelerometer to the recorder module. A battery pack may be included for powering both the module and the accelerometer. Timing circuitry is included to control the time duration within which data is recorded or played back so as to avoid overloading the analog memory components. Multiple accelerometer signal recordings may be taken simultaneously without analog to digital circuits, multiplexing circuitry or software to compensate for the effects of multiplexing the signals.

  18. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  19. Acceleration recorder and playback module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention is directed to methods and apparatus relating to an accelerometer electrical signal recorder and playback module. The recorder module may be manufactured in lightweight configuration and includes analog memory components to store data. Signal conditioning circuitry is incorporated into the module so that signals may be connected directly from the accelerometer to the recorder module. A battery pack may be included for powering both the module and the accelerometer. Timing circuitry is included to control the time duration within which data is recorded or played back so as to avoid overloading the analog memory components. Multiple accelerometer signal recordings may be taken simultaneously without analog to digital circuits, multiplexing circuitry or software to compensate for the effects of multiplexing the signals.

  20. Acceleration recorder and playback module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention is directed to methods and apparatus relating to an accelerometer electrical signal recorder and playback module. The recorder module may be manufactured in lightweight configuration and includes analog memory components to store data. Signal conditioning circuitry is incorporated into the module so that signals may be connected directly from the accelerometer to the recorder module. A battery pack may be included for powering both the module and the accelerometer. Timing circuitry is included to control the time duration within which data is recorded or played back so as to avoid overloading the analog memory components. Multiple accelerometer signal recordings may be taken simultaneously without analog to digital circuits, multiplexing circuitry or software to compensate for the effects of multiplexing the signals.

  1. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  2. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O’Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on–off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s−1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on–off-keyed 10 Gbit s−1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s−1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions. PMID:25523757

  3. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O'Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-12-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on-off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s-1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on-off-keyed 10 Gbit s-1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s-1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions.

  4. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  5. Programmable Thermostat Module Upgrade for the Multipurpose Logistics Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.; Glasgow, S. d.; Reagan, S. E.; Presson, K. H.; Howard, D. E.; Smith, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The STS-121/ULF 1.1 mission was the maiden flight of the programmable thermostat module (PTM) system used to control the 28 V shell heaters on the multi-purpose logistics module (MPLM). These PTMs, in conjunction with a data recorder module (DRM), provide continuous closed loop temperature control and data recording of MPLM on-orbit heater operations. This Technical Memorandum discusses the hardware design, development, test, and verification (DDT&V) activities performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as well as the operational implementation and mission performance.

  6. Photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.J.

    1991-05-16

    This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

  7. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    An, Ki-Chan

    2016-08-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  8. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  9. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  10. Noradrenergic Modulation of Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Craig W.

    2008-01-01

    Through a highly divergent efferent projection system, the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system supplies norepinephrine throughout the central nervous system. State-dependent neuronal discharge activity of locus coeruleus neurons has long-suggested a role of this system in the induction of an alert waking state. More recent work supports this hypothesis, demonstrating robust wake-promoting actions of the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system. Norepinephrine enhances arousal, in part, via actions of β- and α1-receptors located within multiple subcortical structures, including the general regions of the medial septal area and the medial preoptic areas. Recent anatomical studies suggest that arousal-enhancing actions of norepinephrine are not limited to the locus coeruleus system and likely include the A1 and A2 noradrenergic cell groups. Thus, noradrenergic modulation of arousal state involves multiple noradrenergic systems acting with multiple subcortical regions. Pharmacological studies indicate that the combined actions of these systems are necessary for the sustained maintenance of arousal levels associated with spontaneous waking. Enhanced arousal state is a prominent aspect of both stress and psychostimulant drug action and evidence indicates that noradrenergic systems likely play an important role in both stress-related and psychostimulant-induced arousal. These and other observations suggest that the dysregulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission could well contribute to the dysregulation of arousal associated with a variety of behavioral disorders including insomnia and stress-related disorders. PMID:18199483

  11. Living Systems Energy Module

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  12. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  13. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  14. Membrane mirror light modulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warde, Cardinal; McCann, James T.; Shrauger, Vern; Ieong, H.-H.; Ersen, Ali; Wang, X. Y.; Hubbard, J.

    2000-03-01

    We have incorporated membrane mirror technology over a discrete array of pixel wells to create both high-efficiency optical shutters and spatial light modulators (SLM). A continuous metalized-membrane mirror with greater than 98% reflectivity minimizes optical insertion loss. This mirror is electrostatically deformed into the wells with either a common electrode (shutter) or pixilated electrodes (SLM). By using a spatial filter, analog intensity optical modulation is realized. Both 1-D (linear) and 2-D grating pixel patterns have been investigated. With the appropriate pixel dimensions, both coherent monochromatic and broadband incoherent light within the 0.25 to 10.6 micron range can be modulated with contrast ratios up to 1000:1. Small well sizes (approximately 10-micron diameter) allow for modulation speeds up to 1 MHz. The theoretical foundations for the well layout, the membrane mirror deformation and its diffraction properties, and the design trade-offs are detailed. We have applied our membrane mirror technology to CMOS VLSI circuits creating a high-speed, high-efficiency spatial light modulator capable of 80 X 64 resolution and scalable to HDTV standards. The membrane mirror SLM provides either amplitude or phase modulation. In the phase modulation mode, at least two waves of stroke per discrete well are possible.

  15. Intermediate load modules for test and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules were tested for qualification. Tests involved the following: (1) delivery of 20 solar cells for use as reference cells; (2) module documentation and inspection plans specifying the 10 Group I modules; (3) design review of module documentation from Group I modules; (4) revise module documentation to overcome any problems of deficiencies associated with the Group I modules; (5) delivery of 10 Group II modules built to revised specifications; (6) testing of Group II modules to the criteria as outlined in qualification specification. It is found that the solarvolt MSP43E40B satisfies the design criteria of qualification specification for intermediate load modules. Design changes were made in the Group I modules to overcome the deficiencies which allowed Group II modules to pass the qualification tests.

  16. VIBRATING PERVAPORATION MODULES: EFFECT OF MODULE DESIGN ON PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A third commercial-scale vibrating pervaporation membrane module was fabricated and evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions. Experiments with surrogate solutions of four hydrophobic VOCs (1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), trichloroethy...

  17. Variable Coded Modulation software simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielicki, Thomas A.; Hamkins, Jon; Thorsen, Denise

    This paper reports on the design and performance of a new Variable Coded Modulation (VCM) system. This VCM system comprises eight of NASA's recommended codes from the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards, including four turbo and four AR4JA/C2 low-density parity-check codes, together with six modulations types (BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-APSK, 32-APSK, 64-APSK). The signaling protocol for the transmission mode is based on a CCSDS recommendation. The coded modulation may be dynamically chosen, block to block, to optimize throughput.

  18. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  19. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  20. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  1. Wound modulation after filtration surgery.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; Sherwood, Mark B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2012-11-01

    Filtration surgery is the standard invasive procedure for the management of intraocular pressure in advanced glaucoma. The key to a successful outcome is to modulate the normal wound healing cascade that leads to closure of the newly created aqueous outflow pathway. Antifibrotic agents such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil have been increasingly used to modulate the wound healing process and increase surgical success. Although these agents have proven efficacy, they also increase the risk of complications. Efforts have centered on the identification of novel agents and techniques that can influence wound modulation without these complications. We detail new agents and methods under investigation to control wound healing after filtration surgery. PMID:23068975

  2. High Order Modulation Protograph Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thuy V. (Inventor); Nosratinia, Aria (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Digital communication coding methods for designing protograph-based bit-interleaved code modulation that is general and applies to any modulation. The general coding framework can support not only multiple rates but also adaptive modulation. The method is a two stage lifting approach. In the first stage, an original protograph is lifted to a slightly larger intermediate protograph. The intermediate protograph is then lifted via a circulant matrix to the expected codeword length to form a protograph-based low-density parity-check code.

  3. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  4. Photovoltaic Cz Silicon Module Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T. L.

    1998-09-01

    Work focused on reducing the cost per watt of Cz silicon photovoltaic modules under Phase II of Siemens Solar Industries' DOE/NREL PVMaT 4A subcontract is described in this report. New module designs were deployed in this phase of the contract, improvements in yield of over 10% were realized, and further implementation of Statistical Process Control was achieved during this phase. Module configurations representing a 12% cost reduction per watt were implemented in small scale production under Phase II of this contract. Yield improvements are described in detail, yield sensitivity to wafer thickness is quantified, and the deployment of SPC in critical process steps is reported here.

  5. Old Time Apple Cider Makin': An Outdoor Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Bruce E.; Oakes, David B.

    An illustrated, self-contained packet, the resource materials contained in this guide are designed for adaptation to K-8. The resources and ideas presented here are designed to encourage utilization of the outdoors as a learning resource. While intrinsically multidisciplinary, the activities are particularly adaptable to social studies, science,…

  6. Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    An electronic unit denoted the Miniature Intelligent Sensor Module performs sensor-signal-conditioning functions and local processing of sensor data. The unit includes four channels of analog input/output circuitry, a processor, volatile and nonvolatile memory, and two Ethernet communication ports, all housed in a weathertight enclosure. The unit accepts AC or DC power. The analog inputs provide programmable gain, offset, and filtering as well as shunt calibration and auto-zeroing. Analog outputs include sine, square, and triangular waves having programmable frequencies and amplitudes, as well as programmable amplitude DC. One innovative aspect of the design of this unit is the integration of a relatively powerful processor and large amount of memory along with the sensor-signalconditioning circuitry so that sophisticated computer programs can be used to acquire and analyze sensor data and estimate and track the health of the overall sensor-data-acquisition system of which the unit is a part. The unit includes calibration, zeroing, and signalfeedback circuitry to facilitate health monitoring. The processor is also integrated with programmable logic circuitry in such a manner as to simplify and enhance acquisition of data and generation of analog outputs. A notable unique feature of the unit is a cold-junction compensation circuit in the back shell of a sensor connector. This circuit makes it possible to use Ktype thermocouples without compromising a housing seal. Replicas of this unit may prove useful in industrial and manufacturing settings - especially in such large outdoor facilities as refineries. Two features can be expected to simplify installation: the weathertight housings should make it possible to mount the units near sensors, and the Ethernet communication capability of the units should facilitate establishment of communication connections for the units.

  7. Modulation of lymphopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, C.

    1991-01-01

    During the current project period we have demonstrated correspondence between animal models and in vitro models of modulated lymphopoiesis. Our finding that G-CSF, a growth factor for neutrophil granulocytes, suppresses lymphopoiesis in long term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) has important implications both for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of hemopoiesis and for clinical use of recombinant growth factors that are beginning to be widely used for the treatment of a variety of diseases. During the present project period we adopted LTBMC systems developed by others for the purposes of our specific aims. Also we developed a novel long term culture system for NK cells. The discovery of a new growth factor, O-CSF, specific for osteoclasts and the establishment of a clonal assay system that provides evidence for a new class of hemopoietic progenitor cells, the osteoclast progenitor, are important contributions. Given the important role T cells play in the immune response and in the regulation of other lymphohemopoietic cell lineages through the lymphokines they secrete, the need for an in vitro system that lends itself to the analysis of T cell maturation and to the testing of factors that may adversely affect T lymphopoiesis cannot be overemphasized. We believe that we can exploit an advantageous set of circumstances that present an excellent opportunity for initiating a focused experimental program for developing such a system. By a systematic and selective analysis of molecular interactions between heterogenous thymic stromal cells and T cell progenitors at different stages of maturation, it will be possible for our program to define the complement of critical cellular interactions on which successive stages of T lymphopoiesis depend. The experiments we propose will lay a rational foundation for the development of a long term culture system for T lymphopoiesis. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  9. Reconfigurable Processing Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somervill, Kevin; Hodson, Robert; Jones, Robert; Williams, John

    2005-01-01

    To accommodate a wide spectrum of applications and technologies, NASA s Exploration System's Missions Directorate has called for reconfigurable and modular technologies to support future missions to the moon and Mars. In response, Langley Research Center is leading a program entitled Reconfigurable Scaleable Computing (RSC) that is centered on the development of FPGA-based computing resources in a stackable form factor. This paper details the architecture and implementation of the Reconfigurable Processing Module (RPM), which is the key element of the RSC system. The RPM is an FPGA-based, space-qualified printed circuit assembly leveraging terrestrial/commercial design standards into the space applications domain. The form factor is similar to, and backwards compatible with, the PCI-104 standard utilizing only the PCI interface. The size is expanded to accommodate the required functionality while still better than 30% smaller than a 3U CompactPCI(TradeMark)card and without the overhead of the backplane. The architecture is built around two FPGA devices, one hosting PCI and memory interfaces, and another hosting mission application resources; both of which are connected with a high-speed data bus. The PCI interface FPGA provides access via the PCI bus to onboard SDRAM, flash PROM, and the application resources; both configuration management as well as runtime interaction. The reconfigurable FPGA, referred to as the Application FPGA - or simply "the application" - is a radiation-tolerant Xilinx Virtex-4 FX60 hosting custom application specific logic or soft microprocessor IP. The RPM implements various SEE mitigation techniques including TMR, EDAC, and configuration scrubbing of the reconfigurable FPGA. Prototype hardware and formal modeling techniques are used to explore the performability trade space. These models provide a novel way to calculate quality-of-service performance measures while simultaneously considering fault-related behavior due to SEE soft errors.

  10. Polarization Independent Electro-Optic Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Xiao-Tian Steve (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polarization insensitive electro-optic modulator is constructed by providing a polarization beamsplitter to separate an incoming light beam into two orthogonally plane polarized beams. Each of the polarized beams passes through a separate electro-optic modulator where each beam is modulated by the same data signal. After modulation the beams are combined to yield a modulated beam having modulated components that are orthogonally polarized. Not only is this device insensitive to changes in polarization of the input beam, the final modulated beam can be detected by optical receivers without regard to polarization alignment of the modulated beam and the receiver.

  11. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  12. Ultrasound-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  13. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  14. Flip-Flop Digital Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eno, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Clock switched on and off in response to data signal. Flip-flop modulator generates square-wave carrier frequency that is half clock frequency and turns carrier on and off. Final demodulator output logical inverse of data input.

  15. An Embedded Reconfigurable Logic Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Klenke, Robert H.; Shams, Qamar A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A Miniature Embedded Reconfigurable Computer and Logic (MERCAL) module has been developed and verified. MERCAL was designed to be a general-purpose, universal module that that can provide significant hardware and software resources to meet the requirements of many of today's complex embedded applications. This is accomplished in the MERCAL module by combining a sub credit card size PC in a DIMM form factor with a XILINX Spartan I1 FPGA. The PC has the ability to download program files to the FPGA to configure it for different hardware functions and to transfer data to and from the FPGA via the PC's ISA bus during run time. The MERCAL module combines, in a compact package, the computational power of a 133 MHz PC with up to 150,000 gate equivalents of digital logic that can be reconfigured by software. The general architecture and functionality of the MERCAL hardware and system software are described.

  16. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  17. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  18. Renewable Fuels Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook forecasts.

  19. Photovoltaic Module Qualification Plus Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Jordan, D.; Miller, D. C.; Silverman, T. J.; Phillips, N.; Earnest, T.; Romero, R.

    2013-12-01

    This report summarizes a set of test methods that are in the midst of being incorporated into IEC 61215 for certification of a module design or other tests that go beyond certification to establish bankability.

  20. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  1. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  2. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  3. Electricity Market Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

  4. Intelligent spacecraft module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  5. Russian Docking Module is lowered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-built Docking Module (DM) is lowered for installation into the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis while the spaceplane is in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles. The white structures attached to the module's sides are solar panels that will be attached to the Mir after the conclusion of the STS-74 mission.

  6. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  7. Space and motion in nature and Scripture: Galileo, Descartes, Newton.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    In the Scholium to the Definitions in Principia mathematica, Newton departs from his main task of discussing space, time and motion by suddenly mentioning the proper method for interpreting Scripture. This is surprising, and it has long been ignored by scholars. In this paper, I argue that the Scripture passage in the Scholium is actually far from incidental: it reflects Newton's substantive concern, one evident in correspondence and manuscripts from the 1680s, that any general understanding of space, time and motion must enable readers to recognize the veracity of Biblical claims about natural phenomena, including the motion of the earth. This substantive concern sheds new light on an aspect of Newton's project in the Scholium. It also underscores Newton's originality in dealing with the famous problem of reconciling theological and philosophical conceptions of nature in the seventeenth century.

  8. Space and motion in nature and Scripture: Galileo, Descartes, Newton.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    In the Scholium to the Definitions in Principia mathematica, Newton departs from his main task of discussing space, time and motion by suddenly mentioning the proper method for interpreting Scripture. This is surprising, and it has long been ignored by scholars. In this paper, I argue that the Scripture passage in the Scholium is actually far from incidental: it reflects Newton's substantive concern, one evident in correspondence and manuscripts from the 1680s, that any general understanding of space, time and motion must enable readers to recognize the veracity of Biblical claims about natural phenomena, including the motion of the earth. This substantive concern sheds new light on an aspect of Newton's project in the Scholium. It also underscores Newton's originality in dealing with the famous problem of reconciling theological and philosophical conceptions of nature in the seventeenth century. PMID:26227236

  9. Apollo 16 exploration of Descartes - A geologic summary.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Cayley Plains at the Apollo 16 landing site consist of crudely stratified breccias to a depth of at least 200 meters, overlain by a regolith 10 to 15 meters thick. Samples, photographs, and observations by the astronauts indicate that most of the rocks are impact breccias derived from an anorthosite-gabbro complex. The least brecciated members of the suite include coarse-grained anorthosite and finer-grained, more mafic rocks, some with igneous and some with metamorphic textures. Much of the transverse area is covered by ejecta from North Ray and South Ray craters, but the abundance of rock fragments increases to the south toward the younger South Ray crater.

  10. The Ontology of Determination: From Descartes to Spinoza.

    PubMed

    Sangiacomo, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    This paper argues that Spinoza's notions of "conatus" and "power of acting" are derived by means of generalization from the notions of "force of motion" and "force of determination" that Spinoza discussed in his Principles of Cartesian Philosophy to account for interactions among bodies (impacts) on the basis of their degrees of contrariety. I argue that in the Ethics, Spinoza's ontology entails that interactions must always be accounted for in terms of degrees of "agreement or disagreement in nature" among interacting things. The notion of "power of acting" is used to express the extent to which a thing's conatus is aided or restrained by external causes on the basis of its degree of agreement or disagreement in nature with them. "Power of acting" generalizes the same approach and method of resolution at the basis of the notion of "force of determination" in order to account for causal interactions not only among the simplest bodies but also among more complex individuals.

  11. Health Occupations Module. The Integumentary System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the integumentary system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, objectives (e.g., list and describe the types of glands formed in the skin, and explain the…

  12. Contrast adaptation to luminance and brightness modulations.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takehiro; Nakayama, Kazuki; Kawashima, Yuki; Yamauchi, Yasuki

    2016-03-01

    Perceptual brightness and color contrast decrease after seeing a light temporally modulating along a certain direction in a color space, a phenomenon known as contrast adaptation. We investigated whether contrast adaptation along the luminance direction arises from modulation of luminance signals or apparent brightness signals. The stimulus consisted of two circles on a gray background presented on a CRT monitor. In the adaptation phase, the luminance and chromaticity of one circle were temporally modulated, while the other circle was kept at a constant luminance and color metameric with an equal-energy white. We employed two types of temporal modulations, namely, in luminance and brightness. Chromaticity was sinusoidally modulated along the L-M axis, leading to dissociation between luminance and brightness (the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch effect). In addition, luminance modulation was minimized in the brightness modulation, while brightness modulation was minimized in the luminance modulation. In the test phase, an asymmetric matching method was used to measure the magnitude of contrast adaptation for both modulations. Our results showed that, although contrast adaptation along the luminance direction occurred for both modulations, contrast adaptation for luminance modulation was significantly stronger than that for the brightness modulation regardless of the temporal frequency of the adaptation modulation. These results suggest that luminance modulation is more influential in contrast adaptation than brightness modulation.

  13. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  14. Whole Module Offgas Test Report: Space-X Dragon Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Between 7 April and 11 April 2012 a chemist from the JSC Toxicology Group acquired samples of air in 500 ml evacuated canisters from the sealed Dragon Module at the Space-X facility at KSC. Three samples were taken of facility air (two before the test and one after the test), and a total of 9 samples were taken from the sealed module in triplicate at the following times: 0 hours, 48 hours, and 96 hours. The module contained 470 kg, which was 100% of the mass to be launched. Analytical data contained in the Toxicology Group Report (attached) show that the ambient facility air was clean except for almost 9 milligrams per cubic meter of isopropanol (IPA) in the sample taken at the end of the test. Space-X must ensure that IPA is not introduced into the module before it is sealed for launch. Other minor contaminants in the ambient air included the following: perfluoro(2-methyl)pentane and hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane. The first-acquired samples of each triplicate from the module were not analyzed. Analyses of pairs of samples that were taken during the test show excellent agreement between the pairs and a linear increase in the T-values during the 4 days of the test (figure below). The rate of increase averaged 0.124 T units per day. If the time from last purge of the module on the ground to crew first entry on orbit is 10 days, then the T value at first entry should be less than 1.2 units, which is well below the criterion of 3.0 for consideration of additional protection of the crew from offgas products. The primary contributors were as follows: trimethylsilanol (0.057), fluorotrimethylsilane (0.047), acetaldehyde (0.004), hexamethylcyclopentasiloxane (0.003), and toluene (0.002).

  15. Apparatus for encapsulating a photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Dugan, Larry M.

    1995-10-24

    The subject inventions concern various photovoltaic module designs to protect the module from horizontal and vertical impacts and degradation of solar cell efficiency caused by moisture. In one design, a plurality of panel supports that are positioned adjacent to the upper panel in a photovoltaic module absorb vertical forces exerted along an axis perpendicular to the upper panel. Other designs employ layers of glass and tempered glass, respectively, to protect the module from vertical impacts. A plurality of button-shaped channels is used around the edges of the photovoltaic module to absorb forces applied to the module along an axis parallel to the module and direct moisture away from the module that could otherwise penetrate the module and adversely affect the cells within the module. A spacer is employed between the upper and lower panels that has a coefficient of thermal expansion substantially equivalent to the coefficient of thermal expansion of at least one of the panels.

  16. Automated solar module assembly line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bycer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The solar module assembly machine which Kulicke and Soffa delivered under this contract is a cell tabbing and stringing machine, and capable of handling a variety of cells and assembling strings up to 4 feet long which then can be placed into a module array up to 2 feet by 4 feet in a series of parallel arrangement, and in a straight or interdigitated array format. The machine cycle is 5 seconds per solar cell. This machine is primarily adapted to 3 inch diameter round cells with two tabs between cells. Pulsed heat is used as the bond technique for solar cell interconnects. The solar module assembly machine unloads solar cells from a cassette, automatically orients them, applies flux and solders interconnect ribbons onto the cells. It then inverts the tabbed cells, connects them into cell strings, and delivers them into a module array format using a track mounted vacuum lance, from which they are taken to test and cleaning benches prior to final encapsulation into finished solar modules. Throughout the machine the solar cell is handled very carefully, and any contact with the collector side of the cell is avoided or minimized.

  17. NEMS integrating module documentation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-14

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system that produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the US energy markets. The model achieves a supply and demand balance in the end-use demand regions, defined as the nine Census Divisions, by solving for the prices of each energy type such that the quantities producers are willing to supply equal the quantities consumers wish to consume. The system reflects market economics, industry structure, and energy policies and regulations that influence market behavior. The NEMS Integrating Module is the central integrating component of a complex modeling system. As such, a thorough understanding of its role in the modeling process can only be achieved by placing it in the proper context with respect to the other modules. To that end, this document provides an overview of the complete NEMS model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

  18. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  19. CMOTT Turbulence Module for NPARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1997-01-01

    This is a user's manual of the CMOTT turbulence module, version 2.0, developed for the NPARC code. The module is written in a self-contained manner so that the user can use any turbulence model in the module without concern as to how it is implemented and solved. Three two-equation turbulence models have been built into the module: Chien, Shih-Lumley and CMOTT models, and all of them have both the low Reynolds number and wall function options. Unlike Chien's model, both the Shih-Lumley and CMOTT models do not involve the dimensionless wall distance y(sup +) in the low Reynolds number approach, an advantage for separated flow calculations. The Van Driest transformation is used so that the wall functions can be applied to both incompressible and compressible flows. The manual gives the details of the turbulence models used and their numerical implementation. It also gives two application examples, one for subsonic and the other for transonic flow, for demonstration. The module can be easily linked to the NPARC code for practical applications.

  20. Joint Acoustic and Modulation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, Les; Shamma, Shihab A.

    2003-12-01

    There is a considerable evidence that our perception of sound uses important features which is related to underlying signal modulations. This topic has been studied extensively via perceptual experiments, yet there are few, if any, well-developed signal processing methods which capitalize on or model these effects. We begin by summarizing evidence of the importance of modulation representations from psychophysical, physiological, and other sources. The concept of a two-dimensional joint acoustic and modulation frequency representation is proposed. A simple single sinusoidal amplitude modulator of a sinusoidal carrier is then used to illustrate properties of an unconstrained and ideal joint representation. Added constraints are required to remove or reduce undesired interference terms and to provide invertibility. It is then noted that the constraints would also apply to more general and complex cases of broader modulation and carriers. Applications in single-channel speaker separation and in audio coding are used to illustrate the applicability of this joint representation. Other applications in signal analysis and filtering are suggested.

  1. Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI) Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Myscha; Carswell, William; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, QMI (Quench Module Insert) and DMI (Diffusion Module Insert) furnace development. The topics include: 1) Furnace Module in Rack; 2) Quench Module Insert; 3) QMI in MSL Core; 4) Diffusion Module Insert; 5) QMI; and 6) QMI Development and Testing.

  2. Command and Service Module Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Command and Service Module (CSM) Communications. The communication system's capabilities are defined, including CSM-Earth, CSM-Lunar Module and CSM-Extravehicular crewman communications. An overview is provided for S-band communications, including data transmission and receiving rates, operating frequencies and major system components (pre-modulation processors, unified S-band electronics, S-band power amplifier and S-band antennas). Additionally, data transmission rates, operating frequencies and the capabilities of VHF communications are described. Major VHF components, including transmitters and receivers, and the VHF multiplexer and antennas are also highlighted. Finally, communications during pre-launch, ascent, in-flight and entry are discussed. Overall, the CSM communication system was rated highly by flight controllers and crew. The system was mostly autonomous for both crew and flight controllers and no major issues were encountered during flight.

  3. Unity connecting module in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is shown with Pressurized Mating Adapters 1 (left) and 2 (right) attached. Unity is scheduled to undergo testing of the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is the primary payload on mission STS-88, targeted to launch Dec. 3, 1998. Other testing includes the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time.

  4. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  5. Common modules: A success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Walter B., Jr.

    1988-06-01

    During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. military found far-infrared or thermal imaging systems very useful as night vision devices because of ready application as troop-carried, combat vehicle-mounted, and aircraft-mounted systems. The rapid proliferation of applications posed a serious financial problem, yet clearly solved critical needs. The development and acquisition process for each system's development, purchase, and maintenance was both lengthy and expensive. Therefore, an investigative committee was formed in 1971 within the Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics to analyze the problems and develop the design concept for Common Modules. This report focuses on the detector modules and develops cost benefits accrued to date and expected to accrue in the Army's future as a result of common module development and implementation.

  6. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  7. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  8. A compact nanosecond pulse modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Jizhang; Xue, Jianchao; Qiang, Bohan

    Two circuits of nanosecond pulse modulator which generate two different width rectangular pulses respectively are described. The basic configuration of the modulator is the Marx circuit, in which avalanche transistors are used as switching devices. In order to obtain the rectangular pulses a pulse-forming network (PFN) is introduced and fitted into the Marx. A multi-parallel arrangement of the Marx is used to satisfy the broad pulse requirement. Experiments have shown that the two different width rectangular pulses which have 130 V amplitudes and 30 and 200 ns widths respectively can be obtained at a 50 ohms load. The two pulses have steep front edges (3.6 ns and 10 ns respectively) and flat tops with less than + or - 5 percent ripples. Therefore, the modulator can meet the requirements of the nanosecond pulse radar.

  9. Vanadium dioxide based plasmonic modulators.

    PubMed

    Sweatlock, Luke A; Diest, Kenneth

    2012-04-01

    Actively tunable metal-insulator-metal waveguides that employ vanadium dioxide films as the active medium are analyzed numerically. Vanadium dioxide exhibits strong contrast between the optical properties of its insulating and metallic phases. In particular, the large optical absorption in the metallic phase makes it straightforward to implement broadband attenuation modulators and switches, but this strong loss can also complicate the design of other types of devices. We present a plasmonic waveguide that functions as an index modulator with Δn > 20% at λ0 = 1,550 nm (0.80 eV), by using a thin active layer to strike a balance between maximizing index contrast while mitigating attenuation. A second device is configured as a band-stop absorption modulator, taking advantage of symmetry to selectively suppress the TM1 and TM3 modes, with relatively minimal attenuation of the TM0 and TM2 modes.

  10. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    DOEpatents

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  11. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  12. The assess facility descriptor module

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Solid-state membrane module

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Taylor, Dale M.

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  14. Command module/service module reaction control subsystem assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weary, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed review of component failure histories, qualification adequacy, manufacturing flow, checkout requirements and flow, ground support equipment interfaces, subsystem interface verification, protective devices, and component design did not reveal major weaknesses in the command service module (CSM) reaction control system (RCS). No changes to the CSM RCS were recommended. The assessment reaffirmed the adequacy of the CSM RCS for future Apollo missions.

  15. Doping modulated carbon nanotube synapstors for a spike neuromorphic module.

    PubMed

    Shen, Alex Ming; Kim, Kyunghyun; Tudor, Andrew; Lee, Dongwon; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-01

    A doping-modulated carbon nanotube (CNT) electronic device, called a "synapstor," emulates the function of a biological synapse. The CNT synapstor has a field-effect transistor structure with a random CNT network as its channel. An aluminium oxide (Al2 O3 ) film is deposited over half of the CNT channel in the synapstor, converting the covered part of the CNT from p-type to n-type, forming a p-n junction in the CNT channel and increasing the Schottky barrier between the n-type CNT and its metal contact. This scheme significantly improves the postsynaptic current (PSC) from the synapstor, extends the tuning range of the plasticity, and reduces the power consumption of the CNT synapstor. A spike neuromorphic module is fabricated by integrating the CNT synapstors with a Si-based "soma" circuit. Spike parallel processing, memory, and plasticity functions of the module are demonstrated. The module could potentially be integrated and scaled up to emulate a biological neural network with parallel high-speed signal processing, low power consumption, memory, and learning capabilities. PMID:25423906

  16. CAMAC 488 module: 68,000 based GPIB interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.C.

    1985-03-01

    What kind of hardware and software should be used to interface GPIB devices with the existing computer system. One idea was to use a commercially available Multibus card, BLC 8488 from National Semiconductor, whose on-board Z80 would manage the GPIB read/write functions and handshakes. With this card, one could make a hardware system which would consist of (1) CAMAC 080, (2) Multibus crate, (3) M. Shea's M68000, (4) M080, (5) BLC 8488 and (6) memory board. And the software considered for such a hardware package was GAS, which had been an established software package for communication between the ACNET computer system and smart CAMAC modules. However, a second idea was to put everything on a two-wide CAMAC module. The author pursued the second idea and came up with a two-wide CAMAC module called C488. The author describes the hardware - block diagrams, circuit blocks, front panel and hardware tests. He also refers to the software - system, modules and applications.

  17. Monolithic 20-GHz Transmitting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, T.; Kaelin, G.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    20-GHz monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) with amplification and phase-shift (time-delay) capabilities developed. Use of MMIC module technology promises to make feasible development of weight- and cost-effective phased-array antenna systems, identified as major factor in achieving minimum cost and efficient use of frequency and orbital resources of future generations of communication satellite systems. Use of MMIC transmitting modules provides for relatively simple method for phase-shift control of many separate radio-frequency (RF) signals required for phased-array antenna systems.

  18. Static feed water electrolysis module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  19. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-11-16

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  20. Programmable multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-03-02

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  1. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2005-05-24

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  2. ModuleOrganizer: detecting modules in families of transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most known eukaryotic genomes contain mobile copied elements called transposable elements. In some species, these elements account for the majority of the genome sequence. They have been subject to many mutations and other genomic events (copies, deletions, captures) during transposition. The identification of these transformations remains a difficult issue. The study of families of transposable elements is generally founded on a multiple alignment of their sequences, a critical step that is adapted to transposons containing mostly localized nucleotide mutations. Many transposons that have lost their protein-coding capacity have undergone more complex rearrangements, needing the development of more complex methods in order to characterize the architecture of sequence variations. Results In this study, we introduce the concept of a transposable element module, a flexible motif present in at least two sequences of a family of transposable elements and built on a succession of maximal repeats. The paper proposes an assembly method working on a set of exact maximal repeats of a set of sequences to create such modules. It results in a graphical view of sequences segmented into modules, a representation that allows a flexible analysis of the transformations that have occurred between them. We have chosen as a demonstration data set in depth analysis of the transposable element Foldback in Drosophila melanogaster. Comparison with multiple alignment methods shows that our method is more sensitive for highly variable sequences. The study of this family and the two other families AtREP21 and SIDER2 reveals new copies of very different sizes and various combinations of modules which show the potential of our method. Conclusions ModuleOrganizer is available on the Genouest bioinformatics center at http://moduleorganizer.genouest.org PMID:20860790

  3. Environmental testing of block 3 solar cell modules. Part 1: Qualification testing of standard production modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Qualification tests of solar cell modules are described. These modules continue to show improvement over earlier type modules tested. Cell cracking and delamination are less prevalent, and interconnect problems and electrical degradation from environmental testing are now rare.

  4. Transportation Brokerage: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Linda

    A concept-based introduction to transportation brokerage is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of transportation brokerage is defined as an assignment of the management of a specific element of a…

  5. Project-Based Module Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meel, R. M. van

    A project management design for modularizing higher education at open universities was developed and tested. Literature in the fields of project management and development of modular curriculum materials was reviewed and used as a basis for developing a project-based approach to the process of developing modules for self-instruction. According to…

  6. Adolescence Education: Physical Aspect, Module One; Social Aspects, Module Two; Sex Roles, Module Three; Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Module Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    Adolescence Education is a family life education training program designed to assist young people in their physical, social, emotional, and moral development as they prepare for adulthood, marriage, parenthood, aging, and social relationships in the context of family and society. This package consists of four individually bound modules: (1)…

  7. Rights & Responsibilities. Personnel Management Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Gale; And Others

    This module on rights and responsibilities is intended to introduce the hospitality manager or supervisor to sound personnel management practices that comply with the law. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in seven sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a result…

  8. Module/array interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of module design are evaluated, including glass superstrate and metal substrate module configurations, the potential for hail damage, light absorption in glass superstrates, the economics of glass selection, and electrical design. Also, three alternate glass superstrate module configurations are evaluated by means of finite element computer analyses. Two panel sizes, 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft) and 2.4 by 4.8 m are used to support three module sizes, 0.6 by 1.2 m, 1.2 by 1.2 m, and 1.2 by 2.4 m, for design loadings of + or - 1.7 kPa, + or - 2.4 kPa, and + or - 3.6 kPa. Designs and cost estimates are presented for twenty panel types and nine array configurations at each of the three design loadings. Structural cost sensitivities of combined array configurations and panel cases are presented.

  9. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  10. Learning Environments: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Ann L.

    This self-instructional module includes learner objectives, text, practice exercises and answer sheets addressing developments in research on learning environments and why instructional technologists should take the lead in applying the resulting knowledge to the design of training areas. Favorable learning environments are described in general…

  11. The Knife Machine. Module 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on the knife machine, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers one topic: performing special operations on the knife machine (a single needle or multi-needle machine which sews and cuts at the same time). These components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective,…

  12. Reward Modulates Adaptations to Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braem, Senne; Verguts, Tom; Roggeman, Chantal; Notebaert, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Both cognitive conflict (e.g. Verguts & Notebaert, 2009) and reward signals (e.g. Waszak & Pholulamdeth, 2009) have been proposed to enhance task-relevant associations. Bringing these two notions together, we predicted that reward modulates conflict-based sequential adaptations in cognitive control. This was tested combining either a single…

  13. Microcomputer Modules for Undergraduate Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groop, Richard; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Described and evaluated are microcomputer units of instruction that were developed for use in undergraduate geography courses. Students responded favorably to the modules--"Socioeconomic Patterns,""Economic Rent,""Sampling Distribution of Sample Means,""Land Use Competition,""Data Classing,""Weather and Climate," and "Landforms." (RM)

  14. Supported Employment. Missouri LINC Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    This module provides information on supported employment as outlined in the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1986, P.L. 99-506. It discusses models of supported employment; the roles of vocational rehabilitation counselors, school district personnel, and job coaches; and what school district personnel can do to prepare students for supported…

  15. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  16. Clothing and Textile Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    Forty-seven performance-based instructional modules on six major topics are provided for the home economics content area of clothing and textiles. The six topics are (1) planning basics (psychological, physical, social, and behavioral aspects of clothing; elements of design; principles of design; and style and fashion in clothing), (2) buyership…

  17. Coal Market Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

  18. Attention modulates visual size adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Sylvia; Fink, Gereon R; Weidner, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined in healthy subjects (n = 16) whether size adaptation occurs at early, i.e., preattentive, levels of processing or whether higher cognitive processes such as attention can modulate the illusion. To investigate this issue, bottom-up stimulation was kept constant across conditions by using a single adaptation display containing both small and large adapter stimuli. Subjects' attention was directed to either the large or small adapter stimulus by means of a luminance detection task. When attention was directed toward the small as compared to the large adapter, the perceived size of the subsequent target was significantly increased. Data suggest that different size adaptation effects can be induced by one and the same stimulus depending on the current allocation of attention. This indicates that size adaptation is subject to attentional modulation. These findings are in line with previous research showing that transient as well as sustained attention modulates visual features, such as contrast sensitivity and spatial frequency, and influences adaptation in other contexts, such as motion adaptation (Alais & Blake, 1999; Lankheet & Verstraten, 1995). Based on a recently suggested model (Pooresmaeili, Arrighi, Biagi, & Morrone, 2013), according to which perceptual adaptation is based on local excitation and inhibition in V1, we conclude that guiding attention can boost these local processes in one or the other direction by increasing the weight of the attended adapter. In sum, perceptual adaptation, although reflected in changes of neural activity at early levels (as shown in the aforementioned study), is nevertheless subject to higher-order modulation.

  19. Market Segmentation: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Peter H.

    A concept-based introduction to market segmentation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses. The material can be used in many disciplines including engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of market segmentation is primarily a transportation planning technique by…

  20. Automated microorganism Sample Collection Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gall, L. S.; Graham, M. D.; Umbreit, W.

    1969-01-01

    Modified Gelman Sampler obtains representative sample of microorganism population. Proposed Sample Collection Module is based on direct inoculation of selected solid growth media encased in a cartridge at all times except during inoculation. Cartridge can be handled with no danger of contamination to sample or operator.

  1. LISA Propulsion Module Separation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is a space-borne gravitational wave detector consisting of three spacecraft in heliocentric orbit. Each spacecraft is delivered to it operational orbit by a propulsion module. Because of the strict thermal and mass balancing requirements of LISA, the baseline mission concept requires that the propulsion module separate from the sciencecraft after delivery. The only propulsion system currently baselined for the sciencecraft are micronewton level thrusters, such as FEEP or colloid thrusters, that are used to balance the 30-40 microN of solar radiation pressure and provide the drag-free and attitude control of the spacecraft. Due to these thrusters limited authority, the separation of the propulsion module from the sciencecraft must be well controlled to not induce a large tip-off rotation of the sciencecraft. We present here the results of a design study of the propulsion module separation system that is shown to safely deliver the LISA sciencecraft to its final operational orbit.

  2. Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    pBEAM (Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module) is a finite element code for beam-like structures. The methodology uses Euler? Bernoulli beam elements with 12 degrees of freedom (3 translation and 3 rotational at each end of the element).

  3. Commercial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  4. View of docked Apollo 9 Command/Service Module and Lunar Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    View of the docked Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules and Lunar Module, with Earth in the background, during Astronaut David R. Scott's stand-up extravehicular activity, on the fouth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. Scott, command module pilot, is standing in the open hatch of the Command module. Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, took this photograph of Scott from the porch of the Lunar Module.

  5. Universal sensor interface module (USIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Don; Torres, A.; Wynn, John

    1999-01-01

    A universal sensor interface model (USIM) is being developed by the Raytheon-TI Systems Company for use with fields of unattended distributed sensors. In its production configuration, the USIM will be a multichip module consisting of a set of common modules. The common module USIM set consists of (1) a sensor adapter interface (SAI) module, (2) digital signal processor (DSP) and associated memory module, and (3) a RF transceiver model. The multispectral sensor interface is designed around a low-power A/D converted, whose input/output interface consists of: -8 buffered, sampled inputs from various devices including environmental, acoustic seismic and magnetic sensors. The eight sensor inputs are each high-impedance, low- capacitance, differential amplifiers. The inputs are ideally suited for interface with discrete or MEMS sensors, since the differential input will allow direct connection with high-impedance bridge sensors and capacitance voltage sources. Each amplifier is connected to a 22-bit (Delta) (Sigma) A/D converter to enable simultaneous samples. The low power (Delta) (Sigma) converter provides 22-bit resolution at sample frequencies up to 142 hertz (used for magnetic sensors) and 16-bit resolution at frequencies up to 1168 hertz (used for acoustic and seismic sensors). The video interface module is based around the TMS320C5410 DSP. It can provide sensor array addressing, video data input, data calibration and correction. The processor module is based upon a MPC555. It will be used for mode control, synchronization of complex sensors, sensor signal processing, array processing, target classification and tracking. Many functions of the A/D, DSP and transceiver can be powered down by using variable clock speeds under software command or chip power switches. They can be returned to intermediate or full operation by DSP command. Power management may be based on the USIM's internal timer, command from the USIM transceiver, or by sleep mode processing management

  6. ODIN system technology module library, 1972 - 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Watson, D. A.; Glatt, C. R.; Jones, R. T.; Galipeau, J.; Phoa, Y. T.; White, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    ODIN/RLV is a digital computing system for the synthesis and optimization of reusable launch vehicle preliminary designs. The system consists of a library of technology modules in the form of independent computer programs and an executive program, ODINEX, which operates on the technology modules. The technology module library contains programs for estimating all major military flight vehicle system characteristics, for example, geometry, aerodynamics, economics, propulsion, inertia and volumetric properties, trajectories and missions, steady state aeroelasticity and flutter, and stability and control. A general system optimization module, a computer graphics module, and a program precompiler are available as user aids in the ODIN/RLV program technology module library.

  7. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  8. Perl Modules for Constructing Iterators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The Iterator Perl Module provides a general-purpose framework for constructing iterator objects within Perl, and a standard API for interacting with those objects. Iterators are an object-oriented design pattern where a description of a series of values is used in a constructor. Subsequent queries can request values in that series. These Perl modules build on the standard Iterator framework and provide iterators for some other types of values. Iterator::DateTime constructs iterators from DateTime objects or Date::Parse descriptions and ICal/RFC 2445 style re-currence descriptions. It supports a variety of input parameters, including a start to the sequence, an end to the sequence, an Ical/RFC 2445 recurrence describing the frequency of the values in the series, and a format description that can refine the presentation manner of the DateTime. Iterator::String constructs iterators from string representations. This module is useful in contexts where the API consists of supplying a string and getting back an iterator where the specific iteration desired is opaque to the caller. It is of particular value to the Iterator::Hash module which provides nested iterations. Iterator::Hash constructs iterators from Perl hashes that can include multiple iterators. The constructed iterators will return all the permutations of the iterations of the hash by nested iteration of embedded iterators. A hash simply includes a set of keys mapped to values. It is a very common data structure used throughout Perl programming. The Iterator:: Hash module allows a hash to include strings defining iterators (parsed and dispatched with Iterator::String) that are used to construct an overall series of hash values.

  9. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  10. Earth System Science Education Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Kaufman, C.; Humphreys, R. R.; Colgan, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The College of Charleston is developing several new geoscience-based education modules for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). These three new modules provide opportunities for science and pre-service education students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences. The three new modules will be discussed in this session. Coastal Crisis is a module that analyzes rapidly changing coastlines and uses technology - remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor changes in coastal environments. The beaches near Charleston, SC are undergoing erosion and therefore are used as examples of rapidly changing coastlines. Students will use real data from NASA, NOAA and other federal agencies in the classroom to study coastal change. Through this case study, learners will acquire remotely sensed images and GIS data sets from online sources, utilize those data sets within Google Earth or other visualization programs, and understand what the data is telling them. Analyzing the data will allow learners to contemplate and make predictions on the impact associated with changing environmental conditions, within the context of a coastal setting. To Drill or Not To Drill is a multidisciplinary problem based module to increase students’ knowledge of problems associated with nonrenewable resource extraction. The controversial topic of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) examines whether the economic benefit of the oil extracted from ANWR is worth the social cost of the environmental damage that such extraction may inflict. By attempting to answer this question, learners must balance the interests of preservation with the economic need for oil. The learners are exposed to the difficulties associated with a real world problem that requires trade-off between environmental trust and economic well-being. The Citizen Science module challenges students to translate scientific

  11. Modulation bandwidth of spin torque oscillators under current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinsat, M.; Garcia-Sanchez, F.; Jenkins, A. S.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Dieny, B.; Ebels, U.; Tiberkevich, V. S.; Slavin, A. N.; Zeltser, A.; Katine, J. A.; Cyrille, M.-C.

    2014-10-13

    For practical applications of spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO), one of the most critical characteristics is the speed at which an STNO responds to variations of external control parameters, such as current or/and field. Theory predicts that this speed is limited by the amplitude relaxation rate Γ{sub p} that determines the timescale over which the amplitude fluctuations are damped out. In this study, this limit is verified experimentally by analyzing the amplitude and frequency noise spectra of the output voltage signal when modulating an STNO by a microwave current. In particular, it is shown that due to the non-isochronous nature of the STNO the amplitude relaxation rate Γ{sub p} determines not only the bandwidth of an amplitude modulation, but also the bandwidth of a frequency modulation. The presented experimental technique will be important for the optimisation of the STNO characteristics for applications in telecommunications or/and data storage and is applicable even in the case when the STNO output signal is only several times higher than noise.

  12. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  13. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Johnson, Steve A.

    1994-01-01

    An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

  14. Circuit reduces distortion of FM modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Correction circuit improves the linearity of a voltage-variable capacitor used to modulate a free-running oscillator. This improvement only applies to audio frequency modulation and will not correct for slowly varying dc input in some telemetry systems.

  15. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  16. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  17. Direct current modulation of a photomixing signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Florin L.

    2016-04-01

    Direct modulation of the bias voltage of a LTG-GaAs photomixer is exploited to modulate the signal generated at the frequency of the optical beat between two diode lasers at 820 nm. The photomixing signal is calculated from an expansion in power series of the amplitude of the modulation voltage and displays amplitude modulation sidebands equidistantly spaced to the frequency of the optical beat by integer multiples of the modulation frequency. Modulation at harmonics of the modulation frequency is allowed by the electrical nonlinear response of the photomixer, driven at low voltage by the saturation of the electron drift velocity. Coupling of an alternative voltage to the photomixer operated at zero-bias leads to bifrequency operation. Modulation of the photomixing signal and bifrequency operation of the photomixer are observed experimentally with an optical beat in the microwave regime.

  18. Extension Modules for the Python Interpretive language

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Lee; Dubois, Paul F.; Motteler, Zane C.; Yang, Tser-Yuan; Eme, William; Taylor, Lee; Miller, Douglas

    2006-12-29

    Python is an interpreted computer language, freely available to all, which may be extended by user developed "modules". These modules ay be written in a complied language such as 'C', and then linked into the Python program

  19. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  20. Reliability Issues for Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-10-01

    Si modules good in field; new designs need reliability testing. CdTe & CIGS modules sensitive to moisture; carefully seal. CPV in product development stage; benefits from expertise in other industries.