Science.gov

Sample records for modules phase ii

  1. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  2. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in the ninth grade, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for twenty-four units of instruction. Among the modules included are (1) introduction to the world of electricity, (2) electrical safety, (3) the electrical team, (4) resistance and resistors, (5) electric lamps and heating…

  3. Wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides modulate the phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Sun, Baoguo

    2015-03-01

    The antioxidant activities of wheat bran feruloyl oligosaccharides (FOs) were determined in rats by determining the activities and mRNA expression levels of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat organs. FOs was given by gavage at doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mmol/kg body weight every day for 15 days. Compared with the control group, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px in FOs treatment groups significantly (P<0.05) increased in heart, liver, and kidney. All the FOs treatment also significantly (P<0.05) increased the glutathione (GSH) contents in heart (28-58%), liver (32-71%), and kidney (31-73%) compared with the control. FOs up regulated the mRNA expression levels of SOD, CAT, and HO-1 in organs. Moreover, the immunoblot analysis revealed increased nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2) protein expression levels in organs and there were positive correlations between the mRNA expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes and the expressions of Nrf2 protein, which demonstrated FOs treatment could modulate the detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes via Nrf2 signaling. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of TC-5214, a nicotinic channel modulator, in phase I and II clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmei; Henningsson, Anja; Alverlind, Sofie; Tummala, Raj; Toler, Steven; Beaver, Jessica S; Al-Huniti, Nidal

    2014-06-01

    TC-5214 (dexmecamylamine) is a nicotinic channel modulator that has previously been evaluated for treatment of major depression disorder (MDD) and is currently being evaluated by Targacept as a treatment for overactive bladder. A comprehensive population pharmacokinetic (POP PK) model of TC-5214 was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling of pooled plasma concentration data from 6 early phase I studies in 179 healthy participants or patients with non-MDD and 1 phase II study in 68 MDD patients. Concentration-time profiles of TC-5214 after either single or multiple oral doses of TC-5214 was described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption with lag time and first-order elimination. Covariate analysis revealed that creatinine clearance was a significant covariate on clearance and that body weight significantly influenced the central volume of distribution. The final model (with identified covariates) was used to simulate steady-state exposure for patients with impaired renal function. Results from forest plots reveal that patients with moderate to severe renal impairment or end stage renal disease are associated with significantly higher Cssmax and AUC compared to patients with normal renal function. The proposed final POP PK model could be employed in defining a TC-5214 dosage regimen in patients with impaired renal function.

  5. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  6. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  7. H2O2 preconditioning modulates phase II enzymes through p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Lorenzini, Antonello; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-06-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is a complex cardioprotective phenomenon that involves adaptive changes in cells and molecules and occurs in a biphasic pattern: an early phase after 1-2 h and a late phase after 12-24 h. While it is widely accepted that reactive oxygen species are strongly involved in triggering ischemic preconditiong, it is not clear if they play a major role in the early or late phase of preconditioning and which are the mechanisms involved. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms behind H(2)O(2)-induced cardioprotection in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We focused on antioxidant and phase II enzymes and their modulation by protein kinase signaling pathways and nuclear-factor-E(2)-related factor-1 (Nrf1) and Nrf2. H(2)O(2) preconditioning was able to counteract oxidative stress more effectively in the late than in the early phase of adaptation. In particular, H(2)O(2) preconditioning counteracted oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 activity, increasing Bcl2 expression and selectively increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant and phase II enzymes through Nrf1 and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. The downregulation of Nrf1 and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA reduced the expression level of phase II enzymes. Specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and p38 MAPK activation partially reduced the cardioprotection elicited by H(2)O(2) preconditioning and the induction and activity of phase II enzymes. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a key role for Nrf1, and not only for Nrf2, in the induction of phase II enzymes triggered by H(2)O(2) preconditioning.

  8. Wide deviation phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, R. H.; Hearn, C. P.; Wilson, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    Modulator produces phase-modulated waveform having high modulating linearity. Technique is inherently wideband with respect to carrier frequency and can operate over decade carrier frequency range without adjustments. Circuit performance is both mathematically predictable and highly reproducible.

  9. Wideband Linear Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1994-01-01

    Phase modulator for transmission in X band provides large phase deviation that remains nearly linear with voltage over relatively wide range. Operates with low loss over wide frequency band and with stable characteristics over wide temperature range. Phase modulator contains two varactor-diode phase shifters coupled via circulators. Separate drive circuit applies modulating voltages to varactor diodes. Modulation voltages vary in accordance with input to drive circuit.

  10. Field Validation of the Career Education Curriculum Project Modules. Phase II. 7-12 Instrument Development. Final Report. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Earl; Wellman, Frank

    Focusing on the measurement of outcomes rather than on module materials specifically, test items were constructed to evaluate the Career Education Modules for grades 7-12 developed by the Missouri Career Education Project. First, the stated learning objectives of the modules were converted into outcome objectives. Next, the relevant vocabulary,…

  11. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  12. Frequency modulation reveals the phasing of orbital eccentricity during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II and the Eocene hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurin, Jiří; Meyers, Stephen R.; Galeotti, Simone; Lanci, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Major advances in our understanding of paleoclimate change derive from a precise reconstruction of the periods, amplitudes and phases of the 'Milankovitch cycles' of precession, obliquity and eccentricity. While numerous quantitative approaches exist for the identification of these astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, limitations in radioisotopic dating, and instability of the theoretical astronomical solutions beyond ∼50 Myr ago, can challenge identification of the phase relationships needed to constrain climate response and anchor floating astrochronologies. Here we demonstrate that interference patterns accompanying frequency modulation (FM) of short eccentricity provide a robust basis for identifying the phase of long eccentricity forcing in stratigraphic data. One- and two-dimensional models of sedimentary distortion of the astronomical signal are used to evaluate the veracity of the FM method, and indicate that pristine eccentricity FM can be readily distinguished in paleo-records. Apart from paleoclimatic implications, the FM approach provides a quantitative technique for testing and calibrating theoretical astronomical solutions, and for refining chronologies for the deep past. We present two case studies that use the FM approach to evaluate major carbon-cycle perturbations of the Eocene and Late Cretaceous. Interference patterns in the short-eccentricity band reveal that Eocene hyperthermals ETM2 ('Elmo'), H2, I1 and ETM3 (X; ∼52-54 Myr ago) were associated with maxima in the 405-kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity. The same eccentricity configuration favored regional anoxic episodes in the Mediterranean during the Middle and Late Cenomanian (∼94.5-97 Myr ago). The initial phase of the global Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II; ∼93.9-94.5 Myr ago) coincides with maximum and falling 405-kyr eccentricity, and the recovery phase occurs during minimum and rising 405-kyr eccentricity. On a Myr scale, the event overlaps with a node in eccentricity

  13. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  14. Candidate dietary phytochemicals modulate expression of phase II enzymes GSTP1 and NQO1 in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Shi, Miao; Tang, Hui; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2010-08-01

    Many phytochemicals possess cancer-preventive properties, some putatively through phase II metabolism-mediated mutagen/oxidant quenching. We applied human lung cells in vitro to investigate the effects of several candidate phytopreventive agents, including green tea extracts (GTE), broccoli sprout extracts (BSE), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane (SFN), phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), and benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), on inducing phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) at mRNA and protein levels. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were exposed to diet-achievable levels of GTE and BSE (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/L), or individual index components EGCG, SFN, PEITC, BITC (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 micromol/L) for 24 h, 48 h, and 6 d, respectively. mRNA assays employed RNA-specific quantitative RT-PCR and protein assays employed Western blotting. We found that in NHBE cells, while GSTP1 mRNA levels were slightly but significantly increased after exposure to GTE or BSE, NQO1 mRNA increased to 2- to 4-fold that of control when exposed to GTE, BSE, or SFN. Effects on NQO1 mRNA expression in HBEC cells were similar. NQO1 protein expression increased up to 11.8-fold in SFN-treated NHBE cells. Both GSTP1 and NQO1 protein expression in A549 cells were constitutively high but not induced under any condition. Our results suggest that NQO1 is more responsive to the studied chemopreventive agents than GSTP1 in human lung cells and there is discordance between single agent and complex mixture effects. We conclude that modulation of lung cell phase II metabolism by chemopreventive agents requires cell- and agent-specific discovery and testing.

  15. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level I (18 Week).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in grades 7 and 8, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for twelve units of instruction: (1) orientation; (2) understanding electricity; (3) safety; (4) methods to generate electricity; (5) wiring tools and wire; (6) soldering; (7) magnetism and electromagnetism; (8) circuits, symbols,…

  16. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level I (9 Week).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in grades 7 and 8, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for ten units of instruction (nine-week class): (1) orientation; (2) understanding electricity; (3) safety; (4) methods to generate electricity; (5) wiring tools and wire; (6) soldering; (7) magnetism and electromagnetism; (8)…

  17. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level I (9 Week).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in grades 7 and 8, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for ten units of instruction (nine-week class): (1) orientation; (2) understanding electricity; (3) safety; (4) methods to generate electricity; (5) wiring tools and wire; (6) soldering; (7) magnetism and electromagnetism; (8)…

  18. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in the tenth grade, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for sixteen units of instruction: (1) orientation, (2) introduction to electricity/electronics, (3) electricity/electronics safety, (4) fundamental skills, (5) direct current circuits, (6) graphical illustrations, (7) circuit…

  19. Cruciferous vegetable phytochemical sulforaphane affects phase II enzyme expression and activity in rat cardiomyocytes through modulation of Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuela; Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-09-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SF), abundant in Cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce antioxidant/detoxification enzymes in many cancer cell lines, but studies focused on its cytoprotective action in nontransformed cells are just at the beginning. Since we previously demonstrated that SF elicits cardioprotection through an indirect antioxidative mechanism, the aim of this study was to analyze the signaling pathways through which SF exerts its protective effects. Using cultured rat cardiomyocytes, we investigated the ability of SF to activate Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways, which are implicated in cardiac cell survival, and to increase the phosphorylation of Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its binding to the antioxidant response element. By means of specific inhibitors, we demonstrated that the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway represents a mechanism through which SF influences both expression and activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, thioredoxin reductase, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, analyzed by western immunoblotting and spectrophotometric assay, respectively, and modulates Nrf2 binding and phosphorylation resulting in a cytoprotective action against oxidative damage. Results of this study confirm the importance of phase II enzymes modulation as cytoprotective mechanism and support the nutritional assumption of Cruciferous vegetables as source of nutraceutical cardioprotective agents. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  1. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Xin Xin; Feng, Lin Chun; Chen, Jing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Hai Xia; Xu, Shou Ping; Xie, Chuan Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Between August 2011 and September 2013, 132 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled for a prospective phase II study. The prescription doses delivered to the gross tumor volume (pGTVnx) and positive lymph nodes (pGTVnd), the high risk planning target volume (PTV1), and the low risk planning target volume (PTV2), were 67.5 Gy (2.25 Gy/F), 60 Gy (2.0 Gy/F), and 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/F), in 30 fractions, respectively. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to the established RTOG/EORTC criteria. This group of patients was compared with the 190 patients in the retrospective P70 study, who were treated between September 2004 and August 2009 with helical tomotherapy, with a dose of 70-74 Gy/33F/6.5W delivered to pGTVnx and pGTVnd. Results The median follow-up was 23.7 (12–38) months. Acute radiation related side-effects were mainly problems graded as 1 or 2. Only a small number of patients suffered from grade 4 leucopenia (4.5%) or thrombocytopenia (2.3%). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), local-nodal relapse-free survival (LNRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.7%, 95.5%, 92.2%, 92.7% and 93.2%, at 2 years, respectively, with no significant difference compared with the P70 study. Conclusions Smart delivered via the helical tomotherapy technique appears to be associated with an acceptable acute toxicity profile and favorable short-term outcomes for patients with NPC. Long-term toxicities and patient outcomes are under investigation. PMID:27247555

  2. Linear Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit suppresses AM component while providing matched input impedance. Phase modulation uses reflective properties of series resonant tank to reflect all of signal except for small amount in unloaded Q of coils and varactor diode. Circuit used in payload integrator of Space Shuttle S-band communications and tracking equipment, has applications in other communications and tracking equipment.

  3. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Edwards, S.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Pyatt, S.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Wilson, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  4. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  5. Compact optical microfiber phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueliang; Belal, M; Chen, G Y; Song, Zhangqi; Brambilla, G; Newson, T P

    2012-02-01

    A compact optical microfiber phase modulator with MHz bandwidth is presented. A micrometer-diameter microfiber is wound on a millimeter-diameter piezoelectric ceramic rod with two electrodes. When a voltage is applied to the piezoelectric ceramic, the rod is strained, leading to a phase change along the microfiber; because of the small size, the optical microfiber phase modulator can have as high as a few MHz bandwidth response.

  6. Candidate Dietary Phytochemicals Modulate Expression of Phase II Enzymes GSTP1 and NQO1 in Human Lung Cells1–3

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Shi, Miao; Tang, Hui; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D.

    2010-01-01

    Many phytochemicals possess cancer-preventive properties, some putatively through phase II metabolism-mediated mutagen/oxidant quenching. We applied human lung cells in vitro to investigate the effects of several candidate phytopreventive agents, including green tea extracts (GTE), broccoli sprout extracts (BSE), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane (SFN), phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), and benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), on inducing phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) at mRNA and protein levels. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were exposed to diet-achievable levels of GTE and BSE (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/L), or individual index components EGCG, SFN, PEITC, BITC (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 μmol/L) for 24 h, 48 h, and 6 d, respectively. mRNA assays employed RNA-specific quantitative RT-PCR and protein assays employed Western blotting. We found that in NHBE cells, while GSTP1 mRNA levels were slightly but significantly increased after exposure to GTE or BSE, NQO1 mRNA increased to 2- to 4-fold that of control when exposed to GTE, BSE, or SFN. Effects on NQO1 mRNA expression in HBEC cells were similar. NQO1 protein expression increased up to 11.8-fold in SFN-treated NHBE cells. Both GSTP1 and NQO1 protein expression in A549 cells were constitutively high but not induced under any condition. Our results suggest that NQO1 is more responsive to the studied chemopreventive agents than GSTP1 in human lung cells and there is discordance between single agent and complex mixture effects. We conclude that modulation of lung cell phase II metabolism by chemopreventive agents requires cell- and agent-specific discovery and testing. PMID:20554899

  7. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  8. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  9. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F.; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  10. Five-year local control in a phase II study of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy with an incorporated boost for early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Gary M; Anderson, Penny R; Bleicher, Richard J; Litwin, Samuel; Li, Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li, Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J

    2012-11-15

    Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged≥18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  12. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  13. Prototyping of hybrids and modules for the forward silicon strip tracking detector for the ATLAS Phase-II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.; Benítez, V.; Fernández-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Lozano, M.; Ullán, M.; Lacker, H.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Ariza, D.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Gregor, I.; Keller, J.; Lohwasser, K.; Poley, L.; Prahl, V.; Zakharchuk, N.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Bernabéu, J.; Lacasta, C.; Marco-Hernandez, R.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz Contell, C.; Soldevila Serrano, U.; Affolder, T.; Greenall, A.; Gallop, B.; Phillips, P. W.

    2017-05-01

    For the High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider an increased instantaneous luminosity of up to 7.5 ṡ 1034 cm-2 s-1, leading to a total integrated luminosity of up to 3000 fb-1, is foreseen. The current silicon and transition radiation tracking detectors of the ATLAS experiment will be unable to cope with the increased track densities and radiation levels, and will need to be replaced. The new tracking detector will consist entirely of silicon pixel and strip detectors. In this paper, results on the development and tests of prototype components for the new silicon strip detector in the forward regions (end-caps) of the ATLAS detector are presented. Flex-printed readout boards with fast readout chips, referred to as hybrids, and silicon detector modules are investigated. The modules consist of a hybrid glued onto a silicon strip sensor. The channels on both are connected via wire-bonds for readout and powering. Measurements of important performance parameters and a comparison of two possible readout schemes are presented. In addition, the assembly procedure is described and recommendations for further prototyping are derived.

  14. Long term effect of curcumin in restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling and modulation of inflammation in prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Laxmidhar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated significant role of curcumin during its long term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. Present study was designed to investigate long term effect of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice.

  15. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of an Inhaled Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulator - AZD5423 - in COPD Patients: Phase II Study Results.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Piotr; Aurivillius, Magnus; Jorup, Carin; Prothon, Susanne; Taib, Ziad; Edsbäcker, Staffan

    2017-02-17

    AZD5423 is a novel, inhaled, selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator (SGRM), which in an allergen challenge model in asthmatics improved lung function and airway hyper-reactivity. In the current trial, AZD5423 was for the first time tested in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this double-blind, randomised and parallel group study, we examined airway and systemic effects of two doses of AZD5423, inhaled via Turbuhaler for 12 weeks, in 353 symptomatic COPD patients (average pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at screening was 50-52% of predicted normal). Pre-bronchodilator FEV1 was primary variable, with other lung function parameters plus symptoms and 24-hr plasma cortisol being secondary variables. Plasma concentrations of AZD5423 were also measured. Effects were compared against placebo and a reference glucocorticoid receptor agonist control. Neither AZD5423, at doses which have shown to be efficacious in allergen-induced asthma, nor the reference control, at double the approved dose, had any clinically meaningful effect in the patient population studied in regard to lung function or markers of inflammation. Both GR modulators were well tolerated and did suppress 24-hr cortisol. The present study suggests that the selected population of COPD patients does not respond to treatment with AZD5423 as regards lung function, whilst showing the expected systemic effects. It cannot be ruled out that a favourable lung function response of AZD5423 can be evoked using another experimental setting and/or within a different population of COPD patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Phase II trials have been conducted as single-arm trials to compare the response probabilities between an experimental therapy and a historical control. Historical control data, however, often have a small sample size, are collected from a different patient population, or use a different response assessment method, so that a direct comparison between a historical control and an experimental therapy may be severely biased. Randomized Phase II trials entering patients prospectively to both experimental and control arms have been proposed to avoid any bias in such cases. The small sample sizes for typical Phase II clinical trials imply that the use of exact statistical methods for their design and analysis is appropriate. In this article, we propose two-stage randomized Phase II trials based on Fisher's exact test, which does not require specification of the response probability of the control arm for testing. Through numerical studies, we observe that the proposed method controls the type I error accurately and maintains a high power. If we specify the response probabilities of the two arms under the alternative hypothesis, we can identify good randomized Phase II trial designs by adopting the Simon's minimax and optimal design concepts that were developed for single-arm Phase II trials.

  18. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  19. Chocolate Matrix Factors Modulate Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Cocoa Flavan-3-Ol Phase-II Metabolites Following Oral Consumption by Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Andrew P.; Sapper, Teryn N.; Janle, Elsa M.; Rudolph, Ralf; Matusheski, Nathan V.; Ferruzzi, Mario G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of carbohydrates and milk on the bioavailability of catechin (C) and epicatechin (EC) from chocolate has been previously studied. However, little data exists regarding potential modulation of the phase-II metabolism by these chocolate matrix factors. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of matrix composition on qualitative and quantitative profiles of circulating catechins and their metabolites following administration of commercially relevant chocolate confections. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 1.5 g of a confection (reference dark, high sucrose, or milk chocolate) by intragastric gavage, and plasma samples were collected over 8 h. HPLC-MS analysis was performed to quantify C, EC and their metabolites. The predominant metabolites were O-glucuronides (2 metabolites), and O-Me-O-glucuronides (3 metabolites). Plasma concentrations of metabolites were generally the highest for high sucrose treatment and lowest for milk treatment, while reference dark treatment generally resulted in intermediate concentrations. The O-Me-(±)-C/EC-O-β-glucuronide (peak 4) was significantly higher for the high sucrose treatment (2325 nM*h) versus the milk treatment (1300 nM*h). Additionally, CMAX values for (±)-C/EC-O-β-glucuronide (peak 3), and two O-Me-(±)-C/EC-O-β-glucuronides (peaks 4 and 6) were significantly higher for high sucrose treatment (4012, 518, and 2518 nM, respectively) versus the milk treatment (2590, 240, and 1670 nM, respectively). Milk and sucrose appear to modulate both metabolism and plasma pharmacokinetics, and to a lesser extent, the overall bioavailability of catechins from chocolate confections. PMID:20446738

  20. Chocolate matrix factors modulate the pharmacokinetic behavior of cocoa flavan-3-ol phase II metabolites following oral consumption by Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Andrew P; Sapper, Teryn N; Janle, Elsa M; Rudolph, Ralf; Matusheski, Nathan V; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2010-06-09

    The impact of carbohydrates and milk on the bioavailability of catechin (C) and epicatechin (EC) from chocolate has been previously studied. However, little data exist regarding potential modulation of the phase II metabolism by these chocolate matrix factors. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of matrix composition on qualitative and quantitative profiles of circulating catechins and their metabolites following administration of commercially relevant chocolate confections. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 1.5 g of a confection (reference dark, high sucrose, or milk chocolate) by intragastric gavage, and plasma samples were collected over 8 h. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was performed to quantify C, EC, and their metabolites. The predominant metabolites were O-glucuronides (two metabolites) and O-Me-O-glucuronides (three metabolites). Plasma concentrations of metabolites were generally the highest for high sucrose treatment and lowest for milk treatment, while the reference dark treatment generally resulted in intermediate concentrations. The O-Me-(+/-)-C/EC-O-beta-glucuronide (peak 4) was significantly higher for the high sucrose treatment (2325 nM h) versus the milk treatment (1300 nM h). Additionally, C(MAX) values for (+/-)-C/EC-O-beta-glucuronide (peak 3) and two O-Me-(+/-)-C/EC-O-beta-glucuronides (peaks 4 and 6) were significantly higher for the high sucrose treatment (4012, 518, and 2518 nM, respectively) versus the milk treatment (2590, 240, and 1670 nM, respectively). Milk and sucrose appear to modulate both metabolism and plasma pharmacokinetics and, to a lesser extent, the overall bioavailability of catechins from chocolate confections.

  1. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  2. Modulation of cancer endocrine therapy by melatonin: a phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic breast cancer patients progressing under tamoxifen alone.

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, P.; Barni, S.; Meregalli, S.; Fossati, V.; Cazzaniga, M.; Esposti, D.; Tancini, G.

    1995-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the pineal hormone melatonin (MLT) may modulate oestrogen receptor (ER) expression and inhibit breast cancer cell growth. On this basis, we have evaluated the biological and clinical effects of a concomitant MLT therapy in women with metastatic breast cancer who had progressed in response to tamoxifen (TMX) alone. The study included 14 patients with metastasis who did not respond (n = 3) to therapy with TMX alone or progressed after initial stable disease (SD) (n = 11). MLT was given orally at 20 mg day-1 in the evening, every day starting 7 days before TMX, which was given orally at 20 mg day-1 at noon. A partial response was achieved in 4/14 (28.5%) patients (median duration 8 months). The treatment was well tolerated in all cases, and no MLT-induced enhancement of TMX toxicity was seen; on the contrary, most patients experienced a relief of anxiety. Mean serum levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which is a growth factor for breast cancer, significantly decreased on therapy, and this decline was significantly higher in responders than in patients with SD or progression. This pilot phase II study would suggest that the concomitant administration of the pineal hormone MLT may induce objective tumour regressions in metastatic breast cancer patients refractory to TMX alone. PMID:7710954

  3. A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma Patients Enrolled on a Prospective Phase II Proton Study

    PubMed Central

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Edgington, Samantha K.; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David; Szymonifka, Jackie; Khan, Fazal; Moteabbed, Maryam; Friedmann, Alison M.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is highly curable, however, cure may come with significant radiation related toxicity in developing tissues. Proton therapy (PT) can spare excess dose to normal structures, potentially reducing the incidence of adverse effects. Methods Between 2005 and 2012, 54 patients were enrolled on a prospective multi-institutional phase II trial using PT in pediatric RMS. As part of the protocol, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated for comparison with clinical PT plans. Results Target coverage was comparable between PT and IMRT plans with a mean CTV V95 of 100% for both modalities (p=0.82). However, mean integral dose was 1.8 times higher for IMRT (range 1.0-4.9). By site, mean integral dose for IMRT was 1.8 times higher for H&N (p<0.01) and GU (p=0.02), 2.0 times higher for trunk/extremity (p<0.01), and 3.5 times higher for orbit (p<0.01) compared to PT. Significant sparing was seen with PT in 26 of 30 critical structures assessed for orbital, head and neck, pelvic, and trunk/extremity patients. Conclusions Proton radiation lowers integral dose and improves normal tissue sparing when compared to IMRT for pediatric RMS. Correlation with clinical outcomes is necessary once mature long-term toxicity data are available. PMID:25443861

  4. Bone Marrow-sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Cisplatin For Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer: An International Multicenter Phase II Clinical Trial (INTERTECC-2).

    PubMed

    Mell, Loren K; Sirák, Igor; Wei, Lichun; Tarnawski, Rafal; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Yashar, Catheryn M; McHale, Michael T; Xu, Ronghui; Honerkamp-Smith, Gordon; Carmona, Ruben; Wright, Mary; Williamson, Casey W; Kasaová, Linda; Li, Nan; Kry, Stephen; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter; Straube, William; Schwarz, Julie; Lowenstein, Jessica; Jiang, Steve B; Saenz, Cheryl C; Plaxe, Steve; Einck, John; Khorprasert, Chonlakiet; Koonings, Paul; Harrison, Terry; Shi, Mei; Mundt, A J

    2017-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces acute hematologic and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. We enrolled patients with stage IB-IVA cervical carcinoma in a single-arm phase II trial involving 8 centers internationally. All patients received weekly cisplatin concurrently with once-daily IMRT, followed by intracavitary brachytherapy, as indicated. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of either acute grade ≥3 neutropenia or clinically significant GI toxicity within 30 days of completing chemoradiation therapy. A preplanned subgroup analysis tested the hypothesis that positron emission tomography-based image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) would lower the risk of acute neutropenia. We also longitudinally assessed patients' changes in quality of life. From October 2011 to April 2015, 83 patients met the eligibility criteria and initiated protocol therapy. The median follow-up was 26.0 months. The incidence of any primary event was 26.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18.2%-36.9%), significantly lower than the 40% incidence hypothesized a priori from historical data (P=.012). The incidence of grade ≥3 neutropenia and clinically significant GI toxicity was 19.3% (95% CI 12.2%-29.0%) and 12.0% (95% CI 6.7%-20.8%), respectively. Compared with patients treated without IG-IMRT (n=48), those treated with IG-IMRT (n=35) had a significantly lower incidence of grade ≥3 neutropenia (8.6% vs 27.1%; 2-sided χ(2)P=.035) and nonsignificantly lower incidence of grade ≥3 leukopenia (25.7% vs 41.7%; P=.13) and any grade ≥3 hematologic toxicity (31.4% vs 43.8%; P=.25). IMRT reduces acute hematologic and GI toxicity compared with standard treatment, with promising therapeutic outcomes. Positron emission tomography IG-IMRT reduces the incidence of acute neutropenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postoperative simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locoregionally advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma: preliminary results of a phase II trial and propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, You Jin; Jung, Yuh-S; Ryu, Junsun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Chang Yoon; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Joo Young; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-03-01

    With recent technical advances in radiotherapy (RT) planning, simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) has made possible the delivery of high radiation dose to the tumor, minimizing surrounding normal tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of postoperative SIB-IMRT in patients with locoregionally advanced papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). This was a propensity score-matched case control study conducted at a tertiary referring center. This study included locoregionally advanced patients with PTC (pT4 or N1b) who underwent thyroid cancer surgery and radioactive iodine ablation (RIA) followed by postoperative SIB-IMRT (RT group) under a phase II trial or no postoperative RT (Non-RT group) Intervention: Postoperative SIB-IMRT was the intervention. locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS) was compared between RT group and Non-RT group. Multivariate analysis showed that several factors, including sex, American Thyroid Association risk category, and use of postoperative RT were significantly associated with LRFS in all 201 patients (P < .05 each). In the 118 propensity score-matched patients, there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the RT and Non-RT groups, but the LRFS rate was significantly higher in the RT than in the Non-RT group (4 y: 100% vs 84.6%, P = .002). Overall, SIB-IMRT was well tolerated, with no grade ≥3 toxicity, and was completed as planned in all patients. Postoperative SIB-IMRT is feasible and effective in improving locoregional control in patients with locally advanced PTC. Large-scale randomized studies are warranted.

  6. Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response (ARMOR) Phase I and II Studies: Galeterone for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Bruce; Eisenberger, Mario A; Rettig, Matthew B; Chu, Franklin; Pili, Roberto; Stephenson, Joseph J; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Koletsky, Alan J; Nordquist, Luke T; Edenfield, William J; Mamlouk, Khalid; Ferrante, Karen J; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2016-03-15

    Galeterone is a selective, multitargeted agent that inhibits CYP17, antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), and reduces AR expression in prostate cancer cells by causing an increase in AR protein degradation. These open-label phase I and II studies [Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response-1 (ARMOR1) and ARMOR2 part 1] evaluated the efficacy and safety of galeterone in patients with treatment-naive nonmetastatic or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and established a dose for further study. In ARMOR1, 49 patients received increasing doses (650-2,600 mg) of galeterone in capsule formulation; 28 patients in ARMOR2 part 1 received increasing doses (1,700-3,400 mg) of galeterone in tablet formulation for 12 weeks. Patients were evaluated biweekly for safety and efficacy, and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. In ARMOR1, across all doses, 49.0% (24/49) achieved a ≥30% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA; PSA30) and 22.4% (11/49) demonstrated a ≥50% PSA decline (PSA50). In ARMOR2 part 1, across all doses, PSA30 was 64.0% (16/25) and PSA50 was 48.0% (12/25). In the 2,550-mg dose cohort, PSA30 was 72.7% (8/11) and PSA50 was 54.5% (6/11). Galeterone was well tolerated; the most common adverse events were fatigue, increased liver enzymes, gastrointestinal events, and pruritus. Most were mild or moderate in severity and required no action and there were no apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) events. The efficacy and safety from ARMOR1 and ARMOR2 part 1 and the pharmacokinetic results support the galeterone tablet dose of 2,550 mg/d for further study. Galeterone was well tolerated and demonstrated pharmacodynamic changes consistent with its selective, multifunctional AR signaling inhibition. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Wideband Phase-Locked Angle Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lim

    1991-01-01

    Modified configuration for phase-locked angle modulator circuit makes possible to design filters in modulating portion of circuit independently of filter in phase-locked-loop portion. Bandwidth of phase- or frequency-modulated output not limited by low-pass nature of loop filter.

  8. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vuky, Jacqueline; Badiozamani, Kasra; Song Guobin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  9. Local modulated electro-hyperthermia in combination with traditional Chinese medicine vs. intraperitoneal chemoinfusion for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis with malignant ascites: A phase II randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Clifford L.K.; Zhang, Xinting; Wang, Zhen; Ou, Junwen; Lu, Yimin; Chen, Pengfei; Zhao, Changlin; Wang, Xiaopu; Zhang, Hongyu; Roussakow, Sergey V.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and non-toxic alternative to the conventional conservative treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis with malignant ascites (PCMA) by investigating the efficacy and safety of local modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT) combined with the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) ‘Shi Pi’ herbal decoction, compared with standard intraperitoneal chemoinfusion (IPCI). A randomized, controlled, single-center, open-label clinical trial (phase II) with two parallel groups (allocation ratio, 1:1) was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of mEHT+TCM (study group, SG) vs. standard IPCI (control group, CG) in patients with PCMA by intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 260 patients with PCMA were randomly allocated into the two groups (130/130); mEHT was applied for 60 min per session every second day for 4 weeks, for a total of 14 sessions. The TCM decoction was administered orally, at 400 ml daily. In CG, occlusive IPCI with cisplatin (30–60 mg) and fluorouracil (500–600 mg/m2) was applied twice, biweekly. The objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QoL) and adverse event rate (AER) in the two groups were evaluated 1 month after treatment, analyzed and compared. The present study is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02638051). No case was lost or excluded (0/260). The ORR in SG was 77.69% (101/130) vs. 63.85% (73/130) in CG (P<0.05). The QoL in SG was 49.23% vs. 32.3% in CG (P<0.05). The AER in SG was 2.3% (3/130) vs. 12.3% (16/130) in CG (P<0.05). All the adverse events were grade I. In conclusion, the combination of mEHT with TCM achieves better control of PCMA compared with standard IPCI, with less toxicity. Both components of the combination are non-toxic treatments easily tolerated by patients. Thus, this combined treatment may be preferred due to the better benefit-harm balance. PMID:28529748

  10. Phase II Study of Hemithoracic Intensity-Modulated Pleural Radiation Therapy (IMPRINT) As Part of Lung-Sparing Multimodality Therapy in Patients With Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Rimner, Andreas; Zauderer, Marjorie G; Gomez, Daniel R; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Parhar, Preeti K; Wu, Abraham J; Woo, Kaitlin M; Shen, Ronglai; Ginsberg, Michelle S; Yorke, Ellen D; Rice, David C; Tsao, Anne S; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Rusch, Valerie W; Krug, Lee M

    2016-08-10

    We conducted a two-center phase II study to determine the safety of hemithoracic intensity-modulated pleural radiation therapy (IMPRINT) after chemotherapy and pleurectomy-decortication (P/D) as part of a multimodality lung-sparing treatment. Patients received up to four cycles of pemetrexed plus platinum. If feasible, P/D was performed. Hemithoracic IMPRINT was administered to a planned dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. The primary end point was the incidence of grade 3 or greater radiation pneumonitis (RP). A total of 45 patients were enrolled; 18 were not evaluable (because of disease progression before radiation therapy [RT], n = 9; refusal of surgery or RT, n = 5; extrapleural pneumonectomy at time of surgery, n = 2; or chemotherapy complications, n = 2). A total of 26 patients received pemetrexed plus cisplatin, 18 received pemetrexed plus carboplatin, and four received a combination. Thirteen patients (28.9%) had a partial response, 15 patients (33.3%) experienced disease progression, one patient died during chemotherapy, and all others had stable disease. Eight patients underwent P/D or an extended P/D, and 13 underwent a partial P/D. A total of 27 patients started IMPRINT (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 28.8 to 50.4 Gy) and were evaluable for the primary end point (median follow-up, 21.6 months). Six patients experienced grade 2 RP, and two patients experienced grade 3 RP; all recovered after corticosteroid initiation. No grade 4 or 5 radiation-related toxicities were observed. The median progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were 12.4 and 23.7 months, respectively; the 2-year OS was 59% in patients with resectable tumors and was 25% in patients with unresectable tumors. Hemithoracic IMPRINT for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is safe and has an acceptable rate of RP. Its incorporation with chemotherapy and P/D forms a new lung-sparing treatment paradigm for patients with locally advanced MPM. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical

  11. Electro-Optical Resonant Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Robinson, Deborah L.; Hemmati, Hamid

    1993-01-01

    Electro-optical phase modulator includes electro-optical crystal in resonant cavity suitable for use in transmitting digital data on laser beam at data rate of 10 MHz. Switching voltages applied to crystal, thereby switching cavity onto and off resonance, and large phase dispersion occurring near resonance provides output phase modulation. Driving voltages smaller than those of nonresonant modulators. Laser-damage thresholds of apparatus, incorporating bulk optics, inherently greater than modulators based on integrated optics.

  12. The activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in HepG2 hepatoma cells by phytochemicals and subsequent modulation of phase II and antioxidant enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Szaefer, Hanna; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that naturally occurring phytochemicals, indole-3-carbinol, phenethyl isothiocyanate, protocatechuic acid, and tannic acid increased the activity and protein level of hepatic phase II enzymes in animal models. In order to further explore the mechanism of this activity, we investigated the effect of these compounds on the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated transcription in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with all the tested compounds resulted in the translocation from the cytosol and nuclear accumulation of active phosphorylated Nrf2. Furthermore, phenethyl isothiocyanate and indole-3-carbinol increased the transcript and protein levels of GSTA, GSTP, GSTM, GSTT, and NQO1. On the other hand, protocatechuic and tannic acids enhanced only the expression of GSTA, GSTM, and GSTT. The expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes CAT, SOD, GR, and GPx was increased after the treatment with all the tested phytochemicals. These results indicate that isothiocyanates/indoles and protocatechuic and tannic acids induce phase II and antioxidant gene expression in HepG2 cells through the Nrf2-Keap1-ARE signaling pathway. Moreover, the results of this study confirmed that the degradation products of glucosinolates are more effective inducers of phase II and antioxidant enzymes than protocatechuic and tannic acids.

  13. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  14. Interferometer with two-frequency phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, M.G.; Seregin, A.G.; Etsin, I.S.

    1994-07-01

    An interference method of two-frequency phase modulation is studied experimentally and theoretically as applied to displacement measurement and wave front control. Analysis is performed of errors resulting from shot noise, hysteresis of the piezoceramic modulator, phase shift between modulating oscillations, and scatter of their amplitudes. It is shown that a phase measurement error of 2{pi}/180 can be obtained in actual conditions. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Effect Of Phase Unbalance In Product Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1992-01-01

    Paper presents theoretical study of effect of phase unbalance in product modulator of phase-modulation transmitter in deep-space telemetry system upon performance of system. Mathematical model of product modulator used to derive equations for relative strengths of desired suppressed-carrier component and undesired residual-carrier component of transmitted signal. Also addresses effects of unsuppressed-carrier component on carrier-tracking phase-locked loop and bit detector in receiver.

  16. Phase-Modulation Gas-Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, David M.; Schofield, John T.; Margolis, Jack S.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    Electro-optic phase-modulation gas-correlation spectroscopy demonstrated in laboratory tests promising candidate technique for remote sensing of gases, temperatures, and wind velocities in atmosphere. In technique radiation emitted by sample atmosphere passed through electro-optic phase modulator, and modulated and unmodulated versions of spectrum alternately passed through reference absorption cell containing gas to be detected. Radiation emerging from reference cell band-pass filtered and detected. Correlation signal is difference in intensity between phase-modulated and unmodulated detected signals.

  17. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  18. Type II Bi1 - xWxO1.5 + 1.5x: a (3 + 3)-dimensional commensurate modulation that stabilizes the fast-ion conducting delta phase of bismuth oxide.

    PubMed

    Wind, Julia; Auckett, Josie E; Withers, Ray L; Piltz, Ross O; Maljuk, Andrey; Ling, Chris D

    2015-12-01

    The Type II phase in the Bi1 - xWxO1.5 + 1.5x system is shown to have a (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated δ-Bi2O3-related structure, in which the modulation vector ℇ `locks in' to a commensurate value of 1/3. The structure was refined in a 3 × 3 × 3 supercell against single-crystal Laue neutron diffraction data. Ab initio calculations were used to test and optimize the local structure of the oxygen sublattice around a single mixed Bi/W site. The underlying crystal chemistry was shown to be essentially the same as for the recently refined (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated structure of Type II Bi1 - xNbxO1.5 + x (Ling et al., 2013), based on a transition from fluorite-type to pyrochlore-type via the appearance of W4O18 `tetrahedra of octahedra' and chains of corner-sharing WO6 octahedra along 〈110〉F directions. The full range of occupancies on this mixed Bi/W site give a hypothetical solid-solution range bounded by Bi23W4O46.5 (x = 0.148) and Bi22W5O48 (x = 0.185), consistent with previous reports and with our own synthetic and analytical results.

  19. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  20. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  1. Modulation of Breast Cancer Risk Biomarkers by High-Dose Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Phase II Pilot Study in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Phillips, Teresa A; Nydegger, Jennifer L; Kreutzjans, Amy L; Carlson, Susan E; Hidaka, Brandon H; Metheny, Trina; Zalles, Carola M; Mills, Gordon B; Powers, Kandy R; Sullivan, Debra K; Petroff, Brian K; Hensing, Whitney L; Fridley, Brooke L; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Associational studies suggest higher intakes/blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) are associated with reduced breast cancer risk. We performed a pilot study of high-dose EPA + DHA in postmenopausal women to assess feasibility before initiating a phase IIB prevention trial. Postmenopausal women with cytologic evidence of hyperplasia in their baseline random periareolar fine needle aspiration (RPFNA) took 1,860 mg EPA +1500 mg DHA ethyl esters daily for 6 months. Blood and breast tissue were sampled at baseline and study conclusion for exploratory biomarker assessment, with P values uncorrected for multiple comparisons. Feasibility was predefined as 50% uptake, 80% completion, and 70% compliance. Trial uptake by 35 study entrants from 54 eligible women was 65%, with 97% completion and 97% compliance. Favorable modulation was suggested for serum adiponectin (P = 0.0027), TNFα (P = 0.016), HOMA 2B measure of pancreatic β cell function (P = 0.0048), and bioavailable estradiol (P = 0.039). Benign breast tissue Ki-67 (P = 0.036), macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (P = 0.033), cytomorphology index score (P = 0.014), and percent mammographic density (P = 0.036) were decreased with favorable effects in a proteomics array for several proteins associated with mitogen signaling and cell-cycle arrest; but no obvious overall effect on proteins downstream of mTOR. Although favorable risk biomarker modulation will need to be confirmed in a placebo-controlled trial, we have demonstrated feasibility for development of high-dose EPA and DHA ethyl esters for primary prevention of breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  3. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν <= 2 . 1 .1025 yr (90% C.L.), after an exposure of 21 . 6 kg .yr. The result refutes an earlier claim of discovery with high probability. The background index of 1 .10-2 cts/(keV .kg .yr) is lower by about one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. At present the experiment is being upgraded to Phase II. The aim is to collect an exposure of 100kg .yr and further reduce the background by another order of magnitude to a level of <=10-3 cts/(keV .kg .yr). The detector mass will be increased by ~20 kg of new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors from enriched 76Ge, which exhibit superior pulse shape discrimination and hence background rejection power. Low mass detector holders, cold front-end electronics, contacting and cabling schemes are redesigned for ultra low mass and radiopurity. In addition, a retractable liquid argon veto will be installed to efficiently suppress background events that induce scintillation in the liquid argon. A hybrid solution of photomultiplier tubes and silicon photomultipliers coupled to scintillating fibres was chosen. This talk gives an account of the results and these challenging modifications to meet our design goals. The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA

  4. Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) juice modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced hepatic but not mammary gland phase I and II enzymes in female rats.

    PubMed

    Szaefer, Hanna; Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Adamska, Teresa; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2011-03-01

    Chokeberry is a rich source of procyanidins known to have several types of biological activity including anticarcinogenic potential in experimental models. In this study we examined the effect of chokeberry juice on the hepatic and mammary gland carcinogen metabolizing enzyme expression altered by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with chokeberry juice (8 ml/kg b.w.) for 28 consecutive days. DMBA was administered i.p. on the 27th and the 28th days. Pretreatment with chokeberry juice reduced the activity of CYP1A1 and increased that of CYP2B involved in metabolic activation/detoxication of DMBA in rat liver, as well as expression and activity of phase II enzymes. Chokeberry juice had no effect on these parameters in the mammary gland and DMBA induced DNA damage in rat blood cells. These results together with our earlier observations indicate that metabolic alterations induced by chokeberry feeding are tissue specific and depend on the class of carcinogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Randomized phase II trial of selenomethionine as a modulator of efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Singh, Anurag K; Tills, Michael; Dibaj, Shiva; Groman, Adrienne; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether selenomethionine (SLM) reduces mucositis incidence in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) undergoing concurrent chemoradiation (CRT). METHODS: In this multi-institutional, randomized, double-blind phase II trial, patients with Stage III or IV HNSCC received SLM 3600 μg/m2 or placebo twice daily for 7 d prior to CRT, once daily during CRT, and daily for 3 wk following CRT. CRT consisted of 70 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction with cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were randomized, 10 received SLM, and there were no differences in baseline factors. There was no difference in mucositis or patient-reported side effects between groups. There was no difference in overall or relapse-free survival at 12 mo. CONCLUSION: Addition of SLM to CRT for HNSCC was well-tolerated but did not lower the incidence of severe mucositis or improve quality of life or survival outcomes. PMID:26468453

  6. Efficacy of preoperative radiation therapy for resectable rectal adenocarcinoma when combined with oral tegafur-uracil modulated with leucovorin: results from a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Uzcudun, Ana Escribano; Batlle, Jaime Feliu; Velasco, Jesús Calvillo; Sánchez Santos, María Elena; Carpeño, Javier De Castro; Grande, Antonio García; Juberías, Alberto Mata; Piñeiro, Elena Hernández; Olivar, Lara Miralles; García, Alfredo García

    2002-10-01

    ). With a median follow-up of 37 (range, 10-62) months, local failure was found in 3 (8 percent) patients and distant failure in 2 (5 percent). Three-year actuarial disease-free survival and 3-year overall survival rates were 83 and 90 percent, respectively. Local control rate was 92 percent. Toxicity and postoperative complication rates were reasonable. Our neoadjuvant radiation therapy protocol is efficient for the preoperative treatment of resectable rectal adenocarcinoma when combined with chemotherapy (oral tegafur-uracil modulated with leucovorin). this protocol needs to be tested in a phase-III clinical trial with a larger sample size.

  7. Constant-Delay Broadband Microwave Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, Mark; Praba, Krishna

    1994-01-01

    Varactor diodes and transformer waveguide sections used instead of tuned circuits. Microwave phase modulator exhibits approximately flat delay-vs.-frequency response in frequency band of interest, according to design computations.

  8. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  9. Automatic Phase-Compensation Modules For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, John D.; Kunath, Richard R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Automatic amplitude-controlling and phase-shifting modules developed in order to adaptively compensate for distortions in reflectors of microwave communication antennas. Antenna of type in question includes phased array of radiating antenna elements in focal plane of off-axis paraboloidal or similar reflector. Module lies on path of radio-frequency feed between each antenna element and radio-frequency transmitting/receiving equipment.

  10. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  11. Impact of post operative intensity modulated radiotherapy on acute gastro-intestinal toxicity for patients with endometrial cancer: results of the phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE French multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Barillot, Isabelle; Tavernier, Elsa; Peignaux, Karine; Williaume, Danièle; Nickers, Philippe; Leblanc-Onfroy, Magali; Lerouge, Delphine

    2014-04-01

    Whole "conventional" pelvic irradiation (up to 45-50Gy) following hysterectomy is associated with a high rate of adverse gastro-intestinal (GI) adverse events, of which around 60% correspond to acute grade 2 toxicity. The phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE trial was designed to test the hypothesis that IMRT could reduce the incidence of grade 2 or more acute GI toxicity to less than 30% in patients irradiated post-operatively for an endometrial cancer. Patients with post-operative stage Ib G3, Ic or II endometrial carcinomas with no history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease were eligible. Guidelines for volume delineation and dose prescription were detailed in the protocol. The investigators were advised to use a web-based atlas developed for the RTOG 0418 study. The dose of the vaginal and nodal PTV was 45Gy in 25 fractions. To assess the ability of the participating centres to comply with the protocol guidelines, they were requested to complete a dummy run procedure before inclusion of their 1st patient. GI and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity were graded according to the CTCAE V 3.0 classification and were prospectively recorded every week during irradiation, as well as at time of brachytherapy insertions and during the follow-up visit at week 15 (W15). Special attention was given to note any changes to the grade of adverse events between W5 and W15. From May 2008 to April 2010, 49 patients from 6 centres were recruited for the trial. One patient could not be treated, one patient died of vascular stroke at W3 without toxicity, and 1 patient refused to be followed-up after treatment. Thus, 46 cases were available for analysis at W15. The distribution by stage was as follows: Ib 16.3%, Ic 64.2%, II 20.4%. Thirty six patients (75%) received an additional vaginal vault boost of 6-10Gy delivered by HDR brachytherapy in 1 or 2 fractions. Among the 47 patients who completed IMRT, 27% (95% CI 14.5-39.7%) developed at least 1 GI grade 2 adverse event (diarrhoea in 92% of cases

  12. Phenylbutyl Isoselenocyanate Modulates Phase I and II Enzymes and Inhibits 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone Induced DNA Adducts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crampsie, Melissa A.; Jones, Nathan; Das, Arunangshu; Aliaga, Cesar; Desai, Dhimant; Lazarus, Philip; Amin, Shantu; Sharma, Arun K.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains one of the most preventable forms of cancer with about 90% of cases attributed to cigarette smoking. Over the years, the development of chemopreventive agents that could inhibit, delay, or reverse the lung carcinogenesis process has been an active field of research, however, without much attainment. Through extensive structure-activity relationship studies, we recently identified a novel agent phenylbutyl isoselenocyanate (ISC-4), designed based on naturally occurring isothiocyanates well known for their lung cancer prevention properties, as a potential chemopreventive agent. In the present study, we used A/J mice to evaluate the lung cancer chemopreventive potential of ISC-4. A single intragastric dose of 1.25 µmol ISC-4 resulted in a time-dependent increase of selenium levels in serum, liver, and lung, suggesting that ISC-4 is orally bioavailable, a key requirement for a chemopreventive agent. This dose also resulted in a time dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (Cyp) activity and delayed increases in Phase II UDP-glucuronyl transferase (Ugt) and glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) activity. ISC-4 was able to induce mRNA expression of Cyp, Ugt, and Gst enzyme isoforms in liver, but in lung inhibited Cyp isoforms while inducing Ugt and Gst isoforms. In addition, ISC-4 effectively inhibited methyl-DNA adduct formation in mice fed diet supplemented with ISC-4 for two weeks and then treated with the tobacco procarcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). These results suggest that ISC-4 is a strong candidate for development as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:21795424

  13. Convolutional coding combined with continuous phase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzi, S. V.; Wilson, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Background theory and specific coding designs for combined coding/modulation schemes utilizing convolutional codes and continuous-phase modulation (CPM) are presented. In this paper the case of r = 1/2 coding onto a 4-ary CPM is emphasized, with short-constraint length codes presented for continuous-phase FSK, double-raised-cosine, and triple-raised-cosine modulation. Coding buys several decibels of coding gain over the Gaussian channel, with an attendant increase of bandwidth. Performance comparisons in the power-bandwidth tradeoff with other approaches are made.

  14. Convolutional coding combined with continuous phase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzi, S. V.; Wilson, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Background theory and specific coding designs for combined coding/modulation schemes utilizing convolutional codes and continuous-phase modulation (CPM) are presented. In this paper the case of r = 1/2 coding onto a 4-ary CPM is emphasized, with short-constraint length codes presented for continuous-phase FSK, double-raised-cosine, and triple-raised-cosine modulation. Coding buys several decibels of coding gain over the Gaussian channel, with an attendant increase of bandwidth. Performance comparisons in the power-bandwidth tradeoff with other approaches are made.

  15. Electro-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 megabits per sec. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 nano-sec. and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, the resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Mode matching into the bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  16. Phase retrieval by coherent modulation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Morrison, Graeme R.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Robinson, Ian K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval is a long-standing problem in imaging when only the intensity of the wavefield can be recorded. Coherent diffraction imaging is a lensless technique that uses iterative algorithms to recover amplitude and phase contrast images from diffraction intensity data. For general samples, phase retrieval from a single-diffraction pattern has been an algorithmic and experimental challenge. Here we report a method of phase retrieval that uses a known modulation of the sample exit wave. This coherent modulation imaging method removes inherent ambiguities of coherent diffraction imaging and uses a reliable, rapidly converging iterative algorithm involving three planes. It works for extended samples, does not require tight support for convergence and relaxes dynamic range requirements on the detector. Coherent modulation imaging provides a robust method for imaging in materials and biological science, while its single-shot capability will benefit the investigation of dynamical processes with pulsed sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers. PMID:27857061

  17. Phase retrieval by coherent modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Morrison, Graeme R; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Robinson, Ian K

    2016-11-18

    Phase retrieval is a long-standing problem in imaging when only the intensity of the wavefield can be recorded. Coherent diffraction imaging is a lensless technique that uses iterative algorithms to recover amplitude and phase contrast images from diffraction intensity data. For general samples, phase retrieval from a single-diffraction pattern has been an algorithmic and experimental challenge. Here we report a method of phase retrieval that uses a known modulation of the sample exit wave. This coherent modulation imaging method removes inherent ambiguities of coherent diffraction imaging and uses a reliable, rapidly converging iterative algorithm involving three planes. It works for extended samples, does not require tight support for convergence and relaxes dynamic range requirements on the detector. Coherent modulation imaging provides a robust method for imaging in materials and biological science, while its single-shot capability will benefit the investigation of dynamical processes with pulsed sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers.

  18. Phase retrieval by coherent modulation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Morrison, Graeme R.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Robinson, Ian K.

    2016-11-01

    Phase retrieval is a long-standing problem in imaging when only the intensity of the wavefield can be recorded. Coherent diffraction imaging is a lensless technique that uses iterative algorithms to recover amplitude and phase contrast images from diffraction intensity data. For general samples, phase retrieval from a single-diffraction pattern has been an algorithmic and experimental challenge. Here we report a method of phase retrieval that uses a known modulation of the sample exit wave. This coherent modulation imaging method removes inherent ambiguities of coherent diffraction imaging and uses a reliable, rapidly converging iterative algorithm involving three planes. It works for extended samples, does not require tight support for convergence and relaxes dynamic range requirements on the detector. Coherent modulation imaging provides a robust method for imaging in materials and biological science, while its single-shot capability will benefit the investigation of dynamical processes with pulsed sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers.

  19. Electric-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 Mbps. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 ns and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. Experimentally, the resonant cavity can be maintained on resonance with respect to the input laser signal by monitoring the fluctuation of output intensity as the cavity is switched. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of additional dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Furthermore, mode matching into a bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. On the other hand, unlike waveguide modulators which are essentially traveling wave devices, the resonant cavity modulator requires that the cavity be maintained in resonance with respect to the incoming laser signal. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  20. Directly Phase-Modulated Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. L.; Fröhlich, B.; Lucamarini, M.; Roberts, G. L.; Dynes, J. F.; Shields, A. J.

    2016-07-01

    The art of imparting information onto a light wave by optical signal modulation is fundamental to all forms of optical communication. Among many schemes, direct modulation of laser diodes stands out as a simple, robust, and cost-effective method. However, the simultaneous changes in intensity, frequency, and phase have prevented its application in the field of secure quantum communication. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a directly phase-modulated light source which overcomes the main disadvantages associated with direct modulation and is suitable for diverse applications such as coherent communications and quantum cryptography. The source separates the tasks of phase preparation and pulse generation between a pair of semiconductor lasers leading to very pure phase states. Moreover, the cavity-enhanced electro-optic effect enables the first example of subvolt half-wave phase modulation at high signal rates. The source is compact, stable, and versatile, and we show its potential to become the standard transmitter for future quantum communication networks based on attenuated laser pulses.

  1. Phase-locked-loop phase modulator with high modulation index, low distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badstiibner, C. G.

    1969-01-01

    Phase-locked-loop phase modulator has the capability of generating a 6.8MHz carrier at modulation indexes as high as 2.5, with a distortion of the demodulated signal of less than 5 percent. These characteristics are obtained without the use of multipliers.

  2. LSPRAY-II: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    LSPRAY-II is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-II, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  3. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  4. Current Phase II investigational therapies for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Zisapel, Nava

    2015-03-01

    Insomnia is typified by a difficulty in sleep initiation, maintenance and/or quality (non-restorative sleep) resulting in significant daytime distress. This review summarizes the available efficacy and safety data for drugs currently in the pipeline for treating insomnia. Specifically, the authors performed MEDLINE and internet searches using the keywords 'Phase II' and 'insomnia'. The drugs covered target GABAA (zaleplon-CR, lorediplon, EVT-201), orexin (filorexant, MIN-202), histamine-H1 (LY2624803), serotonin 5-HT2A (ITI-007), melatonin/serotonin5-HT1A (piromelatine) and melatonin (indication expansions of prolonged-release melatonin and tasimelteon for pediatric sleep and circadian rhythm disorders) receptors. Low-priced generic environments and high development costs limit the further development of drugs that treat insomnia. However, the bidirectional link between sleep and certain comorbidities may encourage development of specific drugs for comorbid insomnia. New insomnia therapies will most likely move away from GABAAR receptors' modulation to more subtle neurological pathways that regulate the sleep-wake cycle.

  5. Phase-Change Heat-Storage Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-storage module accommodates momentary heating or cooling overload in pumped-liquid heat-transfer system. Large heat-storage capacity of module provided by heat of fusion of material that freezes at or near temperature desired to maintain object to be heated or cooled. Module involves relatively small penalties in weight, cost, and size and more than compensates by enabling design of rest of system to handle only average load. Latent heat of fusion of phase-change material provides large heat-storage capacity in small volume.

  6. Linearity optimization in a class of analog phase modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the ultimate modulating linearity attainable with a phase modulation technique based on the linear addition of quadrature phase carrier signals which have been multiplied by precisely defined nonlinear transformations of the modulating signal. Optimum gain coefficients are derived and plotted to permit implementation of analog phase modulators capable of exceptionally good linearity of phase deviations as large as 5 radians.

  7. Fiber optic microbend phase shifter and modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, H. F.

    1985-09-01

    The present invention relates generally to a fiber optic phase shifter and intensity modulator and more particularly to fiber optic phase shifters and modulators that utilize a microbend transducer. The ability to shift the phase of light propagating in a single mode fiber is quite useful in fiber optic sensors and may also be used in fiber-optic communications. A conventional way to shift the phase of light propagating in a single mode fiber is by stretching the fiber. This is done by wrapping and gluing the fiber around a cylinder of piezoelectric material. When a voltage is applied to the material, the cylinder expands thereby stretching the fiber. Long lengths on the order of 10 meters of fiber and large voltages are needed to drive the piezoelectric cylinder. The ability to modulate the intensity of light propagating in a optic fiber is also useful in fiber optic communication and sensing systems. Such modulation can be performed by a device external to the fiber such as an electrooptic modulator formed in a lithium niobate crystal.

  8. Chromaticity tracking using a phase modulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the classical chromaticity measurement technique, chromaticity is measured by measuring the change in betatron tune as the RF frequency is varied. This paper will describe a novel way of measuring chromaticity: we will phase modulate the RF with a known sine wave and then phase demodulate the betatron frequency. The result is a line in Fourier space which corresponds to the frequency of our sine wave modulation. The peak of this sine wave is proportional to chromaticity. For this technique to work, a tune tracker PLL system is required because it supplies the betatron carrier frequency. This method has been tested in the Tevatron and we will show the results here.

  9. Optical isolator using two tandem phase modulators.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Christopher R; Dupuis, Nicolas; Zhang, Liming

    2011-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate an integrated optical isolator in InP using two phase modulators in series. The phase modulators are driven with a single-frequency signal in quadrature. Theoretically there is no effect on the forward signal, and the carrier of the backward signal can be eliminated, the energy distributed to other frequencies. We achieve a carrier isolation of 11 dB and an excess insertion loss of 2.3 dB. Such an isolator can be monolithically integrated with a laser without extra materials or magnetic fields.

  10. Phase retrieval by coherent modulation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Morrison, Graeme R.; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Robinson, Ian K.

    2016-11-18

    Phase retrieval is a long-standing problem in imaging when only the intensity of the wavefield can be recorded. Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lensless technique that uses iterative algorithms to recover amplitude and phase contrast images from diffraction intensity data. For general samples, phase retrieval from a single diffraction pattern has been an algorithmic and experimental challenge. Here we report a method of phase retrieval that uses a known modulation of the sample exit-wave. This coherent modulation imaging (CMI) method removes inherent ambiguities of CDI and uses a reliable, rapidly converging iterative algorithm involving three planes. It works for extended samples, does not require tight support for convergence, and relaxes dynamic range requirements on the detector. CMI provides a robust method for imaging in materials and biological science, while its single-shot capability will benefit the investigation of dynamical processes with pulsed sources, such as X-ray free electron laser.

  11. MIME: Microprogrammable Minicomputer Emulator. Phase II. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    unlimited. — ~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~ —- , — - - _I _ ~~ ~~ j”— -~j~~$,’ 4~4 AFIT/GCS/EE/79_11 MIME MICROPROGRAMMAB LE MINICOMPUTER EMULATOR PHASE II VOLUME... II THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University (ATC) in Partial Fulfillment...L— ~—~-__— -- _ _ _ _ -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ onterit~- Volume II Appendix A

  12. Melatonin analgesia is associated with improvement of the descending endogenous pain-modulating system in fibromyalgia: a phase II, randomized, double-dummy, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Central disinhibition is a mechanism involved in the physiopathology of fibromyalgia. Melatonin can improve sleep quality, pain and pain threshold. We hypothesized that treatment with melatonin alone or in combination with amitriptyline would be superior to amitriptyline alone in modifying the endogenous pain-modulating system (PMS) as quantified by conditional pain modulation (CPM), and this change in CPM could be associated with serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We also tested whether melatonin improves the clinical symptoms of pain, pain threshold and sleep quality. Methods Sixty-three females, aged 18 to 65, were randomized to receive bedtime amitriptyline (25 mg) (n = 21), melatonin (10 mg) (n = 21) or melatonin (10 mg) + amitriptyline (25 mg) (n = 21) for a period of six weeks. The descending PMS was assessed with the CPM-TASK. It was assessed the pain score on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS 0-100 mm), the score on Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), heat pain threshold (HPT), sleep quality and BDNF serum. Delta values (post- minus pre-treatment) were used to compare the treatment effect. The outcomes variables were collected before, one and six weeks after initiating treatment. Results Melatonin alone or in combination with amitriptyline reduced significantly pain on the VAS compared with amitriptyline alone (P < 0.01). The delta values on the VAS scores were-12.85 (19.93),-17.37 (18.69) and-20.93 (12.23) in the amitriptyline, melatonin and melatonin+amitriptyline groups, respectively. Melatonin alone and in combination increased the inhibitory PMS as assessed by the Numerical Pain Scale [NPS(0-10)] reduction during the CPM-TASK:-2.4 (2.04) melatonin + amitriptyline,-2.65 (1.68) melatonin, and-1.04 (2.06) amitriptyline, (P < 0.05). Melatonin + amitriptyline treated displayed better results than melatonin and amitriptyline alone in terms of FIQ and PPT improvement (P < 0.05, fort both

  13. Phase multistability of self-modulated oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnovtseva, O. V.; Postnov, D. E.; Nekrasov, A. M.; Mosekilde, E.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2002-09-01

    The paper examines the type of multistability that one can observe in the synchronization of two oscillators when the systems individually display self-modulation or other types of multicrest wave forms. The investigation is based on a phase reduction method and on the calculation of phase maps for vanishing and finite coupling strengths, respectively. Various phase-locked patterns are observed. In the presence of a frequency mismatch, the two-parameter bifurcation analysis reveals a set of synchronization regions inserted one into the other. Numerical examples using a generator with inertial nonlinearity and a biologically motivated model of nephron autoregulation are presented.

  14. Introduction to Health Occupations Education II. Module No. I. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of seven modules that introduce health occupations II is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning…

  15. Polarization phase shifting interferometric technique for phase calibration of a reflective phase spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Somparna; Sarkar, Sanjukta; Bhattacharya, Kallol; Hazra, Lakshminarayan

    2013-03-01

    Calibration of phase in spatial light modulators is a prerequisite for applications where a prespecified phase distribution needs to be implemented over the surface of the modulator. The present work proposes a full-field polarization phase shifting interferometric technique, based on the Twyman-Green interferometer, for the purpose.

  16. Ambovex(®) as a novel immunological modulator drug for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the liver: a Phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Salama, Hosny; Ahmad, Hassan; Elchagea, Ismail; Zekri, Abdel Rahman; Medhat, Eman; Bahnassy, Abeer; Lange, Michael; Rabbat, Mohammed; de la Torre, Andrew N; Punamiya, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a global public health problem, based on it being the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The approved conventional treatment methods for HCC have shown life-threatening side effects with limited or negligible success, especially in multifocal HCC. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are being explored, including immunoregulatory molecules that may have the potential to treat or delay the progression of HCC. A novel pharmaceutical botanical drug - Ambovex(®), an immune-modulator molecule - was tested to treat or delay the progress of HCC. We conducted a 6-month randomized clinical trial with an additional 3-month washing period (no treatment) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low-dose Ambovex oral spray in treating patients with HCC. The clinical study involved a total of 40 patients, with 33 in the treatment group and seven in the control group. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured every month and ultrasound scans were performed at time zero and every 2 months thereafter. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed for patients in the treatment group. Ambovex proved to be safe, as there were no significant side effects although some patients found that the drug has unpleasant taste. AFP analysis showed a significant decrease in its level (α=0.05; 95% confidence interval) in the treatment group when compared to the control group at 3 months (P=0.0031) and at 6 months (P=0.007). The ultrasound results showed improvement in the treated group, as evidenced by a significant decrease in the lesion numbers and sizes. The lesions in 38% of treated patients decreased from multiple to single with major improvements; 35% of patients exhibited a decrease from multiple lesions to multiple lesions with minor improvements, whereas 27% had stabilized lesions. CT scans in the treated group showed significant improvement, as there was complete disappearance of the

  17. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  18. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  19. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  20. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for... accordance with the provisions of § 90.173. (c) Phase II applications for authorization on all non-Government...

  1. Modulation of Breast Cancer Risk Biomarkers by High Dose Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Phase II Pilot Study in Pre-menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F.; Phillips, Teresa A.; Box, Jessica A.; Kreutzjans, Amy L.; Carlson, Susan E.; Hidaka, Brandon H.; Metheny, Trina; Zalles, Carola M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Powers, Kandy R.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Petroff, Brian K.; Hensing, Whitney L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Higher intakes of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) have been variably associated with reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer. The purpose of this pilot trial was to assess feasibility and explore effects of high dose EPA and DHA on blood and benign breast tissue risk biomarkers prior to design of a placebo controlled Phase IIB trial. Premenopausal women with evidence of hyperplasia +/- atypia by baseline random periareolar fine needle aspiration (RPFNA) were given 1860 mg of EPA + 1500 mg of DHA ethyl esters daily for 6 months. Blood and benign breast tissue were sampled during the same menstrual cycle phase pre-study and a median of 3 weeks after last dose. Additional blood was obtained within 24 hours of last dose. Feasibility which was pre-defined as 50% uptake, 85% retention and 70% compliance, was demonstrated with 46% uptake, 94% completion, and 85% compliance. Cytologic atypia decreased from 77 to 38% (p=0.002), and Ki-67 from a median of 2.1 to 1.0 % (p=0.021) with an increase in the ratio of EPA + DHA to AA in erythrocyte phospholipids but no change in blood hormones, adipokines, or cytokines. Exploratory breast proteomics assessment showed decreases in several proteins involved in hormone and cytokine signaling with mixed effects on those in the AKT/mTOR pathways. Further investigation of EPA plus DHA for breast cancer prevention in a placebo controlled trial in premenopausal women is warranted. PMID:26276744

  2. Modulation of Breast Cancer Risk Biomarkers by High-Dose Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Phase II Pilot Study in Premenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Phillips, Teresa A; Box, Jessica A; Kreutzjans, Amy L; Carlson, Susan E; Hidaka, Brandon H; Metheny, Trina; Zalles, Carola M; Mills, Gordon B; Powers, Kandy R; Sullivan, Debra K; Petroff, Brian K; Hensing, Whitney L; Fridley, Brooke L; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Higher intakes of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) have been variably associated with reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer. The purpose of this pilot trial was to assess feasibility and explore the effects of high-dose EPA and DHA on blood and benign breast tissue risk biomarkers before design of a placebo-controlled phase IIB trial. Premenopausal women with evidence of hyperplasia ± atypia by baseline random periareolar fine needle aspiration were given 1860 mg of EPA + 1500 mg of DHA ethyl esters daily for 6 months. Blood and benign breast tissue were sampled during the same menstrual cycle phase prestudy and a median of 3 weeks after last dose. Additional blood was obtained within 24 hours of last dose. Feasibility, which was predefined as 50% uptake, 85% retention, and 70% compliance, was demonstrated with 46% uptake, 94% completion, and 85% compliance. Cytologic atypia decreased from 77% to 38% (P = 0.002), and Ki-67 from a median of 2.1% to 1.0% (P = 0.021) with an increase in the ratio of EPA + DHA to AA in erythrocyte phospholipids but no change in blood hormones, adipokines, or cytokines. Exploratory breast proteomics assessment showed decreases in several proteins involved in hormone and cytokine signaling with mixed effects on those in the AKT/mTOR pathways. Further investigation of EPA plus DHA for breast cancer prevention in a placebo-controlled trial in premenopausal women is warranted. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Phase II trial of albumin-bound paclitaxel and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor as an immune modulator in recurrent platinum resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, John B; Swensen, Ron E; Ovenell, Kelsie J; Hitchcock-Bernhardt, Katie M; Reichow, Jessica L; Apodaca, Minjun C; D'Amico, Leonard; Childs, Jennifer S; Higgins, Doreen M; Buening, Barbara J; Goff, Barbara A; Disis, Mary L

    2017-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulates immunity via recruitment of antigen presenting cells and tumor specific T-cell stimulation. Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) followed by GM-CSF may enhance antitumor responses and prolong remissions in ovarian cancer. Immune phenotypes present before treatment may identify responders to chemo-immunotherapy. Recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer patients received nab-paclitaxel, 100mg/m(2) days 1, 8, 15 followed by GM-CSF 250μg days 16-26 every 28days for 6 planned cycles. The primary endpoint was remission duration compared to immediate prior remission. Peripheral blood was evaluated by flow cytometry and interferon-γ ELISPOT. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. Six patients (29%) achieved a biochemical complete response and 9 (43%) a partial response for an overall response rate of 72%. Median time to progression was 4months and 10% of patients achieved longer remissions than the immediate prior regimen. Median overall survival (OS) was 16.8months. Fewer myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) at enrollment significantly associated with complete response (p=0.05). T-cell responses to IGF1R-p1332-1346 (r=0.827, p=0.0003) and IGF1R-p1242-1256 (r=0.850, p=0.0001) during treatment correlated with time to progression. Nab-paclitaxel combined with GM-CSF demonstrated biochemical responses in a majority of patients, although responses were not sustained. This combination did not demonstrate an advantage in OS over prior studies of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy. Agents that modulate MDSC should be studied as potential adjuvants to therapy. Strategies to expand T cells recognizing tumor-associated antigens biologically significant in ovarian cancer should also continue to be investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  5. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m{sup 2}/week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  6. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  7. Anatomy and Physiology. Module No. IV. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of 31 modules on anatomy and physiology is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities,…

  8. Microscope. Module No. VI. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package, with one module on the microscope, is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities, student…

  9. Anatomy and Physiology. Module No. IV. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of 31 modules on anatomy and physiology is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities,…

  10. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  11. AGOR 27/28 Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 AGOR 27/28 Phase II Progress Report ( Technical ) S. Zoltan Kelety, SIO Marine Superintendent...of May 2016. 2. Shipyard Representative biweekly reports and this report were delivered. 3. The work accomplished included Scripps technical review... technical standards. 4. SIO participated in Phase III mission system installation during April and May. Report of this activity will be made by separate

  12. The selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024 (enobosarm) improves lean body mass and physical function in healthy elderly men and postmenopausal women: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James T; Barnette, Kester G; Bohl, Casey E; Hancock, Michael L; Rodriguez, Domingo; Dodson, Shontelle T; Morton, Ronald A; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Cachexia, also known as muscle wasting, is a complex metabolic condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle and a decline in physical function. Muscle wasting is associated with cancer, sarcopenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, end-stage renal disease, and other chronic conditions and results in significant morbidity and mortality. GTx-024 (enobosarm) is a nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that has tissue-selective anabolic effects in muscle and bone, while sparing other androgenic tissue related to hair growth in women and prostate effects in men. GTx-024 has demonstrated promising pharmacologic effects in preclinical studies and favorable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in phase I investigation. METHODS: A 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial was conducted to evaluate GTx-024 in 120 healthy elderly men (>60 years of age) and postmenopausal women. The primary endpoint was total lean body mass assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and secondary endpoints included physical function, body weight, insulin resistance, and safety. RESULTS: GTx-024 treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in total lean body mass that were statistically significant (P < 0.001, 3 mg vs. placebo) and clinically meaningful. There were also significant improvements in physical function (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo) and insulin resistance (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: GTx-024 showed a dose-dependent improvement in total lean body mass and physical function and was well tolerated. GTx-024 may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer and other chronic diseases.

  13. First results from GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    Gerda is designed for a background-free search of 76Ge neutrinoless double-β decay, using bare Ge detectors in liquid Ar. The experiment was upgraded after the successful completion of Phase I to double the target mass and further reduce the background. Newly-designed Ge detectors were installed along with LAr scintillation sensors. Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 with approximately 36 kg of Ge detectors and is currently ongoing. The first results based on 10.8 kg· yr of exposure are presented. The background goal of 10‑3 cts/(keV· kg· yr) is achieved and a search for neutrinoless double-β decay is performed by combining Phase I and II data. No signal is found and a new limit is set at T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L.).

  14. Phase retrieval by coherent modulation imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Morrison, Graeme R.; ...

    2016-11-18

    Phase retrieval is a long-standing problem in imaging when only the intensity of the wavefield can be recorded. Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lensless technique that uses iterative algorithms to recover amplitude and phase contrast images from diffraction intensity data. For general samples, phase retrieval from a single diffraction pattern has been an algorithmic and experimental challenge. Here we report a method of phase retrieval that uses a known modulation of the sample exit-wave. This coherent modulation imaging (CMI) method removes inherent ambiguities of CDI and uses a reliable, rapidly converging iterative algorithm involving three planes. It works formore » extended samples, does not require tight support for convergence, and relaxes dynamic range requirements on the detector. CMI provides a robust method for imaging in materials and biological science, while its single-shot capability will benefit the investigation of dynamical processes with pulsed sources, such as X-ray free electron laser.« less

  15. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  16. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  17. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  18. Multilayer Dielectric Transmissive Optical Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew Scott; Fork, Richard Lynn

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer dielectric device has been fabricated as a prototype of a low-loss, low-distortion, transmissive optical phase modulator that would provide as much as a full cycle of phase change for all frequency components of a transmitted optical pulse over a frequency band as wide as 6.3 THz. Arrays of devices like this one could be an alternative to the arrays of mechanically actuated phase-control optics (adaptive optics) that have heretofore been used to correct for wave-front distortions in highly precise optical systems. Potential applications for these high-speed wave-front-control arrays of devices include agile beam steering, optical communications, optical metrology, optical tracking and targeting, directional optical ranging, and interferometric astronomy. The device concept is based on the same principle as that of band-pass interference filters made of multiple dielectric layers with fractional-wavelength thicknesses, except that here there is an additional focus on obtaining the desired spectral phase profile in addition to the device s spectral transmission profile. The device includes a GaAs substrate, on which there is deposited a stack of GaAs layers alternating with AlAs layers, amounting to a total of 91 layers. The design thicknesses of the layers range from 10 nm to greater than 1 micrometer. The number of layers and the thickness of each layer were chosen in a computational optimization process in which the wavelength dependences of the indices of refraction of GaAs and AlAs were taken into account as the design was iterated to maximize the transmission and minimize the group-velocity dispersion for a wavelength band wide enough to include all significant spectral components of the pulsed optical signal to be phase modulated.

  19. The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  20. The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, John T.

    1992-03-24

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August-September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6808 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500 C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  1. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  2. Gravity dual of spatially modulated phase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shin; Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2010-02-15

    We show that the five-dimensional Maxwell theory with the Chern-Simons term is tachyonic in the presence of a constant electric field. When coupled to gravity, a sufficiently large Chern-Simons coupling causes instability of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes in anti-de Sitter space. The instability happens only at nonvanishing momenta, suggesting a spatially modulated phase in the holographically dual quantum field theory in (3+1) dimensions, with spontaneous current generation in a helical configuration. The three-charge extremal black hole in the type IIB superstring theory on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} barely satisfies the stability condition.

  3. Phase retrieval based on pupil scanning modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiantai; Gao, Zhishan; Ma, Jun; Yuan, Caojin; Yang, Zhongming; Claus, Daniel; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-08-01

    The pupil scanning modulation is a maneuverable method for retrieving the phase of the complex-valued object. It is based on changing the extent of the illumination function using an adaptive aperture. The apertures are fixed on the same border or point of intersection that ensures the location of the aperture. We sequentially increase the size of the aperture and guarantee the necessary overlap between adjacent object fields. An improved algorithm including the adaptive raised-power estimation constraint and gradient-descent step is proposed to accelerate convergence and avoid stagnation during iterations. Both the simulation and experiment have been conducted to verify the feasibility of this method.

  4. Cleome rutidosperma and Euphorbia thymifolia Suppress Inflammatory Response via Upregulation of Phase II Enzymes and Modulation of NF-κB and JNK Activation in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Cleome rutidosperma DC. and Euphorbia thymifolia L. are herbal medicines used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to treat various illnesses. Reports document that they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms involved in their anti-inflammatory actions have not yet been elucidated. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities and underlying mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Cleome rutidosperma (CR) and Euphorbia thymifolia (ET) were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cell line BV2. The morphology changes and production of pro-inflammatory mediators were assayed. Gene expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, and CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, as well as phase II enzymes such as heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), were further investigated using reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-Q-PCR) and Western blotting. The effects of CR and ET on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were examined using Western blotting and specific inhibitors. CR and ET suppressed BV2 activation, down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) overproduction without affecting cell viability. They reduced LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 production, attenuated IL-1β and CCL2 expression, but upregulated HO-1, GCLM and NQO1 expression. They also inhibited p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and modulated Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) activation in BV2 cells. SP600125, the JNK inhibitor, significantly augmented the anti-IL-6 activity of ET. NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, enhanced the anti-IL-6 effects of both CR and ET. Znpp, a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, attenuated the anti-NO effects of CR and ET. Our results show that CR and ET exhibit anti

  5. LSM II: Library Skills Module for English 132.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    The information and exercises provided in this learning module are designed to help English Composition II students at Yavapai College to acquire advanced library skills. The module contains three lessons. Lesson I, "Dictionaries, Various and Sundry Encyclopedias, and Handbooks," uses examples and exercises from fields such as foreign languages,…

  6. LSM II: Library Skills Module for English 132.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    The information and exercises provided in this learning module are designed to help English Composition II students at Yavapai College to acquire advanced library skills. The module contains three lessons. Lesson I, "Dictionaries, Various and Sundry Encyclopedias, and Handbooks," uses examples and exercises from fields such as foreign languages,…

  7. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase.

  8. Monodomain Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Layers for Phase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Oton, E.; Netter, E.; Nakano, T.; D.-Katayama, Y.; Inoue, F.

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal “Blue Phases” (BP) have evolved, in the last years, from a scientific curiosity to emerging materials for new photonic and display applications. They possess attractive features over standard nematic liquid crystals, like submillisecond switching times and polarization- independent optical response. However, BPs still present a number of technical issues that prevent their use in practical applications: their phases are only found in limited temperature ranges, thus requiring stabilization of the layers; stabilized BP layers are inhomogeneous and not uniformly oriented, which worsen the optical performance of the devices. It would be essential for practical uses to obtain perfectly aligned and oriented monodomain BP layers, where the alignment and orientation of the cubic lattice are organized in a single 3D structure. In this work we have obtained virtually perfect monodomain BP layers and used them in devices for polarization independent phase modulation. We demonstrate that, under applied voltage, well aligned and oriented layers generate smoother and higher values of the phase shift than inhomogeneous layers, while preserving polarization independency. All BP devices were successfully stabilized in BPI phase, maintaining the layer monodomain homogeneity at room temperature, covering the entire area of the devices with a unique BP phase. PMID:28281691

  9. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  10. Measuring dirt on photovoltaic modules. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E B

    1980-11-01

    The accumulation of surface dirt on photovoltaic (PV) modules installed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory test sites can cause degraded electrical performance until it is removed either by washing or by rain. Modules with only RTV as a solar-cell encapsulant are more prone to dirt retention than modules covered with glass. Two techniques for measuring and quantifying surface dirt and its effects on module output are described. One technique, using a standard portable glossmeter, measures the scattering of specular light by surface-dirt particles. This measured value can then be correlated with the peak power performance before and after cleaning. A second technique is also described which enables an investigator, in the field, to take dirt samples or replicas of the accumulated surface dirt from the PV module. Photomicrographs of urban, suburban, and rural dirt particles are shown. Measurements of module peak power before and after cleaning indicate that dirt particles in urban environments are more degrading to PV performance than dirt particles found in rural areas. The significance of the measurements is not obvious, however, after examination of the photomicrographs of the dirt particles. It was found that the optical transmission of the particles has a greater effect on peak power performance than the quantity of these particles.

  11. Angiotensin II modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Iwata, Shusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Horio, Nao; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-04-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying gustatory detection of dietary sodium is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (AngII), a major mediator of body fluid and sodium homeostasis, modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities, and that this modulation critically influences ingestive behaviors in mice. Gustatory nerve recording demonstrated that AngII suppressed amiloride-sensitive taste responses to NaCl. Surprisingly, AngII also enhanced nerve responses to sweeteners, but had no effect on responses to KCl, sour, bitter, or umami tastants. These effects of AngII on nerve responses were blocked by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist CV11974. In behavioral tests, CV11974 treatment reduced the stimulated high licking rate to NaCl and sweeteners in water-restricted mice with elevated plasma AngII levels. In taste cells AT1 proteins were coexpressed with αENaC (epithelial sodium channel α-subunit, an amiloride-sensitive salt taste receptor) or T1r3 (a sweet taste receptor component). These results suggest that the taste organ is a peripheral target of AngII. The specific reduction of amiloride-sensitive salt taste sensitivity by AngII may contribute to increased sodium intake. Furthermore, AngII may contribute to increased energy intake by enhancing sweet responses. The linkage between salty and sweet preferences via AngII signaling may optimize sodium and calorie intakes.

  12. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  13. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  14. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  15. 47 CFR 90.711 - Processing of Phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Processing of Phase II applications. 90.711 Section 90.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... 220-222 MHz Band § 90.711 Processing of Phase II applications. (a) Phase II applications for...

  16. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-21

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10{sup −2} cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1·10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10{sup 26} yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10{sup −3} cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  17. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  18. Plumbing. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brath, Ed

    These 26 Student Training Modules on plumbing comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 577.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  19. Bricklaying. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cholewinski, Scott

    These 23 Student Training Modules on bricklaying comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 567.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  20. Tilesetting. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausland, Greg

    These 24 Student Training Modules on tilesetting comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 563.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  1. Drywall. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Doug

    These 18 Student Training Modules on drywall comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 573.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  2. Plastering. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblen, Ron

    These 20 Student Training Modules on plastering comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 569.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  3. Painting. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kracht, Shannon

    These 21 Student Training Modules on painting comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 561.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  4. Unified Technical Concepts. Application Modules Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Unified Technical Concepts (UTC) is a modular system for teaching applied physics in two-year postsecondary technician programs. This UTC laboratory textbook, the second of two volumes, consists of 45 learning modules dealing with basic concepts of physics. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: force…

  5. Unified Technical Concepts. Application Modules Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Unified Technical Concepts (UTC) is a modular system for teaching applied physics in two-year postsecondary technician programs. This UTC laboratory textbook, the second of two volumes, consists of 45 learning modules dealing with basic concepts of physics. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: force…

  6. Robust phase-shift-keying silicon photonic modulator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Donald; Aboketaf, Abdelsalam; Preble, Stefan

    2012-07-30

    Here we propose a robust silicon modulator that seamlessly generates phase shift keyed data. The modulator has very low insertion loss and is robust against electrical amplitude variations in the modulating signal; specifically a 50%-200% variation in modulating amplitude leads to only a π/9 variation in output optical phase, corresponding to only ± 10% variation in the differentially detected signal. This yields a ~2.5dB enhancement in SNR over OOK (on-off-keying) formats.

  7. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  8. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  9. Evaluation of phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator for phase modulation performance using a Twyman Green interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Liying

    2007-06-01

    In order to evaluate the phase modulation performance of a 256 × 256 pixel reflecting liquid crystal spatial light modulator purchased from the US Boulder Nonlinear Systems, we identify the linear range of phase shift and evaluate the spatial nonuniformity of the modulator by measuring both phase and intensity with a Twyman-Green interferometer. Experimental results show that the 50-210 grey scales linear ranges of the phase shift established by phase and intensity measurements are in good agreement with each other, which proves that more accurate phase modulation can be achieved. The inherent backplane curvature of the modulator is less than λ/3 and the root-mean-square value of the phase nonuniformity across the modulator aperture is less than λ/10, so the backplane curvature of the modulator is the main contributor to phase distortion due to the modulator. Analysing the deviation of the root-mean-square value of the phase nonuniformity indicates that the stability of the modulator decreases with increasing grey scales. It is therefore concluded that the modulator calibrated using a single interferometer can be used for beam steering, wave-front correction and transformation.

  10. Monorail bridge conveyor. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonski, J

    1982-04-30

    This report covers the second phase of a four-phase contract to develop and test a roof hung monorail bridge conveyor coal haulage system working behind a continuous miner. Phase II covers the fabrication and assembly of all the components in making up the Monoral Bridge Conveyor System. The original concept presented had to be analyzed before final design could proceed. The analysis revealed that 24 ft. long bridge conveyor segments were the optimum length; the suspension system must have the vertical hinge point between bridges, the impact point of the coal transfer point and the suspension point itself, coincidental. The propulsion system is such that each bridge is self propelled in order to minimize side loading on the monorail. The conveyor belt drive is simple since it only has to drive one single 24 ft. conveyor. The entire assembly of twelve conveyors has been pre-tested in our Murfreesboro, Tennessee, shop. The electric circuit proved successful to operate from a manual control or automatically, and successfully proved the cycle of sequential strating and stopping.

  11. On Banach modules II. Pseudodeterminants and traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaijser, S.

    1997-03-01

    1. In the paper [Kai] it was observed that if A is a Banach algebra (over R or C) then the dual space is not only an A-A-bimodule, but is also injective as a left (or right) A-module. Furthermore, if M is a left (or right) Banach module over the unital Banach algebra A, then there is a natural bilinear map, there denoted TrA, from M × M[prime prime or minute] to A[prime prime or minute], defined byformula here(or [left angle bracket]TrA(m, m[prime prime or minute]), a[right angle bracket] = [left angle bracket]m[prime prime or minute], ma[right angle bracket]). The map TrA can be extended to the projective tensor product M[multiply sign in circle, circumflex accent]M[prime prime or minute], which is also an A-A-bimodule. It is easy to see that the map TrA is a bimodule homomorphism, so that the image is an A-A-submodule of A[prime prime or minute]. This module was denoted EA (M) in [Kai] and is in general not closed as a subspace of M[prime prime or minute]. It does, however, have a natural norm (as a quotient space of M[multiply sign in circle, circumflex accent]M[prime prime or minute]) and the unit ball can be used to define a new norm [parallel R: parallel]a[parallel R: parallel]new = sup {|[left angle bracket]e, a[right angle bracket] | e[set membership] the unit ball of EA(M)} on A, and it is easy to see that this new norm is simply the operator norm of a as an operator on M. The conclusion is that if a[prime prime or minute][set membership]A[prime prime or minute] is not only continuous with respect to the norm [parallel R: parallel]a[parallel R: parallel]L(M) (which is of course in general smaller thatn the given norm on A) but also with respect to the weak topology on A given by the set of all functionals of the form (0·1), then a[prime prime or minute] has a representation of the formformula here.

  12. Search for Annual Modulation in CDMS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, Danielle; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are one of the leading candidates for the undetected mass component comprising ~27% of the observable universe. An excess in the nuclear-recoil event rate measured by a detector, combined with an annual periodicity introduced by the revolution of the Earth about the Sun, is an important indicator of the direct detection of particle dark matter. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses semiconductor crystals to search for WIMPs scattering from atomic nuclei through the simultaneous measurement of ionization and athermal phonons. This technique has achieved excellent discrimination between nuclear recoils (expected for WIMP interactions) and radioactively induced electron recoils, enabling a sensitive search for an annually modulating signal. I will discuss updated results of this search, including possible systematic effects, and describe implications for interpretations of other experimental results such as those from the CoGeNT experiment.

  13. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  14. Robust quantum data locking from phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Wilde, Mark M.; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Quantum data locking is a uniquely quantum phenomenon that allows a relatively short key of constant size to (un)lock an arbitrarily long message encoded in a quantum state, in such a way that an eavesdropper who measures the state but does not know the key has essentially no information about the message. The application of quantum data locking in cryptography would allow one to overcome the limitations of the one-time pad encryption, which requires the key to have the same length as the message. However, it is known that the strength of quantum data locking is also its Achilles heel, as the leakage of a few bits of the key or the message may in principle allow the eavesdropper to unlock a disproportionate amount of information. In this paper we show that there exist quantum data locking schemes that can be made robust against information leakage by increasing the length of the key by a proportionate amount. This implies that a constant size key can still lock an arbitrarily long message as long as a fraction of it remains secret to the eavesdropper. Moreover, we greatly simplify the structure of the protocol by proving that phase modulation suffices to generate strong locking schemes, paving the way to optical experimental realizations. Also, we show that successful data locking protocols can be constructed using random code words, which very well could be helpful in discovering random codes for data locking over noisy quantum channels.

  15. Rogue waves in injected semiconductor lasers with current modulation: role of the modulation phase.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jatin; Nalawade, Dhananjay Bhiku; Zamora-Munt, Jordi; Vilaseca, Ramon; Masoller, Cristina

    2014-11-17

    Semiconductor lasers with continuous-wave optical injection display a rich variety of behaviors, including stable locking, periodic or chaotic oscillations, excitable pulses, etc. Within the chaotic regime it has been shown that the laser intensity can display extreme pulses, which have been identified as optical rogue waves (RWs), and it has also been shown that such extreme pulses can be completely suppressed via direct modulation of the laser current, with appropriated modulation amplitude and frequency. Here we perform a numerical analysis of the RW statistics and show that, when RWs are not suppressed by current modulation, their probability of occurrence strongly depends on the phase of the modulation. If the modulation is slow (the modulation frequency, fmod, is below the relaxation oscillation frequency, fro), the RWs occur within a well-defined interval of values of the modulation phase, i.e., there is a "safe" window of phases where no RWs occur. The most extreme RWs occur for modulation phases that are at the boundary of the safe window. When the modulation is fast (fmod > fro), there is no safe phase window; however, the RWs are likely to occur at particular values of the modulation phase. Our findings are of interest for the study of RWs in other systems, where a similar response to external forcing could be observed, and we hope that they will motivate experimental investigations to further elucidate the role of the modulation phase in the likelihood of the occurrence of RWs.

  16. Phase-modulating lasers toward on-chip integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaka, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Takiguchi, Yu; Nomoto, Yoshiro

    2016-07-01

    Controlling laser-beam patterns is indispensable in modern technology, where lasers are typically combined with phase-modulating elements such as diffractive optical elements or spatial light modulators. However, the combination of separate elements is not only a challenge for on-chip miniaturisation but also hinders their integration permitting the switchable control of individual modules. Here, we demonstrate the operation of phase-modulating lasers that emit arbitrarily configurable beam patterns without requiring any optical elements or scanning devices. We introduce a phase-modulating resonator in a semiconductor laser, which allows the concurrent realisation of lasing and phase modulation. The fabricated devices are on-chip-sized, making them suitable for integration. We believe this work will provide a breakthrough in various laser applications such as switchable illumination patterns for bio-medical applications, structured illuminations, and even real three-dimensional or highly realistic displays, which cannot be realised with simple combinations of conventional devices or elements.

  17. Phase-modulating lasers toward on-chip integration

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Takiguchi, Yu; Nomoto, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Controlling laser-beam patterns is indispensable in modern technology, where lasers are typically combined with phase-modulating elements such as diffractive optical elements or spatial light modulators. However, the combination of separate elements is not only a challenge for on-chip miniaturisation but also hinders their integration permitting the switchable control of individual modules. Here, we demonstrate the operation of phase-modulating lasers that emit arbitrarily configurable beam patterns without requiring any optical elements or scanning devices. We introduce a phase-modulating resonator in a semiconductor laser, which allows the concurrent realisation of lasing and phase modulation. The fabricated devices are on-chip-sized, making them suitable for integration. We believe this work will provide a breakthrough in various laser applications such as switchable illumination patterns for bio-medical applications, structured illuminations, and even real three-dimensional or highly realistic displays, which cannot be realised with simple combinations of conventional devices or elements. PMID:27456666

  18. The VRT gas turbine combustor - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melconian, Jerry O.; Mongia, Hukam C.; Nguyen, Hung L.

    1992-01-01

    An innovative annular combustor configuration is being developed for aircraft and other gas turbine engines. This design has the potential of permitting higher turbine inlet temperatures by reducing the pattern factor and providing a major reduction in NO(x) emission. The design concept is based on a Variable Residence Time (VRT) technique which allows large fuel particles adequate time to completely burn in the circumferentially mixed primary zone. High durability of the combustor is achieved by dual-function use of the incoming air. In Phase I, the feasibility of the concept was demonstrated by water analogue tests and 3D computer modeling. The flow pattern within the combustor was as predicted. The VRT combustor uses only half the number of fuel nozzles of the conventional configuration. In Phase II, hardware was designed, procured, and tested under conditions simulating typical supersonic civil aircraft cruise conditions to the limits of the rig. The test results confirmed many of the superior performance predictions of the VRT concept. The Hastelloy X liner showed no signs of distress after nearly six hours of tests using JP5 fuel.

  19. MesoNAM Verification Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2011-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale model (MesoNAM) forecasts to support launch weather operations. In Phase I, the performance of the model at KSC/CCAFS was measured objectively by conducting a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature, and dew point to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. In Phase II, the AMU modified the current tool by adding an additional 15 months of model output to the database and recalculating the verification statistics. The bias, standard deviation of bias, Root Mean Square Error, and Hypothesis test for bias were calculated to verify the performance of the model. The results indicated that the accuracy decreased as the forecast progressed, there was a diurnal signal in temperature with a cool bias during the late night and a warm bias during the afternoon, and there was a diurnal signal in dewpoint temperature with a low bias during the afternoon and a high bias during the late night.

  20. Antimalarial compounds in Phase II clinical development.

    PubMed

    Held, Jana; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Kreidenweiss, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Malaria is a major health problem in endemic countries and chemotherapy remains the most important tool in combating it. Treatment options are limited and essentially rely on a single drug class - the artemisinins. Efforts are ongoing to restrict the evolving threat of artemisinin resistance but declining sensitivity has been reported. Fueled by the ambitious aim of malaria eradication, novel antimalarial compounds, with improved properties, are now in the progressive phase of drug development. Herein, the authors describe antimalarial compounds currently in Phase II clinical development and present the results of these investigations. Thanks to recent efforts, a number of promising antimalarial compounds are now in the pipeline. First safety data have been generated for all of these candidates, although their efficacy as antimalarials is still unclear for most of them. Of particular note are KAE609, KAF156 and DSM265, which are of chemical scaffolds new to malaria chemotherapy and would truly diversify antimalarial options. Apart from SAR97276, which also has a novel chemical scaffold that has had its development stopped, all other compounds in the pipeline belong to already known substance classes, which have been chemically modified. At this moment in time, there is not one standout compound that will revolutionize malaria treatment but several compounds that will add to its control in the future.

  1. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  2. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  3. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790... Modification of Test Rules § 790.52 Phase II test rule. (a) If EPA determines that the proposed study plan described in § 790.50(a)(2) complies with § 790.50(c), EPA will publish a proposed Phase II test rule in the...

  4. Global phase diagram of disordered type-II Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yijia; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2017-07-01

    With electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node, type-II Weyl semimetal is a newly proposed topological state distinct from its type-I cousin. We numerically study the localization effect for tilted type-I as well as type-II Weyl semimetals and give the global phase diagram. For disordered type-I Weyl semimetal, an intermediate three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall phase is confirmed between Weyl semimetal phase and diffusive metal phase. However, this intermediate phase is absent for disordered type-II Weyl semimetal. Besides, along the direction of tilt, comparing to its type-I cousin, type-II Weyl semimetal typically possesses longer normalized localization length and therefore it is more robust against disorder. Near the phase boundary between the type-I and the type-II Weyl semimetals, infinitesimal disorder will induce an insulating phase so that, in this region, the concept of Weyl semimetal is meaningless for real materials.

  5. Electrically and spatially controllable PDLC phase gratings for diffraction and modulation of laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B.; Marinov, Yordan G.; Petrov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-25

    We present a study on electrically- and spatially-controllable laser beam diffraction, electrooptic (EO) phase modulation, as well as amplitude-frequency EO modulation by single-layer microscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) phase gratings (PDLC SLPGs) of interest for device applications. PDLC SLPGs were produced from nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 in photo-curable NOA65 polymer. The wedge-formed PDLC SLPGs have a continuously variable thickness (2–25 µm). They contain LC droplets of diameters twice as the layer thickness, with a linear-gradient size distribution along the wedge. By applying alternating-current (AC) electric field, the PDLC SLPGs produce efficient: (i) diffraction splitting of transmitted laser beams; (ii) spatial redistribution of diffracted light intensity; (iii) optical phase modulation; (iv) amplitude-frequency modulation, all controllable by the driven AC field and the droplet size gradient.

  6. 10-Mbps electro-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Chen, Chien-Chung; Hemmati, Hamid

    1993-01-01

    A resonant cavity electro-optic phase modulator has been designed and implemented to operate at a data rate of 10 Mbps. The modulator consists of an electro-optic crystal located in a highly resonant cavity. The cavity is electro-optically switched on and off resonance, and the phase dispersion near the cavity resonance provides the output phase modulation. The performance of the modulator was measured by first heterodyne-detecting the signal to an intermediate frequency and then measuring the spectral characteristics using an rf spectrum analyzer. The measured phase shift is shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Further theoretical analysis shows that the design of the modulator can be scaled to operate at 100 Mbps.

  7. A Novel Bayesian Seamless Phase I/II Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuoren; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel bayesian phase I/II design featuring using a hybrid mTPI method in phase I for targeting the MTD level and a randomization allocation schema for adaptively assigning patients to desirable doses in phase II. The mechanism of simultaneously escalating dose in phase I and expanding promising doses to phase II is inherited from a design proposed in literature. Extensive simulation studies indicate that our proposed design can vastly save sample size and efficiently assign more patients to optimal dose when compared to two competing designs. PMID:24023809

  8. 78 FR 30951 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice for Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I to Phase II Transition...

  9. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  10. Highly birefringent crystal for Raman transitions with phase modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Nieves; Abediyeh, Vahide; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Jeronimo-Moreno, Yasser; Gomez, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We present a system to excite Raman transitions with minimum phase noise. The system uses a phase modulator to generate the phase locked beams required for the transition. We use a long calcite crystal to filter out one of the sidebands, avoiding the cancellation that appears at high detunings for phase modulation. The measured phase noise is limited by the quality of the microwave synthesizer. We use the calcite crystal a second time to produce a co-propagating Raman pair with perpendicular polarizations to drive velocity insensitive Raman transitions. Support from CONACYT and Fundacion Marcos Moshinsky.

  11. Phosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase II by casein kinase II: modulation of eukaryotic topoisomerase II activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, P; Glover, C V; Osheroff, N

    1985-01-01

    The phosphorylation of Drosophila melanogaster DNA topoisomerase II by purified casein kinase II was characterized in vitro. Under the conditions used, the kinase incorporated a maximum of 2-3 molecules of phosphate per homodimer of topoisomerase II. No autophosphorylation of the topoisomerase was observed. The only amino acid residue modified by casein kinase II was serine. Apparent Km and Vmax values for the phosphorylation reaction were 0.4 microM topoisomerase II and 3.3 mumol of phosphate incorporated per min per mg of kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation stimulated the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase II by 3-fold over that of the dephosphorylated enzyme, and the effects of modification could be reversed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that post-translational enzymatic modifications can be used to modulate the interaction between topoisomerase II and DNA. Images PMID:2987912

  12. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  13. Experimental verification of electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Matheisen, Christopher; Lena Giesecke, Anna; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has been considered as a promising material for opto-electronic devices, because of its tunable and wideband optical properties. In this work, we demonstrate electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene at wavelengths from 1530 to 1570 nm. By integrating a gated graphene layer in a silicon-waveguide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the key parameters of a phase modulator like change in effective refractive index, insertion loss and absorption change are extracted. These experimentally obtained values are well reproduced by simulations and design guidelines are provided to make graphene devices competitive to contemporary silicon based phase modulators for on-chip applications. PMID:26061415

  14. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  15. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  16. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  17. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  18. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  19. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  20. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved repowering...

  1. Final Report on Phase II; Study of Academic Library Consortia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadra, Carlos A.; And Others

    Phase II involves a case-study analysis of 15 selected consortia to help determine the usefulness and effectiveness of academic library consortia. The two major products resulting from the project are the "Directory of Academic Library Consortia" and the "Guidelines for the Development of Academic Library Consortia." The Phase II report presents…

  2. Characterization of a Multilayered Dielectric Transmissive Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Fork, Richard L.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe a multilayered dielectric stack configuration designed specifically for use as a transmissive phase modulator for broadband optical signals. Applications for this device range from full aperture wavefront correction to nonmechanical beam steering arrays for free space optical communication links. Our implementation employs alternating GaAs and AlAs layers of varying thickness on a GaAs substrate to create a bandpass region of high average transmission centered about the one micrometer wavelength. Within this transmission bandpass, the phase component of the complex transmission coefficient varies in a near-linear fashion with respect to wavelength. The transmission bandpass is designed to have a bandwidth of 21.0 nm (or 6.3THz frequency bandwidth) and to have an edge-to-edge phase change of greater than 47T radians. Modification of the stack materials' optical properties causes the transmission profile to shift spectrally, resulting in a phase modulation for bands of transmitted frequencies. Our broadband phase modulator imparts up to a full-cycle of phase modulation with low loss and low group velocity dispersion. We identify several methods for implementing the requisite modulation, including refractive index modulation through free carrier injection and optical path length modulation through variation in angle of incidence. At least one sample comprising 91 alternating layers has been fabricated to exhibit the bandpass properties required for optical signal phase modulation. We experimentally characterize the sample using an interferometer and spectrometer to measure the transmitted signal spectrum and relative phase modulation. We compare the experimental data to computational predictions and discuss the results.

  3. Noise radar using random phase and frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse compression radar is used in a great number of radar applications. Excellent range resolution and high ECCM performance can be achieved by wide-band modulated long pulses, which spread out the transmitted energy in frequency and time. By using random noise as waveform, the range ambiguity can be suppressed as well. The same limit in doppler resolution is achieved as for a coherent doppler radar when the time compression of the reference is tuned to that of the target. Mostly, the random signal is transmitted directly from a noise generating HF-source. A sine wave, which is phase or frequency modulated by random noise, is an alternative giving similar performance but higher transmitted mean power when peak-limited transmitters are applied. A narrower modulation noise bandwidth can also be applied to generate the same output bandwidth. For phase modulation, the bandwidth amplifying factor is simply the rms value of the phase modulation, and for a frequency modulating waveform the output rms bandwidth equals the rms value of the frequency modulation. The results also show that the range sidelobes can be highly suppressed compared with the sidelobes of the modulating signal. The mean and variance of the correlation integral are derived in terms of the autocorrelation function of the modulation. Finally, random bi-phase modulation and the effects of low-bit ADC at the correlation processing are analyzed and described. The advantages of low range sidelobes and enhanced range resolution make frequency and phase modulation attractive for a great number of applications.

  4. Dynamic displacement measurement based on triangle phase modulation without preliminary measurement of half-wave voltage for phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Kimura, Ryosuke; Ito, Takamasa; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an improved method for our recently proposed dynamic displacement measurement based on triangle phase modulation. The use of deep phase modulation eliminates the need for preliminary measurement of half-wave voltage V π for the phase modulator. We demonstrate displacement measurement with tens-of-nanometer scale taking place within a few micro seconds, where the temporal resolution is 33 ns. A long-term stability is also realized by employing a simple feedback control for the interferometer. The measurement precision is proved to be as high as that in the previously developed system that required careful preliminary measurement of V π .

  5. All-optical phase modulation for integrated interferometric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dante, Stefania; Duval, Daphné; Sepúlveda, Borja; González-Guerrero, Ana Belen; Sendra, José Ramón; Lechuga, Laura M

    2012-03-26

    We present the theoretical and the experimental implementation of an all-optical phase modulation system in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers to solve the drawbacks related to the periodic nature of the interferometric signal. Sensor phase is tuned by modulating the emission wavelength of low-cost commercial laser diodes by changing their output power. FFT deconvolution of the signal allows for direct phase readout, immune to sensitivity variations and to light intensity fluctuations. This simple phase modulation scheme increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements in one order of magnitude, rendering in a sensor with a detection limit of 1.9·10⁻⁷ RIU. The viability of the all-optical modulation approach is demonstrated with an immunoassay detection as a biosensing proof of concept.

  6. Uncovering introductory astronomy students' conceptual modules of lunar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, Rebecca; Traxler, Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Brewe, Bruun and Bearden developed Module Analysis of Multiple Choice Responses (MAMCR) methodology for using network analysis to uncover the underlying conceptual modules of student performance on multiple-choice assessments. The Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (LPCI) assesses students understanding of lunar phases across 8 separate dimensions of understanding based on the results of a detailed qualitative phenomenology of college students' understanding of lunar phases. Unlike many concept inventories, the LPCI has multiple items for each dimension of understanding and each response corresponds to either the scientifically correct answer or to an alternative idea uncovered from the qualitative investigation. In this study, we have combined MAMCR with the database of nearly 2000 LPCI pre-test results. We will report on the preliminary different conceptual modules of lunar phases and the relationship of these modules to previous qualitative research.

  7. Rethinking Phase II Clinical Trial Design in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Kory J.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and economic burden of heart failure continue to rise worldwide, despite implementation of a number of effective heart failure therapies. Although there have been a number phase I–II studies of potential novel heart failure therapies over the past decade, none of these new compounds have been successful in phase III clinical trials. While there are likely a number of reasons for this failure, one of the problems that has become increasingly apparent is the inability of phase II trials to correctly identify novel therapies that will be successful in phase III clinical trials. In the following review, we will discuss the some of the problems inherent with current phase II heart failure clinical trials, as well as discuss possible ways to rethink phase II development of new therapies for heart failure. PMID:25343020

  8. Influence of driving voltage of liquid crystal on modulation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongyang; Du, Shengping

    2017-09-01

    Based on the elastic theory and the dynamics equation of liquid crystal, we use Finite-Difference iterative method to calculate the liquid crystal molecules director distributions under the effect of electric field. According to the director distributions, this paper gets the relationship between LCD modulation phase and the driving voltage. The results of simulation proves that with driving voltage varying from 0 to 5v and the crystal modulation phase varies from 0 to 4π.

  9. Modulated magnetic phases in rare earth metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, T. )

    1994-04-08

    Neutron scattering has played a key role in the microscopic understanding of the static and dynamic properties of magnetic materials. Modulated magnetic structures first discovered in the late fifties can no longer be referred to as exotic; more than a hundred such phases have already been found in a variety of magnetic systems. Neutron and x-ray magnetic scattering have played a complementary role in the recent discovery and understanding of the modulated magnetic phases in rare earth metallic systems.

  10. Parametric resonances and stochastic layer induced by a phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1995-12-31

    The Hamiltonian system with phase modulation in a higher harmonic rf cavity is experimentally studied on the IUCF cooler ring. The Poincare maps in the resonant rotating frame are obtained from experimental data and compared with numerical tracking. The formation of the stochastic layer due to the overlap of parametric resonances is discussed. The dependence of the stochastic layer on the voltage of the higher harmonic rf cavity, amplitude and frequency of the phase modulation is studied.

  11. Method to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunlong; Nie, Jinsong; Shao, Li

    2016-11-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is widely used in many aspects of optical studies. The working principles and applications of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method, which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid spatial light modulator, had some obvious disadvantages in practice. To avoid these issues, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved. Also, a new method to process interference fringes and measure the shift distances and cycles automatically by computers was proposed. The phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by the Meadowlark Company were measured to verify the validity of the newly proposed method. In addition, in order to compensate and correct the nonlinear characteristics of the phase modulation curve, three universal inverse interpolation methods were utilized. The root mean squared error and residual sum of squares between the calibrated phase modulation curve and the ideal phase modulation curve were reduced obviously by taking advantage of the inverse interpolation methods. Subsequently, the method of shape-preserving subsection cubic interpolation had acquired the best performance with high computation efficiency. Experiments have been performed to verify the validity of the interpolation method. The experimental results showed that the phase modulation characteristics of LC-LSM could be acquired and calibrated automatically with convenience and high efficiency by utilizing the newly proposed processing method.

  12. Study on the Phase Modulation Characteristics of Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wu, L. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2006-10-01

    A special Twyman-Green interferometer is designed to measure the phase modulation characteristics of liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), namely, the relationship between phase shift and gray value (applied voltage). By measuring a reflective LC-SLM produced by BNS (Boulder Nonlinear Systems), it is indicated that the LC-SLM has linear phase response within a gray value range between 60 and 200, and the RMS deviation between the average phase and the spatially resolved phase measurements increases with the gray value but is always less than λ/10.

  13. Sinusoidal phase modulating interferometry system for 3D profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Bo; Fa-jie, Duan; Chang-rong, Lv; Fu-kai, Zhang; Fan, Feng

    2014-07-01

    We describe a fiber-optic sinusoidal phase modulating (SPM) interferometer for three-dimensional (3D) profilometry, which is insensitive to external disturbances such as mechanical vibration and temperature fluctuation. Sinusoidal phase modulation is created by modulating the drive voltage of the piezoelectric transducer (PZT) with a sinusoidal wave. The external disturbances that cause phase drift in the interference signal and decrease measuring accuracy are effectively eliminated by building a closed-loop feedback system. The phase stability can be measured with a precision of 2.75 mrad, and the external disturbances can be reduced to 53.43 mrad for the phase of fringe patterns. By measuring the dynamic deformation of the rubber membrane, the RMSE is about 0.018 mm, and a single measurement takes less than 250 ms. The feasibility for real-time application has been verified.

  14. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  15. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography with adaptive function using phase-mode spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2012-05-10

    Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a phase-mode spatial light modulator (SLM) is proposed. The phase-mode SLM implements spatial distribution of phase retardation required in the parallel phase-shifting digital holography. This SLM can also compensate dynamically the phase distortion caused by optical elements such as beam splitters, lenses, and air fluctuation. Experimental demonstration using a static object is presented.

  16. Calcitonin, angiotensin II and FPP significantly modulate mouse sperm function.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L R; Pondel, M D; Vinson, G P

    2001-03-01

    Fertilization-promoting peptide (FPP) regulates the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP pathway to elicit capacitation-dependent responses, stimulating capacitation in uncapacitated spermatozoa and then arresting it in capacitated cells, thereby inhibiting spontaneous acrosome reactions. Like FPP, calcitonin and angiotensin II are found in seminal plasma and so might affect sperm function; this study investigated responses in uncapacitated and capacitated mouse spermatozoa to these three peptides. Both calcitonin (5 ng/ml) and angiotensin II (1 and 10nmol/l), like FPP (100nmol/l), significantly stimulated capacitation, assessed using chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence and fertilization in vitro analyses. Combinations of two or three peptides, at high and low, non-stimulatory concentrations, were more stimulatory than the individual peptides, suggesting that they may act on the same signalling pathway, plausibly AC/cAMP; preliminary data indicate that calcitonin does stimulate cAMP production. In capacitated cells, FPP and calcitonin elicited pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of spontaneous acrosome loss, suggesting involvement of inhibitory G proteins; angiotensin II had no detectable effect. When all three peptides were used, angiotensin II did not interfere with inhibitory responses to FPP/calcitonin. These results suggest that angiotensin II, calcitonin and FPP may somehow modulate the AC/cAMP signal transduction pathway, but the precise mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated.

  17. Considerations of digital phase modulation for narrowband satellite mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grythe, Knut

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat-M system for mobile satellite communication is specified as a frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system, applying Offset Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) for transmitting 8 kbit/sec in 10 kHz user channel bandwidth. We consider Digital Phase Modulation (DPM) as an alternative modulation format for INMARSAT-M. DPM is similar to Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) except that DPM has a finite memory in the premodular filter with a continuous varying modulation index. It is shown that DPM with 64 states in the VA obtains a lower bit error rate (BER). Results for a 5 kHz system, with the same 8 kbit/sec transmitted bitstream, is also presented.

  18. Phase modulation in polarization beating quasi-phase-matching of high-order-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diskin, Tzvi; Kfir, Ofer; Fleischer, Avner; Cohen, Oren

    2015-09-01

    Polarization beating quasi-phase-matching (PB QPM) in high-harmonic generation (HHG) is currently understood as a purely-intensity-modulation quasi-phase-matching (QPM) technique. In PB QPM, the driver ellipticity oscillates during propagation, modulating the HHG conversion efficiency since the single-atom HHG yield decreases rapidly with increasing ellipticity of the driving laser. We show that PB QPM is in fact based on both intensity and phase modulations. Unfortunately, in PB QPM the intensity and phase contributions oppose each other, resulting in significant reduction in the QPM efficiency.

  19. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in this issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.

  20. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in thismore » issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.« less

  1. Continuous-wave phase-matched molecular optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Tsuchiya, Takao; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-02-18

    In optical modulation, the highest available modulation rate is basically limited to the GHz frequency range at best. This is because optical modulation is often performed using electro-optic or acousto-optic effects that require application of an external signal to solid-state nonlinear optical materials. Here we describe optical modulation of continuous-wave radiation at frequencies exceeding 10 THz based on ultrafast variation of molecule polarizability arising from coherent molecular motion. The optical modulation efficiency is extensively enhanced by fulfilling phase-matching conditions with the help of dispersion control of the optical cavity, generating sidebands with a highest ratio of 7.3 × 10(-3). These results will pave the way for development of versatile optical modulation-based techniques in a wide range of research fields in optical sciences, such as mode-locked lasers operating in the THz range.

  2. Continuous-wave phase-matched molecular optical modulator

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Tsuchiya, Takao; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-01-01

    In optical modulation, the highest available modulation rate is basically limited to the GHz frequency range at best. This is because optical modulation is often performed using electro-optic or acousto-optic effects that require application of an external signal to solid-state nonlinear optical materials. Here we describe optical modulation of continuous-wave radiation at frequencies exceeding 10 THz based on ultrafast variation of molecule polarizability arising from coherent molecular motion. The optical modulation efficiency is extensively enhanced by fulfilling phase-matching conditions with the help of dispersion control of the optical cavity, generating sidebands with a highest ratio of 7.3 × 10−3. These results will pave the way for development of versatile optical modulation-based techniques in a wide range of research fields in optical sciences, such as mode-locked lasers operating in the THz range. PMID:26887500

  3. Full electroresistance modulation in a mixed-phase metallic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiqi; Li, L.; Gai, Zheng; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, Anthony T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Ward, Thomas Zac; Lee, Ho Nyung; Sefat, Athena Safa; Christen, Hans M.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2016-03-03

    We report a giant, ~22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Furthermore, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein.

  4. L-band quadriphase phase shift keyed modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoho, R. K.; Arain, M. H.

    1982-09-01

    The design of a phase shift keyed modulator, which is a part of an L-band transmitter developed for the space related portion of a detection and digital communication network, is discussed. The important aspect of the design is that, unlike a conventional 2-bit phase shifter, this device utilizes 180-degree bit phase shifters which are identical and achieve a 90-degree offset between them by virtue of the inherent 90-degree phase difference of the backward wave coupler. In this case, the backward wave coupler is realized as a Lange, interdigital microstrip device. An inherent 3 dB power loss with this configuration is of no consequence since amplitude leveling by an AGC circuit preceding the phase shift keyed modulator is used and is an acceptable tradeoff for phase stability purposes.

  5. Full electroresistance modulation in a mixed-phase metallic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zhiqi; Li, L.; Gai, Zheng; ...

    2016-03-03

    We report a giant, ~22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Furthermore, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systemsmore » with phase instability therein.« less

  6. A New OEO Design Using Optical Phase Modulation and Modulation Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Yu, Nan

    2006-01-01

    We present the design for a phase-modulated Opto-Electronic Oscillator (OEO) that incorporates asymmetric Mach- Zehnder (AMZ) interferometers as phase demodulators together with PM modulation suppression. The new design promises to obtain in the electro-optical domain the low-noise advantages previously achieved in RF and microwave oscillators by the use of carrier suppression but which have been achieved only to a limited extent in OEO's.

  7. Cylindrical PVF2 film based fiber optic phase modulator - Phase shift nonlinearity and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshanam, V. S.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-03-01

    A new cylindrical coil configuration for polyvinylidene flouride (PVF2) film based fiber optic phase modulator is studied for the frequency response and nonlinearity of phase shift at the resonance frequency. This configuration, hitherto unapproached for PVF2 film modulators, offers resonance at well defined, controllable and higher frequencies than possible for the flat-strip configuration. Two versions of this configuration are presented that differ strongly in both the resonance frequency and the phase shift nonlinearity coefficient.

  8. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  9. Planning Targets for Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On August 1, 2011, EPA provided planning targets for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment for the Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This page provides the letters containing those planning targets.

  10. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  11. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  12. Zero-static-power phase-change optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohsen; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2016-03-15

    This Letter presents an innovative design of an electro-optical modulator using germanium telluride (GeTe) phase change material with an integrated nano-heater. The refractive index and the electrical conductivity of GeTe significantly change as the GeTe goes though the crystallographic phase change. Amorphization and crystallization of GeTe is achieved using the Joule heating method by passing current through an array of metal gratings, where GeTe fills the slits between the metal lines. These metal slits also increase the contrast between the amorphous (on) and crystalline (off) phases of the modulator by having extraordinary transmission and reflection response based on interactions of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with the incoming light. The modulator is designed for 1550 nm wavelength, where GeTe is transparent in the amorphous phase and provides high optical on/off contrast. The metal-insulator-metal (MIM) is designed in such a way to only support SPP excitation when GeTe is crystalline and slit resonance when it is amorphous to increase the modulation index. The modulator is stable in both phases with higher than 12 dB change in transmission with zero static power consumption at room temperature.

  13. Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    electrostatic paint spray enclosures, such as the high volume, low pressure ( HVLP ) systems employed at Barstow MCLB, a minimum linear velocity of 100 fpm must be...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) D. Proffitt, R.K. Clayton, & J...ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 * , 85-1996 Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II David Proffitt and Russell K. Clayton

  14. DNA Topoisomerase II Modulates Insulator Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Edward; Torre, Eduardo A.; Bushey, Ashley M.; Gurudatta, B. V.; Corces, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Insulators are DNA sequences thought to be important for the establishment and maintenance of cell-type specific nuclear architecture. In Drosophila there are several classes of insulators that appear to have unique roles in gene expression. The mechanisms involved in determining and regulating the specific roles of these insulator classes are not understood. Here we report that DNA Topoisomerase II modulates the activity of the Su(Hw) insulator. Downregulation of Topo II by RNAi or mutations in the Top2 gene result in disruption of Su(Hw) insulator function. This effect is mediated by the Mod(mdg4)2.2 protein, which is a unique component of the Su(Hw) insulator complex. Co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments show that Topo II and Mod(mdg4)2.2 proteins directly interact. In addition, mutations in Top2 cause a slight decrease of Mod(mdg4)2.2 transcript but have a dramatic effect on Mod(mdg4)2.2 protein levels. In the presence of proteasome inhibitors, normal levels of Mod(mdg4)2.2 protein and its binding to polytene chromosomes are restored. Thus, Topo II is required to prevent Mod(mdg4)2.2 degradation and, consequently, to stabilize Su(Hw) insulator-mediated chromatin organization. PMID:21304601

  15. Inhomogeneous phase-visibility modulating interferometry by space on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Ortega, Uriel; Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Rodriguez-Zurita, Gustavo

    2013-07-29

    A new method in interferometry based on on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation for object phase retrieval is presented. Although the technique introduces inhomogeneous visibility and phase variations in the interferogram, it is shown that the phase retrieval of a given object is still possible. This method is implemented by using three beams and two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series. One of the arms of the system is used as a probe beam and the other two are used as reference beams, yielding from their sum the conventional reference beam of a two-beam interferometer. We demonstrate that, if there is a phase difference within the range of (0,π) between these two beams, the effect of modulation in both amplitude and phase is generated for the case of on-off non-quadrature amplitude modulation. An analytical discussion is provided to sustain this method. Numerical and experimental results are also shown.

  16. Weak interactions modulating the dimensionality in supramolecular architectures in three new nickel(II)-hydrazone complexes, magnetostructural correlation, and catalytic potential for epoxidation of alkenes under phase transfer conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Dipali; Ray, Aurkie; Pilet, Guillaume; Rizzoli, Corrado; Rosair, Georgina M; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Signorella, Sandra; Bellú, Sebastián; Mitra, Samiran

    2011-09-05

    Three different ONO donor acetyl hydrazone Schiff bases have been synthesized from the condensation of acetic hydrazide with three different carbonyl compounds: salicylaldehyde (HL(1)), 2-hydroxyacetophenone (HL(2)), and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (HL(3)). These tridentate ligands are reacted with Ni(OOCCF(3))(2)·xH(2)O to yield three new Ni(II) complexes having distorted octahedral geometry at each Ni center: [Ni(L(1))(OOCCF(3))(CH(3)OH)](2) (1), [Ni(L(2))(OOCCF(3))(H(2)O)](2) (2), and [Ni(L(3))(L(3)H)](OOCCF(3))(H(2)O)(1.65)(CH(3)OH)(0.35) (3). The ligands and the complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis and IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, and the structures of the complexes have been established by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. 1 and 2 are centrosymmetric dinuclear complexes and are structural isomers whereas 3 is a bis chelated cationic monomer coordinated by one neutral and one monoanionic ligand. O-H···O hydrogen bonds in 3 lead to the formation of a dimer. Slight steric and electronic modifications in the ligand backbone provoke differences in the supramolecular architectures of the complexes, leading to a variety of one, two, and three-dimensional hydrogen bonded networks in complexes 1-3 respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that moderate antiferromagnetic interactions operate between phenoxo bridged Ni(II) dimers in 1 and 2 whereas very weak antiferromagnetic exchange occurs through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions in 3. All complexes are proved to be efficient catalysts for the epoxidation of alkenes by NaOCl under phase transfer condition. The efficiency of alkene epoxidation is dramatically enhanced by lowering the pH, and the reactions are supposed to involve high valent Ni(III)-OCl or Ni(III)-O· intermediates. 3 is the best epoxidation catalyst among the three complexes with 99% conversion and very high turnover number (TON, 396).

  17. Digital phase conjugate mirror by parallel arrangement of two phase-only spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Goto, Yuta; Honma, Satoshi; Tomita, Akihisa

    2014-05-19

    In a conventional digital phase conjugation system, only the phase of an input light is time-reversed. This deteriorates phase conjugation fidelity and restricts application fields to specific cases only when the input light has uniformly-distributed scattered wavefront. To overcome these difficulties, we present a digital phase conjugate mirror based on parallel alignment of two phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs), in which both amplitude and phase of the input light can be time-reversed. Experimental result showed that, in the phase conjugation through a holographic diffuser with diffusion angle of 0.5 degree, background noises decrease to 65% by our digital phase conjugation mirror.

  18. Military Family Coping Project - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    anxiety. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Soldier, Intimate Significant Other, Parents, Deployment, Stress, Depression, Anxiety, Life Satisfaction, Addiction , Trauma...Anxiety, Life Satisfaction, Addiction , Trauma 4 The Military Family Coping Project reflects two phases. The first consisted of a series of focus

  19. Liquid crystal spatial light modulator with very large phase modulation operating in high harmonic orders.

    PubMed

    Calero, Venancio; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Albero, Jorge; Sánchez-López, María M; Moreno, Ignacio

    2013-11-15

    Unusually large phase modulation in a commercial liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) is reported. Such a situation is obtained by illuminating with visible light a device designed to operate in the infrared range. The phase modulation range reaches 6π radians in the red region of the visible spectrum and 10π radians in the blue region. Excellent diffraction efficiency in high harmonic orders is demonstrated despite a concomitant and non-negligible Fabry-Perot interference effect. This type of SLM opens the possibility to implement diffractive elements with reduced chromatic dispersion or chromatic control.

  20. Multi-phase modulation for nematic liquid crystal on silicon backplane spatial light modulators using pulse-width modulation driving scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongmin; Gourlay, James; Hossack, William J.; Underwood, Ian; Walton, Anthony J.

    2004-06-01

    In phase modulating diffractive optical devices multi-phase modulation provides improved performance over binary modulation. Multi-phase modulation can be achieved by using nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulators (NLCSLM) with pulse-width modulation driven from a binary CMOS backplane. This paper presents the characteristics and the driving scheme of the 512 × 512 Si-backplane SLM for the implementation of the multi-phase modulation while comparing the binary and four-level phase holograms. Diffraction efficiency of 39.7% for binary grating and 72.9% for four-level blazed grating were obtained at the spatial frequency 1.56 lines/mm.

  1. Modular microfluidic system for emulation of human phase I/phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kampe, Thomas; König, Anna; Schroeder, Hendrik; Hengstler, Jan G; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-03-18

    We present a microfluidic device for coupled phase I/phase II metabolic reactions in vitro. The chip consists of microchannels, which are used as packed bed reactor compartments, filled with superparamagnetic microparticles bearing recombinant microsomal phase I cytochrome P450 or phase II conjugating enzymes (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase). Online coupling of the microfluidic device with LC/MS enabled the quantitative assessment of coupled phase I/phase II transformations, as demonstrated for two different substrates, 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) and dextromethorphan (DEX). In contrast, conventional sequential one-pot incubations did not generate measurable amounts of phase II metabolites. Because the microfluidic device is readily assembled from standard parts and can be equipped with a variety of recombinant enzymes, it provides a modular platform to emulate and investigate hepatic metabolism processes, with particular potential for targeted small-scale synthesis and identification of metabolites formed by sequential action of specific enzymes.

  2. VXI based multibunch detector and QPSK modulator for the PEP-II/ALS/DA{Phi}NE longitudinal feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1997-04-01

    The PEP-II/ALS/DA{Phi}NE feedback systems are complex systems implemented using analog, digital and microwave circuits. The VXI hardware implementation for the Front-end and Back-end analog processing modules is presented. The Front-end module produces a baseband beam phase signal from pickups using a microwave tone burst generator. The Back-end VXI module generates an AM/QPSK modulated signal from a baseband correction signal computed in a digital signal processor. These components are implemented in VXI packages that allow a wide spectrum of system functions including a 120 MHz bandwidth rms detector, reference phase servo, woofer link to the RF control system, standard VXI status/control, and user defined registers. The details of the design and implementation of the VXI modules including performance characteristics are presented.

  3. Arbitrarily modulated beam for phase-only optical encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2014-10-01

    Optical encryption has attracted more and more attention recently due to its remarkable advantages, such as parallel processing and multiple-dimensional characteristics. In this paper, we propose to apply an arbitrarily modulated beam for phase-only optical encryption. In optical security systems, the plane wave is commonly used for the illumination, and unauthorized receivers may easily obtain or estimate the information related to the illumination beam. The proposed strategy with an arbitrarily modulated illumination beam can effectively enhance system security, since a beam modulation pattern (such as a pinhole-array pattern or a random phase-only pattern) can be considered an additional security key. The phase-only optical encryption is taken as an example for illustrating the validity of the proposed method; however it could be straightforward to apply the proposed strategy to other optical security systems.

  4. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using continuous polarization modulation with arbitrary phase modulation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  5. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  6. Interferometric modulator with phase-modulating and cavity-modulating components (IMPACC) for high linearity microwave applications: technology review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, N.; Dingel, B.; Prescod, A.

    2013-06-01

    In this invited paper, we review the theoretical model and performance of an Interferometric Modulator with Phase modulating And Cavity-modulating Components (IMPACC). IMPACC has the highest reported SFDR (e.g., 132 dB-Hz) and offers additional advantages compared to other Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) based electro-optic modulators (e.g., MZI, ring-assisted MZI or RAMZI). The modulator is based on a unique combination of a RF driven phase-modulator (PM) and a ring resonator (RR) within a MZI interferometer. Both the PM and RR in the IMPACC are simultaneously driven by a RF signal of the same frequency, but not necessarily the same amplitude and phase. Here, we summarize the non-ideal and oftentimes detrimental effects such as: (1) RF bandwidth limitation due to free spectral range (FSR) of the RR, (2) RR waveguide loss, (3) deviation of RR coupling ratio from the ideal value, and (4) unbalanced MZ splitter/coupler on the performance of both IMPACC and RAMZI. We show that proper choice of RF power split ratio and RF phase for IMPACC compensate these negative effects and recover IMPACC's ideal performance. Unlike RAMZI, this translates to higher device tolerance, added manufacturing flexibility, and superior modulator performance.

  7. Enabling Technologies for Direct Detection Optical Phase Modulation Formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xian

    Phase modulation formats are believed to be one of the key enabling techniques for next generation high speed long haul fiber-optic communication systems due to the following main advantages: (1) with a balanced detection, a better receiver sensitivity over conventional intensity modulation formats, e.g., a ˜3-dB sensitivity improvement using differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and a ˜1.3-dB sensitivity improvement using differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK); (2) excellent robustness against fiber nonlinearities; (3) high spectrum efficiency when using multilevel phase modulation formats, such as DQPSK. As the information is encoded in the phase of the optical field, the phase modulation formats are sensitive to the phase-related impairments and the deterioration induced in the phase-intensity conversion. This consequently creates new challenging issues. The research objective of this thesis is to depict some of the challenging issues and provide possible solutions. The first challenge is the cross-phase modulation (XPM) penalty for the phase modulated channels co-propagating with the intensity modulated channels. The penalty comes from the pattern dependent intensity fluctuations of the neighboring intensity modulated channels being converted into phase noise in the phase modulation channels. We propose a model to theoretically analyze the XPM penalty dependence on the walk off effect. From this model, we suggest that using fibers with large local dispersion or intentionally introducing some residual dispersion per span would help mitigate the XPM penalty. The second challenge is the polarization dependent frequency shift (PDf) induced penalty during the phase-intensity conversion. The direct detection DPSK is usually demodulated in a Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer (DI). The polarization dependence of DI introduces a PDf causing a frequency offset between the laser's frequency and the transmissivity peak of DI, degrading the demodulated DPSK

  8. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  9. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Lianqing E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang; Li, Guangyong E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  10. The study on measurement methods of phase modulation characteristics for universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun-long; Nie, Jin-song; Shao, Li; Sun, Xiao-quan

    2016-10-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) was widely used in many aspects of optical study. The working principles and application of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of universal liquid spatial light modulator had some obvious disadvantages in the practical use, such as high environmental requirement and difficult interference fringes acquisition. The disadvantages of traditional Twyman-Green interference method gained the difficulty of carrying out corresponding optical measurement experiments. To avoid this, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved in the paper. The experimental light path was designed anew. Distinct and stable interference fringes could be acquired by controlling the optical path difference (OPD) dynamically. To verify the validity of the newly proposed measurement method, the phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by Meadowlark Company were measured by utilizing the improved Twyman-Green interference method at the wavelength of 632.8 nm which was beyond the working wavelengths of the LC-SLM. A series of gray images covering the gray degree from 1 to 256 which were generated by computer were used in the experiment. An extra lens was added in front of a reflector in the optical path to control the OPD dynamically. 256 interference images were acquired after loading the gray image into the LC-SLM in order. After that, the acquired interference images should be pre-processed by several digital image processing methods for easier measurement later. Specifically, the method of gray filtering and morphological processing were adopted to make the interference fringes clearer and thinner in the corresponding processing. Then, the phase modulation curve of the LC-SLM was acquired through numerical computation of the cycles of the interference fringes. In general, the phase

  11. Mechanical modulation method for ultrasensitive phase measurements in photonics biosensing.

    PubMed

    Patskovsky, S; Maisonneuve, M; Meunier, M; Kabashin, A V

    2008-12-22

    A novel polarimetry methodology for phase-sensitive measurements in single reflection geometry is proposed for applications in optical transduction-based biological sensing. The methodology uses altering step-like chopper-based mechanical phase modulation for orthogonal s- and p- polarizations of light reflected from the sensing interface and the extraction of phase information at different harmonics of the modulation. We show that even under a relatively simple experimental arrangement, the methodology provides the resolution of phase measurements as low as 0.007 deg. We also examine the proposed approach using Total Internal Reflection (TIR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) geometries. For TIR geometry, the response appears to be strongly dependent on the prism material with the best values for high refractive index Si. The detection limit for Si-based TIR is estimated as 10(-5) in terms Refractive Index Units (RIU) change. SPR geometry offers much stronger phase response due to a much sharper phase characteristics. With the detection limit of 3.2*10(-7) RIU, the proposed methodology provides one of best sensitivities for phase-sensitive SPR devices. Advantages of the proposed method include high sensitivity, simplicity of experimental setup and noise immunity as a result of a high stability modulation.

  12. Measurement and control of residual amplitude modulation in optical phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liufeng; Liu, Fang; Wang, Chun; Chen, Lisheng

    2012-04-01

    Residual amplitude modulation is one of the major sources of instability in ultra-sensitive optical detections based on frequency modulation. Using a MgO·LiNbO(3) electro-optic crystal, we systematically measure the temperature and polarization dependence of residual amplitude modulation and our experimental results are in good agreement with a previous theoretical analysis. After optical phase modulation, two independent arms including optical detection and frequency demodulation are employed to closely examine the instability of the residual amplitude modulation. Residual amplitude modulation below 25 ppm is obtained with an active cancellation scheme in which the crystal temperature is varied so as to zero the baseline drifts with different origins. Possible improvements for better suppression and stability are discussed. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  13. Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative, Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Johnson, Ryan; Kornreich, Toby; Klym, Mark; Leland, Karen

    In 1996, drawing from religious, educational, social services, media, neighborhoods, nonprofits, and health-providing sectors of the community, the Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative (PVPI) was conceived. During Phase One of the initiative, the following seven points regarding prevention and prevention design strategies were assembled: (1)…

  14. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  15. Adaptive optics fundus camera using a liquid crystal phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Naoki; Bessho, Kenichiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Naoyuki; Fujikado, Takashi; Mihashi, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    We have developed an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera to obtain high resolution retinal images of eyes. We use a liquid crystal phase modulator to compensate the aberrations of the eye for better resolution and better contrast in the images. The liquid crystal phase modulator has a wider dynamic range to compensate aberrations than most mechanical deformable mirrors and its linear phase generation makes it easy to follow eye movements. The wavefront aberration was measured in real time with a sampling rate of 10 Hz and the closed loop system was operated at around 2 Hz. We developed software tools to align consecutively obtained images. From our experiments with three eyes, the aberrations of normal eyes were reduced to less than 0.1 μm (RMS) in less than three seconds by the liquid crystal phase modulator. We confirmed that this method was adequate for measuring eyes with large aberrations including keratoconic eyes. Finally, using the liquid crystal phase modulator, high resolution images of retinas could be obtained.

  16. [Prolonged phase II neuromuscular blockade following succinylcholine administration].

    PubMed

    Jurkolow, G; Fuchs-Buder, T; Lemoine, A; Raft, J; Rocq, N; Meistelman, C

    2014-03-01

    Patients who are given a single dose of succinylcholine normally undergo a short-acting depolarizing phase I neuromuscular block but rarely a phase II block. Prolonged neuromuscular blockade occurs after a single dose of succinylcholine in case of genetically determined abnormal plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity. It is mandatory to use monitoring to detect this side effect. We report a case of a patient with abnormal plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity undergoing a six-hour prolonged neuromuscular phase II block, after a single dose of succinylcholine.

  17. Interactive Digital Image Processing Investigation. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    International Business Machines Corporation WORK UNIT NUMBERS La Federal Systems Division 18100 Frederick Pike naltber b _rg Maryland 2Q760 11...Radiance Versus Wavelength X. 6.2-2 Operation of a Scanning Sensor 6-6 6.2-3 Multispectral Scanner Measurements - Channel 1 6-7 6.2-4 Multispectral...contains recommendations for further work based on the results S of the present study. L. Ii tii iU 1- -i - " - • I1 --. LI I J-- - ----- t [ [ Section 2

  18. Type II Bi1 − xWxO1.5 + 1.5x: a (3 + 3)-dimensional commensurate modulation that stabilizes the fast-ion conducting delta phase of bismuth oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wind, Julia; Auckett, Josie E.; Withers, Ray L.; Piltz, Ross O.; Maljuk, Andrey; Ling, Chris D.

    2015-01-01

    The Type II phase in the Bi1 − xWxO1.5 + 1.5x system is shown to have a (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated δ-Bi2O3-related structure, in which the modulation vector ∊ ‘locks in’ to a commensurate value of 1/3. The structure was refined in a 3 × 3 × 3 supercell against single-crystal Laue neutron diffraction data. Ab initio calculations were used to test and optimize the local structure of the oxygen sublattice around a single mixed Bi/W site. The underlying crystal chemistry was shown to be essentially the same as for the recently refined (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated structure of Type II Bi1 − xNbxO1.5 + x (Ling et al., 2013 ▸), based on a transition from fluorite-type to pyrochlore-type via the appearance of W4O18 ‘tetrahedra of octahedra’ and chains of corner-sharing WO6 octahedra along 〈110〉F directions. The full range of occupancies on this mixed Bi/W site give a hypothetical solid-solution range bounded by Bi23W4O46.5 (x = 0.148) and Bi22W5O48 (x = 0.185), consistent with previous reports and with our own synthetic and analytical results. PMID:26634724

  19. Preliminary Studies of a Phase Modulation Technique for Measuring Chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The classical method for measuring chromaticity is to slowly modulate the RF frequency and then measuring the betatron tune excursion. The technique that is discussed in this paper modulates instead the phase of the RF and then the chromaticity is obtained by phase demodulating the betatron tune. However, this technique requires knowledge of the betatron frequency in real time in order for the phase to be demodulated. Fortunately, the Tevatron has a tune tracker based on the phase locked loop principle which fits this requirement. A preliminary study with this technique has showed that it is a promising method for doing continuous chromaticity measurement and raises the possibility of doing successful chromaticity feedback with it.

  20. System design of programmable 4f phase modulation techniques for rapid intensity shaping: a conceptual comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Heber, Jörg; Janschek, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The present study analyses three beam shaping approaches with respect to a light-efficient generation of i) patterns and ii) multiple spots by means of a generic optical 4f-setup. 4f approaches share the property that due to the one-to-one relationship between output intensity and input phase, the need for time-consuming, iterative calculation can be avoided. The resulting low computational complexity offers a particular advantage compared to the widely used holographic principles and makes them potential candidates for real-time applications. The increasing availability of high-speed phase modulators, e.g. on the basis of MEMS, calls for an evaluation of the performances of these concepts. Our second interest is the applicability of 4f methods to high-power applications. We discuss the variants of 4f intensity shaping by phase modulation from a system-level point of view which requires the consideration of application relevant boundary conditions. The discussion includes i) the micro mirror based phase manipulation combined with amplitude masking in the Fourier plane, ii) the Generalized Phase Contrast, and iii) matched phase-only correlation filtering combined with GPC. The conceptual comparison relies on comparative figures of merit for energy efficiency, pattern homogeneity, pattern image quality, maximum output intensity and flexibility with respect to the displayable pattern. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings.

  1. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Postoperative Treatment of High-Risk to Intermediate-Risk Endometrial Cancer: Results of ADA II Phase 1-2 Trial.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Gabriella; Cilla, Savino; Deodato, Francesco; Ianiro, Anna; Legge, Francesco; Marucci, Martina; Cammelli, Silvia; Perrone, Anna Myriam; De Iaco, Pierandrea; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Autorino, Rosa; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    A prospective phase 1-2 clinical trial aimed at determining the recommended postoperative dose of simultaneous integrated boost volumetric modulated arc therapy (SIB-VMAT) in a large series of patients with high-risk and intermediate-risk endometrial cancer (HIR-EC) is presented. The study also evaluated the association between rate and severity of toxicity and comorbidities and the clinical outcomes. Two SIB-VMAT dose levels were investigated for boost to the vaginal vault, whereas the pelvic lymph nodes were always treated with 45 Gy. The first cohort received a SIB-VMAT dose of 55 Gy in 25 consecutive 2.2-Gy fractions, and the subsequent cohort received higher doses (60 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions). Seventy consecutive HIR-EC patients, roughly half of whom were obese (47.1%) or overweight (37.1%), with Charlson Age-Comorbidity Index >2 (48.5%), were enrolled. Thirty-one patients (44.3%) were administered adjuvant chemotherapy before starting radiation therapy. All patients (n=35 per dose level) completed irradiation without any dose-limiting toxicity. Proctitis (any grade) was associated with radiation therapy dose (P=.001); not so enterocolitis. Grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were recorded in 17 (24.3%) and 14 patients (20.0%), respectively, and were not associated with radiation dose. As for late toxicity, none of patients experienced late grade ≥3 GI or grade ≥2 GU toxicity. The 3-year late grade ≥2 GI and GU toxicity-free survival were 92.8% and 100%, respectively, with no difference between the 2 dose levels. With a median follow-up period of 25 months (range, 4-60 months), relapse/progression of disease was observed in 10 of 70 patients (14.2%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was 1.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2-10.7), whereas the 3-year disease-free survival was 81.3% (95% CI: 65.0-90.0). This clinical study showed the feasibility of this technique and its good profile in terms of acute and

  2. Characterization of the phase modulation property of a free-space electro-optic modulator by interframe intensity correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huimin; Song, Lei; Hu, Zexiong; Liu, Hongxiang; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yongzhi; Peng, Zengshou

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of a phase modulator or phase shifter has always been an integral part of phase-modulating or phase-adjusting applications. We propose a simplified approach to characterize a phase modulator by investigating the performance of phase shifts from grabbed interferograms using the phase extraction method. After reviewing some phase analysis techniques, the interframe intensity correlation (IIC) matrix method is introduced to the investigation. The proposed strategy is illustrated by the measurement of a free-space electro-optic modulator (EOM). Placing the modulator in one arm of a Michelson interferometer, the global phase shifts are estimated by the IIC method from the phase-stepped interferograms. Experimental results demonstrate the tested EOM has a phase modulation response of at least 2π  rad with a π/20  rad modulation precision for λ=1064  nm. In addition, our method is applicable to various types of phase modulator or phase shifter calibration, e.g., electro-optic phase modulator, spatial light modulator, or piezoelectric transducer (PZT).

  3. Computer Systems Acquisition Metrics Handbook. Volume II. Quality Factor Modules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    AD- A120 376 SYSTEMS ARCH4ITECTS INC RtANDOLPH MASS F/ O 9/2CCOM4PUTER SYSTEMS ACQUISITION METRICS MAN09M@. VOLUME It. QUALI -ETC iuMAT 82 FIft2 8-C...components of the "COMPUTER SYSTEMS ACQUISITION METRICS HANDBOOK". le Cj co-i " z/%a 4 • \\ // INTRODUCTION AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR CORRECTNESS MODULE...rr LE ~M M 1inT DRS4I- UALTG i MSIGNUT M0 JI PJM.DGIWn MaN TU IE ESD PIRMJCrS, FOR TEST AND INTEGRATION PHASE Apply the Preliminary Design Worksheets

  4. Phase shifting mask modulated laser patterning on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fan; Liu, Fengyuan; Ye, Ziran; Sui, Chenghua; Yan, Bo; Cai, Pinggen; Lv, Bin; Li, Yun; Chen, Naibo; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi

    2017-01-01

    A one-step graphene patterning method is developed in this paper. A phase shifting mask is used to modulate incident laser beam spatially and generate graphene patterns by laser heating. Periodic graphene nanoribbon and nanomesh structures are fabricated by employing 1D and 2D phase shifting masks, respectively. The noncontact, simple procedure, easy handling and economic properties of this method make it promising towards graphene-based device fabrication.

  5. Automated Air Information Production System - Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Center (DMAAC). The scope of this effort encompassed the analysis , design, specification, implementation, and test and evaluation of all hardware and...and the implementation of a PILOT system. The scope of the Phase I effort encompassed the analysis , design, and specification of all hardware and...division multiplexors, and 2 Government furnished KG-34 encrypt/decrypt units and Mosler safes. The Publishing subsystem hardware configuration (reference

  6. Modulated phase matching and high-order harmonic enhancement mediated by the carrier-envelope phase

    SciTech Connect

    Faccio, Daniele; Serrat, Carles; Cela, Jose M.; Farres, Albert; Di Trapani, Paolo; Biegert, Jens

    2010-01-15

    The process of high-order harmonic generation in gases is numerically investigated in the presence of a few-cycle pulsed-Bessel-beam pump, featuring a periodic modulation in the peak intensity due to large carrier-envelope-phase mismatch. A two-decade enhancement in the conversion efficiency is observed and interpreted as the consequence of a mechanism known as a nonlinearly induced modulation in the phase mismatch.

  7. Direct phasing in femtosecond nanocrystallography. II. Phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Spence, John C H; Millane, Rick P

    2014-03-01

    X-ray free-electron laser diffraction patterns from protein nanocrystals provide information on the diffracted amplitudes between the Bragg reflections, offering the possibility of direct phase retrieval without the use of ancillary experimental diffraction data [Spence et al. (2011). Opt. Express, 19, 2866-2873]. The estimated continuous transform is highly noisy however [Chen et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. A70, 143-153]. This second of a series of two papers describes a data-selection strategy to ameliorate the effects of the high noise levels and the subsequent use of iterative phase-retrieval algorithms to reconstruct the electron density. Simulation results show that employing such a strategy increases the noise levels that can be tolerated.

  8. Charge modulation as fingerprints of phase-string triggered interference

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zheng; Tian, Chushun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Zaanen, Jan

    2015-07-07

    Charge order appears to be an ubiquitous phenomenon in doped Mott insulators, which is currently under intense experimental and theoretical investigations particularly in the high T c cuprates. This phenomenon is conventionally understood in terms of Hartree-Fock-type mean-field theory. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for charge modulation which is rooted in the many-particle quantum physics arising in the strong coupling limit. Specifically, we consider the problem of a single hole in a bipartite t - J ladder. As a remnant of the fermion signs, the hopping hole picks up subtle phases pending the fluctuating spins, the so-called phase-string effect. We demonstrate the presence of charge modulations in the density matrix renormalization group solutions which disappear when the phase strings are switched off. This form of charge modulation can be understood analytically in a path-integral language with a mean-field-like approximation adopted, showing that the phase strings give rise to constructive interferences leading to self-localization. When the latter occurs, left- and right-moving propagating modes emerge inside the localization volume and their interference is responsible for the real space charge modulation.

  9. Chromaticity Measurements Using Phase Modulated RF and Vector Signal Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-02-16

    Chromaticity measurements are usually done by changing the energy of the beam by a known amount and measuring the change in betatron tune with a spectrum analyzer. The energy change is done by adjusting the RF frequency. The change in RF frequency is made large enough so that the change in betatron tune can be seen. If synchrotron motion is present in the beam, then measuring the change in betatron tune can be difficult. This note will outline a method to measure the change in betatron tune by phase-modulating the RF and measuring the phase modulated betatron spectrum Extremely small resolution bandwidths are available on modern vector signal analyzers. A small resolution bandwidth is equivalent to measuring the chromaticity many times and averaging the results. This would permit much smaller shifts in betatron tunes to be measured. The phase-modulated signal consists of sidebands whose amplitudes are given by Bessel functions. The complication of the Bessel functions can be removed if the vector signal analyzer is capable of phase demodulation. The sign of the chromaticity can be determined by observing the modulation spectrum at both betatron sidebands.

  10. Adiabatic quantum computing with phase modulated laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of quantum logical gates for multilevel systems is demonstrated through decoherence control under the quantum adiabatic method using simple phase modulated laser pulses. We make use of selective population inversion and Hamiltonian evolution with time to achieve such goals robustly instead of the standard unitary transformation language. PMID:17195865

  11. Coherence control of pulse trains by spectral phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Koivurova, Matias; Turunen, Jari; Setälä, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a technique to control the spectral and temporal coherence properties of pulsed beams of light via time-dependent manipulation of the spectral phase. Modulation schemes for the generation of partially coherent pulse trains from a train of fully coherent pulses are presented. The feasibility of experimental realization of the method is confirmed by numerical estimates.

  12. Charge modulation as fingerprints of phase-string triggered interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zheng; Tian, Chushun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Zaanen, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Charge order appears to be an ubiquitous phenomenon in doped Mott insulators, which is currently under intense experimental and theoretical investigations particularly in the high Tc cuprates. This phenomenon is conventionally understood in terms of Hartree-Fock-type mean-field theory. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for charge modulation which is rooted in the many-particle quantum physics arising in the strong coupling limit. Specifically, we consider the problem of a single hole in a bipartite t -J ladder. As a remnant of the fermion signs, the hopping hole picks up subtle phases pending the fluctuating spins, the so-called phase-string effect. We demonstrate the presence of charge modulations in the density matrix renormalization group solutions which disappear when the phase strings are switched off. This form of charge modulation can be understood analytically in a path-integral language with a mean-field-like approximation adopted, showing that the phase strings give rise to constructive interferences leading to self-localization. When the latter occurs, left- and right-moving propagating modes emerge inside the localization volume and their interference is responsible for the real space charge modulation.

  13. Generation of a flat optical frequency comb based on a cascaded polarization modulator and phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cihai; He, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Guo, Ronghui; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-08-15

    A scheme to generate a flat optical frequency comb (OFC) with a fixed phase relationship between the comb lines is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a cascaded polarization modulator (PolM) and phase modulator. Because the PolM introduces more controllable parameters compared with the conventional intensity modulator, 9, 11, and 13 comb lines can be generated with relatively low RF powers, or 15, 17, and 19 comb lines can be obtained if high RF powers are applied. The experimentally generated 9, 11, and 13 OFCs have a flatness of 1, 1.3, and 2.1 dB, respectively. The scheme requires no DC bias to the modulators, no optical filter, and no frequency divider or multiplier, which is simple and stable.

  14. Phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion for sensitive FBG sensor interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, Javier; Barrera, David; Madrigal, Javier; Sales, Salvador

    2017-04-01

    An interrogation technique based on phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion due to FBG filtering is presented. A 10 GHz tone is used to phase modulate an optical carrier located at the Bragg wavelength of a given FBG. The modulation index is set to a small value to keep Bessel identities close to 0 in order to avoid higher harmonics. Changes of the Bragg wavelength cause a power change in the photodetected 10 GHz tone. A remarkable linear sensitivity of 1 dB/pm for a shift up to 10 pm of the Bragg wavelength is demonstrated through experimental measurements. The range with linear sensitivity can be enlarged sweeping the source wavelength. This proves that the presented interrogation technique is able to interrogate FBGs with a resolution far below 1 pm and no need of extra postprocessing.

  15. Modulating the Anticancer Activity of Ruthenium(II)-Arene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Catherine M; Păunescu, Emilia; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Griffioen, Arjan W; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-04-23

    Following the identification of [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate)], a ruthenium(II)-arene complex with a perfluoroalkyl-modified ligand that displays remarkable in vitro cancer cell selectivity, a series of structurally related compounds were designed. In the new derivatives, the p-cymene ring and/or the chloride ligands are substituted by other ligands to modulate the steric bulk or aquation kinetics. The new compounds were evaluated in both in vitro (cytotoxicity and migration assays) and in vivo (chicken chorioallantoic membrane) models and were found to exhibit potent antivascular effects.

  16. Optical phase encryption by phase contrast using electrically addressed spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishchal, Naveen Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2003-03-01

    We report the use of an electrically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulator (EALCSLM) operating in the phase mode as a phase-contrast filter (PCF). As an application, an optical phase encryption system has been implemented. We encrypt and decrypt a two-dimensional phase image obtained from an amplitude image. Encrypted image is holographically recorded in a Barium titanate crystal and is then decrypted by generating through phase conjugation, a conjugate of the encrypted image. The decrypted phase image is converted into an amplitude image using an EASLM as a PCF. The idea has been supported by the experimental results.

  17. Characteristics of complex light modulation through an amplitude-phase double-layer spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungjae; Roh, Jinyoung; Kim, Soobin; Park, Juseong; Kang, Hoon; Hahn, Joonku; Jeon, Youngjin; Park, Shinwoong; Kim, Hwi

    2017-02-20

    The complex modulation characteristics of a light field through an amplitude-phase double-layer spatial light modulator are analyzed based on the wave-optic numerical model, and the structural conditions for the optimal double-layer complex modulation structure are investigated. The relationships of interlayer distance, pixel size, and complex light modulation performance are analyzed. The main finding of this study is that the optimal interlayer distance for the double-layer structure can be found at the Talbot effect condition. For validating the practical usefulness of our findings, a high quality reconstruction of the complex computer-generated holograms and the robustness of the angular tolerance of the complex modulation at the Talbot interlayer distance are numerically demonstrated.

  18. Single-arm Phase II cancer survival trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The current practice for designing single-arm Phase II trials with time-to-event endpoints is limited to using either a maximum likelihood estimate test under the exponential model or a naive approach based on dichotomizing the event time at a landmark time point. A trial designed under the exponential model may not be reliable, and the naive approach is inefficient. The modified one-sample log-rank test statistic proposed in this article fills the void. In general, the proposed test can be used to design single-arm Phase II survival trials under any parametric survival distribution. Simulation results showed that it preserves type I error well and provides adequate power for Phase II cancer trial designs with time-to-event endpoints.

  19. Propagation of phase modulation signals in time-varying plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Di; Liu, Yanming; He, Pan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of time-varying plasma to the propagation of phase modulation signals are investigated in this paper. Through theoretical analysis, the mechanism of the interaction between the time-varying plasma and the phase modulation signal is given. A time-varying plasma generator which could produce arbitrary time-varying plasma is built by adjusting the discharge power. A comparison of results from experiment and simulation prove that the time-varying plasma could cause the special rotation of QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) constellation, and the mechanism of constellation point's rotation is analyzed. Additionally, the experimental results of the QPSK signals' EVM (Error Vector Magnitude) after time-varying and time-invariant plasma with different ωp/ω are given. This research could be used to improve the TT&C (Tracking Telemeter and Command) system of re-entry vehicles.

  20. Phase-modulated radio over fiber multimode links.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José

    2012-05-21

    We present the first experimental demonstration of a phase-modulated MMF link implementing high-frequency digital transmission in a cost-effective solution based on direct detection. Successful subcarrier transmission of QPSK, 16-QAM and 64-QAM data channels for bit rates up to 120 Mb/s through a 5 km MMF link is achieved over the microwave region comprised between 6 and 20 GHz. The overall capacity of the proposed approach can be further increased by properly accommodating more passband channels in the operative frequency range determined by the phase-to-intensity conversion process provided by the dispersive nature of the optical fiber. In this sense, our results show the possibility of achieving an aggregate bit rate per length product of 144 Gb/s · km and confirm, in consequence, the possibility of broadband phase-modulated radio over fiber transmission through MMF links suitable for multichannel SCM signal distribution.

  1. Multimodal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer with high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy preceded or not by radical prostatectomy, concurrent intensified-dose docetaxel and long-term androgen deprivation therapy: results of a prospective phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal management of high-risk prostate cancer remains uncertain. In this study we assessed the safety and efficacy of a novel multimodal treatment paradigm for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods This was a prospective phase II trial including 35 patients with newly diagnosed high-risk localized or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy preceded or not by radical prostatectomy, concurrent intensified-dose docetaxel-based chemotherapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Primary endpoint was acute and late toxicity evaluated with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Secondary endpoint was biochemical and clinical recurrence-free survival explored with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Acute gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary toxicity was grade 2 in 23% and 20% of patients, and grade 3 in 9% and 3% of patients, respectively. Acute blood/bone marrow toxicity was grade 2 in 20% of patients. No acute grade ≥4 toxicity was observed. Late gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary toxicity was grade 2 in 9% of patients each. No late grade ≥3 toxicity was observed. Median follow-up was 63 months (interquartile range 31–79). Actuarial 5-year biochemical and clinical recurrence-free survival rate was 55% (95% confidence interval, 35-75%) and 70% (95% confidence interval, 52-88%), respectively. Conclusions In our phase II trial testing a novel multimodal treatment paradigm for high-risk prostate cancer, toxicity was acceptably low and mid-term oncological outcome was good. This treatment paradigm, thus, may warrant further evaluation in phase III randomized trials. PMID:24423462

  2. Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.

    2010-02-16

    Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

  3. Adaptive Processing Experiment (APE) Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    52,bs egos.0 64, **WOiS *-1 mTh.ls -Silos 1010 woosS logo 0 .0p 11% 93 *.u44 *38.5’ 04b 109 11,t Soo? 3s,0 mono 󈧏 Ou3 0,~ 36’sq w44S*83 1160 *to...02 =Soo b5,0 614 0,02 40002 wool 041,4Ib -6201’ ’.21 so? logo Ilk W.06 woos 󈧄 .41,74 059,13 w943 t0% 75,0 e5o w(n4 *,0’q Soi -37,A0 .$goes 0044 .10...CURR.C T -1 F I PL I fR Prik kFC ~jv,1Y I AND) PI VITH It, 7AP’SA Fk)~o AtA PACjmC, Ur $(jfA40f sk~ FHo PHASE AMPI ’LTUDE IflTAt. FILTFR FILTER~ Fo.FR

  4. Phase-modulation method for AWG phase-error measurement in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazumasa; Hirose, Tomohiro

    2009-12-15

    We report a phase-modulation method for measuring arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) phase error in the frequency domain. By combining the method with a digital sampling technique that we have already reported, we can measure the phase error within an accuracy of +/-0.055 rad for the center 90% waveguides in the array even when no carrier frequencies are generated in the beat signal from the interferometer.

  5. Optical investigations of He II two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muoio, E.; Jager, B.; Puech, L.; Rousset, B.; Thibault, P.; van Weelderen, R.; Wolf, P. E.

    2002-05-01

    We describe the optical techniques we used to detect droplets in the HeII two phase flow of the Cryoloop experiment. These include quantitative light scattering, imaging, and laser phase sensitive anemometry and granulometry (PDPA). We demonstrate that droplets appear for vapor velocities larger than 5 m/s, and that they progressively invade the entire pipe cross section as the vapor velocity is increased. Estimates are given for the droplet size and density.

  6. Theory of Self-Phase Modulation and Spectral Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. R.; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    Self-phase modulation refers to the phenomenon in which a laser beam propagating in a medium interacts with the medium and imposes a phase modulation on itself. It is one of those very fascinating effects discovered in the early days of nonlinear optics (Bloembergen and Lallemand, 1966; Brewer, 1967; Cheung et al., 1968; Lallemand, 1966; Jones and Stoicheff, 1964; Shimizu, 1967; Stoicheff, 1963). The physical origin of the phenomenon lies in the fact that the strong field of a laser beam is capable of inducing an appreciable intensity-dependent refractive index change in the medium. The medium then reacts back and inflicts a phase change on the incoming wave, resulting in self-phase modulation (SPM). Since a laser beam has a finite cross section, and hence a transverse intensity profile, SPM on the beam should have a transverse spatial dependence, equivalent to a distortion of the wave front. Consequently, the beam will appear to have self-diffracted. Such a self-diffraction action, resulting from SPM in space, is responsible for the well-known nonlinear optical phenomena of self-focusing and self-defocusing (Marburger, 1975; Shen, 1975). It can give rise to a multiple ring structure in the diffracted beam if the SPM is sufficiently strong (Durbin et al., 1981; Santamato and Shen, 1984). In the case of a pulsed laser input, the temporal variation of the laser intensity leads to an SPM in time. Since the time derivative of the phase of a wave is simply the angular frequency of the wave, SPM also appears as a frequency modulation. Thus, the output beam appears with a self-induced spectral broadening (Cheung et al., 1968; Gustafson et al., 1969; Shimizu, 1967).

  7. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  8. Spatial Frequency Modulated Imaging (SPIFI) with amplitude or phase grating from a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Michael D.; Barbano, Emerson C.; Worts, Nathan; Field, Jeffrey J.; Hoy, Christopher; Wernsing, Keith A.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Spatial Frequency Modulated Imaging (SPIFI) with single element detection has previously been demonstrated with a time varying amplitude spatial frequency. This has been shown in a variety of modalities (linear, TPEF, SHG) and also with variations on the base design to provide additional dimensions of information. SPIFI is also capable of providing enhanced resolution images. However, the signal-to-noise is a limiting factor in the quality of the resolution enhancement. We present a microscope design which uses a nematic spatial light modulator to provide a time varying amplitude from an amplitude or phase grating. Twophoton excitation fluorescence images of 10-µm fluorescent polystyrene beads are presented using a phase grating. Additionally, the microscope can provide spatial gratings in polarization which provide an alternative means of imaging in third harmonic generation (THG). THG images are provided using an amplitude and polarization-grating modulation pattern.

  9. Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project. Phase II: Internal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Dana

    This report is based on the Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project - Phase II. The project was a follow-up to an earlier study, extending from June 1980 to June 1983, in which government funding and engineering manpower were used to conduct an energy management program in 52 selected pilot schools in 5 areas of the province. The report…

  10. Phase II cancer clinical trials with heterogeneous patient populations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Chang, Myron N; Kang, Sun J

    2012-01-01

    The patient population for a Phase II trial often consists of multiple subgroups in terms of risk level. In this case, a popular design approach is to specify the response rate and the prevalence of each subgroup, to calculate the response rate of the whole population by the weighted average of the response rates across subgroups, and to choose a standard Phase II design such as Simon's optimal or minimax design to test the response rate for the whole population. In this case, although the prevalence of each subgroup is accurately specified, the observed prevalence among the accrued patients to the study may be quite different from the expected one because of the small sample size, which is typical in most Phase II trials. The fixed rejection value for a chosen standard Phase II design may be either too conservative (i.e., increasing the false rejection probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more high-risk patients than expected, or too anti-conservative (i.e., increasing the false acceptance probability of the experimental therapy) if the trial accrues more low-risk patients than expected. We can avoid such problems by adjusting the rejection values, depending on the observed prevalence from the trial. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the flexible designs compared with the standard design with fixed rejection values under various settings.

  11. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  12. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of π/6 (and up to π/3 by postselection on photons that remain in the system longer than average) between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. By upgrading to a state-of-the-art cavity, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of π at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic. PMID:27519798

  13. Phase ambiguity resolution for offset QPSK modulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A demodulator for Offset Quaternary Phase Shift Keyed (OQPSK) signals modulated with two words resolves eight possible combinations of phase ambiguity which may produce data error by first processing received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data in an integrated carrier loop/symbol synchronizer using a digital Costas loop with matched filters for correcting four of eight possible phase lock errors, and then the remaining four using a phase ambiguity resolver which detects the words to not only reverse the received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data channels, but to also invert (complement) the I(sub R) and/or Q(sub R) data, or to at least complement the I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data for systems using nontransparent codes that do not have rotation direction ambiguity.

  14. Phase ambiguity resolution for offset QPSK modulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1991-06-01

    A demodulator for Offset Quaternary Phase Shift Keyed (OQPSK) signals modulated with two words resolves eight possible combinations of phase ambiguity which may produce data error by first processing received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data in an integrated carrier loop/symbol synchronizer using a digital Costas loop with matched filters for correcting four of eight possible phase lock errors, and then the remaining four using a phase ambiguity resolver which detects the words to not only reverse the received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data channels, but to also invert (complement) the I(sub R) and/or Q(sub R) data, or to at least complement the I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data for systems using nontransparent codes that do not have rotation direction ambiguity.

  15. Dynamic phase-control of a rising sun magnetron using modulated and continuous current

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gutierrez, Sulmer; Browning, Jim; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Smithe, David N.; Watrous, Jack

    2016-01-28

    Phase-control of a magnetron is studied via simulation using a combination of a continuous current source and a modulated current source. The addressable, modulated current source is turned ON and OFF at the magnetron operating frequency in order to control the electron injection and the spoke phase. Prior simulation work using a 2D model of a Rising Sun magnetron showed that the use of 100% modulated current controlled the magnetron phase and allowed for dynamic phase control. In this work, the minimum fraction of modulated current source needed to achieve a phase control is studied. The current fractions (modulated versus continuous) were varied from 10% modulated current to 100% modulated current to study the effects on phase control. Dynamic phase-control, stability, and start up time of the device were studied for all these cases showing that with 10% modulated current and 90% continuous current, a phase shift of 180° can be achieved demonstrating dynamic phase control.

  16. Phase-dependent modulation of corticospinal excitability during the observation of the initial phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Uchida, Natsuko; Yoshida, Mami; Liang, Nan; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken to identify the temporal characteristics of corticospinal excitability of tibialis anterior muscle during the observation of the initial phase of gait. For this purpose, using transcranial magnetic stimulation, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during the observation of the second step of an actor's first three steps of gait initiation with (complex gait) or without (normal gait) an obstacle and unstable surface. The results demonstrate that (1) MEPs during the observation of the initial phase of normal gait were significantly increased only at early swing phase, but not other phases (mid-swing, heel contact, mid-stance, and heel off) and (2) MEPs during the observation of the initial phase of complex gait were significantly increased at early swing and also at mid-swing and heel contact phases. These findings provide the first evidence that corticospinal excitability during the observation of gait, especially the initial phase, is modulated in phase- and motor-demanded-dependent manners.

  17. Modulated phases of phospholipid bilayers induced by tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2012-11-01

    The influence of α-, γ- and δ-tocopherols on the structure and phase behavior of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers has been determined from X-ray diffraction studies on oriented multilayers. In all the three cases the main-transition temperature (T(m)) of DPPC was found to decrease with increasing tocopherol concentration up to around 25 mol%. Beyond this the main transition is suppressed in the case of γ-tocopherol, whereas T(m) becomes insensitive to composition in the other two cases. The pre-transition is found to be suppressed over a narrow tocopherol concentration range between 7.5 and 10 mol% in DPPC-γ-tocopherol and DPPC-δ-tocopherol bilayers, and the ripple phase occurs down to the lowest temperature studied. In all the three cases a modulated phase is observed above a tocopherol concentration of about 10 mol%, which is similar to the P(β) phase reported in DPPC-cholesterol bilayers. This phase is found to occur even in excess water conditions at lower tocopherol concentrations, and consists of bilayers with periodic height modulation. These results indicate the ability of tocopherols to induce local curvature in membranes, which could be important for some of their biological functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  19. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  20. Natural transformation and phase variation modulation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Heather L; Richardson, Anthony R; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2004-05-01

    Neisseria meningitidis has evolved the ability to control the expression-state of numerous genes by phase variation. It has been proposed that the process aids this human pathogen in coping with the diversity of microenvironments and host immune systems. Therefore, increased frequencies of phase variation may augment the organism's adaptability and virulence. In this study, we found that DNA derived from various neisserial co-colonizers of the human nasopharynx increased N. meningitidis switching frequencies, indicating that heterologous neisserial DNA modulates phase variation in a transformation-dependent manner. In order to determine whether the effect of heterologous DNA was specific to the Hb receptor, HmbR, we constructed a Universal Rates of Switching cassette (UROS). With this cassette, we demonstrated that heterologous DNA positively affects phase variation throughout the meningococcal genome, as UROS phase variation frequencies were also increased in the presence of neisserial DNA. Overexpressing components of the neisserial mismatch repair system partially alleviated DNA-induced changes in phase variation frequencies, thus implicating mismatch repair titration as a cause of these transformation-dependent increases in switching. The DNA-dependent effect on phase variation was transient and may serve as a mechanism for meningococcal genetic variability that avoids the fitness costs encountered by global mutators.

  1. Chandra X-ray spectroscopy of focused wind in the Cygnus X-1 system. II. The non-dip spectrum in the low/hard state - modulations with orbital phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miškovičová, Ivica; Hell, Natalie; Hanke, Manfred; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Grinberg, Victoria; Duro, Refiz; Madej, Oliwia K.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Rodriguez, Jérôme; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Lee, Julia C.; Brown, Gregory V.; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    Accretion onto the black hole in the system HDE 226868/Cygnus X-1 is powered by the strong line-driven stellar wind of the O-type donor star. We study the X-ray properties of the stellar wind in the hard state of Cyg X-1, as determined using data from the Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings. Large density and temperature inhomogeneities are present in the wind, with a fraction of the wind consisting of clumps of matter with higher density and lower temperature embedded in a photoionized gas. Absorption dips observed in the light curve are believed to be caused by these clumps. This work concentrates on the non-dip spectra as a function of orbital phase. The spectra show lines of H-like and He-like ions of S, Si, Na, Mg, Al, and highly ionized Fe (Fe xvii-Fe xxiv). We measure velocity shifts, column densities, and thermal broadening of the line series. The excellent quality of these five observations allows us to investigate the orbital phase-dependence of these parameters. We show that the absorber is located close to the black hole. Doppler shifted lines point at a complex wind structure in this region, while emission lines seen in some observations are from a denser medium than the absorber. The observed line profiles are phase-dependent. Their shapes vary from pure, symmetric absorption at the superior conjunction to P Cygni profiles at the inferior conjunction of the black hole.

  2. Phase-Array Approach to Optical Whispering Gallery Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    This technology leverages the well-defined orbital number of a whispering gallery modulator (WGM) to expand the range of applications for such resonators. This property rigidly connects the phase variation of the field in this mode with the azimuthal angle between the coupling locations. A WGM with orbital momentum L has exactly L instant nodes around the circumference of the WGM resonator supporting such a mode. Therefore, in two locations separated by the arc alpha, the phase difference of such a field will be equal to phi= alpha L. Coupling the field out of such locations, and into a balanced interferometer, once can observe a complete constructive or distractive interference (or have any situation in between) depending on the angle alpha. Similarly, a mode L + delta L will pick up the phase phi + alpha delta L. In all applications of a WGM resonator as a modulator, the orbital numbers for the carrier and sidebands are different, and their differences delta L are known (usually, but not necessarily, delta L = 1). Therefore, the choice of the angle alpha, and of the interferometer arms difference, allows one to control the relative phase between different modes and to perform the conversion, separation, and filtering tasks necessary.

  3. Refractive index modulation vs. before-bleach optical density modulation characteristics of silver halide phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2005-01-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed with various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). A pair of absorption and phase holograms was recorded at each value of the recording parameters. Optical densities before bleaching were determined using the absorption holograms. Then each phase grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100×) objective. Thus modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. To characterize the processing, the modulation of the refractive index of the processed phase holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. These characteristics are especially useful for the comparison of various bleaching agents used with the same developer. Characteristics of similar forms were obtained for all the processing types, with significant differences in the slope and extent of the curves, so that sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could be compared directly.

  4. Linear phase encoding for holographic data storage with a single phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-04-01

    A linear phase encoding is presented for realizing a compact and simple holographic data storage system with a single spatial light modulator (SLM). This encoding method makes it possible to modulate a complex amplitude distribution with a single phase-only SLM in a holographic storage system. In addition, an undesired light due to the imperfection of an SLM can be removed by spatial frequency filtering with a Nyquist aperture. The linear phase encoding is introduced to coaxial holographic data storage. The generation of a signal beam using linear phase encoding is experimentally verified in an interferometer. In a coaxial holographic data storage system, single data recording, shift selectivity, and shift multiplexed recording are experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Bayesian approach to two-stage phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Pepple, P A; Choi, S C

    1997-05-01

    Consider the situation in which there are several different therapeutic agents. It is desired to select the best agent and to examine its efficacy relative to the control. Too often clinical trials terminate with negative outcomes in part due to inadequate phase II studies. A two-stage phase II based on a Bayesian approach is considered in order to reduce such likelihood. The first stage consists of selecting the best agent and the second stage consists of examining the relative efficacy of the selected agent compared to the control. A formal phase III clinical trial can be initiated when the particular agent is shown to be promising on the basis of the proposed phase II study. The Bayesian approach employed uses an ad hoc likelihood due to the fact that the exact likelihood is complex and intractable. In this sense the proposed approach is thus an approximation. A simulation study is conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed Bayesian approach and compared to two fixed-sample-size approaches. Due to the fact that the procedure is approximate, the simulation study is essential to assess the usefulness of the procedure. The study suggests that the Bayesian approach is an attractive alternative to fixed-sample-size approaches.

  6. Phase-shifting interferometry by wave amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Rivera-Ortega, Uriel

    2011-07-01

    A new method for phase-shifting interferometry based on wave amplitude modulation is proposed and discussed. This proposal is based on the interference of three waves, where two waves attend as two reference waves and the other wave attends as a probe wave. Thereby, three interference terms are obtained, but because a phase difference of π/2 between the two references is kept constant, one of the three terms will be dropped, while the two remaining will be put in quadrature. Under these conditions, the resulting pattern is mathematically modeled by an interferogram of two waves, where an additional phase is given by the amplitude variations of the reference waves. In this Letter, both a theoretical model and some numerical simulations are presented.

  7. Spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasselet, Etienne

    2010-12-01

    We show experimentally that optical phase singularities (PSs) can be written and erased, locally and in a controllable manner, into a light beam using the giant Kerr optical nonlinearities of liquid crystals. The method relies on the nonlinear optical spin-orbit coupling experienced by a collimated probe beam when a collinear focused pump beam imprints a radial birefringent pattern into a nematic film. In addition, experimental data are quantitatively described, accounting for the elastic anisotropy of the material and its nonlocal spatial response to the pump light field. Since we show that the optical intensity of a light beam (the “pump”) controls the phase of another beam (the “probe”) in a singular fashion (i.e., with the generation of a screw PS) via their interaction in a nonlinear medium that involves spin-orbit coupling, we dubbed such a nonlinear optical process as spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation.

  8. Spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brasselet, Etienne

    2010-12-15

    We show experimentally that optical phase singularities (PSs) can be written and erased, locally and in a controllable manner, into a light beam using the giant Kerr optical nonlinearities of liquid crystals. The method relies on the nonlinear optical spin-orbit coupling experienced by a collimated probe beam when a collinear focused pump beam imprints a radial birefringent pattern into a nematic film. In addition, experimental data are quantitatively described, accounting for the elastic anisotropy of the material and its nonlocal spatial response to the pump light field. Since we show that the optical intensity of a light beam (the 'pump') controls the phase of another beam (the 'probe') in a singular fashion (i.e., with the generation of a screw PS) via their interaction in a nonlinear medium that involves spin-orbit coupling, we dubbed such a nonlinear optical process as spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation.

  9. Phased-array optical whispering gallery mode modulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator device and method capable of filtering sidebands of optical modulators are provided. The method includes providing an optical resonator adapted to support whispering gallery modes and forming a first field and a second field from a first location and a second location, respectively, at the circumference of the optical resonator and being separated by an arc angle, .alpha.. The method includes adjusting relative phase between the first field and the second field in accordance to a differential phase, .beta., and combining the first and the second fields into an output. Particular selection of the arc angle, .alpha., and the differential phase, .beta., can determine the function of the output.

  10. Accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiation with simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for early breast cancer: A phase I/II dosimetric and clinical feasibility study from a tertiary cancer care centre of India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dodul; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Jana, Manisha; Laviraj, Macharla Anjaneyelu; Deo, Suryanarayan Vs; Roy, Soumyajit; Guleria, Randeep; Rath, Goura K

    2017-03-01

    Hypofractionation has become standard of care after Breast Conserving Therapy (BCT) in many European and few others western countries. Though still debatable, tumor cavity boost is routinely practised in our centre. Hypofractionation is not yet the current standard of practice in Asian countries. Employing hypofractionation and simultaneous integrated boost to lumpectomy cavity with conformal technique is not the current practice in this region. Hence the study was performed to see whether accelerated hypofractionation and simultaneous boost can be combined using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treating early breast cancer (EBC) patients. Female patients with EBC treated by whole breast radiation and boost were treated simultaneously to a dose of 40.5Gy and 48Gy in fifteen fractions over three weeks to entire breast and tumor cavity respectively with VMAT. Dosimetry including target coverage, OAR (organ at risk) sparing and acute radiation toxicity were evaluated. Ten consecutive patients were treated. Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and OAR sparing were mostly satisfactory. Mean volume of PTVWB and PTVBoost were 786.18cm(3) and 228.9cm(3) respectively. Mean Dmean to PTVWB and PTVBOOST were 41.9Gy and 49.1Gy respectively. Dmax to PTVWB and PTVBOOST were 127.56% and 110.67% respectively. Ipsilateral lung mean dose and V20 were 13.92Gy and 21.53% respectively. V40 and V25 of heart were 0.17% and 2.25% respectively. All patients are disease free after a median follow up of two years. Most acute toxicities were Grade1. Only two patients out of ten developed Grade 2 skin reaction during radiation. Early cosmesis using Harvard cosmesis scale is good to excellent. Accelerated hypofractionated RT using SIB-VMAT is a clinically feasible technique with acceptable initial result. Initial results are encouraging. Simultaneous integrated boost with accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy is a novel approach

  11. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  12. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  13. A Kinetic Approach to Bose-Einstein Condensates: Self-Phase Modulation and Bogoliubov Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J.T.; Bingham, R.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-11-01

    A kinetic approach to Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is proposed based on the Wigner-Moyal equation (WME). In the semiclassical limit, the WME reduces to the particle-number conservation equation. Two examples of applications are (i) a self-phase modulation of a BE condensate beam, where we show that part of the beam is decelerated and eventually stops as a result of the gradient of the effective self-potential, and (ii) the derivation of a kinetic dispersion relation for sound waves in BECs, including collisionless Landau damping.

  14. Measurement of characteristics and phase modulation accuracy increase of LC SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondareva, A. P.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Starikov, R. S.; Starikov, S. N.

    2014-09-01

    Phase liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC SLM) are actively integrated in various optical systems for dynamic diffractive optical elements imaging. To achieve the best performance, high stability and linearity of phase modulation is required. This article presents results of measurement of characteristics and phase modulation accuracy increase of state of the art LC SLM with HD resolution "HoloEye PLUTO VIS".

  15. Multi-spatial-frequency and phase-shifting profilometry using a liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung-Il; Park, Chang-Sub; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Kyung-Woo; Park, Ji-Sub; Seo, Youngmin; Hahn, Joonku; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2012-05-10

    Optical profilometry is widely applied for measuring the morphology of objects by projecting predetermined patterns on them. In this technique, the compact size is one of the interesting issues for practical applications. The generation of pattern by the interference of coherent light sources has a potential to reduce the dimension of the illumination part. Moreover, this method can make fine patterns without projection optics, and the illumination part is free of restriction from the numerical aperture of the projection optics. In this paper, a phase-shifting profilometry is implemented by using a single liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC phase modulator is designed to generate the interference patterns with several different spatial frequencies by changing selection of the spacing between the micro-pinholes. We manufactured the LC phase modulator and calibrated it by measuring the phase modulation amount depending on an applied voltage. Our optical profilometry using the single LC cell can generate multi-spatial frequency patterns as well as four steps of the phase-shifted patterns. This method can be implemented compactly, and the reconstructed depth profile is obtained without a phase-unwrapping algorithm.

  16. Study of phase I NOx control: Lessons learned for phase II NOx control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.

    1996-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is concerned with lowering the levels of acid rain in the USA. One of the contributions to acid rain is nitric oxides referred to as NO{sub x}. Title IV seeks NO{sub x} reductions from two groupings of utility steam generators. The first group, known as Phase I, was to have their reductions made by January 1, 1996. The purpose of this paper is to look back at Phase I to see what one can learn for use in Phase II compliance planning. Phase II units are scheduled to be in compliance by January 1, 2000. As such, this paper looks to answer four questions about Phase I units.

  17. Macroscopic Phase Separation, Modulated Phases, and Microemulsions: A Unified Picture of Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Maibaum, Lutz; Schick, M.

    2014-01-01

    We simulate a simple phenomenological model describing phase behavior in a multicomponent membrane, a model capable of producing macroscopic phase separation, modulated phases, and microemulsions, all of which have been discussed in terms of raft phenomena. We show that one effect of thermal fluctuations on the mean-field phase diagram is that it permits a direct transition between either one of the coexisting liquid phases to a microemulsion. This implies that one system exhibiting phase separation can be related to a similar system exhibiting the heterogeneities characteristic of a microemulsion. The two systems could differ in their average membrane composition or in the relative compositions of their exoplasmic and cytoplasmic leaves. The model provides a unified description of these raft-associated phenomena. PMID:24806930

  18. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  19. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  20. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  1. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  2. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  3. Study of the GERDA Phase II background spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Gerda experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN in Italy, searches for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. Gerda Phase II is aiming to reach a sensitivity for the 0νββ half life of 1026 yr in ∼ 3 years of physics data taking with 100 kg·yr of exposure and a background index of ∼ 10‑3 cts/(keV·kg·yr). After 6 months of acquisition a first data release with 10.8 kg·yr of exposure is performed, showing that the design background is achieved. In this work a study of the Phase II background spectrum, the main spectral structures and the background sources will be presented and discussed.

  4. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y P; Wang, J S; Huang, K N; Ho, C T; Huang, J D; Young, M S

    2007-06-01

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the "measurement pulse" in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  5. Envelope pulsed ultrasonic distance measurement system based upon amplitude modulation and phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. P.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, K. N.; Ho, C. T.; Huang, J. D.; Young, M. S.

    2007-06-15

    A novel microcomputer-based ultrasonic distance measurement system is presented. This study proposes an efficient algorithm which combines both the amplitude modulation (AM) and the phase modulation (PM) of the pulse-echo technique. The proposed system can reduce error caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation effect when using the AM and PM envelope square wave form (APESW). The APESW ultrasonic driving wave form causes a phase inversion phenomenon in the relative wave form of the receiver. The phase inversion phenomenon sufficiently identifies the ''measurement pulse'' in the received wave forms, which can be used for accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. In addition, combining a countertechnique to compute the phase shifts of the last cycle for TOF, the presented system can obtain distance resolution of 0.1% of the wavelength corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency of the ultrasonic wave. The standard uncertainty of the proposed distance measurement system is found to be 0.2 mm at a range of 50-500 mm. The APESW signal generator and phase detector of this measuring system are designed on a complex programmable logic device, which is used to govern the TOF measurement and send the data to a personal computer for distance calibration and examination. The main advantages of this APESW system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirement, and ease of implementation.

  6. Parallel phase modulation scheme for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Hartman, M T; Quetschke, V; Tanner, D B; Reitze, D H; Mueller, G

    2014-11-17

    Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) requires multiple frequency sidebands to disentangle all of the main interferometer's length signals. This paper presents the results of a risk reduction experiment to produce two sets of frequency sidebands in parallel, avoiding mixed 'sidebands on sidebands'. Two phase modulation frequencies are applied to separate Electro-Optic Modulators (EOMs), with one EOM in each of the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In this system the Mach-Zehnder's arm lengths are stabilized to reduce relative intensity noise in the recombined carrier beam by feeding a corrective control signal back to the Rubidium Titanyl Phosphate (RTP) EOM crystals to drive the optical path length difference to zero. This setup's use of the RTP crystals as length actuators provides enough bandwidth in the feedback to meet arm length stability requirements for aLIGO.

  7. Optimal synthesis of double-phase computer generated holograms using a phase-only spatial light modulator with grating filter.

    PubMed

    Song, Hoon; Sung, Geeyoung; Choi, Sujin; Won, Kanghee; Lee, Hong-Seok; Kim, Hwi

    2012-12-31

    We propose an optical system for synthesizing double-phase complex computer-generated holograms using a phase-only spatial light modulator and a phase grating filter. Two separated areas of the phase-only spatial light modulator are optically superposed by 4-f configuration with an optimally designed grating filter to synthesize arbitrary complex optical field distributions. The tolerances related to misalignment factors are analyzed, and the optimal synthesis method of double-phase computer-generated holograms is described.

  8. Application of a localized chaos by rf-phase modulations in phase-space dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Physics of chaos in a localized phase-space region is exploited to produce a longitudinally uniformly distributed beam. Theoretical study and simulations are used to study its origin and applicability in phase-space dilution of beam bunch. Through phase modulation to a double-rf system, a central region of localized chaos bounded by invariant tori are generated by overlapping parametric resonances. Condition and stability of the chaos will be analyzed. Applications include high-power beam, beam distribution uniformization, and industrial beam irradiation.

  9. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  10. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  11. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  12. Method of phase space beam dilution utilizing bounded chaos generated by rf phase modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Pham, Alfonse N.; Lee, S. Y.; Ng, K. Y.

    2015-12-10

    This paper explores the physics of chaos in a localized phase-space region produced by rf phase modulation applied to a double rf system. The study can be exploited to produce rapid particle bunch broadening exhibiting longitudinal particle distribution uniformity. Hamiltonian models and particle-tracking simulations are introduced to understand the mechanism and applicability of controlled particle diffusion. When phase modulation is applied to the double rf system, regions of localized chaos are produced through the disruption and overlapping of parametric resonant islands and configured to be bounded by well-behaved invariant tori to prevent particle loss. The condition of chaoticity and themore » degree of particle dilution can be controlled by the rf parameters. As a result, the method has applications in alleviating adverse space-charge effects in high-intensity beams, particle bunch distribution uniformization, and industrial radiation-effects experiments.« less

  13. Phase Modulator with Terahertz Optical Bandwidth Formed by Multi-Layered Dielectric Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S. (Inventor); Fork, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical phase modulator includes a bandpass multilayer stack, formed by a plurality of dielectric layers, preferably of GaAs and AlAs, and having a transmission function related to the refractive index of the layers of the stack, for receiving an optical input signal to be phase modulated. A phase modulator device produces a nonmechanical change in the refractive index of each layer of the stack by, e.g., the injection of free carrier, to provide shifting of the transmission function so as to produce phase modulation of the optical input signal and to thereby produce a phase modulated output signal.

  14. Modulated phases of graphene quantum Hall polariton fluids

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Francesco M. D.; Giovannetti, Vittorio; MacDonald, Allan H.; Polini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing experimental interest in coupling cavity photons to the cyclotron resonance excitations of electron liquids in high-mobility semiconductor quantum wells or graphene sheets. These media offer unique platforms to carry out fundamental studies of exciton-polariton condensation and cavity quantum electrodynamics in a regime, in which electron–electron interactions are expected to play a pivotal role. Here, focusing on graphene, we present a theoretical study of the impact of electron–electron interactions on a quantum Hall polariton fluid, that is a fluid of magneto-excitons resonantly coupled to cavity photons. We show that electron–electron interactions are responsible for an instability of graphene integer quantum Hall polariton fluids towards a modulated phase. We demonstrate that this phase can be detected by measuring the collective excitation spectra, which is often at a characteristic wave vector of the order of the inverse magnetic length. PMID:27841346

  15. Thermodynamic design of a phase change thermal storage module

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M.; Bellecci, C.; Charach, C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper analyzes the irreversibilities due to the heat transfer processes in a latent heat thermal storage system. The Thermal Storage Module (TSM) consists of a cylindrical shell that surrounds an internal coaxial tube. The shell side is filled by a Phase Change Material (PCM); a fluid flows through the inner tube and exchanges heat along the way. The most fundamental assumption underlying this study is that the exergy of the hot fluid stream in the active phase is discharged into the environment and completely destroyed, unless it is partially intercepted by the storage system. A numerical study is conducted to identify and to minimize the thermodynamic losses of the storage and removal processes. The dependence of the second-law efficiency of the system on various design parameters is investigated and discussed.

  16. Modulated phases of graphene quantum Hall polariton fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Francesco M. D.; Giovannetti, Vittorio; MacDonald, Allan H.; Polini, Marco

    2016-11-01

    There is a growing experimental interest in coupling cavity photons to the cyclotron resonance excitations of electron liquids in high-mobility semiconductor quantum wells or graphene sheets. These media offer unique platforms to carry out fundamental studies of exciton-polariton condensation and cavity quantum electrodynamics in a regime, in which electron-electron interactions are expected to play a pivotal role. Here, focusing on graphene, we present a theoretical study of the impact of electron-electron interactions on a quantum Hall polariton fluid, that is a fluid of magneto-excitons resonantly coupled to cavity photons. We show that electron-electron interactions are responsible for an instability of graphene integer quantum Hall polariton fluids towards a modulated phase. We demonstrate that this phase can be detected by measuring the collective excitation spectra, which is often at a characteristic wave vector of the order of the inverse magnetic length.

  17. Sponges, Tubules and Modulated Phases of Para-Antinematic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, J. B.; Galatola, P.

    1997-10-01

    We theoretically analyze the behavior of membranes presenting a nematic susceptibility, induced by the presence of anisotropic phospholipids having a quadrupolar nematic symmetry. This kind of anisotropic phospholipids is either naturally found in some biological membranes, or can be chemically tailored by linking pairs of single surfactants at the level of their polar heads, giving rise to so-called “gemini” surfactants. We predict that such membranes can acquire a non-zero paranematic order induced by the membrane curvature, which in turn produces curvature instabilities. We call the resulting paranematic order para-antinematic, since it is opposite on opposite sides of the membrane. We find phase transitions toward sponges (L3), tubules, or modulated “egg-carton” phases.

  18. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  19. Chromatic-dispersion measurement by modulation phase-shift method using a Kerr phase-interrogator.

    PubMed

    Baker, Chams; Lu, Yang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2014-09-22

    We present a novel approach for the measurement of chromatic-dispersion in long optical fibers using a modulation phase-shift method based on a Kerr phase-interrogator. This approach utilizes a Kerr phase-interrogator to measure the phase variation of a sinusoidal optical signal induced by traveling in a fiber under test as the laser carrier wavelength and the sinusoidal signal frequency are varied. Chromatic-dispersion measurement for several fibers including a standard single-mode silica fiber and a dispersion-shifted fiber is experimentally demonstrated. The ultrafast response of the Kerr phase-interrogator opens the way for real-time monitoring of chromatic-dispersion in kilometers-long optical fibers.

  20. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  1. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bertarelli, A.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Roesler, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-02

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  2. Silicon sensor prototypes for the Phase II upgrade of the CMS tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergauer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) has been identified as the highest priority program in High Energy Physics in the mid-term future. It will provide the experiments an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500 fb-1 over 10 years of operation, starting in 2025. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented p-p luminosity, especially in terms of radiation levels and occupancy, the CMS collaboration will need to replace its entire strip tracker by a new one. In this paper the baseline layout option for this new Phase-II tracker is shown, together with two variants using a tilted barrel geometry or larger modules from 8-inch silicon wafers. Moreover, the two module concepts are discussed, which consist either of two strip sensors (2S) or of one strip and one pixel sensor (PS). These two designs allow pT discrimination at module level enabling the tracker to contribute to the L1 trigger decision. The paper presents testing results of the macro-pixel-light sensor for the PS module and shows the first electrical characterization of unirradiated, full-scale strip sensor prototypes for the 2S module concept, both on 6- and 8-inch wafers.

  3. Tests with beam setup of the TileCal phase-II upgrade electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reward Hlaluku, Dingane

    2017-09-01

    The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC which will have an average luminosity 5-7 times larger than the nominal Run-2 value. The ATLAS Tile calorimeter plans to introduce a new readout architecture by completely replacing the back-end and front-end electronics for the High Luminosity LHC. The photomultiplier signals will be fully digitized and transferred for every bunch crossing to the off-detector Tile PreProcessor. The Tile PreProcessor will further provide preprocessed digital data to the first level of trigger with improved spatial granularity and energy resolution in contrast to the current analog trigger signals. A single super-drawer module commissioned with the phase-II upgrade electronics is to be inserted into the real detector to evaluate and qualify the new readout and trigger concepts in the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. This new super-drawer, so-called hybrid Demonstrator, must provide analog trigger signals for backward compatibility with the current system. This Demonstrator drawer has been inserted into a Tile calorimeter module prototype to evaluate the performance in the lab. In parallel, one more module has been instrumented with two other front-end electronics options based on custom ASICs (QIE and FATALIC) which are under evaluation. These two modules together with three other modules composed of the current system electronics were exposed to different particles and energies in three test-beam campaigns during 2015 and 2016.

  4. Modulator for tone and binary signals. [phase of modulation of tone and binary signals on carrier waves in communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcchesney, J. R.; Lerner, T.; Fitch, E. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Tones and binary information are transmitted as phase variations on a carrier wave of constant amplitude and frequency. The carrier and tones are applied to a balanced modulator for deriving an output signal including a pair of sidebands relative to the carrier. The carrier is phase modulated by a digital signal so that it is + or - 90 deg out of phase with the predetermined phase of the carrier. The carrier is combined in an algebraic summing device with the phase modulated signal and the balanced modulator output signal. The output of the algebraic summing device is hard limited to derive a constant amplitude and frequency signal having very narrow bandwidth requirements. At a receiver, the tones and binary data are detected with a phase locked loop having a voltage controlled oscillator driving a pair of orthogonal detection channels.

  5. Orientation to Handicapping Conditions: Level II. Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glen, Sally; McCoy, Youlonda

    The second of three training modules for paraprofessionals working with handicapped children, this manual presents information relevant to paraprofessionals in community colleges, public schools, and child care settings. The module is intended for those with some experience and/or education regarding special needs children. The first of two major…

  6. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  7. Distinct type I and type II toxin-antitoxin modules control Salmonella lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Moreno-Córdoba, Inmaculada; Figueroa, Virginia; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2015-03-20

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules contribute to the generation of non-growing cells in response to stress. These modules abound in bacterial pathogens although the bases for this profusion remain largely unknown. Using the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model, here we show that a selected group of TA modules impact bacterial fitness inside eukaryotic cells. We characterized in this pathogen twenty-seven TA modules, including type I and type II TA modules encoding antisense RNA and proteinaceous antitoxins, respectively. Proteomic and gene expression analyses revealed that the pathogen produces numerous toxins of TA modules inside eukaryotic cells. Among these, the toxins HokST, LdrAST, and TisBST, encoded by type I TA modules and T4ST and VapC2ST, encoded by type II TA modules, promote bacterial survival inside fibroblasts. In contrast, only VapC2ST shows that positive effect in bacterial fitness when the pathogen infects epithelial cells. These results illustrate how S. Typhimurium uses distinct type I and type II TA modules to regulate its intracellular lifestyle in varied host cell types. This function specialization might explain why the number of TA modules increased in intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  8. Finding regulatory modules from gene expression data II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao; Kloster, Morten; Wingreen, Ned

    2004-03-01

    We tested the Progressive Iterative Signature Algorithm (PISA) on synthetic data and on a large gene-expression data set for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For synthetic data, the false-positive rate for identifying transcriptional modules was extremely low. For the yeast data set of 1012 experimental conditions for 6206 genes, PISA identified a large number of modules, most of which could be readily assigned to specific biological functions. These included many small modules (with as few as five genes) that could not be easily found by ISA. We compared the set of modules we found to the Gene Ontology annotation database and found many significant overlaps. The modules identified by PISA also compare favorably to experimentally and theoretically determined sets of genes regulated by individual transcription factors.

  9. A phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer with dual-pulse phase modulated probe signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. E.; Vdovenko, V. S.; Gorshkov, B. G.; Potapov, V. T.; Simikin, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    A novel configuration of a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) utilizing dual-pulse phase modulations of the probe signal is presented and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed modulation method enables one to perform the demodulation and reconstruction of an external perturbation signal which impacts the fiber using the phase diversity technique. The proposed phase-sensitive OTDR has some advantages in comparison with conventional solutions, which are discussed. The feasibility of a double pulse OTDR with phase modulation is demonstrated and theoretically proved.

  10. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  14. 47 CFR 90.765 - Licenses term for Phase II licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licenses term for Phase II licenses. 90.765... 220-222 MHz Band Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.765 Licenses term for Phase II licenses. Nationwide licenses authorized pursuant to § 90.717...

  15. Impacts of cross-phase modulation on modulation instability of Airy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingkai; Fu, Xiquan; Bai, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    The modulation instability (MI) of Airy pulses with the influence of cross-phase modulation is studied based on the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations in nonlinear media. The main lobe of Airy pulses can be manifested as breakup of MI under interaction with higher power pumped solitons, although the power of Airy pulses is small. By comparing the main lobe's gain spectrum of MI, the gain spectrum has gradually improved with the increase of power of pumped solitons. The gain spectrum of MI of the main lobe is inversely proportional to the truncation coefficient, and then it gradually approaches to that of Gauss pulses with the truncation coefficient increasing to 1. For the side lobes of Airy pulses, there are similar MI but smaller gain spectrum than the main lobe when the pumped solitons is overlapping with corresponding ones of Airy pulses.

  16. Characterization of a spatial light modulator and its application in phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Kohler, C; Zhang, F; Osten, Wolfgang

    2009-07-10

    Recently a phase retrieval method using a movable phase plate as modulator has been proposed [Phys. Rev. A75, 043805 (2007)]. This method is applicable to general complex-valued fields and exhibits rapid convergence and high robustness to noise. In this paper, we demonstrate how to use this technique to characterize the phase shifting properties of a liquid-crystal modulator, and in turn we use the characterized modulator as the modulation device in the presented phase retrieval method. The adoption of a dynamic modulator gives a much more robust and flexible setup.

  17. Tunable RF photonic phase shifter based on optical DSB modulation and FBG filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yongfeng; Huang, Shanguo; Sun, Kai; Gao, Xinlu; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-01-01

    A broadband RF photonic phase shifter that can achieve the tunable phase shift with little RF amplitude variation is presented. It is based on homodyne mixing technique. The beating between phase-modulated optical carrier and the sidebands can generate RF signal with desired phase shift. Results show the RF phase shifter can achieve a continuous phase shift with low amplitude variation.

  18. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  19. Phase retrieval via spatial light modulator phase modulation in 4f optical setup: numerical inverse imaging with sparse regularization for phase and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2012-01-01

    The 4f optical setup is considered with a wave field modulation by a spatial light modulator located in the focal plane of the first lens. Phase as well as amplitude of the wave field are reconstructed from noisy multiple-intensity observations. The reconstruction is optimal due to a constrained maximum likelihood formulation of the problem. The proposed algorithm is iterative with decoupling of the inverse of the forward propagation of the wave field and the filtering of phase and amplitude. The sparse modeling of phase and amplitude enables the advanced high-accuracy filtering and sharp imaging of the complex-valued wave field. Artifacts typical for the conventional algorithms (wiggles, ringing, waves, etc.) and attributed to optical diffraction can be suppressed by the proposed algorithm.

  20. Arbitrary manipulation of spatial amplitude and phase using phase-only spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structure of a light beam is an important degree of freedom to be extensively explored. By designing simple configurations with phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs), we show the ability to arbitrarily manipulate the spatial full field information (i.e. amplitude and phase) of a light beam. Using this approach to facilitating arbitrary and independent control of spatial amplitude and phase, one can flexibly generate different special kinds of light beams for different specific applications. Multiple collinear orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, and Bessel beams, having both spatial amplitude and phase distributions, are successfully generated in the experiments. Some arbitrary beams with odd-shaped intensity are also generated in the experiments. PMID:25501584

  1. Study of the modulation characterization of phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panezai, Spozmai; Wang, Dayong; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Yunxin

    2012-10-01

    The liquid crystal spatial light modulator is becoming a more and more important device due to its wide applications. During its characterization, the phase modulation is the most important one. In this paper, the modulation characterization of a PLUTO phase-only spatial light modulator based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) is studied by applying the lensless Fourier transform digital holography. In the digital holography, the LCOS is used as a reflected sample which modulates the phase of the incident wavefront with respect to the addressed gray level and gives the information of entire active region. This result is then compared with the result obtained by using conventional Michelson Interferometric method and both results are in good accordance with each other. At last the same holographic set up is used for the imaging of phase grating as a reflected object which is addressed to the LCOS and the clear profilometry of the grating is achieved.

  2. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  3. Parts Counter. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, James A.

    These 23 Student Training Modules on parts counter comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 571.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  4. Cement Finishing. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nama, Joe

    These 20 Student Training Modules on cement finishing comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 575.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of…

  5. Floor Covering. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblen, Ron

    These 21 Student Training Modules on floor covering comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 565.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  6. Spectral changes induced by a phase modulator acting as a time lens

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-07-06

    We show both numerically and experimentally that a phase modulator, acting as a time lens in the Fourier-lens configuration, can induce spectral broadening, narrowing, or shifts, depending on the phase of the modulator cycle. These spectral effects depend on the maximum phase shift that can be imposed by the modulator. In our numerical simulations, pulse spectrum could be compressed by a factor of 8 for a 30 rad phase shift. Experimentally, spectral shifts over a 1.35 nm range and spectral narrowing and broadening by a factor of 2 were demonstrated using a lithium niobate phase modulator with a maximum phase shift of 16 rad at a 10 GHz modulation frequency. All spectral changes were accomplished without employing optical nonlinear effects such as self- or cross-phase modulation.

  7. Chromatic aberration control with liquid crystal spatial phase modulators.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jose L; Fernandez, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2017-05-01

    The chromatic behavior of diffractive optical elements, exhibiting 2π-wrapped phase profiles, implemented into liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLM) is described. A wrapped phase map is only equivalent to the original continuous profile for the design wavelength while at other wavelengths there are unwanted phase jumps and the profile does not correspond to a pure defocus. For those conditions the wrapped profile behaves as a multiple order lens (multi-focal lens). The optical power dispersion for each order is linearly proportional to the wavelength, while the energy of each order depends on the design wavelength and the material dispersion. For practical purposes, for most of the visible range only first order (main defocus) is relevant but two other orders may also be considered depending on the actual PSF of the system. As an application, we demonstrate that the longitudinal chromatic aberration of the eye can be compensated by the diffractive lens dispersion when the appropriate defocus is programmed into the SLM.

  8. Fatty Acid Concentration and Phase Transitions Modulate Aβ Aggregation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rana, Pratip; Dean, Dexter N; Steen, Edward D; Vaidya, Ashwin; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan; Ghosh, Preetam

    2017-09-04

    Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides is a significant event that underpins Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Aβ aggregates, especially the low-molecular weight oligomers, are the primary toxic agents in AD and hence, there is increasing interest in understanding their formation and behavior. Aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process in which the pre-nucleation events are dominated by Aβ homotypic interactions. Dynamic flux and stochasticity during pre-nucleation renders the reactions susceptible to perturbations by other molecules. In this context, we investigate the heterotypic interactions between Aβ and fatty acids (FAs) by two independent tool-sets such as reduced order modelling (ROM) and ensemble kinetic simulation (EKS). We observe that FAs influence Aβ dynamics distinctively in three broadly-defined FA concentration regimes containing non-micellar, pseudo-micellar or micellar phases. While the non-micellar phase promotes on-pathway fibrils, pseudo-micellar and micellar phases promote predominantly off-pathway oligomers, albeit via subtly different mechanisms. Importantly off-pathway oligomers saturate within a limited molecular size, and likely with a different overall conformation than those formed along the on-pathway, suggesting the generation of distinct conformeric strains of Aβ, which may have profound phenotypic outcomes. Our results validate previous experimental observations and provide insights into potential influence of biological interfaces in modulating Aβ aggregation pathways.

  9. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.; Ostovic, V.

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  10. Infrared imaging based on quantum dot optical phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Yang, Tao; Peng, Chen; Martini, Rainer

    2011-08-01

    In the past two decades, there is an increasing interest in developing new infrared photodetectors based on novel nanostructures, such as quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) and quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). However, the commonly used electrical read-out approach limits the resolution of QWIP/QDIP infrared imaging to around 1 mega pixel. In this paper, we reported our theoretical study on an all-optical readout based on quantum dot phase modulation, which provides a new way for the intersubband infrared detection by measuring the phase change in the transmitted interband near infrared (NIR) and allows a high-resolution middle infrared (MIR) or far infrared (FIR) imaging. Utilizing the long life time in the quantum dots, the intersubband infrared resonant light is used to control the interband NIR resonant light phase. An infrared image can be converted into a visible or near infrared image, which can be easily captured with a high resolution CCD camera. It provides a new way to obtain a high resolution infrared image.

  11. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John Michael; Ostovic, Vlado

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  12. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  13. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  14. Polarization Mechanisms in Phase II Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-12

    34 OdRO a mnk W) Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride), x-rays, piezelectricity, polarization, poling FAWWRmCT ffls~ -ew nam 9 Uf"Oo me..Mv £*mM NOWsA Unoriented...phase II films were poled with fields up to 3.2 MV/cm at room o) temperature. A determination of the piezoelectric strain coefficient provided a measure...sT. VW OtU.4LF-41U.4" ". . -. I u CIImVP CLAI IaICATIOM OV- VPI PU.I (Ul... O111 111..41 the poling field and different polarization mechanisms appear

  15. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  16. General analytic solution for far-field phase and amplitude control, with a phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lewis Z; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Lloyd, David T; Hooker, Simon M

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical solution for the phase introduced by a phase-only spatial light modulator to generate far-field phase and amplitude distributions within a domain of interest. The solution is demonstrated experimentally and shown to enable excellent control of the far-field amplitude and phase.

  17. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  18. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Girard, T. A.; Fernandes, A. C.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a 14.1 kg d measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30 kg d Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |a{sub p}|<0.32 for M{sub W}=50 GeV/c{sup 2} on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3x10{sup -5} pb at M{sub W}=45 GeV/c{sup 2} is obtained.

  19. Standards Improvement Project-Phase II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-01-05

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) through this final rule is continuing to remove and revise provisions of its standards that are outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, or inconsistent, or can be clarified or simplified by being written in plain language. The Agency completed Phase I of the Standards Improvement Project in June 1998. In this Phase II of the Standards Improvement Project, OSHA is again revising or removing a number of health provisions in its standards for general industry, shipyard employment, and construction. The Agency believes that the changes streamline and make more consistent the regulatory requirements in OSHA health and safety standards. In some cases, OSHA has made substantive revisions to requirements because they are outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, or inconsistent with more recently promulgated health standards. The Agency believes these revisions will reduce regulatory requirements for employers without reducing employee protection.

  20. Identification of 14 quercetin phase II mono- and mixed conjugates and their formation by rat and human phase II in vitro model systems.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Hester; Boersma, Marelle G; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2004-11-01

    In this study, the HPLC, UV-vis, LC-MS, and 1H NMR characteristics of 14 different phase II mono- and mixed conjugates of quercetin were determined, providing a useful tool in the identification of quercetin phase II metabolite patterns in various biological systems. Using these data, the phase II metabolism of quercetin by different rat and human liver and intestine in vitro models, including cell lines, S9 samples, and hepatocytes, was investigated. A comparison of quercetin phase II metabolism between rat and human liver and intestinal cell lines, S9, and hepatocytes showed considerable variation in the nature and ratios of quercetin conjugate formation. It could be established that the intestine contributes significantly to the phase II metabolism of quercetin, especially to its sulfation, that organ-dependent phase II metabolism in rat and man differ significantly, and that human interindividual variation is higher for quercetin sulfation than for glucuronidation or methylation. Furthermore, quercetin conjugation by different in vitro models from corresponding origins may differ significantly. The identification of the various mono- and mixed quercetin phase II conjugates revealed significant differences in phase II conjugation by a variety of in vitro models and led to the conclusion that none of the in vitro models converted quercetin to a phase II metabolite mixture similar to the in vivo plasma metabolite pattern of quercetin. Altogether, the identification of a wide range of phase II metabolites of quercetin as presented in this study allows the determination of quercetin phase II biotransformation patterns and opens the way for a better-funded assessment of the biological activity of quercetin in a variety of biological systems.

  1. Texture In Amplitude Modulated (AM) And Phase Derivative (PD) Echograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thijssen, Johan M.; Oosterveld, Bernard J.; Romijn, R. L.

    1987-09-01

    The information about the condition of parenchymal tissues is obscured by the performance characteristics of echographic equipment. The authors investigated by realistic 3-D simulations the so-called beam diffraction effects on two echographic imaging modalities: amplitude modulated (AM) and phase derivative (PD) echograms. Furthermore the modification of the image texture by attenuation was quantified. In order to assess the potentials of statistical analysis of texture for medical diagnostics the effects caused by varying the density of scattering particles in a homogeneous medium were studied. It is concluded, that unless beam diffraction effects are either prevented, or adequately corrected for, quantitative texture analysis is not meaningful. In addition, the data have to be corrected for the non-linear and time dependent amplifier characteristics. Data-acquisition and preprocessing equipment performing these tasks has been developed at the authors' laboratory.

  2. Quantitative EEG Signatures through Amplitude and Phase Modulation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akaash

    2017-01-01

    Cortical spatiotemporal signal patterns based on object recognition can be discerned from visual stimulation. These are in the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) patterns, which contain perceptual information gathered from sensory input. A high-density Electroencephalograph (EEG) device consisting of 48 electrodes with a spacing of 5 mm was utilized to measure frontal lobe activity in order to capture event-related potentials from visual stimuli. Four randomized stimuli representing different levels of salient responsiveness were measured to determine if mild stimuli can be discerned from more extreme stimuli. AM/PM response patterns were detected between mild and more salient stimuli across participants. AM patterns presented distinct signatures for each stimulus. AM patterns had the highest number of incidents detected in the middle of the frontal lobe. Through this work, we can expand our encyclopedia of neural signatures to object recognition, and provide a broader understanding of quantitative neural responses to external stimuli. The results provide a quantitative approach utilizing spatiotemporal patterns to analyze where distinct AM patterns can be linked to object perception. PMID:28840113

  3. Quantitative EEG Signatures through Amplitude and Phase Modulation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mark H; Padmanabha, Akaash

    2017-01-01

    Cortical spatiotemporal signal patterns based on object recognition can be discerned from visual stimulation. These are in the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) patterns, which contain perceptual information gathered from sensory input. A high-density Electroencephalograph (EEG) device consisting of 48 electrodes with a spacing of 5 mm was utilized to measure frontal lobe activity in order to capture event-related potentials from visual stimuli. Four randomized stimuli representing different levels of salient responsiveness were measured to determine if mild stimuli can be discerned from more extreme stimuli. AM/PM response patterns were detected between mild and more salient stimuli across participants. AM patterns presented distinct signatures for each stimulus. AM patterns had the highest number of incidents detected in the middle of the frontal lobe. Through this work, we can expand our encyclopedia of neural signatures to object recognition, and provide a broader understanding of quantitative neural responses to external stimuli. The results provide a quantitative approach utilizing spatiotemporal patterns to analyze where distinct AM patterns can be linked to object perception.

  4. Ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation with high-speed phase and amplitude modulation capability.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Amir; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-05-04

    We introduce a novel photonic-assisted ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation setup capable of high-speed phase and amplitude modulation of the individual arbitrary waveforms. The waveform generator is based on an optical interferometer, within which a high-resolution optical pulse shaper and integrated optic phase and intensity modulators are placed, followed by frequency-to-time mapping. The phase and amplitude of each ultrabroadband waveform within the generated sequence can be continuously tuned by adjusting the driving voltages applied to the phase and intensity modulator pair, hence overcoming the slow update speed of conventional spatial light modulator-based pulse shapers. Moreover, this data modulation is completely independent from and does not interfere with RF waveform design. Programmable ultrabroadband RF sequences, spanning more than 4.7 octaves from 2 to 52 GHz, are modulated with real-time data in up to 16 level, M-ary phase-shift keying and quadrature amplitude modulation formats.

  5. Experimental Determination of the Hamiltonian for Synchrotron Motion with RF Phase Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, Michiko

    2003-07-11

    Synchrotron motion with rf phase modulation was studied experimentally. Poincare maps in the resonant processing frame were obtained from the experimental data and compared with the tori of the resonant Hamiltonian. The experimental data revealed island structure in longitudinal phase space. Experimental results for synchrotron motion excited by phase modulation at the third harmonic of the synchrotron frequency are also reported.

  6. Er:YAG clinical results on hard tissue: phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozean, Colette D.; Powell, G. L.

    1998-04-01

    Objective: In Phase I, we demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the pulsed 2.94 micron Er:YAG laser for caries removal, cavity preparation and laser etching utilizing in vivo teeth scheduled for removal to quantitatively verify the safety of the product for up to one year following treatment. Phase II was a continuation of this study evaluating in vivo teeth to verify the safety and efficacy of the Er:YAG in a long-term follow-up study. Methods: We randomly divided the patients into two groups: a laser group and a control group, which employed the high speed drill. The investigators rated clinical efficacy by several criteria, evaluated pain and measured pulpal vitality up to two years following treatment. This phase consisted of 512 procedures that made up the laser group and 357 procedures that made up the control group. Conclusions: The results from this phase showed that the Er:YAG laser was able to perform as well as, if not better than, the drill in caries removal, cavity preparation, and acid etching alone. Use of the laser virtually eliminated the need for anesthesia. The Er:YAG laser is safe and efficacious for removal of caries, cavity preparation and etching prior to acid etching.

  7. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  8. Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design for combination trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Yuan, Ying; Johnson, Valen E

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials of combination therapies for the treatment of cancer are playing an increasingly important role in the battle against this disease. To more efficiently handle the large number of combination therapies that must be tested, we propose a novel Bayesian phase II adaptive screening design to simultaneously select among possible treatment combinations involving multiple agents. Methods Our design is based on formulating the selection procedure as a Bayesian hypothesis testing problem in which the superiority of each treatment combination is equated to a single hypothesis. During the trial conduct, we use the current values of the posterior probabilities of all hypotheses to adaptively allocate patients to treatment combinations. Results Simulation studies show that the proposed design substantially outperforms the conventional multiarm balanced factorial trial design. The proposed design yields a significantly higher probability for selecting the best treatment while allocating substantially more patients to efficacious treatments. Limitations The proposed design is most appropriate for the trials combining multiple agents and screening out the efficacious combination to be further investigated. Conclusions The proposed Bayesian adaptive phase II screening design substantially outperformed the conventional complete factorial design. Our design allocates more patients to better treatments while providing higher power to identify the best treatment at the end of the trial. PMID:23359875

  9. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1–Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity. PMID:19185948

  10. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1-Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity.

  11. Low voltage and high resolution phase modulator based on blue phase liquid crystals with external compact optical system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xing, Yufei; Guo, Zhengbo; Li, Qing

    2015-06-15

    Liquid crystal phase modulators are emerging as a new technological advancement, since they can be used for a wide range of applications. To improve their performance, polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC) phase modulators with fast response time and accurate phase profile become a necessary. Here, we proposed a facile PS-BPLC phase modulator to achieve particularly low voltage and high resolution. By employing a specific external compact optical system setup, the driving voltage is reduced to 26.09V to obtain 2π phase change at the wavelength of 532 nm. An accurate numerical modeling is also conducted to provide a systematic investigation of the fringing electric field effect to the performance of high resolution PS-BPLC phase modulator. The wavefront distortion caused by the fringing electric field can be automatically compensated to generate accurate phase profile for fast response liquid crystal phase modulator. This work provides a new protocol to realize liquid crystal on silicon based fast response and high resolution phase modulator.

  12. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses Part II. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    II: Effects of Multiple Doses Part !I: 2,4-T)initrotoiuene I Progres Report No. 3 oNovember 1978 by 3I Cheng-Chun Lee U Hirty V. Ellis, III Jo.,n J...Sciences Division November 1978 vii :. •I~~~~AMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS ... ... PHASE IIz Effects of Multiple Doses m . ............... PART...161 xi MAMOMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITION COMPOUNDS PHASE II: Effects of Multiple Dones PART II: 2,4

  13. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  14. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  15. General algorithm to optimize the diffraction efficiency of a phase-type spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Cibula, Matthew A; McIntyre, David H

    2013-08-01

    We present a general approach for optimizing the diffraction efficiency of a phase-type spatial light modulator (SLM). While the SLM displays a one-dimensional phase grating, the phase shift of one pixel in the grating is varied and the first-order diffraction efficiency is measured. This is repeated pixel-by-pixel to find the optimum phase encoding for the device that maximizes the diffraction efficiency. This method compensates for nonlinearity of the modulator phase response and is especially useful for optimizing modulators with less than 2π phase shift.

  16. Closed-loop fiber-optic gyroscope with a sawtooth phase-modulated feedback.

    PubMed

    Ebberg, A; Schiffner, G

    1985-06-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of a closed-loop fiber-optic gyroscope are reported. Phase nulling is accomplished by applying a sawtooth modulation to an integrated-optic phase modulator located at one side of the sensing loop. The frequency of the phase modulation is proportional to the rotation rate, thus permitting a digital readout. The influence of a finite flyback period on the scale factor is investigated.

  17. High-speed multilevel phase/amplitude spatial light modulator advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauchert, Kipp A.; Serati, Steven A.

    1999-03-01

    Recent and near-term advancements in our multi-level (analog) phase/amplitude liquid crystal spatial light modulators will be presented. These advancements include higher resolution, smaller pixel pitch, planarized pixel pads, and higher speed modulation for phase-only, amplitude-only, and phase- amplitude-coupled modulation. These devices have applications in optical processing, optical storage, holographic display, and beam steering. Design criteria and experimental data will be presented.

  18. Investigations of SBS and Laser Gain Competition in High-Power Phase Modulated Fiber Amplifiers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-26

    through radio frequency (RF) phase modulation. Generally, linewidth broadening is achieved through a filtered microwave white noise source (WNS). WNS...signals. By seeding with appropriate wavelengths and seed powers, the effective length of the amplifier is shortened as the narrow linewidth signal...line (phase modulated) 1064 nm seed in conjunction with a broadband 1036 nm seed source. 2. PHASE MODULATED LASER GAIN COMPETITION Recently, we have

  19. Saturated semiconductor optical amplifier phase modulation for long range laser radar applications.

    PubMed

    Carns, Jennifer L; Duncan, Bradley D; Dierking, Matthew P

    2012-08-20

    We investigate the use of a semiconductor optical amplifier operated in the saturation regime as a phase modulator for long range laser radar applications. The nature of the phase and amplitude modulation resulting from a high peak power Gaussian pulse, and the impact this has on the ideal pulse response of a laser radar system, is explored. We also present results of a proof-of-concept laboratory demonstration using phase-modulated pulses to interrogate a stationary target.

  20. Randomized Phase II Trial of Sulindac for Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, Paul J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L. Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E.; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E.; Edell, Eric S.; Rickman, Otis B.; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F.; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥ 30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). Methods At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150 mg bid or an identical placebo bid for six months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Results Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n = 31 and n = 30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p = 0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p = 0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.92). Conclusions Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150 mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention

  1. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac for lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Rickman, Otis B; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2013-03-01

    Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150mg bid or an identical placebo bid for 6 months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n=31 and n=30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p=0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p=0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p=0.92). Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  2. Dopaminergic modulation of phase reversal in desert locusts

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Ahmad M.; O'Connor, Vincent; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Newland, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to modify their behavior, physiology, and morphology to adapt to environmental change. The global pest, the desert locust, shows two extreme phenotypes; a solitarious phase that is relatively harmless and a gregarious phase that forms swarms and causes extensive agricultural and economic damage. In the field, environmental conditions can drive isolated animals into crowded populations and previous studies have identified the biogenic amine serotonin as a key determinant of this transition. Here we take an integrated approach to investigate the neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral correlates defined by a laboratory based paradigm that mimics facets of swarm break down as gregarious locusts become isolated. Following isolation there was an increased propensity of locusts to avoid conspecifics, and show a reduced locomotion. Changes in choice behavior occurred within 1 h of isolation although isolation-related changes progressed with increased isolation time. Isolation was accompanied by changes in the levels of the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin within the CNS within 1 h. Dopamine levels were higher in isolated animals and we focused on the role played by this transmitter in synaptic changes that may underpin solitarization. Dopamine reduced synaptic efficacy at a key central synapse between campaniform sensilla (CS) and a fast extensor tibiae motor neuron that is involved in limb movement. We also show that dopamine injection into the haemocoel was sufficient to induce solitarious-like behavior in otherwise gregarious locusts. Further, injection of a dopamine antagonist, fluphenazine, into isolated locusts induced gregarious-like behavior. This highlights that dopaminergic modulation plays an important role in the plasticity underpinning phase transition and sets a context to deepen the understanding of the complementary role that distinct neuromodulators play in polyphenism in locusts. PMID:25426037

  3. Arbitrary phase modulation for optical spectral control and suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Achar V.; Nilsson, Johan

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the use of external phase modulation to broaden the linewidth of a laser source. We use nonlinear optimization to find phase modulations that create nearly tophat-shaped discrete spectra and thus the highest total power within a limited linewidth and a limited peak spectral power density. Such phase modulations and spectra can be realized with an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and are attractive for suppressing stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fiber. Compared to alternative modulation approaches, the AWG benefits from a large number of degrees of freedom and well-controlled spectral phase in the AWG output.

  4. A 100 Mbps resonant cavity phase modulator for coherent optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Robinson, Deborah L.; Hemmati, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A resonant cavity electro-optic phase modulator has been designed and implemented to operate at a data rate of 100 Mbps. The modulator consists of an electro-optic crystal located in a highly resonant cavity. The cavity is electro-optically tuned on and off resonance, and the phase dispersion near the cavity resonance provides the output phase modulation. The performance of the modulator was measured by first heterodyne detecting the signal to an intermediate frequency and then measuring the spectral characteristics using an RF spectrum analyzer. The measured phase shift is shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Early investigational therapeutics for gastrointestinal motility disorders: from animal studies to Phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The most common gastrointestinal disorders that include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function (such as chronic [functional] diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation) and opioid-induced constipation. These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation and opioid-induced constipation, based on animal to Phase II studies. Medications with complete Phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders and robust pharmacological studies from animal to Phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients.

  6. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  7. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  8. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  9. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  10. Experimental observation of excess noise in a detuned phase-modulation harmonic mode-locking laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shiquan; Bao Xiaoyi

    2006-09-15

    The intracavity phase-modulated laser can work in two distinct stages: 1) phase mode-locking when the applied modulation frequency is equal to the cavity's fundamental frequency or one of its harmonics, and 2) the FM laser oscillation at a moderate detuned modulation frequency. In this paper, we experimentally studied the noise buildup process in the transition from FM laser oscillation to phase mode-locking in a phase-modulated laser. We found that the relaxation oscillation frequency varies with the modulation frequency detuning and the relaxation oscillation will occur twice in the transition region. Between these two relaxation oscillations, the supermode noise can be significantly enhanced, which is evidence of excess noise in laser systems. All of these results can be explained by the theory of Floquet modes in a phase-modulated laser cavity.

  11. Ring resonator-based on-chip modulation transformer for high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Hoekman, Marcel; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-11-04

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel wideband on-chip photonic modulation transformer for phase-modulated microwave photonic links. The proposed device is able to transform phase-modulated optical signals into intensity-modulated versions (or vice versa) with nearly zero conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise. It is constructed using waveguide-based ring resonators, which features simple architecture, stable operation, and easy reconfigurability. Beyond the stand-alone functionality, the proposed device can also be integrated with other functional building blocks of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) to create on-chip complex microwave photonic signal processors. As an application example, a PIC consisting of two such modulation transformers and a notch filter has been designed and realized in TriPleX(TM) waveguide technology. The realized device uses a 2 × 2 splitting circuit and 3 ring resonators with a free spectral range of 25 GHz, which are all equipped with continuous tuning elements. The device can perform phase-to-intensity modulation transform and carrier suppression simultaneously, which enables high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonics links (PM-MPLs). Associated with the bias-free and low-complexity advantages of the phase modulators, a single-fiber-span PM-MPL with a RF bandwidth of 12 GHz (3 dB-suppression band 6 to 18 GHz) has been demonstrated comprising the proposed PIC, where the achieved spurious-free dynamic range performance is comparable to that of Class-AB MPLs using low-biased Mach-Zehnder modulators.

  12. Writing Articles for News Media. Self-Paced Instructional Module. Module Number II-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Kent

    One of 33 self-paced instructional modules for training industry services leaders to provide guidance in the performance of manpower services by public agencies to new and expanding private industry, this module contains three sequential learning activities on writing news articles about industry training activities. (Three of the other modules…

  13. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  14. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  15. A Beamforming Approach to Phase-Amplitude Modulation Analysis of Multi-Channel EEG

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, A.L.; Babadi, B.; Prerau, M.J.; Mukamel, E.A.; Brown, E.N.; Purdon, P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Phase-amplitude modulation is a form of cross frequency coupling where the phase of one frequency influences the amplitude of another higher frequency. It has been observed in neurophysiological recordings during sensory, motor, and cognitive tasks, as well as during general anesthesia. In this paper, we describe a novel beamforming procedure to improve estimation of phase-amplitude modulation. We apply this method to 64-channel EEG data recorded during propofol general anesthesia. The method improves the sensitivity of phase-amplitude analyses, and can be applied to a variety of multi-channel neuroscience data where phase-amplitude modulation is present. PMID:23367474

  16. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications: Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jack H.; Ross, James A.; Hadden, Steve; Gonzalez, Mario; Rogers, Zach; Henderson, B. Kyle

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. During the Phase I MVIS program, funded by AFRL and DARPA, a hybrid piezoelectric/D-strut isolator was built and tested to prove its viability for retroffitable insertion into sensitive payload attachments. A second phase of the program, which is jointly funded between AFRL and Honeywell, was started in November of 2002 to build a hexapod and the supporting interface electronics and do a flight demonstration of the technology. The MVIS-II program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. This paper describes the simulations, overall test plan and product development status of the overall MVIS-II program as it approaches flight.

  17. Elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis: phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marion; Oberle, Kathleen; Grace, Michael; Russell, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II clinical trial was to examine safety of elk velvet antler taken concurrently with rheumatoid arthritis medications and to determine efficacy by dose to enable sample size estimation and dose standardization for a larger study. Forty patients with stage II rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 arms of 10 patients each. One group received placebo and the other 3 groups received 2, 4, or 6 capsules (215 mg) of elk velvet antler with appropriate placebos to total 6 capsules daily. All subjects continued to take their arthritis medications. Outcome variables were reported adverse events and health status. At 1 month, there were no significant differences between groups in number of adverse events or health status. The greatest improvement was in the 6 elk velvet antler group, the least was in the placebo group. Differences were not statistically significant. It was concluded that elk velvet antler can be taken safely in conjunction with a number of rheumatoid arthritis medications and should be studied further to assess efficacy.

  18. Full-color 3D display using binary phase modulation and speckle reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoba, Osamu; Masuda, Kazunobu; Harada, Syo; Nitta, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    One of the 3D display systems for full-color reconstruction by using binary phase modulation is presented. The improvement of reconstructed objects is achieved by optimizing the binary phase modulation and accumulating the speckle patterns by changing the random phase distributions. The binary phase pattern is optimized by the modified Frenel ping-pong algorithm. Numerical and experimental demonstrations of full color reconstruction are presented.

  19. Compact direct space-to-time pulse shaping with a phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Mansuryan, T; Kalashyan, M; Lhermite, J; Suran, E; Kermene, V; Barthelemy, A; Louradour, F

    2011-05-01

    A very compact and innovative pulse shaper is proposed and demonstrated. The standard architecture for pulse shaping that is composed of diffraction gratings associated with an amplitude-phase spatial light modulator (SLM) is replaced by a single phase-only SLM. It acts as a pulse stretcher and as an amplitude and phase modulator at the same time. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the accurate control of amplitude and phase of shaped pulses.

  20. Conversion of a transverse density modulation into a longitudinal phase space modulation using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2010-03-01

    We report on an experiment to produce a train of sub-picosecond microbunches using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The generation of a modulation on the longitudinal phase space is done by converting an initial horizontal modulation produced using a multislits mask. The preliminary experimental data clearly demonstrate the conversion process. To date only the final energy modulation has been measured. However numerical simulations, in qualitative agreement with the measurements, indicate that the conversion process should also introduce a temporal modulation.

  1. Improved phase generated carrier demodulation algorithm for eliminating light intensity disturbance and phase modulation amplitude variation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Youwan; Zeng, Hualin; Li, Liyan; Zhou, Yan

    2012-10-10

    In this paper we propose a novel, improved, phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation algorithm based on the PGC-differential-cross-multiplying approach (PGC-DCM). The influence of phase modulation amplitude variation and light intensity disturbance (LID) on traditional PGC demodulation algorithms is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. An experimental system for remote no-contact microvibration measurement is set up to confirm the stability of the improved PGC algorithm with LID. In the experiment, when the LID with a frequency of 50 Hz and the depth of 0.3 is applied, the signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SINAD) of the improved PGC algorithm is 19 dB, higher than the SINAD of the PGC-DCM algorithm, which is 8.7 dB.

  2. Photonic ultrawideband impulse radio generation and modulation over a fiber link using a phase modulator and a delay interferometer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Sun, Junqiang

    2012-08-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and flexible photonic scheme for generation and modulation of ultrawideband (UWB) using a phase modulator and a fiber delay interferometer (DI)-based multichannel frequency discrimination. By introducing a Gaussian signal to the phase modulator, the UWB polarity-switchable doublet pulses can be achieved by combining the pair of UWB monocycle pulses with inverted polarities at the DI outputs under proper time delay. Furthermore, the pulse shape modulation, pulse position modulation, and on-off keying can be performed by coding the electrical data patterns and adjusting the time delay between the two monocycle pulses. Only a laser source introduced in the architecture guarantees the excellent dispersion tolerance over 75 km optical fiber link for UWB pulse sequence, which has potential application in future high-speed UWB impulse radio over optical fiber access networks.

  3. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  4. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. II-A to II-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 4 modules on vital signs is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students, through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module may…

  5. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. II-A to II-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 4 modules on vital signs is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students, through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings. Each module may…

  6. Analysis of SBIR phase I and phase II review results at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J; Calkins, B M

    1991-09-01

    A cohort of phase I and phase II summary statements for the SBIR grant applications was evaluated to determine the strengths and weaknesses in approved and disapproved applications. An analysis of outcome variables (disapproval or unfunded status) was examined with respect to exposure variables (strengths or shortcomings). Logistic regression models were developed for comparisons to measure the predictive value of shortcomings and strengths to the outcomes. Disapproved phase I results were compared with an earlier 1985 study. Although the magnitude of the frequencies of shortcomings was greater in the present study, the relative rankings within shortcoming class were more alike than different. Also, the frequencies of shortcomings were, with one exception, not significantly different in the two studies. Differences in the summary statement review may have accounted for some differences observed between the 1985 data and results of the present study. Comparisons of Approved/Disapproved and Approved-Unfunded/Funded yielded the following observations. For phase I applicants, a lack of a clearly stated, testable hypothesis, a poorly qualified or described investigative team, and inadequate methodological approaches contributed significantly (in that order) to a rating of disapproval. A critical flaw for phase II proposals was failure to accomplish objectives of the phase I study. Methodological issues also dominate the distinctions in both comparison groups. A clear result of the data presented here and that published previously is that SBIR applicants need continuing assistance to improve the chances of their success. These results should serve as a guide to assist NIH staff as they provide information to prospective applicants focusing on key elements of the application. A continuing review of the SBIR program would be helpful to evaluate the quality of the submitted science.

  7. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  8. The Development of New Measures of Cognitive Variables in Elementary School Children (Phase II). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, J. William; And Others

    This report covers Phase II of a two-phase project concerned with the development of new measures of cognitive variables in elementary school children. The four tasks undertaken in Phase II were: (1) prepare, revise and describe instruments designed to measure the cognitive variables categorized as concept formation, language development, logical…

  9. Corticospinal Modulations during Bimanual Movement with Different Relative Phases

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yoshifumi; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate corticospinal modulation of bimanual (BM) movement with different relative phases (RPs). The participants rhythmically abducted and adducted the right index finger (unimanual (UM) movement) or both index fingers (BM movement) with a cyclic duration of 1 s. The RP of BM movement, defined as the time difference between one hand movement and the other hand movement, was 0°, 90°, or 180°. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the right flexor dorsal interosseous muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were obtained during UM or BM movement. Corticospinal excitability in the first dorsal interosseous muscle during BM movement with 90° RP was higher than that during UM movement or BM movement with 0° or 180° RP. The correlation between muscle activity level and corticospinal excitability during BM movement with 90° RP was smaller than that during UM movement or BM movement with 0° or 180° RP. The higher corticospinal excitability during BM movement with 90° RP may be caused by the greater effort expended to execute a difficult task, the involvement of interhemispheric interaction, a motor binding process, or task acquisition. The lower dependency of corticospinal excitability on the muscle activity level during BM movement with 90° RP may reflect the minor corticospinal contribution to BM movement with an RP that is not in the attractor state. PMID:27014026

  10. Phase modulation of insulin pulses enhances glucose regulation and enables inter-islet synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boah; Song, Taegeun; Lee, Kayoung; Kim, Jaeyoon; Han, Seungmin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho; Jo, Junghyo

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner from multiple micro-organs called the islets of Langerhans. The amplitude and phase (shape) of insulin secretion are modulated by numerous factors including glucose. The role of phase modulation in glucose homeostasis is not well understood compared to the obvious contribution of amplitude modulation. In the present study, we measured Ca2+ oscillations in islets as a proxy for insulin pulses, and we observed their frequency and shape changes under constant/alternating glucose stimuli. Here we asked how the phase modulation of insulin pulses contributes to glucose regulation. To directly answer this question, we developed a phenomenological oscillator model that drastically simplifies insulin secretion, but precisely incorporates the observed phase modulation of insulin pulses in response to glucose stimuli. Then, we mathematically modeled how insulin pulses regulate the glucose concentration in the body. The model of insulin oscillation and glucose regulation describes the glucose-insulin feedback loop. The data-based model demonstrates that the existence of phase modulation narrows the range within which the glucose concentration is maintained through the suppression/enhancement of insulin secretion in conjunction with the amplitude modulation of this secretion. The phase modulation is the response of islets to glucose perturbations. When multiple islets are exposed to the same glucose stimuli, they can be entrained to generate synchronous insulin pulses. Thus, we conclude that the phase modulation of insulin pulses is essential for glucose regulation and inter-islet synchronization. PMID:28235104

  11. Phase modulation of insulin pulses enhances glucose regulation and enables inter-islet synchronization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boah; Song, Taegeun; Lee, Kayoung; Kim, Jaeyoon; Han, Seungmin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho; Jo, Junghyo

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner from multiple micro-organs called the islets of Langerhans. The amplitude and phase (shape) of insulin secretion are modulated by numerous factors including glucose. The role of phase modulation in glucose homeostasis is not well understood compared to the obvious contribution of amplitude modulation. In the present study, we measured Ca2+ oscillations in islets as a proxy for insulin pulses, and we observed their frequency and shape changes under constant/alternating glucose stimuli. Here we asked how the phase modulation of insulin pulses contributes to glucose regulation. To directly answer this question, we developed a phenomenological oscillator model that drastically simplifies insulin secretion, but precisely incorporates the observed phase modulation of insulin pulses in response to glucose stimuli. Then, we mathematically modeled how insulin pulses regulate the glucose concentration in the body. The model of insulin oscillation and glucose regulation describes the glucose-insulin feedback loop. The data-based model demonstrates that the existence of phase modulation narrows the range within which the glucose concentration is maintained through the suppression/enhancement of insulin secretion in conjunction with the amplitude modulation of this secretion. The phase modulation is the response of islets to glucose perturbations. When multiple islets are exposed to the same glucose stimuli, they can be entrained to generate synchronous insulin pulses. Thus, we conclude that the phase modulation of insulin pulses is essential for glucose regulation and inter-islet synchronization.

  12. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  14. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  15. Phase II drugs under investigation for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Baiula, Monica; Spampinato, Santi

    2014-12-01

    Ocular allergies comprise a spectrum of conditions that are underreported and underdiagnosed, and are frequently associated with rhinoconjunctivitis. Although allergic conjunctivitis is often not a sight-threatening condition, it could have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, morbidity and productivity. A variety of agents are available for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, including antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, dual action agents, glucocorticoids, calcineurin inhibitors and immunotherapy. The goal of this review is to investigate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ocular allergy. Within, the authors analyze the pharmacological management of allergic conjunctivitis and highlight Phase II clinical trial studies. Recent findings about the pathophysiology of allergic conjunctivitis have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ocular disease. This, in turn, has led to the identification of novel targets, which, in turn, has led to the development of new therapeutic agents that are currently under evaluation in the first phases of clinical development. The most interesting agents, under development, are the new topical glucocorticoids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, resolvins, interleukin-1 receptor antagonists and integrin antagonists. The authors now await promising results, which can confirm the therapeutic value of these novel emerging drugs for treating allergic conjunctivitis.

  16. Thermal imaging QC for silicon strip staves of the ATLAS phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergel Infante, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    A new silicon strip detector is part of the phase II upgrade of the ATLAS inner tracker. Light-material carbon fiber honeycomb sandwich staves serve as mechanical support for the strip sensors and readout modules and to move the dissipated heat out of the detector. A cooling pipe inside the stave is embedded in heat-conducting foam that thermally connects the pipe with the readout modules. The staves are required to pass a set of quality control (QC) tests before they are populated with readout modules. One test uses a non-invasive inspection method of infrared (IR) thermal imaging of the heat path while the stave is cooled to around -40°C at ambient room temperature. Imperfections in the manufacturing, such as the delamination of the stave facing from the foam, will exhibit a different temperature profile compared to a flawless stave. We report on the current status of the thermal imaging QC measurements including a characterization of various contributions to the uncertainties in the temperature reading of the IR camera such as pedestal variations, common-mode noise, vignetting, and statistical fluctuations across the field of view.

  17. Coherent combining of fiber-laser-pumped frequency converters using all fiber electro-optic modulator for active phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Canat, G.; Le Gouët, J.; Goular, D.; Lombard, L.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) by active phase control could be useful for power scaling fiber-laser-pumped optical frequency converters like OPOs. However, a phase modulator operating at the frequency-converted wavelength is needed, which is non standard component. Fortunately, nonlinear conversion processes rely on a phase-matching condition correlating, not only the wave vectors of the coupled waves, but also their phases. This paper demonstrates that, using this phase correlation for indirect control of the phase, coherent combining of optical frequency converters is feasible using standard all-fibered electro-optic modulators. For the sake of demonstration, this new technique is experimentally applied twice for continuous wave second-harmonic-generator (SHG) combination: i) combining 2 SHG of 1.55-μm erbium-doped fiber amplifiers in PPLN crystals generating 775-nm beams; ii) combining 2 SHG of 1.064-μm ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers in LBO crystals generating 532-nm beams. Excellent CBC efficiency is achieved on the harmonic waves in both these experiments, with λ/20 and λ/30 residual phase error respectively. In the second experiment, I/Q phase detection is added on fundamental and harmonic waves to measure their phase variations simultaneously. These measurements confirm the theoretical expectations and formulae of correlation between the phases of the fundamental and harmonic waves. Unexpectedly, in both experiments, when harmonic waves are phase-locked, a residual phase difference remains between the fundamen tal waves. Measurements of the spectrum of these residual phase differences locate them above 50 Hz, revealing that they most probably originate in fast-varying optical path differences induced by turbulence and acoustic-waves on the experimental breadboard.

  18. Spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and phase-only spatial light modulator for constructing arbitrary complex fields.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2014-02-24

    We propose a spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM), by which arbitrary complex-amplitude fields can be generated with higher spatial resolution and diffraction efficiency than off-axis and double-phase computer-generated holograms. Our method encodes the original complex object as a phase-only diffusion image by scattering the complex object using a random diffuser. In addition, all incoming light to the SLM is consumed for a single diffraction order, making a diffraction efficiency of more than 90% possible. This method can be applied for holographic data storage, three-dimensional displays, and other such applications.

  19. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.; Stone, M. E.; Miller, D. H.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  20. Method for in-depth characterization of electro-optic phase modulators.

    PubMed

    Arar, Bassem; Schiemangk, Max; Wenzel, Hans; Brox, Olaf; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-02-01

    A flexible method to measure the modulation efficiency and residual amplitude modulation, including non-linearities, of phase modulators is presented. The method is based on demodulation of the modulated optical field in the optical domain by means of a heterodyne interferometer and subsequent analysis of the I&Q quadrature components of the corresponding RF beat note signal. As an example, we determine the phase modulation efficiency and residual amplitude modulation for both the TE and TM modes of a GaAs chip-based phase modulator at the wavelength of 1064 nm. From the results of these measurements, we estimate the linear and quadratic electro-optic coefficients for a P-p-n-N GaAs/AlGaAs double heterostructure.

  1. Waveform measurement technique for phase/frequency-modulated lights based on self-heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Hidemi

    2017-03-06

    A novel technique is proposed and demonstrated for measuring the temporal waveforms of phase/frequency-modulated lights based on self-heterodyne interferometry with a delay time much shorter than the modulation period and on the unwrapped phase detection of heterodyne beat signals with real-time vector signal analysis. The technique makes use of an approximated relationship between the beat signal phase and the instantaneous frequency of modulated lights. The results of waveform measurements are presented for directly frequency-modulated and externally phase-modulated lights, which have been commonly employed for FWCW-LIDAR and serrodyne frequency translation, respectively. The temporal waveforms of triangular modulation are successfully measured with a frequency deviation as large as 15 GHz and the detailed investigation is presented on the deviation of measured waveform from ideal ones.

  2. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  3. 2.75-4.75 GHz QPSK modulator with low amplitude and phase errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Wells, G.

    1990-07-01

    A QPSK modulator with a 2.75-4.75 GHz operating frequency range is presented. The modulator is realized using a broadband power divider, microstrip-slotline-microstrip transitions and Lange couplers. Computer optimized matching circuits are used to maintain a phase error less than 5 deg and an amplitude phase imbalance error across the band of less than 0.5 dB. The modulator is suitable for MMIC implementation.

  4. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Motta, Irene; Scaramellini, Natalia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-07-01

    Regular transfusion and iron chelation are the current treatment of severe forms of thalassemia. As a consequence of this demanding supportive treatment, there are several unmet therapeutic needs. Due to a deeper understanding in the pathophysiology of thalassemia, new therapeutic strategies have been developed that are now in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Areas covered: Activin receptor ligand traps (luspatercept and sotatercept), drugs targeting ineffective erythropoiesis, showed encouraging results in Phase I and II clinical trials. A phase III clinical trial is currently ongoing. Ruxolitinib, a Jak2 inhibitor, has been tested to limit stress erythropoiesis in a phase II clinical trial. In addition, improvement in iron chelation has been developed. Moreover, several trials of gene therapy are currently active in different countries with different lentiviral vectors. Expert opinion: The most promising molecules are the activin receptor ligand traps. Together with gene therapy these could be an alternative to bone marrow transplant, aiming towards a curative strategy. The main limit to gene therapy seems to be the conditioning regimen, thus an in vivo gene therapy would be more suitable. At pre-clinical level gene editing is showing extremely encouraging results.

  5. Domain structure in biphenyl incommensurate phase II observed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, A.; Emery, J.; Spiesser, M.

    1994-11-01

    The domain structure in incommensurate phase II of single biphenyl crystal has been observed by investigations of the optically excited states of the Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (E.P.R.) deuterated naphthalene molecular probes which substitute biphenyl molecules. Our results confirm that this phase is a 1q bi-domain one. The analysis of the spectra obtained in X band (9.5 GHz) experiments, in relation with the spin Hamiltonian parameter properties permits us to show that the E.P.R. probe rotates around a direction perpendicular to its long axis while the biphenyl molecule undergoes a twist movement around this axis. They also account for a regime which is like a “ multi-soliton " regime while the modulation is a plane wave one in the pure single crystal. The two molecules of the high temperature cell do not exactly experience the saure displacement field in the incommensurate phase and consequently the two domains can be distinguished. The spin Hamiltonian parameters which characterize the E.P.R. probes have been determined in the incommensurate phase II of biphenyl. La structure en domaines de la phase II du biphényle est mise en évidence par les investigations dans les états photo-excités des molécules de naphtalène deutéré, utilisées comme sondes de Résonance Paramagnétique Electronique, se substituant de manière diluée dans le mono-cristal de biphényle. Ceci confirme que cette phase est 1q bi-domaine. L'analyse des spectres obtenus dans des expériences en bande X (9.5 GHz) en relation avec les propriétés de l'hamiltonien de spin permet de montrer que la sonde moléculaire tourne autour d'une direction perpendiculaire à son grand axe alors que la molécule de biphényle subit un mouvement de twist autour de cet axe. Les résultats montrent que ces sondes rendent compte d'un régime qui est comme un régime “ multi-solitons " alors que la modulation est plane dans le cristal pur. Les deux molécules sondes de la cellule

  6. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, K.; Parker, D.; Martin, E.; Chasar, D.; Amos, B.

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  7. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  8. Phase I and phase II objective response rates are correlated in pediatric cancer trials: an argument for better clinical trial efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jonathan C.; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    While many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented. 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a “positive” conclusion versus a “negative” one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, p < 0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only one had a “positive” conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. Objective response rates are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Though not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  9. Double sinusoidal phase-modulating distributed-Bragg-reflector laser-diode interferometer for distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takamasa; Suda, Hiromi; Sasaki, Osami

    2003-01-01

    A previously proposed double sinusoidal phase-modulating (DSPM) laser-diode interferometer measures distances larger than a half-wavelength by detecting modulation depth. Although it requires a vibrating mirror to provide the second modulation to the interference signal, such vibrations naturally affect measurement accuracy. We propose a static-type DSPM laser-diode interferometer that uses no mechanical modulation. Our experimental results indicate a measurement error of +/- 1.6 microm.

  10. Emerging Roles of Nrf2 and Phase II Antioxidant Enzymes in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; An, Chengrui; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase II metabolic enzymes are a battery of critical proteins that detoxify xenobiotics by increasing their hydrophilicity and enhancing their disposal. These enzymes have long been studied for their preventative and protective effects against mutagens and carcinogens and for their regulation via the Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1) / Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2) / ARE (antioxidant response elements) pathway. Recently, a series of studies have reported the altered expression of phase II genes in postmortem tissue of patients with various neurological diseases. These observations hint at a role for phase II enzymes in the evolution of such conditions. Furthermore, promising findings reveal that overexpression of phase II genes, either by genetic or chemical approaches, confers neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to summarize the current literature on phase II genes in the central nervous system (CNS). This should help guide future studies on phase II genes as therapeutic targets in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduce the concept of phase I, II and III enzymes, with a special focus on phase II enzymes. We then discuss their expression regulation, their inducers and executors. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the neuroprotective effects of phase II enzymes and the potential application of Nrf2 inducers to the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:23025925

  11. Digital phase-shifting interferometer with an electrically addressed liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Bitou, Youichi

    2003-09-01

    A digital phase-shifting interferometer with a liquid-crystal-display coupled, parallel aligned, nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is developed. The optical phase shift in the Michelson-type polarization interferometer is achieved by a digital phase shift of a grating displayed on the spatial light modulator. Accurate experimental results of using the heterodyne system for pi/2 phase steps were demonstrated. A phase-shifting interferometer with no moving parts and no requirement for calibration of the value of the phase shift was achieved.

  12. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Bannochie, C. J.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  13. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  14. Chromaticity tracking with a phase modulation/demodulation technique in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Tevatron chromaticity tracker (CT) has been successfully commissioned and is now operational. The basic idea behind the CT is that when the phase of the Tevatron RF is slowly modulated, the beam momentum is also modulated. This momentum modulation is coupled transversely via chromaticity to manifest as a phase modulation on the betatron tune. And so by phase demodulating the betatron tune, the chromaticity can be recovered. However, for the phase demodulation to be successful, it is critical that the betatron tune be a coherent signal that can be easily picked up by a phase detector. This is easily done because the Tevatron has a phase locked loop based tune tracker which coherently excites the beam at the betatron tune.

  15. Effect of a misspecification of response rates on type I and type II errors, in a phase II Simon design.

    PubMed

    Baey, Charlotte; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Phase-II trials are a key stage in the clinical development of a new treatment. Their main objective is to provide the required information for a go/no-go decision regarding a subsequent phase-III trial. In single arm phase-II trials, widely used in oncology, this decision relies on the comparison of efficacy outcomes observed in the trial to historical controls. The false positive rate generally accepted in phase-II trials, around 10%, contrasts with the very high attrition rate of new compounds tested in phase-III trials, estimated at about 60%. We assumed that this gap could partly be explained by the misspecification of the response rate expected with standard treatment, leading to erroneous hypotheses tested in the phase-II trial. We computed the false positive probability of a defined design under various hypotheses of expected efficacy probability. Similarly we calculated the power of the trial to detect the efficacy of a new compound for different expected efficacy rates. Calculations were done considering a binary outcome, such as the response rate, with a decision rule based on a Simon two-stage design. When analysing a single-arm phase-II trial, based on a design with a pre-specified null hypothesis, a 5% absolute error in the expected response rate leads to a false positive rate of about 30% when it is supposed to be 10%. This inflation of type-I error varies only slightly according to the hypotheses of the initial design. Single-arm phase-II trials poorly control for the false positive rate. Randomised phase-II trials should, therefore, be more often considered.

  16. Optimize the modulation response of twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays as pure phase spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Baiheng; Peng, Fei; Kang, Mingwu; Zhou, Jiawu

    2014-11-01

    Twisted-nematic liquid crystal displays (TN-LCD) are widely used in numerous research fields of optics working as spatial light modulators. Approaches to obtaining desired intensity or phase modulation by TN-LCD have been extensively studied based on the knowledge of TN-LCD's internal structure parameters, e.g., the orientation of LC molecules at the surfaces, the twist angle, the thickness of the LC layer, and the birefringence of the material. Generally TN-LCD placed between two linear polarizers (P) produces coupled intensity and phase modulation. To obtain the commonly used pure phase modulation, quarter wave plates (QWP) are often used in front of and/or behind the LCD. In this paper, we present a method to optimize the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD to obtain pure phase modulation in the configuration of P-QWP-LCD-QWP-P each with proper orientation. Firstly an improved method for determining the Jones matrix of the TN-LCD without knowing its internal parameters is presented, which is based on the macroscopical Jones matrix descriptions for TN-LCD, linear polarizer and QWP. Only three sets of intensity measurements are needed for the complete determination of the TN-LCD's Jones matrix for a single wavelength. Then Jones matrix calculations are carried out to determine the orientations of the polarizers and QWPs for pure phase modulation response. In addition, we prove that the phase modulation depth (PMD) of the TN-LCD can be further increased provided that the mean intensity transmission is decreased to a lower level, which is very useful when the TN-LCD is used as a phase modulator and the ratio between the intensities of the desired diffracted order relative to the other diffracted orders is required higher. Experimental results coincide well with the optical modulation properties of the TN-LCD predicted by our determined Jones matrix. In contrast to the traditional method which requires knowledge of the TN-LCD's internal structure parameters

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  19. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  20. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  1. Dual phase-shift Bragg grating silicon photonic modulator operating up to 60 Gb/s.

    PubMed

    Bédard, K; Simard, A D; Filion, B; Painchaud, Y; Rusch, L A; LaRochelle, S

    2016-02-08

    We demonstrate PAM-4 and OOK operation of a novel silicon photonic modulator. The modulator design is based on two phase-shifts in a Bragg Grating structure driven in a push pull configuration. Back-to-back PAM-4 modulation is demonstrated below the FEC threshold at up to 60 Gb/s. OOK modulation is also shown up to 55 Gb/s with MMSE equalization and up to 50 Gb/s without equalization. Eye diagrams and BER curves at different bit rates are provided for both PAM-4 and OOK modulations. To our knowledge, this structure is the fastest silicon photonic modulator based on Bragg gratings, reaching modulation speed comparable to the fastest Mach-Zehnder modulators and micro-ring modulators.

  2. Tunable WDM sampling pulse streams using a spatial phase modulator in a biased pulse shaper.

    PubMed

    Sinefeld, David; Shayovitz, Dror; Golani, Ori; Marom, Dan M

    2014-02-01

    We generate transform-limited WDM optical sampling pulse bursts by filtering ultrashort pulses from a mode-locked laser. A phase spatial light modulator (SLM) is used in a biased pulse shaper to circumvent the need to modulate with 2π phase wraps, which are known to limit the phase response. The arrangement compresses and retimes user-selectable bandwidths from the optical short pulse source with precise control of pulse bandwidth, pulse stream rates, and duty cycle.

  3. A role for phosphorylated Pol II CTD in modulating transcription coupled histone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Spain, Marla M; Govind, Chhabi K

    2011-03-01

    Histone acetylation modulates histone occupancy both at promoters and in coding sequences. Based on our recent observation that HDACs in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are co-transcriptionally recruited to coding regions by elongating polymerases, we propose a model in which Pol II facilitates recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes as well as other factors required for productive elongation.

  4. A role for phosphorylated Pol II CTD in modulating transcription coupled histone dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Marla M

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetylation modulates histone occupancy both at promoters and in coding sequences. Based on our recent observation that HDACs in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are co-transcriptionally recruited to coding regions by elongating polymerases, we propose a model in which Pol II facilitates recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes as well as other factors required for productive elongation. PMID:21468233

  5. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  6. The phase II ATLAS Pixel upgrade: the Inner Tracker (ITk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, T.

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. Several layout options are being investigated. All of these include a barrel part and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. All structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. Different designs of planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology for the different pixel layers. While the RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip, the pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gbit/s per data link (FE-chip) will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mbit/s for the outermost. This paper presents an overview of the different components of the ITk and the current status of the developments.

  7. A Neutron Scattering Kernel of Solid Methane in phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yunchang; Snow, William Michael; Liu, Cnen-Yu; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Baxter, David V.

    2008-04-01

    A neutron scattering cross section model of solid methane was studied for the cold neutron moderator of Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at IUCF/Indiana University especially in temperature range of 20.4 4K. The analytical scattering kernel was adapted from Ozaki.et al .[1][2] to describe molecular rotation in this temperature range. This model includes a molecular translation and intra-molecular vibration as well as the rotational degree of freedom in effective ways. For more broad applications into monte carlo simulations, neutron scattering libraries for MCNP were produced from the frequency spectrums using NJOY code. We have tested this newly- developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures. The simulation results show good agreement with measurement data in different temperatures. [1] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, and T. Yamamoto, The Journal of Chemical Physics 73, 3442 (1980). [2] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, K. Otaka, and T. Yamamoto, Can. J. Physics. 59, 275 (1981).

  8. Part 3: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Phase II Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response to anticancer therapy. Known determinants that may affect the pharmacological response to a drug are, among others, nongenetic factors, including age, gender, use of comedication, and liver and renal function. Nonetheless, these covariates do not explain all the observed interpatient variability. Differences in genetic constitution among patients have been identified to be important factors that contribute to differences in drug response. Because genetic polymorphism may affect the expression and activity of proteins encoded, it is a key covariate that is responsible for variability in drug metabolism, drug transport, and pharmacodynamic drug effects. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability. This third part in the series of reviews is focused on genetic variability in phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (glutathione S-transferases, uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and N-acetyltransferases) and discusses the effects of genetic polymorphism within the genes encoding these enzymes on anticancer drug therapy outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are proposed. PMID:21659608

  9. Background rejection of n+ surface events in GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta (0vββ) decay in 76Ge using an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors immersed in liquid argon (LAr). Phase II of the experiment uses 30 new broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors with superior pulse shape discrimination capabilities compared to the previously used semi-coaxial detector design. By far the largest background component for BEGe detectors in GERDA are n+-surface events from 42K β decays which are intrinsic in LAr. The β particles with up to 3.5 MeV can traverse the 0.5 to 0.9 mm thick electrode and deposit energy within the region of interest for the 0vββ decay. However, those events have particular pulse shape features allowing for a strong discrimination. The understanding and simulation of this background, showing a reduction by up to a factor 145 with pulse shape discrimination alone, is presented in this work.

  10. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  11. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  12. Method and apparatus for quadriphase-shift-key and linear phase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermesmeyer, C. E. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A submultiple of an S-band transmitter output frequency was divided equally between a linear phase modulation branch and a QPSK modulation branch. The linear modulation branch includes a multiplier to increase the carrier frequency to a level which, when combined with the carrier in the QPSK branch in an up-converter (utilizing a mixer at the input followed by a bandpass filter), produces the transmitter output frequency. This allows the QPSK modulator to operate at one-eighth of the output frequency where repeatable and precisely controlled modulation can be easily achieved. This also allows linear phase modulation at one-eighth the output frequency where low modulator deviation and good linearity can be easily maintained.

  13. Retrieval of the pulse amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms using the simulated annealing method.

    PubMed

    Honzatko, Pavel; Kanka, J; Vrany, B

    2004-11-29

    The simulated annealing method is used for retrieving the amplitude and phase from cross-phase modulation spectrograms. The method allows us to take into account the birefringence of the measurement fiber and resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer. The influence of the birefringence and analyzer resolution are discussed.

  14. Phase-modulated dual-path feedback for time delay signature suppression from intensity and phase chaos in semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shuiying; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Liyue; Wen, Aijun; Shang, Lei; Zhang, Huixing; Lin, Lin

    Phase-modulated dual-path feedback (PM-DPF) is proposed to conceal time delay (TD) signatures from both intensity chaos and phase chaos in semiconductor lasers (SLs). The TD signatures are evaluated via both auto-correlation function and permutation entropy function. For the purpose of comparison, we also consider three other feedback configurations: SL with single-path feedback (SPF), SL with phase-modulated single-path feedback (PM-SPF), and SL with dual-path feedback (DPF). It is found that, for four feedback configurations, under the condition of strong feedback, successful TD concealment from both intensity and phase chaos can only be realized in SL with PM-DPF, due to the joint contribution of dual path feedback structure and phase modulation. Furthermore, to check the key factor contributing to TD concealment in SL with PM-DPF, the effects of feedback strength, feedback delay, modulation depth and modulation frequency are examined carefully. It is shown that, to obtain successful TD concealment from both intensity and phase chaos under the condition of strong feedback, the modulation frequency close to or greater than the relaxation oscillation frequency is suggested, while the modulation depth is the most important factor contributing to TD concealment, and higher modulation depth is desired. Besides, similar feedback strengths for two feedback paths are suggested. The TD signatures of intensity chaos for SLs with different feedback configurations are also verified experimentally. The SL with PM-DPF is an excellent chaotic source for security-enhanced chaotic communication systems as well as random number of generators based on chaotic SLs.

  15. Automated procedures for the assembly of the CMS Phase 1 upgrade pixel modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Alex; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the pixel tracker for the CMS experiment requires the assembly of approximately 1000 modules consisting of pixel sensors bump bonded to readout chips. The precision assembly of modules in this volume is made possible using several robotic processes for dispensing epoxy,positioning of sensor components, automatic wire-bonding and robotic deposition of elastomer for wire bond encapsulation. We will describe the these processes in detail, along with the measurements that quanitfy the quality of assembled modules, and describe the subsequent steps in which the sensor modules are used in the construction of the Phase 1 pixel tracker. With support from USCMS.

  16. Modulation-format-independent blind phase search algorithm for coherent optical square M-QAM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Gao, Yuliang; Lu, Chao; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Long, Keping

    2014-10-06

    Modulation format independence is one of the key challenges in digital signal processing (DSP) techniques for future elastic optical transmissions. We proposed a modulation-format-independent blind phase search (MFI-BPS) algorithm for square M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) systems, in which modulation format recognition (MFR) and carrier phase estimation (CPE), are included and implemented both in a feed-forward manner. Comprehensive simulation and the experimental studies on 224 Gbit/s polarization multiplexing 16-QAM (PM-16QAM) systems demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed MFI-BPS algorithm.

  17. Emerging technologies and approaches to minimize discharges into Lake Michigan Phase 2, Module 3 report.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. C.; Gillenwater, P.; Urgun Demirtas, M.

    2011-05-11

    Purdue University Calumet (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) have conducted an independent study to identify deployable technologies that could help the BP Whiting Refinery, and other petroleum refineries, meet future wastewater discharge limits. This study has been funded by BP. Each organization tested a subset of the target technologies and retains sole responsibility for its respective test design and implementation, quality assurance and control, test results obtained from each of the technologies, and corresponding conclusions and recommendations. This project was divided in two phases and modules. This report summarizes the work conducted by Argonne in Phase II Module 3 (Bench Scale Testing). Other Modules are discussed elsewhere (Emerging Technologies and Approaches to Minimize Discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase 2, Modules 1-3 Report, April 2011, prepared for BP Americas by the Argonne - Purdue Task Force). The goal of this project was to identify and assess available and emerging wastewater treatment technologies for removing mercury and vanadium from the Whiting Refinery wastewater and to conduct bench-scale tests to provide comparable, transparent, and uniform results across the broad range of technologies tested. After the bench-scale testing phase, a previously developed decision matrix was refined and applied by Argonne to process and review test data to estimate and compare the preliminary performance, engineering configuration, preliminary cost, energy usage, and waste generation of technologies that were shown to be able to remove Hg and/or V to below the target limit at the bench scale. The data were used as the basis to identify the best candidates for further testing at the bench or pilot scale on a slip stream of effluent to lake (ETL) or clarifier effluent (CE) at the Whiting Refinery to determine whether future limits could be met and to generate other pertinent data for scale-up and sustainability evaluation. As a result of

  18. Phase retrieval based on cosine grating modulation and transport of intensity equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ya-ping; Zhang, Quan-bing; Cheng, Hong; Qian, Yi; Lv, Qian-qian

    2016-10-01

    In order to calculate the lost phase from the intensity information effectively, a new method of phase retrieval which based on cosine grating modulation and transport of intensity equation is proposed. Firstly, the cosine grating is loaded on the spatial light modulator in the horizontal and vertical direction respectively, and the corresponding amplitude of the light field is modulated. Then the phase is calculated by its gradient which is extracted from different direction modulation light illumination. The capability of phase recovery of the proposed method in the presence of noise is tested by simulation experiments. And the results show that the proposed algorithm has a better resilience than the traditional Fourier transform algorithm at low frequency noise. Furthermore, the phase object of different scales can be retrieved using the proposed algorithm effectively by changing the frequency of cosine grating, which can control the imaging motion expediently.

  19. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  20. Performance results of a 300-deg linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/- 2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  1. Theoretical analysis of a method for extracting the phase of a phase-amplitude modulated signal generated by a direct-modulated optical injection-locked semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwan; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2017-05-01

    The phase modulation (PM) and amplitude modulation (AM) of optical signals can be achieved using a direct-modulated (DM) optical injection-locked (OIL) semiconductor laser. We propose and theoretically analyze a simple method to extract the phase component of a PM signal produced by a DM-OIL semiconductor laser. The pure AM component of the combined PM-AM signal can be isolated by square-law detection in a photodetector and can then be used to compensate for the PM-AM signal based on an optical homodyne method. Using the AM compensation technique, we successfully developed a simple and cost-effective phase extraction method applicable to the PM-AM optical signal of a DM-OIL semiconductor laser.

  2. Novel prostaglandin receptor modulators--part II: EP receptor modulators; a patent review (2002 - 2012).

    PubMed

    Flesch, Daniel; Merk, Daniel; Lamers, Christina; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2013-02-01

    Prostaglandins and their G-protein-coupled receptors play numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles, especially in inflammation and its resolution. The variety of effects mediated by prostanoids makes prostanoid receptors valuable drug targets and the research on prostaglandin receptor modulators is intensive. The physiological and pathophysiological effects of prostaglandin E(2) are especially complex and numerous. The four subtypes of EP receptor have gained a lot of industrial and academic interest, in particular EP(2) and EP(4) for various indications. Evaluation of the patent activity over the last decade (2002 - 2012) illustrates several potent compounds targeting the distinct prostaglandin E(2) receptors. Many novel methods for the use of EP receptor modulators have been developed, in addition to the classical indications for agents modulating the arachidonic acid cascade such as pain and inflammation. Several EP targeting agents with good potency and selectivity have been developed but their pharmacological use and utility has not yet been satisfactorily investigated. More research is necessary, and clinical use of these agents might therefore take some more time.

  3. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  4. Investing in Our Nation's Youth. National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign: Phase II (Final Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents the findings from an evaluation of Phase II of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign. The number one goal of the campaign was to educate youth to reject illegal drugs. This report evaluates Phase II and focuses on the effect of paid television advertising on awareness of anti-drug messages among youth, teens, and…

  5. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  6. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  7. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  8. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  9. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  10. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Limitation on... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  11. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  12. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  13. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  14. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  15. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  16. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  17. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  18. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  19. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent the...

  20. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective in...

  1. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  2. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-2, Operation of Ultrasonic Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This second in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II describes specific ultrasonic test techniques and calibration principles. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  3. A Standardized Certification Program for Case Managers Serving Frail Elderly Texans. Module II: Assessment and Care Plan Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusky, Richard A.; And Others

    This learning module is one of three training modules that were developed for members of the Texas Gerontological Consortium for Continuing Education to use in preparing case managers working in human service professions coordinating community-based programs for frail elderly Texans. Module II deals with the following topics: assessment (role of…

  4. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  6. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  7. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  8. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-2, Operation of Ultrasonic Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This second in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II describes specific ultrasonic test techniques and calibration principles. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  9. Lab to Large Scale Transition for Non-Vacuum Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells: Phase II--Annual Technical Report, August 2003-July 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kapur, V. K.; Bansal, A.; Asenio, O. I.; Shigeoka, M. K.; Le, P.; Gergen, B.; Rasmussen, M.; Zuniga, R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this subcontract, as part of the R&D Partners category is to: (i) identify the challenges that International Solar Electric Technology, Inc. (ISET) may face in the process of making a ''Lab to Large Scale'' transition for its ink-based non-vacuum process in production of thin-film CIGS solar cells and modules, and (ii) develop workable solutions for these challenges such that they can readily be implemented in a large-scale processing line for CIGS modules. The primary objective of this research is to streamline ISET's ink-based non-vacuum process for fabricating efficient CIGS modules to lower the cost of module production << $1.0/watt. To achieve this objective, ISET has focused R&D efforts on investigating topics that directly impact the ultimate cost of processing CIGS modules. These topics of concern include (i) module output, and therefore, the solar cell and the module efficiency, (ii) overall process yield which requires developing a process that offers a very high degree of repeatability for every manufacturing step, and (iii) a process approach that maximizes the utilization of the materials used. In accordance with the above, this report will cover activity during Phase II in the investigation of methods for low-cost manufacturing and process development. Specific tasks cover four broad areas: (1) solar cell efficiency, (2) process control, (3) module integration, and (4) enhanced material utilization by reduction of waste stream.

  10. Modulation of oxygen production in Archaean oceans by episodes of Fe(II) toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Mloszewska, Aleksandra M.; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Schoenberg, Ronny; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen accumulated in the surface waters of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere several hundred million years before the Great Oxidation Event between 2.4 and 2.3 billion years ago. Before the Great Oxidation Event, periods of enhanced submarine volcanism associated with mantle plume events supplied Fe(II) to sea water. These periods generally coincide with the disappearance of indicators of the presence of molecular oxygen in Archaean sedimentary records. The presence of Fe(II) in the water column can lead to oxidative stress in some organisms as a result of reactions between Fe(II) and oxygen that produce reactive oxygen species. Here we test the hypothesis that the upwelling of Fe(II)-rich, anoxic water into the photic zone during the late Archaean subjected oxygenic phototrophic bacteria to Fe(II) toxicity. In laboratory experiments, we found that supplying Fe(II) to the anoxic growth medium housing a common species of planktonic cyanobacteria decreased both the efficiency of oxygenic photosynthesis and their growth rates. We suggest that this occurs because of increasing intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We use geochemical modelling to show that Fe(II) toxicity in conditions found in the late Archaean photic zone could have substantially inhibited water column oxygen production, thus decreasing fluxes of oxygen to the atmosphere. We therefore propose that the timing of atmospheric oxygenation was controlled by the timing of submarine, plume-type volcanism, with Fe(II) toxicity as the modulating factor.

  11. Utility response to Phase I and Phase II acid rain legislation - an economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Ireland, P.A.; Radliffe, P.

    1995-06-01

    Electric utility companies in the U.S. have already implemented their plans for compliance with the Phase I Acid Rain legislation contained in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Out of the 261 units located at 110 power plants affected by Phase I legislation (all located in the midwest and east), FGD systems were installed on only 13,500 MW of capacity, a total of only 14 plants on 25 units. This paper will summarize the total installed capital cost experience for these facilities, which included a variety of FGD processes, vendors, designs and performance requirements. Costs for other recent FGD installations will also be presented. In addition, potential compliance plan options for Phase II legislation requirements will be discussed, providing a description of the decision making process and the plant characteristics that would lead to installation of SO{sub 2} control technology. The paper finishes with an update on the results of the latest FGD economic evaluations that have been completed recently. Brief process descriptions are followed by the operating and capital cost estimate comparisons with commercial technology.

  12. Intensified Adjuvant Treatment of Prostate Carcinoma: Feasibility Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mantini, Giovanna; Fersino, Sergio; Frascino, Vincenzo; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Fionda, Bruno; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; De Belvis, Antonio; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a preliminary feasibility acute and late toxicity evaluation of an intensified and modulated adjuvant treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients after radical prostatectomy. Material and Methods. A phase I/II has been designed. Eligible patients were 79 years old or younger, with an ECOG of 0–2, previously untreated, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma with no distant metastases, pT2–4 N0-1, and with at least one of the following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. All patients received a minimum dose on tumor bed of 64.8 Gy, or higher dose (70.2 Gy; 85.4%), according to the pathological stage, pelvic lymph nodes irradiation (57.7%), and/or hormonal therapy (69.1%). Results. 123 patients were enrolled and completed the planned treatment, with good tolerance. Median follow-up was 50.6 months. Grade 3 acute toxicity was only 2.4% and 3.3% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively. No patient had late grade 3 GI toxicity, and the GU grade 3 toxicity incidence was 5.8% at 5 years. 5-year BDSF was 90.2%. Conclusions. A modulated and intensified adjuvant treatment in PCa was feasible in this trial. A further period of observation can provide a complete assessment of late toxicity and confirm the BDSF positive results. PMID:25093169

  13. Excitation Power Modulates Energy-Transfer Dynamics in a Supramolecular Ru(II) -Fe(II) -Ru(II) Triad.

    PubMed

    Kübel, Joachim; Wächtler, Maria; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2017-08-11

    Multichromophoric arrays are key to light harvesting in natural and artificial photosynthesis. A trinuclear, symmetric Ru(II) -Fe(II) -Ru(II) triad may resemble a light-harvesting model system in which excitation energy from donor units (Ru-terpyridine fragments) is efficiently transferred to the acceptor (the Fe-terpyridine fragment). The photoinduced dynamics after simultaneous excitation of more than a single chromophoric unit (donor/acceptor) at varying excitation fluence is investigated in this contribution. Data suggests that energy transfer is decelerated if the acceptor states (on the Fe(II) unit) are not depopulated fast enough. As a consequence, the lifetime of a high-lying excited state (centered on either of the Ru(II) units) is prolonged. A kinetic model is suggested to account for this effect. Although the proposed model is specifically adopted to account for the experimental data reported here, it might be generalized to other situations in which multiple energy or electron donors are covalently linked to a single acceptor site, a situation of interest in contemporary artificial photosynthesis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.K.

    1987-09-01

    The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

  15. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  16. Relative sideband amplitudes versus modulation index for common functions using frequency and phase modulation. [for design and testing of communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocklin, F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations defining the amplitude of sidebands resulting from either frequency modulation or phase modulation by either square wave, sine wave, sawtooth or triangular modulating functions are presented. Spectral photographs and computer generated tables of modulation index vs. relative sideband amplitudes are also included.

  17. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  18. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  19. Endothelial Cells Inhibit the Angiotensin II Induced Phenotypic Modulation of Rat Vascular Adventitial Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Ying; Chang, Neng-Bin; Li, Tao; Jiang, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Lei; He, Yan-Zheng; Jiang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The phenotypic modulation of vascular adventitial fibroblasts plays an important role in vascular remodeling. Evidence have shown that endothelial cells and adventitial fibroblasts interact under certain conditions. In this study, we investigated the influence of endothelial cells on the phenotypic modulation of adventitial fibroblasts. Endothelial cells and adventitial fibroblasts from rat thoracic aorta were cultivated in a co-culture system and adventitial fibroblasts were induced with angiotensin II (Ang II). Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and migration of adventitial fibroblasts were analyzed. Ang II upregulated the expression of collagen I and α-SMA and the migration of adventitial fibroblasts. Adventitial fibroblasts-endothelial cells co-culturing attenuated the effects of Ang II. Homocysteine-treated endothelial cells, which are functionally impaired, were less inhibitory of the phenotypic modulation of adventitial fibroblasts. Supplementation of endothelial cells with L-arginine (L-Arg) or 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) enhanced the trends, while with L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) the opposite effect was observed. Under the influence of Ang II, adventitial fibroblasts were prone to undergo phenotypic modulation, which was closely related to vascular remodeling. Our study showed that endothelial cells influenced fibroblast phenotypic transformation and such effect would be mediated through the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1921-1927, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Electrically optical phase controlling for millimeter wave orbital angular momentum multi-modulation communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haotian; Tang, Jin; Yu, Zhenliang; Yi, Jun; Chen, Shuqing; Xiao, Jiangnan; Zhao, Chujun; Li, Ying; Chen, Lin; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-06-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM), an emerging and fascinating degree of freedom, has highlighted an innovation in communication and optical manipulation field. The beams with different OAM state, which manifest as the phase front ;twisting; of electromagnetic waves, are mutually orthogonal, which is exactly what a new freedom applied to practical communication eagers for. Herein, we proposed a novel millimeter-wave OAM modulation technique by electrically optical phase controlling. By modulating OAM and phase of optical-millimeter-wave synchronously, the multi-modulation: quadrature orbital angular momentum modulation (QOM) communication system at W band is structured and simulated, allowing a 50 Gbit/s signal transmitting with bit-error rates less than 10-4. Our work might suggest that OAM could be compounded to more complex multi-modulation signal, and revealed a new insight into OAM based high capacity wireless and radio-over-fiber communication.