Science.gov

Sample records for molar heat capacities

  1. Molar heat capacity and entropy of calcium metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.; Chase, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    The heat capacity of calcium has been measured at 85 mean temperatures between T ??? 8 K and T ??? 369 K using an adiabatically-shielded calorimeter in an intermittent heating mode. At T = 298.15 K, the recommended values for the molar heat capacity, molar entropy, and molar enthalpy increment referred to T = 0 are (25.77 ?? 0.08) J??K-1??mol-1, (42.90 ?? 0.11) J??K-1??mol-1, and (5811 ?? 12) J??mol-1, respectively. The uncertainties are twice the standard deviation of the mean. ?? 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  2. Changes in molar volume and heat capacity of actin upon polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Quirion, F; Gicquaud, C

    1993-01-01

    We have used densimetry and microcalorimetry to measure the changes in molar volume and heat capacity of the actin molecule during Mg(2+)-induced polymerization. Molar volume is decreased by 720 ml/mol. This result is in contradiction with previous measurements by Ikkai and Ooi [(1966) Science 152, 1756-1757], and by Swezey and Somero [(1985) Biochemistry 24, 852-860]: both of these groups reported increases in actin volume during polymerization, of 391 ml/mol and 63 ml/mol respectively. We also observed a decrease in heat capacity of about 69.5 kJ.K-1.mol-1 during polymerization. This is in agreement with the concept of conformational fluctuation of proteins proposed by Lumry and Gregory [(1989) J.Mol. Liq. 42, 113-144]whereby either ligand binding by a protein or monomer-monomer interaction decreases the protein's conformational flexibility. PMID:8240275

  3. Low-temperature heat capacities and standard molar enthalpy of formation of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-Wei; Di, You-Ying; Kong, Yu-Xia; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports that the low-temperature heat capacities of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid were measured by a precision automatic calorimeter over a temperature range from 78 K to 380 K. A polynomial equation of heat capacities as a function of temperature was fitted by the least-squares method. Based on the fitted polynomial, the smoothed heat capacities and thermodynamic functions of the compound relative to the standard reference temperature 298.15 K were calculated and tabulated at intervals of 5 K. The constant-volume energy of combustion of the compound was determined by means of a precision rotating-bomb combustion calorimeter. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the compound was derived from the constant-volume energy of combustion. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound was calculated from a combination of the datum of the standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the compound with other auxiliary thermodynamic quantities through a Hess thermochemical cycle.

  4. Thermal sensitivity analysis data utilizing Q10 scanning, Boltzmann slope factor and the change of molar heat capacity.

    PubMed

    Kang, KyeongJin

    2016-03-01

    As a further elaboration of the recently devised Q10 scanning analysis ("Exceptionally high thermal sensitivity of rattlesnake TRPA1 correlates with peak current amplitude" [1]), the interval between current data points at two temperatures was shortened and the resulting parameters representing thermal sensitivities such as peak Q10s and temperature points of major thermosensitivity events are presented for two TRPA1 orthologues from rattlesnakes and boas. In addition, the slope factors from Boltzmann fitting and the change of molar heat capacity of temperature-evoked currents were evaluated and compared as alternative ways of thermal sensitivity appraisal of TRPA1 orthologues.

  5. Thermal sensitivity analysis data utilizing Q10 scanning, Boltzmann slope factor and the change of molar heat capacity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, KyeongJin

    2016-01-01

    As a further elaboration of the recently devised Q10 scanning analysis (“Exceptionally high thermal sensitivity of rattlesnake TRPA1 correlates with peak current amplitude” [1]), the interval between current data points at two temperatures was shortened and the resulting parameters representing thermal sensitivities such as peak Q10s and temperature points of major thermosensitivity events are presented for two TRPA1 orthologues from rattlesnakes and boas. In addition, the slope factors from Boltzmann fitting and the change of molar heat capacity of temperature-evoked currents were evaluated and compared as alternative ways of thermal sensitivity appraisal of TRPA1 orthologues. PMID:26870758

  6. Heat capacities and densities of electrolyte mixtures in aqueous solution — Application to the determination of apparent molar heat capacities and volumes for potassium triiodide and dioxoneptunium(V) perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemire, R. J.; Campbell, A. B.; Saluja, P. P. S.; LeBlanc, J. C.

    Apparent molar heat capacities for KI 3(aq) were determined from flow-microcalorimetric measurements of KI(aq) solutions containing dissolved iodine. From these, the conventional partial molar heat capacity C∞p,2 ( I-3, maq, 298.15 K) = 156±40 JK-1mol-1 is estimated. Also, densities and heat capacities for NpO2ClO4( aq) + HClO4( aq) mixtures were measured. Preliminary values are reported for apparent molar heat capacities (at 298.15 K) and volumes (at 296.02 K) for NpO 2ClO 4(aq). From these, values for the ionic apparent molar volume and heat capacity of NpO +2(aq) are calculated. Analysis of the data is done assuming deviations from Young's rule are small for the apparent molar heat capacities of simple electrolytes. This is shown to be true for aqueous solutions of NaCl( aq) + KBr( aq) (298.15 K and 348.15 K) and NaCl( aq) + MgCl2( aq) (348.15 K).

  7. GENERAL: Low-temperature heat capacities and standard molar enthalpy of formation of N-methylnorephedrine C11H17NO(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, You-Ying; Wang, Da-Qi; Shi, Quan; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports that low-temperature heat capacities of N-methylnorephedrine C11H17NO(s) have been measured by a precision automated adiabatic calorimeter over the temperature range from T = 78 K to T = 400K. A solid to liquid phase transition of the compound was found in the heat capacity curve in the temperature range of T = 342-364 K. The peak temperature, molar enthalpy and entropy of fusion of the substance were determined. The experimental values of the molar heat capacities in the temperature regions of T = 78-342 K and T = 364-400 K were fitted to two polynomial equations of heat capacities with the reduced temperatures by least squares method. The smoothed molar heat capacities and thermodynamic functions of N-methylnorephedrine C11H17NO(s) relative to the standard reference temperature 298.15 K were calculated based on the fitted polynomials and tabulated with an interval of 5 K. The constant-volume energy of combustion of the compound at T = 298.15K was measured by means of an isoperibol precision oxygen-bomb combustion calorimeter. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the sample was calculated. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound was determined from the combustion enthalpy and other auxiliary thermodynamic data through a Hess thermochemical cycle.

  8. Low Temperature Heat Capacities and Standard Molar Enthalpy of Formation of 2-Pyrazinecarboxylic Acid (C5H4N2O2)(s).

    PubMed

    Kong, Yu-Xia; Di, You-Ying; Yang, Wei-Wei; Gao, Sheng-Li; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Low-temperature heat capacities of 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid (C5H4N2O2)(s) were measured by a precision automated adiabatic calorimeter over the temperature range from 78 to 400 K. A polynomial equation of heat capacities as a function of temperature was fitted by least squares method. Based on the fitted polynomial, the smoothed heat capacities and thermodynamic functions of the compound relative to the standard reference temperature 298.15 K were calculated and tabulated at 10 K intervals. The constant-volume energy of combustion of the compound at T = 298.15 K was measured by a precision rotating-bomb combustion calorimeter to be ΔcU = -(17839.40 ± 7.40) J g-1. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the compound was determined to be ΔcH0m = -(2211.39 ± 0.92) KJ mol-1, according to the definition of combustion enthalpy. Finally, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound was calculated to be ΔfH0m = -(327.82 ± 1.13) kJ mol-1 in accordance with Hess law. PMID:24061733

  9. GENERAL: Low-temperature heat capacities and standard molar enthalpy of formation of 4-(2-aminoethyl)-phenol (C8H11NO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, You-Ying; Kong, Yu-Xia; Yang, Wei-Wei; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports that low-temperature heat capacities of 4-(2-aminoethyl)-phenol (C8H11NO) are measured by a precision automated adiabatic calorimeter over the temperature range from 78 to 400 K. A polynomial equation of heat capacities as a function of the temperature was fitted by the least square method. Based on the fitted polynomial, the smoothed heat capacities and thermodynamic functions of the compound relative to the standard reference temperature 298.15 K were calculated and tabulated at the interval of 5 K. The energy equivalent, ɛcalor, of the oxygen-bomb combustion calorimeter has been determined from 0.68 g of NIST 39i benzoic acid to be ɛcalor = (14674.69±17.49)J.K-1. The constant-volume energy of combustion of the compound at T = 298.15 K was measured by a precision oxygen-bomb combustion calorimeter to be ΔcU = -(32374.25±12.93)J.g-1. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion for the compound was calculated to be ΔcHmominus = -(4445.47 ± 1.77) k. J · mol-1 according to the definition of enthalpy of combustion and other thermodynamic principles. Finally, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound was derived to be ΔfHmominus(C8H11NO, s) = -(274.68 ± 2.06) kJ · mol-1, in accordance with Hess law.

  10. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed.

  11. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  12. Low-temperature molar heat capacities and entropies of MnO2 (pyrolusite), Mn3O4 (hausmanite), and Mn2O3 (bixbyite)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Pyrolusite (MnO2), hausmanite (Mn3O4), and bixbyite (Mn2O3), are important ore minerals of manganese and accurate values for their thermodynamic properties are desirable to understand better the {p(O2), T} conditions of their formation. To provide accurate values for the entropies of these important manganese minerals, we have measured their heat capacities between approximately 5 and 380 K using a fully automatic adiabatically-shielded calorimeter. All three minerals are paramagnetic above 100 K and become antiferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic at lower temperatures. This transition is expressed by a sharp ??-type anomaly in Cpmo for each compound with Ne??el temperatures TN of (92.2??0.2), (43.1??0.2), and (79.45??0.05) K for MnO2, Mn3O4, and Mn2O3, respectively. In addition, at T ??? 308 K, Mn2O3 undergoes a crystallographic transition, from orthorhombic (at low temperatures) to cubic. A significant thermal effect is associated with this change. Hausmanite is ferrimagnetic below TN and in addition to the normal ??-shape of the heat-capacity maxima in MnO2 and Mn2O3, it has a second rounded maximum at 40.5 K. The origin of this subsidiary bump in the heat capacity is unknown but may be related to a similar "anomalous bump" in the curve of magnetization against temperature at about 39 K observed by Dwight and Menyuk.(1) At 298.15 K the standard molar entropies of MnO2, Mn3O4, and Mn2O3, are (52.75??0.07), (164.1??0.2), and (113.7??0.2) J??K-1??mol-1, respectively. Our value for Mn3O4 is greater than that adopted in the National Bureau of Standards tables(2) by 14 per cent. ?? 1985.

  13. Heat capacity, configurational heat capacity and fragility of hydrous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Giordano, D.; Alletti, M.

    2014-10-01

    The glassy and liquid heat capacities of four series of dry and hydrous natural glasses and magma as a function of temperature and water content (up to 19.9 mol%) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analyzed compositions are basalt, latite, trachyte and pantellerite. The results of this study indicate that the measured heat capacity of glasses (Cpg) is a linear function of composition and is well reproduced by the empirical model of Richet (1987). For the investigated glasses, the partial molar heat capacity of water can be considered as independent of composition, in agreement with Bouhifd et al. (2006). For hydrous liquids, the heat capacity (Cpliq) decreases nonlinearly with increasing water content. Previously published models, combined with the partial molar heat capacity of water from the literature, are not able to reproduce our experimental data in a satisfactory way. We estimated the partial molar heat capacity of water (CpH2O) in hydrous magma over a broad compositional range. The proposed value is 41 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1. Water strongly affects the configurational heat capacity at the glass transition temperature [Cpconf (Tg)]. An increases of Cpconf (Tg) with water content was measured for the polymerized liquids (trachyte and pantellerite), while the opposite behavior was observed for the most depolymerized liquids (basalt and latite). Structural and rheological implications of this behavior are discussed in light of the presented results.

  14. Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of Pr(NO3)3(aq), Gd(NO3)3(aq), Ho(NO3)3(aq), and Y(NO3)3(aq) at T = (288.15, 298.15, 313.15 and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J; Lui, J; Erickson, K; Munoz, J; Hakin, A H

    2004-07-13

    Relative densities and relative massic heat capacities have been measured for acidified solutions (prepared at University of Lethbridge) of Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq), and Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) at T = (288.15, 298.15, 313.15, and 328.15) K and p = 0.1 MPa. In addition, relative densities and massic heat capacities have been measured at the same temperatures and pressure for Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) and Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) solutions which were supplied from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (n.b. measurements at T = 328.15 K for Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) were not performed due to the limited volume of solution available). Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities for the aqueous salt solutions have been calculated from the experimental apparent molar properties of the acidified salt solutions using Young's Rule whereas the apparent molar properties of the LLNL solutions were calculated directly from the measured densities and massic heat capacities. The two sets of data for the Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) systems provide a check of the internal consistency of the Young's Rule approach we have utilized. The concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of the aqueous salt solutions have been modeled at each investigated temperature using the Pitzer ion interaction equations to yield apparent molar properties at infinite dilution. Complex formation within the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems is discussed and is qualitatively explored by probing the concentration dependence of apparent molar volumes and heat capacities. It is also shown that in spite of the complex formation within the aqueous rare earth nitrate systems there remains a high degree of self-consistency between the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities at infinite dilution reported in this manuscript and those previously reported for aqueous rare earth perchlorate salt systems.

  15. Low-Temperature Heat Capacities and Standard Molar Enthalpy of Formation of Dichloro Bis(2-aminopyridine) Zinc (II), ZnCl2(C5H6N2)2(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Wen-Yan; di, You-Ying; Liu, Yan-Juan; Kong, Yu-Xia; Tan, Zhi-Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Dichloro bis(2-aminopyridine) zinc (II), ZnCl2(C5H6N2)2(s), was synthesized by the method of solvonthermal synthesis in which 2-aminopyridine and zinc chloride were chosen as the reactants. X-ray crystallography, chemical analysis, and elemental analysis were applied to characterize the structure and composition of the complex. Low-temperature heat capacities of the title compound were measured with a precise small-sample automated adiabatic calorimeter over the temperature range from 78 K to 398 K. A polynomial equation of the heat capacities as a function of temperature was fitted by a least-squares method. Smoothed heat capacities and thermodynamic functions of the compound relative to the standard reference temperature (298.15 K) were calculated and tabulated at intervals of 5 K based on the fitted polynomial. A reasonable thermochemical cycle was designed, and the standard molar enthalpies of dissolution for the reactants and products of the synthesis reaction in a selected solvent were measured by an isoperibol solution-reaction calorimeter. In addition, the enthalpy change of the reaction was calculated from the data of the above standard molar enthalpies of dissolution. Finally, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of the complex ZnCl2(C5H6N2)2(s) was determined to be -(400.52 ± 1.66) kJ · mol-1 in accordance with Hess's law.

  16. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  17. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  18. Nonequilibrium heat capacity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Dibyendu

    2013-12-01

    Development of steady state thermodynamics and statistical mechanics depends crucially on our ability to extend the notions of equilibrium thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states (NESS). The present paper considers the extension of heat capacity. A modified definition is proposed which continues to maintain the same relation to steady state Shannon entropy as in equilibrium, thus providing a thermodynamically consistent treatment of NESS heat capacity.

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ja of... - Molar Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Molar Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat... Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents Constituent MEVa dscf/mol MHCb Btu/mol... standard conditions of 68 °F and 1 atmosphere. b MHC = molar heat content (higher heating value basis),...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ja of... - Molar Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Molar Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat... Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents Constituent MEVa dscf/mol MHCb Btu/mol... standard conditions of 68 °F and 1 atmosphere. b MHC = molar heat content (higher heating value basis),...

  1. Low-temperature heat capacity and entropy of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2): estimates of the standard molar enthalpy and Gibbs free energy of formation of chalcopyrite and bornite (Cu5FeS4)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Wiggins, L.B.; Barton, P.B.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The heat capacity of CuFeS2 (chalcopyrite) was measured between 6.3 and 303.5 K. At 298.15 K, Cp,mo and Smo(T) are (95.67??0.14) J??K-1??mol-1 and (124.9??0.2) J??K-1??mol-1, respectively. From a consideration of the results of two sets of equilibrium measurements we conclude that ??fHmo(CuFeS2, cr, 298.15 K) = -(193.6??1.6) kJ??mol-1 and that the recent bomb-calorimetric determination by Johnson and Steele (J. Chem. Thermodynamics 1981, 13, 991) is in error. The standard molar Gibbs free energy of formation of bornite (Cu5FeS4) is -(444.9??2.1) kJ??mol-1 at 748 K. ?? 1985.

  2. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a “Knudsen heat capacity” as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  3. The system H 2O-NaCl. Part II: Correlations for molar volume, enthalpy, and isobaric heat capacity from 0 to 1000 °C, 1 to 5000 bar, and 0 to 1 XNaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesner, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    to that for molar volumes. Specific enthalpies computed from the correlation typically agree within 1-3% with those obtained from other studies. Similarly, isobaric heat capacities show good agreement with published data except for high salinities at moderate pressures and temperatures.

  4. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  5. Heat Capacity in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Ninad V.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2005-05-01

    Heat capacity (Cp) is one of several major thermodynamic quantities commonly measured in proteins. With more than half a dozen definitions, it is the hardest of these quantities to understand in physical terms, but the richest in insight. There are many ramifications of observed Cp changes: The sign distinguishes apolar from polar solvation. It imparts a temperature (T) dependence to entropy and enthalpy that may change their signs and which of them dominate. Protein unfolding usually has a positive ΔCp, producing a maximum in stability and sometimes cold denaturation. There are two heat capacity contributions, from hydration and protein-protein interactions; which dominates in folding and binding is an open question. Theoretical work to date has dealt mostly with the hydration term and can account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major Cp-related features: the positive and negative Cp of hydration for apolar and polar groups, respectively; the convergence of apolar group hydration entropy at T ≈ 112°C; the decrease in apolar hydration Cp with increasing T; and the T-maximum in protein stability and cold denaturation.

  6. The heat capacity of titanium disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylla, W. K.; Stillman, S. E.; Sabella, M. S.; Cotts, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    The heat capacity of TiSi2 has been measured in the temperature range 105-500 K. The heat capacity of TiSi2 varies monotonically between temperatures of 100 and 500 K with a reference value of 22.0 +/- 0.2 J/g atom K at 298.15 K. Based upon our heat capacity data, the standard molar entropy of TiSi2 at 298.15 K estimated to be 22.2 +/- 0.8 J/g atom K. Our data support estimates of the higher temperature heat capacity of TiSi2 based upon previously measured heat capacities of different, but similar, substances. A number of TiSi2 samples were prepared by rapidly quenching (greater than 10(exp 5) K/s) from the melt. The structure and the measured heat capacity of these samples were similar to those of well annealed samples, underscoring the thermal stability of this material.

  7. Free Energy and Heat Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, Masaki; Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2015-10-13

    Free energy and heat capacity of actinide elements and compounds are important properties for the evaluation of the safety and reliable performance of nuclear fuel. They are essential inputs for models that describe complex phenomena that govern the behaviour of actinide compounds during nuclear fuel fabrication and irradiation. This chapter introduces various experimental methods to measure free energy and heat capacity to serve as inputs for models and to validate computer simulations. This is followed by a discussion of computer simulation of these properties, and recent simulations of thermophysical properties of nuclear fuel are briefly reviewed.

  8. Thermochemistry of uranium compounds: XVI, Calorimetric determination of the standard molar enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K, low-temperature heat capacity, and high-temperature enthalpy increments of UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O (schoepite)

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, I.R.; O`Hare, P.A.G.; Lewis, B.M.; Johnson, G.K.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1987-08-01

    Three precise calorimetric methods, viz., low-temperature adiabatic, high-temperatuare drop, and solution-reaction, have been used to determine as a function of temperature the key chemical thermodynamic properties of a pure sample of schoepite, UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. The following results have been obtained at the standard reference temperature T = 298.15 K:standard molar enthalpy of formation {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = {minus}1825.4 +- 2.1 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/; molar heat capacity C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T) = 172.07 +- 0.34 JK/sup {minus}1/; and the standard molar entropy S/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = 188.54 +- 0.38 JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/. The molar enthalpy increments relative to 298.15 K and the molar heat capacity are given by the polynomials: {H{sub m}{sup 0}(T) {minus} H{sub m}{sup 0}(298.15 K)}/(J mol/sup {minus}1/) = {minus}38209.0 + 84.2375 (T/K) + 0.1472958 (T/K){sup 2} and C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T)/(JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/) = 84.238 + 0.294592 (T/K), where 298.15 K < T < 400 K. The present result for {Delta}/sup f/H/sub m/{sup 0} at 298.15 K has been combined with three other closely-agreeing values from the literature to give a recommended weighted mean {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1826.4 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/, from which is calculated the standard Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}/sub f/G/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1637.0 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/ at 298.15 K. Complete thermodynamic properties of schoepite are tabulated from 298.15 to 423.15 K. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Estimating heat capacity and heat content of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Eugene C.; Hemingway, Bruch S.

    1995-01-01

    Our measured heat-capacity values for rocks and other measurements of heat capacity or heat content of rocks found in the literature have been compared with estimated rock heat capacities calculated from the summation of heat capacities of both minerals and oxide components. The validity of calculating the heat content or heat capacity of rocks to better than about ± 3% from its mineral or chemical composition is well demonstrated by the data presented here.

  10. Heat capacity of coal chars

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The selected starting materials were, a North Dakota lignite, an Illinois No. 6 bituminous and a Virginia coking coal. The carbon content of these coals ranged from 59 to 75 wt% (mineral matter included). Half of each of the received coal sample was demineralized using a standard procedure. Chars were prepared from the received and demineralized pulverized coals by pyrolysis. Heating rate of 5/sup 0/C/minute was employed for the pyrolysis under dry nitrogen gas atmosphere. The pyrolysis temperatures were 700, 900 and 1100/sup 0/C for periods of 0.1, 1 and 24. The char samples were characterized by chemical composition analysis, x-ray diffraction and porosimetry. Heat capacity data were collected over 75 to 300/sup 0/K temperature range using an adiabatic calorimeter. The heat capacity of these samples increases, with increasing temperature and moisture content, and its behavior and order of magnitude are similar to that of carbon when compared on a moisture free basis. Due to the uncertainties of the chemical forms of the mineral matter and the water phase below room temperature, all the heat capacity data are analyzed on a dry mineral matter free basis.

  11. The heat capacity mapping mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    The first in a series of low cost Atmospheric Explorer Satellites, the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) was designed to evaluate the utility of thermal inertial and other thermal and reflectance data for: (1) discriminating bedrock and unconsolidated regolith types; (2) mapping soil moisture; (3) measuring plant canopy temperatures; (4) examining thermal circulation in large bodies of water; and (5) monitoring urban heat islands. Final reports from the HCMM investigator's program are beginning to define the utility of day/the night thermal data. Under favorable circumstances, some major rock types can be identified, soil moisture in extensive agricultural and alluvial terrains can be detected and at least semiqualitatively assessed; and circulation of currents in large bodies of water can be followed by noting thermal patterns.

  12. The Heat Capacity of Ideal Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of an ideal gas has been shown to be calculable directly by statistical mechanics if the energies of the quantum states are known. However, unless one makes careful calculations, it is not easy for a student to understand the qualitative results. Why there are maxima (and occasionally minima) in heat capacity-temperature curves…

  13. Effect of water on the heat capacity of polymerized aluminosilicate glasses and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. Ali; Whittington, Alan; Roux, Jacques; Richet, Pascal

    2006-02-01

    The effect of water on heat capacity has been determined for four series of hydrated synthetic aluminosilicate glasses and supercooled liquids close to albite, phonolite, trachyte, and leucogranite compositions. Heat capacities were measured at atmospheric pressure by differential scanning calorimetry for water contents between 0 and 4.9 wt % from 300 K to about 100 K above the glass transition temperature ( Tg). The partial molar heat capacity of water in polymerized aluminosilicate glasses, which can be considered as independent of composition, is =-122.319+341.631×10-3T+63.4426×105/T2 (J/mol K). In liquids containing at least 1 wt % H 2O, the partial molar heat capacity of water is about 85 J/mol K. From speciation data, the effects of water as hydroxyl groups and as molecular water have tentatively been estimated, with partial molar heat capacities of 153 ± 18 and 41 ± 14 J/mol K, respectively. In all cases, water strongly increases the configurational heat capacity at Tg and exerts a marked depressing effect on Tg, in close agreement with the results of viscosity experiments on the same series of glasses. Consistent with the Adam and Gibbs theory of relaxation processes, the departure of the viscosity of hydrous melts from Arrhenian variations correlates with the magnitude of configurational heat capacities.

  14. Alternate high capacity heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, F. E.

    1986-01-01

    The performance predictions for a fifty foot heat pipe (4 foot evaporator - 46 foot condensor) are discussed. These performance predictions are supported by experimental data for a four foot heat pipe. Both heat pipes have evaporators with axial groove wick structures and condensers with powder metal external artery wick structures. The predicted performance of a rectangular axial groove/external artery heat pipe operating in space is given. Heat transport versus groove width is plotted for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator. The curves show that maximum power is achieved for groove widths from 0.040 to 0.053 as the number of grooves varies from 300 to 100. The corresponding range of maximum power is 3150 to 2400 watts. The relationships between groove width and heat pipe evaporate diameter for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator are given. A four foot heat pipe having a three foot condenser and one foot evaporator was built and tested. The evaporator wick structure used axial grooves with rectangular cross sections, and the condenser wick structure used powder metal with an external artery configuration. Fabrication drawings are enclosed. The predicted and measured performance for this heat pipe is shown. The agreement between predicted and measured performance is good and therefore substantiates the predicted performance for a fifty foot heat pipe.

  15. Chemistry Lab--Heat Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Explores measuring the specific heat of a metal ball. The ball is heated to a known temperature then placed in cold water. Students measure the temperature gain of the water in this investigation of the principle of Conservation of Energy. As a second task, students make a precise determination of the density of the ball. (PVD)

  16. Heat Capacity of Hydrous Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2015-12-01

    We determined the heat capacities of four series of glasses and liquids of basaltic and basaltic andesite compositions including two natural remelts from Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and two Fe-free analogs. The samples are low-alkali, Ca- and Mg-rich aluminosilicates with non-bridging oxygen to tetrahedrally-coordinated cation ratios (NBO/T) ranging between 0.33 and 0.67. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed at atmospheric pressure between room temperature and ≈100 K above the glass transition for hydrous samples and up to ≈1800 K for dry samples. The water contents investigated range up to 5.34 wt.% (16.4 mol%). Water does not measurably affect the heat capacity of glasses (T heat capacity, which generally gets larger with increasing water content and with decreasing polymerization. The onset of the glass transition in hydrous samples also occurs below the Dulong-Petit limit of 3R/g atom. We see little change in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content; hydrous liquid heat capacities are within 3-6% of the dry liquid, at low temperatures just above the glass transition. However, dry liquids show a decrease in heat capacity with increasing temperature above the glass transition, from supercooled to superliquidus temperatures. Liquid heat capacity values just above the glass transition range between 95-100 J/mol K, whereas liquid heat capacity values at superliquidus temperatures are between 85-91 J/mol K. Comparison with other studies of the heat capacity of hydrous glasses and liquids shows that the liquid heat capacity of strongly depolymerized samples (NBO/T ≥ 0.8) increases with increasing water content, whereas depolymerized samples (0.4 ≤ NBO/T ≤ 0.8) or polymerized samples (NBO/T ≤ 0.4) generally show little change or a moderate decrease in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content.

  17. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  18. Heat capacity in weakly correlated liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrustalyov, Yu. V.; Vaulina, O. S.; Koss, X. G.

    2012-12-15

    Previously unavailable numerical data related to the heat capacity in two- and three-dimensional liquid Yukawa systems are obtained by means of fluctuation theory. The relations between thermal conductivity and diffusion constants are numerically studied and discussed. New approximation for heat capacity dependence on non-ideality parameter for weakly correlated systems of particles is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing theoretical and numerical data is discussed.

  19. 'Heat from Above' Heat Capacity Measurements in Liquid He-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. A. M.; Chatto, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Babkin, A. V.; Boyd, S. T. P.; Churilov, A. M.; McCarson, T. D.; Chui, T. C. P.; Day, P. K.; Dunca, R. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have made heat capacity measurements of superfluid He-4 at temperatures very close to the lambda point, T(sub lambda) , in a constant heat flux, Q, when the helium sample is heated from above. In this configuration the helium enters a self-organized (SOC) heat transport state at a temperature T(sub SOC)(Q), which for Q greater than or = 100 nW/sq cm lies below T(sub lambda). At low Q we observe little or no deviation from the bulk Q = 0 heat capacity up to T(sub SOC)(Q); beyond this temperature the heat capacity appears to be sharply depressed, deviating dramatically from its bulk behaviour. This marks the formation and propagation of a SOC/superfluid two phase state, which we confirm with a simple model. The excellent agreement between data and model serves as an independent confirmation of the existence of the SOC state. As Q is increased (up to 6 micron W/sq cm) we observe a Q dependant depression in the heat capacity that occurs just below T(sub SOC)(Q), when the entire sample is still superfluid. This is due to the emergence of a large thermal resistance in the sample, which we have measured and used to model the observed heat capacity depression. Our measurements of the superfluid thermal resistivity are a factor of ten larger than previous measurements by Baddar et al.

  20. Meteorite heat capacities: Results to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Macke, R.; Britt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Heat capacity is an essential thermal property for modeling asteroid internal metamorphism or differentiation, and dynamical effects like YORP or Yarkovsky perturbations. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive method for measuring the heat capacity of meteorites at low temperature [1]. A sample is introduced into a dewar of liquid nitrogen and an electronic scale measures the amount of nitrogen boiled away as the sample is cooled from the room temperature to the liquid nitrogen temperature; given the heat of vaporization of liquid nitrogen, one can then calculate the heat lost from the sample during the cooling process. Note that heat capacity in this temperature range is a strong function of temperature, but this functional relation is essentially the same for all materials; the values we determine are equivalent to the heat capacity of the sample at 175 K. To correct for systematic errors, samples of laboratory-grade quartz are measured along with the meteorite samples. To date, more than 70 samples of more than 50 different meteorites have been measured in this way, including ordinary chondrites [1], irons [2], basaltic achondrites [3], and a limited number of carbonaceous chondrites [1]. In general, one can draw a number of important conclusions from these results. First, the heat capacity of a meteorite is a function of its mineral composition, independent of shock, metamorphism, or other physical state. Second, given this relation, heat capacity can be strongly altered by terrestrial weathering. Third, the measurement of heat capacity in small (less than 1 g) samples as done typically by commercial systems runs a serious risk of giving misleading results for samples that are heterogeneous on scales of tens of grams or more. Finally, we demonstrate that heat capacity is a useful tool for determining and classifying a sample, especially if used in conjunction with other intrinsic variables such as grain density and magnetic susceptibility

  1. High-temperature heat capacity of YFe3(BO3)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. M.; Denisova, L. T.; Gudim, I. A.; Temerov, V. L.; Volkov, N. V.; Patrin, G. S.; Chumilina, L. G.

    2014-02-01

    The molar heat capacity of YFe3(BO3)4 has been measured using differential scanning calorimetry in the temperature range 339-1086 K. It has been found that the dependence C p = f( T) exhibits an extremum at a temperature of 401 K due to the structural transition.

  2. The Determination of Heat Capacity Ratios in a Simple Open System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Glen L.

    2007-01-01

    A virtually closed system is treated as open and compared to known results. The classic experiment of Clement and Desormes provides the conceptual framework for this open system approach in determining the molar heat capacity ratios, lambda. This alternate view, extends the theoretical treatment beyond the first law of thermodynamics for closed…

  3. MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-09-29

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were

  4. Classical fluids of negative heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, P.T.; Woodard, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    It is shown that new parameters X can be defined such that the heat capacity C{sub X} {equivalent_to} T({partial_derivative}S/{partial_derivative}T)X is negative, even when the canonical ensemble (i.e. at fixed T = ({partial_derivative}U/{partial_derivative}S) and Y {ne} X) is stable. As examples we treat black body radiation and general gas systems with nonsingular {kappa}{sub T}. For the case of a simple ideal gas we even exhibit an apparatus which enforces a constraint X(p,V) = const. that makes C{sub X} < 0. Since it is possible to invent constraints for which canonically stable systems have negative heat capacity we speculate that it may also be possible to infer the statistical mechanics of canonically unstable systems - for which even the traditional heat capacities are negative - by imposing constraints that stabilize the associated, inoncanonical ensembles.

  5. Classical fluids of negative heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, P.T. . Faculty of Mathematical Studies); Woodard, R.P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-06-01

    It is shown that new parameters X can be defined such that the heat capacity C{sub X} {equivalent to} T({partial derivative}S/{partial derivative}T)X is negative, even when the canonical ensemble (i.e. at fixed T = ({partial derivative}U/{partial derivative}S) and Y {ne} X) is stable. As examples we treat black body radiation and general gas systems with nonsingular {kappa}{sub T}. For the case of a simple ideal gas we even exhibit an apparatus which enforces a constraint X(p,V) = const. that makes C{sub X} < 0. Since it is possible to invent constraints for which canonically stable systems have negative heat capacity we speculate that it may also be possible to infer the statistical mechanics of canonically unstable systems - for which even the traditional heat capacities are negative - by imposing constraints that stabilize the associated, inoncanonical ensembles.

  6. Heat capacities of crystalline tetraalkylammonium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manin, N. G.; Kustov, A. V.; Antonova, O. A.

    2012-05-01

    The behavior of crystalline tetraalkylammonium salts at 290-350 K was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. For tetraethyl- and tetrabutylammonium bromides (Et4NBr and Bu4NBr), the experimental heat capacities agreed well with the literature values. For tetrahexyl-, tetraheptyl-, and tetraoctylam-monium bromides (Hex4NBr, Hep4NBr, and Oct4NBr), phase transitions were found between crystal modifications whose characteristic temperatures depended significantly on the size of the cation. Empirical equations for the temperature dependences of the heat capacities of the salts within the ranges of homogeneous equilibrium phases were derived.

  7. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  8. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  9. Heat capacity of paramagnetic nickelocene: Comparison with diamagnetic ferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorai, Michio; Kaneko, Yuki; Hashiguchi, Takao

    2014-05-01

    Nickelocene [bis(η5-cyclopentadienyl)nickel: Ni(C5H5)2, electron spin S=1, the ground state configuration 3A2g] is paramagnetic and belongs to a typical molecule-based magnet. Heat capacities of nickelocene have been measured at temperatures in the 3-320 K range by adiabatic calorimetry. By comparing with those of diamagnetic ferrocene crystal, a small heat capacity peak centered at around 15 K and a sluggish hump centered at around 135 K were successfully separated. The low-temperature peak at 15 K caused by the spin is well reproduced by the Schottky anomaly due to the uniaxial zero-field splitting of the spin S=1 with the uniaxial zero-field splitting parameter D/k=45 K (k: the Boltzmann constant). The magnetic entropy 9.7 J K-1mol-1 is substantially the same as the contribution from the spin-manifold R ln 3=9.13 J K-1mol-1 (R: the gas constant). The sluggish hump centered at around 135 K arises from rotational disordering of the cyclopentadienyl rings of nickelocene molecule. The enthalpy and entropy gains due to this anomaly are 890 J mol-1 and 6.9 J K-1mol-1, respectively. As the hump spreads over a wide temperature region, separation of the hump from the observed heat capacity curve involves a little bit ambiguity. Therefore, these values should be regarded as being reasonable but tentative. The present entropy gain is comparable with 5.5 J K-1mol-1 for the sharp phase transition at 163.9 K of ferrocene crystal. This fact implies that although the disordering of the rings likewise takes place in both nickelocene and ferrocene, it proceeds gradually in nickelocene and by way of a cooperative phase transition in ferrocene. A reason for this originates in loose molecular packing in nickelocene crystal. Molar heat capacity and the standard molar entropy of nickelocene are larger than those of ferrocene beyond the mass effect over the whole temperature region investigated. This fact provides with definite evidences for the loose molecular packing in nickelocene

  10. Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties of HoMnO3 in the range of 364-1046 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, L. T.; Chumilina, L. G.; Shaikhutdinov, K. A.; Patrin, G. S.; Denisov, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the molar heat capacity of HoMnO3 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental data have been used to calculate the thermodynamic properties of the oxide compound (changes in the enthalpy H°( T)- H°(364 K), entropy S°( T)- S°(364 K), and reduced Gibbs energy Φ°( T)). The data on the heat capacity of HoMnO3 have been generalized in the range of 40-1000 K.

  11. The Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rotter, M D; Dane, C B; Gonzales, S A; Merrill, R D; Mitchell, S C; Parks, C W; Yamamoto, R M

    2003-12-08

    Heat-capacity operation of a laser is a novel method by which high average powers can be generated. In this paper, we present the principles behind heat-capacity operation, in addition to describing the results of recent experiments.

  12. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) Notification Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    To encourage wide use of the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data, especially among the scientific community, special notifications were prepared to inform them about the data's availability, its form, and the procedures for obtaining them. To achieve the widest distribution to the primary audiences of interest, mailings were made to scientists associated with the OSTA Resource Observation Division programs and to scientific and professional societies and journals. Accompanying the notifications to the societies and journals were samples of the HCMM imagery and a description of the image's predominant characteristics. A follow-up survey was completed to determine the effectiveness of the HCMM notifications.

  13. Volume analysis of heat-induced cracks in human molars: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sandholzer, Michael A.; Baron, Katharina; Heimel, Patrick; Metscher, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Only a few methods have been published dealing with the visualization of heat-induced cracks inside bones and teeth. Aims: As a novel approach this study used nondestructive X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) for volume analysis of heat-induced cracks to observe the reaction of human molars to various levels of thermal stress. Materials and Methods: Eighteen clinically extracted third molars were rehydrated and burned under controlled temperatures (400, 650, and 800°C) using an electric furnace adjusted with a 25°C increase/min. The subsequent high-resolution scans (voxel-size 17.7 μm) were made with a compact micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174). In total, 14 scans were automatically segmented with Definiens XD Developer 1.2 and three-dimensional (3D) models were computed with Visage Imaging Amira 5.2.2. The results of the automated segmentation were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and uncorrected post hoc least significant difference (LSD) tests using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17. A probability level of P < 0.05 was used as an index of statistical significance. Results: A temperature-dependent increase of heat-induced cracks was observed between the three temperature groups (P < 0.05, ANOVA post hoc LSD). In addition, the distributions and shape of the heat-induced changes could be classified using the computed 3D models. Conclusion: The macroscopic heat-induced changes observed in this preliminary study correspond with previous observations of unrestored human teeth, yet the current observations also take into account the entire microscopic 3D expansions of heat-induced cracks within the dental hard tissues. Using the same experimental conditions proposed in the literature, this study confirms previous results, adds new observations, and offers new perspectives in the investigation of forensic evidence. PMID:25125923

  14. Hybrid Heat Capacity - Moving Slab Laser Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A

    2002-04-01

    A hybrid configuration of a heat capacity laser (HCL) and a moving slab laser (MSL) has been studied. Multiple volumes of solid-state laser material are sequentially diode-pumped and their energy extracted. When a volume reaches a maximum temperature after a ''sub-magazine depth'', it is moved out of the pumping region into a cooling region, and a new volume is introduced. The total magazine depth equals the submagazine depth times the number of volumes. The design parameters are chosen to provide high duty factor operation, resulting in effective use of the diode arrays. The concept significantly reduces diode array cost over conventional heat capacity lasers, and it is considered enabling for many potential applications. A conceptual design study of the hybrid configuration has been carried out. Three concepts were evaluated using CAD tools. The concepts are described and their relative merits discussed. Because of reduced disk size and diode cost, the hybrid concept may allow scaling to average powers on the order of 0.5 MW/module.

  15. High capacity heat pipe performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A high capacity heat pipe which will operate in one-g and in zero-g is investigated. An artery configuration which is self-priming in one-g was emphasized. Two artery modifications were evolved as candidates to achieve one-g priming and will provide the very high performance: the four artery and the eight artery configurations. These were each evaluated analytically for performance and priming capability. The eight artery configuration was found to be inadequate from a performance standpoint. The four artery showed promise of working. A five-inch long priming element test article was fabricated using the four artery design. Plexiglas viewing windows were made on each end of the heat pipe to permit viewing of the priming activity. The five-inch primary element would not successfully prime in one-g. Difficulties on priming in one-g raised questions about zero-g priming. Therefore a small test element heat pipe for verifying that the proposed configuration will self-prime in zero-g was fabricated and delivered.

  16. High-Capacity Heat-Pipe Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Duschatko, R. J.; Voss, F. E.; Sauer, L. W.

    1989-01-01

    Heat pipe with cylindrical heat-input surface has higher contact thermal conductance than one with usual flat surface. Cylindrical heat absorber promotes nearly uniform flow of heat into pipe at all places around periphery of pipe, helps eliminate hotspots on heat source. Lugs in aluminum pipe carry heat from outer surface to liquid oozing from capillaries of wick. Liquid absorbs heat, evaporates, and passes out of evaporator through interlug passages.

  17. Electron heat capacity and lattice properties of Americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Filanovich, A. N.; Os'kina, V. A.; Volkov, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron heat capacity of americium is calculated using the concepts on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of this element. The Debye temperature, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the bulk modulus of americium are determined on the basis of the results of calculations and experimental data on heat capacity.

  18. Calculation of difference in heat capacities at constant pressure and constant volume with the aid of the empirical Nernst and Lindemann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontev, K. L.

    1981-07-01

    An expression is obtained for heat capacity differences of materials at a constant pressure and volume, on the basis of the rigorous thermodynamic equation (Kittel, 1976), and by using the Grueneisen law (Kikoin and Kikoin, 1976) of constancy of the ratio of the cubic expansion coefficient to the molar heat capacity. Conditions are determined, where the empirical Nernst and Lindemann (Filippov, 1967) equation is regarded as rigorous.

  19. Heat capacity of water: A signature of nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, C.; Conde, M. M.; McBride, C.; Abascal, J. L. F.; Noya, E. G.; Ramirez, R.; Sesé, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this note we present results for the heat capacity at constant pressure for the TIP4PQ/2005 model, as obtained from path-integral simulations. The model does a rather good job of describing both the heat capacity of ice Ih and of liquid water. Classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005, TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, simple point charge/extended, and TIP5P models are unable to reproduce the heat capacity of water. Given that classical simulations do not satisfy the third law of thermodynamics, one would expect such a failure at low temperatures. However, it seems that for water, nuclear quantum effects influence the heat capacities all the way up to room temperature. The failure of classical simulations to reproduce Cp points to the necessity of incorporating nuclear quantum effects to describe this property accurately.

  20. The Heat Capacity of Metals: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigeishi, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Presented here are improvements in the original design of an introductory statistical thermodynamics experiment with the result that heat capacities of metals are routinely obtained within ten percent of literature values. (BB)

  1. Heat Capacity of Solids--by Courtesy of the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bligh, P. H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a heat capacity experiment designed to provide an interactive environment between the student, the experiment, and the computer. Discusses computer software that has been developed so that the entire interaction can be coordinated from the computer keyboard. (TW)

  2. Accurate Measurement of Heat Capacity by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Experience with high quality heat capacity measurement by differential scanning calorimetry is summarized and illustrated, pointing out three major causes of error: (1) incompatible thermal histories of the sample, reference and blank runs; (2) unstable initial and final isotherms; (3) incompatible differences between initial and final isotherm amplitudes for sample, reference and blank runs. Considering these problems, it is shown for the case of polyoxymethylene that accuracies in heat capacity of 0.1 percent may be possible.

  3. Heat capacity and absolute entropy of iron phosphides

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrokhotova, Z.V.; Zaitsev, A.I.; Litvina, A.D.

    1994-09-01

    There is little or no data on the thermodynamic properties of iron phosphides despite their importance for several areas of science and technology. The information available is of a qualitative character and is based on assessments of the heat capacity and absolute entropy. In the present work, we measured the heat capacity over the temperature range of 113-873 K using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and calculated the absolute entropy.

  4. The heat capacity of water near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučelić, V.; Vučelić, D.

    1983-11-01

    Anomalous heat capacities of water at solid/water interfaces have been obtained. The solids vary from inorganic (zeolites, porous class, silica gel, activated carbon) to biological (protein lysozyme and adrenal gland). Water heat capacities at all interfaces exhibit the same pattern. At room temperature the small values are close to ice and increase with temperature, reaching the value of free water between 380 and 440 K.

  5. Heat capacity, electrical and thermal conductivity of silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyzi, Azra; Chegel, Raad

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the electronic heat capacity, electrical and thermal conductivity of monolayer planar and buckled silicon sheets (silicene) through tight binding approximation and Kubo-Greenwood formula. Applying and increasing dopant atoms to the system leads to opening a gap in the band structures and density of states that causes to decrease (increase) the heat capacity before (after) the Schottky anomaly. The electrical and electronic thermal conductivity of doped silicene reduces with increasing impurity strength.

  6. Evidence of nanostructuration from the heat capacities of the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid series.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marisa A A; Coutinho, João A P; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2013-09-14

    In the present work, the heat capacities at T = 298.15 K of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C(N/2)C(N/2)im][NTf2], were measured, for the first time, using a high-precision heat capacity drop calorimeter, with an uncertainty of less than 0.15%. Based on the obtained results, it was possible to evaluate the effect of the cation symmetry on the heat capacity data through a comparative analysis with the [C(N-1)C1im][NTf2] ionic liquid series. The molar heat capacities of the [C(N/2)C(N/2)im][NTf2] ionic liquids series present a less pronounced deviation from the linearity along the alkyl chain length than the asymmetric based ionic liquids series. Lower molar heat capacities for the symmetric than the asymmetric series were observed, being this difference more evident for the specific and volumic heat capacities. As observed for the [C(N-1)C1im][NTf2] series, a trend shift in the heat capacities at [C6C6im][NTf2] was found that reflects the impact of nonpolar region nanostructuration on the thermophysical properties of the ionic liquids. The profile of the two regions is in agreement with the expected effect arising from the nanostructuration in ionic liquids. The results obtained in the present work show a clear indication that for the symmetric series, [C(N/2)C(N/2)im][NTf2], the starting of the liquid phase nanostructuration/alkyl chain segregation occurs around [C6C6im][NTf2].

  7. Landau-Placzek ratio for heat density dynamics and its application to heat capacity of liquids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Scopigno, Tullio

    2013-01-21

    Exact relation for contributions to heat capacity of liquids is obtained from hydrodynamic theory. It is shown from analysis of the long-wavelength limit of heat density autocorrelation functions that the heat capacity of simple liquids is represented as a sum of two contributions due to "phonon-like" collective excitations and heat relaxation. The ratio of both contributions being the analogy of Landau-Placzek ratio for heat processes depends on the specific heats ratio. The theory of heat density autocorrelation functions in liquids is verified by computer simulations. Molecular dynamics simulations for six liquids having the ratio of specific heats γ in the range 1.1-2.3, were used for evaluation of the heat density autocorrelation functions and predicted Landau-Placzek ratio for heat processes. The dependence of contributions from collective excitations and heat relaxation process to specific heat on γ is shown to be in excellent agreement with the theory.

  8. On the heat capacity of Ce{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Durgesh Samatham, S. Shanmukharao Venkateshwarlu, D. Gangrade, Mohan Ganesan, V.

    2014-04-24

    Electrical resistivity and heat capacity measurements on Cerium based dense Kondo compound Ce{sub 3}Al have been reported. Clear signatures of first order structural transition at 108K, followed by a Kondo minimum and coherence are clearly seen in resistivity. The structural transition is robust and is not affected by magnetic fields. Heat capacity measurements reveal an anomalous enhancement in the heavy fermion character upon magnetic fields. Vollhardt invariance in specific heat C(T.H) curves have been observed at T=3.7K and at H ≈ 6T.

  9. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  10. Heat Capacity of Dilute 3He-4He Monolayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Masashi

    2016-05-01

    The heat capacities of a small amount of 3He dissolved in monolayer 4He films are measured to clarify natures of monolayer 4He films. With increasing areal density, the measured heat capacities gradually increase and subsequently gradually decrease. With further increase in areal density, the measured heat capacity rapidly decreases to zero over a very narrow areal density range near that of the sqrt{3} × sqrt{3} phase. These slightly complex areal-density variations and dependence on 3He concentration are discussed from the viewpoint of the known properties of 4He films. The behaviors can be explained. However, the expected two-dimensional gas-liquid or gas-solid coexistence is not observed in this study.

  11. Heat Capacities of Natural Antlerite and Brochantite at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bissengaliyeva, Mira R; Bekturganov, Nuraly S; Gogol, Daniil B; Taimassova, Shynar T; Koketai, Temirgaly A; Bespyatov, Michael A

    2013-11-14

    The investigation of a magnetic component of the heat capacity of natural samples of copper sulfates antlerite Cu3SO4(OH)4 in the temperature range below 40 K and brochantite Cu4SO4(OH)6 below 55 K has been carried out. A regular component of the heat capacity has been calculated from experimental data of adiabatic calorimetry. In the low-temperature area of (0 to 55) K two peaks of magnetic heat capacity for brochantite have been registered. The contributions of anomalous component ΔStr into entropy of the minerals are (11 ± 3) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for antlerite and (5.3 ± 1.5) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for brochantite.

  12. Heat Capacities of Natural Antlerite and Brochantite at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bissengaliyeva, Mira R; Bekturganov, Nuraly S; Gogol, Daniil B; Taimassova, Shynar T; Koketai, Temirgaly A; Bespyatov, Michael A

    2013-11-14

    The investigation of a magnetic component of the heat capacity of natural samples of copper sulfates antlerite Cu3SO4(OH)4 in the temperature range below 40 K and brochantite Cu4SO4(OH)6 below 55 K has been carried out. A regular component of the heat capacity has been calculated from experimental data of adiabatic calorimetry. In the low-temperature area of (0 to 55) K two peaks of magnetic heat capacity for brochantite have been registered. The contributions of anomalous component ΔS tr into entropy of the minerals are (11 ± 3) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for antlerite and (5.3 ± 1.5) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for brochantite. PMID:24249917

  13. Heat capacities and thermodynamic properties of annite (aluminous iron biotite)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The heat capacities have been measured between 7 and 650 K by quasi-adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. At 298.15 K and 1 bar, the calorimetric entropy for our sample is 354.9??0.7 J/(mol.K). A minimum configurational entropy of 18.7 J/(mol.K) for full disorder of Al/Si in the tetrahedral sites should be added to the calorimetric entropy for third-law calculations. The heat capacity equation [Cp in units of J/mol.K)] Cp0 = 583.586 + 0.075246T - 3420.60T-0.5 - (4.4551 ?? 106)T-2 fits the experimental and estimated heat capacities for our sample (valid range 250 to 1000 K) with an average deviation of 0.37%. -from Authors

  14. Development of a high capacity variable conductance heat pipe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosson, R.; Hembach, R.; Edelstein, F.; Loose, J.

    1973-01-01

    The high-capacity, pressure-primed, tunnel-artery wick concept was used in a gas-controlled variable conductance heat pipe. A variety of techniques were employed to control the size of gas/vapor bubbles trapped within the artery. Successful operation was attained with a nominal 6-foot long, 1-inch diameter cold reservoir VCHP using ammonia working fluid and nitrogen control gas. The pipe contained a heat exchanger to subcool the liquid in the artery. Maximum transport capacity with a 46-inch effective length was 1200 watts level (more than 50,000 watt-inches) and 800 watts at 0.5-inch adverse tilt.

  15. High thermal-transport capacity heat pipes for space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Albert W.; Gustafson, Eric; Roukis, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of performance tests of several dual-slot heat pipe test articles. The dual-slot configuration has a very high thermal transport capability and has been identified as a very promising candidate for the radiator system for the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. Two six-foot long aluminum heat pipes were built and tested with ammonia and acetone. A 20-ft long heat pipe was also built and tested with ammonia. The test results have been compared with performance predictions. A thermal transport capacity of 2000 W at an adverse tilt of 1 in. and a 1000 W capacity at an adverse tilt of 2 in. were achieved on the 20-ft long heat pipe. These values are in close agreement with the predicted performance limits.

  16. Specific heat capacity of freshly excised prostate specimens.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Rao, N; Kelly, H; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2011-11-01

    The specific heat capacity of tissue is a critical parameter for thermal therapies that act over a long period of time. It is also critical for thermoacoustic signal generation. We present ex vivo measurements of specific heat capacity performed by a dual-pin probe with tight temperature control of the specimen. One 30 mm × 1.28 mm probe heats steadily for 30 s, while another measurement probe measures temperatures 6 mm away from the center of the heater probe. Specific heat values ranging from 2.9 to 4 J cm(-3) °C(-1) were measured on 20 lobes from ten fresh prostate specimens with varying degrees of cancerous involvement as confirmed by histology.

  17. High capacity demonstration of honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.; Cerza, M. R., Jr.; Hall, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    High capacity honeycomb panel heat pipes were investigated as heat rejection radiators on future space platforms. Starting with a remnant section of honeycomb panel measuring 3.05-m long by 0.127-m wide that was originally designed and built for high-efficiency radiator fins, features were added to increase thermal transport capacity and thus permit test evaluation as an integral heat transport and rejection radiator. A series of subscale panels were fabricated and reworked to isolate individual enhancement features. Key to the enhancement was the addition of a liquid sideflow that utilizes pressure priming. A prediction model was developed and correlated with measured data, and then used to project performance to large, space-station size radiators. Results show that a honeycomb panel with 5.08-cm sideflow spacing and core modification will meet the design load of a 50 kW space heat rejection system.

  18. Specific heat capacity of nanoporous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cong-Liang; Feng, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Li, Jing; Wang, Ge

    2013-09-01

    Based on Lindemann's criterion, a specific heat capacity model for nanoporous material was proposed by defining the surface-atom layer, to take the surface atoms and the volume atoms separately into account. The height of the surface-atom layer was determined from the experiment, and results show that only the first layer atoms on the surface should be separately considered for nanoporous Al2O3. The shape factor of the pore was also introduced in the model with values between 2 (for cylindrical pore) and 3 (for spherical pore) to characterize the morphology of the pore. It turns out experimentally that the specific heat capacity of the analyzed nanoporous Al2O3 is much larger than that of the bulk, which can be interpreted as due to the fact that the surface atom plays a more important role than the volume one. And the smaller the radius and/or the larger the porosity, which lead to a larger surface-volume ratio, the larger the specific heat capacity becomes. The nanoporous material could be a better heat storage medium than the corresponding bulk with a much lighter weight, smaller volume but higher heat storage capacity.

  19. Heat capacities of liquid metals above 1500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Heat capacity data are presented for liquid transition metals for temperatures close to the melting point and for 3000, 4000, and 5000 K. The data have been obtained by summarizing the results of levitation, exploding-wire, and drop-calorimetry measurements reported in the literature and by providing analytical estimates where experimental data are not available. The data given here are useful in assigning heat loads and predicting structure survival during extreme temperature excursions caused by nuclear, laser, or particle irradiations.

  20. Heat capacity of square-well fluids of variable width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largo, J.; Solana, J. R.; Acedo, L.; Santos, A.

    We have obtained by Monte Carlo NVT simulations the constant-volume excess heat capacity of square-well fluids for several temperatures, densities and potential widths. Heat capacity is a thermodynamic property much more sensitive to the accuracy of a theory than other thermodynamic quantities, such as the compressibility factor. This is illustrated by comparing the reported simulation data for the heat capacity with the theoretical predictions given by the Barker-Henderson perturbation theory as well as with those given by a non-perturbative theoretical model based on Baxter's solution of the Percus-Yevick integral equation for sticky hard spheres. Both theories give accurate predictions for the equation of state. By contrast, it is found that the Barker-Henderson theory strongly underestimates the excess heat capacity for low to moderate temperatures, whereas a much better agreement between theory and simulation is achieved with the non-perturbative theoretical model, particularly for small well widths, although the accuracy of the latter worsens for high densities and low temperatures, as the well width increases.

  1. Heat capacities of lanthanide and actinide monazite-type ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Beridze, George; Vinograd, Victor L.; Bosbach, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    (Ln, An)xPO4 monazite-type ceramics are considered as potential matrices for the disposal of nuclear waste. In this study we computed the heat capacities and the standard entropies of these compounds using density functional perturbation theory. The calculations of lanthanide monazites agree well with the existing experimental data and provide information on the variation of the standard heat capacities and entropies along the lanthanide series. The results for AnPO4 monazites are similar to those obtained for the isoelectronic lanthanide compounds. This suggests that the missing thermodynamic data on actinide monazites could be similarly computed or assessed based on the properties of their lanthanide analogs. However, the computed heat capacity of PuPO4 appear to be significantly lower than the measured data. We argue that this discrepancy might indicate potential problems with the existing experimental data or with their interpretation. This shows a need for further experimental studies of the heat capacities of actinide-bearing, monazite-type ceramics.

  2. Improved Method for Determining the Heat Capacity of Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Roger; Moran, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    An improved procedure for laboratory determination of the heat capacities of metals is described. The temperature of cold water is continuously recorded with a computer-interfaced temperature probe and the room temperature metal is added. The method is more accurate and faster than previous methods. It allows students to get accurate measurements…

  3. A new angle on heat capacity changes in hydrophobic solvation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelly R; Sharp, Kim A

    2003-08-13

    The differential solubility of polar and apolar groups in water is important for the self-assembly of globular proteins, lipid membranes, nucleic acids, and other specific biological structures through hydrophobic and hydrophilic effects. The increase in water's heat capacity upon hydration of apolar compounds is one signature of the hydrophobic effect and differentiates it from the hydration of polar compounds, which cause a decrease in heat capacity. Water structuring around apolar and polar groups is an important factor in their differential solubility and heat capacity effects. Here, it is shown that joint radial/angular distribution functions of water obtained from simulations reveal quite different hydration structures around polar and apolar groups: polar and apolar groups have a deficit or excess, respectively, of "low angle hydrogen bonds". Low angle hydrogen bonds have a larger energy fluctuation than high angle bonds, and analysis of these differences provides a physical reason for the opposite changes in heat capacity and new insight into water structure around solutes and the hydrophobic effect.

  4. Heat Capacity of Superfluid (sup 4)He in the Presence of a Heat Current Near T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C. P.; Goodstein, David L.; Harter, Alexa W.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamic theory of superfluid helium in the presence of a heat current is presented. We show that there is a thermodynamic relation between the heat capacity and the expression ps(W), which describes the depression of the superfluid density with the counterflow velocity W. Using this relation we show that the heat capacity of superfluid super4He in the presence of a heat current diverges at a depressed lambda transition temperature, suggesting the possibility of a new second order phase transition where the superfluid wave function is not the order parameter.

  5. Working Fluids for Increasing Capacities of Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has shown that the capacities of heat pipes can be increased through suitable reformulation of their working fluids. The surface tensions of all of the working fluids heretofore used in heat pipes decrease with temperature. As explained in more detail below, the limits on the performance of a heat pipe are associated with the decrease in the surface tension of the working fluid with temperature, and so one can enhance performance by reformulating the working fluid so that its surface tension increases with temperature. This improvement is applicable to almost any kind of heat pipe in almost any environment. The heat-transfer capacity of a heat pipe in its normal operating-temperature range is subject to a capillary limit and a boiling limit. Both of these limits are associated with the temperature dependence of surface tension of the working fluid. In the case of a traditional working fluid, the decrease in surface tension with temperature causes a body of the liquid phase of the working fluid to move toward a region of lower temperature, thus preventing the desired spreading of the liquid in the heated portion of the heat pipe. As a result, the available capillary-pressure pumping head decreases as the temperature of the evaporator end of the heat pipe increases, and operation becomes unstable. Water has widely been used as a working fluid in heat pipes. Because the surface tension of water decreases with increasing temperature, the heat loads and other aspects of performance of heat pipes that contain water are limited. Dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols have shown promise as substitutes for water that can offer improved performance, because these solutions exhibit unusual surface-tension characteristics: Experiments have shown that in the cases of an aqueous solution of an alcohol, the molecules of which contain chains of more than four carbon atoms, the surface tension increases with temperature when the

  6. On the specific heat capacity enhancement in nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Hentschke, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    Molten salts are used as heat transfer fluids and for short-term heat energy storage in solar power plants. Experiments show that the specific heat capacity of the base salt may be significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of certain nanoparticles. This effect, which is technically interesting and economically important, is not yet understood. This paper presents a critical discussion of the existing attendant experimental literature and the phenomenological models put forward thus far. A common assumption, the existence of nanolayers surrounding the nanoparticles, which are thought to be the source of, in some cases, the large increase of a nanofluid's specific heat capacity is criticized and a different model is proposed. The model assumes that the influence of the nanoparticles in the surrounding liquid is of long range. The attendant long-range interfacial layers may interact with each other upon increase of nanoparticle concentration. This can explain the specific heat maximum observed by different groups, for which no other theoretical explanation appears to exist. PMID:26873263

  7. On the specific heat capacity enhancement in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschke, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    Molten salts are used as heat transfer fluids and for short-term heat energy storage in solar power plants. Experiments show that the specific heat capacity of the base salt may be significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of certain nanoparticles. This effect, which is technically interesting and economically important, is not yet understood. This paper presents a critical discussion of the existing attendant experimental literature and the phenomenological models put forward thus far. A common assumption, the existence of nanolayers surrounding the nanoparticles, which are thought to be the source of, in some cases, the large increase of a nanofluid's specific heat capacity is criticized and a different model is proposed. The model assumes that the influence of the nanoparticles in the surrounding liquid is of long range. The attendant long-range interfacial layers may interact with each other upon increase of nanoparticle concentration. This can explain the specific heat maximum observed by different groups, for which no other theoretical explanation appears to exist.

  8. On the specific heat capacity enhancement in nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Hentschke, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    Molten salts are used as heat transfer fluids and for short-term heat energy storage in solar power plants. Experiments show that the specific heat capacity of the base salt may be significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of certain nanoparticles. This effect, which is technically interesting and economically important, is not yet understood. This paper presents a critical discussion of the existing attendant experimental literature and the phenomenological models put forward thus far. A common assumption, the existence of nanolayers surrounding the nanoparticles, which are thought to be the source of, in some cases, the large increase of a nanofluid's specific heat capacity is criticized and a different model is proposed. The model assumes that the influence of the nanoparticles in the surrounding liquid is of long range. The attendant long-range interfacial layers may interact with each other upon increase of nanoparticle concentration. This can explain the specific heat maximum observed by different groups, for which no other theoretical explanation appears to exist.

  9. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission investigation no. 25 (Tellus project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deparatesi, S. G. (Principal Investigator); Reiniger, P. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The TELLUS pilot project, utilizing 0.5 to 1.1 micron and 10.5 to 12.5 micron day and/or night imagery from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission, is described. The application of remotely sensed data to synoptic evaluation of evapotranspiration and moisture in agricultural soils was considered. The influence of topography, soils, land use, and meteorology on surface temperature distribution was evaluated. Anthropogenic heat release was investigated. Test areas extended from semi-arid land in southern Italy to polders in the Netherlands, and from vine-growing hills in the Rhineland to grasslands in Buckinghamshire.

  10. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures. PMID:27482621

  11. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures.

  12. Poly(3-methylpyrrole): Vibrational dynamics, phonon dispersion and heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Parvej; Srivastava, Seema; Ansari, Saif-ul-Islam; Gupta, V. D.

    2013-07-01

    Normal modes of vibration and their dispersions in poly(3-methylpyrrole) (P3MPy) based on the Urey-Bradley force field are reported. It provides a detailed interpretation of previously reported I.R. spectra. Characteristic features of dispersion curves, such as regions of high density-of-states, repulsion, and character mixing of dispersive modes are discussed. Predictive values of heat capacity as a function of temperature are calculated from dispersion curves via density-of-states.

  13. Heat capacity and entropy changes in processes involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sturtevant, J M

    1977-01-01

    Six possible sources of the large heat capacity and entropy changes frequently observed for processes involving proteins are identified. Of these the conformational, hydrophobic, and vibrational effects seem likely to be of greatest importance. A method is proposed for estimating the magnitudes of the hydrophobic and vibrational contributions. Application of this method to several protein processes appears to achieve significant clarification of previously confusing and apparently contradictory data. PMID:196283

  14. Heat Transfer Capacity of Lotus-Type Porous Copper Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Hiroshi; Ogushi, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Hideo; Ikeda, Teruyuki

    Lotus-type porous copper is a form of copper that includes many straight pores, which are produced by the precipitation of supersaturated gas dissolved in the molten metal during solidification. The lotus-type porous copper is attractive as a heat sink because a higher heat transfer capacity is obtained as the pore diameter decreases. We investigate a fin model for predicting the heat transfer capacity of the lotus-type porous copper. Its heat transfer capacity is verified to be predictable via the straight fin model, in which heat conduction in the porous metal and the heat transfer to the fluid in the pores are taken into consideration by comparison with a numerical analysis. We both experimentally and analytically determine the heat transfer capacities of three types of heat sink: with conventional groove fins, with groove fins that have a smaller fin gap (micro-channels) and with lotus-type porous copper fins. The conventional groove fins have a fin gap of 3mm and a fin thickness of 1mm, the micro-channels have a fin gap of 0.5mm and a fin thickness of 0.5mm, and the lotus-type porous copper fins have pores with a diameter of 0.3mm and a porosity of 0.39. The lotus-type porous copper fins were found to have a heat transfer capacity 4 times greater than the conventional groove fins and 1.3 times greater than the micro-channel heat sink under the same pumping power.

  15. Heat capacity of solid proteins by thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ge; Wunderlich, B.

    1997-11-01

    In a continuing effort to better understand the thermodynamic properties of proteins, solid state heat capacities of poly(amino acid)s of all 21 naturally occurring amino 4 copoly(amino acid)s and about 10 proteins have been analyzed by now using the Advanced Thermal Analysis System, ATHAS. The experimental measurements were performed with adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry from 10 to about 450 K. The heat capacities of the samples in their pure, solid states are linked to an approximate vibrational spectrum by making use of known group vibrations and a set of parameters, {Theta}{sub 1} and {Theta}{sub 3}, of the Tarasov function for the skeletal vibrations. Good agreement is found between experiment and calculation with root mean square errors mostly within {+-}3%. The experimental data were analyzed also with an empirical addition scheme using data for the poly(amino acid)s. Based on this study, vibrational heat capacity can now be predicted for all proteins with an accuracy comparable to common experiments. Furthermore, gradual transitions, indicative of molecular motion prior to devitrification, melting, or decomposition, can be identified. The new experimental data compared here with the prior samples are: bovine {beta}-lactoglobulin, chicken lysozyme and ovalbumin.

  16. High capacity demonstration of honeycomb panel heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of performance enhancing the sandwich panel heat pipe was investigated for moderate temperature range heat rejection radiators on future-high-power spacecraft. The hardware development program consisted of performance prediction modeling, fabrication, ground test, and data correlation. Using available sandwich panel materials, a series of subscale test panels were augumented with high-capacity sideflow and temperature control variable conductance features, and test evaluated for correlation with performance prediction codes. Using the correlated prediction model, a 50-kW full size radiator was defined using methanol working fluid and closely spaced sideflows. A new concept called the hybrid radiator individually optimizes heat pipe components. A 2.44-m long hybrid test vehicle demonstrated proof-of-principle performance.

  17. Heat capacity and sound velocities of low dimensional Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Solis, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the heat capacity ratio and sound velocities for an interactionless Fermi gas immersed in periodic structures such as penetrable multilayers or multitubes created by one (planes) or two perpendicular (tubes) external Dirac comb potentials. The isobaric specific heat of the fermion gas presents the dimensional crossover previously observed in the isochoric specific heat - from 3D to 2D or to 1D -. The quotient between the two quantities has a prominent bump related to the confinement, and as the temperature increases, it goes towards the monoatomic classical gas value 5/3. We present the isothermal and the adiabatic sound velocities of the fermion gas which show anomalous behavior at temperatures below TF due to the dimensionality of the system, while at higher temperatures again we recover the behavior of a classical Fermi gas. Furthermore, as the temperature goes to zero the sound velocity has a finite value, as expected.

  18. Heat Capacity Study of Solution Grown Crystals of Isotactic Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,H.; Cebe, P.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the specific heat capacity on isotactic polystyrene (iPS) crystals grown from dilute solution. Solution grown crystal (SGC) samples had larger crystal fractions and greatly reduced rigid amorphous fractions compared to their bulk cold-crystallized counterparts. Heat capacity studies were performed from below the glass transition temperature to above the melting temperature by using quasi-isothermal temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and standard DSC. Two or three endotherms are observed, which represent the melting of crystals. The small rigid amorphous fraction relaxes in a wide temperature range from just above the glass transition temperature to just below the first crystal melting endotherm. As in bulk iPS, 1 multiple reversing melting was found in iPS SGCs, supporting the view that double melting in iPS may be due to dual thermal stability distribution existing along one single lamella.2 The impact of reorganization and annealing on the melt endotherms was also investigated. Annealing occurs as a result of the very slow effective heating rate of the quasi-isothermal measurements compared to standard DSC. The improvement of crystal perfection through annealing causes the reversing melting endotherms to occur at a temperature higher than the endotherms seen in the standard DSC scan.

  19. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandarusi, J. A.; Yesavage, V. F.

    1988-11-01

    An automated flow calorimeter has been developed for the measurement of heat capacity and latent enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures (300 700 K) and pressure (<30M Pa) with a design accuracy of 0.1%. The method of measurement is the traditional electrical power input flow calorimeter, utilizing a precision metering pump, which eliminates the need for flow-rate monitoring. The calorimeter cell uses a unique concentric coil design with passive metal radiation shields and active guard heaters to minimize heat leakage, eliminate the traditional constant-temperature bath, and facilitate easy component replacement. An additional feature of the instrument is a complete automation system, greatly simplifying operation of the apparatus. A novel multitasking software scheme allows a single microcomputer simultaneously to control all system temperatures, provide continuous monitoring and updates on system status, and log data. Preliminary results for liquid water mean heat capacities show the equipment to be performing satisfactorily, with data accuracies of better than ±0.3%. Minor equipment modifications and better thermometry are required to reduce systemic errors and to achieve the designed operational range.

  20. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sandarusi, J.A.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1988-11-01

    An automated flow calorimeter has been developed for the measurement of heat capacity and latent enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures (300-700 K) and pressure (< 30 MPa) with a design accuracy of 0.1%. The method of measurement is the traditional electrical power input flow calorimeter, utilizing a precision metering pump, which eliminates the need for flow-rate monitoring. The calorimeter cell uses a unique concentric coil design with passive metal radiation shields and active guard heaters to minimize heat leakage, eliminate the traditional constant-temperature bath, and facilitate easy component replacement. An additional feature of the instrument is a complete automation system, greatly simplifying operation of the apparatus. A novel multitasking software scheme allows a single microcomputer simultaneously to control all system temperatures, provide continuous monitoring and updates on system status, and log data. Preliminary results for liquid water mean heat capacities show the equipment to be performing satisfactorily, with data accuracies of better than /plus minus/0.3%. Minor equipment modifications and better thermometry are required to reduce systemic errors and to achieve the designed operational range.

  1. Ground water applications of the heat capacity mapping mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The paper discusses the ground water portion of a hydrologic investigation of eastern South Dakota using data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite. The satellite carries a two-channel radiometer (0.5-1.1 and 10.5-12.5 microns) in a sun synchronous orbit and collects data at approximately 0230 and 1330 local standard time with repeat coverage of 5 to 16 days depending on latitude. It is shown that HCMM data acquired at appropriate periods of the diurnal and annual temperature cycle can provide useful information on shallow ground water.

  2. The decarbonation and heat capacity of ZnCO3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haselton, H.T.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The decarbonation curve for ZnCO3 has been determined in the pressure range 3-20 kbar by using a combination of cold-seal vessels and piston-cylinder apparatus with NaCl assemblies. Heat capacities for both synthetic and natural ZnCO3 samples were measured by differential scanning calorimetry at temperatures ranging from 340 to 497 K. The results of these experiments indicate that the enthalpy of formation for smithsonite, ??Hf(1,298.15), is approximately -817. kJ/mol. which is about 4 kJ more negative than most tabulated values. ?? 1987.

  3. Specific heat capacity of molten salt-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chang; Huang, Chien-Hsun

    2013-06-21

    There is no consensus on the effect of nanoparticle (NP) addition on the specific heat capacity (SHC) of fluids. In addition, the predictions from the existing model have a large discrepancy from the measured SHCs in nanofluids. We show that the SHC of the molten salt-based alumina nanofluid decreases with reducing particle size and increasing particle concentration. The NP size-dependent SHC is resulted from an augmentation of the nanolayer effect as particle size reduces. A model considering the nanolayer effect which supports the experimental results was proposed.

  4. Heat capacity mapping mission. [satellite for earth surface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), part of a series of Applications Explorers Missions, is designed to provide data on surface heating as a response to solar energy input. The data is obtained by a two channel scanning radiometer, with one channel covering the visible and near-IR band between 0.5 and 1.1 micrometers, and the other covering the thermal-IR between 10.5 and 12.5 micrometers. The temperature range covered lies between 260 and 340 K, in 0.3 deg steps, with an accuracy at 280 K of plus or minus 0.5 K. Nominal altitude is 620 km, with a ground swath 700 km wide.

  5. Modeling of Material Removal by Solid State Heat Capacity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-04-17

    Pulsed lasers offer the capability of rapid material removal. Here we present simulations of steel coupon tests by two solid state heat capacity lasers built at LLNL. Operating at 1.05 pm, these deliver pulse energies of about 80 J at 10 Hz, and about 500 J at 20 Hz. Each is flashlamp-pumped. The first laser was tested at LLNL, while the second laser has been delivered to HELSTF, White Sands Missile Range. Liquid ejection appears to be an important removal mechanism. We have modeled these experiments via a time-dependent code called THALES, which describes heat transport, melting, vaporization, and the hydrodynamics of liquid, vapor, and air. It was previously used, in a less advanced form, to model drilling by copper vapor lasers [1] . It was also used to model vaporization in beam dumps for a high-power laser [2]. The basic model is in 1D, while the liquid hydrodynamics is handled in 2D.

  6. Determination of the heat capacities of Lithium/BCX (bromide chloride in thionyl chloride) batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubow, Stephen A.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1989-01-01

    Heat capacities of twelve different Lithium/BCX (BrCl in thionyl chloride) batteries in sizes AA, C, D, and DD were determined. Procedures and measurement results are reported. The procedure allowed simple, reproducible, and precise determinations of heat capacities of industrially important Lithium/BCX cells, without interfering with performance of the cells. Use of aluminum standards allowed the accuracy of the measurements to be maintained. The measured heat capacities were within 5 percent of calculated heat capacity values.

  7. Low-temperature heat capacity of magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. V.

    2008-12-01

    This paper continues the previous investigation into a recently discovered phenomenon of magnetic fluid solidification at temperatures essentially exceeding the freezing point of the base fluid. Physically, this phenomenon is related to the fact that at decreasing temperatures the magnetic fluid loses fluidity (with its viscosity tending to infinity) at a temperature higher than the freezing point of the base fluid. The main factor determining the freezing point is the type of the surface-active substance covering the particles. A group of different surfactants is examined with the aim of finding the lowest possible solidification temperature. The best result is obtained for linoleic acid (-100°C). In order to gain a deeper insight into the mechanisms of fluid solidification, a series of thermophysical measurements has been done. Heat capacity measurements made for an isooctane-based magnetic fluid stabilized by oleic acid at a temperature ranging from -130°C to 0 did not reveal any noticeable heat capacity anomalies in the vicinity of the solidification temperature. This suggests that the solidification of the magnetic fluid proceeds without phase transition. The highest peak of the heat flux is observed at the freezing point of isooctane. The position of the maximum slightly changes with the concentration of magnetic particles. With an increase of the concentration the temperature of the heat flux maximum decreases. In the presence of free oleic acid in isooctane a low peak is observed at a temperature of about -15°C. The peak position is independent of the oleic acid concentration. Tables 1, Figs 7, Refs 1.

  8. Heat Capacity Measurements by Simultaneous Relaxation and AC-Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, H.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2012-02-01

    A high-resolution method for measuring the heat capacity Cp using simultaneously AC and Relaxation Calorimetry techniques has been developed. This technique is useful for both first and second-order phase transitions of liquids and complex fluids. The difference of the Cp's measured by the Relaxation and AC calorimetry is a direct measurement of a phase transitions' latent heat. As a test, the Cp of two cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals, 5CB and 8CB, were measured using a square wave modulation pulse train over a base temperature range from 300 to 320 K in which 5CB exhibits a first-order phase transition and 8CB exhibits a first and second-order phase transition. Fourier transform analysis allows for the direct Cp measurement at the fundamental frequency of the square wave pulse train (as well as higher frequency orders) as function of temperature (i.e., AC-mode). The heating and cooling relaxations at the beginning and end of the square pulse heating allows for a relaxation analysis of Cp by applying the dual slope-method that includes all enthalpic conversions.

  9. Molecular origin of the negative heat capacity of hydrophilic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Yoshidome, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    The hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydrations are analyzed with the emphasis on the sign of the heat capacity of hydration (HCH). The angle-dependent integral equation theory combined with a multipolar water model is employed in the analysis. The hydration entropy (HE) is decomposed into the translational and orientational parts. It is found that the orientational part governs the temperature dependence of the HE. The orientational part is further decomposed into the solute-water pair correlation component (component 1) and the water reorganization component (component 2). For hydrophilic solutes, components 1 and 2 are negative and positive, respectively. As the temperature becomes higher, component 1 increases while component 2 decreases: They make positive and negative contributions to the HCH, respectively. The strong solute-water electrostatic attractive interactions induce the distortion of water structure near the solute and the break of hydrogen bonds. As the temperature increases, the effect of the attractive interactions becomes smaller and the distortion of water structure is reduced (i.e., more hydrogen bonds are recovered with increasing temperature). The latter effect dominates, leading to negative HCH. During the heat addition the formation of hydrogen bonds, which accompanies heat generation, occurs near the solute. Consequently, the addition of the same amount of heat leads to a larger increase in the thermal energy (or equivalently, in the temperature) than in the case of pure water. The hydrophobic hydration, which is opposite to the hydrophilic hydration in many respects, is also discussed in detail.

  10. Quartz: heat capacities from 340 to 1000 K and revised values for the thermodynamic properties.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    New heat-capacity data for quartz have been measured over the T interval 340-1000 K by differential scanning calorimetry. The data were combined with recent heat-content and heat-capacity data to provide a significantly revised set of thermodynamic properties for alpha -quartz and to resolve the problem of disparate heat-content and heat-capacity data for alpha - and beta -quartz.-J.A.Z.

  11. Heat capacity of xenon adsorbed on nanobundle grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishko, K. A.; Sokolova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    A model of a one-dimensional nonideal gas in an external transverse force field is used to interpret the experimentally observed thermodynamic properties of xenon deposited in grooves on the surface of carbon nanobundles. A nonideal gas model with pairwise interactions is not entirely adequate for describing dense adsorbates (at low temperatures), but makes it easy to account for the exchange of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere, which is an important factor at intermediate (on the order of 35 K for xenon) and, especially, high (˜100 K) temperatures. In this paper, we examine a 1D real gas taking only the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones interaction into account, but under exact equilibrium with respect to the number of particles between the 1D adsorbate and the 3D atmosphere of the measurement cell. The low-temperature branch of the specific heat is fitted independently by an elastic chain model so as to obtain the best agreement between theory and experiment over the widest possible region, beginning at zero temperature. The gas approximation sets in after temperatures for which the phonon specific heat of the chain essentially transforms to a one-dimensional equipartition law. Here the basic parameters of both models can be chosen so that the heat capacity C(T) of the chain transforms essentially continuously into the corresponding curve for the gas approximation. Thus, it can be expected that an adequate interpretation of the real temperature dependences of the specific heat of low-dimensionality atomic adsorbates can be obtained through a reasonable combination of the phonon and gas approximations. The main parameters of the gas approximation (such as the desorption energy) obtained by fitting the theory to experiments on the specific heat of xenon correlate well with published data.

  12. Experimental validation of enhanced heat capacity of ionic liquid-based nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiznobaik, Hani; Shin, Donghyun

    2013-04-01

    Enhanced heat capacities of molten salts and oxide nanoparticle mixtures ("nanomaterials") have been recently reported. These molten salts are used as thermal energy storage in solar thermal power, and the enhancement of their heat capacities are expected to significantly decrease the cost of electricity. However, the mechanism for the enhanced heat capacity of these nanomaterials is unknown. Different phase transition of molten salts near nanoparticles has been recently proposed to be primarily responsible for the enhanced heat capacity of this type of nanomaterials. Hence, we present an experimental validation of the proposed mechanism for the enhanced heat capacity of nanomaterials.

  13. Heat capacity and heat content measurements on binary compounds in the Ru-Si, Ru-Ge, and Ru-Sn systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, J.J.; Gachon, J.C.; Feschotte, P.; Perring, L. |

    1997-11-01

    Molar heat capacities of Ru{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5} Ru{sub 0.4}Si{sub 0.6}, Ru{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}, Ru{sub 0.4}Ge{sub 0.6}, Ru{sub 0.4}Sn{sub 0.6}, and Ru{sub 0.3}Sn{sub 0.7} were determined every 10 K by differential scanning calorimetry in the temperature range from 310 to 1080 K. The present results have been fitted by a polynomial function of temperature: C{sub p} = a+bT-cT{sup -2}. Heat contents of the six phases have been verified by drop calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation are given for the studied compounds.

  14. Soil moisture applications of the heat capacity mapping mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of ground, aircraft and satellite investigations conducted to evaluate the potential of the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) to monitor soil moisture and the depth of shallow ground water. The investigations were carried out over eastern South Dakota to evaluate the relation between directly measured soil temperatures and water content at various stages of canopy development, aircraft thermal scanner measurements of apparent canopy temperature and the reliability of actual HCMM data. The results demonstrate the possibility of evaluating soil moisture on the basis of HCMM apparent canopy temperature and day-night soil temperature difference measurements. Limitations on the use of thermal data posed by environmental factors which influence energy balance interactions, including phase transformations, wind patterns, topographic variations and atmospheric constituents are pointed out.

  15. Heat Capacity Changes Associated with Nucleic Acid Folding

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas heat capacity changes (ΔCPs) associated with folding transitions are commonplace in the literature of protein folding, they have long been considered a minor energetic contributor in nucleic acid folding. Recent advances in the understanding of nucleic acid folding and improved technology for measuring the energetics of folding transitions have allowed a greater experimental window for measuring these effects. We present in this review a survey of current literature that confronts the issue of ΔCPs associated with nucleic acid folding transitions. This work helps to gather the molecular insights that can be gleaned from analysis of ΔCPs and points toward the challenges that will need to be overcome if the energetic contribution of ΔCP terms are to be put to use in improving free energy calculations for nucleic acid structure prediction. PMID:16429398

  16. A calorimetric investigation of spessartine: Vibrational and magnetic heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, Edgar; Geiger, Charles A.; Withers, Anthony C.; Essene, Eric J.

    2009-06-01

    The heat capacity ( Cp) of two synthetic spessartine samples (Sps) was measured on 20-30 mg-size samples in the temperature range 2-864 K by relaxation calorimetry (RC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polycrystalline spessartine samples were synthesized in two different laboratories at high pressures and temperatures from glass and oxide-mixture starting materials and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and electron-microprobe analysis. The low-temperature heat capacity data show a prominent lambda transition with a peak at 6.2 K, which is interpreted to be the result of a paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition. The DSC data around ambient T agree excellently with the RC data and can be represented by the Cp polynomial for T > 250 K: CpSps=610-3060·T-0.5-1.45·107·T-2+1.82·109·T-3. Integration of the low temperature Cp data yields a calorimetric standard entropy for the two different samples of So = 334.6 ± 2.7 J/mol · K and 336.0 ± 2.7 J/mol · K. The preferred standard third-law entropy for spessartine is So = 335.3 ± 3.8 J/mol · K, which is the mean value from the two separate determinations. The lattice (vibrational) heat capacity of spessartine was calculated using the single-parameter phonon dispersion model of Komada and Westrum. The lattice entropy at 298.15 K is Svib298.15=297.7J/mol·K, which represents 89% of the calorimetric entropy. The magnetic heat capacity and entropy of spessartine, Smag, at 298.15 K were also calculated. The Smag of the two samples is 38.7 and 37.4 J/mol · K, which is 87% and 83% of the maximum possible magnetic entropy given by 3Rln6 = 44.7 J/mol · K. Published model-dependent lattice-dynamic calculations of Svib298.15 are analyzed and compared to the experimental data. Using the calorimetrically determined So and the Cp polynomial for spessartine, together with high P- T experimental phase-equilibrium data on Mn 2+-Mg partitioning between garnet and olivine, allows calculation of the

  17. Testing of a high capacity research heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Tests were performed on a high-capacity channel-wick heat pipe to assess the transport limitations of v-grooves and the effects of boiling. The results showed that transport can vary significantly (less than 50 W) under similar conditions and the continuous boiling was observed at power levels as low as 40 W. In addition, some evidence was found to support the predictions using a groove transport model which shows that transport increases with lower groove densities and longer evaporators. However, due to transport variations, these results were not consistent throughout the program. When a glass fiber wick was installed over the grooves, a relatively low transport level was achieved (80 to 140 W). Based on these results and the identification of some potential causes for them, several design suggestions were recommended for reducing the possibility of boiling and improving groove transport.

  18. Thermodynamics of micellization from heat-capacity measurements.

    PubMed

    Šarac, Bojan; Bešter-Rogač, Marija; Lah, Jurij

    2014-06-23

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the most important technique for studying the thermodynamics of structural transitions of biological macromolecules, is seldom used in quantitative thermodynamic studies of surfactant micellization/demicellization. The reason for this could be ascribed to an insufficient understanding of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of surfactant solutions (DSC data) in terms of thermodynamics, which leads to problems with the design of experiments and interpretation of the output signals. We address these issues by careful design of DSC experiments performed with solutions of ionic and nonionic surfactants at various surfactant concentrations, and individual and global mass-action model analysis of the obtained DSC data. Our approach leads to reliable thermodynamic parameters of micellization for all types of surfactants, comparable with those obtained by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). In summary, we demonstrate that DSC can be successfully used as an independent method to obtain temperature-dependent thermodynamic parameters for micellization.

  19. Transient response of a high-capacity heat pipe for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, J. H.; Holmes, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    High-capacity heat pipe radiator panels have been proposed as the primary means of heat rejection for Space Station Freedom. In this system, the heat pipe would interface with the thermal bus condensers. Changes in system heat load can produce large temperature and heat load variations in individual heat pipes. Heat pipes could be required to start from an initially cold state, with heat loads temporarily exceeding their low-temperature transport capacity. The present research was motivated by the need for accurate prediction of such transient operating conditions. In this work, the cold startup of a 6.7-meter long high-capacity heat pipe is investigated experimentally and analytically. A transient thermohydraulic model of the heat pipe was developed which allows simulation of partially-primed operation. The results of cold startup tests using both constant temperature and constant heat flux evaporator boundary conditions are shown to be in good agreement with predicted transient response.

  20. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures. PMID:27046573

  1. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures.

  2. High-molar-mass hyaluronan behavior during testing its radical scavenging capacity in organic and aqueous media: effects of the presence of manganese(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Rapta, Peter; Valachová, Katarína; Gemeiner, Peter; Soltés, Ladislav

    2009-02-01

    This study compares the radical scavenging capacity of high-molar-mass hyaluronan (HA) using standardized methods applying 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and 2,2'-azinobis[3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonate] (ABTS) radical cations as oxidants. Additionally, spin-trapping technique combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to evaluate the ability of HA to scavenge reactive radicals. The thermal decomposition of K2S2O8 in pure H2O or in a H2O/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixture at 333 K was used as a source of reactive paramagnetic species. We found that HA does not exhibit radical-scavenging activity when DPPH radicals or ABTS(.+) radical cations are used as oxidant, but that HA is an effective radical scavenger at low concentrations, if the oxidation reactions are initiated by the decomposition of K2S2O8. At higher HA concentrations, a more complex behavior and prooxidant HA action was observed. The influence of Mn(II) ions on the reaction mechanisms of radical generation and termination in the K2S2O8/H2O/DMSO system in the presence of HA was studied in detail. PMID:19235158

  3. Droplet Evaporator For High-Capacity Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed heat-exchange scheme boosts heat transfer per unit area. Key component is generator that fires uniform size droplets of subcooled liquid at hot plate. On impact, droplets spread out and evaporate almost instantly, removing heat from plate. In practice, many generator nozzles arrayed over evaporator plate.

  4. Shock waves and phase changes in a large-heat-capacity fluid emerging from a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P. A.; Kim, Y.-G.; Carofano, G. C.

    1986-05-01

    The emergence of a shockwave from the open end of a shock tube is studied, with special emphasis on test fluids of high molar heat capacity, i.e. retrograde fluids. A variety of wavelike vapour-liquid phase changes are observed in such fluids, including the liquefaction shock, mixture-evaporation shock, condensation waves associated with shock splitting and liquid-evaporation waves (these phenomena have analogues in the polymorphic phase changes of solids; only the first two are treated in this paper). The open end of the shock-tube test section discharges into an observation chamber where photographs of the emerging flow are taken. Calculations were performed with the Benedict-Webb-Rubin, van der Waals and other equations of state. Numerical (finite-difference) predictions of the flow were made for single-phase and two-phase flows: solutions were tested against the experimental shock diffraction and vortex data of Skews. The phase-change properties of the test fluid can be quantified by the 'retrogradicity' r(T), measuring the difference in slope between the P, T isentrope and the vapour-pressure curve, and the 'kink' k(T), measuring the difference between the single-phase and mixture sound speeds. Mixture-evaporation (i.e. rerefaction) shocks appear to have a sonic-sonic or double Chapman-Jouguet structure and show agreement with amplitude predictions based on k(T). Liquefaction shocks are found to show a reproducible transition from regular, smooth shock fronts to irregular, chaotic shock fronts with increasing shock Mach number. This transition can be correlated with published stability limits.

  5. Large-scale calculations of gas phase thermochemistry: Enthalpy of formation, standard entropy, and heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M.; van Maaren, Paul J.; Ditz, Jonas C.; Lindh, Roland; van der Spoel, David

    2016-09-01

    Large scale quantum calculations for molar enthalpy of formation (ΔfH0), standard entropy (S0), and heat capacity (CV) are presented. A large data set may help to evaluate quantum thermochemistry tools in order to uncover possible hidden shortcomings and also to find experimental data that might need to be reinvestigated, indeed we list and annotate approximately 200 problematic thermochemistry measurements. Quantum methods systematically underestimate S0 for flexible molecules in the gas phase if only a single (minimum energy) conformation is taken into account. This problem can be tackled in principle by performing thermochemistry calculations for all stable conformations [Zheng et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 10885-10907 (2011)], but this is not practical for large molecules. We observe that the deviation of composite quantum thermochemistry recipes from experimental S0 corresponds roughly to the Boltzmann equation (S = RlnΩ), where R is the gas constant and Ω the number of possible conformations. This allows an empirical correction of the calculated entropy for molecules with multiple conformations. With the correction we find an RMSD from experiment of ≈13 J/mol K for 1273 compounds. This paper also provides predictions of ΔfH0, S0, and CV for well over 700 compounds for which no experimental data could be found in the literature. Finally, in order to facilitate the analysis of thermodynamics properties by others we have implemented a new tool obthermo in the OpenBabel program suite [O'Boyle et al., J. Cheminf. 3, 33 (2011)] including a table of reference atomization energy values for popular thermochemistry methods.

  6. Direct Observation of a Majorana Quasiparticle Heat Capacity in 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Y. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Majorana fermion, which acts as its own antiparticle, was suggested by Majorana in 1937 (Nuovo Cimento 14:171). While no stable particle with Majorana properties has yet been observed, Majorana quasiparticles (QP) may exist at the boundaries of topological insulators. Here we report the preliminary results of direct observation of Majorana QPs by a precise measurements of superfluid 3He heat capacity. The bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity falls exponentially with cooling at the temperatures significantly below the energy gap. Owing to the zero energy gap mode the Majorana heat capacity falls in a power law. The Majorana heat capacity can be larger than bulk one at some temperature, which depends on surface to volume ratio of the experimental cell. Some times ago we developed the Dark matter particles detector (DMD) on a basis of superfluid 3He which is working at the frontier of extremely low temperatures (Winkelmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 559:384-386, 2006). Here we report the observation of zero gap mode of Majorana, follows from the new analyses of DMD heat capacity, published early. We have found a 10 % deviation from the bulk superfluid 3He heat capacity at the temperature of 135 μK. This deviation corresponds well to the theoretical value for Majorana heat capacity at such low temperature. (Note, there were no fitting parameters).

  7. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  8. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  9. S = 1 Excitations in Heat Capacity of the Haldane Compound TMNIN Doped with a Nonmagnetic Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawae, Tatsuya; Ito, Masakazu; Mito, Masaki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    1999-03-01

    We have studied the field dependence of the heat capacity of a typicalHaldane antiferromagnet (CH3)4NNi(NO)3 (TMNIN) doped with thenonmagnetic impurity Zn2+, as well as of a pure TMNIN. The overallfeatures of the magnetic heat capacity, including the characteristic broadmaximum, are almost reproduced by the theoretical curve with J/k B =-12 K for both systems in zero field. The field dependence in the impuresystems is described well by assuming the Schottky heat capacity with S =1, not S = 1/2 expected from the VBS model. A possible reason why the S= 1 model is suitable is discussed.

  10. Orientation and heat capacity of horizontally adsorbed molecules in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Yen

    2014-02-01

    The orientation and the heat capacity of horizontally adsorbed molecules are investigated in static electric fields. We evaluate the energy spectrum and the wave function to probe the rotational characteristics of the molecule. Numerical results indicate that the electric field and the effect of quantum confinement lead to anticrossing behaviors in the energy levels. The orientation reveals a stepped feature due to the anticrossing in the ground state. Moreover, the heat capacity displays two peaks near the anticrossing. By means of comparison, each peak of the heat capacity corresponds to a particular degree of orientation.

  11. Study of heating capacity of focused IR light soldering systems.

    PubMed

    Anguiano, C; Félix, M; Medel, A; Bravo, M; Salazar, D; Márquez, H

    2013-10-01

    An experimental study about four optical setups used for developing a Focused IR Light Soldering System (FILSS) for Surface Mount Technology (SMT) lead-free electronic devices specifically for Ball Grid Arrays (BGA) is presented. An analysis of irradiance and infrared thermography at BGA surface is presented, as well as heat transfer by radiation and conduction process from the surface of the BGA to the solder balls. The results of this work show that the heating provided by our proposed optical setups, measured at the BGA under soldering process, meets the high temperature and uniform thermal distribution requirements, which are defined by the reflow solder method for SMT devices. PMID:24104296

  12. Prediction of heat capacities of solid inorganic salts from group contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, A.T.M.G.; Eakman, J.M.; Yarbro, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    A group contribution technique is proposed to predict the coefficients in the heat capacity correlation, C{sub p} = a + bT + c/T{sup 2} + dT{sup 2}, for solid inorganic salts. The results from this work are compared with fits to experimental data from the literature. It is shown to give good predictions for both simple and complex solid inorganic salts. Literature heat capacities for a large number (664) of solid inorganic salts covering a broad range of cations (129), anions (17) and ligands (2) have been used in regressions to obtain group contributions for the parameters in the heat capacity temperature function. A mean error of 3.18% is found when predicted values are compared with literature values for heat capacity at 298{degrees} K. Estimates of the error standard deviation from the regression for each additivity constant are also determined.

  13. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F(-) and a Na(+) ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na(+) and F(-) ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔC(p) stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na(+) ion, it decreases upon charging the F(-) ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  14. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F{sup -} and a Na{sup +} ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na{sup +} and F{sup -} ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity {Delta}C{sub p} stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na{sup +} ion, it decreases upon charging the F{sup -} ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q=-0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  15. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  16. Ambient heat capacities and entropies of ionic solids: a unique view using the Debye equation.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-06-01

    Entropies of solids are obtained experimentally as integrals of measured heat capacities over the temperature range from zero to ambient. Correspondingly, the Debye phonon distribution equation for solids provides a theoretical connection between these two chemical thermodynamic measures. We examine how the widely applicable Debye equation illuminates the relation between the corresponding experimental measures using more than 250 ionic solids. Estimation of heat capacities for simple ionic solids by the Dulong-Petit heat capacity limit, by the Neumann-Kopp elemental sum, and by the ion sum method is examined in relation to the Debye equation. We note that, and explain why, the ambient temperature heat capacities and entropies of ionic solids are found to be approximately equal, and how deviations from equality may be related to the Debye temperature, ΘD, which characterizes the Debye equation. It is also demonstrated that Debye temperatures may be readily estimated from the experimental ratio of ambient heat capacity to entropy, C(p)/S(p), rather than requiring resort to elaborate theoretical or experimental procedures for their determination. Correspondingly, ambient mineral entropies and heat capacities are linearly correlated and may thus be readily estimated from one another.

  17. Measurement of the Heat Capacity of He-II Under a Heat Current Near the Lambda Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harter, Alexa W.; Lee, Richard A. M.; Chui, Talso C. P.; Goodstein, David L.

    2000-01-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the heat capacity of superfluid helium-4 under an applied heat current near the lambda transition. The calorimeter is a standard cylindrical thermal conductivity cell with a 0.6 mm gap between two copper endplates. The sidewall is made of stainless steel. A heat current density in the range of 1 to 4 microW/sq cm is applied through the helium sample while a pulse method is used to measure the heat capacity. Temperature changes are recorded with high-resolution thermometers (HRTs) located on the top and bottom endplates. Corrections are made to the readings of the HRTs to account for the Kapitza boundary resistance and the anomalous Kapitza boundary resistance. After the corrections, both the top and the bottom HRTs. give the same heat capacity values. The heat capacity is found to be much larger than the prediction of recent theories. We also plotted our data on a scaled plot to test the prediction of scaling by the theories. The result and its interpretation will be presented. The cell height was deliberately made to be thin to reduce the effects of gravity. Nonetheless, gravity is expected to have significant effects on the heat capacity data in the temperature range of our measurement. A space experiment would remove this unwanted gravity effect and allow the true physics to be examined. Moreover, in the absence of gravity, a deeper cell can be used allowing HRTs to be mounted on to the sidewall providing direct measurements of the helium temperature, unaffected by the anomalous Kapitza boundary resistance.

  18. Heat capacities and entropies at 298.15 K of MgTiO3 (geikielite), ZnO (zincite), and ZnCO3 (smithsonite)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Haselton, H.T.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    Heat capacities of synthetic MgTiO3 (geikielite), ZnO (zincite), and natural crystals of smithsonite (ZnCO3) were measured between 9 and 366 K using an automatic adiabatically shielded calorimeter. At 298.15 K the standard molar entropies Smo of MgTiO3, ZnO, and ZnCO3 are (74.64 ?? 0.15), (43.16 ?? 0.09), and (81.19 ?? 0.16) J??K-1??mol-1, respectively. Debye temperatures for MgTiO3 and ZnO calculated from our Cp, mo values below 20 K are (900 ?? 20) K and (440 ?? 25) K respectively. Heat capacities for MgTiO3 and ZnO were combined with enthalpy increments from the literature to derive heat-capacity equations for these phases from 260 to about 1800 K. The heat capacities of MgTiO3 between 260 and 1720 K were fitted with an average deviation of 0.3 per cent by the equation: C??p,m/(J??K-1??mol-1) = 222.5-0.05274(T/K)-6.092x105(T/K)-1-1874.6(T/K) -1/2+1.878x10-5(T/K)2 and for ZnO the equation: C??p,m/(J??K-1??mol-1) = 53.999+7.851x10-4(T/K)-5.868x105(T/K)-2 -127.50(T/K)-:1/2+1.9376x10-6(T/K)2 fits the heat capacities in the temperature interval of 250 to 1800 K with an average deviation of 0.7 per cent. ?? 1989.

  19. Ultrafast demagnetization of FePt:Cu thin films and the role of magnetic heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimling, Johannes; Kimling, Judith; Wilson, R. B.; Hebler, Birgit; Albrecht, Manfred; Cahill, David G.

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of different time scales of ultrafast demagnetization has attracted much attention. This so-called diversity of ultrafast demagnetization has been explained by the microscopic three temperature model (M3TM) and by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch model (LLBM). Here, we revisit the basic three temperature model (3TM) and provide a general criterion for explaining the different time scales observed. We focus on the role of magnetic heat capacity, which we find mainly determines the slowing down of the demagnetization time with increasing ambient temperature and laser fluence. In this context, we clarify the role of magnetic heat capacity in the M3TM and compare the 3TM with the LLBM. To illustrate the role of magnetic heat capacity, we present a simulation of ultrafast demagnetization of Ni. Furthermore, we present time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of ultrafast demagnetization and specific heat of Fe46Cu6Pt48 from 300 K to close to its Curie temperature. While most of the prior experimental research used high-fluence laser pulses causing sizable temperature excursions of the sample, our experiments involve small temperature excursions, which are crucial for studying the role of magnetic heat capacity in ultrafast demagnetization. Our experimental results corroborate that the slowing down of ultrafast demagnetization is dominated by the increase of the magnetic heat capacity near the Curie temperature.

  20. On the heat capacity of elements in WMD regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Sebatien

    2014-03-01

    Once thought to get simpler with increasing pressure, elemental systems have been discovered to exhibit complex structures and multiple phases at high pressure. For carbon, QMD/PIMC simulations have been performed and the results are guiding alternative modelling methodologies for constructing a carbon equation-of-state covering the warm dense matter regime. One of the main results of our new QMD/PIMC carbon equation of state is that the decay of the ion-thermal specific heat with temperature is much faster than previously expected. An important question is whether this is only found in carbon and not other element. In this presentation, based on QMD calculations for several elements, we explore trends in the transition from condensed matter to warm dense matter regime.

  1. A New Method for the Determination of the Specific Heat Capacity Using Laser-Flash Calorimetry Down to 77K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göbel, A.; Hemberger, F.; Vidi, S.; Ebert, H.-P.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for evaluation of the specific heat capacity in the temperature regime between 77K and 330K using laser-flash calorimetry is presented. Usually, laser-flash calorimetry is accomplished by performing an additional laser-flash measurement on a reference specimen with a known specific heat capacity and by comparing the maximum rear-side temperatures rises. In this study, the calibration is achieved by comparison of the rear-side temperature rise to specific-heat-capacity data determined by other methods in an adjacent temperature regime. Subsequently, the thus yielded proportional factor is used for the evaluation of the specific heat capacity from laser-flash measurements at temperatures where no specific-heat-capacity data are available. The reliability of this method is shown by performing measurements on a material with known specific heat capacity, aluminum oxide. Furthermore, the specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity of borosilicate crown glass (BK7) was determined experimentally.

  2. Capacity modulation of a heat pump system by changing the composition of refrigerant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.; Kim, M.S.

    1999-07-01

    Experimental investigation of a capacity modulation of a heat pump system using refrigerant mixtures has been performed. Experimental apparatus was made to have a refrigeration part and a composition changing part. The performance of the heat pump system filled with R32/134a mixture was investigated. Heating capacity, cooing capacity, and coefficient of performance (COP) of the system were also investigated under several heating and cooling conditions. In the composition changing part, a gas-liquid separator was used to collect the vapor and the liquid phase separately from incoming refrigerant mixture, which eventually changes the composition of the circulating refrigerant mixtures. The mass fraction of the charged refrigerant in the heat pump system was selected as 40/60 and 70/30 by mass percentage. The composition of the refrigerant with initial composition of 40/60 of the circulating mixture varied from 35/65 to 48/52 in the refrigeration part. For the refrigerant with initial composition of 70/30, the composition varied from 65/35 to 75/25. With this composition change, cooing capacity increased from 2.63 to 3.30 kW, and COP varied from 3.22 to 2.78 under the cooling condition. In the heating test, heating capacity increased from 1.53 to 2.30 kW, and COP decreased from 2.15 to 2.03. As the composition of R32 in the circulating refrigerant mixture increases, heating and cooling capacities are enhanced, but COP tends to decrease.

  3. Expression of heat-shock protein 25 immunoreactivity in the dental pulp and enamel organ during odontogenesis in the rat molar.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hayato; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2002-01-01

    The present immunocytochemical study reports on the expression of heat-shock protein (Hsp) 25 during odontogenesis in rat molars from postnatal 1 to 100 days. Hsp 25 immunoreactivity (IR) appeared in the immature dental mesenchymal cells and the differentiating and differentiated odontoblasts. At 30 days, the coronal odontoblasts retained intense Hsp25-IR, whereas the odontoblasts in the root and floor pulp were initially weak or negative but increased in IR in the later stages, indicating that the expression of Hsp 25 reflects the differentiation status of odontoblasts. During amelogenesis, the secretory ameloblasts were Hsp 25 immunopositive and the enamel free area (EFA) cells showed intense Hsp 25-IR when they developed a ruffled border. Ruffle-ended ameloblasts (RA) also consistently showed intense Hsp 25-IR, but smooth ended ameloblasts (SA) showed weak IR. These data suggest that Hsp 25 is related to the formation and maintenance of the ruffled border of RA and EFA cells.

  4. Heat capacity and thermodynamic functions for gehlenite and staurolite: with comments on the Schootky anomaly in the heat capacity of staurolite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The heat capacities of a synthetic gehlenite and a natural staurolite were measured from 12 and 5 K, respectively, to 370 K by adiabatic calorimetry, and the heat capacities of staurolite were measured to 900 K by differential scanning calorimetry. At 298.15 K and 1 bar the entropy of gehlenite is 210.1 + or - 0.6 J/(mol.K) and that of staurolite is 1019.6 + or - 12.0 for H2Al2Fe4Al16Si8O48 and 1101.0 + or - 12.0 for 103(H3Al1.15Fe2+0.60)- 324(Fe2+2.07Fe3+0.54 Ti0.08Mn0.02Al1.19)(Mg0.44Al15.26)Si8O48. -J.A.Z.

  5. A Framework for Spatial Assessment of Local Level Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity to Extreme Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Hayden, M.; Harlan, S.; Ruddell, D.; Komatsu, K.; England, B.; Uejio, C.

    2008-12-01

    Changing climate is predicted to increase the intensity and impacts of heat waves prompting the need to develop preparedness and adaptation strategies that reduce societal vulnerability. Central to understanding societal vulnerability, is adaptive capacity, the potential of a system or population to modify its features/behaviors so as to better cope with existing and anticipated stresses and fluctuations. Adaptive capacity influences adaptation, the actual adjustments made to cope with the impacts from current and future hazardous heat events. Understanding societal risks, vulnerabilities and adaptive capacity to extreme heat events and climate change requires an interdisciplinary approach that includes information about weather and climate, the natural and built environment, social processes and characteristics, interactions with the stakeholders, and an assessment of community vulnerability. This project presents a framework for an interdisciplinary approach and a case study that explore linkages between quantitative and qualitative data for a more comprehensive understanding of local level vulnerability and adaptive capacity to extreme heat events in Phoenix, Arizona. In this talk, we will present a methodological framework for conducting collaborative research on societal vulnerability and adaptive capacity on a local level that includes integration of household surveys into a quantitative spatial assessment of societal vulnerability. We highlight a collaborative partnership among researchers, community leaders and public health officials. Linkages between assessment of local adaptive capacity and development of regional climate change adaptation strategies will be discussed.

  6. Capacity modulation of an inverter heat pump system with capillary tubes and TXV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Kim, Y.

    1999-07-01

    The capacity of an air-to-air heat pump is decreased as the outdoor temperature is raised in the cooling mode operation. Capacity control of a heat pump system with respect to the outdoor temperature is required to provide adequate capacity at high condensing temperature condition on the heating mode operation of the system. An experimental study was performed on the characteristics of an inverter driven water-to-water heat pump system with a variation of compressor frequency and expansion device. The frequency was altered from 30 Hz to 75 Hz. Capillary tubes (700, 800, 900 mm) and thermostatic expansion valve (TXV) were used as an expansion device, and their results were compared. Performance of the system was measured at various condenser (30, 34, 39 C) and evaporator (26.1, 28.5 C) inlet temperatures of the secondary fluids. The system with longer capillary tube had higher increase of capacity and COP at high secondary fluid temperature entering the condenser. As the frequency was raised, the capacity and COP of the system with shorter capillary tube increased more than that with longer capillary tube, and capacity and COP of the TXV system was enhanced more than the capillary tube system.

  7. A Study of Specific Heat Capacity Functions of Polyvinyl Alcohol- Cassava Starch Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Lee Tin; Rahman, W. A. W. A.; Rahmat, A. R.; Morad, N. A.; Salleh, M. S. N.

    2010-03-01

    The specific heat capacity ( C sp) of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) blends with cassava starch (CSS) was studied by the differential scanning calorimetry method. Specimens of PVOH-CSS blends: PPV37 (70 mass% CSS) and PPV46 (60 mass% CSS) were prepared by a melt blending method with glycerol added as a plasticizer. The results showed that the specific heat capacity of PPV37 and PPV46 at temperatures from 330 K to 530 K increased from (2.963 to 14.995) J· g-1 · K-1 and (2.517 to 14.727) J · g-1· K-1, respectively. The specific heat capacity of PVOH-CSS depends on the amount of starch. The specific heat capacity of the specimens can be approximated by polynomial equations with a curve fitting regression > 0.992. For instance, the specific heat capacity (in J · g-1 · K-1) of PPV37 can be expressed by C sp = -17.824 + 0.063 T and PPV46 by C sp = -18.047 + 0.061 T, where T is the temperature (in K).

  8. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard fixed-capacity systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40% - 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying 'on' for 60% - 100% more hours per day compared to fixed -capacity systems. Experiments in this research examined the performance of 2-ton and 3-ton fixed- and variable-capacity systems and the impacts of system oversizing.

  9. HEAT OF DILUTION CALCULATION FOR 19 MOLAR SODIUM HYDROXIDE WITH WATER FOR USE IN 241-S-112

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    2007-02-20

    High concentration caustic solutions are known to cause stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel at elevated temperature. This calculation establishes the conditions where heat of dilution will not cause the solution temperature--concentration to exceed the boundary for stress corrosion cracking as established by NACE International.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation and heat capacity of two-dimensional spin-polarized atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sugheir, M. K.; Ghassib, H. B.; Awawdeh, M.

    2011-07-15

    The static fluctuation approximation (SFA) is used to study the condensate fraction and the specific heat capacity of finite two-dimensional spin-polarized atomic hydrogen. It is found that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs in this system. The transition temperature at different densities decreases as the number of particles of the system increases. At low density, a sharp peak in the specific heat capacity is observed at the transition temperature. On the other hand, as the density of the system increases, the transition temperature becomes no longer well-defined, and a hump is observed in the specific heat capacity around the transition temperature. A qualitative comparison of our results to published results for finite Bose systems shows good agreement.

  11. Debye temperature, thermal expansion, and heat capacity of TcC up to 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Song, T.; Ma, Q.; Tian, J.H.; Liu, X.B.; Ouyang, Y.H.; Zhang, C.L.; Su, W.F.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A number of thermodynamic properties of rocksalt TcC are investigated for the first time. • The quasi-harmonic Debye model is applied to take into account the thermal effect. • The pressure and temperature up to about 100 GPa and 3000 K, respectively. - Abstract: Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity of ideal stoichiometric TcC in the rocksalt structure have been studied systematically by using ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory method within the generalized gradient approximation. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the dependences of Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, constant-volume heat capacity, and constant-pressure heat capacity on pressure and temperature are successfully predicted. All the thermodynamic properties of TcC with rocksalt phase have been predicted in the entire temperature range from 300 to 3000 K and pressure up to 100 GPa.

  12. Dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestfálová, Magda; Šafařík, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental base for the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of substances is the thermal equation of state and the dependence of some of the basic specific heat capacities on temperature. Dependence of isobaric specific heat capacity on the pressure can already be deduced from these relations. International standards of the properties of water and steam are based on the new scientific formulation IAPWS-95. The equation is in the form of Helmholtz dimensionless function with very much parameters. The aim of this paper is to design the simple dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature in the range in which the steam occurs in the atmospheric moist air.

  13. Heat capacities of solid polymers (The Advanced THermal Analysis System, ATHAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal properties of solid, linear macromolecules are accessible through heat capacity measurements from about 10 K to the glass transition. By measuring and collecting data on over 150 polymers, a data bank was established and used as a base for detailed correlation with an approximate frequency spectrum for the polymers. Besides assessment of the entropy at zero kelvin of disordered polymers, this heat capacity knowledge has helped in the elucidation of partial phase transitions and conformationally disordered crystal phases. A link has also been established to measurements of mobility through solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. Most recently heat capacity measurements have been linked to full dynamic simulations of crystal segments of 1900 chain atoms. Questions of disorder and anharmonicity can thus be analyzed. The work is summarized as the Advanced Thermal Analysis System, ATHAS. 27 refs., 26 figs.

  14. Akermanite: phase transitions in heat capacity and thermal expansion, and revised thermodynamic data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Evans, H.T.; Nord, G.L.; Haselton, H.T.; Robie, R.A.; McGee, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A small but sharp anomaly in the heat capacity of akermanite at 357.9 K, and a discontinuity in its thermal expansion at 693 K, as determined by XRD, have been found. The enthalpy and entropy assigned to the heat-capacity anomaly, for the purpose of tabulation, are 679 J/mol and 1.9 J/(mol.K), respectively. They were determined from the difference between the measured values of the heat capacity in the T interval 320-365 K and that obtained from an equation which fits the heat-capacity and heat-content data for akermanite from 290 to 1731 K. Heat-capacity measurements are reported for the T range from 9 to 995 K. The entropy and enthalpy of formation of akermanite at 298.15 K and 1 bar are 212.5 + or - 0.4 J/(mol.K) and -3864.5 + or - 4.0 kJ/mol, respectively. Weak satellite reflections have been observed in hk0 single-crystal X-ray precession photographs and electron-diffraction patterns of this material at room T. With in situ heating by TEM, the satellite reflections decreased significantly in intensity above 358 K and disappeared at about 580 K and, on cooling, reappeared. These observations suggest that the anomalies in the thermal behaviour of akermanite are associated with local displacements of Ca ions from the mirror plane (space group P421m) and accompanying distortion of the MgSi2O7 framework.-L.C.C.

  15. High accuracy heat capacity measurements through the lambda transition of helium with very high temperature resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, W. M.; Lipa, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of the heat capacity singularity of helium at the lambda transition was performed with the aim of improving tests of the Renormalization Group (RG) predictions for the static thermodynamic behavior near the singularity. The goal was to approach as closely as possible to the lambda-point while making heat capacity measurements of high accuracy. To do this, a new temperature sensor capable of unprecedented resolution near the lambda-point, and two thermal control systems were used. A short description of the theoretical background and motivation is given. The initial apparatus and results are also described.

  16. Specific Heat Capacity of Nitrobenzene-Tetradecane Near the Liquid-Liquid Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada-Perez, P.; Cordoyiannis, G.; Cerdeiriña, C. A.; Glorieux, C.; Thoen, J.

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution adiabatic scanning calorimetry has been used to study the specific heat capacity anomaly of the nitrobenzene-tetradecane mixture near its upper critical point. The analysis, which is based on a method that uses heat capacity and enthalpy data, yields a value of the critical amplitude ratio A +/ A - which is consistent with the universal, accepted one. The critical amplitude of the correlation length was derived via two-scale factor universality. All this information is compared to that reported in previous studies for nitrobenzene-alkane mixtures.

  17. Investigations of temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and specific heat capacity of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eser, Erhan; Koç, Hüseyin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we calculated the electrical resistivity and heat capacities of some ideal metals (Cu, Pt, and Pd) using a method that it employs the statistical model and Debye functions. The method is used to provide a simple and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. The results obtained for the electrical resistivity and heat capacity have been compared with the results in literature. The results obtained at low temperature are in excellent agreement with experimental and theoretical results. Finally the used approximation and analytical method are a useful approach to calculate thermophysical properties of metals.

  18. Correlation dependence of the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient of metallic aluminum on its heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodryakov, V. Yu.; Bykov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The correlation between the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient β( T) and the heat capacity C( T) of aluminum is considered in detail. It is shown that a clear correlation is observed in a significantly wider temperature range, up to the melting temperature of the metal, along with the low-temperature range where it is linear. The significant deviation of dependence β( C) from the low-temperature linear behavior is observed up to the point where the heat capacity achieves the classical Dulong-Petit limit of 3 R ( R is the universal gas constant).

  19. Heat Capacity Uncertainty Calculation for the Eutectic Mixture of Biphenyl/Diphenyl Ether Used as Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J. C.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Mehos, M.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to calculate the uncertainty at 95% confidence for the experimental values of heat capacity of the eutectic mixture of biphenyl/diphenyl ether (Therminol VP-1) determined from 300 to 370 degrees C. Twenty-five samples were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to obtain the sample heat flow as a function of temperature. The ASTM E-1269-05 standard was used to determine the heat capacity using DSC evaluations. High-pressure crucibles were employed to contain the sample in the liquid state without vaporizing. Sample handling has a significant impact on the random uncertainty. It was determined that the fluid is difficult to handle, and a high variability of the data was produced. The heat capacity of Therminol VP-1 between 300 and 370 degrees C was measured to be equal to 0.0025T+0.8672 with an uncertainty of +/- 0.074 J/g.K (3.09%) at 95% confidence with T (temperature) in Kelvin.

  20. Inverse Identification of Temperature-Dependent Volumetric Heat Capacity by Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czél, Balázs; Woodbury, Keith A.; Gróf, Gyula

    2013-02-01

    An artificial neural network (NN)-based solution of the inverse heat conduction problem of identifying the temperature-dependent volumetric heat capacity function of a solid material is presented in this paper. The inverse problem was defined according to the evaluation of the BICOND thermophysical property measurement method. The volumetric heat capacity versus temperature function is to be determined using the measured transient temperature history of a single sensor. In this study, noiseless and noisy artificial measurements were generated by the numerical solution of the corresponding direct heat conduction problem. The inverse problem was solved by back-propagation and radial basis function type neural networks applying the whole history mapping approach. The numerical tests included the comparison of two different data representations of the network inputs (i.e., temperature vs. time and time vs. temperature) and accuracy analysis of the two network types with noiseless and noisy inputs. Based on the results presented, it can be stated that feed-forward NNs are powerful tools in a non-iterative solution of function estimation inverse heat conduction problems and they are likely to be very effective in evaluation of real measured temperature histories to determine the volumetric heat capacity as an arbitrary function of temperature.

  1. The effect of mechanical activation on the heat capacity of powdered tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, A. I.; Kiselev, M. R.; Klyuev, V. A.; Loznetsova, N. N.; Toporov, Yu. P.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the heat capacity ( C p ) of a mechanically activated tungsten powder. It is established that the mechanical processing leads to an increase in C p of the metal powder at low temperatures and modifies the character of the temperature dependence of this parameter. The dependences of C p and its heating-induced variation on the treatment duration have been determined. It is concluded that the observed effects are related to the accumulation of defects in the metal grain volume during mechanical activation and their annealing in the course of heating.

  2. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  3. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  4. Recommendations for accurate heat capacity measurements using a Quantum Design physical property measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Catherine A.; Stancescu, Maria; Marriott, Robert A.; White, Mary Anne

    2007-02-01

    A commercial instrument for determination of heat capacities of solids from ca. 400 K to 0.4 K, the physical property measurement system from Quantum Design, has been used to determine the heat capacities of a standard samples (sapphire [single crystal] and copper). We extend previous tests of the PPMS in three important ways: to temperatures as low as 0.4 K; to samples with poor thermal conductivity; to compare uncertainty with accuracy. We find that the accuracy of heat capacity determinations can be within 1% for 5 K < T < 300 K and 5% for 0.7 K < T < 5 K. Careful attention should be paid to the relative uncertainty for each data point, as determined from multiple measurements. While we have found that it is possible in some circumstances to obtain excellent results by measurement of samples that contribute more than ca. 1/3 to the total heat capacity, there is no "ideal" sample mass and sample geometry also is an important consideration. In fact, our studies of pressed pellets of zirconium tungstate, a poor thermal conductor, show that several samples of different masses should be determined for the highest degree of certainty.

  5. Anomalies of low-temperature heat capacity in superconductors with twins

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Our earlier paper showed that superconductors with twins may give rise to metastable superconducting domains that differ by /pi/ in the phase of the order parameter. The antiphase domain wall(ADW) separating them contains a plane on which the superconducting gap /Delta/ vanishes. This paper discusses the contribution of electron states localized in ADW to the electron heat capacity C(T).

  6. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB50 at low temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50 crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the summore » of SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. As a result, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.« less

  7. Low-temperature heat capacity of fullerite C60 doped with deuteromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Dolbin, A. V.; Sundqvist, B.

    2012-01-01

    The heat capacity C of fullerite doped with deuteromethane (CD4)0.4(C60) has been investigated in the temperature interval 1.2-120 K. The contribution ΔCCD4 of the CD4 molecules to the heat capacity C has been isolated. It is shown that at T ≈ 120 K the rotational motion of CD4 molecules in the octahedral voids of the C60 lattice is weakly hindered. When the temperature is lowered to 80 K, the rotational motion of the CD4 molecules changes from weakly hindered rotation to libration. In the range T = 1.2-30 K, ΔCCD4 is described quite accurately by the sum of contributions from the translational and librational vibrations and tunneling rotation of CD4 molecules. The contribution of tunneling rotation to the heat capacity ΔCCD4(T) is dominant below 5 K. The effect of nuclear-spin conversion of the CD4 molecules on the heat capacity has been observed and the characteristic times for nuclear spin conversion between the lowest levels of the A- and T-species of CD4 molecules at T < 5 K have been estimated. A feature observed in ΔCCD4(T) near T = 5.5 K is most likely a manifestation of a first-order phase transition in the orientational glass form of the solution.

  8. THE HEAT CAPACITY OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES BY DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement (to 3% accuracy) of the constant-pressure liquid-phase heat capacities of 21 hydrogen-containing fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether (CF3OCF2H) with boiling points ranging from -34.6 to 76.7 C, using diff...

  9. How to measure heat capacity of metals at 10s to 100s of GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Z. M.; Townley, A.; Jeanloz, R.

    2014-12-01

    Adapting methods of calorimetry to the diamond-anvil cell can provide important new information for understanding planetary interiors. Here we show that heat capacity of metals can be measured to the 10-100 GPa range by using AC electrical heating inside diamond anvil cells. Frequencies of f ≈ 1-100 MHz must be used to contain the heat within the sample of interest, as evidenced by numerical and physical models of heat flow: f > DinsCins2/(Csamdsam)2, where Dins is the thermal diffusivity of the insulation, Cins and Csam are specific heat capacities of insulation and metal sample, and dsam is sample thickness. Heat must be deposited uniformly (e.g. skin depth > sample thickness) for the most accurate and unambiguous measurements, thereby allowing measurement of the energetics of pre-melting, melting and partial melting of metals, including iron and its alloys. In principle, high-pressure calorimetry can be used to independently determine melting at high pressures, and also to quantify latent heats of fusion, thereby revealing the density of liquid metals at Earth core conditions.

  10. Heat capacities of synthetic hedenbergite, ferrobustamite and CaFeSi2O6 glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haselton, H.T.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    Heat capacities have been measured for synthetic hedenbergite (9-647 K), ferrobustamite (5-746 K) and CaFeSi2O6 glass (6-380 K) by low-temperature adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry. The heat capacity of each of these structural forms of CaFeSiO6 exhibits anomalous behavior at low temperatures. The X-peak in the hedenbergite heat-capacity curve at 34.5 K is due to antiferromagnetic ordering of the Fe2+ ions. Ferrobustamite has a bump in its heat-capacity curve at temperatures less than 20 K, which could be due to weak cooperative magnetic ordering or to a Schottky anomaly. Surprisingly, a broad peak with a maximum at 68 K is present in the heat-capacity curve of the glass. If this maximum, which occurs at a higher temperature than in hedenbergite is caused by magnetic ordering, it could indicate that the range of distortions of the iron sites in the glass is quite small and that coupling between iron atoms is stronger in the glass than in the edge-shared octahedral chains of hedenbergite. The standard entropy change, So298.15 - So0, is 174.2 ?? 0.3, 180.5 ?? 0.3 and 185.7 ?? 0.4 J/mol??K for hedenbergite, ferrobustamite and CaFeSi2O6 glass, respectively. Ferrobustamite is partially disordered in Ca-Fe distribution at high temperatures, but the dependence of the configuratonal entropy on temperature cannot be evaluated due to a lack of information. At high temperatures (298-1600 K), the heat capacity of hedenbergite may be represented by the equation Cop(J/mol??K) = 3l0.46 + 0.01257T-2039.93T -1 2 - 1.84604?? l06T-2 and the heat capacity of ferrobustamite may be represented by Cop(J/mol??K) = 403.83-0.04444T+ 1.597?? 10-5T2-3757.3T -1 2. ?? 1987.

  11. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Luis; Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making.

  12. Phonon Mechanisms for Excess Heat Capacity in Membrane Isolated Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of phonon transport in membrane-isolated superconducting transition edge sensors is discussed. Surveys of the literature on this type of sensor reveal a number of designs with excess heat capacity and a smaller subset that exhibit decoupling of the superconducting film from the underlying dielectric. A simple model is addressed in which the membrane, despite its thermal isolation, fails to fully thermalize to the temperature of the metal film heating it. A population of phonons exists which is emitted by the metal film, partially thermalizes the dielectric and is then reabsorbed in the metal film without escaping from the device structure to the thermal bath. The size of this population and its contribution to the heat capacity are estimated for several device scenarios.

  13. High-temperature heat capacity of Co3O4 spinel: thermally induced spin unpairing transition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mocala, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Sherman, David M.

    1992-01-01

    A strong anomaly was found in the heat capacity of Co3O4 between 1000 K and the decomposition temperature. This anomaly is not related to the decomposition of Co3O4 to CoO. The measured entropy of transition, ??S=46??4 J mol-1 K-1 of Co3O4, supports the interpretation that this anomaly reflects a spin unpairing transition in octahedrally coordinated Co3+ cations. Experimental values of heat capacity, heat content and entropy of Co3O4 in the high temperature region are provided. The enthalpy of the spin unpairing transition is 53??4 kJ mol-1 of Co3O4. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Evaluation of a large capacity heat pump concept for active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagel, L. L.; Herring, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of engineering analyses assessing the conceptual feasibility of a large capacity heat pump for enhancing active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure are presented. A unique heat pump arrangement which permits cooling the structure of a Mach 6 transport to aluminum temperatures without the aid of thermal shielding is described. The selected concept is compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants, with Freon R-11 selected as the preferred refrigerant. Condenser temperatures were limited to levels compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants by incorporating a unique multipass condenser design, which extracts mechanical energy from the hydrogen fuel, prior to each subsequent pass through the condenser. Results show that it is technically feasible to use a large capacity heat pump in lieu of external shielding. Additional analyses are required to optimally apply this concept.

  15. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices. PMID:20527779

  16. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices.

  17. A completely automated flow, heat-capacity, calorimeter for use at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.S.Z. ); Sandarusi, J. )

    1990-11-01

    An automated, flow calorimeter has been constructed to measure the isobaric heat capacities of concentrated, aqueous electrolyte solutions using a differential calorimetry technique. The calorimeter is capable of operation to 700 K and 40 MPa with a measurement accuracy of 0.03% relative to the heat capacity of the pure reference fluid (water). A novel design encloses the calorimeter within a double set of separately controlled, copper, adiabatic shields that minimize calorimeter heat losses and precisely control the temperature of the inlet fluids. A multistage preheat train, used to efficiently heat the flowing fluid, includes a counter-current heat exchanger for the inlet and outlet fluid streams in tandem with two calorimeter preheaters. Complete system automation is accomplished with a distributed control scheme using multiple processors, allowing the major control tasks of calorimeter operation and control, data logging and display, and pump control to be performed simultaneously. A sophisticated pumping strategy for the two separate syringe pumps allows continuous fluid delivery. This automation system enables the calorimeter to operate unattended except for the reloading of sample fluids. In addition, automation has allowed the development and implementation of an improved heat loss calibration method that provides calorimeter calibration with absolute accuracy comparable to the overall measurement precision, even for very concentrated solutions.

  18. Heat capacity and entropy of Ni2SiO4-olivine from 5 to 1000 K and heat capacity of Co2SiO4 from 360 to 1000 K.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.; Ito, J.; Krupka, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    The heat capacity of Ni2SiO4-olivine has been measured between 5 and 387 K by cryogenic adiabatic-shield calorimetry and between 360 and 1000 K by differential scanning calorimetry. The heat capacity of Co2SiO4-olivine was measured between 360 and 1000 K by differential scanning calorimetry.-J.A.Z.

  19. Calorimetric studies of the heat capacity and relaxation of amorphous Si prepared by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, K. H.; Kui, H. W.; Chik, K. P.

    1993-10-01

    The heat capacity of a-Si thin film prepared by electron beam evaporation method was measured from 360 to 820 K by a differential scanning calorimeter. For the as-prepared a-Si specimen, two novel irreversible endothermic processes and one irreversible broad exothermic reaction were found. The origins of the endothermic reactions were not known. It is suggested that they may be caused by a change in the number and distribution of voids that occurs at approximately 465 K and the creation of dangling bonds at the higher temperature regime (≳620 K). The exothermic reaction is attributed to heat release during structural relaxation. When measuring the heat capacity of a-Si, Ca-Sip, these irreversible reactions were first eliminated by annealing the specimens at high temperatures. The heat capacity of crystalline Si, Cc-Sip, was also measured and the difference, ΔCSip=Ca-Sip -Cc-Sip, was used to evaluate the thermodynamic melting temperature of the a-Si, Tal, which is determined to be 1400 K.

  20. Heat capacity measurements of sub-nanoliter volumes of liquids using bimaterial microchannel cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. F.; Miriyala, N.; Lee, J.; Hassanpourfard, M.; Kumar, A.; Thundat, T.

    2016-05-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip compatible techniques for thermal characterization of miniaturized volumes of liquid analytes are necessary in applications such as protein blotting, DNA melting, and drug development, where samples are either rare or volume-limited. We developed a closed-chamber calorimeter based on a bimaterial microchannel cantilever (BMC) for sub-nanoliter level thermal analysis. When the liquid-filled BMC is irradiated with infrared (IR) light at a specific wavelength, the IR absorption by the liquid analyte results in localized heat generation and the subsequent deflection of the BMC, due to a thermal expansion mismatch between the constituent materials. The time constant of the deflection, which is dependent upon the heat capacity of the liquid analyte, can be directly measured by recording the time-dependent bending of the BMC. We have used the BMC to quantitatively measure the heat capacity of five volatile organic compounds. With a deflection noise level of ˜10 nm and a signal-to-noise ratio of 68:1, the BMC offers a sensitivity of 30.5 ms/(J g-1 K-1) and a resolution of 23 mJ/(g K) for ˜150 pl liquid for heat capacity measurements. This technique can be used for small-scale thermal characterization of different chemical and biological samples.

  1. Physiological responses to heat of resting man with impaired sweating capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totel, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of total-body heat exposure were studied in three groups of subjects with varied degrees of impaired sweating capacity. The responses of two ectodermal dysplasic men, six quadriplegic men, and a man with widespread burned scar tissue were compared with the responses of three able-bodied men resting in the heat. It was found that the able-bodied and burned subjects competed successfully with a controlled environment of 38 C and 20% relative humidity for up to 150 min, whereas the quadriplegic and ectodermal dysplasic men developed hyperthermia, hyperventilation, and distress after only 120 and 75 min of heat exposure, respectively. The intolerance to heat is thus ascribed directly to the inability to produce and evaporate sweat.

  2. Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage: Effect of Metallic Mesh Size on Storage Time and Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2015-11-01

    Use of metallic meshes in latent heat thermal storage system shortens the charging time (total melting of the phase change material), which is favorable in practical applications. In the present study, effect of metallic mesh size on the thermal characteristics of latent heat thermal storage system is investigated. Charging time is predicted for various mesh sizes, and the influence of the amount of mesh material on the charging capacity is examined. An experiment is carried out to validate the numerical predictions. It is found that predictions of the thermal characteristics of phase change material with presence of metallic meshes agree well with the experimental data. High conductivity of the metal meshes enables to transfer heat from the edges of the thermal system towards the phase change material while forming a conduction tree in the system. Increasing number of meshes in the thermal system reduces the charging time significantly due to increased rate of conduction heat transfer in the thermal storage system; however, increasing number of meshes lowers the latent heat storage capacity of the system.

  3. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore » FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  4. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  5. A Novel Measurement Method for the Simultaneous Estimation of Specific Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoichi; Okada, Ryo; Nemoto, Takashi; Ohta, Hiromichi; Takiguchi, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    A novel method is proposed for the simultaneous calculation of thermal conductivity κ and specific heat capacity C. The new method is a combination of two established techniques. One is the photopyroelectric method for thermal diffusivity α and the other is the front-heat front-detection photothermoreflectance method for thermal effusivity b. After α, b, and density ρ measurements, C and κ are easily calculated as C = b α -1/2 ρ -1 and κ = α 1/2 b. Test measurements on a commercial Si single-crystal wafer were performed to demonstrate that the method is sufficiently accurate.

  6. Determining the Heat Exchange Capacity of Underground Coal Mines in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. J.; Lopez, D. A.; Leftwich, T. E.; Wolfe, M. E.; Angle, M. P.; Fugitt, F. L.

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP) exploit either saturated bedrock/soils or large surface water bodies as the heat source/sink for the heating and cooling systems. In areas with flooded mines or large subsurface water bodies, it is possible to utilize the water within the voids as the heat source/sink in GSHPs. Utilizing the water within subsurface voids a heat exchanger instead of the traditional saturated bedrock/soils has the potential to be more efficient in heating and cooling applications. The water within the void space is a better thermal conductor than bedrock and soils. Additionally, it is possible that, in a saturated void the heat can be carried away from the exchange site at a greater rate, improving the potential for thermal exchange. This study is focused on characterizing the potential overall heat exchange capacity for flooded mine sites within Ohio. To achieve the overall potential exchange capacity, possible maximum and minimum mine water residence times, effective mine volumes, groundwater recharge rates, maximum and minimum possible linear groundwater velocity, groundwater flow direction, and average ambient mine temperatures were calculated using GIS software and groundwater recharge data from the United States Geological Survey, and characteristics of physical parameters for the mines from the Ohio Geological Survey. The potential linear mine water velocities were calculated by creating a theoretical cross sectional area in the direction of estimated groundwater flow with a respective length of the mine in the direction of groundwater flow and width of the coal bed thickness. It was assumed that all of water entering the mine void exited the through the cross sectional area. By dividing the volume of water entering the mine per year by the cross sectional area, the linear groundwater velocities were estimated. By using the specific heat of water at the estimated temperatures and the volumes of water within the mines, possible

  7. Heat capacity of {sup 4}He in Vycor near the critical coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuls, F.W.; Crowell, P.A.; Reppy, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    The authors report heat capacity measurements of {sup 4}He films in Vycor near the critical coverage. The goal of these studies is to determine whether the low temperature phase at coverages below the onset of superfluidity is a glass or an insulator with a gap. The data cover a temperature range of 5 mK to 600 mK. At the lowest temperatures, a CMN DC-SQUID thermometer is used. This thermometer contains 3 mg of CMN to minimize its heat capacity. The sensitivity at 10 mK is better than 500 pK/{radical}Hz. The CMN powder is mixed with a Ag sinter to improve thermal conductivity. The resistance thermometers mounted on the cell are found to be reliable down to 14 mK.

  8. Isobaric Heat Capacity, Isothermal Compressibility and Fluctuational Properties of 1-Bromoalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkovskii, V. I.; Ryshkova, O. S.; Neruchev, Yu. A.; Goncharov, A. L.; Postnikov, E. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of the experimental measurements of the isobaric heat capacity for 1-bromohexane, 1-bromoheptane, 1-bromooctane, 1-bromononane, 1-bromodecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-bromododecane and 1-bromotetradecane at normal pressure and the speed of sound and the density for 1-bromotetradecane within the temperature range 298.15-423.15 K. These data on the isobaric heat capacity and the literature-based reference data for the density and the speed of sound were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility and the inverse reduced fluctuations. Based on the comparison of the results for pure n-alkanes and α ,ω -dibromoalkanes, we discuss the influence of bromine atom on the volume fluctuations.

  9. Vibrational Spectra and Heat Capacity of Methane, and the Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennis, Ronald; Bailey, Ryan; Henderson, Giles

    2000-12-01

    A two-part physical chemistry laboratory experiment is described in which students evaluate statistical mechanical theory by comparing a measured speed of sound and heat capacity with values predicted from vibrational spectra. In part 1 students measure the IR spectrum of CH4(g) and the Raman spectrum of CH4(l) to determine quantized vibrational energy spacings. Strong Raman scattering of a pulsed nitrogen laser beam is observed with a liquid methane sample in a custom cryogenic cell constructed from two side-arm test tubes and a length of Pyrex tube. These data are used with the statistical mechanics of a harmonic oscillator to calculate vibrational heat capacities and CP/CV; of CH4(g) and the speed of sound in CH4(g). In part 2, the predicted speed of sound is compared with an experimental value measured with a simple acoustic resonance cavity (Kundt's tube) exhausted to a Bunsen burner.

  10. Influence of heat treatment on antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of selected vegetables.

    PubMed

    Juániz, Isabel; Ludwig, Iziar A; Huarte, Estibaliz; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Moreno-Rojas, Jose Manuel; Cid, Concepción; De Peña, María-Paz

    2016-04-15

    The impact of cooking heat treatments (frying in olive oil, frying in sunflower oil and griddled) on the antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of onion, green pepper and cardoon, was evaluated. The main compounds were quercetin and isorhamnetin derivates in onion, quercetin and luteolin derivates in green pepper samples, and chlorogenic acids in cardoon. All heat treatments tended to increase the concentration of phenolic compounds in vegetables suggesting a thermal destruction of cell walls and sub cellular compartments during the cooking process that favor the release of these compounds. This increase, specially that observed for chlorogenic acids, was significantly correlated with an increase in the antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH (r=0.70). Griddled vegetables, because of the higher temperature applied during treatment in comparison with frying processes, showed the highest amounts of phenolic compounds with increments of 57.35%, 25.55% and 203.06% compared to raw onion, pepper and cardoon, respectively.

  11. Low-Temperature Heat Capacity and Localized Vibrational Modes in Natural and Synthetic Tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; May, Andrew F; Delaire, Olivier A; McGuire, Michael A; Lu, Xu; Li, Cheng-Yun; Case, Eldon D; Morelli, Donold

    2014-01-01

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu12-x (Fe, Zn, Ag)x(Sb, As)4S13) and synthetic (Cu12-xZnxSb4S13 with x=0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2K and 380K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ~1.0 meV, ~2.8 meV and ~8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibration modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  12. Dynamic heat capacity of the east model and of a bead-spring polymer model.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, John Dwane; Brown, Jonathan R.; Adolf, Douglas Brian

    2011-10-01

    In this report we have presented a brief review of the glass transition and one means of characterizing glassy materials: linear and nonlinear thermodynamic oscillatory experiments to extract the dynamic heat capacity. We have applied these methods to the east model (a variation of the Ising model for glass forming systems) and a simple polymeric system via molecular dynamics simulation, and our results match what is seen in experiment. For the east model, since the dynamics are so simple, a mathematical model is developed that matches the simulated dynamics. For the polymeric system, since the system is a simulation, we can instantaneously 'quench' the system - removing all vibrational energy - to separate the vibrational dynamics from dynamics associated with particle rearrangements. This shows that the long-time glassy dynamics are due entirely to the particle rearrangements, i.e. basin jumping on the potential energy landscape. Finally, we present an extension of linear dynamic heat capacity to the nonlinear regime.

  13. Relationship between physico-chemical properties of magnetic fluids and their heating capacity.

    PubMed

    Salas, Gorka; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Morales, Maria del Puerto

    2013-12-01

    The final goal in magnetic hyperthermia research is to use nanoparticles in the form of a colloidal suspension injected into human beings for a therapeutic application. Therefore the challenge is not only to develop magnetic nanoparticles with good heating capacities, but also with good colloidal properties, long blood circulation time and with grafted ligands able to facilitate their specific internalisation in tumour cells. Significant advances have been achieved optimising the properties of the magnetic nanoparticles, showing extremely large specific absorption rate values that will contribute to a reduction in the concentration of the magnetic fluid that needs to be administered. In this review we show the effect of different characteristics of the magnetic particles, such as size, size distribution and shape, and the colloidal properties of their aqueous suspensions, such as hydrodynamic size and surface modification, on the heating capacity of the magnetic colloids.

  14. Influence of heat treatment on antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of selected vegetables.

    PubMed

    Juániz, Isabel; Ludwig, Iziar A; Huarte, Estibaliz; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Moreno-Rojas, Jose Manuel; Cid, Concepción; De Peña, María-Paz

    2016-04-15

    The impact of cooking heat treatments (frying in olive oil, frying in sunflower oil and griddled) on the antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of onion, green pepper and cardoon, was evaluated. The main compounds were quercetin and isorhamnetin derivates in onion, quercetin and luteolin derivates in green pepper samples, and chlorogenic acids in cardoon. All heat treatments tended to increase the concentration of phenolic compounds in vegetables suggesting a thermal destruction of cell walls and sub cellular compartments during the cooking process that favor the release of these compounds. This increase, specially that observed for chlorogenic acids, was significantly correlated with an increase in the antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH (r=0.70). Griddled vegetables, because of the higher temperature applied during treatment in comparison with frying processes, showed the highest amounts of phenolic compounds with increments of 57.35%, 25.55% and 203.06% compared to raw onion, pepper and cardoon, respectively. PMID:26616976

  15. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity of graphene in two-band Harrison model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Hamze; Bagheri, Mehran; Khodadadi, Jabbar

    2015-11-01

    Using a two-band tight-binding Harrison model and Green's function technique, the influences of both localized σ and delocalized π electrons on the density of states, the Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility, and the heat capacity of a graphene sheet are investigated. We witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of Van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes diamagnetism in graphene-based nanosystems, a paramagnetic behavior associated with the itinerant π electrons could be occurred. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the heat capacity. This study asserts that the contribution of both σ and π electrons play dominant roles in the mentioned physical quantities.

  16. Low temperature heat capacity of permanently densified SiO2 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Giovanni; Carini, Giuseppe; Cosio, Daniele; D'Angelo, Giovanna; Rossi, Flavio

    2016-03-01

    A study of low temperature specific heat capacity (1-30 K) has been performed on samples of vitreous SiO2, which have been compacted under pressures up to 8 GPa to explore different glassy phases having growing density. Increasing densification by more than 21% leads to a progressive reduction of the specific heat capacity Cp and to a shift from 10 K up to about 17 K of the broad hump, the calorimetric Boson peak (BP), observed above 1 K in a Cp(T)/T3 vs. T plot. The revealed changes are not accounted for by the modifications of the elastic continuum, implying a nature of additional vibrations at variance with the extended sound waves. Increasing atomic packing of the glassy network leads to a progressively decreasing excess heat capacity over that of α-quartz, a crystalline polymorph of SiO2. By using the low-frequency Raman intensity measured in these glasses to determine the temperature dependence of the low temperature heat capacity, it has been evaluated the density of low-frequency vibrational states. The observations are compared with some theoretical pictures explaining the nature of the BP, disclosing qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Soft Potential Model and the results of a simulation study concerning the vibrations of jammed particles. This finding leads to evaluate a nanometer length scale which suggests the existence of poorly packed domains formed from several n-membered rings involving SiO4 tetrahedra. These soft regions are believed to be the main source of low-frequency vibrations giving rise to the BP.

  17. The development of a high-capacity instrument module heat transport system, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data sheets provide temperature requirements for 82 individual instruments that are under development or planned for grouping on a space platform or pallet. The scientific objectives of these instrument packages are related to solar physics, space plasma physics, astronomy, high energy astrophysics, resources observations, environmental observations, materials processing, and life sciences. System specifications are given for a high capacity instrument module heat transport system to be used with future payloads.

  18. The development of a high-capacity instrument module heat transport system, appendixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Data sheets provide temperature requirements for 82 individual instruments that are under development or planned for grouping on a space platform or pallet. The scientific objectives of these instrument packages are related to solar physics, space plasma physics, astronomy, high energy astrophysics, resources observations, environmental observations, materials processing, and life sciences. System specifications are given for a high capacity instrument module heat transport system to be used with future payloads.

  19. Heat capacity and thermal expansion of icosahedral lutetium boride LuB66

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V V; Avdashchenko, D V; Matovnikov, A V; Mitroshenkov, N V; Bud’ko, S L

    2014-01-07

    The experimental values of heat capacity and thermal expansion for lutetium boride LuB66 in the temperature range of 2-300 K were analysed in the Debye-Einstein approximation. It was found that the vibration of the boron sub-lattice can be considered within the Debye model with high characteristic temperatures; low-frequency vibration of weakly connected metal atoms is described by the Einstein model.

  20. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (C(p)) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design "Physical Properties Measurement System" (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in C(p) to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC C(p) data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS C(p) data by a factor CpDSC/CpPPMSat298K. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures.

  1. Thermolysis, nonisothermal decomposition kinetics, specific heat capacity and adiabatic time-to-explosion of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 (DNANT= dinitroacetonitrile).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, Hao; Xu, Kangzhen; Zhang, Wantao; Ren, Zhaoyu; Song, Jirong; Zhao, Fengqi

    2014-02-20

    A new energetic copper complex of dinitroacetonitrile (DNANT), [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2, was first synthesized through an unexpected reaction. The thermal decomposition of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 was studied with DSC and TG/DTG methods. The gas products were analyzed through a TG-FTIR-MS method. The nonisothermal kinetic equation of the exothermic process is dα/dT = 10(10.92)/β4(1 - α)[-ln(1 - α)](3/4) exp(-1.298 × 10(5)/RT). The self-accelerating decomposition temperature and critical temperature of thermal explosion are 217.9 and 221.0 °C. The specific heat capacity of [Cu(NH3)4](DNANT)2 was determined with a micro-DSC method, and the molar heat capacity is 512.6 J mol(-1) K(-1) at 25 °C. Adiabatic time-to-explosion of Cu(NH3)4(DNANT)2 was also calculated to be about 137 s.

  2. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-24

    A new generation of full variable-capacity air-conditioning (A/C) and heat pump units has come on the market that promises to deliver very high cooling and heating efficiency. The units are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, the new units can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40%–118% of nominal full capacity) and stay on for 60%–100% more hours per day than the fixed-capacity systems depending on load-to-capacity ratios. Two-stage systems were not evaluated in this research effort.

  3. Reduction in thermal conductivity and tunable heat capacity of inorganic/organic hybrid superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Szwejkowski, Chester J.; Karppinen, Maarit; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of molecular monolayers on the thermal conductivities and heat capacities of hybrid inorganic/organic superlattice thin films fabricated via atomic/molecular layer deposition. We measure the cross plane thermal conductivities and volumetric heat capacities of TiO2- and ZnO-based superlattices with periodic inclusion of hydroquinone layers via time domain thermoreflectance. In comparison to their homogeneous counterparts, the thermal conductivities in these superlattice films are considerably reduced. We attribute this reduction in the thermal conductivity mainly due to incoherent phonon boundary scattering at the inorganic/organic interface. Increasing the inorganic/organic interface density reduces the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of these films. High-temperature annealing treatment of the superlattices results in a change in the orientation of the hydroquinone molecules to a 2D graphitic layer along with a change in the overall density of the hybrid superlattice. The thermal conductivity of the hybrid superlattice increases after annealing, which we attribute to an increase in crystallinity.

  4. Prevalence of temperature-dependent heat capacity changes in protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-Chi; Richard, Allison J; Datta, Kausiki; LiCata, Vince J

    2008-04-15

    A large, negative DeltaCp of DNA binding is a thermodynamic property of the majority of sequence-specific DNA-protein interactions, and a common, but not universal property of non-sequence-specific DNA binding. In a recent study of the binding of Taq polymerase to DNA, we showed that both the full-length polymerase and its "Klentaq" large fragment bind to primed-template DNA with significant negative heat capacities. Herein, we have extended this analysis by analyzing this data for temperature-variable heat capacity effects (DeltaDeltaCp), and have similarly analyzed an additional 47 protein-DNA binding pairs from the scientific literature. Over half of the systems examined can be easily fit to a function that includes a DeltaDeltaCp parameter. Of these, 90% display negative DeltaDeltaCp values, with the result that the DeltaCp of DNA binding will become more negative with rising temperature. The results of this collective analysis have potentially significant consequences for current quantitative theories relating DeltaCp values to changes in accessible surface area, which rely on the assumption of temperature invariance of the DeltaCp of binding. Solution structural data for Klentaq polymerase demonstrate that the observed heat capacity effects are not the result of a coupled folding event.

  5. Modeling the heat capacities of aqueous 1-1 electrolyte solutions with Pitzer`s equations

    SciTech Connect

    Criss, C.M.; Millero, F.J.

    1996-01-25

    The apparent molal heat capacities {phi}{sub Cp} of 1-1 electrolytes at 25{degree}C have been fitted to the Pitzer equation, {phi}{sub Cp}=C{sub p,2}{degree}+(A{sub J}/1.2)ln(1+ 1.2I{1/2})-2RT{sup 2}[mB{sup J}{sub MX}+m{sup 2} C{sup J}{sub MX}], where C{sub p,2}{degree} is the partial molal heat capacity of at infinite dilution and B{sup J}{sub MX} and C{sup J}{sub MX} are empirical constants related to ion-ion interactions. The values of C{sub p,2}{degree} of the electrolytes have been used to determine partial molal heat capacities of ions. The coefficients B{sup J}{sub MX} and C{sup J}{sub MX} have been combined with Pitzer coefficients for enthalpies and osmotic coefficients to develop equations that can be used to determine activity coefficients of these electrolytes from 10 to 70{degree}C and from 0.1 to 2 m to within 1%. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Seasonal and geographical variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Matthew J; Wolf, Blair O; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2016-03-01

    Intraspecific variation in avian thermoregulatory responses to heat stress has received little attention, despite increasing evidence that endothermic animals show considerable physiological variation among populations. We investigated seasonal (summer versus winter) variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling in an Afrotropical ploceid passerine, the white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali; ∼ 47 g) at three sites along a climatic gradient with more than 10 °C variation in mid-summer maximum air temperature (Ta). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) using open flow-through respirometry, and core body temperature (Tb) using passive integrated transponder tags. Sparrow-weavers were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively higher Ta between 30 and 52 °C to elicit maximum evaporative cooling capacity (N=10 per site per season); the maximum Ta birds tolerated before the onset of severe hyperthermia (Tb ≈ 44 °C) was considered to be their hyperthermia threshold Ta (Ta,HT). Our data reveal significant seasonal acclimatisation of heat tolerance, with a desert population of sparrow-weavers reaching significantly higher Ta in summer (49.5 ± 1.4 °C, i.e. higher Ta,HT) than in winter (46.8 ± 0.9 °C), reflecting enhanced evaporative cooling during summer. Moreover, desert sparrow-weavers had significantly higher heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity during summer compared with populations from more mesic sites (Ta,HT=47.3 ± 1.5 and 47.6 ± 1.3 °C). A better understanding of the contributions of local adaptation versus phenotypic plasticity to intraspecific variation in avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity is needed for modelling species' responses to changing climates. PMID:26787477

  7. Seasonal and geographical variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Matthew J; Wolf, Blair O; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2016-03-01

    Intraspecific variation in avian thermoregulatory responses to heat stress has received little attention, despite increasing evidence that endothermic animals show considerable physiological variation among populations. We investigated seasonal (summer versus winter) variation in heat tolerance and evaporative cooling in an Afrotropical ploceid passerine, the white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali; ∼ 47 g) at three sites along a climatic gradient with more than 10 °C variation in mid-summer maximum air temperature (Ta). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) using open flow-through respirometry, and core body temperature (Tb) using passive integrated transponder tags. Sparrow-weavers were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively higher Ta between 30 and 52 °C to elicit maximum evaporative cooling capacity (N=10 per site per season); the maximum Ta birds tolerated before the onset of severe hyperthermia (Tb ≈ 44 °C) was considered to be their hyperthermia threshold Ta (Ta,HT). Our data reveal significant seasonal acclimatisation of heat tolerance, with a desert population of sparrow-weavers reaching significantly higher Ta in summer (49.5 ± 1.4 °C, i.e. higher Ta,HT) than in winter (46.8 ± 0.9 °C), reflecting enhanced evaporative cooling during summer. Moreover, desert sparrow-weavers had significantly higher heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity during summer compared with populations from more mesic sites (Ta,HT=47.3 ± 1.5 and 47.6 ± 1.3 °C). A better understanding of the contributions of local adaptation versus phenotypic plasticity to intraspecific variation in avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity is needed for modelling species' responses to changing climates.

  8. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making. PMID:27606592

  9. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Luis; Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making. PMID:27606592

  10. Integration and flight demonstration of a high-capacity monogroove heat-pipe radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, J. G.

    1984-06-01

    The cancellation of the TDRS-B satellite as the payload for the eighth Space Shuttle mission provided a unique opportunity to demonstrate on-orbit operation of the high-capacity monogroove heat pipe used in the space constructible radiator subsystem. In less than 4 months, a flight experiment was conceived, designed, fabricated, tested, integrated with a payload carrier, installed in the Orbiter Challenger payload bay, and successfully operated in flight. Still color photographs and direct crew visual observation of color changes in a pattern of temperature-sensitive liquid-crystal tapes provided the temperature data necessary to verify successful on-orbit startup and orbital transient response of the heat pipe when subjected to a heat load from its attached electrical heaters. This successful on-orbit demonstration verified analytical design tools and provided confidence in the use of high-capacity heat pipes for future space applications. The flight experiment hardware and the integration and test activities that led to the flight are described, and the actual flight results are compared to analytical performance predictions.

  11. Integration and flight demonstration of a high-capacity monogroove heat-pipe radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The cancellation of the TDRS-B satellite as the payload for the eighth Space Shuttle mission provided a unique opportunity to demonstrate on-orbit operation of the high-capacity monogroove heat pipe used in the space constructible radiator subsystem. In less than 4 months, a flight experiment was conceived, designed, fabricated, tested, integrated with a payload carrier, installed in the Orbiter Challenger payload bay, and successfully operated in flight. Still color photographs and direct crew visual observation of color changes in a pattern of temperature-sensitive liquid-crystal tapes provided the temperature data necessary to verify successful on-orbit startup and orbital transient response of the heat pipe when subjected to a heat load from its attached electrical heaters. This successful on-orbit demonstration verified analytical design tools and provided confidence in the use of high-capacity heat pipes for future space applications. The flight experiment hardware and the integration and test activities that led to the flight are described, and the actual flight results are compared to analytical performance predictions.

  12. Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties of andradite garnet, Ca3Fe2Si3O12, between 10 and 1000 K and revised values for ΔfGom (298.15 K) of hedenbergite and wollastonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.; Bin, Zhao; Hemingway, Bruce S.; Barton, Mark D.

    1987-01-01

    Between 300 and 1000 K the molar heat capacity of andradite can be represented by the equation Cop,m = 809.24 - 7.025 × 10−2T− 7.403 × 103T−0.5 − 6.789 × 105T−2. We have also used our thermochemical data for andradite to estimate the Gibbs free energy of formation of hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) for which we obtained ΔfGom (298.15 K) = −2674.3 ± 5.8 kJ/mol.

  13. Thermophysical properties of ilvaite CaFe22+Fe3+Si2O7O (OH); heat capacity from 7 to 920 K and thermal expansion between 298 and 856 K

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Evans, H.T.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The heat capacity of ilvaite from Seriphos, Greece was measured by adiabatic shield calorimetry (6.4 to 380.7 K) and by differential scanning calorimetry (340 to 950 K). The thermal expansion of ilvaite was also investigated, by X-ray methods, between 308 and 853 K. At 298.15 K the standard molar heat capacity and entropy for ilvaite are 298.9??0.6 and 292.3??0.6 J/(mol. K) respectively. Between 333 and 343 K ilvaite changes from monoclinic to orthorhombic. The antiferromagnetic transition is shown by a hump in Cp0with a Ne??el temperature of 121.9??0.5 K. A rounded hump in Cp0between 330 and 400 K may possibily arise from the thermally activated electron delocalization (hopping) known to take place in this temperature region. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Heat Capacity Anomaly Near the Lower Critical Consolute Point of Triethylamine-Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flewelling, Anne C.; DeFonseka, Rohan J.; Khaleeli, Nikfar; Partee, J.; Jacobs, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    The heat capacity of the binary liquid mixture triethylamine-water has been measured near its lower critical consolute point using a scanning, adiabatic calorimeter. Two data runs are analyzed to provide heat capacity and enthalpy data that are fitted by equations with background terms and a critical term that includes correction to scaling. The critical exponent a was determined to be 0.107 +/- 0.006, consistent with theoretical predictions. When alpha was fixed at 0.11 to determine various amplitudes consistently, our values of A(+) and A(-) agreed with a previous heat capacity measurement, but the value of A(-) was inconsistent with values determined by density or refractive index measurements. While our value for the amplitude ratio A(+)/ A(-) = 0.56 +/- 0.02 was consistent with other recent experimental determinations in binary liquid mixtures, it was slightly larger than either theoretical predictions or recent experimental values in liquid-vapor systems. The correction to scaling amplitude ratio D(+)/D(-) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 was half of that predicted. As a result of several more precise theoretical calculations and experimental determinations, the two-scale-factor universality ratio X, which we found to be 0.019 +/- 0.003, now is consistent among experiments and theories. A new 'universal' amplitude ratio R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) involving the amplitudes for the specific heat was tested. Our determination of R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) = -0.5 +/- 0.1 and R(sup -)(sub Bcr) = 1.1 +/- 0.1 is smaller in magnitude than predicted and is the first such determination in a binary fluid mixture.

  15. Technique for determination of accurate heat capacities of volatile, powdered, or air-sensitive samples using relaxation calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Robert A.; Stancescu, Maria; Kennedy, Catherine A.; White, Mary Anne

    2006-09-01

    We introduce a four-step technique for the accurate determination of the heat capacity of volatile or air-sensitive samples using relaxation calorimetry. The samples are encapsulated in a hermetically sealed differential scanning calorimetry pan, in which there is an internal layer of Apiezon N grease to assist thermal relaxation. Using the Quantum Design physical property measurement system to investigate benzoic acid and copper standards, we find that this method can lead to heat capacity determinations accurate to ±2% over the temperature range of 1-300K, even for very small samples (e.g., <10mg and contributing ca. 20% to the total heat capacity).

  16. A room-temperature phase transition in maximum microcline - Heat capacity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Openshaw, R.E.; Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.; Krupka, K.M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal hysteresis in heat capacity measurements recently reported (Openshaw et al., 1976) for a maximum microcline prepared from Amelia albite by fused-salt ion-exchange is described in detail. The hysteresis is characterized by two limiting and reproducible curves which differ by 1% of the measured heat capacities. The lower curve, denoted curve B, represents the values obtained before the sample had been cooled below 300 K. Measurements made immediately after cooling the sample below 250 K followed a second parallel curve, curve A, to at least 370 K. Values intermediate to the two limiting curves were also obtained. The transitions from the B to the A curve were rapid and observed to occur three times. The time required to complete the transition from the A to the B curve increased from 39 h to 102 h in the two times it was observed to occur. The hysteresis is interpreted as evidence of a phase change in microcline at 300??10 K The heat effect associated with the phase change has not been evaluated. ?? 1979 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Heat capacity from 12 to 305°K and entropy of talc and tremolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Stout, J.W.

    1963-01-01

    The heat capacities of talc, Mg3Si4O10(OH)2, and tremolite, Ca2Mg6Si8O22(OH)2, have been measured between 12 and 305??K. Smoothed values of heat capacity, entropy, enthalpy, and free energy are tabulated. At 298.15?? K. the values of the thermodynamic functions are: talc, Cp?? = 76.89 ?? 0.23 cal. deg.-1 mole-1, S?? = 62.33 ?? 0.19 cal. deg.-1 mole-1, H?? - H6?? = 11,206 ?? 34 cal. mole-1; tremolite, Cp?? = 156.7 ?? 0.6 cal. deg.-1 mole-1, S?? = 131.2 ?? 0.5 cal. deg.-1 mole-1, H?? - H6?? = 23,335 ?? 90 cal. mole-1. From the equilibrium data of Bowen and Tuttle and the entropy of talc, the heat of formation of talc from MgO, SiO2, and H2O (liq.) is calculated to be ??H??f298 = -43.6 ?? 1 kcal.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of zeolites: low-temperature heat capacities and thermodynamic functions for phillipsite and clinoptilolite. Estimates of the thermochemical properties of zeolitic water at low temperature.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Measured heat capacities between 15 and 305 K and calculated heat capacities, entropies, enthalpy functions and Gibbs energy functions are reported and analysed for phillipsite and clinoptilolite. - J.A.Z.

  19. Heat capacity anomaly in a self-aggregating system: Triblock copolymer 17R4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumancas, Lorenzo V.; Simpson, David E.; Jacobs, D. T.

    2015-05-01

    The reverse Pluronic, triblock copolymer 17R4 is formed from poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO): PPO14 - PEO24 - PPO14, where the number of monomers in each block is denoted by the subscripts. In water, 17R4 has a micellization line marking the transition from a unimer network to self-aggregated spherical micelles which is quite near a cloud point curve above which the system separates into copolymer-rich and copolymer-poor liquid phases. The phase separation has an Ising-like, lower consolute critical point with a well-determined critical temperature and composition. We have measured the heat capacity as a function of temperature using an adiabatic calorimeter for three compositions: (1) the critical composition where the anomaly at the critical point is analyzed, (2) a composition much less than the critical composition with a much smaller spike when the cloud point curve is crossed, and (3) a composition near where the micellization line intersects the cloud point curve that only shows micellization. For the critical composition, the heat capacity anomaly very near the critical point is observed for the first time in a Pluronic/water system and is described well as a second-order phase transition resulting from the copolymer-water interaction. For all compositions, the onset of micellization is clear, but the formation of micelles occurs over a broad range of temperatures and never becomes complete because micelles form differently in each phase above the cloud point curve. The integrated heat capacity gives an enthalpy that is smaller than the standard state enthalpy of micellization given by a van't Hoff plot, a typical result for Pluronic systems.

  20. Very high-resolution heat-capacity measurements near the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements of the heat capacity of a sample of helium 3-mm high are reported, which extend to within 5 x 10 to the -8th deg of the lambda transition at the vapor pressure. From an analysis of the results allowing for the effect of gravity, the values -0.0127 + or - 0.0026 (2 sigma) for the exponent alpha (= alpha-prime) and 1,058 + or - 0.004 for the leading singularity ratio A/A-prime are obtained. These values are in closer agreement with the theoretical predictions than those reported previously.

  1. Evaluating near-surface soil moisture using Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Four dates of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data were analyzed in order to evaluate HCMM thermal data use in estimating near-surface soil moisture in a complex agricultural landscape. Because of large spatial and temporal ground cover variations, HCMM radiometric temperatures alone did not correlate with soil water content. The radiometric temperatures consisted of radiance contributions from different canopies and their respective soil backgrounds. However, when surface soil temperatures were empirically estimated from HCMM temperatures and percent cover of each pixel, a highly significant correlation was obtained between the estimated soil temperatures and near-surface soil water content.

  2. Snow hydrology studies using data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Bowley, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the snow hydrology application of thermal infrared (IR) data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite. The HCMM data in both imagery and digital tape formats are analyzed for two study areas: the Salt-Verde Watershed in central Arizona and the southern Sierra Nevada in California. The analysis procedures are described, including the development of a unique contour plotting program that makes it possible to overlay HCMM thermal contours directly onto the visible channel imagery. The results indicate that satellite thermal-IR data can provide the hydrologist with additional useful information on snow cover.

  3. The lambda point experiment in microgravity. [He heat capacity close to phase transition point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.; Marek, D.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment for performing high-resolution measurements of the heat capacity singularity at the lambda point of helium in microgravity conditions is described. By obtaining such measurements in space, it is expected that the intrinsic distortion of the transition would be reduced by at least two orders of magnitude, allowing the theory of cooperative phase transitions to be more effectively tested. Technology developments for the lambda point experiment include a new high-resolution thermometer, an advanced thermal control system, and a reusable flight-qualified superfluid helium dewar.

  4. Soft-x-ray, heat-capacity, and transport measurements on icosahedral and crystalline alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, P. A.; Wagner, J. L.; Biggs, B. D.; Shen, Y.; Wong, K. M.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Poon, S. J.

    1988-04-01

    Soft-x-ray emission, heat-capacity, and resistivity measurements are reported for icosahedral and Frank-Kasper phases of Al-Cu-Li and Al-Cu-Mg. This is the first extensive comparison of electronic properties of periodic and quasiperiodic lattices generated by packing similar structural units. Results are compared with theories of quasicrystals and provide a guideline for the observability of Van Hove singularities in quasicrystals. The density of states N(0) is a factor of 3 less in Al-Cu-Li than in Al-Cu-Mg alloys; this is spectroscopically confirmed.

  5. Change in heat capacity accurately predicts vibrational coupling in enzyme catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Arcus, Vickery L; Pudney, Christopher R

    2015-08-01

    The temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been used to infer the vibrational coupling of the protein and or substrate to the reaction coordinate, particularly in enzyme-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions. We find that a new model for the temperature dependence of experimentally determined observed rate constants (macromolecular rate theory, MMRT) is able to accurately predict the occurrence of vibrational coupling, even where the temperature dependence of the KIE fails. This model, that incorporates the change in heat capacity for enzyme catalysis, demonstrates remarkable consistency with both experiment and theory and in many respects is more robust than models used at present.

  6. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saygi, Salih

    2014-02-15

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grüneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  7. High-temperature heat capacity of orthovanadates Ce1- x Bi x VO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, L. T.; Chumilina, L. G.; Belousova, N. V.; Denisov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Orthovanadates Ce1- x Bi x VO4 (1 ≥ x ≥ 0) have been produced by solid-phase synthesis from initial oxides CeO2, Bi2O3, and V2O5 upon step-by-step burning. The high-temperature heat capacity of Ce1- x Bi x VO4 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental data on C p = f(T) were used to calculate the thermodynamic properties (the enthalpy changes, the entropy changes, and the Gibbs energy).

  8. Surface temperature variations as measured by the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The AEM-1 satellite, the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission, has acquired high-quality thermal infrared data at times of day especially suited for studying the earth's surface and the exchange of heat and moisture with the atmosphere. Selected imagery illustrates the considerable variability of surface temperature in and around cities, in the dry southwestern United States, in the Appalachian Mountains, and in agricultural areas. Through simplifying assumptions, an analytic experience is derived that relates day/night temperature differences to the near-surface layer (thermal inertia) and to meteorological factors. Analysis of the result suggests that, in arid regions, estimates of relative thermal inertia may be inferred, whereas, in agricultural areas, a hydrologic interpretation is possible.

  9. Heat capacity, enthalpy of mixing, and thermal conductivity of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te pseudobinary melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    1986-01-01

    Heat capacity and enthalpy of mixing of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te pseudobinary melts were calculated assuming an associated solution model for the liquid phase. The thermal conductivity of the pseudobinary melts for x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 was then calculated from the heat capacity values and the experimental values of thermal diffusivity and density for these melts. The thermal conductivity for the pseudobinary solid solution is also discussed.

  10. Identification of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Capacity in Unsteady Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnic, D.; Elliott, L.; Ingham, D. B.

    1996-07-01

    In this study the inverse problem of the identification of temperature dependent thermal properties of a heat conducting body is investigated. The solution of the corresponding direct problem is obtained using a time marching boundary element method (BEM), which allows, without any need of interpolation and solution domain discretisation, efficient and accurate evaluation of the temperature everywhere inside the space-time dependent domain. Since the inverse problem, which requires the determination of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity from a finite set of temperature measurements taken inside the body, possesses poor uniqueness features, additional information is achieved by assuming that the thermal properties belong to a set of polynomials. Thus the inverse problem reduces to a parameter system estimation problem which is solved using the nonlinear least-squares method. Convergent and stable numerical results are obtained for the finite set of parameters which characterise the thermal properties for various test examples. Once the thermal properties are accurately obtained then the BEM determines automatically the temperature inside the solution domain and the remaining unspecified boundary values and the numerically obtained results show good agreement with the corresponding analytical solutions.

  11. Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) data processing algorithm, calibration, and flight performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohse, J. R.; Bewtra, M.; Barnes, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale and procedures used in the radiometric calibration and correction of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data are presented. Instrument-level testing and calibration of the Heat Capacity Mapping Radiometer (HCMR) were performed by the sensor contractor ITT Aerospace/Optical Division. The principal results are included. From the instrumental characteristics and calibration data obtained during ITT acceptance tests, an algorithm for post-launch processing was developed. Integrated spacecraft-level sensor calibration was performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) approximately two months before launch. This calibration provided an opportunity to validate the data calibration algorithm. Instrumental parameters and results of the validation are presented and the performances of the instrument and the data system after launch are examined with respect to the radiometric results. Anomalies and their consequences are discussed. Flight data indicates a loss in sensor sensitivity with time. The loss was shown to be recoverable by an outgassing procedure performed approximately 65 days after the infrared channel was turned on. It is planned to repeat this procedure periodically.

  12. Complex Heat Capacity of Lithium Borate Glasses Studied by Modulated DSC

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Yu; Ike, Yuji; Matsui, Chihiro; Kodama, Masao; Kojima, Seiji

    2006-05-05

    Complex heat capacity, C{sub p}* = C{sub p}' - iC{sub p}'', of lithium borate glasses Li2O{center_dot}(1-x)B2O3 (x = 0.00 - 0.33) has been investigated by Modulated DSC (MDSC). We have successfully observed the frequency dependent C{sub p}* by MDSC in the frequency range 0.01 to 0.1 Hz, and the average relaxation time of glass transition has been determined as a function of temperature. Moreover, the composition dependence of the thermal properties has been investigated. The calorimetric glass transition temperatures become higher with the increase of concentration of Li2O and show the board maximum around x = 0.26-0.28. The width of glass transition region becomes narrower as Li2O increases. These results relate to the change of the fragility of the system. It has been proven that the complex heat capacity spectroscopy by MDSC is a powerful tool to investigate the glass transition phenomena.

  13. Study of magnetic entropy and heat capacity in ferrimagnetic Fe3Se4 nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishwas, Mousumi Sen; Poddar, Pankaj

    2016-05-01

    Change in the magnetic entropy and specific heat capacity in Fe3Se4 nanorods synthesized by a wet-chemical method in a broad temperature (215-340 K) and magnetic field range (0-60 k Oe) was studied. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔS M ) is estimated by an indirect method from the isothermal magnetization curves measured in this temperature range. SM\\max of  -46  ×  10-2 J kg-1 · K-1 was obtained at ~317 K when the field was changed from 0 to 60 kOe. The maximum in the isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔS M ) is observed in close proximity to T C (~323 K), which is linked to the order-disorder transition. The nature of this transition was analyzed by universal curve behavior. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of specific heat capacity was studied and analyzed to estimate the adiabatic temperature change (ΔT ad). The magnetic entropy change of Fe3Se4 nanoparticles is found to be comparable with similar ferrite and manganite nanoparticle systems and a broad operating temperature window of ~30 K was observed around room temperature.

  14. Magnetic Contribution to Heat Capacity and Entropy of Nicke Ferrite (NiFe2O4)

    SciTech Connect

    S Ziemniak, L Anovitz, R Castelli

    2005-12-15

    The heat capacity of nickel ferrite was measured as a function of temperature over the range from 50 to 1200 C using a differential scanning calorimeter. A thermal anomaly was observed at 584.9 C, the expected Curie temperature, T{sub c}. The observed behavior was interpreted by recognizing the sum of three contributions: (1) lattice (vibrational), (2) a spin wave (magnetic) component and (3) a {lambda}-transition (antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition) at the Curie temperature. The first was modeled using vibrational frequencies derived from an experimentally-based ir absorption spectrum, while the second was modeled using a spin wave analysis that provided a T{sup 3/2} dependency in the low temperature limit, but incorporated an exchange interaction between cation spins in the octahedral and tetrahedral sites at elevated temperatures, as first suggested by Grimes [15]. The {lambda}-transition was fitted to an Inden-type model which consisted of two truncated power law series in dimensionless temperature (T/T{sub c}). Exponential equality was observed below and above T{sub c}, indicating symmetry about the Curie temperature. Application of the methodology to existing heat capacity data for other transition metal ferrites (AFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, A = Fe, Co) revealed the same exponential equality, i.e., m = n = 5.

  15. Low-temperature heat capacity and localized vibrational modes in natural and synthetic tetrahedrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E. May, A. F.; Delaire, O.; McGuire, M. A.; Lu, X.; Liu, Cheng-Yun; Case, E. D.; Morelli, D. T.

    2014-05-21

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu{sub 12−x} (Fe, Zn, Ag){sub x}(Sb, As){sub 4}S{sub 13}) and synthetic (Cu{sub 12−x}Zn{sub x}Sb{sub 4}S{sub 13} with x = 0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2 K and 380 K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ∼1.0 meV, ∼2.8 meV, and ∼8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibrational modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  16. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements at elevated temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Yesavage, V.F.

    1990-08-31

    The need for highly accurate thermal property data for a broad range of new application fluids is well documented. To facilitate expansion of the current thermophysical database, an automated flow calorimeter was developed for the measurement of highly accurate isobaric heat capacities and enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. The experimental technique utilizes traditional electrical power input, adiabatic flow calorimetry with a precision metering pump that eliminates the need for on-line flow rate monitoring. In addition, a complete automation system, greatly simplifies the operation of the apparatus and increases the rapidity of the measurement process. The range over which the instrument was tested, was 300--600 K and 0--12 Mpa, although the calorimeter should perform up to the original design goals of 700 K and 30 MPa. The new flow calorimeter was evaluated by measuring the mean, isobaric, specific heat capacities of liquid water and n-pentane. These experiments yielded an average deviation from the standard literature data of +0.02% and a total variation of 0.05%. Additional data analysis indicated that the overall measurement uncertainty was conservatively estimated as 0.2% with an anticipated precision of 0.1--0.15% at all operating conditions. 44 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  18. Emulsion stabilizing capacity of intact starch granules modified by heat treatment or octenyl succinic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Timgren, Anna; Rayner, Marilyn; Dejmek, Petr; Marku, Diana; Sjöö, Malin

    2013-01-01

    Starch granules are an interesting stabilizer candidate for food-grade Pickering emulsions. The stabilizing capacity of seven different intact starch granules for making oil-in-water emulsions has been the topic of this screening study. The starches were from quinoa; rice; maize; waxy varieties of rice, maize, and barley; and high-amylose maize. The starches were studied in their native state, heat treated, and modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). The effect of varying the continuous phase, both with and without salt in a phosphate buffer, was also studied. Quinoa, which had the smallest granule size, had the best capacity to stabilize oil drops, especially when the granules had been hydrophobically modified by heat treatment or by OSA. The average drop diameter (d32) in these emulsions varied from 270 to 50 μm, where decreasing drop size and less aggregation was promoted by high starch concentration and absence of salt in the system. Of all the starch varieties studied, quinoa had the best overall emulsifying capacity, and OSA modified quinoa starch in particular. Although the size of the drops was relatively large, the drops themselves were in many instances extremely stable. In the cases where the system could stabilize droplets, even when they were so large that they were visible to the naked eye, they remained stable and the measured droplet sizes after 2 years of storage were essentially unchanged from the initial droplet size. This somewhat surprising result has been attributed to the thickness of the adsorbed starch layer providing steric stabilization. The starch particle-stabilized Pickering emulsion systems studied in this work has potential practical application such as being suitable for encapsulation of ingredients in food and pharmaceutical products. PMID:24804025

  19. Performance of Variable Capacity Heat Pumps in a Mixed Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D; Gehl, Anthony C; Jackson, Roderick K

    2012-04-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps represent the next wave of technology for heat pumps. In this report, the performance of two variable capacity heat pumps (HPs) is compared to that of a single or two stage baseline system. The units were installed in two existing research houses located in Knoxville, TN. These houses were instrumented to collect energy use and temperature data while both the baseline systems and variable capacity systems were installed. The homes had computer controlled simulated occupancy, which provided consistent schedules for hot water use and lighting. The temperature control and energy use of the systems were compared during both the heating and cooling seasons. Multiple linear regression models were used along with TMY3 data for Knoxville, TN in order to normalize the effect that the outdoor air temperature has on energy use. This enables a prediction of each system's energy use over a year with the same weather. The first system was a multi-split system consisting of 8 indoor units and a single outdoor unit. This system replaced a 16 SEER single stage HP with a zoning system, which served as the baseline. Data was collected on the baseline system from August 2009 to December 2010 and on the multi-split system from January 2011 to January 2012. Soon after the installation of the multi-split system, some of the smaller rooms began over-conditioning. This was determined to be caused by a small amount of continuous refrigerant flow to all of the indoor units when the outdoor unit was running regardless of whether they were calling for heat. This, coupled with the fact that the indoor fans run continuously, was providing enough heat in some rooms to exceed the set point. In order to address this, the indoor fans were disabled when not actively heating per the manufacturer's recommendation. Based on the measured data, the multi-split system was predicted to use 40% more energy in the heating season and 16% more energy in the cooling season than the

  20. New equations for density, entropy, heat capacity, and potential temperature of a saline thermal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongbing; Feistel, Rainer; Koch, Manfred; Markoe, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    A set of fitted polynomial equations for calculating the physical variables density, entropy, heat capacity and potential temperature of a thermal saline fluid for a temperature range of 0-374 °C, pressure range of 0.1-100 MPa and absolute salinity range of 0-40 g/kg is established. The freshwater components of the equations are extracted from the recently released tabulated data of freshwater properties of Wagner and Pruß [2002. The IAPWS formulation 1995 for the thermodynamic properties of ordinary water substance for general and scientific use. Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data 31, 387-535]. The salt water component of the equation is based on the near-linear relationship between density, salinity and specific heat capacity and is extracted from the data sets of Feistel [2003. A new extended Gibbs thermodynamic potential of seawater. Progress in Oceanography 58, 43-114], Bromley et al. [1970. Heat capacities and enthalpies of sea salt solutions to 200 °C. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data 15, 246-253] and Grunberg [1970. Properties of sea water concentrates. In: Third International Symposium on Fresh Water from the Sea, vol. 1, pp. 31-39] in a temperature range 0-200 °C, practical salinity range 0-40, and varying pressure and is also calibrated by the data set of Millero et al. [1981. Summary of data treatment for the international high pressure equation of state for seawater. UNESCO Technical Papers in Marine Science 38, 99-192]. The freshwater and salt water components are combined to establish a workable multi-polynomial equation, whose coefficients were computed through standard linear regression analysis. The results obtained in this way for density, entropy and potential temperature are comparable with those of existing models, except that our new equations cover a wider temperature—(0-374 °C) than the traditional (0-40 °C) temperature range. One can apply these newly established equations to the calculation of in-situ or

  1. Maximal heat dissipation capacity and hyperthermia risk: neglected key factors in the ecology of endotherms.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Król, Elzbieta

    2010-07-01

    1. The role of energy in ecological processes has hitherto been considered primarily from the standpoint that energy supply is limited. That is, traditional resource-based ecological and evolutionary theories and the recent 'metabolic theory of ecology' (MTE) all assume that energetic constraints operate on the supply side of the energy balance equation. 2. For endothermic animals, we provide evidence suggesting that an upper boundary on total energy expenditure is imposed by the maximal capacity to dissipate body heat and therefore avoid the detrimental consequences of hyperthermia--the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory. We contend that the HDL is a major constraint operating on the expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and that processes that generate heat compete and trade-off within a total boundary defined by heat dissipation capacity, rather than competing for limited energy supply. 3. The HDL theory predicts that daily energy expenditure should scale in relation to body mass (M(b)) with an exponent of about 0.63. This contrasts the prediction of the MTE of an exponent of 0.75. 4. We compiled empirical data on field metabolic rate (FMR) measured by the doubly-labelled water method, and found that they scale to M(b) with exponents of 0.647 in mammals and 0.658 in birds, not significantly different from the HDL prediction (P > 0.05) but lower than predicted by the MTE (P < 0.001). The same statistical result was obtained using phylogenetically independent contrasts analysis. Quantitative predictions of the model matched the empirical data for both mammals and birds. There was no indication of curvature in the relationship between Log(e) FMR and Log(e)M(b). 5. Together, these data provide strong support for the HDL theory and allow us to reject the MTE, at least when applied to endothermic animals. 6. The HDL theory provides a novel conceptual framework that demands a reframing of our views of the interplay between energy and the environment in

  2. Structure and thermal properties of salicylate-based-protic ionic liquids as new heat storage media. COSMO-RS structure characterization and modeling of heat capacities.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Johan; Feder-Kubis, Joanna; Zorębski, Michał; Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Chorążewski, Mirosław; Hensel-Bielówka, Stella; Zorębski, Edward; Paluch, Marian; Dzida, Marzena

    2014-02-28

    During this research, we present a study on the thermal properties, such as the melting, cold crystallization, and glass transition temperatures as well as heat capacities from 293.15 K to 323.15 K of nine in-house synthesized protic ionic liquids based on the 3-(alkoxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium salicylate ([H-Im-C1OC(n)][Sal]) with n = 3-11. The 3D structures, surface charge distributions and COSMO volumes of all investigated ions are obtained by combining DFT calculations and the COSMO-RS methodology. The heat capacity data sets as a function of temperature of the 3-(alkoxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium salicylate are then predicted using the methodology originally proposed in the case of ionic liquids by Ge et al. 3-(Alkoxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium salicylate based ionic liquids present specific heat capacities higher in many cases than other ionic liquids that make them suitable as heat storage media and in heat transfer processes. It was found experimentally that the heat capacity increases linearly with increasing alkyl chain length of the alkoxymethyl group of 3-(alkoxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium salicylate as was expected and predicted using the Ge et al. method with an overall relative absolute deviation close to 3.2% for temperatures up to 323.15 K.

  3. Some examples of the utility of HCMM data in geologic remote sensing. [Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of HCMM (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission) data in geologic remote sensing are presented, and the data set is composed of HCMM and aircraft digital scanner data and ground truth data from four western U.S. test sites. Data are used in the thermal model to test thermal data effectiveness, and changes in temperature with depth and time for dry soils are described by the model. It is found that the HCMM thermal inertia image is useful in the separability of bedrock and alluvium in Death Valley, and aa and pahoehoe flows in the Pisgah basalt flow. In a color composite of HCMM day temperature, night temperature, and day visible images of the Pisgah Crater test site, it is possible to distinguish alluvium, playa, aa and pahoehoe basalt flow, rhyolite intrusives, and other elements. Ground checking of units at a few points will extend capabilities to large areas and assist in creating telegeologic maps.

  4. Evaluating depth to shallow groundwater using Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, Donald G.

    1982-01-01

    Four dates of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data were analyzed to evaluate the utility of HCMM thermal data for evaluating depth to shallow groundwater. During the summer, shallow water tables can create lower soil temperatures throughout the diurnal temperature cycle. Because of large spatial and temporal ground cover variations, HCMM daytime radiometric temperatures alone did not correlate with water table depth. The radiometric temperatures consisted of radiance contributions from different crop canopies and their respective soil backgrounds. However, when surface soil temperatures were empirically estimated from HCMM temperatures and percent cover of each pixel, significant correlations were obtained between estimated soil temperatures and water table depth. Correlations increased as the season progressed and temperature gradients within the soil profile increased. However, estimated soil temperatures were also correlated with near-surface soil moisture since during the daytime, increasing soil moisture reduced surface soil temperature. Complementary effects of shallow water tables and soil moisture on daytime temperatures cannot be separated.

  5. The electronic heat capacity of YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anu; Singh, Hempal; Indu, B. D.

    2016-07-01

    The contributions due to the point defects or disorder and anharmonicities which play deterministic role in the understanding of electronic heat capacity (EHC) of high temperature superconductors (HTS) have been investigated via electron density of states (EDOS) approach on the basis of quantum dynamical many body theory. The evaluation of EDOS has been carried out with the help of most versatile method of double time temperature dependent electron Green's functions (GF) via a Hamiltonian (non BCS type) which includes the effects of electrons, phonons, defects, anharmonicity, and electron-phonon interactions which enables to account the effects of cubic anharmonicity besides with both the force constant changes and mass difference caused by the impurities in developing the results for EDOS and EHC. The new results reveal some striking features of EHC of HTS.

  6. Intracavity adaptive correction of a 10 kW, solid-state, heat-capacity laser.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Johansson, E M; Dane, C B; Fochs, S N; Brase, J M

    2004-01-12

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large aperture (100 cm{sup 2}), confocal, unstable resonator requiring near-diffraction-limited beam quality. There are two primary sources of the aberrations in the system: residual, static aberrations from the fabrication of the optical components and predictable, time-dependent, thermally-induced index gradients within the gain medium. A deformable mirror placed within the cavity is used to correct the aberrations that are sensed externally with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Although it is more challenging than external correction, intracavity correction enables control of the mode growth within the resonator, resulting in the ability to correct a more aberrated system longer. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results from initial correction of the static aberrations and dynamic correction of the time-dependent aberrations are presented.

  7. Intracavity adaptive correction of a 10 kW, solid-state, heat-capacity laser

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2004-05-13

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large aperture (100 cm{sup 2}), confocal, unstable resonator requiring near-diffraction-limited beam quality. There are two primary sources of the aberrations in the system: residual, static aberrations from the fabrication of the optical components and predictable, time-dependent, thermally-induced index gradients within the gain medium. A deformable mirror placed within the cavity is used to correct the aberrations that are sensed externally with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Although the complexity of intracavity adaptive correction is greater than that of external correction, it enables control of the mode growth within the resonator, resulting in the ability to correct a more aberrated system longer. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results from initial correction of the static aberrations and dynamic correction of the time-dependent aberrations are presented.

  8. THERMAL-INERTIA MAPPING IN VEGETATED TERRAIN FROM HEAT CAPACITY MAPPING MISSION SATELLITE DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Ken; Hummer-Miller, Susanne

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-inertia data, derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite, were analyzed in areas of varying amounts of vegetation cover. Thermal differences which appear to correlate with lithologic differences have been observed previously in areas of substantial vegetation cover. However, the energy exchange occurring within the canopy is much more complex than that used to develop the methods employed to produce thermal-inertia images. Because adequate models are lacking at present, the interpretation is largely dependent on comparison, correlation, and inference. Two study areas were selected in the western United States: the Richfield, Utah and the Silver City, Arizona-New Mexico, 1 degree multiplied by 2 degree quadrangles. Many thermal-inertia highs were found to be associated with geologic-unit boundaries, faults, and ridges. Lows occur in valleys with residual soil cover.

  9. Estimation of yield capacity of fractured rock aquifer for multi-well groundwater heat pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Hyeongmin; Yeo, In Wook

    2015-04-01

    Geothermal heat pump system is classified as closed loop and open loop. Closed loop uses a refrigerant as a heat source. For the reason, when using it for a long time, there is a possibility that the refrigerant pipe is corroded. Accordingly, soil and groundwater can be contaminated. Whereas the open loop system uses a eco-friendly groundwater as a heat source. Thermal circulation of standing column well (SCW) occurs in one well. In contrast, thermal circulation of multi-well groundwater heat pump system (MGHP) occurs through fractured rock aquifer between extraction and injection wells. Therefore, temperature efficiency of MGHP appears to be better than that of SCW. However, the MGHP has problems such as the overflowing in the injection well and the clogging, which restricts the wide use of MGHP. This study aims at how to to array the extraction and injection wells for stable circulating of groundwater and at evaluating the sustainable yield capacity of groundwater circulation between the two wells. The study site is located in Chuncheon, Republic of Korea. Pumping tests were conducted to estimate transmissivity of the two wells (W3, W4). In addition, the step-circulation tests were conducted to estimate the sustainable yield capacity. Transmissivity of W3 and W4 was estimated to be 5.81 x 10^-5 m^2/s and 2.57 x 10^-5 m^2/s, respectively. Preliminary groundwater circulation tests were conducted to figure out the array of the extraction and injection wells. Circulation tests were performed for two cases: first, extraction well was set at the well with higher transmissivity and injection well set at the well with lower transmissivity, and the opposite array was set for the second case. In the first case, when flow rate was set at 70.47 m^3/day, the water level of W3 fell 0.61m and that of W4 rose 1.89m. In the second case, when flow rate was set at 67.70 m^3/day, the water level of W4 fell 2.17m and that of W3 rose 0.5m. Preliminary groundwater

  10. General characteristics and availability of Landsat 3 and heat capacity mapping mission thermal infrared data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    Two satellite systems launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 1978 carried sensors which operated in the thermal infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum, The final IR radiation data provide spectral information about the physical properties of the Earth's surficial materials not duplicated in either the visible or reflective IR wavelength regions. Landsat 3, launched on March 5, 1978, contained a thermal sensor as part of the multispectral scanner (MSS) system. The sensor operated in the 10.4- to 12.6-?m (band 8) wavelength region and produced imagery with a ground resolution of approximately 235 m. Launched on April 26) 1978) the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) spacecraft carried a sensor, the heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) which operated in the 10.5- to 12.5?m wavelength region and produced imagery with a ground resolution of approximately 600 m at nadir. The HCMM satellite acquired over 6,600 data passes of visible (0.55-1.1 ?m), as well as thermal IR data, over North America, Europe, and Australia. General characteristics and availability of Landsat 3 and HCMM thermal IR data are discussed. Landsat 3 reflected IR band 7 (0.55-1.1 ?m) and Landsat 3 band 8 thermal data acquired over the eastern and western United States are analyzed and compared with HCMM visible, thermal IR, thermal inertia, and day-night temperature difference imagery for geologic applications. Digitally processed and enhanced HCMM data (high-pass filters, diagonal derivatives, and band ratios), produced by the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff) Ariz., are presented for geologic interpretation.

  11. Modeling Antimortar Lethality by a Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2005-02-15

    We have studied the use of a solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) in mortar defense. This type of laser, as built at LLNL, produces high-energy pulses with a wavelength of about 1 {micro}m and a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz. Currently, the average power is about 26 kW. Our model of target interactions includes optical absorption, two-dimensional heat transport in the metal casing and explosive, melting, wind effects (cooling and melt removal), high-explosive reactions, and mortar rotation. The simulations continue until HE initiation is reached. We first calculate the initiation time for a range of powers on target and spot sizes. Then we consider an engagement geometry in which a mortar is fired at an asset defended by a 100-kW SSHCL. Propagation effects such as diffraction, turbulent broadening, scattering, and absorption are calculated for points on the trajectory, by means of a validated model. We obtain kill times and fluences, as functions of the rotation rate. These appear quite feasible.

  12. Invited article: micron resolution spatially resolved measurement of heat capacity using dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changdong; Zheng, Xuan; Cahill, David G; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2013-07-01

    A pump-probe photothermal technique - dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance - was developed for measuring heat capacity with a spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm. The method was validated by measuring several common materials with known heat capacity. Rapid measurement of composition-phase-property relationships was demonstrated on Ti-TiSi2 and Ni-Zr diffusion couples; experimental values of heat capacity of the intermetallic compounds in these diffusion couples were compared with literature values and CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) calculations. The combination of this method and diffusion multiples provides an efficient way to generate thermodynamic data for CALPHAD modeling and database construction. The limitation of this method in measuring low thermal diffusivity materials is also discussed.

  13. High-temperature adiabatic calorimeter for constant-volume heat capacity measurements of compressed gases and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.W.; Deal, R.J.; Blanco, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    A high-temperature adiabatic calorimeter has been developed to measure the constant-volume specific heat capacities (c{sub v}) of both gases and liquids, especially fluids of interest to emerging energy technologies. The chief design feature is its nearly identical twin bomb arrangement, which allows accurate measurement of energy differences without large corrections for energy losses due to thermal radiation fluxes. Operating conditions for the calorimeter cover a range of temperatures from 250 K to 700 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. Performance tests were made with a sample of twice-distilled water. Heat capacities for water were measured from 300 K to 420 K at pressures to 20 MPa. The measured heat capacities differed from those calculated with an independently developed standard reference formulation with a root-mean-square fractional deviation of 0.48%.

  14. HTFLO: a computer model of a resistively-heated UO/sub 2/ pin with a rate-dependent heat capacity. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Smaardyk, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented to describe the thermal behavior of an uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) rod that is heated resistively and cooled by surface radiation. A standard forward differencing scheme is used for the heat transfer calculations. Temperature-dependent electrical and thermal properties are calculated at the beginning of each time step. In addition, the heat capacity is calculated from a dynamic enthalpy model based on equilibrium and instantaneous heat capacity models with a user-selectable relaxation time. This report describes the finite difference equations used, the treatment of the source and boundary terms, and the dynamic enthalpy model. Detailed input instructions are provided and a sample calculation is shown.

  15. Low-temperature dynamics of matrix isolated methane molecules in fullerite C60: The heat capacity, isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Manzhelii, V. G.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Dolbin, A. V.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sundqvist, B.

    2014-08-01

    The heat capacity of the interstitial solid solution (CH4)0.4C60 has been investigated in the temperature interval 1.4-120 K. The contribution of CH4 molecules to the heat capacity of the solution has been separated. The contributions of CH4 and CD4 molecules to the heat capacity of the solutions (CH4)0.40C60 and (CD4)0.40C60 have been compared. It is found that above 90 K the character of the rotational motion of CH4 and CD4 molecules changes from libration to hindered rotation. In the interval 14-35 K the heat capacities of CH4 and CD4 molecules are satisfactorily described by contributions of the translational and libration vibrations, as well as the tunnel rotation for the equilibrium distribution of the nuclear spin species. The isotope effect is due to mainly, the difference in the frequencies of local translational and libration vibrations of molecules CH4 and CD4. The contribution of the tunnel rotation of the CH4 and CD4 molecules to the heat capacity is dominant below 8 K. The isotopic effect is caused by the difference between both the conversion rates and the rotational spectra of the nuclear spin species of CH4 and CD4 molecules. The conversion rate of CH4 molecules is several times lower than that of CD4 ones. Weak features observed in the curves of temperature dependencies of the heat capacity of CH4 and CD4 molecules near 6 and 8 K, respectively, are most likely a manifestation of first-order polyamorphic phase transitions in the orientational glasses of these solutions.

  16. Ruptured tubal molar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yakasai, I A; Adamu, N; Galadanchi, H S

    2012-01-01

    Molar pregnancies in most instances develop within the uterine cavity, but may occur at any site. Ectopic molar pregnancy is a rare event. The objective of this study was to present a case of ruptured tubal molar gestation, discuss its clinical features and ways to improve diagnostic accuracy. A 35-year-old woman presented with features suggestive of ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy. There was neither any evidence at the time of presentation to suspect a molar gestation, nor β human chorionic gonadotrophin (βhCG) hormone estimation was done, but only a clearview pregnancy test was carried out. She had total left salpingectomy and histological evaluation of the specimen revealed complete hydatidiform mole. The hCG level normalized within 3 weeks of follow-up. Clinical features of ectopic molar pregnancy may be indistinguishable from non-molar ectopic pregnancy. We recommend βhCG estimation as well as histological examination of the surgical specimen for all patients coming with features suggestive of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:23238205

  17. Novel Anthropometry-Based Calculation of the Body Heat Capacity in the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Young Boum; Park, Eun Seok; Kim, Ka Yul; Song, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-01-01

    Heat capacity (HC) has an important role in the temperature regulation process, particularly in dealing with the heat load. The actual measurement of the body HC is complicated and is generally estimated by body-composition-specific data. This study compared the previously known HC estimating equations and sought how to define HC using simple anthropometric indices such as weight and body surface area (BSA) in the Korean population. Six hundred participants were randomly selected from a pool of 902 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 70 years for the training set. The remaining 302 participants were used for the test set. Body composition analysis using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to access body components including body fat, water, protein, and mineral mass. Four different HCs were calculated and compared using a weight-based HC (HC_Eq1), two HCs estimated from fat and fat-free mass (HC_Eq2 and HC_Eq3), and an HC calculated from fat, protein, water, and mineral mass (HC_Eq4). HC_Eq1 generally produced a larger HC than the other HC equations and had a poorer correlation with the other HC equations. HC equations using body composition data were well-correlated to each other. If HC estimated with HC_Eq4 was regarded as a standard, interestingly, the BSA and weight independently contributed to the variation of HC. The model composed of weight, BSA, and gender was able to predict more than a 99% variation of HC_Eq4. Validation analysis on the test set showed a very high satisfactory level of the predictive model. In conclusion, our results suggest that gender, BSA, and weight are the independent factors for calculating HC. For the first time, a predictive equation based on anthropometry data was developed and this equation could be useful for estimating HC in the general Korean population without body-composition measurement.

  18. CHIP Knockdown Reduced Heat Shock Response and Protein Quality Control Capacity in Lens Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Bao, X; Qin, Y; Taylor, A; Shang, F; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) systems, including molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), plays an important role in maintaining intracellular protein homeostasis. Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70- interacting protein (CHIP) links the chaperone and UPPs, thus contributing to the repair or removal of damaged proteins. Over-expression of CHIP had previously been used to protect cells from environmental stress. In order to gain a more physiologic mechanism of the advantage conferred by CHIP, we induced a CHIP knockdown and monitored the ability of cells to cope with environmental stress. To knockdown CHIP, the human lens epithelial cell line HLE B3 was transfected with lentiviral particles that encode a CHIP short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or negative control lentiviral particles. Stable CHIP-knock down cells (KD) and negative control cells (NC) were selected with puromycin. After exposure to heat shock stress, there was no change observed in the expression of Hsp90. In contrast, Hsp70 levels increased significantly in NC cells but less so in KD cells. Hsp27 levels also increased after heat shock, but only in NC cells. Protein ubiquitination was reduced when CHIP was knocked down. CHIP knockdown reduced the ability to clear aggregation proteins. When same levels of aggregation-prone RFP-mutant crystallin fusion protein, RFP/V76D-γD, was expressed, there was ~9- fold more aggregates in KD cells as compared to that observed in NC cells. Furthermore, KD cells were more sensitive to toxicity of amino acid analog canavanine as compared to NC cells. Together, these data indicate that CHIP is required for PQC and that CHIP knockdown diminished cellular PQC capacity in lens cells.

  19. Novel Anthropometry-Based Calculation of the Body Heat Capacity in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Young Boum; Park, Eun Seok; Kim, Ka Yul; Song, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-01-01

    Heat capacity (HC) has an important role in the temperature regulation process, particularly in dealing with the heat load. The actual measurement of the body HC is complicated and is generally estimated by body-composition-specific data. This study compared the previously known HC estimating equations and sought how to define HC using simple anthropometric indices such as weight and body surface area (BSA) in the Korean population. Six hundred participants were randomly selected from a pool of 902 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 70 years for the training set. The remaining 302 participants were used for the test set. Body composition analysis using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to access body components including body fat, water, protein, and mineral mass. Four different HCs were calculated and compared using a weight-based HC (HC_Eq1), two HCs estimated from fat and fat-free mass (HC_Eq2 and HC_Eq3), and an HC calculated from fat, protein, water, and mineral mass (HC_Eq4). HC_Eq1 generally produced a larger HC than the other HC equations and had a poorer correlation with the other HC equations. HC equations using body composition data were well-correlated to each other. If HC estimated with HC_Eq4 was regarded as a standard, interestingly, the BSA and weight independently contributed to the variation of HC. The model composed of weight, BSA, and gender was able to predict more than a 99% variation of HC_Eq4. Validation analysis on the test set showed a very high satisfactory level of the predictive model. In conclusion, our results suggest that gender, BSA, and weight are the independent factors for calculating HC. For the first time, a predictive equation based on anthropometry data was developed and this equation could be useful for estimating HC in the general Korean population without body-composition measurement. PMID:26529594

  20. Novel Anthropometry-Based Calculation of the Body Heat Capacity in the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Young Boum; Park, Eun Seok; Kim, Ka Yul; Song, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-01-01

    Heat capacity (HC) has an important role in the temperature regulation process, particularly in dealing with the heat load. The actual measurement of the body HC is complicated and is generally estimated by body-composition-specific data. This study compared the previously known HC estimating equations and sought how to define HC using simple anthropometric indices such as weight and body surface area (BSA) in the Korean population. Six hundred participants were randomly selected from a pool of 902 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 70 years for the training set. The remaining 302 participants were used for the test set. Body composition analysis using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to access body components including body fat, water, protein, and mineral mass. Four different HCs were calculated and compared using a weight-based HC (HC_Eq1), two HCs estimated from fat and fat-free mass (HC_Eq2 and HC_Eq3), and an HC calculated from fat, protein, water, and mineral mass (HC_Eq4). HC_Eq1 generally produced a larger HC than the other HC equations and had a poorer correlation with the other HC equations. HC equations using body composition data were well-correlated to each other. If HC estimated with HC_Eq4 was regarded as a standard, interestingly, the BSA and weight independently contributed to the variation of HC. The model composed of weight, BSA, and gender was able to predict more than a 99% variation of HC_Eq4. Validation analysis on the test set showed a very high satisfactory level of the predictive model. In conclusion, our results suggest that gender, BSA, and weight are the independent factors for calculating HC. For the first time, a predictive equation based on anthropometry data was developed and this equation could be useful for estimating HC in the general Korean population without body-composition measurement. PMID:26529594

  1. CHIP Knockdown Reduced Heat Shock Response and Protein Quality Control Capacity in Lens Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Liu, Z; Bao, X; Qin, Y; Taylor, A; Shang, F; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) systems, including molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP), plays an important role in maintaining intracellular protein homeostasis. Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70- interacting protein (CHIP) links the chaperone and UPPs, thus contributing to the repair or removal of damaged proteins. Over-expression of CHIP had previously been used to protect cells from environmental stress. In order to gain a more physiologic mechanism of the advantage conferred by CHIP, we induced a CHIP knockdown and monitored the ability of cells to cope with environmental stress. To knockdown CHIP, the human lens epithelial cell line HLE B3 was transfected with lentiviral particles that encode a CHIP short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or negative control lentiviral particles. Stable CHIP-knock down cells (KD) and negative control cells (NC) were selected with puromycin. After exposure to heat shock stress, there was no change observed in the expression of Hsp90. In contrast, Hsp70 levels increased significantly in NC cells but less so in KD cells. Hsp27 levels also increased after heat shock, but only in NC cells. Protein ubiquitination was reduced when CHIP was knocked down. CHIP knockdown reduced the ability to clear aggregation proteins. When same levels of aggregation-prone RFP-mutant crystallin fusion protein, RFP/V76D-γD, was expressed, there was ~9- fold more aggregates in KD cells as compared to that observed in NC cells. Furthermore, KD cells were more sensitive to toxicity of amino acid analog canavanine as compared to NC cells. Together, these data indicate that CHIP is required for PQC and that CHIP knockdown diminished cellular PQC capacity in lens cells. PMID:26321754

  2. FY04 LDRD Final Report Small Sample Heat Capacity Under High Pressure LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-FS-020

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Jackson, D D

    2005-02-11

    Specific heat provides a probe of bulk thermodynamic properties, including low energy excitations (phonons, magnons, etc), the electron density of states, and direct observation of phase transitions. The ability to measure specific heat as a function of pressure permits study of these properties as a function of lattice parameters. This in turn should allow construction of an equation of state for a given system. Previous measurements of specific heat under pressure done by adiabatic methods were limited to materials with extremely large heat capacities because it was difficult to decouple the sample heat capacity from the surrounding pressure cell. Starting in the late Seventies, Eichler and Gey[1] demonstrated an AC technique to measure heat capacity of relatively small samples ({approx}100's mg) in a piston pressure cylinder at pressures up to 2 GPa. More recently, this technique has been expanded to include work on significantly smaller samples (< 1mg) in large diamond anvil cells (DAC)[2]. However, these techniques require a relatively weak coupling of the sample to the surrounding thermal bath, which limits the base temperature, particularly for radioactive samples possessing significant self-heating such as plutonium. A different technique, sometimes referred to as the 3{omega}-technique, utilizes a two dimensional heat flow model to extract heat capacity, C, and {kappa}, the thermal conductivity, from an oscillating heat input. One advantage of this method is that it does not require that the sample be thermally isolated from the heat bath, so lower base temperatures should be accessible to interesting self-heating samples. From an experimental perspective, the design requirements of the 3{omega} and AC techniques are quite similar. We focused on development of these techniques for a copper-beryllium (CuBe) pressure clamp for use on small samples at temperatures down to 1.7K and at pressures up to 1.6 GPa. The successful development of this capability will

  3. Age-related differences in heat loss capacity occur under both dry and humid heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Joanie; Boulay, Pierre; Wright-Beatty, Heather E.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Hardcastle, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the progression of impairments in heat dissipation as a function of age and environmental conditions. Sixty men (n = 12 per group; 20–30, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, and 55–70 yr) performed four intermittent exercise/recovery cycles for a duration of 2 h in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid (35°C, 60% relative humidity) conditions. Evaporative heat loss and metabolic heat production were measured by direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and heat loss during the sessions. Evaporative heat loss was reduced during exercise in the humid vs. dry condition in age groups 20–30 (−17%), 40–44 (−18%), 45–49 (−21%), 50–54 (−25%), and 55–70 yr (−20%). HE fell short of being significantly different between groups in the dry condition, but was greater in age group 20–30 yr (279 ± 10 W) compared with age groups 45–49 (248 ± 8 W), 50–54 (242 ± 6 W), and 55–70 yr (240 ± 7 W) in the humid condition. As a result of a reduced rate of heat dissipation predominantly during exercise, age groups 40–70 yr stored between 60–85 and 13–38% more heat than age group 20–30 yr in the dry and humid conditions, respectively. These age-related differences in heat dissipation and heat storage were not paralleled by significant differences in local sweating and skin blood flow, or by differences in core temperature between groups. From a whole body perspective, combined heat and humidity impeded heat dissipation to a similar extent across age groups, but, more importantly, intermittent exercise in dry and humid heat stress conditions created a greater thermoregulatory challenge for middle-aged and older adults. PMID:24812643

  4. Age-related differences in heat loss capacity occur under both dry and humid heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Larose, Joanie; Boulay, Pierre; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Sigal, Ronald J; Hardcastle, Stephen; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the progression of impairments in heat dissipation as a function of age and environmental conditions. Sixty men (n = 12 per group; 20-30, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, and 55-70 yr) performed four intermittent exercise/recovery cycles for a duration of 2 h in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid (35°C, 60% relative humidity) conditions. Evaporative heat loss and metabolic heat production were measured by direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and heat loss during the sessions. Evaporative heat loss was reduced during exercise in the humid vs. dry condition in age groups 20-30 (-17%), 40-44 (-18%), 45-49 (-21%), 50-54 (-25%), and 55-70 yr (-20%). HE fell short of being significantly different between groups in the dry condition, but was greater in age group 20-30 yr (279 ± 10 W) compared with age groups 45-49 (248 ± 8 W), 50-54 (242 ± 6 W), and 55-70 yr (240 ± 7 W) in the humid condition. As a result of a reduced rate of heat dissipation predominantly during exercise, age groups 40-70 yr stored between 60-85 and 13-38% more heat than age group 20-30 yr in the dry and humid conditions, respectively. These age-related differences in heat dissipation and heat storage were not paralleled by significant differences in local sweating and skin blood flow, or by differences in core temperature between groups. From a whole body perspective, combined heat and humidity impeded heat dissipation to a similar extent across age groups, but, more importantly, intermittent exercise in dry and humid heat stress conditions created a greater thermoregulatory challenge for middle-aged and older adults.

  5. Intracavity, adaptive correction of a high-average-power, solid-state, heat-capacity laser

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2005-01-05

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multigeneration laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels. Wavefront quality is a driving metric of its performance. A deformable mirror with over 100 degrees of freedom situated within the cavity is used to correct both the static and dynamic aberrations sensed with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The laser geometry is an unstable, confocal resonator with a clear aperture of 10 cm x 10 cm. It operates in a pulsed mode at a high repetition rate (up to 200 Hz) with a correction being applied before each pulse. Wavefront information is gathered in real-time from a low-power pick-off of the high-power beam. It is combined with historical trends of aberration growth to calculate a correction that is both feedback and feed-forward driven. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results are presented.

  6. Heat capacity and thermal relaxation of bulk helium very near the lambda point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.; Swanson, D. R.; Nissen, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992 a low temperature experiment was flown on the Space Shuttle in low Earth orbit. The objective of the mission was to measure the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of helium very close to the lambda point with the smearing effect of gravity removed. We report preliminary results from the experiment, and compare them with related measurements performed on the ground. The sample was s sphere of helium 3.5 cm in diameter contained within a copper calorimeter of vey high thermal conductivity. The calorimeter was attached to a pair of high resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers with noise levels in the 10(exp -10) K range and suspended from a high stability thermal isolation system. During the mission we found that the resolution of the thermometers was degraded somewhat due to the impact of charged particles. This effect limited the useful resolution of the measurements to about two nanokelvins from the lambda point. The results reported here are limited to about ten nanokelvins from the transition.

  7. The heat-capacity of ilmenite and phase equilibria in the system Fe-T-O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Treiman, A.H.; Essene, E.J.; Hemingway, B.S.; Westrum, E.F.; Wall, V.J.; Burriel, R.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and high temperature differential scanning calorimetry have been used to measure the heat-capacity of ilmenite (FeTiO3) from 5 to 1000 K. These measurements yield S2980 = 108.9 J/(mol ?? K). Calculations from published experimental data on the reduction of ilmenite yield ??2980(I1) = -1153.9 kJ/(mol ?? K). These new data, combined with available experimental and thermodynamic data for other phases, have been used to calculate phase equilibria in the system Fe-Ti-O. Calculations for the subsystem Ti-O show that extremely low values of f{hook}O2 are necessary to stabilize TiO, the mineral hongquiite reported from the Tao district in China. This mineral may not be TiO, and it should be re-examined for substitution of other elements such as N or C. Consideration of solid-solution models for phases in the system Fe-Ti-O allows derivation of a new thermometer/oxybarometer for assemblages of ferropseudobrookite-pseudobrookitess and hematite-ilmenitess. Preliminary application of this new thermometer/oxybarometer to lunar and terrestrial lavas gives reasonable estimates of oxygen fugacities, but generally yields subsolidus temperatures, suggesting re-equilibration of one or more phases during cooling. ?? 1985.

  8. Heat Capacity Changes Associated with DNA Duplex Formation: Salt- and Sequence-Dependent Effects†

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Duplexes are the most fundamental elements of nucleic acid folding. Although it has become increasingly clear that duplex formation can be associated with a significant change in heat capacity (ΔCp), this parameter is typically overlooked in thermodynamic studies of nucleic acid folding. Analogy to protein folding suggests that base stacking events coupled to duplex formation should give rise to a ΔCp due to the release of waters solvating aromatic surfaces of nucleotide bases. In previous work, we showed that the ΔCp observed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for RNA duplex formation depended on salt and sequence. In the present work, we apply calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques to a series of designed DNA duplexes to demonstrate that both the salt dependence and sequence dependence of ΔCps observed by ITC reflect perturbations to the same fundamental phenomenon: stacking in the single-stranded state. By measuring the thermodynamics of single strand melting, one can accurately predict the ΔCps observed for duplex formation by ITC at high and low ionic strength. We discuss our results in light of the larger issue of contributions to ΔCp from coupled equilibria and conclude that observed ΔCps can be useful indicators of intermediate states in nucleic acid folding phenomena. PMID:16401089

  9. Ideal-gas heat capacities and virial coefficients of HFC refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Yokozeki, A.; Sato, H.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of HFC (hydrofluorocarbon) compounds have been extensively studied with worldwide interest as alternative refrigerants. Both quality and quantity in the experimental data far exceed those for the CFC and HCFC refrigerants. These data now provide a great opportunity to examine the validity of theoretical models, and vice versa. Among them, the ideal-gas heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup 0}) and virial coefficients derived from the experimental data are of particular interest, since they are directly related to the intramolecular and intermolecular potentials through the statistical mechanical procedure. There have been some discrepancies reported in the observed and theoretical C{sub p}{sup 0} for HFC compounds. The authors have performed new calculations for C{sub p}{sup 0} for several HFCs. The present results are consistent with the selected experimental values. The second (B) and Third (C) virial coefficients have been reported for these HFC refrigerants from speed of sound data and Burnett PVT data. Often, a square well-type intermolecular potential is employed to correlate the data. However, the model potential cannot account consistently for both B and C coefficients with the same potential parameters. They have analyzed the data with the Stockmayer potential and obtained self-consistent results for various HFC (R-23, R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a) compounds with physically reasonable potential parameters.

  10. A role for haemolymph oxygen capacity in heat tolerance of eurythermal crabs.

    PubMed

    Giomi, Folco; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2013-01-01

    Heat tolerance in aquatic ectotherms is constrained by a mismatch, occurring at high temperatures, between oxygen delivery and demand which compromises the maintenance of aerobic scope. The present study analyses how the wide thermal tolerance range of an eurythermal model species, the green crab Carcinus maenas is supported and limited by its ability to sustain efficient oxygen transport to tissues. Similar to other eurytherms, C. maenas sustains naturally occurring acute warming events through the integrated response of circulatory and respiratory systems. The response of C. maenas to warming can be characterized by two phases. During initial warming, oxygen consumption and heart rate increase, while stroke volume and haemolymph oxygen partial pressure decrease. During further warming, dissolved oxygen levels in the venous compartment decrease below the threshold of full haemocyanin oxygen saturation. The progressive release of haemocyanin bound oxygen with further warming follows an exponential pattern, thereby saving energy in oxygen transport and causing an associated leveling off of metabolic rate. According to the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT), this indicates that the thermal tolerance window is widened by the increasing contribution of haemocyanin oxygen transport and associated energy savings in cardiocirculation. Haemocyanin bound oxygen sustains cardiac performance to cover the temperature range experienced by C. maenas in the field. To our knowledge this is the first study providing evidence of a relationship between thermal tolerance and blood (haemolymph) oxygen transport in a eurythermal invertebrate. PMID:23720633

  11. A role for haemolymph oxygen capacity in heat tolerance of eurythermal crabs

    PubMed Central

    Giomi, Folco; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2013-01-01

    Heat tolerance in aquatic ectotherms is constrained by a mismatch, occurring at high temperatures, between oxygen delivery and demand which compromises the maintenance of aerobic scope. The present study analyses how the wide thermal tolerance range of an eurythermal model species, the green crab Carcinus maenas is supported and limited by its ability to sustain efficient oxygen transport to tissues. Similar to other eurytherms, C. maenas sustains naturally occurring acute warming events through the integrated response of circulatory and respiratory systems. The response of C. maenas to warming can be characterized by two phases. During initial warming, oxygen consumption and heart rate increase, while stroke volume and haemolymph oxygen partial pressure decrease. During further warming, dissolved oxygen levels in the venous compartment decrease below the threshold of full haemocyanin oxygen saturation. The progressive release of haemocyanin bound oxygen with further warming follows an exponential pattern, thereby saving energy in oxygen transport and causing an associated leveling off of metabolic rate. According to the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT), this indicates that the thermal tolerance window is widened by the increasing contribution of haemocyanin oxygen transport and associated energy savings in cardiocirculation. Haemocyanin bound oxygen sustains cardiac performance to cover the temperature range experienced by C. maenas in the field. To our knowledge this is the first study providing evidence of a relationship between thermal tolerance and blood (haemolymph) oxygen transport in a eurythermal invertebrate. PMID:23720633

  12. Heat capacity changes in RNA folding: application of perturbation theory to hammerhead ribozyme cold denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    In proteins, empirical correlations have shown that changes in heat capacity (ΔCP) scale linearly with the hydrophobic surface area buried upon folding. The influence of ΔCP on RNA folding has been widely overlooked and is poorly understood. In addition to considerations of solvent reorganization, electrostatic effects might contribute to ΔCPs of folding in polyanionic species such as RNAs. Here, we employ a perturbation method based on electrostatic theory to probe the hot and cold denaturation behavior of the hammerhead ribozyme. This treatment avoids much of the error associated with imposing two-state folding models on non-two-state systems. Ribozyme stability is perturbed across a matrix of solvent conditions by varying the concentration of NaCl and methanol co-solvent. Temperature-dependent unfolding is then monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The resulting array of unfolding transitions can be used to calculate a ΔCP of folding that accurately predicts the observed cold denaturation temperature. We confirm the accuracy of the calculated ΔCP by using isothermal titration calorimetry, and also demonstrate a methanol-dependence of the ΔCP. We weigh the strengths and limitations of this method for determining ΔCP values. Finally, we discuss the data in light of the physical origins of the ΔCPs for RNA folding and consider their impact on biological function. PMID:15282329

  13. Heat capacity decomposition by partition function zeros for interacting self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Ning; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-10-01

    A novel method based on partition function zeros is developed to demonstrate the additional advantages by considering both loci of partition function zeros and thermodynamical functions associated with them. With this method, the first pair of complex conjugate zeros (first zeros) can be defined without ambiguity and the critical point of a small system can be defined as the peak position of the heat capacity component associated with the first zeros. For the system with two phase transitions, two pairs of first zeros corresponding to two phase transitions can be identified and two overlapping phase transitions can be well separated. This method is applied to the interacting self-avoiding walk (ISAW) of homopolymer with N monomers on the simple cubic lattice, which has a collapse transition at a higher temperature and a freezing transition at a low temperature. The exact partition functions ZN with N up to 27 are calculated and our approach gives a clear scenario for the collapse and the freezing transitions.

  14. Analytical insight into the lattice thermal conductivity and heat capacity of monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Dipankar; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2016-09-01

    We report, a detailed theoretical study on the lattice thermal conductivity of a suspended monolayer MoS2, far beyond its ballistic limit. The analytical approach adopted in this work mainly relies on the use of Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) within the relaxation time approximation (RTA), along with the first-principles calculations. Considering the relative contributions from the various in-plane and out-of-plane acoustic modes, we derive the closed-form expressions of the mode specific heat capacities, which we later use to obtain the phonon thermal conductivities of the monolayer MoS2. Besides finding the intrinsic thermal conductivity, we also analyse the effect of the phonon-boundary scattering, for different dimensions and edge roughness conditions. The viability of the semi-analytic solution of lattice thermal conductivity reported in this work ranges from a low temperature (T∼30 K) to a significantly high temperature (T∼550 K), and the room temperature (RT) thermal conductivity value has been obtained as 34.06 Wm-1K-1 which is in good agreement with the experimental result.

  15. The Ideal and Real Gas Heat Capacity of Potassium Atoms at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biolsi, Louis; Biolsi, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The ideal gas heat capacity, Cp, of potassium atoms is calculated to high temperatures using statistical mechanics. Since there are a large number of electronic energy levels in the partition function (Boltzmann sum) below the first ionization potential, the partition function and Cp will become very large as the temperature increases unless the number of energy levels contributing to the partition function is constrained. Two primary categories of arguments are used to do this. First, at high temperatures, the increased size of the atoms constrains the sum (Bethe method). Second, an argument based on the existence of interacting charged species at higher temperatures is used to constrain the sum (ionization potential lowering method). When potassium atoms are assumed to constitute a real gas that obeys the virial equation of state, the lowest non-ideal contribution to Cp depends on the second derivative of the second virial coefficient, B( T), which depends on the interaction potential energy curves between two potassium atoms. When two ground-state (2{S}) atoms interact, they can follow either of the two potential energy curves. When a 2{S} atom interacts with an atom in the first electronically excited (2{P}) state, they can follow any of the eight potential energy curves. The values of B( T) for the ten states are determined, then averaged, and used to calculate the nonideal contribution to Cp.

  16. Magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of the spin Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-11-01

    Using linear response theory, Heisenberg model Hamiltonian and Green's function technique, the influences of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), external magnetic field and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling on the density of magnon modes (DMM), the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the magnon heat capacity (MHC) of a spin Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, are investigated. The results reveal a band gap in the DMM and we witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes ferromagnetism in spin Lieb-based nanosystems, MS is investigated. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the MHC. The results show that the effects of the magnetic field on the MHC and MS have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, MHC and MS increase when the magnetic field strength increases. On the other hand, the MHC and MS reduce with increasing the magnetic field strength in the high temperature region. Also comprehensive numerical modelling of the DMM, the MS and the MHC of a spin Lieb lattice yields excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  17. The Stone-Wales transformation: from fullerenes to graphite, from radiation damage to heat capacity.

    PubMed

    Heggie, M I; Haffenden, G L; Latham, C D; Trevethan, T

    2016-09-13

    The Stone-Wales (SW) transformation, or carbon-bond rotation, has been fundamental to understanding fullerene growth and stability, and ab initio calculations show it to be a high-energy process. The nature and topology of the fullerene energy landscape shows how the Ih-C60 must be the final product, if SW transformations are fast enough, and various mechanisms for their catalysis have been proposed. We review SW transformations in fullerenes and then discuss the analogous transformation in graphite, where they form the Dienes defect, originally posited to be a transition state in the direct exchange of a bonded atom pair. On the basis of density functional theory calculations in the local density approximation, we propose that non-equilibrium concentrations of the Dienes defect arising from displacing radiation are rapidly healed by point defects and that equilibrium concentrations of Dienes defects are responsible for the divergent ultra-high-temperature heat capacity of graphite.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'. PMID:27501968

  18. EFFECT OF HEAT ON THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF AN ACTIVATED CARBON FOR DECOLORIZING/DEODORIZING YELLOW ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Freundlich model was evaluated for use to assess the effect of heat on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon for decolorizing/deodorizing corn zein. Because zein protein and its color/odor components are all adsorbed by activated carbon, a method to monitor their removal was needed. Y...

  19. Calibration of High Temperature Thermal Conductivity System: New Algorithm to Measure Heat Capacity Using Flash Thermal Diffusivity in Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deb, Rahul; Snyder, Jeff G.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing thermoelectric materials, an algorithm for heat capacity measurements and the process of flash thermal diffusivity. The contents include: 1) What are Thermoelectrics?; 2) Thermoelectric Applications; 3) Improving Thermoelectrics; 4) Research Goal; 5) Flash Thermal Diffusivity; 6) Background Effects; 7) Stainless Steel Comparison; 8) Pulse Max Integral; and 9) Graphite Comparison Algorithm.

  20. Reversing and nonreversing heat capacity of poly(lactic acid) in the glass transition region by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Pyda, Marek {nmn}; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn}

    2005-11-01

    A study of the glass transition of an amorphous and a semicrystalline poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is performed with adiabatic calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC). The reversing, total, and nonreversing apparent heat capacities of samples with different contents of L- and D-lactic acid and with various thermal histories were evaluated. Different modes of TMDSC analyses of amorphous and semicrystalline PLA were compared to the total heat capacity from standard DSC. The enthalpy relaxation and the cold crystallization in the glass transition region are largely irreversible. The melting is largely irreversible, but a 100% reversing fraction is observed at low temperatures from 375 to 420 K, which becomes small inside the major melting peak at about 440 K. From the TMDSC of amorphous PLA, the combined information on endothermic and exothermic enthalpy relaxation and glass transition were deconvoluted into the reversing and nonreversing components. The glass transition temperature from the reversing heat capacity and the enthalpy relaxation peaks from the nonreversing component shift to higher temperature for increasingly annealed PLA. The relaxation times for aging decrease on cooling until the glass transition is reached and then increase. This behavior is linked to cooperativity. All quantitative thermal analyses are based on the heat capacity of the solid and liquid, evaluated earlier with the advanced thermal analysis system (ATHAS).

  1. Heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of thulium tellurites in the range of 298.15-673 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustembekov, K. T.; Dyusekeeva, A. T.; Bekturganova, A. Zh.; Kasenov, B. K.; Makhatova, N. A.; Fomin, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The isobaric heat capacity of double thulium tellurites is studied via dynamic calorimetry in the range of 298.15-673 K. It is used as the basis for deriving the equation C p o ˜ f( T) and determining the thermodynamic functions. Dependences C p o ˜ f( T) are found to have second-order phase λ-transitions.

  2. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB50 at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50 crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the sum of SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. As a result, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.

  3. Heat capacity and monogamy relations in the mixed-three-spin XXX Heisenberg model at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zad, Hamid Arian; Movahhedian, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Heat capacity of a mixed-three-spin (1/2,1,1/2) antiferromagnetic XXX Heisenberg chain is precisely investigated by use of the partition function of the system for which, spins (1,1/2) have coupling constant J1 and spins (1/2,1/2) have coupling constant J2. We verify tripartite entanglement for the model by means of the convex roof extended negativity (CREN) and concurrence as functions of temperature T, homogeneous magnetic field B and the coupling constants J1 and J2. As shown in our previous work, [H. A. Zad, Chin. Phys. B 25 (2016) 030303.] the temperature, the magnetic field and the coupling constants dependences of the heat capacity for such spin system have different behaviors for the entangled and separable states, hence, we did some useful comparisons between this quantity and negativities of its organized bipartite (sub)systems at entangled and separable states. Here, we compare the heat capacity of the mixed-three-spin (1/2,1,1/2) system with the CREN and the tripartite concurrence (as measures of the tripartite entanglement) at low temperature. Ground state phase transitions, and also, transition from ground state to some excited states are explained in detail for this system at zero temperature. Finally, we investigate the heat capacity behavior around those critical points in which these quantum phase transitions occur.

  4. Heat capacity of aqueous monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, and N-methyldiethanolamine-based blends with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    New data are reported on the heat capacity of CO{sub 2}-loaded, aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and aqueous MDEA-based blends with MEA and DEA. The work reported here was motivated by the need to quantify the effect of acid gas loading on the important physical properties of gas-sweetening solvents.

  5. Heat capacities and entropies of sillimanite, fibrolite, andalusite, kyanite, and quartz and the Al2SiO5 phase diagram

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.; Evans, H.T.; Kerrick, Derrill M.

    1991-01-01

    Low-temperature heat capacities for sillimanite, fibrolite, and both fine-grained and coarse-grained quartz have been measured. Superambient heat capacities have been measured for four sillimanite, two andalusite, one kyanite, and two fibrolite samples. Equations are recommended for the temperature dependence of the heat capacities of kyanite, andalusite, sillimanite, and fibrolite. The heat capacity functions have been combined with thermal expansion (fibrolite and sillimanite reported here), enthalpy of solution, and phase equilibrium data in order to construct a phase diagram for the Al2SiO5 polymorphs. -from Authors

  6. Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties for coesite and jadeite, reexamination of the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Bohlen, S.R.; Hankins, W.B.; Westrum, E.F.; Kuskov, O.L.

    1998-01-01

    The heat capacities of synthetic coesite and jadeite were measured between about 15 and 850 K by adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental data were smoothed and estimates were made of heat capacities to 1800 K. The following equations represent our estimate of the heat capacities of coesite and jadeite between 298.15 and 1800 K: [see original article for formula]. Tables of thermodynamic values for coesite and jadeite to 1800 K are presented. The entropies of coesite and jadeite are 40.38 ?? 0.12 and 136.5 ?? 0.32 J/(mol.K), respectively, at 298.15 K. The entropy for coesite derived here confirms the value published earlier by Holm et al. (1967). We have derived an equation to describe the quartz-coesite boundary over the temperature range of 600 to 1500 K, P(GPa) = 1.76 + 0.001T(K). Our results are in agreement with the enthalpy of transition reported by Akaogi and Navrotsky (1984) and yield -907.6 ?? 1.4 kJ/mol for the enthalpy of formation of coesite from the elements at 298.15 K and 1 bar, in agreement with the value recommended by CODATA (Khodakovsky et al. 1995). Several sources of uncertainty remain unacceptably high, including: the heat capacities of coesite at temperatures above about 1000 K; the heat capacities and volumetric properties of ?? quartz at higher pressures and at temperatures above 844 K; the pressure corrections for the piston cylinder apparatus used to determine the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary.

  7. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  8. Third molar infections.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Pericoronitis is an infectious disease often associated with the eruption of a third molar. It can be either acute (serous and suppurative) or chronic. Pain is usually the predominant symptom in acute stages, whereas chronic forms of the disease may display very few symptoms. Both present exudate. The infection is multimicrobial, predominantly caused strictly by betalactamase-producing anaerobeic microorganisms. Treatment measures are symptomatic, antimicrobial and surgical. Antimicrobial treatment is indicated for preoperative prophylaxis when there is a high risk of postoperative infection and, during the acute stages of suppurative pericoronitis when surgery must be postponed. First-line treatment in this case consists of amoxicillin with associated clavulanic acid. Although surgical treatment of pericoronitis presenting at the third molar is indicated as a Grade C recommendation for extraction, it is the most common indication for extraction of a retained third molar, owing to the improved quality of life it can offer the patient.

  9. Heat capacity and phase equilibria of almandine, Fe 3Al 2Si 3O 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anovitz, L. M.; Essene, E. J.; Metz, G. W.; Bohlen, S. R.; Westrum, E. F., Jr.; Hemingway, B. S.

    1993-09-01

    The heat capacity of a synthetic almandine, Fe 3Al 2Si 3O 12, was measured from 6 to 350 K using equilibrium, intermittent-heating quasi-adiabatic calorimetry and from 420 to 1000 K using differential scanning calorimetry. These measurements yield Cp298 = 342.80 ± 1.4 J/mol · K and S298o = 342.60 J/mol · K. Mössbauer characterizations show the almandine to contain less than 2 ± 1% of the total iron as Fe 3+. X-ray diffraction studies of this synthetic almandine yield a = 11.521 ± 0.001 Å and V298o = 115.11 +- 0.01 cm 3/mol, somewhat smaller than previously reported. The low-temperature Cp data indicate a lambda transition at 8.7 K related to an antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition with TN = 7.5 K. Modeling of the lattice contribution to the total entropy suggests the presence of entropy in excess of that attributable to the effects of lattice vibrations and the magnetic transition. This probably arises from a low-temperature electronic transition (Schottky contribution). Combination of the Cp data with existing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data on almandine yields ΔGf,298 o = -4938.3 kJ/mol and ΔHf,298 o= - 5261.3 kJ/mol for almandine when calculated from the elements. The equilibrium almandine = hercynite + fayalite + quartz limits the upper T/P for almandine and is metastably located at ca. 570°C at P = 1 bar, with a dP/dT of +17 bars/°C. This agrees well with reversed experiments on almandine stability when they are corrected for magnetite and hercynite solid-solutions. In ‖ O2- T space, almandine oxidizes near QFM by the reactions almandine + O2 = magnetite + sillimanite + quartzandalmandine + 02 = hercynite + magnetite + quartz. With suitable correction for reduced activities of solid phases, these equilibria provide useful oxygen barometers for medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks.

  10. Heat capacity and phase equilibria of almandine, Fe3Al2Si3O12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Essene, E.J.; Metz, G.W.; Bohlen, S.R.; Westrum, E.F.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The heat capacity of a synthetic almandine, Fe3Al2Si3O12, was measured from 6 to 350 K using equilibrium, intermittent-heating quasi-adiabatic calorimetry and from 420 to 1000 K using differential scanning calorimetry. These measurements yield Cp298 = 342.80 ?? 1.4 J/mol ?? K and S298o = 342.60 J/mol ?? K. Mo??ssbauer characterizations show the almandine to contain less than 2 ?? 1% of the total iron as Fe3+. X-ray diffraction studies of this synthetic almandine yield a = 11.521 ?? 0.001 A?? and V298o = 115.11 +- 0.01 cm3/mol, somewhat smaller than previously reported. The low-temperature Cp data indicate a lambda transition at 8.7 K related to an antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition with TN = 7.5 K. Modeling of the lattice contribution to the total entropy suggests the presence of entropy in excess of that attributable to the effects of lattice vibrations and the magnetic transition. This probably arises from a low-temperature electronic transition (Schottky contribution). Combination of the Cp data with existing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data on almandine yields ??Gf,298o = -4938.3 kJ/mol and ??Hf,298o= -5261.3 kJ/mol for almandine when calculated from the elements. The equilibrium almandine = hercynite + fayalite + quartz limits the upper T P for almandine and is metastably located at ca. 570??C at P = 1 bar, with a dP dT of +17 bars/??C. This agrees well with reversed experiments on almandine stability when they are corrected for magnetite and hercynite solid-solutions. In {norm of matrix}O2-T space, almandine oxidizes near QFM by the reactions almandine + O2 = magnetite + sillimanite + quartz and almandine + 02 = hercynite + magnetite + quartz. With suitable correction for reduced activities of solid phases, these equilibria provide useful oxygen barometers for medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks. ?? 1993.

  11. Heat Capacity Changes and Disorder-to-Order Transitions in Allosteric Activation.

    PubMed

    Cressman, William J; Beckett, Dorothy

    2016-01-19

    Allosteric coupling in proteins is ubiquitous but incompletely understood, particularly in systems characterized by coupling over large distances. Binding of the allosteric effector, bio-5'-AMP, to the Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase, BirA, enhances the protein's dimerization free energy by -4 kcal/mol. Previous studies revealed that disorder-to-order transitions at the effector binding and dimerization sites, which are separated by 33 Å, are integral to functional coupling. Perturbations to the transition at the ligand binding site alter both ligand binding and coupled dimerization. Alanine substitutions in four loops on the dimerization surface yield a range of energetic effects on dimerization. A glycine to alanine substitution at position 142 in one of these loops results in a complete loss of allosteric coupling, disruption of the disorder-to-order transitions at both functional sites, and a decreased affinity for the effector. In this work, allosteric communication between the effector binding and dimerization surfaces in BirA was further investigated by performing isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on nine proteins with alanine substitutions in three dimerization surface loops. In contrast to BirAG142A, at 20 °C all variants bind to bio-5'-AMP with free energies indistinguishable from that measured for wild-type BirA. However, the majority of the variants exhibit altered heat capacity changes for effector binding. Moreover, the ΔCp values correlate with the dimerization free energies of the effector-bound proteins. These thermodynamic results, combined with structural information, indicate that allosteric activation of the BirA monomer involves formation of a network of intramolecular interactions on the dimerization surface in response to bio-5'-AMP binding at the distant effector binding site.

  12. Molecular-dynamics simulation of the heat capacity for nickel and copper clusters: Shape and size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gafner, S. L.; Redel, L. V.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.

    2012-03-15

    We have investigated the heat capacity of ideal Cu and Ni fcc clusters with diameters from 2 to 6 nm in the temperature range 200-800 K by the molecular-dynamics method using a modified tight-binding potential. Our analysis has shown consistency with the experimental results at temperatures of 200-300 K. The data obtained are also indicative of several regularities that are in agreement with the analytical calculations. We have concluded from the results of our computer simulations that the heat capacity in the case of isolated free clusters can exceed that of a bulk material, with this difference decreasing as the nanoparticle grows proportionally to the reduction in the fraction of surface atoms. The excess of the heat capacity for ideal copper and nickel nanoclusters with D = 6 nm at T = 200 K has been found to be 10% and 13%, respectively. Consequently, the large heat capacities of copper and nickel nanostructures observed in some real experiments cannot be related to the characteristics of free clusters. We hypothesize that these properties of a nanomaterial depend on the degree of agglomeration of its constituent particles, i.e., the surfaces and interphase boundaries of interconnected nanoclusters can have a strong effect. To test this hypothesis, we took nickel and copper clusters of various sizes (4000-7200 atoms) produced through the simulation of condensation from the gas phase. At high temperatures, we failed to adequately assess the role of the interphase boundaries in calculating the heat capacity of nanoparticles. The reason was the mass diffusion of Ni or Cu atoms to impart an energetically more favorable shape and structure to the synthesized clusters. At low temperatures, the heat capacity of such clusters exceeded that of clusters with an ideal shape and structure by a value from 3.2% to 10.6%. We have concluded that the Ni and Cu clusters produced in real experiments cannot be applied in devices using the thermal energy of such clusters without

  13. Development of a self-priming high-capacity heat pipe for flight on OAO-C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.; Swerdling, B.; Kosson, R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a 0.500-inch OD heat pipe with a spiral artery designed to fill under surface tension forces in a one-g field. Capacities in excess of 12,000 watt-inches have been achieved with ammonia as the working fluid. The paper presents the analysis, design, and test of the three-foot-long development models. Also included are some design and fabrication details, along with qualification ground test data for a 12-foot-long spiral artery isothermalizer type heat pipe that is installed on the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory C Model scheduled for launch in 1972.

  14. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics, heat capacity and thermal safety of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao-Qiang; Gao, Hong-Xu; Ji, Tie-Zheng; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Hu, Rong-Zu

    2011-10-15

    The specific heat capacity (C(p)) of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was determined with the continuous C(p) mode of microcalorimeter. The equation of C(p) with temperature was obtained. The standard molar heat capacity of GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was 1.225 J mol(-1)K(-1) at 298.15K. With the help of the peak temperature (T(p)) from the non-isothermal DTG curves of the mixture at different heating rates (β), the apparent activation energy (E(k) and E(o)) and pre-exponential constant (A(K)) of thermal decomposition reaction obtained by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Using density (ρ) and thermal conductivity (λ), the decomposition heat (Q(d), taking half-explosion heat), Zhang-Hu-Xie-Li's formula, the values (T(e0) and T(p0)) of T(e) and T(p) corresponding to β → 0, thermal explosion temperature (T(be) and T(bp)), adiabatic time-to-explosion (t(TIad)), 50% drop height (H(50)) of impact sensitivity, and critical temperature of hot-spot initiation (T(cr,hot spot)) of thermal explosion of the mixture were calculated. The following results of evaluating the thermal safety of the mixture were obtained: T(be) = 441.64K, T(bp) = 461.66 K, t(Tlad) = 78.0 s (n = 2), t(Tlad) = 74.87 s (n = 1), t(Tlad) = 71.85 s (n = 0), H(50) = 21.33 cm. PMID:21820242

  15. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics, heat capacity and thermal safety of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao-Qiang; Gao, Hong-Xu; Ji, Tie-Zheng; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Hu, Rong-Zu

    2011-10-15

    The specific heat capacity (C(p)) of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was determined with the continuous C(p) mode of microcalorimeter. The equation of C(p) with temperature was obtained. The standard molar heat capacity of GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was 1.225 J mol(-1)K(-1) at 298.15K. With the help of the peak temperature (T(p)) from the non-isothermal DTG curves of the mixture at different heating rates (β), the apparent activation energy (E(k) and E(o)) and pre-exponential constant (A(K)) of thermal decomposition reaction obtained by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Using density (ρ) and thermal conductivity (λ), the decomposition heat (Q(d), taking half-explosion heat), Zhang-Hu-Xie-Li's formula, the values (T(e0) and T(p0)) of T(e) and T(p) corresponding to β → 0, thermal explosion temperature (T(be) and T(bp)), adiabatic time-to-explosion (t(TIad)), 50% drop height (H(50)) of impact sensitivity, and critical temperature of hot-spot initiation (T(cr,hot spot)) of thermal explosion of the mixture were calculated. The following results of evaluating the thermal safety of the mixture were obtained: T(be) = 441.64K, T(bp) = 461.66 K, t(Tlad) = 78.0 s (n = 2), t(Tlad) = 74.87 s (n = 1), t(Tlad) = 71.85 s (n = 0), H(50) = 21.33 cm.

  16. A method for determination of heat storage capacity of the mold materials using a differential thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovik, E.

    2016-04-01

    The article proposes a method for determining of the heat storage capacity of the mould materials. Modern materials for mouldsare made using a variety of technologies, and the manufacturers of binders and additives ensure thermal properties of certain materials only when using a certain recipe. In practice, for management of the casting solidification process (creation of the volume or directed mode) it is favorable to apply various technological methods, including modification of one of the important properties of the casting mould, which is heat storage capacity. A rather simple technique based on the application of the differential thermal analysis was developed for its experimental definition. The obtained data showed a possibility of industrial application of the method.

  17. Heat capacities and thermodynamic properties of braunite (Mn7 SiO12) and rhodonite (MnSiO3)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Huebner, J.S.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1995-01-01

    The heat capacities, C0P, of synthetic rhodonite and braunite have been measured by adiabatic calorimetry from 6 to ~350 K. The heat capacity of braunite was also measured to ~900 K by differential scanning calorimetry. Brunite exhibits a ??-peak in C0P in the temperature region 93.4-94.2 K. Rhodonite did not show the expected peak in C0P characteristic of the co-operative ordering of the Mn2+ spins at temperatures above 6 K. A revised petrogenetic grid for the system Mn-Si-O-C at 2000 bars is presented and is consistent with both thermochemical values and occurrence of natural assemblages. -from Authors

  18. Effect of hydrolysis on heat capacity, thermodynamic functions, and the relaxation transition of crab chitin and chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashtanov, E. A.; Uryash, V. F.; Kokurina, N. Yu.; Larina, V. N.

    2014-02-01

    The heat capacity of crab chitin and chitosan is measured in a vacuum adiabatic calorimeter at 10-330 K. The thermodynamic characteristics (enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs function) are calculated at T → 0 K to 330 K. Differential thermal analysis is used to calculate the relaxation transitions and thermal degradation of chitin and chitosan at 80-600 K. Acid hydrolysis is performed and its effect on the physicochemical properties and thermodynamic functions of chitin and chitosan is studied.

  19. Laser Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Gases: A Novel Approach to Determining Heat Capacity Ratios and Gas Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, J. Clayton; Compton, R. N.; Feigerle, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    The speed of sound is measured in several gases using a pulsed laser to create a micro-spark on a carbon rod and a microphone connected to a digital oscilloscope to measure the time-of-flight of the resulting shockwave over a known distance. These data are used to calculate the heat capacity ratios (C[subscript p]/C[subscript V]) of the gases and…

  20. Heat capacities and thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Akinori; Ichise, Kenichi; Arai, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    The thermal diffusivity of AmO 2 was measured from 473 to 773 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 473 and 1373 K using a laser flash method. The enthalpy increment of AmO 2 was measured from 335 to 1081 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 335 and 1086 K using drop calorimetry. The heat capacities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were derived from the enthalpy increment measurements. The thermal conductivity was determined from the measured thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and bulk density. The heat capacities of AmO 2 was found larger than that of AmO 1.5. The thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were found to decrease with increasing temperature in the investigated temperature range. The thermal conductivity of AmO 1.5 with A -type hexagonal structure was smaller than that of AmO 2 with C-type fluorite structure but larger than that of sub-stoichiometric AmO 1.73.

  1. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and low temperature heat capacity of α-Na₂NpO₄.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anna L; Hen, Amir; Magnani, Nicola; Sanchez, Jean-Pierre; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Raison, Philippe E; Caciuffo, Roberto; Konings, Rudy J M; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2016-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties at low temperatures of hexavalent disodium neptunate α-Na2NpO4 are investigated for the first time in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Np(VI) valence state is confirmed by the isomer shift value of the Mössbauer spectra, and the local structural environment around the neptunium cation is related to the fitted quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameters. Moreover, magnetic hyperfine splitting is reported below 12.5 K, which could indicate magnetic ordering at this temperature. This interpretation is further substantiated by the existence of a λ-peak at 12.5 K in the heat capacity curve, which is shifted to lower temperatures with the application of a magnetic field, suggesting antiferromagnetic ordering. However, the absence of any anomaly in the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility data shows that the observed transition is more intricate. In addition, the heat capacity measurements suggest the existence of a Schottky-type anomaly above 15 K associated with a low-lying electronic doublet found about 60 cm(-1) above the ground state doublet. The possibility of a quadrupolar transition associated with a ground state pseudoquartet is thereafter discussed. The present results finally bring new insights into the complex magnetic and electronic peculiarities of α-Na2NpO4.

  2. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and low temperature heat capacity of α-Na₂NpO₄.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anna L; Hen, Amir; Magnani, Nicola; Sanchez, Jean-Pierre; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Raison, Philippe E; Caciuffo, Roberto; Konings, Rudy J M; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2016-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties at low temperatures of hexavalent disodium neptunate α-Na2NpO4 are investigated for the first time in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Np(VI) valence state is confirmed by the isomer shift value of the Mössbauer spectra, and the local structural environment around the neptunium cation is related to the fitted quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameters. Moreover, magnetic hyperfine splitting is reported below 12.5 K, which could indicate magnetic ordering at this temperature. This interpretation is further substantiated by the existence of a λ-peak at 12.5 K in the heat capacity curve, which is shifted to lower temperatures with the application of a magnetic field, suggesting antiferromagnetic ordering. However, the absence of any anomaly in the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility data shows that the observed transition is more intricate. In addition, the heat capacity measurements suggest the existence of a Schottky-type anomaly above 15 K associated with a low-lying electronic doublet found about 60 cm(-1) above the ground state doublet. The possibility of a quadrupolar transition associated with a ground state pseudoquartet is thereafter discussed. The present results finally bring new insights into the complex magnetic and electronic peculiarities of α-Na2NpO4. PMID:26823458

  3. Practical approach for measuring heat capacity of pharmaceutical crystals/glasses by modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Harada, Takuji; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Yoshihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A practical protocol to obtain accurate heat capacity values of pharmaceutical compounds using modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetry was established. Three pharmaceutical compounds, acetaminophen, indomethacin, and tri-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin were used as model compounds. Powder samples did not produce reproducible results, presumably due to inclusion of gas in gap of powders that influenced the measured heat capacity and thermal homogeneity in the sample. Thus, the amorphous characteristics were evaluated using quench-cooled samples. Crystalline samples were obtained by partially melting the sample to allow recrystallization using the residual crystal as a template. Optimum sample mass was about 10 mg. Use of too small sample size resulted in poor reproducibility due to localization of the sample in the pan, while too large size resulted in low heat capacity values probably because of heterogeneity of the sample temperature. The optimum modulation period was in the range of 60 s and 90 s, to which the ramp rates of 2°C/min and 1°C/min, respectively, were applied. The ramp amplitude was less significant in the evaluation. This information should help in comprehending basic characteristics of pharmaceutical compounds.

  4. Heat capacity of hydrous trachybasalt from Mt Etna: comparison with CaAl2Si2O8 (An)-CaMgSi2O6 (Di) as basaltic proxy compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Potuzak, M.; Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    The specific heat capacity ( C p) of six variably hydrated ( 3.5 wt% H2O) iron-bearing Etna trachybasaltic glasses and liquids has been measured using differential scanning calorimetry from room temperature across the glass transition region. These data are compared to heat capacity measurements on thirteen melt compositions in the iron-free anorthite (An)-diopside (Di) system over a similar range of H2O contents. These data extend considerably the published C p measurements for hydrous melts and glasses. The results for the Etna trachybasalts show nonlinear variations in, both, the heat capacity of the glass at the onset of the glass transition (i.e., C p g ) and the fully relaxed liquid (i.e., C p l ) with increasing H2O content. Similarly, the "configurational heat capacity" (i.e., C p c = C p l - C p g ) varies nonlinearly with H2O content. The An-Di hydrous compositions investigated show similar trends, with C p values varying as a function of melt composition and H2O content. The results show that values in hydrous C p g , C p l and C p c in the depolymerized glasses and liquids are substantially different from those observed for more polymerized hydrous albitic, leucogranitic, trachytic and phonolitic multicomponent compositions previously investigated. Polymerized melts have lower C p l and C p c and higher C p g with respect to more depolymerized compositions. The covariation between C p values and the degree of polymerization in glasses and melts is well described in terms of SMhydrous and NBO/ T hydrous. Values of C p c increase sharply with increasing depolymerization up to SMhydrous 30-35 mol% (NBO/ T hydrous 0.5) and then stabilize to an almost constant value. The partial molar heat capacity of H2O for both glasses ( C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{g} ) and liquids ( C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l} ) appears to be independent of composition and, assuming ideal mixing, we obtain a value for C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l} of 79 J mol-1 K-1. However, we note that a range of values for

  5. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent transient thermoreflectance method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhu, Jie; Tian, Miao; Gu, Xiaokun; Schmidt, Aaron; Yang, Ronggui

    2013-03-01

    The increasing interest in the extraordinary thermal properties of nanostructures has led to the development of various measurement techniques. Transient thermoreflectance method has emerged as a reliable measurement technique for thermal conductivity of thin films. In this method, the determination of thermal conductivity usually relies much on the accuracy of heat capacity input. For new nanoscale materials with unknown or less-understood thermal properties, it is either questionable to assume bulk heat capacity for nanostructures or difficult to obtain the bulk form of those materials for a conventional heat capacity measurement. In this paper, we describe a technique for simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity κ and volumetric heat capacity C of both bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) signals. The heat transfer model is analyzed first to find how different combinations of κ and C determine the frequency-dependent TDTR signals. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity is then demonstrated with bulk Si and thin film SiO2 samples using frequency-dependent TDTR measurement. This method is further testified by measuring both thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of novel hybrid organic-inorganic thin films fabricated using the atomic∕molecular layer deposition. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity can significantly shorten the development∕discovery cycle of novel materials.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent transient thermoreflectance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Zhu, Jie; Tian, Miao; Gu, Xiaokun; Schmidt, Aaron; Yang, Ronggui

    2013-03-01

    The increasing interest in the extraordinary thermal properties of nanostructures has led to the development of various measurement techniques. Transient thermoreflectance method has emerged as a reliable measurement technique for thermal conductivity of thin films. In this method, the determination of thermal conductivity usually relies much on the accuracy of heat capacity input. For new nanoscale materials with unknown or less-understood thermal properties, it is either questionable to assume bulk heat capacity for nanostructures or difficult to obtain the bulk form of those materials for a conventional heat capacity measurement. In this paper, we describe a technique for simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity κ and volumetric heat capacity C of both bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) signals. The heat transfer model is analyzed first to find how different combinations of κ and C determine the frequency-dependent TDTR signals. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity is then demonstrated with bulk Si and thin film SiO2 samples using frequency-dependent TDTR measurement. This method is further testified by measuring both thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of novel hybrid organic-inorganic thin films fabricated using the atomic/molecular layer deposition. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity can significantly shorten the development/discovery cycle of novel materials.

  7. A complete carbon-nanotube-based on-chip cooling solution with very high heat dissipation capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yifeng; Nabiollahi, Nabi; Wang, Teng; Wang, Shun; Hu, Zhili; Carlberg, Björn; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Heat dissipation is one of the factors limiting the continuous miniaturization of electronics. In the study presented in this paper, we designed an ultra-thin heat sink using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as micro cooling fins attached directly onto a chip. A metal-enhanced CNT transfer technique was utilized to improve the interface between the CNTs and the chip surface by minimizing the thermal contact resistance and promoting the mechanical strength of the microfins. In order to optimize the geometrical design of the CNT microfin structure, multi-scale modeling was performed. A molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) was carried out to investigate the interaction between water and CNTs at the nanoscale and a finite element method (FEM) modeling was executed to analyze the fluid field and temperature distribution at the macroscale. Experimental results show that water is much more efficient than air as a cooling medium due to its three orders-of-magnitude higher heat capacity. For a hotspot with a high power density of 5000 W cm-2, the CNT microfins can cool down its temperature by more than 40 °C. The large heat dissipation capacity could make this cooling solution meet the thermal management requirement of the hottest electronic systems up to date.

  8. A complete carbon-nanotube-based on-chip cooling solution with very high heat dissipation capacity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yifeng; Nabiollahi, Nabi; Wang, Teng; Wang, Shun; Hu, Zhili; Carlberg, Björn; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Heat dissipation is one of the factors limiting the continuous miniaturization of electronics. In the study presented in this paper, we designed an ultra-thin heat sink using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as micro cooling fins attached directly onto a chip. A metal-enhanced CNT transfer technique was utilized to improve the interface between the CNTs and the chip surface by minimizing the thermal contact resistance and promoting the mechanical strength of the microfins. In order to optimize the geometrical design of the CNT microfin structure, multi-scale modeling was performed. A molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) was carried out to investigate the interaction between water and CNTs at the nanoscale and a finite element method (FEM) modeling was executed to analyze the fluid field and temperature distribution at the macroscale. Experimental results show that water is much more efficient than air as a cooling medium due to its three orders-of-magnitude higher heat capacity. For a hotspot with a high power density of 5000 W cm(-2), the CNT microfins can cool down its temperature by more than 40 °C. The large heat dissipation capacity could make this cooling solution meet the thermal management requirement of the hottest electronic systems up to date. PMID:22222357

  9. Ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), for ionic solids and liquids: an application of volume-based thermodynamics (VBT).

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2011-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties, such as standard entropy, among others, have been shown to correlate well with formula volume, V(m), thus permitting prediction of these properties on the basis of chemical formula and density alone, with no structural detail required. We have termed these procedures "volume-based thermodynamics" (VBT). We here extend these studies to ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), of a wide range of materials. We show that heat capacity is strongly linearly correlated with formula volume for large sets of minerals, for ionic solids in general, and for ionic liquids and that the results demonstrate that the Neumann-Kopp rule (additivity of heat capacity contributions per atom) is widely valid for ionic materials, but the smaller heat capacity contribution per unit volume for ionic liquids is noted and discussed. Using these correlations, it is possible to predict values of ambient (298 K) heat capacities quite simply. We also show that the heat capacity contribution of water molecules of crystallization is remarkably constant, at 41.3 ± 4.7 J K(-1) (mol of water)(-1), so that the heat capacities of various hydrates may be reliably estimated from the values of their chemical formula neighbors. This result complements similar observations that we have reported for other thermodynamic differences of hydrates. PMID:21812409

  10. Multiple pulse-heating experiments with different current to determine total emissivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    A modified pulse-heating method is proposed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the hemispherical total emissivity, specific heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures. The proposed method is based on the analysis of a series of rapid resistive self-heating experiments on a sample heated at different temperature rates. The method is used to measure the three properties of the IG-110 grade of isotropic graphite at temperatures from 850 to 1800 K. The problem of the extrinsic heating-rate effect, which reduces the accuracy of the measurements, is successfully mitigated by compensating for the generally neglected experimental error associated with the electrical measurands (current and voltage). The results obtained by the proposed method can be validated by the linearity of measured quantities used in the property determinations. The results are in reasonably good agreement with previously published data, which demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method, in particular, to the resistivity and total emissivity measurements. An interesting result is the existence of a minimum in the emissivity of the isotropic graphite at around 1120 K, consistent with the electrical resistivity results.

  11. Acute oral administration of a tyrosine and phenylalanine-free amino acid mixture reduces exercise capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Tumilty, Les; Davison, Glen; Beckmann, Manfred; Thatcher, Rhys

    2013-06-01

    Acute tyrosine administration is associated with increased exercise capacity in the heat. To explore whether reduced plasma tyrosine and phenylalanine (tyrosine precursor) is associated with impaired exercise capacity in the heat, eight healthy, moderately trained male volunteers, unacclimated to exercise in the heat, performed two tests in a crossover design separated by at least 7 days. In a randomised, double-blind fashion, subjects ingested 500 mL flavoured, sugar-free water containing amino acids [(TYR-free; isoleucine 15 g, leucine 22.5 g, valine 17.5 g, lysine 17.5 g, methionine 5 g, threonine 10 g, tryptophan 2.5 g)] to lower the ratio of plasma tyrosine plus phenylalanine:amino acids competing for blood-brain barrier uptake (CAA), a key determinant of brain uptake, or a balanced mixture (BAL; TYR-free plus 12.5 g tyrosine and 12.5 g phenylalanine). One hour later, subjects cycled to exhaustion at 63 ± 5 % [Formula: see text]O2peak in 30 °C and 60 % relative humidity. Pre-exercise ratio of plasma tyrosine plus phenylalanine:ΣCAA declined 75 ± 5 % from rest in TYR-free (P < 0.001), but was unchanged in BAL (P = 0.061). Exercise time was shorter in TYR-free (59.8 ± 19.0 min vs. 66.2 ± 16.9 min in TYR-free and BAL respectively; P = 0.036). Heart rate (P = 0.298), core (P = 0.134) and skin (P = 0.384) temperature, RPE (P > 0.05) and thermal sensation (P > 0.05) were similar at exhaustion in both trials. These data indicate that acutely depleting plasma catecholamine precursors:ΣCAA is associated with reduced submaximal exercise capacity in the heat.

  12. Application of laser polarimetry to the measurement of the specific heat capacity of molybdenum in the range 2000 to 2800 K by a pulse-heating technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cezairliyan, A.; Basak, D.; McClure, J.L.; Krishnan, S.

    1998-07-01

    Measurement of the specific heat capacity of molybdenum (standard reference material) in the temperature range 2000 to 2800 K is described. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of a solid cylindrical specimen from room temperature to the maximum temperature of interest by the passage of a sub-second-duration electrical current pulse through the specimen with simultaneous measurement of the pertinent experimental quantities. The experimental quantities yield: the current through the specimen, voltage drop across the specimen, and specimen temperature. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of performing accurate thermophysical measurements where the specimen`s true temperature is determined from measurements of surface radiance temperature with a pyrometer and normal spectral emissivity with a laser polarimeter. This approach of measuring true temperature eliminates the need of having a blackbody configuration for the specimen. In addition to the specific heat capacity, the normal spectral emissivity (at 633 nm) and electrical resistivity of molybdenum in the temperature range from 2000 to 2800 K are presented.

  13. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: scaling of heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity in three southern African arid-zone passerines.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Maxine C; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2015-06-01

    Many birds can defend body temperature (Tb) far below air temperature (Ta) during acute heat exposure, but relatively little is known about how avian heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity varies with body mass (Mb), phylogeny or ecological factors. We determined maximum rates of evaporative heat dissipation and thermal end points (Tb and Ta associated with thermoregulatory failure) in three southern African ploceid passerines, the scaly-feathered weaver (Sporopipes squamifrons, Mb≈10 g), sociable weaver (Philetairus socius, Mb≈25 g) and white-browed sparrow-weaver (Plocepasser mahali, Mb≈40 g). Birds were exposed to a ramped profile of progressively increasing Ta, with continuous monitoring of behaviour and Tb used to identify the onset of severe hyperthermia. The maximum Ta birds tolerated ranged from 48°C to 54°C, and was positively related to Mb. Values of Tb associated with severe heat stress were in the range of 44 to 45°C. Rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) increased rapidly when Ta exceeded Tb, and maximum evaporative heat dissipation was equivalent to 141-222% of metabolic heat production. Fractional increases in EWL between Ta<40°C and the highest Ta reached by each species were 10.8 (S. squamifrons), 18.4 (P. socius) and 16.0 (P. mahali). Resting metabolic rates increased more gradually with Ta than expected, probably reflecting the very low chamber humidity values we maintained. Our data suggest that, within a taxon, larger species can tolerate higher Ta during acute heat stress.

  14. Energy savings in one-pipe steam heating systems fitted with high-capacity air vents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Multifamily buildings heated by one-pipe steam systems experience significant temperature gradients from apartment to apartment, often reaching 15{degrees}F. As a result, many tenants are to cold, or if the heating system output is increased so as to heat the coldest apartment adequately, too hot. While both are undesirable, the second is particularly so because it wastes energy. It was thought that insufficient air venting of the steam pipes contributed to the gradient. Theoretically, if steam mains and risers are quickly vented, steam will reach each radiator at approximately the same time and balance apartment temperatures. The project`s objective was to determine if the installation of large-capacity air vents at the ends of steam mains and risers would economically reduce the temperature gradient between apartments and reduce the amount of space heating energy required. The test was conducted by enabling and disabling air vents biweekly in 10 multifamily buildings in New York City between December 1992 to May 1993. The temperatures of selected apartments and total space heating energy were compared during each venting regime. There was no difference in energy consumption between ``vents on`` and ``vents off`` periods (see Tables 2 and 5); however, there was a reduction in the maximum spread of apartment temperatures.

  15. Dimensionless Model of a Thermoelectric Cooling Device Operating at Real Heat Transfer Conditions: Maximum Cooling Capacity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Kostishin, V. G.; Alenkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Real operating conditions of a thermoelectric cooling device are in the presence of thermal resistances between thermoelectric material and a heat medium or cooling object. They limit performance of a device and should be considered when modeling. Here we propose a dimensionless mathematical steady state model, which takes them into account. Analytical equations for dimensionless cooling capacity, voltage, and coefficient of performance (COP) depending on dimensionless current are given. For improved accuracy a device can be modeled with use of numerical or combined analytical-numerical methods. The results of modeling are in acceptable accordance with experimental results. The case of zero temperature difference between hot and cold heat mediums at which the maximum cooling capacity mode appears is considered in detail. Optimal device parameters for maximal cooling capacity, such as fraction of thermal conductance on the cold side y, fraction of current relative to maximal j' are estimated in range of 0.38-0.44 and 0.48-0.95, respectively, for dimensionless conductance K' = 5-100. Also, a method for determination of thermal resistances of a thermoelectric cooling system is proposed.

  16. Molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Karine; Correia, Adriana de Sales Cunha; Cunha, Robson Frederico

    2009-01-01

    Enamel defects are common alterations that can occur in both the primary or permanent dentition. A range of etiological factors related to this pathology can be found in the literature. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a kind of enamel defect alteration that requires complex treatment solutions, and for this reason, it is of great clinical interest for dental practice. This article describes the management of a clinical case of MIH in a 7-year-old child. The different treatment options depending on the extension of the defect, the degree of tooth eruption and the hygiene and diet habits of the patient are also discussed.

  17. Study on Fuel Cell Network System Considering Reduction in Fuel Cell Capacity Using Load Leveling and Heat Release Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    Reduction in fuel cell capacity linked to a fuel cell network system is considered. When the power demand of the whole network is small, some of the electric power generated by the fuel cell is supplied to a water electrolysis device, and hydrogen and oxygen gases are generated. Both gases are compressed with each compressor and they are stored in cylinders. When the electric demand of the whole network is large, both gases are supplied to the network, and fuel cells are operated by these hydrogen and oxygen gases. Furthermore, an optimization plan is made to minimize the quantity of heat release of the hot water piping that connects each building. Such an energy network is analyzed assuming connection of individual houses, a hospital, a hotel, a convenience store, an office building, and a factory. Consequently, compared with the conventional system, a reduction of 46% of fuel cell capacity is expected.

  18. Chemical forces and water holding capacity study of heat-induced myofibrillar protein gel as affected by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziye; Yang, Yuling; Tang, Xiaozhi; Chen, Yinji; You, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effects of high pressure (100-500 MPa) on chemical forces and water holding capacity of heat-induced myofibrillar protein (MP) gel were investigated. As pressure increased, total sulfhydryl (SH) group content decreased and absolute value of zeta potential increased, which suggested the formation of disulfide bonds and increased the strength of electrostatic repulsion. Surface hydrophobicity and normalized intensity of the 760 cm(-1) band showed a maximum value at 200 MPa, indicating that 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for hydrophobic interactions. Hydrogen bonding of MP gel was strengthened at pressures of 300 MPa and above. Bound water (T2b) had lower water mobility and was more closely associated with proteins. Free water (T22) had higher water mobility. More free water was attracted by proteins or trapped in gel structure, and transferred to bound or immobilized water as pressure increased. A value of 200 MPa was the optimum pressure for the water holding capacity of MP gel.

  19. Effect of aerobic capacity on sweat rate and fluid intake during outdoor exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Nakai, S; Yorimoto, A; Kawabata, T; Morimoto, T

    1995-01-01

    We measured the aerobic capacity, sweat rate and fluid intake of trained athletes during outdoor exercise and examined the relationship between aerobic capacity and thermoregulatory responses at high ambient temperatures. The maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) of the subjects, nine male baseball players of college age, was determined by maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. The subjects practised baseball regularly without drinking fluids from 1330 to 1530 hours. After 30 min rest, they played a baseball game with free access to a sports drink at 15 degrees C from 1600 to 1830 hours. At a mean ambient temperature of 36.7 (SEM 0.2) degree C, the mean percentage of body mass loss (delta mb) and increase of oral temperature (delta To) from 1330 to 1530 hours was 3.47 (SEM 0.12)% and 0.81 (SEM 0.14) degree C, respectively. The sweat loss from 1330 to 1830 hours was 56.53 (SEM 1.56)ml.kg-1 of body mass (mb) while the mean fluid consumption was 44.78 (SEM 2.39)ml.kg-1 of mb, with recovery of 76.08 (SEM 2.81)% of sweat loss. The VO2max was significantly inversely correlated with delta mb, fluid intake and rehydration amount, but showed no correlation with delta To. These results would suggest that at a given exercise intensity in subjects with a higher aerobic capacity body temperature is maintained with a lower sweating rate than that in subjects with a lower aerobic capacity.

  20. Polymer alloys with balanced heat storage capacity and engineering attributes and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soroushian, Parviz

    2002-01-01

    A thermoplastic polymer of relatively low melt temperature is blended with at least one of thermosets, elastomers, and thermoplastics of relatively high melt temperature in order to produce a polymer blend which absorbs relatively high quantities of latent heat without melting or major loss of physical and mechanical characteristics as temperature is raised above the melting temperature of the low-melt-temperature thermoplastic. The polymer blend can be modified by the addition of at least one of fillers, fibers, fire retardants, compatibilisers, colorants, and processing aids. The polymer blend may be used in applications where advantage can be taken of the absorption of excess heat by a component which remains solid and retains major fractions of its physical and mechanical characteristics while absorbing relatively high quantities of latent heat.

  1. An immunocytochemical study of pulpal responses to cavity preparation by laser ablation in rat molars by using antibodies to heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 and class II MHC antigen.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu; Ohshima, Hayato

    2004-03-01

    Initial responses of odontoblasts and immunocompetent cells to cavity preparation by laser ablation were investigated in rat molars. In untreated control teeth, intense heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 immunoreactivity was found in the cell bodies of odontoblasts, whereas cells immunopositive for the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen were predominantly located beneath the odontoblast layer in the dental pulp. Cavity preparation caused the destruction of the odontoblast layer and the shift of most class-II-MHC-positive cells from the pulp-dentin border toward the pulp core at the affected site. Twelve hours after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border and extended their processes deep into the exposed dentinal tubules, but subsequently disappeared from the pulp-dentin border together with Hsp-25-immunopositive cells by 24 h after the operation. By 3-5 days postoperation, distinct abscess formation consisting of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found in the dental pulp. The penetration of masses of oral bacteria was recognizable in the dentinal tubules beneath the prepared cavity. These findings indicate that cavity preparation by laser ablation induces remarkable inflammation by continuous bacterial infections via dentinal tubules in this experimental model, thereby delaying pulpal regeneration.

  2. Propogation of the 1(mu) High-Power Beam from a Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C B; Moriss, J R; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C D

    2002-06-25

    A solid-state laser system, used as a directed energy defensive weapon, possesses many compelling logistical advantages over high-average-power chemical laser systems. As an electrically-powered laser, it uses no chemicals, generates no effluents, and requires no specialized logistics support--the laser is recharged by running the vehicle engine. It provides stealth, having low signature operation without the generation of temperature, smoke, or visible light. It is silent in operation, limited only by the onboard vehicle electrical charging and propulsion system. Using the heat-capacity mode of operation, scaling of average power from a solid-state laser has been demonstrated beyond 10kW and work in progress will result in the demonstration of a 100 kW solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL). The heat-capacity approach provides unprecedented power-to-weight ratios in a compact platform that is readily adapted to mobile operation. A conceptual engineering and packaging study has resulted in a 100kW SSHCL design that we believe can be integrated onto a hybrid-electric HMMWV or onto new vehicle designs emerging from the future combat system (FCS) development. 100 kW has been proposed as a power level that demonstrates a significant scaling beyond what has been demonstrated for a solid-state laser system and which could have a significant lethality against target sets of interest. However, the characteristics of heat-capacity laser scaling are such that designs with output powers in excess of 1 MW can be readily formulated. An important question when addressing the military utility of a high-power solid-state laser system is that of the required average power during engagement with a target. The answer to this question is complex, involving atmospheric propagation, beam interaction with the target, and the damage response of the target. Successful target shoot-downs with the THEL deuterium fluoride (DF) laser system provide what is probably the best understanding of

  3. High-temperature heat capacity of stannates Pr2Sn2O7 and Nd2Sn2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, L. T.; Irtyugo, L. A.; Beletskii, V. V.; Denisov, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    Oxide compounds Pr2Sn2O7 and Nd2Sn2O7 have been obtained by solid-phase synthesis. The effect of temperature on the heat capacity of Pr2Sn2O7 (360-1045 K) and Nd2Sn2O7 (360-1030 K) has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermodynamic properties of the compounds (changes in enthalpy, entropy, and the reduced Gibbs energy) have been calculated by the experimental data of C p = f( T).

  4. Compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and heat capacity of CH4 and CO2 hydrate mixtures using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ning, F L; Glavatskiy, K; Ji, Z; Kjelstrup, S; H Vlugt, T J

    2015-01-28

    Understanding the thermal and mechanical properties of CH4 and CO2 hydrates is essential for the replacement of CH4 with CO2 in natural hydrate deposits as well as for CO2 sequestration and storage. In this work, we present isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat capacity of fully occupied single-crystal sI-CH4 hydrates, CO2 hydrates and hydrates of their mixture using molecular dynamics simulations. Eight rigid/nonpolarisable water interaction models and three CH4 and CO2 interaction potentials were selected to examine the atomic interactions in the sI hydrate structure. The TIP4P/2005 water model combined with the DACNIS united-atom CH4 potential and TraPPE CO2 rigid potential were found to be suitable molecular interaction models. Using these molecular models, the results indicate that both the lattice parameters and the compressibility of the sI hydrates agree with those from experimental measurements. The calculated bulk modulus for any mixture ratio of CH4 and CO2 hydrates varies between 8.5 GPa and 10.4 GPa at 271.15 K between 10 and 100 MPa. The calculated thermal expansion and specific heat capacities of CH4 hydrates are also comparable with experimental values above approximately 260 K. The compressibility and expansion coefficient of guest gas mixture hydrates increase with an increasing ratio of CO2-to-CH4, while the bulk modulus and specific heat capacity exhibit the opposite trend. The presented results for the specific heat capacities of 2220-2699.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for any mixture ratio of CH4 and CO2 hydrates are the first reported so far. These computational results provide a useful database for practical natural gas recovery from CH4 hydrates in deep oceans where CO2 is considered to replace CH4, as well as for phase equilibrium and mechanical stability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. The computational schemes also provide an appropriate balance between computational accuracy and cost for predicting

  5. Heat capacity of the frustrated magnetic pyrochlores Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Hf2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Alice M.; Klavins, Peter; Corruccini, L. R.

    2008-06-01

    The heat capacities of Gd2Zr2O7 and Gd2Hf2O7 both show sharp peaks in the vicinity of 0.77 K, consistent with the existence of long range magnetic order. They are superimposed in both cases on broader maxima centered at approximately 1 K, presumably due to short range spin correlations. Both compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions, with Weiss constants of approximately -7 K. Comparisons are made to earlier results for the isomorphic compounds Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Sn2O7.

  6. Labworks and the Kundt's Tube: A New Way to Determine the Heat Capacities of Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Philip A.; Morgan, Matthew E.

    2004-01-01

    The potency of heat in gases is measured by the application of a computer and the LabWorks interaction, while the speed of sound in gases is determined by an instrument called Kundt's tube. This unique and accurate procedure is repeatable, and greatly reduces data acquisition time.

  7. IMP improves water-holding capacity, physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels from porcine meat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Migita, Koshiro; Okitani, Akihiro; Matsuishi, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) of heat-induced pork gels was examined. The heat-induced gels were obtained from meat homogenates prepared by adding nine volumes of 0.3-0.5 mol/L NaCl solutions containing 9-36 mmol/L disodium inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) or 9 mmol/L tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (KPP) to minced pork. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the WHC to the same level as attained by KPP. Physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels were also examined. The heat-induced gels were prepared from porcine meat homogenates containing 0.3 mol/L NaCl and 9-36 mmol/L IMP or 9 mmol/L KPP. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the values of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and springiness, measured with a Tensipresser, and several organoleptic scores to the same level as the score attained by KPP. Thus, it is concluded that IMP is expected to be a practical substitute for pyrophosphates to improve the quality of sausages.

  8. IMP improves water-holding capacity, physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels from porcine meat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Migita, Koshiro; Okitani, Akihiro; Matsuishi, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) of heat-induced pork gels was examined. The heat-induced gels were obtained from meat homogenates prepared by adding nine volumes of 0.3-0.5 mol/L NaCl solutions containing 9-36 mmol/L disodium inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) or 9 mmol/L tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (KPP) to minced pork. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the WHC to the same level as attained by KPP. Physical and sensory properties of heat-induced gels were also examined. The heat-induced gels were prepared from porcine meat homogenates containing 0.3 mol/L NaCl and 9-36 mmol/L IMP or 9 mmol/L KPP. IMP at 36 mmol/L enhanced the values of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and springiness, measured with a Tensipresser, and several organoleptic scores to the same level as the score attained by KPP. Thus, it is concluded that IMP is expected to be a practical substitute for pyrophosphates to improve the quality of sausages. PMID:24428177

  9. Low-temperature heat capacity upon the transition from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic Heusler alloys Fe2 MeAl ( Me = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourov, N. I.; Marchenkov, V. V.; Korolev, A. V.; Lukoyanov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The heat capacity of band magnets Fe2 MeAl ( Me = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) ordered in crystal structure L21 has been measured in the range 2 K ≤ T ≤ 50 K. The dependences of the Debye temperature ΘD, the Sommerfeld coefficient γ, and the temperature-independent contribution to heat capacity C 0 on the number of valence electrons z in the alloys have been determined.

  10. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses and Aluminate Solutions - 13099

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-07-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOHNaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components. (authors)

  11. The component slope linear model for calculating intensive partial molar properties /application to waste glasses and aluminate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  12. Specific heat capacity and dendritic growth kinetics of liquid peritectic Fe-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Z. C.; Wang, W. L.; Luo, S. B.; Wei, B.

    2016-08-01

    The specific heat and dendritic growth of highly undercooled peritectic Fe-Cu alloys were investigated by electromagnetic levitation technique. The specific heat values of liquid peritectic Fe92.8Cu7.2 and hyperperitectic Fe88.5Cu11.5 alloys were determined to be 40.4 and 39.58 J·mol-1·K-1 over wide temperature ranges. The measured growth velocities rose rapidly with increasing undercooling, which reached 69 and 68 m·s-1 at the maximum undercoolings of 401 K (0.23 TL) and 468 K (0.27 TL). The microstructures of peritectic Fe-Cu alloys were refined significantly with enhanced undercooling. Theoretical analyses showed that almost segregationless solidification was realized if undercooling was sufficiently large.

  13. Stepwise heat-capacity change at an orientation transition in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aya, Satoshi; Sasaki, Yuji; Pociecha, Damian; Araoka, Fumito; Górecka, Ewa; Ema, Kenji; Muševič, Igor; Orihara, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    2014-02-01

    During a phase transition in a bulk material, heat is exchanged with matter to balance the changes in the internal energy and the entropy of the system. Here we report on the thermal detection of a surface-mediated anchoring transition, a spontaneous and discontinuous orientation change between planar (P) and homeotropic (H) alignments within a single nematic phase by changing temperature. In this case a stepwise change in the heat flow, similar to a glass transition, is observed by means of high-resolution differential scanning calorimetry. We found that the jump in the specific heat does not depend on the sample volume, although the contribution of molecules in the vicinity of surfaces, which trigger the transition, becomes less with increasing the sample volume. This means that different molecular orientations, H and P, with respect to surfaces have different thermodynamic free energies. We also address why the anchoring transition occurs by means of grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction measurements, which clearly reveal the formation of quasismectic layers parallel to surfaces in the nematic phase.

  14. Stepwise heat-capacity change at an orientation transition in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Aya, Satoshi; Sasaki, Yuji; Pociecha, Damian; Araoka, Fumito; Górecka, Ewa; Ema, Kenji; Muševič, Igor; Orihara, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    2014-02-01

    During a phase transition in a bulk material, heat is exchanged with matter to balance the changes in the internal energy and the entropy of the system. Here we report on the thermal detection of a surface-mediated anchoring transition, a spontaneous and discontinuous orientation change between planar (P) and homeotropic (H) alignments within a single nematic phase by changing temperature. In this case a stepwise change in the heat flow, similar to a glass transition, is observed by means of high-resolution differential scanning calorimetry. We found that the jump in the specific heat does not depend on the sample volume, although the contribution of molecules in the vicinity of surfaces, which trigger the transition, becomes less with increasing the sample volume. This means that different molecular orientations, H and P, with respect to surfaces have different thermodynamic free energies. We also address why the anchoring transition occurs by means of grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction measurements, which clearly reveal the formation of quasismectic layers parallel to surfaces in the nematic phase.

  15. Discontinuity in heat capacity of Fe0.5Co0.5(110) alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Dámaso, G.; Castillo-Alvarado, F.-L.; Cruz-Torres, A.; Rójas-Hernández, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we calculate heat capacity of alloy thin films of FeCo on the surface of the plane (110), using three parameters, the concentration x(i), the lattice long range order parameter t(i) and the magnetic order parameter σ(i), being i the number of layers of the thin film. The formulations reported by Hill [1] in the context of small particles and Valenta's model [2] can be applied to the film structure when we treat a thin film as a system divided into subsystems equivalent to two-dimensional parallel layers. The FeCo bulk alloy is completely homogeneous while a thin film have spatial discontinuities in their surfaces. We consider three ferromagnetic thin films formed by 11, 15 and 19 layers in the Helmholtz's free energy, which is minimized applying their first partial derivatives with respect to chemical composition, long range order parameter and magnetic order parameter. We calculate internal energy and heat capacity as a function of temperature and we verify that have two jumps as are reported in literature for the bulk; there are many results of bulk or surface effects of FeCo, but no enough results about ferromagnetic FeCo thin films and this fact does this work interesting.

  16. On the heat capacities of M2AlC (M=Ti,V,Cr) ternary carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drulis, Monika K.; Drulis, H.; Gupta, S.; Barsoum, M. W.; El-Raghy, T.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the heat capacities cp of bulk polycrystalline samples of Ti2AlC, V2AlC, and Cr2AlC in the 3-260 K temperature range. Given the structural and chemical similarities of these compounds it is not surprising that the cp's and their temperature dependencies were quite similar. Nevertheless, at all temperatures the heat capacity of Cr2AlC was higher than the other two. The density of states at the Fermi level were 3.9, 7.5, and 14.6 (eV unit cell)-1 for Ti2AlC, V2AlC, and Cr2AlC, respectively. The results obtained are analyzed using the Debye and Einstein model approximations for cp. Good description of cp is obtained if one assumes that nine phonon modes vibrate according to the Debye model approximation whereas the remaining 3 of 12 modes expected for M2AlC formula unit fulfill an Einstein-like phonon vibration pattern. Debye temperatures θD describing acoustic phonon and Einstein temperature θE describing optical phonon contributions have been estimated for the studied compounds. The Debye temperatures are reasonably high and fall in the range of 600-700 K. A linear dependence was found between the number of d electrons along the row Ti, V, and Cr and the density of states at the Fermi level.

  17. Heat capacity of the site-diluted spin dimer system Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samulon, E. C.; Shapiro, M. C.; Fisher, I. R.

    2011-08-05

    Heat-capacity and susceptibility measurements have been performed on the diluted spin dimer compound Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈. The parent compound Ba₃Mn₂O₈ is a spin dimer system based on pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled S=1, 3d² Mn⁵⁺ ions such that the zero-field ground state is a product of singlets. Substitution of nonmagnetic S=0, 3d⁰ V⁵⁺ ions leads to an interacting network of unpaired Mn moments, the low-temperature properties of which are explored in the limit of small concentrations 0≤x≤0.05. The zero-field heat capacity of this diluted system reveals a progressive removal of magnetic entropy over an extended range of temperatures, with no evidence for amore » phase transition. The concentration dependence does not conform to expectations for a spin-glass state. Rather, the data suggest a low-temperature random singlet phase, reflecting the hierarchy of exchange energies found in this system.« less

  18. Temperature dependences of the electron phonon coupling, electron heat capacity and thermal conductivity in Ni under femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2007-05-01

    The electron temperature dependences of the electron-phonon coupling factor, electron heat capacity and thermal conductivity are investigated for Ni in a range of temperatures typically realized in femtosecond laser material processing applications, from room temperature up to temperatures of the order of 10 4 K. The analysis is based on the electronic density of states obtained through the electronic structure calculations. Thermal excitation of d band electrons is found to result in a significant decrease in the strength of the electron-phonon coupling, as well as large deviations of the electron heat capacity and the electron thermal conductivity from the commonly used linear temperature dependences on the electron temperature. Results of the simulations performed with the two-temperature model demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the thermophysical parameters accounting for the thermal excitation of d band electrons leads to higher maximum lattice and electron temperatures achieved at the surface of an irradiated Ni target and brings the threshold fluences for surface melting closer to the experimentally measured values as compared to the predictions obtained with commonly used approximations of the thermophysical parameters.

  19. Heat capacity peak at the quantum critical point of the transverse Ising magnet CoNb2O6

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tian; Koohpayeh, S. M.; Krizan, J. W.; McQueen, T. M.; Cava, R. J.; Ong, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    The transverse Ising magnet Hamiltonian describing the Ising chain in a transverse magnetic field is the archetypal example of a system that undergoes a transition at a quantum critical point (QCP). The columbite CoNb2O6 is the closest realization of the transverse Ising magnet found to date. At low temperatures, neutron diffraction has observed a set of discrete collective spin modes near the QCP. Here, we ask if there are low-lying spin excitations distinct from these relatively high-energy modes. Using the heat capacity, we show that a significant band of gapless spin excitations exists. At the QCP, their spin entropy rises to a prominent peak that accounts for 30% of the total spin degrees of freedom. In a narrow field interval below the QCP, the gapless excitations display a fermion-like, temperature-linear heat capacity below 1 K. These novel gapless modes are the main spin excitations participating in, and affected by, the quantum transition. PMID:26146018

  20. Heat capacity of one-dimensional chains of methane molecules in the outer grooves of carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Barabashko, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The heat capacity at constant pressure CP of 1D-chains of methane molecules adsorbed in the grooves on the outer surface of the bundles of closed single-walled nanotubes was measured in the temperature range from 2 to 60 K for the first time. The behavior of the temperature dependence of CP below 12 K indicates the presence of a Schottky-type anomaly originated from the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the rotational spectra of the A, T, and E nuclear-spin species of methane molecules. The feature observed in the vicinity of 14 K is presumably caused by an orientational phase transition, in which the nature of the rotational motion of the molecules changes from libration to hindered rotation. It was found that the rotational heat capacity in the temperature range of 30-40 K is close to that of freely rotating methane molecules. An increase in the derivative dCP(T)/dT above 40 K and the feature in the CP(T) near 52 K are due to the decay of 1D chains of CH4.

  1. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Rao, Murali H; Aluru, Srikanth C; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect affecting teeth. High prevalence rates of MIH and its clinical implications are significant for both the patients and clinicians. A wide variation in defect prevalence (2.4-40.2%) is reported. It seems to differ with regions and various birth cohorts. Some of the recent prevalence studies are tabulated. Patient implications include hypersensitive teeth, rapid progression of caries, mastication impairment due to rapid attrition, and esthetic repercussions. Implications for clinicians include complexity in treatment planning and treatment implementation, poor prognosis of the restorations, difficulty in achieving pain control during treatment, and behavior management problems. Intention of this paper is to review the etio-pathogenesis, prevalence, clinical features, diagnostic features, and eventually present a sequential treatment approach, i.e., in accordance with current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27595731

  2. Calculation of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity of sedimentary rocks using petrophysical well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    In this study, equations are developed that predict for synthetic sedimentary rocks (clastics, carbonates and evapourates) thermal properties comprising thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and thermal diffusivity. The rock groups are composed of mineral assemblages with variable contents of 15 major rock-forming minerals and porosities of 0-30 per cent. Petrophysical properties and their well-logging-tool-characteristic readings were assigned to these rock-forming minerals and to pore-filling fluids. Relationships are explored between each thermal property and other petrophysical properties (density, sonic interval transit time, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) using multivariate statistics. The application of these relations allows computing continuous borehole profiles for each rock thermal property. The uncertainties in the prediction of each property vary depending on the selected well-log combination. Best prediction is in the range of 2-8 per cent for the specific heat capacity, of 5-10 per cent for the thermal conductivity, and of 8-15 for the thermal diffusivity, respectively. Well-log derived thermal conductivity is validated by laboratory data measured on cores from deep boreholes of the Danish Basin, the North German Basin, and the Molasse Basin. Additional validation of thermal conductivity was performed by comparing predicted and measured temperature logs. The maximum deviation between these logs is <3 °C. The thermal-conductivity calculation allowed an evaluation of the depth range in which the palaeoclimatic effect on the subsurface temperature field can be observed in the North German Basin. This effect reduces the surface heat-flow density by 25 mW m-2.

  3. Increment of specific heat capacity of solar salt with SiO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable. PACS 65.: Thermal properties of condensed matter; 65.20.-w: Thermal properties of liquids; 65.20.Jk: Studies of thermodynamic properties of specific liquids PMID:25346648

  4. Capillary priming characteristics of a high capacity dual passage heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, G. P.

    1982-01-01

    A parametric study of the forces governing the liquid-vapor interface was performed for the purpose of determining the capillary priming characteristics of Grumman's dual passage monogroove heat pipe when subjected to low-g or zero-g conditions. The static liquid-vapor interface configuration was determined through minimization of the free surface energies and a mathematical model and computer program which describe the time to prime was developed. Modeling predictions confirmed expectations of proper priming action and established the criteria for sizing of the liquid and vapor channels.

  5. High Temperature Heat Capacity of Alloy D9 Using Drop Calorimetry Based Enthalpy Increment Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Aritra; Raju, S.; Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E.

    2007-02-01

    Alloy D9 is a void-swelling resistant nuclear grade austenitic stainless steel (SS) based on AISI type 316-SS in which titanium constitutes an added predetermined alloying composition. In the present study, the high-temperature enthalpy values of alloy D9 with three different titanium-to-carbon mass percent ratios, namely Ti/C = 4, 6, and 8, have been measured using inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range from 295 to 1323 K. It is found that within the level of experimental uncertainty, the enthalpy values are independent of the Ti-C mass ratio. The temperature dependence of the isobaric specific heat C P is obtained by a linear regression of the measured enthalpy data. The measured C P data for alloy D9 may be represented by the following best-fit expression: C_P(J \\cdot kg^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1})= 431 + 17.7 × 10^{-2}T + 8.72 × 10^{-5}/T^2. It is found that the measured enthalpy and specific heat values exhibit good agreement with reported data on 316 and other related austenitic stainless steels.

  6. Development of a molecular-dynamics-based cluster-heat-capacity model for study of homogeneous condensation in supersonic water-vapor expansions.

    PubMed

    Borner, Arnaud; Li, Zheng; Levin, Deborah A

    2013-02-14

    Supersonic expansions to vacuum produce clusters of sufficiently small size that properties such as heat capacities and latent heat of evaporation cannot be described by bulk vapor thermodynamic values. In this work the Monte-Carlo Canonical-Ensemble (MCCE) method was used to provide potential energies and constant-volume heat capacities for small water clusters. The cluster structures obtained using the well-known simple point charge model were found to agree well with earlier simulations using more rigorous potentials. The MCCE results were used as the starting point for molecular dynamics simulations of the evaporation rate as a function of cluster temperature and size which were found to agree with unimolecular dissociation theory and classical nucleation theory. The heat capacities and latent heat obtained from the MCCE simulations were used in direct-simulation Monte-Carlo of two experiments that measured Rayleigh scattering and terminal dimer mole fraction of supersonic water-jet expansions. Water-cluster temperature and size were found to be influenced by the use of kinetic rather than thermodynamic heat-capacity and latent-heat values as well as the nucleation model.

  7. Does heat acclimation improve exercise capacity at altitude? A cross-tolerance model.

    PubMed

    White, A C; Salgado, R M; Schneider, S; Loeppky, J A; Astorino, T A; Mermier, C M

    2014-11-01

    New approaches to inducing altitude acclimation in a relatively short timeframe are needed, as it is not practical for many soldiers and athletes to gain access to specialized training facilities. Acclimation to one environmental stressor could enhance adaptation to various other stressors in animals and humans. This phenomenon has been described as cross-tolerance and involves the activation of common protective pathways. The purpose of this review is to discuss possible mechanisms involved in the cross-tolerance between heat and hypoxia. Future data could potentially support the use of a cross-tolerance model as a means for military personnel to prepare for deployment to high-altitude environments, as well as for athletes competing at high altitude.

  8. Heat capacity study of the magnetic phases in a Nd5Ge3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villuendas, D.; Tsutaoka, T.; Hernàndez Ferràs, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The different magnetic phases of the intermetallic compound Nd5Ge3 are studied in terms of the specific heat, in a broad range of temperatures (350 mK-140 K) and magnetic fields (up to 40 kOe). The expected T3 and T 3 / 2 terms are not found in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) phases respectively, but a gapped T2 contribution that originates from a mixture of AFM and FM interactions in different dimensionalities under a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy, is present in both. An almost identical Schottky anomaly, that arises from the hyperfine splitting of the nuclear levels of the Nd3+ ions, is observed in both phases, which leads us to state that the magnetic-field induced transition AFM → FM that the system experiments below 26 K consists in the flip of the magnetic moments of the Nd ions, conserving the average local moment.

  9. Limits to sustained energy intake. XXIII. Does heat dissipation capacity limit the energy budget of lactating bank voles?

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Edyta T; Król, Elżbieta; Chrzascik, Katarzyna M; Rudolf, Agata M; Speakman, John R; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Understanding factors limiting sustained metabolic rate (SusMR) is a central issue in ecological physiology. According to the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory, the SusMR at peak lactation is constrained by the maternal capacity to dissipate body heat. To test that theory, we shaved lactating bank voles (Myodes glareolus) to experimentally elevate their capacity for heat dissipation. The voles were sampled from lines selected for high aerobic exercise metabolism (A; characterized also by increased basal metabolic rate) and unselected control lines (C). Fur removal significantly increased the peak-lactation food intake (mass-adjusted least square means ± s.e.; shaved: 16.3 ± 0.3 g day(-1), unshaved: 14.4 ± 0.2 g day(-1); P<0.0001), average daily metabolic rate (shaved: 109 ± 2 kJ day(-1), unshaved: 97 ± 2 kJ day(-1); P<0.0001) and metabolisable energy intake (shaved: 215 ± 4 kJ day(-1), unshaved: 185 ± 4 kJ day(-1); P<0.0001), as well as the milk energy output (shaved: 104 ± 4 kJ day(-1); unshaved: 93 ± 4 kJ day(-1); P=0.021) and litter growth rate (shaved: 9.4 ± 0.7 g 4 days(-1), unshaved: 7.7 ± 0.7 g 4 days(-1); P=0.028). Thus, fur removal increased both the total energy budget and reproductive output at the most demanding period of lactation, which supports the HDL theory. However, digestive efficiency was lower in shaved voles (76.0 ± 0.3%) than in unshaved ones (78.5 ± 0.2%; P<0.0001), which may indicate that a limit imposed by the capacity of the alimentary system was also approached. Shaving similarly affected the metabolic and reproductive traits in voles from the A and C lines. Thus, the experimental evolution model did not reveal a difference in the limiting mechanism between animals with inherently different metabolic rates. PMID:26747907

  10. Analytic investigation of the AEM-A/HCMM attitude control system performance. [Application Explorer Missions/Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, G. M.; Huang, W.; Shuster, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), scheduled for launch in 1978, will be three-axis stabilized relative to the earth in a 600-kilometer altitude, polar orbit. The autonomous attitude control system consists of three torquing coils and a momentum wheel driven in response to error signals computed from data received from an infrared horizon sensor and a magnetometer. This paper presents a simple model of the attitude dynamics and derives the equations that determine the stability of the system during both attitude acquisition (acquisition-mode) and mission operations (mission-mode). Modifications to the proposed mission-mode control laws which speed the system's response to transient attitude errors and reduce the steady-state attitude errors are suggested. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the results obtained with the simple model.

  11. Toward the physical basis of thermophilic proteins: linking of enriched polar interactions and reduced heat capacity of unfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The enrichment of salt bridges and hydrogen bonding in thermophilic proteins has long been recognized. Another tendency, featuring lower heat capacity of unfolding (DeltaC(p)) than found in mesophilic proteins, is emerging from the recent literature. Here we present a simple electrostatic model to illustrate that formation of a salt-bridge or hydrogen-bonding network around an ionized group in the folded state leads to increased folding stability and decreased DeltaC(p). We thus suggest that the reduced DeltaC(p) of thermophilic proteins could partly be attributed to enriched polar interactions. A reduced DeltaC(p) might serve as an indicator for the contribution of polar interactions to folding stability. PMID:12496083

  12. Heat-capacity and magnetic measurements on the Y(Ni2-xCox)B2C system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoellwarth, C. C.; Klavins, P.; Shelton, R. N.

    1996-02-01

    We have performed field- and temperature-dependent magnetization, resistivity, and heat-capacity measurements on polycrystalline samples of the Y(Ni2-xCox)B2C system with 0.0<=x<=0.4. Values of Tc,χ0,Hc2,ΘD, λ, and N(Ed) were determined for various samples. We observe that ΘD increases with x, while all the other parameters decrease with x. The Tc vs x data can be described using the BCS theory and the measured values of N(Ef) and ΘD. The results suggest that the decrease in Tc is due to the decrease in N(Ef), in agreement with the results from band structure calculations.

  13. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications.

  14. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  15. Zeolite Y adsorbents with high vapor uptake capacity and robust cycling stability for potential applications in advanced adsorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, XS; Narayanan, S; Michaelis, VK; Ong, TC; Keeler, EG; Kim, H; Mckay, IS; Griffin, RG; Wang, EN

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg, Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the lab-scale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N-2 sorption, Al-27/Si-29 MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N-2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G.; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S.; Griffin, Robert G.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, 27Al/29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick’s 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  17. Heat capacity of quantum adsorbates: Hydrogen and helium on evaporated gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, J.T. |

    1996-06-01

    The author has constructed an apparatus to make specific heat measurements of quantum gases adsorbed on metallic films at temperatures between 0.3 and 4 K. He has used this apparatus to study quench-condensed hydrogen films between 4 and 923 layers thick with J = 1 concentrations between 0.28 and 0.75 deposited on an evaporated gold surface. He has observed that the orientational ordering of the J = 1 molecules depends on the substrate temperature during deposition of the hydrogen film. He has inferred that the density of the films condensed at the lowest temperatures is 25% higher than in bulk H{sub 2} crystals and have observed that the structure of those films is affected by annealing at 3.4 K. The author has measured the J = 1 to J = 0 conversion rate to be comparable to that of the bulk for thick films; however, he found evidence that the gold surface catalyzes conversion in the first two to four layers. He has also used this apparatus to study films of {sup 4}He less than one layer thick adsorbed on an evaporated gold surface. He shows that the phase diagram of the system is similar to that for {sup 4}He/graphite although not as rich in structure, and the phase boundaries occur at different coverages and temperatures. At coverages below about half a layer and at sufficiently high temperatures, the {sup 4}He behaves like a two-dimensional noninteracting Bose gas. At lower temperatures and higher coverages, liquidlike and solidlike behavior is observed. The Appendix shows measurements of the far-infrared absorptivity of the high-{Tc} superconductor La{sub 1.87}Sr{sub 0.13}CuO{sub 4}.

  18. Carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling improves exercise capacity following soccer-specific intermittent exercise performed in the heat.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N D; Maclaren, D P M; Reilly, T; Drust, B

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of carbohydrate and reducing core body temperature pre-exercise, either separately or combined, may have ergogenic effects during prolonged intermittent exercise in hot conditions. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling on the physiological responses to soccer-specific intermittent exercise and the impact on subsequent high-intensity exercise performance in the heat. Twelve male soccer players performed a soccer-specific intermittent protocol for 90 min in the heat (30.5°C and 42.2% r.h.) on four occasions. On two occasions, the participants underwent a pre-cooling manoeuvre. During these sessions either a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHOc) or a placebo was consumed at (PLAc). During the remaining sessions either the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO) or placebo (PLA) was consumed. At 15-min intervals throughout the protocol participants performed a mental concentration test. Following the soccer-specific protocol participants performed a self-chosen pace test and a test of high-intensity exercise capacity. The period of pre-cooling significantly reduced core temperature, muscle temperature and thermal sensation (P < 0.05). Self-chosen pace was greater with CHOc (12.5 ± 0.5 km h(-1)) compared with CHO (11.3 ± 0.4 km h(-1)), PLA (11.3 ± 0.4 km h(-1)) and PLAc (11.6 ± 0.5 km h(-1)) (P < 0.05). High-intensity exercise capacity was improved with CHOc and CHO when compared with PLA (CHOc; 79.8 ± 7 s, CHO; 72.1 ± 5 s, PLAc; 70.1 ± 8 s, PLA; 57.1 ± 5 s; P < 0.05). Mental concentration during the protocol was also enhanced during CHOc compared with PLA (P < 0.05). These results suggest pre-cooling in conjunction with the ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise enhances exercise capacity and helps maintain mental performance during intermittent exercise in hot conditions.

  19. Schottky contribution to the heat capacity of monazite type (La, Pr)PO4 from low temperature calorimetry and fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. D.; Hirsch, A.; Bayarjargal, L.; Peters, L.; Roth, G.; Winkler, B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and low temperature heat capacity measurements of Pr-containing samples in the (La, Pr)PO4 solid solution series can be employed to strongly constrain the Stark energy levels of Pr3+ in monazite type structures. The resulting set of Stark energy levels for the 3H4 ground state of Pr3+ reproduces the low temperature Schottky anomaly of the heat capacity much more accurately than theoretical models published earlier. We also show that there is no excess heat capacity along the binary solid solution with respect to an interpolation between the two end members LaPO4 and PrPO4.

  20. Complex Refractive Index, Specific Heat Capacity, and Thermal Conductivity for Crystalline Sb-Te Alloys and ZnS-SiO2 with Various Compositions at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Suzuki, Osamu; Yagi, Takashi; Taketoshi, Naoyuki

    2013-12-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the complex refractive index, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of crystalline Sb-Te alloys and ZnS-SiO2 with various compositions by using a spectroscopic ellipsometer, differential scanning calorimeter, and nanosecond pulsed light heating thermoreflectance system. The temperature range was set from room temperature to several hundred degrees Celsius. The values of these properties are useful for calculating realistic temperatures in memory devices and for designing device structures.

  1. Imbalance between oxygen photoreduction and antioxidant capacities in Symbiodinium cells exposed to combined heat and high light stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberty, S.; Fransolet, D.; Cardol, P.; Plumier, J.-C.; Franck, F.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, coral reefs have been affected by several large-scale bleaching events, and such phenomena are expected to increase in frequency and severity in the future, thus compromising their survival. High sea surface temperature accompanied by high levels of solar irradiance has been found to be responsible for the induction of oxidative stress ultimately ending with the disruption of the symbiosis between cnidarians and Symbiodinium. For two decades, many studies have pointed to the water-water cycle (WWC) as being one of the primary mediators of this phenomenon, but the impacts of environmental stress on the O2 reduction by PSI and the associated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-detoxifying enzymes remain to be determined. In this study, we analyzed the impacts of acute thermal and light stress on the WWC in the model Symbiodinium strain A1. We observed that the high light treatment at 26 °C resulted in the up-regulation of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities and an increased production of ROS with no significant change in O2-dependent electron transport. Under high light and at 33 °C, O2-dependent electron transport was significantly increased relative to total electron transport. This increase was concomitant with a twofold increase in ROS generation compared with the treatment at 26 °C, while enzymes involved in the WWC were largely inactivated. These data show for the first time that combined heat and light stress inactivate antioxidant capacities of the WWC and suggests that its photoprotective functions are overwhelmed under these conditions. This study also indicates that cnidarians may be more prone to bleach if they harbor Symbiodinium cells having a highly active Mehler-type electron transport, unless they are able to quickly up-regulate their antioxidant capacities.

  2. Enhancement of supercooling capacity and survival by cold acclimation, rapid cold and heat hardening in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xialin; Cheng, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang

    2011-12-01

    Insects can increase their resistance to cold stress by prior exposure to non-lethal cold temperatures. Here, we investigated the supercooling capacity and survival of eggs, 3rd and 5th instar larvae, and pupae of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during CA, and responses to various pre-treatment protocols, including constant temperatures, thermoperiods, and RCH, RHH, RCH+RHH and RHH+RCH combined with thermoperiods. Only acclimated eggs demonstrated a significant decrease in SCP, from -20.7±0.3 to -22.9±0.3°C, among all experimental groups compared to non-acclimated stages. Survival increased by 17.5% for eggs, 40.0% and 13.3% for 3rd and 5th instar larvae, and by 20.0% for pupae after CA. Compared to controls, survival of eggs under the conditions of thermoperiod (5:15°C), thermoperiod (5:15°C)+RHH, and thermoperiod (5:15, 10:20, and 15:25°C)+RCH significantly increased. In addition, survival of 3rd and 5th instar larvae and pupae increased under the conditions of thermoperiod (5:15°C) and thermoperiod (5:15°C)+RCH, possibly due to the induction of heat shock proteins or cryoprotectants. However, the pre-treatments of thermoperiod+RCH+RHH and thermoperiod+RHH+RCH did not significantly enhance survival of any developmental stage. These adaptive responses may allow S. exigua to enhance supercooling capacity and survival in response to seasonal or unexpected diurnal decreases in environmental temperatures. PMID:21878325

  3. Enhancement of supercooling capacity and survival by cold acclimation, rapid cold and heat hardening in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xialin; Cheng, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang

    2011-12-01

    Insects can increase their resistance to cold stress by prior exposure to non-lethal cold temperatures. Here, we investigated the supercooling capacity and survival of eggs, 3rd and 5th instar larvae, and pupae of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during CA, and responses to various pre-treatment protocols, including constant temperatures, thermoperiods, and RCH, RHH, RCH+RHH and RHH+RCH combined with thermoperiods. Only acclimated eggs demonstrated a significant decrease in SCP, from -20.7±0.3 to -22.9±0.3°C, among all experimental groups compared to non-acclimated stages. Survival increased by 17.5% for eggs, 40.0% and 13.3% for 3rd and 5th instar larvae, and by 20.0% for pupae after CA. Compared to controls, survival of eggs under the conditions of thermoperiod (5:15°C), thermoperiod (5:15°C)+RHH, and thermoperiod (5:15, 10:20, and 15:25°C)+RCH significantly increased. In addition, survival of 3rd and 5th instar larvae and pupae increased under the conditions of thermoperiod (5:15°C) and thermoperiod (5:15°C)+RCH, possibly due to the induction of heat shock proteins or cryoprotectants. However, the pre-treatments of thermoperiod+RCH+RHH and thermoperiod+RHH+RCH did not significantly enhance survival of any developmental stage. These adaptive responses may allow S. exigua to enhance supercooling capacity and survival in response to seasonal or unexpected diurnal decreases in environmental temperatures.

  4. Relationship between heat-labile enterotoxin secretion capacity and virulence in wild type porcine-origin enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Prageeth; Xing, Jun; Berberov, Emil M; Marx, David B; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an important virulence factor secreted by some strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The prototypic human-origin strain H10407 secretes LT via a type II secretion system (T2SS). We sought to determine the relationship between the capacity to secrete LT and virulence in porcine-origin wild type (WT) ETEC strains. Sixteen WT ETEC strains isolated from cases of severe diarrheal disease were analyzed by GM1ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure LT concentrations in culture supernatants. All strains had detectable LT in supernatants by 2 h of culture and 1 strain, which was particularly virulent in gnotobiotic piglets (3030-2), had the highest LT secretion level all porcine-origin WT strains tested (P<0.05). The level of LT secretion (concentration in supernatants at 6-h culture) explained 92% of the variation in time-to-a-moribund-condition (R2 = 0.92, P<0.0001) in gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with either strain 3030-2, or an ETEC strain of lesser virulence (2534-86), or a non-enterotoxigenic WT strain (G58-1). All 16 porcine ETEC strains were positive by PCR analysis for the T2SS genes, gspD and gspK, and bioinformatic analysis of 4 porcine-origin strains for which complete genomic sequences were available revealed a T2SS with a high degree of homology to that of H10407. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees constructed using T2SS genes gspC, gspD, gspE and homologs showed that strains 2534-86 and 3030-2 clustered together in the same clade with other porcine-origin ETEC strains in the database, UMNK88 and UMN18. Protein modeling of the ATPase gene (gspE) further revealed a direct relationship between the predicted ATP-binding capacities and LT secretion levels as follows: H10407, -8.8 kcal/mol and 199 ng/ml; 3030-2, -8.6 kcal/mol and 133 ng/ml; and 2534-86, -8.5 kcal/mol and 80 ng/ml. This study demonstrated a direct relationship between predicted ATP-binding capacity of GspE and LT secretion, and

  5. Heat capacities and entropies of Mg2SiOa, Mn2SiOa, and Co2SiOa between 5 and 380 K

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.; Hemingway, Bruch S.; Takei, Humihiko

    1982-01-01

    whereas the shoulder near 12 K corresponds to the change from the collinear to a canted spin structure. Our calorimetric values for the antiferromagnetic-paramagnetictr ansition temperature (N6el Temperature) are in excellent agreement with those obtained by powder magnetic susceptibility measurements, 49t2 K and 5015 K for co2Sioa and Mn2Sioa respectively. The thermal Debye temperature, 0$, of Mg2Sioa calculated from our c$ measurements between 6.3 and 13.8 K is 768+15 K and agrees well with the elastic vaiue ofi of 758 K based on the mean sound velocity calculated from the room temperature elastic stiffness constants (ci:) of Graham and Barsch. At 298.15K (25"c) the molar heat capacitiesa re 118.6,1 28.7, and 133.4J /(mol . K) and the molar entropiesa re 94.11-r0.101, 55.910.4a nd,1 42.6-+0.J2l (mol . K) respectivelyf or Mg2SiO4M, n2SiOaa, nd Co2SiOa.

  6. Neptunium Monochalcogenides: Heat Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troć, R.

    This document is part of subvolume B6bβ`Actinide Monochalcogenides' of Volume 27 `Magnetic properties of non-metallic inorganic compounds based on transition elements' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. The volume presents magnetic and related properties of monochalcogenides based on actinides and their solid solutions.

  7. Heat capacity and thermal expansion anomalies in the nitromethane-1-butanol mixture near its upper critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeiriña, C. A.; Troncoso, J.; Carballo, E.; Romaní, L.

    2002-09-01

    The heat capacity per unit volume Cp and density ρ of the nitromethane-1-butanol critical mixture near its upper consolute point are determined in this work. Cp data are obtained at atmospheric pressure as a function of temperature in the one-phase and two-phase regions, using a differential scanning calorimeter. The suitability of DSC for recording Cp as a function of T in the critical region is confirmed by measurements of the nitromethane-cyclohexane mixture, the results being quite consistent with reported data. By fitting the Cp data in the one-phase region, the critical exponent α is found to be 0.110+/-0.014-and hence consistent with the universal accepted value-and the critical amplitude A+=0.0606+/-0.0006 J K-1 cm-3. ρ data were only obtained in the one-phase region, using a vibrating tube densimeter. The amplitude of the density anomaly was found to be C+1=-0.017+/-0.003 g cm-3, which is moderately low in spite of the large difference between the densities of the pure liquids. The thermodynamic consistency of the A+ and C+1 values was examined in relation to the previously reported value for the slope of the critical line dTc/dp. The results of this analysis were consistent with previous work on this matter.

  8. Separate contributions of large- and small-scale dynamics to the heat capacity of proteins. A new viscosity approach.

    PubMed

    Käiväräinen, A; Fradkova, L; Korpela, T

    1993-05-01

    We present here a theoretical description and experimental verification of a novel method of separating large-scale (LS) and small-scale (SS) dynamics contributions to the heat capacities of proteins in solution by using viscosity dependences. It was assumed that the LS dynamics, related to the thermal fluctuations of domains and subunits, is dependent on solvent viscosity within a sucrose concentration of 0-15% w/v, in contrast with the SS dynamics, which are related to fluctuations of atoms and amino acid residues. The results obtained with immunoglobulin G, hemoglobin and cytochrome c were in reasonable accordance with the previous data achieved by a spin-label method: the LS dynamics decrease, whereas the SS dynamics increase within the temperature elevation. The changes are dependent on the stage of the active sites of the proteins. The internal compensation of molecular dynamics between the LS and SS fluctuations may be an important factor in the design of thermostable enzymes and proteins. A new phenomenon concerning the ability of macromolecules to increase free volume in water as a result of ice-like clusters stabilization is revealed. PMID:8489854

  9. Application of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data to regional geologic analysis for mineral and energy resource evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K. (Principal Investigator); Hummer-Miller, S.; Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Krohn, M. D.; Podwysocki, M. H.; Pohn, H. H.; Raines, G. L.; Rowan, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Heat Capacity Mapping Mission thermal-inertia images of a diversity of terrains and geologic settings were examined in conjunction with topographic, geologic, geophysical, and LANDSAT data. The images were found to have attributes similar to bedrock maps. In the Cascades region, two new features were identified and a method was developed to characterize regional terranes using linear feature data. Two northeast-trending Lineaments were discovered in the Overthrust Belt of Montana and Idaho. The longer of the two extends from the Idaho-Oregon border, through the Idaho batholith and across the Lewis thrust. It coincides, along segments, with mapped faults and an aeromagnetic pattern change. A major lineament crossing the Colorado Plateau and the Southern Rocky Mountians was detected on several thermal-inertial images and evidence was found for the existence of a geologic discontinuity. Vegetation-covered areas in Richfield and the Silver City quadrangle (Arizona and New Mexico) displayed thermal-inertia differences within heavily vegetation areas although no apreciable correlation was found between vegetation cover and thermal inertia. Resistant ridges and knolls have high thermal inertias and thermal-inertia contrasts occurred at lithologic and fault contacts. In the heavy vegetated Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona, a Lithologic unit obscured on LANDSAT MSS data due to the vegetation cover, exhibited a thermal-inertia contrast with its surroundings.

  10. GUVs melt like LUVs: the large heat capacity of MLVs is not due to large size or small curvature.

    PubMed

    Kreutzberger, Mark A; Tejada, Emmanuel; Wang, Ying; Almeida, Paulo F

    2015-06-01

    The excess heat capacity functions (ΔCp) associated with the main phase transition of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) are very different. Two explanations are possible. First, the difference in vesicle size (curvature) results in different gel-fluid interactions in the membrane; those interactions have a large effect on the cooperativity of the phase transition. Second, there is communication between the bilayers in an MLV when they undergo the gel-fluid transition; this communication results in thermodynamic coupling of the phase transitions of the bilayers in the MLV and, consequently, in an apparent increase in the cooperativity of the transition. To test these hypotheses, differential scanning calorimetry was performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of pure dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. The ΔCp curve of GUVs was found to resemble that of the much smaller LUVs. The transition in GUVs and LUVs is much broader (half-width ∼1.5°C) than in MLVs (∼0.1°C). This similarity in GUVs and LUVs indicates that their size has little effect on gel-fluid interactions in the phase transition. The result suggests that coupling between the transitions in the bilayers of an MLV is responsible for their apparent higher cooperativity in melting.

  11. Probing 2-band superconductivity of Al and C-substituted MgB2 with heat capacity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambano, Antonio J.

    2005-03-01

    We study the changes in the heat capacity Cp(T) in Mg1-xAlxB2 (x <= 0.19) and Mg(B1-yCy)2 (y <= 0.08). The two band model is used to fit Cp(T) and extract the two energy gaps and electron-phonon coupling matrix for the different dopant concentrations. These fitting routines are sensitive to background subtraction, and we discuss what constraints this places on sample quality and preparation. Like previous results, fits for Al doping do not indicate merging of the gaps, suggesting Al does not increase interband scattering. However, we also notice trends that are different from those seen in previous experiments, which we also discuss. For instance, the main peak due to the sigma band does not smear with increasing Al content, but remains fairly abrupt. Other characterization suggests the Al doped samples are of very high quality. Results for C doping are also discussed in terms of filling the sigma band hole states with electrons and increased interband scattering.

  12. Determination of the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of cobalt oxide nanoparticles and the thermodynamic properties of the hydration layers.

    PubMed

    Spencer, E C; Ross, N L; Parker, S F; Woodfield, B F; Boerio-Goates, J; Smith, S J; Olsen, R E; Kolesnikov, A I; Navrotsky, A; Ma, C

    2011-05-25

    We present low temperature (11 K) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data on four hydrated nanoparticle systems: 10 nm CoO·0.10H(2)O (1), 16 nm Co(3)O(4)·0.40H(2)O (2), 25 nm Co(3)O(4)·0.30H(2)O (3) and 40 nm Co(3)O(4)·0.026H(2)O (4). The vibrational densities of states were obtained for all samples and from these the isochoric heat capacity and vibrational energy for the hydration layers confined to the surfaces of these nanoparticle systems have been elucidated. The results show that water on the surface of CoO nanoparticles is more tightly bound than water confined to the surface of Co(3)O(4), and this is reflected in the reduced heat capacity and vibrational entropy for water on CoO relative to water on Co(3)O(4) nanoparticles. This supports the trend, seen previously, for water to be more tightly bound in materials with higher surface energies. The INS spectra for the antiferromagnetic Co(3)O(4) particles (2-4) also show sharp and intense magnetic excitation peaks at 5 meV, and from this the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of Co(3)O(4) nanoparticles has been calculated; this represents the first example of use of INS data for determining the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of any magnetic nanoparticle system.

  13. Thermodynamic investigation by heat capacity measurements of ferrimagnetic A2Mn[Mn(CN)6] (A=K, Rb, Cs) Prussian blue compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yuka; Yamashita, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; DaSilva, Jack G; Kareis, Christopher M; Miller, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    Heat capacity measurements of a new series of Prussian blue analogs of A2Mn[Mn(CN)6] (A=K, Rb, Cs) composition were performed using thermal relaxation calorimetry. The Cs compound has a face-centered cubic structure with a linear Mn-C≡N-Mn linkage, while the monoclinic Rb and K compounds have nonlinear Mn-C≡N-Mn linkages. For all of the compounds, large broad thermal anomalies associated with magnetic transitions were observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. The systematic changes in the heat capacity for the three compounds under magnetic fields of up to 7 T were found to be consistent with ferrimagnetic ordering with large spontaneous magnetization. Although the peak temperatures were slightly lower than reported values obtained by magnetic susceptibility measurements, the magnetic entropy was evaluated to be 22.0 ± 2.5 J K(-1) mol(-1). This value is consistent with an entropy of Rln12 corresponding to full entropy of one low-spin and one high-spin Mn(II) ion in the formula unit, though some ambiguity remains in lattice estimation. Broadening of the peak width of the magnetic heat capacity divided by the temperature was observed as the size of the alkali ions decreased from Cs to K. This behavior is consistent with an increase in the lattice distortion produced by the bending of the C≡N-Mn angles. PMID:24263378

  14. Thermodynamic investigation by heat capacity measurements of ferrimagnetic A2Mn[Mn(CN)6] (A=K, Rb, Cs) Prussian blue compounds.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yuka; Yamashita, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; DaSilva, Jack G; Kareis, Christopher M; Miller, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    Heat capacity measurements of a new series of Prussian blue analogs of A2Mn[Mn(CN)6] (A=K, Rb, Cs) composition were performed using thermal relaxation calorimetry. The Cs compound has a face-centered cubic structure with a linear Mn-C≡N-Mn linkage, while the monoclinic Rb and K compounds have nonlinear Mn-C≡N-Mn linkages. For all of the compounds, large broad thermal anomalies associated with magnetic transitions were observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. The systematic changes in the heat capacity for the three compounds under magnetic fields of up to 7 T were found to be consistent with ferrimagnetic ordering with large spontaneous magnetization. Although the peak temperatures were slightly lower than reported values obtained by magnetic susceptibility measurements, the magnetic entropy was evaluated to be 22.0 ± 2.5 J K(-1) mol(-1). This value is consistent with an entropy of Rln12 corresponding to full entropy of one low-spin and one high-spin Mn(II) ion in the formula unit, though some ambiguity remains in lattice estimation. Broadening of the peak width of the magnetic heat capacity divided by the temperature was observed as the size of the alkali ions decreased from Cs to K. This behavior is consistent with an increase in the lattice distortion produced by the bending of the C≡N-Mn angles.

  15. Determination of the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of cobalt oxide nanoparticles and the thermodynamic properties of the hydration layers

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Parker, Stewart F.; Woodfield, Brian; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Smith, S. J.; Olsen, R. E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Ma, C

    2011-01-01

    We present low temperature (11 K) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data on four hydrated nanoparticle systems: 10 nm CoO 0.10H2O (1), 16 nmCo3O4 0.40H2O (2), 25 nm Co3O4 0.30H2O (3) and 40 nmCo3O4 0.026H2O (4). The vibrational densities of states were obtained for all samples and from these the isochoric heat capacity and vibrational energy for the hydration layers confined to the surfaces of these nanoparticle systems have been elucidated. The results show that water on the surface of CoO nanoparticles is more tightly bound than water confined to the surface of Co3O4, and this is reflected in the reduced heat capacity and vibrational entropy for water on CoO relative to water on Co3O4 nanoparticles. This supports the trend, seen previously, for water to be more tightly bound in materials with higher surface energies. The INS spectra for the antiferromagnetic Co3O4 particles (2 4) also show sharp and intense magnetic excitation peaks at 5 meV, and from this the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of Co3O4 nanoparticles has been calculated; this represents the first example of use of INS data for determining the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of any magnetic nanoparticle system.

  16. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Heat Capacity of Metals and Demonstration of Law of Dulong and Petit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Stracuzzi, Vincent; Nirode, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Today's general chemistry students are introduced to many of the principles and concepts of thermodynamics. In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity are frequently discussed. Classical calorimetric methods of analysis and thermal equilibrium experiments are used to determine heat…

  17. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ∼29 J g(-1) for Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g(-1) K(-1) for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.

  18. Temperature and compression effects on electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling in aluminum and beryllium: Insights from ab initio simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zi; Li, Chuanying; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping; Kang, Wei

    2015-11-15

    Ultrafast laser experiments on metals usually induce a high electron temperature and a low ion temperature and, thus, an energy relaxation process. The electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling factor are crucial thermal quantities to describe this process. We perform ab initio theoretical studies to determine these thermal quantities and their dependence on density and electron temperature for the metals aluminum and beryllium. The heat capacity shows an approximately linear dependence on the temperature, similar to free electron gas, and the compression only slightly affects the capacity. The electron-phonon coupling factor increases with both temperature and density, and the change observed for beryllium is more obvious than that for aluminum. The connections between thermal quantities and electronic/atomic structures are discussed in detail, and the different behaviors of aluminum and beryllium are well explained.

  19. Temperature and compression effects on electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling in aluminum and beryllium: Insights from ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zi; Wang, Cong; Kang, Wei; Li, Chuanying; Zhang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments on metals usually induce a high electron temperature and a low ion temperature and, thus, an energy relaxation process. The electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling factor are crucial thermal quantities to describe this process. We perform ab initio theoretical studies to determine these thermal quantities and their dependence on density and electron temperature for the metals aluminum and beryllium. The heat capacity shows an approximately linear dependence on the temperature, similar to free electron gas, and the compression only slightly affects the capacity. The electron-phonon coupling factor increases with both temperature and density, and the change observed for beryllium is more obvious than that for aluminum. The connections between thermal quantities and electronic/atomic structures are discussed in detail, and the different behaviors of aluminum and beryllium are well explained.

  20. Heat capacty, relative enthalpy, and calorimetric entropy of silicate minerals: an empirical method of prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R.; Haas, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Through the evaluation of experimental calorimetric data and estimates of the molar isobaric heat capacities, relative enthalpies and entropies of constituent oxides, a procedure for predicting the thermodynamic properties of silicates is developed. Estimates of the accuracy and precision of the technique and examples of its application are also presented. -J.A.Z.

  1. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  2. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-08-25

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH.

  3. Molarization of mandibular second premolar.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Neha; Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

    2014-05-01

    Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

  4. Heat shock protein induction by certain chemical stressors is correlated with their cytotoxicity, lipophilicity and protein-denaturing capacity.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus-Steinmetz, U; Rensing, L

    1997-12-01

    Seven agents were analyzed with respect to their ability to induce heat shock protein (HSP) synthesis in C6 rat glioma cells. Induction of HSP synthesis was correlated with cytotoxicity and lipophilicity of the substances. In addition to the first four n-alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) and phenol, whose capacity to induce HSP was analyzed earlier (Neuhaus-Steinmetz et al., 1994. Mol. Pharmacol. 45, 36-41), isopropanol, 1,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), diethylstilbestrol (DES), carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), rotenone, paracetamol and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) induced HSP synthesis after a 1-h incubation at a substance-specific concentration. The maximal induction of HSPs was closely correlated with the cytotoxicity of all substances and occurred when cell viability was reduced to 75 +/- 11% of the controls. Cytotoxicity and the ability to induce HSP were correlated with the lipophilicity of the alcohols, phenol, rotenone and paracetamol. Calculation of the hypothetical membrane concentrations of these compounds yielded a nearly equal value (0.54 +/- 0.13 M), indicating that interaction of substances with lipophilic cellular compounds, such as membranes or lipophilic core regions of proteins, is a critical step leading to HSP induction. This assumption is supported by a correlation between HSP induction and protein denaturation by the different alcohols (Herskovits et al., 1970. J. Biol. Chem. 245, 2588-2598). We assume that the amount of misfolded proteins induced by these lipophilic agents is responsible for the induction of HSP synthesis. ASA, DNP and CCCP induced HSP at lower concentrations than substances with a similar lipophilicity, which may be due to effects which add to the misfolding of proteins or to other signal pathways.

  5. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Boronat-Catalá, M.; Catalá-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9–86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6–88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9–17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47–0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39–35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  6. On the low-temperature behavior of the critical specific heat capacity of an anharmonic crystal with long-range interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanova, Ekaterina S.; Krushkov, Angel Y.

    2016-03-01

    An exactly solvable lattice model describing structural phase transitions in an anharmonic crystal with long-range interaction (decreasing at large distances r as r-d-σ, where d is the space dimensionality and 0 < σ ≤ 2) is considered near to its zero-temperature critical point. The low-temperature behavior of the bulk specific heat capacity at the lower classical critical dimension (d = σ) is studied in different regions of the (T, λ)-phase diagram, where T is the temperature and λ is a parameter which switches on quantum fluctuations. From the results obtained one can see that when T → 0+ the specific heat capacity tends to zero in a different way in the regions: (a) renormalized classical region - as T raised to the second power and (b) quantum disordered region - exponentially.

  7. Disorder in crystalline phases of chiral glass formers 5 ∗CB and 8 ∗OCB evidenced by the low temperature heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Suzuki, Hal; Krawczyk, Jan; Massalska-Arodź, Maria

    2008-09-01

    The heat capacity of two glass formers 5 ∗CB and 8 ∗OCB, each of which has two crystalline polymorphs (phases I and II) as well as a glass phase, was determined between 0.35 K and 20 K. The T-linear term of the heat capacity becomes significant below 1 K for both glasses. The glassy crystalline phase II of 5 ∗CB also shows such contribution, which is consistent with the existence of a residual entropy. Unexpectedly, however, the 'stable' phase II of 8 ∗OCB shows the similar contribution, indicating that this phase is disordered, whereas the glassy crystalline phase I shows no such contribution.

  8. New approaches to the simulation of heat-capacity curves and phase diagrams of pseudobinary phospholipid mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Johann, C; Garidel, P; Mennicke, L; Blume, A

    1996-01-01

    A simulation program using least-squares minimization was developed to calculate and fit heat capacity (cp) curves to experimental thermograms of dilute aqueous dispersions of phospholipid mixtures determined by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry. We analyzed cp curves and phase diagrams of the pseudobinary aqueous lipid systems 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol/ 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3phosphatidylcholine (DMPG/DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid/1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPA/DPPC) at pH 7. The simulation of the cp curves is based on regular solution theory using two nonideality parameters rho g and rho l for symmetric nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phases. The broadening of the cp curves owing to limited cooperativity is incorporated into the simulation by convolution of the cp curves calculated for infinite cooperativity with a broadening function derived from a simple two-state transition model with the cooperative unit size n = delta HVH/delta Hcal as an adjustable parameter. The nonideality parameters and the cooperative unit size turn out to be functions of composition. In a second step, phase diagrams were calculated and fitted to the experimental data by use of regular solution theory with four different model assumptions. The best fits were obtained with a four-parameter model based on nonsymmetric, nonideal mixing in both phases. The simulations of the phase diagrams show that the absolute values of the nonideality parameters can be changed in a certain range without large effects on the shape of the phase diagram as long as the difference of the nonideality parameters for rho g for the gel and rho l for the liquid-crystalline phase remains constant. The miscibility in DMPG/DPPC and DMPA/DPPC mixtures differs remarkably because, for DMPG/DPPC, delta rho = rho l -rho g is negative, whereas for DMPA/DPPC this difference is positive. For DMPA/DPPC, this

  9. A reduced core to skin temperature gradient, not a critical core temperature, affects aerobic capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-07-01

    in beginning and ending core temperatures or baseline 3-mile run time. This capacity difference appears to result from a magnified core to skin gradient via an environmental temperature advantageous to convective heat loss, and in part from an increased sweat rate. PMID:24956952

  10. A reduced core to skin temperature gradient, not a critical core temperature, affects aerobic capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Ruby, Brent C

    2014-07-01

    in beginning and ending core temperatures or baseline 3-mile run time. This capacity difference appears to result from a magnified core to skin gradient via an environmental temperature advantageous to convective heat loss, and in part from an increased sweat rate.

  11. Heat capacities and entropies of rhodochrosite (MnCO3) and siderite (FeCO3) between 5 and 600 K.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Haselton, H.T.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1984-01-01

    The heat capacities of rhodochrosite, (Mn0.994Fe0.005Mg0.001)CO3, and siderite, 171(Fe0.956Mn0.042Mg0.002)CO3, were measured between 5 and 550 K by combined cryogenic-adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry. These new data were used to reanalyse the thermodynamic properties of these phases.-J.A.Z.

  12. Heat Capacity of γ-Fe2SiO4 and Thermodynamic Calculation of Fayalite - γ-Fe2SiO4 Phase Transition Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, W.; Dachs, E.; Withers, A. C.; Essene, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    The low-temperature heat capacity (Cp) of γ-Fe2SiO4 was measured between 5 and 303 K using the heat capacity option of a physical properties measurement system (PPMS). Fayalite powder was used as the starting material to synthesize the γ-Fe2SiO4 at 8.5 GPa and 1273 K by a 1,000-ton Walker-type multi-anvil device at the university of Minnesota. The heat capacity data were measured at more than 100 different temperatures with both logarithmic spacing and linear spacing. The measured heat capacity data show a broad lambda-transition at 11.8 K, probably related to a paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic transition just like the 65 K transition in fayalite. The difference in the Cp between fayalite and γ-Fe2SiO4 is reduced as the temperature increases in the range of 50-300 K. The Cp and entropy of γ- Fe2SiO4 at standard temperature and pressure (S°298) are 131.1±0.6 J mol-1K-1 and 140.2±0.4 J mol-1K-1, respectively. The Gibbs free energy at standard pressure and temperature (G°f,298) is calculated to be 1,369.3±2.7 J mol-1 based on the new entropy data. Based on current thermodynamic data, the calculated phase boundary for the fayalite - γ- Fe2SiO4 transition at high temperatures and pressures is consistent with the results of previous experimental studies.

  13. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M.; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ~29 J g-1 for Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g-1 K-1 for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiOx core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ~29 J g-1 for Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g-1 K-1 for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental results are included for the following: SEM images of the HITEC molten salt with and without a mixture of Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs; statistical diameter distribution of pure Sn and Sn/SiOx core-shell NPs; the HAADF image and EDS linescan profile of a Sn/SiOx core-shell NP; XRD analysis for Sn NPs annealing at different heating

  14. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. III. Correction terms for the solvation free energies, enthalpies, entropies, heat capacities, volumes, compressibilities, and expansivities of solvated ions.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions (finite or periodic system, system or box size) and treatment of electrostatic interactions (Coulombic, lattice-sum, or cutoff-based) used during these simulations. However, as shown by Kastenholz and Hünenberger [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006)], correction terms can be derived for the effects of: (A) an incorrect solvent polarization around the ion and an incomplete or/and inexact interaction of the ion with the polarized solvent due to the use of an approximate (not strictly Coulombic) electrostatic scheme; (B) the finite-size or artificial periodicity of the simulated system; (C) an improper summation scheme to evaluate the potential at the ion site, and the possible presence of a polarized air-liquid interface or of a constraint of vanishing average electrostatic potential in the simulated system; and (D) an inaccurate dielectric permittivity of the employed solvent model. Comparison with standard experimental data also requires the inclusion of appropriate cavity-formation and standard-state correction terms. In the present study, this correction scheme is extended by: (i) providing simple approximate analytical expressions (empirically-fitted) for the correction terms that were evaluated numerically in the above scheme (continuum-electrostatics calculations); (ii) providing correction terms for derivative thermodynamic single-ion solvation properties (and corresponding partial molar variables in solution), namely, the enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric expansivity (including appropriate standard-state correction terms). The ability of the correction scheme to produce methodology-independent single-ion solvation free energies based on atomistic simulations is tested in the case of Na(+) hydration, and the nature and magnitude of the correction terms for

  15. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. III. Correction terms for the solvation free energies, enthalpies, entropies, heat capacities, volumes, compressibilities, and expansivities of solvated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Maria M.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-01

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions (finite or periodic system, system or box size) and treatment of electrostatic interactions (Coulombic, lattice-sum, or cutoff-based) used during these simulations. However, as shown by Kastenholz and Hünenberger [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006)], 10.1529/biophysj.106.083667, correction terms can be derived for the effects of: (A) an incorrect solvent polarization around the ion and an incomplete or/and inexact interaction of the ion with the polarized solvent due to the use of an approximate (not strictly Coulombic) electrostatic scheme; (B) the finite-size or artificial periodicity of the simulated system; (C) an improper summation scheme to evaluate the potential at the ion site, and the possible presence of a polarized air-liquid interface or of a constraint of vanishing average electrostatic potential in the simulated system; and (D) an inaccurate dielectric permittivity of the employed solvent model. Comparison with standard experimental data also requires the inclusion of appropriate cavity-formation and standard-state correction terms. In the present study, this correction scheme is extended by: (i) providing simple approximate analytical expressions (empirically-fitted) for the correction terms that were evaluated numerically in the above scheme (continuum-electrostatics calculations); (ii) providing correction terms for derivative thermodynamic single-ion solvation properties (and corresponding partial molar variables in solution), namely, the enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric expansivity (including appropriate standard-state correction terms). The ability of the correction scheme to produce methodology-independent single-ion solvation free energies based on atomistic simulations is tested in the case of Na+ hydration, and the nature and magnitude

  16. Isochoric Heat Capacities of Ethanol-water Mixtures at Temperatures from 280K to 420K and Pressures up to 30MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Noboru; Tsuruno, Seizo; Endo, Harumi; W. Magee, Joseph

    Specific heat capacity at constant volume is one of the most important thermodynamic properties to develop and evaluate thermodynamic equations of state. With this viewpoint, isochoric heat capacities of ethanol-water mixtures have beenmeasured with a twin-cell type adiabatic calorimeter developed at the National Defense Academy. Temperatures were measured with a platinum resistance thermometer on the bottom of each cell and were reported on the ITS-90. Sample pressure measurements were made with a quartz crystal transducer. Densities were calculated from the volume of the calorimeter cell and sample mass. The experimental expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor k=2)of temperature measurements is ±13mK, and that of pressure measurement is ±8kPa. The expanded relative uncertainty for isochoric heat capacity is estimated to be ±2% for liquid phase measurements, and for density it is ±0.16%. The present measurements for {xC2H5OH + (l-x)H2O} with x=(0.104, 0.253, 0.498 and 0.755), were obtained at temperatures from 280 to 420 K and at pressures up to 30 MPa.

  17. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and low temperature heat capacity of α-Na2NpO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anna L.; Hen, Amir; Magnani, Nicola; Sanchez, Jean-Pierre; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Raison, Philippe E.; Caciuffo, Roberto; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2016-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties at low temperatures of hexavalent disodium neptunate α-Na2NpO4 are investigated for the first time in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Np(VI) valence state is confirmed by the isomer shift value of the Mössbauer spectra, and the local structural environment around the neptunium cation is related to the fitted quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameters. Moreover, magnetic hyperfine splitting is reported below 12.5 K, which could indicate magnetic ordering at this temperature. This interpretation is further substantiated by the existence of a λ-peak at 12.5 K in the heat capacity curve, which is shifted to lower temperatures with the application of a magnetic field, suggesting antiferromagnetic ordering. However, the absence of any anomaly in the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility data shows that the observed transition is more intricate. In addition, the heat capacity measurements suggest the existence of a Schottky-type anomaly above 15 K associated with a low-lying electronic doublet found about 60 cm-1 above the ground state doublet. The possibility of a quadrupolar transition associated with a ground state pseudoquartet is thereafter discussed. The present results finally bring new insights into the complex magnetic and electronic peculiarities of α-Na2NpO4.

  18. The Numerical Comparison of Magnetic Susceptibility and Heat Capacity of TMNIN with the Result of a Quantum Monte Carlo Method for the Haldane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masakazu; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    1994-03-01

    The measurements of magnetic heat capacity and susceptibility of one-dimensional S=1 antiferromagnet (CH3)4NNi(NO2)3 (TMNIN) have been carried out in order to make comparison with the theoretical results of a quantum Monte Carlo method for the Haldane system. The results for the heat capacity, which show a broad maximum around 10 K, are well reproduced by the theory with the interaction J/k B=-12.0±1.0 K in the temperature range T>0.2\\mid J\\mid S(S+1)/k_B. The low temperature heat capacity exhibits an exponential decay with gap energy Δ/k B=5.3±0.2 K, which gives {\\mitΔ}=0.44\\mid J\\mid , in contrast to the linear dependence on temperature as in the case for half integer spin. The residual magnetic entropy below 0.7 K is estimated to be 0.07% of Nk B ln 3, which denies the possibility of three-dimensional ordering of the spin system at lower temperatures. The observed susceptibility also agrees with the theory with J/k B=-10.9 K and g=2.02 in the whole temperature region, when we take the effect from the finite length of the chains into consideration.

  19. Rotational tunneling of methyl groups and the electronic heat capacity of EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 under magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Yoshizumi, Masayuki; Akutsu, Hiroki; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    In order to discuss the stability of the gapless features in the spin liquid state against magnetic fields, we report results and analyses of low-temperature heat capacity measurements of EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 under magnetic fields. The large upturn of CpT-1 at 0 T observed previously in EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 can be attributed to the rotational tunneling of the methyl groups in the counter cations and this upturn is suppressed by applying magnetic fields. The phenomenological resemblance of the feature under magnetic field was confirmed by comparative discussion of heat capacity measurement of metal complex of [Cu(acac)(OCH3)]2 having similar methyl groups. The gapless character evidenced by the finite electronic heat capacity coefficient, γ was found to be retained upon applying 17 T in EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2, which means that spin liquid ground state is stable against high magnetic fields. The finite γ in the spin liquid compounds is considered to be related to a kind of density of states in spin excitations rather than those determined by disorders such as spin glasses.

  20. Heat capacity of yttrium aluminum garnet, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, in the range 350-610 K

    SciTech Connect

    Pashinkin, A.S.; Malkova, A.S.; Ivanov, I.A.

    1995-12-01

    Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, doped most often with neodymium (Nd{sup 3+}), is widely used as a gain medium in lasers. In thermodynamic and physical calculations aimed at optimizing conditions for the preparation of YAG, data on its thermodynamic properties, including heat capacity C{sub p}, are of key importance. In earlier studies, C{sub p} of undoped YAG in the range 4.25-300.8 K was measured and its standard entropy calculated. At higher temperatures (223 - 673), heat capacity measurements with an IT-S-400 calorimeter yielded values about 4% greater than an adiabatic calorimeter. This systematic error was taken into account in further calculations so as to match the C{sub p} data in the range 298-673 K with low-temperature measurements. These results should, however, be considered preliminary. Further measurements and more thorough data treatment revealed a pronounced scatter in C{sub p} data in the range 448 - 673 K. Therefore, we undertook repeat measurements of the isobaric heat capacity of YAG with a DSM-2M differential scanning calorimeter.

  1. Temperature dependent electron-phonon coupling and heat capacity in thin slabs of topological insulator Bi2Te3 as pertinent to the thermal spike model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Paramita; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Electron-phonon coupling strength and electronic heat capacity are essential ingredients of the widely accepted thermal spike model of swift heavy ion matter interaction. The concept, although applicable very well in metals, loses its validity in materials with a band gap, wherein it is customary to take the two quantities merely as adjustable parameters to fit the experimental results. Topological insulators, like Bi2Te3, are quite interesting in this regard because they are also metallic albeit near the surface. In this work, we compute by first-principles the electron density of states of ∼16 Å thick Bi2Te3 slabs of different orientations and demonstrate an unusually high metallicity for the [0 0 1] slab. The density of states is then used to calculate the electron-phonon coupling strength and electronic heat capacity as a function of electron temperature. Strongly electron temperature dependent but weak electron-phonon coupling has been observed, along with systematic deviations of the electronic heat capacity from the linear free-electron metal values.

  2. Assessing the potential for increased capacity of combined heat and power facilities based on available corn stover and forest logging residue in Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Selvarani

    The amount of available biomass feedstock and associated cost components were analyzed to determine the potential increase in energy capacity of two existing combined heat and power plants in Mississippi. The amount of corn stover and forest logging residue within a 10-mile radius can satisfy the existing requirements of CHP plants in Scott (1 MW) and Washington counties (5 MW). Transporting feedstock within a smaller source area had lower transportation costs, but higher total unit cost than the two other source buffer scenarios. However, capital costs associated with higher plant capacities were significantly higher and plant expansion may not be economically advantageous. Increasing the CHP capacity from 1 MW to 2 MW in Scott county and 5 MW to 10 MW in Washington county might be a sustainable approach by drawing feedstock from a smaller area and at lower utilization rates, while keeping transportation costs low.

  3. Supernumerary molars. A review of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Menardía-Pejuan, V; Berini-Aytés, L; Gay-Escoda, C

    2000-01-01

    Supernumerary molars are not uncommon and may be found nearly anywhere in the dental alveolar arches. A series of 36 patients that presented with 53 supernumerary molars are reviewed. They occurred more frequently in the maxilla (86.8%), had little or no clinical significance, tended to be impacted, and were not associated with the impactation of the third molar. Four cases of maxillary fifth molars are described. PMID:11799727

  4. Cu/Nb-Ti MRI wires with improved stability by incorporating filaments of large heat capacity substance PrB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilin, V. E.; Kovalev, I. A.; Kruglov, S. L.; Sсherbakov, V. I.; Shutova, D. I.; Vorobjeva, A. E.; Salunin, N. I.; Potanina, L. V.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we report our recent research on thermal stabilization of low-temperature superconducting magnets by means of large heat capacity substances (LHCS). Two samples (lengths ˜100 m) of NbTi composite wires with additional internal filaments made from intermetallic compound PrB6 (5.9-7.3 vol.%) were produced and tested. The design of the wires was similar to that of the conventional MRI sc wires, except for their smaller diameter (0.835 mm instead of 1.345 mm). Our final goal was the investigation of the possibility to minimize (or even eliminate completely) the necessity of MRI magnets training before their commissioning. The comparative stability measurements showed a twofold increase of the minimum quench energies (MQEs) of the doped wires against short heat disturbances. The magnetic field corresponding to the first flux jump increased by 50%. In MQE tests, the PrB6 heat capacity was fully utilized over the course of a 1 ms heat pulse. In the thermomagnetic stability measurements, the efficiency of LHCS doping was about 75% due to the fast evolution of the flux jumps.

  5. Thermodynamic Properties at Saturation Derived from Experimental Two-Phase Isochoric Heat Capacity of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikhronidi, Nikolai G.; Batyrova, Rabiyat G.; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin M.; Magee, Joseph W.; Wu, Jiangtao

    2016-11-01

    New measurements are reported for the isochoric heat capacity of the ionic liquid substance 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([C6mim][NTf2]). These measurements extend the ranges of our earlier study (Polikhronidi et al. in Phys Chem Liq 52:657, 2014) by 5 % of the compressed liquid density and by 75 K. An adiabatic calorimeter was used to measure one-phase (C_{V1}) liquid and two-phase (C_{V2}) liquid + vapor isochoric heat capacities, densities (ρ _s), and phase-transition temperatures (T_s) of the ionic liquid (IL) substance. The combined expanded uncertainty of the density ρ and isochoric heat capacity C_V measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.15 % and 3 %, respectively. Measurements are concentrated in the immediate vicinity of the liquid + vapor phase-transition curve, in order to closely observe phase transitions. The present measurements and those of our earlier study are analyzed together and are presented in terms of thermodynamic properties (T_s, ρ _s, C_{V1} and C_{V2}) evaluated at saturation and in terms of key-derived thermodynamic properties C_P, C_S, W_S^' }}, K_{TS}^' }}, ( {partial P/partial T} ) V^' }, and ( {partial V/partial T} ) _{P}^' }) on the liquid + vapor phase-transition curve. A thermodynamic relation by Yang and Yang is used to confirm the internal consistency of measured two-phase heat capacities C_{V2} , which are observed to fall perfectly on a line as a function of specific volume at a constant temperature. The observed linear behavior is exploited to evaluate contributions to the quantity C_{V2} = f(V, T) from chemical potential C_{{Vμ}} =-Td^{{2}}μ /dT2 and from vapor pressure C_{VP} =VTd2PS /dT2. The physical nature and specific details of the temperature and specific volume dependence of the two-phase isochoric heat capacity and some features of the other derived thermodynamic properties of IL at liquid saturation curve are considered

  6. Molar versus as a paradigm clash.

    PubMed

    Baum, W M

    2001-05-01

    The molar view of behavior arose in response to the demonstrated inadequacy of explanations based on contiguity. Although Dinsmoor's (2001) modifications to two-factor theory render it irrefutable, a more basic criticism arises when we see that the molar and molecular views differ paradigmatically. The molar view has proven more productive.

  7. Molar versus as a paradigm clash.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, W M

    2001-01-01

    The molar view of behavior arose in response to the demonstrated inadequacy of explanations based on contiguity. Although Dinsmoor's (2001) modifications to two-factor theory render it irrefutable, a more basic criticism arises when we see that the molar and molecular views differ paradigmatically. The molar view has proven more productive. PMID:11453623

  8. [Distalization of the upper second molar: biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Castaldo, A

    1991-01-01

    The Author shows a system to dystalize the second upper molars and, if necessary, the third upper molars. This system, easy to be adapted, is made up by a palatal bar inserted between the first upper molars, by a sectional and a 100 grams precalibrated open Sentalloy coil spring used as an active force. PMID:1784296

  9. Pulpal responses to cavity preparation in aged rat molars.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Eriko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Nomura, Shuichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2006-10-01

    The dentin-pulp complex is capable of repair after tooth injuries including dental procedures. However, few data are available concerning aged changes in pulpal reactions to such injuries. The present study aimed to clarify the capability of defense in aged pulp by investigating the responses of odontoblasts and cells positive for class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to cavity preparation in aged rat molars (300-360 days) and by comparing the results with those in young adult rats (100 days). In untreated control teeth, immunoreactivity for intense heat-shock protein (HSP)-25 and nestin was found in odontoblasts, whereas class-II-MHC-positive cells were densely distributed in the periphery of the pulp. Cavity preparation caused two types of pulpal reactions based on the different extent of damage in the aged rats. In the case of severe damage, destruction of the odontoblast layer was conspicuous at the affected site. By 12 h after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border but subsequently disappeared together with HSP-25-immunopositive cells, and finally newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells took the place of the degenerated odontoblasts and acquired immunoreactivity for HSP-25 and nestin by postoperative day 3. In the case of mild damage, no remarkable changes occurred in odontoblasts after operation, and some survived through the experimental stages. These findings indicate that aged pulp tissue still possesses a defense capacity, and that a variety of reactions can occur depending on the difference in the status of dentinal tubules and/or odontoblast processes in individuals.

  10. Data use investigations for applications Explorer Mission A (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission): HCMM's role in studies of the urban heat island, Great Lakes thermal phenomena and radiometric calibration of satellite data. [Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester New York and Lake Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Schimminger, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of data from NASA'a heat capacity mapping mission satellite for studies of the urban heat island, thermal phenomena in large lakes and radiometric calibration of satellite sensors was assessed. The data were found to be of significant value in all cases. Using HCMM data, the existence and microstructure of the heat island can be observed and associated with land cover within the urban complex. The formation and development of the thermal bar in the Great Lakes can be observed and quantitatively mapped using HCMM data. In addition, the thermal patterns observed can be associated with water quality variations observed both from other remote sensing platforms and in situ. The imaging radiometer on-board the HCMM satellite is shown to be calibratible to within about 1.1 C of actual surface temperatures. These findings, as well as the analytical procedures used in studying the HCMM data, are included.

  11. The standard enthalpy of formation and low-temperature heat capacity of 1,1',3,3'-tetra-( tert-butyl)ferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, M. S.; Larina, V. N.; Karyakin, N. V.; Sheiman, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    The heat capacity of crystalline 1,1',3,3'-tetra-( tert-butyl)ferrocene (TTBF) was measured in an adiabatic vacuum calorimeter over the temperature range 5-302 K. The thermodynamic functions of TTBF in the crystalline state were calculated from T→0 to 302 K. The enthalpy of combustion of TTBF was determined in an isothermal calorimeter with a stationary bomb. The standard thermodynamic functions of formation of the compound in the crystalline state at 298.15 K were calculated.

  12. Verification of ab-initio mixing enthalpy using thermodynamic simulation of phase equilibrium and the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of the bcc Fe- Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovsky, A. L.; Vasilyev, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with application of physical-empirical models for the thermodynamic description of the bcc Fe-Cr alloys and phase equilibrium, as well as prediction of behavior of the temperature dependences of the specific heat of alloys. This approach allowed performing verification of ab-initio calculations results obtained by different authors for the mixing enthalpy at 0K which were used to assess the chemical part of the mixing enthalpy. Analysis of calculated phase diagram fragments and the temperature dependences of heat capacities for two alloy compositions and their comparison with experimental data, has allowed us to estimate the degree of reliability of various approximations used in ab-initio calculations, and thereby realize their verification for further practical use.

  13. Heat capacity, entropy of Ln2(MoO4)3 (Ln = La, Sm, and Gd), and the high-temperature enthalpy of Ln2(MoO4)3 (Ln = Eu, Dy, and Ho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, V. M.; Suponitskiy, Y. L.; Liashenko, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The low-temperature heat capacity of Ln2(MoO4)3 (Ln = La, Sm, and Gd) is investigated by means of adiabatic calorimetry within the range of 60-300 K. The temperature dependences of the heat capacity are found and the values of the standard entropy are calculated, based on extrapolations to 0 K. Characteristic temperatures for molybdates are determined from the results of IR spectroscopic studies. The high-temperature enthalpy of Ln2(MoO4)3 (Ln = Eu, Dy, and Ho) is measured via high-temperature microcalorimetry, and the temperature dependence of heat capacity is calculated in the range of 298-1000 K. Since samarium and gadolinium molybdates are of the same structural type as terbium molybdate, we can estimate the anomaly of the heat capacity in the low-temperature region using the data for terbium molybdate and find the entropy of samarium and gadolinium molybdates.

  14. Effects of Chlorination and Heat Treatment on Flour and Gluten Functionality Explored by Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) and Mixograph

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of chlorination and heat treatment on flour and gluten functionality were explored by SRC and mixograph for the soft wheat cultivar, Croplan 594W. Regardless of milling yield, SRC results for chlorinated flour samples showed a decrease in lactic acid SRC values with increasing extent of...

  15. [Molar pregnancy (primary or recurrent?)].

    PubMed

    Ayala, A; Aizpuru, E; Tovar, J M

    1989-08-01

    A peculiar case of gestational trophoblastic disease is described. A 24 year old female with former history of three molar pregnancies, spontaneous abortion and anembryoic pregnancy was admitted because of a newly diagnosed hydatiform mole (ex novo). After uterine curettage followed by a low oral dose of methotrexate (0.5 mg/kg/day) for five days. The HCG levels determined in plasma by beta-HCG- radioinmmunoassay, became negative until four months of follow3 up. An intrauterine device was installed. She resumed HCG positivity a year later and a histerectomy was performed. A post-surgical diagnosis of invasive mole was made. Since the possibility of intercurrent pregnancy was lowered by the presence of a intrauterine device, we assumed that trophoblastic transformation into an invasive mole adopted a sort of dormant period before its resurge (resurrection) independently either from curettage of chemotherapy.

  16. Specific features of low-frequency vibrational dynamics and low-temperature heat capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, M. V.; Roshal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A continuous model has been constructed for low-frequency dynamics of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The formation of the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum of a double-walled nanotube from phonon spectra of its constituent single-walled nanotubes has been considered in the framework of the proposed approach. The influence of the environment on the phonon spectrum of a single double-walled carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A combined method has been proposed for estimating the coefficients of the van der Waals interaction between the walls of the nanotube from the spectroscopic data and the known values of the elastic moduli of graphite. The low-temperature specific heat has been calculated for doublewalled carbon nanotubes, which in the field of applicability of the model ( T < 35 K) is substantially less than the sum of specific heats of two individual single-walled nanotubes forming it.

  17. Heat capacity of the site-diluted spin dimer system Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈

    SciTech Connect

    Samulon, E. C.; Shapiro, M. C.; Fisher, I. R.

    2011-08-05

    Heat-capacity and susceptibility measurements have been performed on the diluted spin dimer compound Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈. The parent compound Ba₃Mn₂O₈ is a spin dimer system based on pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled S=1, 3d² Mn⁵⁺ ions such that the zero-field ground state is a product of singlets. Substitution of nonmagnetic S=0, 3d⁰ V⁵⁺ ions leads to an interacting network of unpaired Mn moments, the low-temperature properties of which are explored in the limit of small concentrations 0≤x≤0.05. The zero-field heat capacity of this diluted system reveals a progressive removal of magnetic entropy over an extended range of temperatures, with no evidence for a phase transition. The concentration dependence does not conform to expectations for a spin-glass state. Rather, the data suggest a low-temperature random singlet phase, reflecting the hierarchy of exchange energies found in this system.

  18. Temperature-dependent determination of electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling factor for Fe0.72Cr0.18Ni0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Jan; Sotrop, Jürgen; Borek, Stephan; Huber, Heinz P.; Minár, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical approach using ab initio calculations was applied to study the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse with the metal alloy Fe0.72Cr0.18Ni0.1 (AISI 304). The electronic structure was simulated by taking into account the chemical and magnetic disorder of the alloy by the coherent potential approximation implemented in a fully relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker formalism in the framework of spin density functional theory. A self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure using the Matsubara technique in the paramagnetic state of Fe0.72Cr0.18Ni0.1 for finite temperatures was applied. Utilizing these predictions we determined the electron heat capacity and the electron-phonon coupling factor of Fe0.72Cr0.18Ni0.1 in dependence on the electron temperature for two-temperature model applications. Compared with pure Fe a maximum deviation of 5% for the electron heat capacity and 25% for the electron-phonon coupling factor was found.

  19. Omnidirectional Measurements of Angle-Resolved Heat Capacity for Complete Detection of Superconducting Gap Structure in the Heavy-Fermion Antiferromagnet UPd_{2}Al_{3}.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige; Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai

    2016-07-15

    Quasiparticle excitations in UPd_{2}Al_{3} were studied by means of heat-capacity (C) measurements under rotating magnetic fields using a high-quality single crystal. The field dependence shows C(H)∝H^{1/2}-like behavior at low temperatures for both two hexagonal crystal axes, i.e., H∥[0001] (c axis) and H∥[112[over ¯]0] (a axis), suggesting the presence of nodal quasiparticle excitations from heavy bands. At low temperatures, the polar-angle (θ) dependence of C exhibits a maximum along H∥[0001] with a twofold symmetric oscillation below 0.5 T, and an unusual shoulder or hump anomaly has been found around 30°-60° from the c axis in C(θ) at intermediate fields (1≲μ_{0}H≲2  T). These behaviors in UPd_{2}Al_{3} purely come from the superconducting nodal quasiparticle excitations, and can be successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations assuming the gap symmetry with a horizontal linear line node. We demonstrate the whole angle-resolved heat-capacity measurements done here as a novel spectroscopic method for nodal gap determination, which can be applied to other exotic superconductors. PMID:27472129

  20. The ingestion of combined carbohydrates does not alter metabolic responses or performance capacity during soccer-specific exercise in the heat compared to ingestion of a single carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N D; Campbell, I T; Drust, B; Evans, L; Reilly, T; Maclaren, D P M

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ingesting a glucose plus fructose solution on the metabolic responses to soccer-specific exercise in the heat and the impact on subsequent exercise capacity. Eleven male soccer players performed a 90 min soccer-specific protocol on three occasions. Either 3 ml · kg(-1) body mass of a solution containing glucose (1 g · min(-1) glucose) (GLU), or glucose (0.66 g · min(-1)) plus fructose (0.33 g · min(-1)) (MIX) or placebo (PLA) was consumed every 15 minutes. Respiratory measures were undertaken at 15-min intervals, blood samples were drawn at rest, half-time and on completion of the protocol, and muscle glycogen concentration was assessed pre- and post-exercise. Following the soccer-specific protocol the Cunningham and Faulkner test was performed. No significant differences in post-exercise muscle glycogen concentration (PLA, 62.99 ± 8.39 mmol · kg wet weight(-1); GLU 68.62 ± 2.70; mmol · kg wet weight(-1) and MIX 76.63 ± 6.92 mmol · kg wet weight(-1)) or exercise capacity (PLA, 73.62 ± 8.61 s; GLU, 77.11 ± 7.17 s; MIX, 83.04 ± 9.65 s) were observed between treatments (P > 0.05). However, total carbohydrate oxidation was significantly increased during MIX compared with PLA (P < 0.05). These results suggest that when ingested in moderate amounts, the type of carbohydrate does not influence metabolism during soccer-specific intermittent exercise or affect performance capacity after exercise in the heat.

  1. Kinetic-freezing and unfreezing of local-region fluctuations in a glass structure observed by heat capacity hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Aji, D. P. B.; Johari, G. P.

    2015-06-07

    Fluctuations confined to local regions in the structure of a glass are observed as the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation. Properties of these regions and their atomic configuration are currently studied by relaxation techniques, by electron microscopy, and by high-energy X-ray scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure methods. One expects that these fluctuations (i) would kinetically freeze on cooling a glass, and the temperature coefficient of its enthalpy, dH/dT, would consequently show a gradual decrease with decrease in T, (ii) would kinetically unfreeze on heating the glass toward the glass-liquid transition temperature, T{sub g}, and dH/dT would gradually increase, and (iii) there would be a thermal hysteresis indicating the time and temperature dependence of the enthalpy. Since no such features have been found, thermodynamic consequences of these fluctuations are debated. After searching for these features in glasses of different types, we found it in one of the most stable metal alloy glasses of composition Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20}. On cooling from its T{sub g}, dH/dT decreased along a broad sigmoid-shape path as local-region fluctuations kinetically froze. On heating thereafter, dH/dT increased along a similar path as these fluctuations unfroze, and there is hysteresis in the cooling and heating paths, similar to that observed in the T{sub g}-endotherm range. After eliminating other interpretations, we conclude that local-region fluctuations seen as the JG relaxation in the non-equilibrium state of a glass contribute to its entropy, and we suggest conditions under which such fluctuations may be observed.

  2. Comment on "Heat capacity, enthalpy fluctuations, and configurational entropy in broken ergodic systems" [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164503 (2010)].

    PubMed

    Johari, G P

    2011-04-14

    A critical examination shows that the specific heat and shear modulus relaxation spectra do not support the notions of continuously broken ergodicity and loss of configurational contribution on isothermal glass transition, nor does the long-known result that C(p) → 0 as T → 0 K prove that S(conf) → 0. Spectra show variation of the real and imaginary components due to phase lag and not due to loss of configurational degrees of freedom. The high-frequency shear modulus, G(∞), of glass increases with time as its fictive temperature decreases and dG(∞)∕dT decreases when a glass forms. PMID:21495772

  3. Thermal management of instruments on space platforms using a high capacity two-phase heat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.; Fowle, A.; Almgren, D.

    1981-01-01

    A system utilizing a pumped, two-phase single component working fluid for heat exchange and transport services necessary to meet the temperature control requirements of typical orbiting instrument payloads on space platforms is described. The design characteristics of the system is presented, together with a presentation of a laboratory apparatus for demonstration of proof of concept. Results indicate that the pumped two-phase design concept can meet a wide range of thermal performance requirements with the only penalty being the requirement for a small liquid pump.

  4. The Expression of Carnosine and Its Effect on the Antioxidant Capacity of Longissimus dorsi Muscle in Finishing Pigs Exposed to Constant Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peige; Hao, Yue; Feng, Jinghai; Lin, Hai; Feng, Yuejin; Wu, Xin; Yang, Xin; Gu, Xianhong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of constant high ambient temperatures on meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and carnosine expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of finishing pigs. Castrated 24 male DLY (crossbreeds between Landrace×Yorkshire sows and Duroc boars) pigs were allocated to one of three treatments: constant ambient temperature at 22°C and ad libitum feeding (CON, n = 8); constant high ambient temperature at 30°C and ad libitum feeding (H30, n = 8); and constant ambient temperature at 22°C and pair-fed with H30 (PF, n = 8). Meat quality, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, antioxidant capacity, carnosine content, and carnosine synthetase (CARNS1) mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle were measured after three weeks. The results revealed that H30 had lower pH24 h, redness at 45 min, and yellowness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.05), and higher drip loss at 48 h and lightness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.01). Constant heat stress disrupted the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in longissimus dorsi muscle with higher MDA content (p<0.01) and lower antioxidant capacity (p<0.01). Carnosine content and CARNS1 mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of H30 pigs were significantly decreased (p<0.01) after three weeks at 30°C. In conclusion, constant high ambient temperatures affect meat quality and antioxidant capacity negatively, and the reduction of muscle carnosine content is one of the probable reasons. PMID:25358371

  5. Molar volumes and densities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.; Bethke, Philip M.

    1962-01-01

    These tables present critically chosen "best values" for the density and molar volume of selected mineral compounds. No attempt was made to be all-inclusive; rather we have tried to present data for chemically and physically well-defined phases for which the molar volume and/or density was knovvn to the order of 0. 2 percent.

  6. Low field magnetocaloric effect and heat capacity of A-site ordered NdBaMn 2O 6 manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, A. M.; Gamzatov, A. G.; Kalitka, V. S.; Kaul, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in the A-site ordered manganite NdBaMn 2O 6 is studied. The MCE in this compound has an anomalous behavior. In low magnetic fields, the abrupt transitions between the direct and inverse magnetocaloric effects are observed. In a relatively strong magnetic field H=11 kOe, the direct and inverse effects are observed only at cooling, while the heating mode reveals only an inverse MCE. The value of the MCE ( -ΔS=0.7 J/kg K and ΔS=1.02 J/kg K for ΔH=11 kOe) does not reach high values, but the proximity of the effects occurring at room temperatures expects the use of both effects in the magnetic cooling technology.

  7. Single crystal growth and heat capacity measurements of triangular lattice R2Pt6Ga15 (R =rare earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Ueda, T.; Ohara, S.

    2016-02-01

    We have succeeded in synthesizing the single crystal of R2Pt6Ga15 (R=La-Nd, Sm- Lu) with hexagonal Sc0.67Fe2Si5-type structure using Ga self flux method. The crystal structure was confirmed by the powder X-ray method. The unit-cell volume V of R2Pt6Ga15 follows the lanthanide concentration except R = Ce, Eu and Yb, indicating that the valences of R = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, and Lu ion are trivalent, whereas those of R = Ce, Eu and Yb ion are deviate from trivalent. We have measured the specific heat C(T) of R2Pt6Ga15. It is found that the magnetic order takes place in R2Pt6Ga15 (R=Pr, Nd, Sm-Tm). Moreover, the multiple phase transitions were observed in R2Pt6Ga15 (R = Nd, Eu, Gd and Ho).

  8. Force Field Benchmark of Organic Liquids: Density, Enthalpy of Vaporization, Heat Capacities, Surface Tension, Isothermal Compressibility, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Dielectric Constant

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition of small organic molecules is often very similar to amino acid side chains or the bases in nucleic acids, and hence there is no a priori reason why a molecular mechanics force field could not describe both organic liquids and biomolecules with a single parameter set. Here, we devise a benchmark for force fields in order to test the ability of existing force fields to reproduce some key properties of organic liquids, namely, the density, enthalpy of vaporization, the surface tension, the heat capacity at constant volume and pressure, the isothermal compressibility, the volumetric expansion coefficient, and the static dielectric constant. Well over 1200 experimental measurements were used for comparison to the simulations of 146 organic liquids. Novel polynomial interpolations of the dielectric constant (32 molecules), heat capacity at constant pressure (three molecules), and the isothermal compressibility (53 molecules) as a function of the temperature have been made, based on experimental data, in order to be able to compare simulation results to them. To compute the heat capacities, we applied the two phase thermodynamics method (Lin et al. J. Chem. Phys.2003, 119, 11792), which allows one to compute thermodynamic properties on the basis of the density of states as derived from the velocity autocorrelation function. The method is implemented in a new utility within the GROMACS molecular simulation package, named g_dos, and a detailed exposé of the underlying equations is presented. The purpose of this work is to establish the state of the art of two popular force fields, OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulation) and GAFF (generalized Amber force field), to find common bottlenecks, i.e., particularly difficult molecules, and to serve as a reference point for future force field development. To make for a fair playing field, all molecules were evaluated with the same parameter settings, such as thermostats and barostats

  9. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt. PMID:24168168

  10. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Cerritelli, Gian F.; Miliozzi, Adio; Kenny, José M.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt.

  11. Effect of nanoparticles on heat capacity of nanofluids based on molten salts as PCM for thermal energy storage.

    PubMed

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Cerritelli, Gian F; Miliozzi, Adio; Kenny, José M

    2013-10-29

    In this study, different nanofluids with phase change behavior were developed by mixing a molten salt base fluid (selected as phase change material) with nanoparticles using the direct-synthesis method. The thermal properties of the nanofluids obtained were investigated. These nanofluids can be used in concentrating solar plants with a reduction of storage material if an improvement in the specific heat is achieved. The base salt mixture was a NaNO3-KNO3 (60:40 ratio) binary salt. The nanoparticles used were silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), and a mix of silica-alumina (SiO2-Al2O3). Three weight fractions were evaluated: 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%. Each nanofluid was prepared in water solution, sonicated, and evaporated. Measurements on thermophysical properties were performed by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and the dispersion of the nanoparticles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained show that the addition of 1.0 wt.% of nanoparticles to the base salt increases the specific heat of 15% to 57% in the solid phase and of 1% to 22% in the liquid phase. In particular, this research shows that the addition of silica-alumina nanoparticles has a significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of the NaNO3-KNO3 binary salt. These results deviated from the predictions of the theoretical model used. SEM suggests a greater interaction between these nanoparticles and the salt.

  12. Expressly Fabricated Molar Tube Bases: Enhanced Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Phull, Tarun Singh; Rana, Tarun; Kumar, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians, Orthodontists and their patients’ parents often expect the best results in the shortest time span possible. Orthodontic bonding of molar tubes has been an acceptable risk in a modern era of refined biomaterials and instrumentation. Although many orthodontists still prefer banding to bonding, it is the failure rate of the tubes on molars which accounts to an impedance in molar bonding. One of the reasons for molar attachment failures is attributed to improper adaptation of the buccal tube base with or without increased thickness of composite. Merits of banding the second molars especially when these are the terminal teeth for anchorage have been overemphasized in the literature. The present article presents a simple and relatively less time consuming technique of preparing molar tubes to be bonded on tooth surfaces which may be quite difficult to isolate especially for bonding, for example, mandibular second molars. The increased surface area of the composite scaffold helps not only in enhanced bond strength but also serves to reduce the incidence of plaque accumulation given the dexterity of invitro preparation. The removal of the occlusal part of the molar tube scaffold helps in prevention of open / raised bite tendencies. The present innovation, therefore, is not merely serendipity but a structured technique to overcome a common dilemma for the clinical orthodontist. The present dictum of banding being superior to molar tube bonding may prove to be futile with trendsetting molar attachments. It is also an established fact that bonding proves to be a lesser expensive modality when compared to banding procedures. PMID:25121070

  13. Expressly fabricated molar tube bases: enhanced adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tarun; Phull, Tarun Singh; Rana, Tarun; Kumar, Varun

    2014-06-01

    Clinicians, Orthodontists and their patients' parents often expect the best results in the shortest time span possible. Orthodontic bonding of molar tubes has been an acceptable risk in a modern era of refined biomaterials and instrumentation. Although many orthodontists still prefer banding to bonding, it is the failure rate of the tubes on molars which accounts to an impedance in molar bonding. One of the reasons for molar attachment failures is attributed to improper adaptation of the buccal tube base with or without increased thickness of composite. Merits of banding the second molars especially when these are the terminal teeth for anchorage have been overemphasized in the literature. The present article presents a simple and relatively less time consuming technique of preparing molar tubes to be bonded on tooth surfaces which may be quite difficult to isolate especially for bonding, for example, mandibular second molars. The increased surface area of the composite scaffold helps not only in enhanced bond strength but also serves to reduce the incidence of plaque accumulation given the dexterity of invitro preparation. The removal of the occlusal part of the molar tube scaffold helps in prevention of open / raised bite tendencies. The present innovation, therefore, is not merely serendipity but a structured technique to overcome a common dilemma for the clinical orthodontist. The present dictum of banding being superior to molar tube bonding may prove to be futile with trendsetting molar attachments. It is also an established fact that bonding proves to be a lesser expensive modality when compared to banding procedures. PMID:25121070

  14. On the origin of the heat capacity feature of annealed ices and ice clathrates, and interpreting water's diffusivity in terms of the entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2000-08-01

    In order to investigate the origins of (i) the spontaneous temperature rise on annealing pure hexagonal and cubic ices and ice clathrates and (ii) the sigmoid-shape increase in the heat capacity, C p, on heating the annealed samples, the enthalpy and entropy decrease on annealing of pure cubic ice and one ice clathrate have been determined from their C p data. This decrease is found to be much higher than that expected from orientational relaxation of H 2O molecules and that calculated from the spontaneous decrease in the Bjerrum or orientational defects concentrations. On this basis and the known observation that dopants not only decrease the relaxation time of the ices and ice clathrates but also modify the shape of the C p-increase feature, it is concluded that the spontaneous temperature rise on annealing occurs when some of the H 2O molecules achieve a preferential orientation, which is equivalent to their partial proton ordering. The sigmoid-shape C p-feature observed on heating the annealed samples is therefore due to the time- and temperature-dependent recovery of their random orientations or complete proton disorder. This is fundamentally different from structural relaxation in glasses whose entropy of disorder itself increases on heating. In a second aspect of the study, the known temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient of water is used to calculate two fundamental quantities of the configurational entropy theory: (i) the size of the cooperatively rearranging regions, which is 4.7 molecules at 150 K, and (ii) the temperature-invariant energy, which is 7.4 kJ mol -1. These seem plausible and similar to those observed for other liquids. Finally, it is pointed out that a comparison of bulk water's dielectric properties with those of the ions afflicted, two-molecule thick water layer between the platelets of sodium vermiculite clay [R. Bergman, J. Sweson, Nature 403 (2000) 283], is inappropriate on fundamental grounds.

  15. Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar: Report of five rare cases

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Bernardo Q.; Cheib, Paula L.; de Brito, Gabriela M.; Pinto, Larissa S. M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar is a rare condition that practitioners might face in the field of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. The early diagnosis and extraction of the adjacent ectopic third molar have been advocated, and prior research has reported a high rate of spontaneous eruption following third molar removal. However, some challenges in the daily practice are that the early diagnosis of this type of tooth impaction is difficult with conventional radiographic examination, and sometimes the early surgical removal of the maxillary third molar must be postponed because of the risks of damaging the second molar. The objective of this study is to report a case series of five young patients with maxillary second molar impaction and to discuss the difficulty of early diagnosis with the conventional radiographic examination, and unpredictability of self-correction. PMID:26321848

  16. Measurements of heat capacity associated with the magnetic transition in La_0.7A_0.3MnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yoon Hee; Moon, I. K.; Ju, H. L.

    2001-03-01

    It is well known that the transition temperature of the paramagnetic insulator-magnetic metal transition in the perovskite manganites La_1-xA_xMnO3 (x = 0.3, A = divalent metal) depends sensitively on the average size of A-site cations. In order to elucidate the physical reason for this behavior, we have carried out high-resolution measurements of heat capacity of samples with A = Ca, Sr, Ba. By critically comparing these results as well as magnetization measurements, we were able to draw a conclusion: as the average size of the A-site cation gets smaller than a certain value, the two-phase coexistence sets in and the transition temperature abruptly decreases.

  17. Heat capacities, magnetic properties, and resistivities of ternary RPdBi alloys where R = La, Nd, Gd, Dy, Er, and Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Riedemann, T.M.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past four and a half decades research on the rare earths, their compounds, and their alloys has yielded significant insights into the nature of materials. The rare earths can be used to systematically study a series of alloys or compounds. Magnetic ordering, crystalline fields, spin fluctuations, the magnetocaloric effect, and magnetostriction are a small sample of phenomena studied that are exhibited by the rare earth family. A significant portion of research has been conducted on the abundant RM{sub 2} and RM phases, where R is the rare earth and M is a transition metal. The natural progression of science has led to the study of related RMX ternary phases, where X is either another transition metal or semimetal. There are now over 1,000 known RMX phases. The focus of this study is on RPdBi where R = La, Nd, Gd, Dy, Er, and Lu. Their heat capacities, magnetic properties, and resistivities are studied.

  18. Systematic Studies on Anharmonicity of Rattling Phonons in Type I Clathrates by Low Temperature Heat Capacity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Katsumi; Wu, Jiazhen; Tanabe, Yoichi; Heguri, Satoshi; Shiimotani, Hidekazu; Tohoku University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Clathrates are featured by cage-like polyhedral hosts mainly composed of the IVth group elements of Si, Ge, or Sn and alkali metal or alkaline-earth metal elements can be accommodated inside as a guest atom. One of the most intriguing issues in clathrates is their outstanding high thermoelectric performances thanks to the low thermal conductivity. Being irrespective of good electric conductivity σ, the guest atom motions provide a low-energy lying less-dispersive phonons and can greatly suppress thermal conductivity κ. This makes clathrates close to the concept of ``phonon glass electron crystal: PGEC'' and useful in thermoelectric materials from the viewpoint of the figure of merit. In the present study, we show that the local phonon anharmonicity indicated by the tunneling-term of the endohedral atoms (αT) and the itinerant-electron term (γeT), both of which show T-linear dependences in specific heat Cp, can successfully be separated by employing single crystals with various carrier concentrations in a wide range of temperture experimennts. The factors affecting on the phonon anharmonicity as well as the strength of electron-phonon interactions will be discussed based on our recent experiments. The research was financially supported by Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant in Aid for Science, and Technology of Japan.

  19. Alternating current calorimeter for specific heat capacity measurements at temperatures below 10 K and pressures up to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeo, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    A developed alternating current calorimeter for measuring the absolute value of specific heat C of a very small sample under a pressure up to 10 GPa and low temperature below 10 K is described. A Bridgman anvil cell made of tungsten carbide with a top diameter of 3 mm is used. A hollow at the top prevents expansion of the sample space over the anvil top. Two chip resistors, which act as a thermometer and a heater, are mounted on the outer part of a copper-beryllium gasket with a frying pan-like shape. Thus, the thermometer is not pressurized. In order to isolate the gasket from the anvil thermally, diamond powder with a grain size of 0.25 μm is placed on the anvil top. Two jumps of C at the superconducting transitions of Pb (3.3 mg) and In (5.0 mg) are observed under various pressures up to 9 GPa, as clearly as those at the ambient pressure.

  20. Anharmonic phonon quasiparticle theory of zero-point and thermal shifts in insulators: Heat capacity, bulk modulus, and thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip B.

    2015-08-01

    The quasiharmonic (QH) approximation uses harmonic vibrational frequencies ωQ ,H(V ) computed at volumes V near V0 where the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) energy Eel(V ) is minimum. When this is used in the harmonic free energy, QH approximation gives a good zeroth order theory of thermal expansion and first-order theory of bulk modulus, where nth-order means smaller than the leading term by ɛn, where ɛ =ℏ ωvib/Eel or kBT /Eel , and Eel is an electronic energy scale, typically 2 to 10 eV. Experiment often shows evidence for next-order corrections. When such corrections are needed, anharmonic interactions must be included. The most accessible measure of anharmonicity is the quasiparticle (QP) energy ωQ(V ,T ) seen experimentally by vibrational spectroscopy. However, this cannot just be inserted into the harmonic free energy FH. In this paper, a free energy is found that corrects the double-counting of anharmonic interactions that is made when F is approximated by FH( ωQ(V ,T ) ) . The term "QP thermodynamics" is used for this way of treating anharmonicity. It enables (n +1 ) -order corrections if QH theory is accurate to order n . This procedure is used to give corrections to the specific heat and volume thermal expansion. The QH formulas for isothermal (BT) and adiabatic (BS) bulk moduli are clarified, and the route to higher-order corrections is indicated.

  1. Alternating current calorimeter for specific heat capacity measurements at temperatures below 10 K and pressures up to 10 GPa.

    PubMed

    Umeo, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    A developed alternating current calorimeter for measuring the absolute value of specific heat C of a very small sample under a pressure up to 10 GPa and low temperature below 10 K is described. A Bridgman anvil cell made of tungsten carbide with a top diameter of 3 mm is used. A hollow at the top prevents expansion of the sample space over the anvil top. Two chip resistors, which act as a thermometer and a heater, are mounted on the outer part of a copper-beryllium gasket with a frying pan-like shape. Thus, the thermometer is not pressurized. In order to isolate the gasket from the anvil thermally, diamond powder with a grain size of 0.25 μm is placed on the anvil top. Two jumps of C at the superconducting transitions of Pb (3.3 mg) and In (5.0 mg) are observed under various pressures up to 9 GPa, as clearly as those at the ambient pressure. PMID:27370464

  2. Alternating current calorimeter for specific heat capacity measurements at temperatures below 10 K and pressures up to 10 GPa.

    PubMed

    Umeo, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    A developed alternating current calorimeter for measuring the absolute value of specific heat C of a very small sample under a pressure up to 10 GPa and low temperature below 10 K is described. A Bridgman anvil cell made of tungsten carbide with a top diameter of 3 mm is used. A hollow at the top prevents expansion of the sample space over the anvil top. Two chip resistors, which act as a thermometer and a heater, are mounted on the outer part of a copper-beryllium gasket with a frying pan-like shape. Thus, the thermometer is not pressurized. In order to isolate the gasket from the anvil thermally, diamond powder with a grain size of 0.25 μm is placed on the anvil top. Two jumps of C at the superconducting transitions of Pb (3.3 mg) and In (5.0 mg) are observed under various pressures up to 9 GPa, as clearly as those at the ambient pressure.

  3. Sextant of Sapphires for Molar Distalization

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Yudistar Venkata; Ganugapanta, Vivek Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Space analysis quantifies the amount of crowding within the arches estimating the severity of space discrepancy. The space gaining procedures include extraction and non-extraction procedures like expansion, proximal stripping and molar distalization. Aim To identify features seen in molar distalization cases. Materials and Methods The sample size comprised 20 patients in whom molar distalization was decided as the treatment plan. The study models and lateral cephalograms of all the patients were taken. Occlusograms were obtained. Model analysis and cephalometric analysis were performed. Descriptive statistical analysis like mean, standard deviation, standard error and mode were done. Results The parameters in Question gave following results. The Bolton analysis showed anterior mandibular excess with mean value of 1.56mm±1.07. The first order discrepancy between maxillary central and lateral incisors was 5±1.95. The premolar rotation showed mean value of 16.58±5.12. The molar rotation showed the value of 7.66±2.26. The nasolabial angle showed the mean of 101.25±8.7 IMPA of 101.4±5.74. Conclusion The six features studied in molar distalization cases [First order discrepancy between upper central and lateral incisors; Rotation of premolars and molars; Bolton’s discrepancy in anterior dentition; Average to horizontal growth pattern; Proclined lower incisors and Obtuse nasolabial angle] can be taken as patterns seen in molar distalization cases and considered as a valid treatment plan. PMID:27656572

  4. Transition Helmholtz free energy, entropy, and heat capacity of free-standing smectic films in water: A mean-field treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Śliwa, Izabela; Zakharov, A. V.

    2014-11-21

    Using the extended McMillan's mean field approach with anisotropic forces a study of both the structural and thermodynamic properties of free-standing smectic film (FSSF) in water on heating to the isotropic temperature is carried out numerically. By solving the self-consistent nonlinear equations for the order parameters, we obtained that the smectic-A-isotropic (AI) transition occurs through the series of layer-thinning transitions causing the films to thin in the stepwise manner as the temperature is increased above the bulk smectic-A-isotropic temperature T{sub AI}(bulk). With enhanced pair interactions in the bounding layers, the smectic-isotropic transition corresponds to smectic melting of the central layers. The effects of surface “enhanced” pair interactions in the bounding layers and of film thickness on the orientational and translational order parameters, the Helmholtz free energy and entropy, as well as the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of FSSFs, have also been investigated. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained – by means of optical microscopy and ellipsometry techniques – data of the temperature when the thin decylcyanobiphenyl smectic film immersing in water ruptures has been obtained.

  5. Heat capacity and phase equilibria of almandine, Fe[sub 3]Al[sub 2]Si[sub 3]O[sub 12

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, L.M. ); Essene, E.J.; Metz, G.W.; Westrum, E.F. Jr. ); Bohlen, S.R. ); Hemingway, B.S. )

    1993-09-01

    The heat capacity of a synthetic almandine, Fe[sub 3]Al[sub 2]Si[sub 3]O[sub 12], was measured from 6 to 350 K using equilibrium, intermittent-heating quasi-adiabatic calorimetry and from 420 to 1000 K using differential scanning calorimetry. These measurements yield Cp[sub 298] = 342.80 [+-] 1.4 J/mol[center dot]K and S[degrees][sub 298] = 342.60 J/mol[center dot]K. Moessbauer characterizations show the almandine to contain less than 2 [+-] 1% of the total iron as Fe[sup 3+]. X-ray diffraction studies of this synthetic almandine yield a = 11.521 [+-] 0.001 [angstrom] and V[degrees][sub 298] = 115.11 [+-] 0.01 cm[sup 3]/mol, somewhat smaller than previously reported. The low-temperature Cp data indicate a lambda transition at 8.7 K related to an antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition with T[sub N] = 7.5 K. Modeling of the lattice contribution to the total entropy suggests the presence of entropy in excess of that attributable to the effects of lattice vibrations and the magnetic transition. This probably arises from a low-temperature electronic transition (Schottky contribution).

  6. Transition Helmholtz free energy, entropy, and heat capacity of free-standing smectic films in water: a mean-field treatment.

    PubMed

    Śliwa, Izabela; Zakharov, A V

    2014-11-21

    Using the extended McMillan's mean field approach with anisotropic forces a study of both the structural and thermodynamic properties of free-standing smectic film (FSSF) in water on heating to the isotropic temperature is carried out numerically. By solving the self-consistent nonlinear equations for the order parameters, we obtained that the smectic-A-isotropic (AI) transition occurs through the series of layer-thinning transitions causing the films to thin in the stepwise manner as the temperature is increased above the bulk smectic-A-isotropic temperature TAI(bulk). With enhanced pair interactions in the bounding layers, the smectic-isotropic transition corresponds to smectic melting of the central layers. The effects of surface "enhanced" pair interactions in the bounding layers and of film thickness on the orientational and translational order parameters, the Helmholtz free energy and entropy, as well as the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of FSSFs, have also been investigated. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained - by means of optical microscopy and ellipsometry techniques - data of the temperature when the thin decylcyanobiphenyl smectic film immersing in water ruptures has been obtained.

  7. Heat capacity of α-AlH(3) and α-AlD(3) at temperatures up to 1000 K.

    PubMed

    Antonov, V E; Kolesnikov, A I; Markushkin, Yu E; Palnichenko, A V; Ren, Y; Sakharov, M K

    2008-07-01

    The densest α modification of AlH(3) and AlD(3) is thermodynamically stable at high hydrogen pressures. At ambient pressure, α-AlH(3) and α-AlD(3) rapidly and irreversibly decompose to Al and H(2) or D(2) gas when heated to about 420 and 520 K, respectively. In the present paper, the heat capacities at constant volume (C(V)) and at constant pressure (C(P)) are calculated for α-AlH(3) and α-AlD(3) at a pressure of 1 atm and temperatures 0-1000 K using the phonon densities of states determined earlier by inelastic neutron scattering at helium temperatures (Kolesnikov et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 76 064302). The C(P)(T) dependence of AlH(3) is also measured at temperatures 6-30 K and 130-320 K and that of AlD(3) at 130-320 K in order to compensate for the scatter in the literature data and to improve the accuracy of the calculated C(V) and C(P) dependences at low temperatures.

  8. Effects of dietary addition of heat-killed Mycobacterium phlei on growth performance, immune status and anti-oxidative capacity in early weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jin-Feng; Wu, Wei-Gao; Zhang, Xiao-Qing; Tu, Wei; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Fang, Re-Jun

    2016-08-01

    The contradiction between high susceptibility of early weaned piglets to enteric pathogens and rigid restriction of antibiotic use in the diet is still prominent in the livestock production industry. To address this issue, the study was designed to replace dietary antibiotics partly or completely by an immunostimulant, namely heat-killed Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei). Piglets (n = 192) were randomly assigned to one of the four groups: (1) basal diet (Group A), (2) basal diet + a mixture of antibiotics (80 mg/kg diet, Group B), (3) basal diet + a mixture of antibiotics (same as in Group B, but 40 mg/kg diet) + heat-killed M. phlei (1.5 g/kg diet) (Group C) and (4) basal diet + heat-killed M. phlei (3 g/kg diet) (Group D). All piglets received the respective diets from days 21 to 51 of age and were weaned at the age of 28 d. Compared with the Control (Group A), in all other groups the average daily gain, average daily feed intake, small intestinal villus height:crypt depth ratio and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunal mucosa were increased. A decreased incidence of diarrhoea in conjunction with an increased sIgA concentration in the intestinal mucosa and serum IL-12 and IFN-γ concentrations was found in groups supplemented with heat-killed M. phlei (Groups C and D), but not in Group B. Groups C and D also showed decreased IL-2 concentrations in the intestinal mucosa with lower TLR4 and phosphor-IκB protein levels. The antioxidant capacity was reinforced in Groups C and D, as evidenced by the reduction in malondialdehyde and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes in serum. These data indicate that heat-killed M. phlei is a promising alternative to antibiotic use for early weaned piglets via induction of protective immune responses. PMID:27216553

  9. Thermal Control and Enhancement of Heat Transport Capacity of Two-Phase Loops With Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Didion, J.; Ochterbeck, J. M.; Allen, J.

    2000-01-01

    electric power requirements making the EHD conduction pumping attractive to applications such as two-phase systems (e.g. capillary pumped loops and heat pipes). Currently, the EHD conduction pump performance is being tested on a two-phase loop under various operating conditions in the laboratory environment. The simple non-mechanical and lightweight design of the EHD pump combined with the rapid control of performance by varying the applied electric field, low power consumption, and reliability offer significant advantages over other pumping mechanisms; particularly in reduced gravity applications.

  10. The heat capacity of a natural monticellite and phase equilibria in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, Z.D.; Essene, E.J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Metz, G.W.; Westrum, E.F.; Hemingway, B.S.; Valley, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The heat capacity of a natural monticellite (Ca1.00Mg.09Fe.91Mn.01Si0.99O3.99) measured between 9.6 and 343 K using intermittent-heating, adiabatic calorimetry yields Cp0(298) and S2980 of 123.64 ?? 0.18 and 109.44 ?? 0.16 J ?? mol-1 K-1 respectively. Extrapolation of this entropy value to end-member monticellite results in an S0298 = 108.1 ?? 0.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. High-temperature heat-capacity data were measured between 340-1000 K with a differential scanning calorimeter. The high-temperature data were combined with the 290-350 K adiabatic values, extrapolated to 1700 K, and integrated to yield the following entropy equation for end-member monticellite (298-1700 K): ST0(J ?? mol-1 K-1) = S2980 + 164.79 In T + 15.337 ?? 10-3 T + 22.791 ?? 105 T-2 - 968.94. Phase equilibria in the CaO-MgO-SiO2 system were calculated from 973 to 1673 K and 0 to 12 kbar with these new data combined with existing data for akermanite (Ak), diopside (Di), forsterite (Fo), merwinite (Me) and wollastonite (Wo). The location of the calculated reactions involving the phases Mo and Fo is affected by their mutual solid solution. A best fit of the thermodynamically generated curves to all experiments is made when the S0298 of Me is 250.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1 less than the measured value of 253.2 J ?? mol-1 K-1. A best fit to the reversals for the solid-solid and decarbonation reactions in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-CO2 system was obtained with the ??G0298 (kJ ?? mole-1) for the phases Ak(-3667), Di(-3025), Fo(-2051), Me(-4317) and Mo(-2133). The two invariant points - Wo and -Fo for the solid-solid reactions are located at 1008 ?? 5 K and 6.3 ?? 0.1 kbar, and 1361 ?? 10 K and 10.2 ?? 0.2 kbar respectively. The location of the thermodynamically generated curves is in excellent agreement with most experimental data on decarbonation equilibria involving these phases. ?? 1986.

  11. Effects of temperature-humidity index and chromium supplementation on antioxidant capacity, heat shock protein 72, and cytokine responses of lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F J; Weng, X G; Wang, J F; Zhou, D; Zhang, W; Zhai, C C; Hou, Y X; Zhu, Y H

    2014-07-01

    Heat stress adversely affects the productivity and immune status of dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is commonly used to indicate the degree of heat stress on dairy cattle. We investigated the effects of different THI and Cr supplementation on the antioxidant capacity, the levels of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), and cytokine responses of lactating cows. The study used a total of 24 clinically healthy uniparous midlactation Holstein cows, which were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 12 per group), and was conducted in 3 designated THI periods: low THI period (LTHI; THI = 56.4 ± 2.5), moderate THI period (MTHI; THI = 73.9 ± 1.7), and high THI period (HTHI; THI = 80.3 ± 1.0). The 2 groups of cows were fed corn and corn silage based basal diet supplemented chromium picolinate to provide 3.5 mg of Cr/cow daily (Cr+) or basal diet with no Cr (Cr-). The experiment was a 3 × 2 factorial design. The numbers of leukocytes (P < 0.05) and serum levels of glucose (P < 0.001) were lower; however, the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN; P < 0.001) and creatinine (P < 0.001) were greater in the MTHI and HTHI than in LTHI. The total antioxidant capacity in the serum was unaltered; an increase in superoxide dismutase activity (P < 0.001) and in serum malondialdehyde concentration (P < 0.001) was observed in the MTHI and HTHI compared with the LTHI. The high THI led to increases in serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; P < 0.001) and IL-10 (P < 0.05). Cows supplemented with Cr had lower (P = 0.009) serum concentrations of cholesterol but greater (P < 0.001, respectively) serum levels of Hsp72 and IL-10 compared with those without Cr supplementation in the HTHI. Western blot analysis revealed that cows supplemented with Cr had greater (P = 0.038) expression of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B α (IκBα) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) compared with those without Cr supplementation in the HTHI, whereas the expression

  12. Maxillary second molar extractions in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wilson; Wong, Ricky Wing-Kit; Ikegami, Tomio; Hägg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    This article is a review of the rationales, indications, methods, and effects of orthodontic treatment with maxillary second molar extractions. In addition to the patient's malocclusion, specific considerations about the status and position of the maxillary second and third molars should be taken into account. In recent years, the development of temporary anchorage devices, in addition to extraoral traction and intraoral distalization appliances, has become another armamentarium in the distalization of the maxillary posterior teeth, which may affect the selection of teeth to be extracted from second to third molars. In conclusion, extraction of maxillary second molars is a viable option in selected cases at present, but it is important to understand the indications and limitations of this treatment choice.

  13. Maxillary first molar with five canals

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Root canal treatment is a technically demanding procedure especially in the case of maxillary first molar where the anatomy is extremely variable. Failure to recognise and treat these variations may lead to unpredictable outcomes. This case report describes non-surgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary first molar with two palatal and two mesiobuccal canals. It also highlights the need for good anatomical knowledge of root canal morphology and its variations in order to achieve consistently successful results. PMID:25239993

  14. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-01-01

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation. PMID:24577171

  15. Molar shape variability in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that platyrrhines constitute a monophyletic group represented by three families: Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae. Morphological variability between and within these three families, however, is widely discussed and debated. The aim of this study was to assess molar shape variability in platyrrhines, to explore patterns of interspecific variation among extant species, and to evaluate how molar shape can be used as a taxonomic indicator. The analyses were conducted using standard multivariate analyses of geometric morphometric data from 802 platyrrhine lower molars. The results indicated that the interspecific variation exhibited a highly homoplastic pattern related to functional adaptation of some taxa. However, phylogeny was also an important factor in shaping molar morphological traits, given that some phenotypic similarities were consistent with current phylogenetic positions. Our results show that the phylogenetic and functional signals of lower molar shape vary depending on the taxa and the tooth considered. Based on molar shape, Aotus showed closer similarities to Callicebus, as well as to some Cebidae and Ateles-Lagothrix, due to convergent evolutionary trends caused by similar dietary habits, or due to fast-evolving branches in the Aotus lineage, somewhat similar to the shape of Callicebus and Cebidae.

  16. Molar shape variability in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that platyrrhines constitute a monophyletic group represented by three families: Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae. Morphological variability between and within these three families, however, is widely discussed and debated. The aim of this study was to assess molar shape variability in platyrrhines, to explore patterns of interspecific variation among extant species, and to evaluate how molar shape can be used as a taxonomic indicator. The analyses were conducted using standard multivariate analyses of geometric morphometric data from 802 platyrrhine lower molars. The results indicated that the interspecific variation exhibited a highly homoplastic pattern related to functional adaptation of some taxa. However, phylogeny was also an important factor in shaping molar morphological traits, given that some phenotypic similarities were consistent with current phylogenetic positions. Our results show that the phylogenetic and functional signals of lower molar shape vary depending on the taxa and the tooth considered. Based on molar shape, Aotus showed closer similarities to Callicebus, as well as to some Cebidae and Ateles-Lagothrix, due to convergent evolutionary trends caused by similar dietary habits, or due to fast-evolving branches in the Aotus lineage, somewhat similar to the shape of Callicebus and Cebidae. PMID:27650581

  17. Heat capacities of kaolinite from 7 to 380 K and of DMSO- intercalated kaolinite from 20 to 310 K. The entropy of kaolinite Al2Si2O5(OH)4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    The heat capacities of kaolinite (7 to 380 K) and of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) intercalated kaolinite (20 to 310 K) were measured by adiabatically shielded calorimetry. The third law entropy of kaolinite, S??298, is 200.9??0.5 J.mol-1.K-1. The "melting point' of the DMSO in the intercalate, 288.0??0.2 K, is 3.7 K lower than that of pure DMSO, 291.67 K. The heat capacity of DMSO in the intercalate above 290 K is approximately 5.2 J.mol-1.K-1 smaller than that of pure liquid DMSO at the same temperature. -Authors

  18. Thermal effusivity measurement based on analysis of 3D heat flow by modulated spot heating using a phase lag matrix with a combination of thermal effusivity and volumetric heat capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Hiromichi; Hatori, Kimihito; Matsui, Genzou; Yagi, Takashi; Miyake, Shugo; Okamura, Takeo; Endoh, Ryo; Okada, Ryo; Morishita, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Shinichiro; Taguchi, Kohei; Kato, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    The study goal was to establish a standard industrial procedure for the measurement of thermal effusivity by a thermal microscope (TM), using a periodic heating method with a thermoreflectance (TR) technique. To accomplish this goal, a working group was organized that included four research institutes. Each institute followed the same procedure: a molybdenum (Mo) film was sputtered on the surface of Pyrex, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), alumina (Al2O3), Germanium (Ge), and silicon (Si) samples, and then the phase lag of the laser intensity modulation was measured by the resultant surface temperature. A procedure was proposed to calibrate the effect of 3D heat flow, based on the analytical solution of the heat conduction equation, and thermal effusivity was measured. The derived values show good agreement with literature values. As a result, the TM calibration procedure can be recommended for practical use in measuring the thermal effusivity in a small region of the materials.

  19. Electronically- and crystal-structure-driven magnetic structures and physical properties of RScSb (R = rare earth) compounds. A neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity study

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C; Dhar, S K; Kulkarni, R; Provino, A; Paudyal, Durga; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Gschneidner, Karl A

    2014-08-14

    The synthesis of the new equiatomic RScSb ( R = La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) compounds has been recently reported. These rare earth compounds crystallize in two different crystal structures, adopting the CeScSi-type ( I 4/ mmm) for the lighter R (La-Nd, Sm) and the CeFeSi-type (P4 /nmm) structure for the heavier R ( R = Gd-Tm, Lu, Y). Here we report the results of neutron diffraction, magnetization and heat capacity measurements on some of these compounds ( R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb). Band structure calculations have also been performed on CeScSb and GdScGe (CeScSi-type), and on GdScSb and TbScSb (CeFeSi-type) to compare and understand the exchange interactions in CeScSi and CeFeSi structure types. The neutron diffraction investigation shows that all five compounds order magnetically, with the highest transition temperature of 66 K in TbScSb and the lowest of about 9 K in CeScSb. The magnetic ground state is simple ferromagnetic (τ = [0 0 0]) in CeScSb, as well in NdScSb for 32 >T > 22 K. Below 22 K a second magnetic transition, with propagation vector τ = [¼ ¼ 0], appears in NdScSb. PrScSb has a magnetic structure within, determined by mostly ferromagnetic interactions and antiferromagnetic alignment of the Pr-sites connected through the I-centering ( τ = [1 0 0]). A cycloidal spiral structure with a temperature dependent propagation vector τ = [δ δ ½] is found in TbScSb. The results of magnetization and heat capacity lend support to the main conclusions derived from neutron diffraction. As inferred from a sharp peak in magnetization, GdScSb orders antiferromagnetically at 56 K. First principles calculations show lateral shift of spin split bands towards lower energy from the Fermi level as the CeScSi-type structure changes to the CeFeSi-type structure. This rigid shift may force the system to transform from exchange split ferromagnetic state to the antiferromagnetic state in RScSb compounds (as seen for example in GdScSb and TbScSb) and is proposed to

  20. Formation enthalpies and heat capacities of rear earth titanates: RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} (RE=La, Nd and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayun, Shmuel; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-03-15

    The formation enthalpies and heat capacities of orthorhombic rare earth titanates, RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} (RE=La, Nd and Gd), have been studied by high temperature differential scanning calorimetry (300-1473 K) and oxide-melt solution calorimetry. The RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} samples are stable in enthalpy with respect to their oxides and the pyrochlore RE{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase. The general trend that has been demonstrated in other RE-ternary systems; decreasing thermodynamic stability with decreasing R{sub A}/R{sub B} was found to be valid for the RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, and their enthalpies of formation from oxides become more negative with increasing RE{sup 3+} ionic radius. - Graphical abstract: Normalized enthalpy of formation for one RE{sup 3+} cation from the oxides for several RE ternary oxide systems vs. the cation radius ratio R{sub A}/R{sub B} (A=RE, B=Ti, Zr, P). All the RE ternary oxide systems are stable relative to constituent oxides, with increasing stability as R{sub A}/R{sub B} increases. The Roman numerals above the cations represent the coordination number. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation enthalpies and heat capacities of RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} (RE=La, Nd and Gd) were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enthalpies of formation of RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} from oxides become more negative with increasing RE{sup 3+} ionic radius. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} phases are stable in enthalpy with respect to their oxides and the pyrochlore RE{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic stability of orthorhombic RE{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} decrease with increasing R{sub B} to R{sub A} ratio.

  1. The decrease in the IgG-binding capacity of intensively dry heated whey proteins is associated with intense Maillard reaction, structural changes of the proteins and formation of RAGE-ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Wichers, Harry J; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is the most common way of milk processing, inducing structural changes as well as chemical modifications in milk proteins. These modifications influence the immune-reactivity and allergenicity of milk proteins. This study shows the influence of dry heating on the solubility, particle size, loss of accessible thiol and amino groups, degree of Maillard reaction, IgG-binding capacity and binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) of thermally treated and glycated whey proteins. A mixture of whey proteins and lactose was dry heated at 130 °C up to 20 min to mimic the baking process in two different water activities, 0.23 to mimic the heating in the dry state and 0.59 for the semi-dry state. The dry heating was accompanied by a loss of soluble proteins and an increase in the size of dissolved aggregates. Most of the Maillard reaction sites were found to be located in the reported conformational epitope area on whey proteins. Therefore the structural changes, including exposure of the SH group, SH-SS exchange, covalent cross-links and the loss of available lysine, subsequently resulted in a decreased IgG-binding capacity (up to 33%). The binding of glycation products to RAGE increased with the heating time, which was correlated with the stage of the Maillard reaction and the decrease in the IgG-binding capacity. The RAGE-binding capacity was higher in samples with a lower water activity (0.23). These results indicate that the intensive dry heating of whey proteins as it occurs during baking may be of importance to the immunological properties of allergens in cow's milk, both due to chemical modifications of the allergens and formation of AGEs.

  2. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  3. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Tapes for day and night passes on May 16 and May 20, 1978 and a day pass on May 3, 1980 were processed. Results indicate that it is extremely difficult to locate a field of 9 pixel size and temperature data from the HCMM are consistently lower than temperatures measured with a scanner flown at low altitudes. The temperature differences between the satellite and aircraft data appear to be temperature dependent, being smaller at lower temperatures. Three data points are in the format (airc, HCMM) (12,9), (30,23), and (39,30). The linear equation for these three points is T sub HCMM = 0.778 T sub airc -0.33.

  4. HCMM Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Thermal imagery shows a large temperature variation over the 640 acre experimental site. The variation is due to the slope and aspect of the terrain as well as the aircraft flight direction (east-west versus north-south). In spite of these individual temperature differences, mean temperature values from 40 to 640 acre blocks are essentially identical regardless of aircraft flight direction.

  5. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  6. Negative heat-capacity at phase-separations in microcanonical thermostatistics of macroscopic systems with either short or long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, D. H. E.

    2006-06-01

    Conventional thermo-statistics address infinite homogeneous systems within the canonical ensemble. However, some 170 years ago the original motivation of thermodynamics was the description of steam engines, i.e., boiling water. Its essential physics is the separation of the gas phase from the liquid. Of course, boiling water is inhomogeneous and as such cannot be treated by conventional thermo-statistics. Then it is not astonishing, that a phase transition of first order is signaled canonically by a Yang Lee singularity. Thus, it is only treated correctly by microcanonical Boltzmann Planck statistics. This was elaborated in the talk presented at this conference. It turns out that the Boltzmann Planck statistics is much richer and gives fundamental insight into statistical mechanics and especially into entropy. This can be done to a far extend rigorously and analytically. The deep and essential difference between “extensive” and “intensive” control parameters, i.e., microcanonical and canonical statistics, was exemplified by rotating, self-gravitating systems. In the present paper the necessary appearance of a convex entropy S(E) and the negative heat capacity at phase separation in small as well macroscopic systems independently of the range of the force is pointed out.

  7. Contrasting Effects of Salt and Temperature on Niosome-Bound Norharmane: Direct Evidence for Positive Heat Capacity Change in the Niosome:β-Cyclodextrin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mondal, Ramakanta; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-05-01

    The modulation of the prototropic equilibrium of a cancer cell photosensitizer, norharmane (NHM), within a niosome microheterogeneous environment has been investigated. The contrasting effects of temperature and extrinsically added salt on the photophysics of niosome-bound drug have been meticulously explored from steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. The cation ⇌ neutral prototropic equilibrium of NHM is found to be preferentially favored toward the neutral species with increasing salt concentration, and the results are rationalized on the basis of water penetration to the hydration layer of niosome. The effects are typically reversed with temperature. The differential rotational relaxation behavior of NHM under various conditions has also been addressed from fluorescence anisotropy decay. Further, the study delineates the application of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) as a potential host system, leading to drug sequestration from the niosome-encapsulated state. To this end, a detailed investigation of the thermodynamics of the niosome:βCD interaction has been undertaken by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to unravel the notable dependence of the thermodynamic parameters on temperature. Consequently, a critical analysis of the variation of the enthalpy change (ΔH) of the process with temperature leads to the unique observation of a positive heat capacity change (ΔCp) marking the hallmark of hydrophobic hydration. PMID:27082934

  8. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  9. Analysis of the heat capacity for pure CH4 and CH4/CCl4 on graphite near the melting point and calculation of the T-X phase diagram for (CH3)CCl3 + CCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtseven, Hamit; Yılmaz, Aygül

    2016-06-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the heat capacity Cp for the pure CH4 and the coadsorbed CH4/CCl4 on graphite near the melting point. The heat capacity peaks are analyzed using the experimental data from the literature by means of the power-law formula. The critical exponents for the heat capacity are deduced below and above the melting point for CH4 (Tm = 104.8 K) and CH4/CCl4 (Tm = 99.2 K). Our exponent values are larger as compared with the predicted values of some theoretical models exhibiting second order transition. Our analyses indicate that the pure methane shows a nearly second order (weak discontinuity in the heat capacity peak), whereas the transition in coadsorbed CH4/CCl4 is of first order (apparent discontinuity in Cp). We also study the T – X phase diagram of a two-component system of CH3CCl3+CCl4 using the Landau phenomenological model. Phase lines of the R+L (rhombohedral+liquid) and FCC+L (face-centred cubic + liquid) are calculated using the observed T – X phase diagram of this binary mixture. Our results show that the Landau mean field theory describes the observed behavior of CH3CCl3+CCl4 adequately. From the calculated T – X phase diagram, critical behavior of some thermodynamic quantities can be predicted at various temperatures and concentrations (CCl4) for a binary mixture of CH3CCl3+CCl4.

  10. Analysis of the heat capacity for pure CH4 and CH4/CCl4 on graphite near the melting point and calculation of the T-X phase diagram for (CH3)CCl3 + CCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtseven, Hamit; Yılmaz, Aygül

    2016-06-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the heat capacity Cp for the pure CH4 and the coadsorbed CH4/CCl4 on graphite near the melting point. The heat capacity peaks are analyzed using the experimental data from the literature by means of the power-law formula. The critical exponents for the heat capacity are deduced below and above the melting point for CH4 (Tm = 104.8 K) and CH4/CCl4 (Tm = 99.2 K). Our exponent values are larger as compared with the predicted values of some theoretical models exhibiting second order transition. Our analyses indicate that the pure methane shows a nearly second order (weak discontinuity in the heat capacity peak), whereas the transition in coadsorbed CH4/CCl4 is of first order (apparent discontinuity in Cp). We also study the T - X phase diagram of a two-component system of CH3CCl3+CCl4 using the Landau phenomenological model. Phase lines of the R+L (rhombohedral+liquid) and FCC+L (face-centred cubic + liquid) are calculated using the observed T - X phase diagram of this binary mixture. Our results show that the Landau mean field theory describes the observed behavior of CH3CCl3+CCl4 adequately. From the calculated T - X phase diagram, critical behavior of some thermodynamic quantities can be predicted at various temperatures and concentrations (CCl4) for a binary mixture of CH3CCl3+CCl4.

  11. Capacity fade modelling of lithium-ion battery under cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, T. R.; Chung, Yongmann M.; Wang, Jihong

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo two-dimensional (P2D) electro-chemical lithium-ion battery model is presented in this paper to study the capacity fade under cyclic charge-discharge conditions. The Newman model [1,2] has been modified to include a continuous solvent reduction reaction responsible for the capacity fade and power fade. The temperature variation inside the cell is accurately predicted using a distributed thermal model coupled with the internal chemical heat generation. The model is further improved by linking the porosity variation with the electrolyte partial molar concentration, thereby proving a stronger coupling between the battery performance and the chemical properties of electrolyte. The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer growth is estimated for different cut-off voltages and charging current rates. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient as well as the porosity variation influences the SEI layer growth and the battery life significantly. The choice of an electrolyte decides the conductivity and partial molar concentration, which is found to have a strong influence on the capacity fade of the battery. The present battery model integrates all essential electro-chemical processes inside a lithium-ion battery under a strong implicit algorithm, proving a useful tool for computationally fast battery monitoring system.

  12. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications.

  13. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications. PMID:19161121

  14. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Noncompliant Molar Distalizing Appliance: Bonded Molar Distalizer

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, A.; Ahmad Akhoundi, M. S.; Rafighii, A.; Arab, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Attempts to treat class II malocclusions without extraction in non-compliant patients have led to utilization of intraoral molar distalizing appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate dental and skeletal effects of Bonded Molar Distalizer (BMD) which is a simple molar distalizing appliance. Materials and Methods Sixteen patients (12 girls, four boys) with bilateral half-cusp class II molar relationship, erupted permanent second molars and normal or vertical growth pattern were selected for bilateral distalization of maxillary molars via BMD. The screws were activated every other day, alternately. Lateral cephalograms and study models were obtained before treatment and after 11 weeks activation of the appliance. Results Significant amounts of molar distalization, molar distal tipping and anchorage loss were observed. The mean maxillary first molar distal movement was 1.22±0.936 mm with a distal tipping of 2.97±3.74 degrees in 11 weeks. The rate of distal movement was 0.48 mm per month. Reciprocal mesial movement of the first premolars was 2.26±1.12 mm with a mesial tipping of 4.25±3.12 degrees. Maxillary incisors moved 3.55±1.46 mm and tipped 9.87±5.03 degrees mesially. Lower anterior face height (LAFH) decreased 1.28±1.36 mm. Conclusion BMD is appropriate for distalizing maxillary molars, especially in patients with critical LAFH, although significant amounts of anchorage loss occur using this appliance. PMID:22457837

  15. Molar and molecular views of choice.

    PubMed

    Baum, William M

    2004-06-30

    The molar and molecular views of behavior are not different theories or levels of analysis; they are different paradigms. The molecular paradigm views behavior as composed of discrete units (responses) occurring at moments in time and strung together in chains to make up complex performances. The discrete pieces are held together as a result of association by contiguity. The molecular view has a long history both in early thought about reflexes and in associationism, and, although it was helpful to getting a science of behavior started, it has outlived its usefulness. The molar view stems from a conviction that behavior is continuous, as argued by John Dewey, Gestalt psychologists, Karl Lashley, and others. The molar paradigm views behavior as inherently extended in time and composed of activities that have integrated parts. In the molar paradigm, activities vary in their scale of organization--i.e., as to whether they are local or extended--and behavior may be controlled sometimes by short-term relations and sometimes by long-term relations. Applied to choice, the molar paradigm rests on two simple principles: (a) all behavior constitutes choice; and (b) all activities take time. Equivalence between choice and behavior occurs because every situation contains more than one alternative activity. The principle that behavior takes time refers not simply to any notion of response duration, but to the necessity that identifying one action or another requires a sample extended in time. The molecular paradigm's momentary responses are inferred from extended samples in retrospect. In this sense, momentary responses constitute abstractions, whereas extended activities constitute concrete particulars. Explanations conceived within the molecular paradigm invariably involve hypothetical constructs, because they require causes to be contiguous with responses. Explanations conceived within the molar paradigm retain direct contact with observable variables.

  16. Ectopic molar pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bousfiha, Najoua; Erarhay, Sanaa; Louba, Adnane; Saadi, Hanan; Bouchikhi, Chahrazad; Banani, Abdelaziz; Fatemi, Hind El; Sekkal, Med; Laamarti, Afaf

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of hydatidiform moles is 1 per 1,000 pregnancies. Ectopic pregnancy occurs in 20 per 1,000 pregnancies. Thus, the incidence of the ectopic molar gestation is very rare. We report a case of tubal molar pregnancy diagnosed at the systematic histology exam of an ectopic pregnancy. We report the case of 32 years old nulliparus women who presented a vaginal bleeding, lower abdominal pain and 6 weeks amenorrhea corresponding to the last menstrual period. At the clinical examination, the arterial pressure was 100/60 mmHG. The gynecological examination was difficult because of lower abdominal pain. Serum gonadotropin activity was 3454 ui/l. Pelvic ultrasound revealed an irregular echogenic mass in the left adnexa. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a left-sided unruptured ampullary ectopic pregnancy. A left laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed. The systematic histologic test identified an ectopic partial molar pregnancy, which was confirmed by DNA ploidy image analysis. The patient was followed with weekly quantitative B-hCG titers until three successive B-hCG levels were negative. It is pertinent that clinicians take routine histological examination of tubal specimens in ectopic pregnancy very seriously in order to diagnose cases of ectopic molar gestations early and mount appropriate post treatment surveillance. PMID:22655097

  17. Ectopic molar pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bousfiha, Najoua; Erarhay, Sanaa; Louba, Adnane; Saadi, Hanan; Bouchikhi, Chahrazad; Banani, Abdelaziz; El Fatemi, Hind; Sekkal, Med; Laamarti, Afaf

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of hydatidiform moles is 1 per 1,000 pregnancies. Ectopic pregnancy occurs in 20 per 1,000 pregnancies. Thus, the incidence of the ectopic molar gestation is very rare. We report a case of tubal molar pregnancy diagnosed at the systematic histology exam of an ectopic pregnancy. We report the case of 32 years old nulliparus women who presented a vaginal bleeding, lower abdominal pain and 6 weeks amenorrhea corresponding to the last menstrual period. At the clinical examination, the arterial pressure was 100/60 mmHG. The gynecological examination was difficult because of lower abdominal pain. Serum gonadotropin activity was 3454 ui/l. Pelvic ultrasound revealed an irregular echogenic mass in the left adnexa. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a left-sided unruptured ampullary ectopic pregnancy. A left laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed. The systematic histologic test identified an ectopic partial molar pregnancy, which was confirmed by DNA ploidy image analysis. The patient was followed with weekly quantitative B-hCG titers until three successive B-hCG levels were negative. It is pertinent that clinicians take routine histological examination of tubal specimens in ectopic pregnancy very seriously in order to diagnose cases of ectopic molar gestations early and mount appropriate post treatment surveillance. PMID:22655097

  18. Mass versus molar doses, similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, A; Lamparczyk, H

    2008-11-01

    Generally, they are two systems expressing the amounts of active substance in a given drug product, i.e. mass and molar dose. Currently, the dose system based on the mass is widely used in which doses are expressed in grams or milligrams. On the other hand, the molar dose system is in direct relation to the number of molecules. Hence, the objective of this work was to compare both systems in order to find their advantages and disadvantages. Active substances belonging to the groups of antibiotics, nootropic agents, beta-blockers, vitamins, GABA-analog, COX-2 inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, lipid-modifying agents (fibrates), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (profens), estrogens, neuroleptics, analgesics and benzodiazepines were considered. Moreover, products containing two active substances were also taken into account. These are mixtures of hydrochlorothiazide with active substances influencing the renin-angiotensin system and combined oral contraceptives. For each active substance, belonging to the groups mentioned above molar doses were calculated from mass doses and molar mass. Hence, groups of drugs with a single active substance, drugs with similar pharmacological activities, pharmaceutical alternatives, and drugs with a single active ingredient manufactured in different doses were compared in order to find which dose system describes more adequately differences between and within the groups mentioned above. Comparisons were supported by a number of equations, which theoretically justify the data, and relationships derived from calculations. PMID:19069248

  19. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational–rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu; Truhlar, Donald G. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our “path-by-path” enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P{sup −6}) to O(P{sup −12}), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational–rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan–Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300–3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  20. Heat capacity measurements for cryolite (Na3AlF6) and reactions in the system NaFeAlSiOF

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Hemingway, B.S.; Westrum, E.F.; Metz, G.W.; Essene, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The heat capacity of cryolite (Na3AlF6) has been measured from 7 to 1000 K by low-temperature adiabatic and high-temperature differential scanning calorimetry. Low-temperature data were obtained on material from the same hand specimen in the calorimetric laboratories of the University of Michigan and U.S. Geological Survey. The results obtained are in good agreement, and yield average values for the entropy of cryolite of: S0298 = 238.5 J/mol KS0T-S0298 = 145.114 ln T+ 193.009*10-3T- 10.366* 105 T2- 872.89 J/mol K (273-836.5 K)??STrans = 9.9J/mol KS0T-S0298 =198.414 ln T+73.203* 10-3T-63.814* 105 T2-1113.11 J/mol K (836.5-1153 K) with the transition temperature between ??- and ??-cryolite taken at 836.5 K. These data have been combined with data in the literature to calculate phase equilibria for the system NaFeAlSiOF. The resultant phase diagrams allow constraints to be placed on the fO2, fF2, aSiO2 and T conditions of formation for assemblages in alkalic rocks. A sample application suggests that log fO2 is approximately -19.2, log fF2 is -31.9 to -33.2, and aSiO2 is -1.06 at assumed P T conditions of 1000 K, 1 bar for the villiaumite-bearing Ilimaussaq intrusion in southwestern Greenland. ?? 1987.

  1. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational-rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our "path-by-path" enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P(-6)) to O(P(-12)), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational-rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan-Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300-3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  2. Role of the heat capacity change in understanding and modeling melting thermodynamics of complementary duplexes containing standard and nucleobase-modified LNA.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis B; Turner, Robin F B; Haynes, Charles A

    2011-06-14

    Melting thermodynamic data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are reported for 43 duplexed oligonucleotides containing one or more locked nucleic acid (LNA) substitutions. The measured heat capacity change (ΔC(p)) for the helix-to-coil transition is used to compute the changes in enthalpy and entropy for melting of an LNA-bearing duplex at the T(m) of its corresponding isosequential unmodified DNA duplex to allow rigorous thermodynamic analysis of the stability enhancements provided by LNA substitutions. Contrary to previous studies, our analysis shows that the origin of the improved stability is almost exclusively a net reduction (ΔΔS° < 0) in the entropy gain accompanying the helix-to-coil transition, with the magnitude of the reduction dependent on the type of nucleobase and its base pairing properties. This knowledge and our average measured value for ΔC(p) of 42 ± 11 cal mol(-1) K(-1) bp(-1) are then used to derive a new model that accurately predicts melting thermodynamics and the increased melting temperature (ΔT(m)) of heteroduplexes formed between an unmodified DNA strand and a complementary strand containing any number and configuration of standard LNA nucleotides A, T, C, and G. This single-base thermodynamic (SBT) model requires only four entropy-related parameters in addition to ΔC(p). Finally, DSC data for 20 duplexes containing the nucleobase-modified LNAs 2-aminoadenine (D) and 2-thiothymine (H) are reported and used to determine SBT model parameters for D and H. The data and model suggest that along with the greater stability enhancement provided by D and H bases relative to their corresponding A and T analogues, the unique pseudocomplementary properties of D-H base pairs may make their use appealing for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  3. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational-rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our "path-by-path" enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P(-6)) to O(P(-12)), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational-rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan-Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300-3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities. PMID:25637967

  4. Thermodynamic properties of illite, smectite and beidellite by calorimetric methods: Enthalpies of formation, heat capacities, entropies and Gibbs free energies of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, H.; Blanc, P.; Rogez, J.; Mikaelian, G.; Kawaji, H.; Olives, J.; Amouric, M.; Denoyel, R.; Bourrelly, S.; Montouillout, V.; Vieillard, P.; Fialips, C. I.; Michau, N.; Gaucher, E. C.

    2012-07-01

    The thermodynamic properties of three aluminous 2:1 clay minerals were acquired at 1.013 bars and at temperatures between 5 and 500 K using various calorimetric methods. Calorimetric measurements were performed on hydrated and dehydrated <2 μm clay fractions of smectite MX-80 (Wyoming), illite IMt-2 (Silver Hill) and beidellite SBId-1 (Black Jack Mine). After purification, the mineralogical analyses gave the following structural formulae: Na0.409K0.024Ca0.009 (Si3.738Al0.262) (Al1.598Mg0.214Fe 0.173 3 + Fe 0.035 2 +)O10(OH)2,K0.762Na0.044 (Si3.387Al0.613) (Al1.427Mg0.241Fe 0.292 3 + Fe 0.084 2 +)O10(OH)2 and Ca0.185K0.104 (Si3.574Al0.426) (Al1.812Mg0.09Fe 0.112 3 +)O10(OH)2 for smectite MX-80, illite IMt-2 and beidellite SBId-1, respectively. Heat capacities were measured by low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, from 5 to 500 K. Standard enthalpies of formation were obtained from solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K. The standard Gibbs free energies of formation of the clay minerals were also calculated, together with the equilibrium constants at 25 °C, for anhydrous and hydrated minerals. A comparison between these experimental data and estimated values obtained from prediction models available in the literature, enabled the calculation method that appears to be the most relevant to be selected, at least for aluminous 2:1 clay minerals.

  5. Determination of the energy storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between methylfuran and maleic anhydride as applied to storing solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    The heat storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between 2-methylfuran and maleic anhydride is calculated using reaction parameters obtained from solution calorimetry. An equilibrium constant of .614 1/mol and a heat of reaction of 14.33 kcal/mole were obtained from experiments at 45/sup 0/C. A reaction ..delta..C/sub p/ of -21.8 cal/mole was calculated from heat capacity information at 25/sup 0/C. From these parameters, a solution initially seven molar in methylfuran and maleic anhydride was found to have a maximum apparent volumetric heat capacity of about 1.85 times that of water. This maximum occurs at about 335/sup 0/K. Typical active solar energy schemes operate between 300 and 400/sup 0/K. When cycled between these temperatures, this system has an overall apparent heat capacity about 1.5 times that of water. The apparent heat capacity increases as the temperature range is narrowed.

  6. Till Surgery do us Part: Unexpected Bilateral Kissing Molars

    PubMed Central

    Anish, Narayanankutty; Vivek, Velayudhannair; Thomas, Sunila; Daniel, Vineet Alex; Thomas, Jincy; Ranimol, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence impacted teeth, single or multiple is very common. But, phenomenon of kissing molars is an extremely rare phenomenon. Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first or second molars does not share the same frequency of occurrence. But, there are rare cases in which the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots point in the opposite direction, and are termed as kissing molars. Sometimes, these teeth will be associated with pathologies. This article reports a rare case of mandibular bilateral kissing molars. PMID:25918627

  7. Assessment of association between molar incisor hypomineralization and hypomineralized second primary molar

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rakesh; Chandak, Shweta; Chandwani, Manisha; Singh, Prabhat; Pimpale, Jitesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) has been described as a clinical entity of systemic origin affecting the enamel of one or all first permanent molars and also the incisors; less frequently the second primary molars have also been reported to develop hypomineralization of the enamel, along with MIH. Aim: To scrutinize the association between hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPMs) and MIH and their prevalence in schoolgoing pupils in Nagpur, Maharashtra, India and the associated severity of dental caries. Design: A sample of 1,109 pupils belonging to 3–12-year-old age group was included. The entire sample was then divided into Group I (3–5 years) and Group II (6–12 years). The scoring criteria proposed by the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry for hypomineralization was used to score HSPM and MIH. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System II (ICDAS II) was used for appraising caries status in the hypomineralized molars. The examination was conducted by a single calibrated dentist in schools in daylight. The results, thus obtained, were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test and odds ratio. Result: Of the children examined, 10 in Group I (4.88%) had HSPM and 63 in Group II (7.11%) had MIH in at least one molar. In Group II, out of 63 subjects diagnosed with MIH, 30 subjects (48%) also had HSPM. Carious lesions with high severity were appreciated in hypomineralized molars. Conclusion: The prevalence of HSPM was 4.88% and of MIH was 7.11%. Approximately half of the affected first permanent molars were associated with HSPM. The likelihood of development of caries increased with the severity of hypomineralization defect. PMID:27011930

  8. Thermal diffusion and partial molar enthalpy variations of n-butane in silicalite-1.

    PubMed

    Inzoli, I; Simon, J M; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S

    2008-11-27

    We report for the first time the heat of transfer and the Soret coefficient for n-butane in silicalite-1. The heat of transfer was typically 10 kJ/mol. The Soret coefficient was typically 0.006 K(-1) at 360 K. Both varied with the temperature and the concentration. The thermal conductivity of the crystal with butane adsorbed was 1.46 +/- 0.07 W/m K. Literature values of the isosteric enthalpy of adsorption, the concentration at saturation, and the diffusion coefficients were reproduced. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were used to find these results, and a modified heat-exchange algorithm, Soft-HEX, was developed for the purpose. Enthalpies of butane were also determined. We use these results to give numerical proof for a recently proposed relation, that the heat of transfer plus the partial molar enthalpy of butane is constant at a given temperature. The proof is offered for a regime where the partial molar enthalpy can be approximated by the molar internal energy. This result may add to the understanding of the sign of the Soret coefficient. The technical importance of the heat of transfer is discussed.

  9. Human dental age estimation combining third molar(s) development and tooth morphological age predictors.

    PubMed

    Thevissen, P W; Galiti, D; Willems, G

    2012-11-01

    In the subadult age group, third molar development, as well as age-related morphological tooth information can be observed on panoramic radiographs. The aim of present study was to combine, in subadults, panoramic radiographic data based on developmental stages of third molar(s) and morphological measurements from permanent teeth, in order to evaluate its added age-predicting performances. In the age range between 15 and 23 years, 25 gender-specific radiographs were collected within each age category of 1 year. Third molar development was classified and registered according the 10-point staging and scoring technique proposed by Gleiser and Hunt (1955), modified by Köhler (1994). The Kvaal (1995) measuring technique was applied on the indicated teeth from the individuals' left side. Linear regression models with age as response and third molar-scored stages as explanatory variables were developed, and morphological measurements from permanent teeth were added. From the models, determination coefficients (R (2)) and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated. Maximal-added age information was reported as a 6 % R² increase and a 0.10-year decrease of RMSE. Forensic dental age estimations on panoramic radiographic data in the subadult group (15-23 year) should only be based on third molar development.

  10. Effects of Monovalent Anions on a Temperature-dependent Heat Capacity Change for E. coli SSB Tetramer Binding to Single Stranded DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that the linkage of temperature-dependent protonation and DNA base unstacking equilibria contribute significantly to both the negative enthalpy change (ΔHobs) and the negative heat capacity change (ΔCp,obs) for E. coli SSB homotetramer binding to single stranded (ss) DNA. Using isothermal titration calorimetry we have now examined ΔHobs over a much wider temperature range (5°C to 60°C) and as a function of monovalent salt concentration and type for SSB binding to (dT)70 under solution conditions that favor the fully wrapped (SSB)65 complex (monovalent salt concentration ≥ 0.20 M). Over this wider temperature range we observe a strongly temperature dependent ΔCp,obs. The ΔHobs decreases as temperature increases from 5°C to 35°C (ΔCp,obs <0), but then increase at higher temperatures up to 60°C (ΔCp,obs >0). Both salt concentration and anion type have large effects on ΔHobs and ΔCp,obs. These observations can be explained by a model in which SSB protein can undergo a temperature and salt dependent conformational transition (below 35°C), the midpoint of which shifts to higher temperature (above 35°C) for SSB bound to ssDNA. Anions bind weakly to free SSB, with the preference, Br- > Cl- > F-, and these anions are then released upon binding ssDNA, affecting both ΔHobs and ΔCp,obs. We conclude that the experimentally measured values of ΔCp,obs for SSB binding to ssDNA cannot be explained solely on the basis of changes in accessible surface area (ASA) upon complex formation, but rather result from a series of temperature dependent equilibria (ion binding, protonation and protein conformational changes) that are coupled to the SSB-ssDNA binding equilibrium. This is also likely true for many other protein-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:16618108

  11. Low-temperature heat capacities of CaAl2SiO6 glass and pyroxene and thermal expansion of CaAl2SiO6 pyroxene.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haselton, H.T.; Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Low-T heat capacities (5-380 K) have been measured by adiabatic calorimetry for synthetic CaAl2SiO6 glass and pyroxene. High-T unit cell parameters were measured for CaAl2SiO6 pyroxene by means of a Nonius Guinier-Lenne powder camera in order to determine the mean coefficient of thermal expansion in the T range 25-1200oC. -J.A.Z.

  12. Low-temperature heat capacity of diopside glass (CaMgSi2O6): A calorimetric test of the configurational-entropy theory applied to the viscosity of liquid silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richet, P.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Heat-capacity measurements have been made between 8 and 370 K on an annealed and a rapidly quenched diopside glass. Between 15 and 200 K, Cp does not depend significantly on the thermal history of the glass. Below 15 K Cp is larger for the quenched than for the annealed specimen. The opposite is true above 200 K as a result of what is interpreted as a secondary relaxation around room temperature. The magnitude of these effects, however, is small enough that the relative entropies S(298)-S(0) of the glasses differ by only 0.5 J/mol K, i.e., a figure within the combined experimental uncertainties. The insensitivity of relative entropies to thermal history supports the assumption that the configurational heat capacity of the liquid may be taken as the heat capacity difference between the liquid and the glass (??Cp). Furthermore, this insensitivity allows calculation of the residual entropies at 0 K of diopside glasses as a function of the fictive temperature from the entropy of fusion of diopside and the heat capacities of the crystalline, glassy and liquid phases. For a glass with a fictive temperature of 1005 K, for example, this calorimetric residual entropy is 24.3 ?? 3 J/mol K, in agreement with the prediction made by RICHET (1984) from an analysis of the viscosity data with the configurational-entropy theory of relaxation processes of Adam and Gibbs (1965). In turn, all the viscosity measurements for liquid diopside, which span the range 0.5-4?? 1013 poise, can be quantitatively reproduced through this theory with the calorimetrically determined entropies and ??Cp data. Finally, the unclear significance of "activation energies" for structural interpretations of viscosity data is emphasized, and the importance of ??Cp and glass-transition temperature systematics for determining the composition and temperature dependences of the viscosity is pointed out. ?? 1986.

  13. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Cansiz, Erol; Isler, Sabri Cemil; Gultekin, B Alper

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth.

  14. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Isler, Sabri Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth. PMID:27429810

  15. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  16. The effect of buffer molarity on axonal exposure and axoaxonal apposition in the rat molar pulp.

    PubMed

    Holland, G R

    1981-11-01

    Axons in the rat molar pulp have been examined morphometrically to determine axonal size and the degree of axonal exposure and axoaxonal apposition in tissue fixed by perfusion using 2% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffers ranging in molarity form 0.025 M to 0.4 M. Between 31.2% and 45.0% of the axons were incompletely ensheathed. This proportion of axons exposed was linearly related to the buffer molarity (P less than 0.05) and was approximately double that found in more central axons. Between 32.3% and 45.0% of the axons were in contact with other axons. This proportion was not linearly related to buffer molarity but was least ten times higher than that observed in more centrally positioned nerve fibers in the inferior alveolar nerves. Increasing buffer molarity reduced the size of the axons, a relationship not found in the more central axons. It is suggested that axonal exposure and axoaxonal apposition are constant, significant features of pulpal nerve fibers that may be related to the onset and spread of nociceptive activity. The permeability properties of pulpal axons may differ from those of more centrally placed axons.

  17. Complications of third molar surgery and their management.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    The frequency and severity of untoward events associated with surgical procedures are influenced by multiple factors that may be related to the procedure, patient, and/or surgeon. Not every third molar needs to be removed. Full bony impacted lower third molars well below the cervical margin of the second molar crowns should be considered for retention. Certain deviations from normal healing should be considered to be complications. Risk factors associated with third molar removal should be carefully established and explained to the patient. Third molar surgery has a predictable postsoperative course for the average patient.

  18. Complications of third molar surgery and their management.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    The frequency and severity of untoward events associated with surgical procedures are influenced by multiple factors that may be related to the procedure, patient, and/or surgeon. Not every third molar needs to be removed. Full bony impacted lower third molars well below the cervical margin of the second molar crowns should be considered for retention. Certain deviations from normal healing should be considered to be complications. Risk factors associated with third molar removal should be carefully established and explained to the patient. Third molar surgery has a predictable postsoperative course for the average patient. PMID:23021398

  19. Periodontal changes following molar intrusion with miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Heravi, Farzin; Radvar, Mehrdad; Anbiaee, Najmeh; Madani, Azam Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the introduction of skeletal anchorage system, recently it is possible to successfully intrude molar teeth. On the other hand, there have been concerns about periodontal changes associated with intrusion and there are few studies on this topic, especially for posterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Ten female patients were enrolled in this study. Maxillary molar intrusion was achieved by inserting two miniscrews and a 17 × 25 titanium molybdenum alloy spring. Crestal height changes were evaluated at three intervals including: Baseline (T0), end of active treatment (T1) and 6 months after retention (T2). Other variables including probing depth, gingival recession, attachment level and bleeding on probing were evaluated by clinical measurements in the three above mentioned intervals. One-sample Kolmogrov-Smirnov test ascertained the normality of the data. For all patients, the changes in tooth position and crestal height were evaluated using one-sample t-test. (P < 0.05) Results: Supra-erupted molars were successfully intruded a mean of 2.1 ± 0.9 mm during active treatment (T0-T1). A mean bone resorption of 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in mesial crest and 1 ± 0.8 mm in distal crest had occurred in total treatment (T0-T2). A mean of 0.6 ± 1.4 mm bone was deposited on mesial crest during the retention period (T1-T2) following tooth relapse. On average, 0.8 ± 0.4 mm attachment gain was obtained. Gingival margin coronalized a mean of 0.8 ± 0.6 mm throughout the entire treatment. Probing depth showed no significant change during treatment. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, these results suggest that not only periodontal status was not negatively affected by intrusion, but also there were signs of periodontal improvement including attachment gain and shortening of clinical crown height. PMID:26288629

  20. Third molar development: measurements versus scores as age predictor.

    PubMed

    Thevissen, P W; Fieuws, S; Willems, G

    2011-10-01

    Human third molar development is widely used to predict chronological age of sub adult individuals with unknown or doubted age. For these predictions, classically, the radiologically observed third molar growth and maturation is registered using a staging and related scoring technique. Measures of lengths and widths of the developing wisdom tooth and its adjacent second molar can be considered as an alternative registration. The aim of this study was to verify relations between mandibular third molar developmental stages or measurements of mandibular second molar and third molars and age. Age related performance of stages and measurements were compared to assess if measurements added information to age predictions from third molar formation stage. The sample was 340 orthopantomograms (170 females, 170 males) of individuals homogenously distributed in age between 7 and 24 years. Mandibular lower right, third and second molars, were staged following Gleiser and Hunt, length and width measurements were registered, and various ratios of these measurements were calculated. Univariable regression models with age as response and third molar stage, measurements and ratios of second and third molars as predictors, were considered. Multivariable regression models assessed if measurements or ratios added information to age prediction from third molar stage. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) and root mean squared errors (RMSE) obtained from all regression models were compared. The univariable regression model using stages as predictor yielded most accurate age predictions (males: R(2) 0.85, RMSE between 0.85 and 1.22 year; females: R(2) 0.77, RMSE between 1.19 and 2.11 year) compared to all models including measurements and ratios. The multivariable regression models indicated that measurements and ratios added no clinical relevant information to the age prediction from third molar stage. Ratios and measurements of second and third molars are less accurate age predictors