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Sample records for molars anatomical aspects

  1. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  2. Anatomically guided implant site preparation technique at molar sites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tizcareño, Mario H; Bravo-Flores, Claudia

    2009-10-01

    Immediate postextraction implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth is a difficult procedure in view of having to place the implant in an ideal position without jeopardizing its initial stability. The surgeon often faces the problem of directing the initial osteotomy in the medial portion of the alveolus with the difficulty of engaging the inter-radicular septum of the extraction socket. The drill may slip continually leading to an inaccurate site preparation, and consequently to a deficient implant insertion. The fixture is often placed directly into either one of the extraction sockets of the tooth to be replaced. The anatomically guided site preparation technique is a very useful tool to perform implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth. This approach of implant insertion consists of a progressive preparation of the implant site using the anatomy and geometry of the root of the multiradicular teeth to be extracted as a reference and as an aid to engage the inter-radicular septum. This places the implants in a favorable and proper position from a biomechanical and occlusal standpoint. The objective of this article is to describe the anatomically guided implant site preparation technique as an aid to favorably place dental implants in multiradicular teeth postextraction.

  3. Anatomical Relationship of Lingual Nerve to the Region of Mandibular Third Molar

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Leite Leal Nunes, Carla Maria; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Cândida

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study evaluated the relationship of the lingual nerve with the adjacent anatomical structures of the mandibular third molar region, influencing the dentist to be aware of the variability of these relationships. Material and Methods Samples of 24 human corpse half-heads were selected and divided according with the presence or absence of the mandibular third molars. The lingual nerve (LN) was explored, showing its run from the oblique line until its crossing with the submandibular gland duct. The measurements along the LN and the adjacent anatomical structures were taken at the retromolar, molar and sublingual region with the use of a digital caliper. Results The distance from the LN and the third molar socket, which represents the horizontal distance of the lingual plate to the nerve, on average, was 4.4 mm (SD 2.4 mm). The distance from the LN and the lingual alveolar rim, which represents the vertical relationship between the nerve and the lingual alveolar rim of the third molar socket, on average, was 16.8 mm (SD 5.7 mm). The LN has a varied topography that leaves it very vulnerable during any procedure executed in this region. Conclusions Unless adequate protection of the lingual nerve is acquired by following an adequate surgical technique, the lingual nerve will always be vulnerable to damage during surgical intervention or manipulation in this region. PMID:24478912

  4. Anatomical aspects of angiosperm root evolution

    PubMed Central

    Seago, James L.; Fernando, Danilo D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Anatomy had been one of the foundations in our understanding of plant evolutionary trends and, although recent evo-devo concepts are mostly based on molecular genetics, classical structural information remains useful as ever. Of the various plant organs, the roots have been the least studied, primarily because of the difficulty in obtaining materials, particularly from large woody species. Therefore, this review aims to provide an overview of the information that has accumulated on the anatomy of angiosperm roots and to present possible evolutionary trends between representatives of the major angiosperm clades. Scope This review covers an overview of the various aspects of the evolutionary origin of the root. The results and discussion focus on angiosperm root anatomy and evolution covering representatives from basal angiosperms, magnoliids, monocots and eudicots. We use information from the literature as well as new data from our own research. Key Findings The organization of the root apical meristem (RAM) of Nymphaeales allows for the ground meristem and protoderm to be derived from the same group of initials, similar to those of the monocots, whereas in Amborellales, magnoliids and eudicots, it is their protoderm and lateral rootcap which are derived from the same group of initials. Most members of Nymphaeales are similar to monocots in having ephemeral primary roots and so adventitious roots predominate, whereas Amborellales, Austrobaileyales, magnoliids and eudicots are generally characterized by having primary roots that give rise to a taproot system. Nymphaeales and monocots often have polyarch (heptarch or more) steles, whereas the rest of the basal angiosperms, magnoliids and eudicots usually have diarch to hexarch steles. Conclusions Angiosperms exhibit highly varied structural patterns in RAM organization; cortex, epidermis and rootcap origins; and stele patterns. Generally, however, Amborellales, magnoliids and, possibly

  5. Pubourethral ligaments in women: anatomical and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Vazzoler, N; Soulié, M; Escourrou, G; Seguin, P; Pontonnier, F; Bécue, J; Plante, P

    2002-02-01

    The anatomy and histological structure of the proximal (PPUL), distal (DPUL) and intermediate (IPUL) pubourethral ligaments in women was examined to improve the understanding of their roles in female urethral physiology. An anatomical study of the pelvis was carried out in 10 adult female cadavers (60-102 years), the pelvis being removed and frozen prior to dissection. The pubourethral ligaments (PUL) were dissected in sagittal sections in seven specimens and in a frontal section in one specimen; the remaining two pelves were dissected using a hypogastric approach. The location, insertion, direction and histological structure of the ligamentous structures were studied. The PUL were identified in all 10 dissections, being paired, symmetrical, pearly-white, fibrous and resistant to stretching. The bony (parietal) insertion was variable on the posterior surface of the pubis, while the visceral insertion was located on the dorsal aspect of the proximal third of the urethra and neck of the bladder for the PPUL and on the distal third of the urethra for the DPUL. Histologically, the ligaments were composed of dense collagen fibres and bundles of axially orientated smooth muscle fibres. The PPUL was closely associated with the sphincter urogenitalis muscle, whereas the DPUL appeared to reinforce the role of the compressor urethra. It is suggested that the PUL plays an effective role in passive and active suspension of the urethra. The pubourethral ligaments are a constant anatomical entity which should be spared in urethral surgery in women in order to ensure an intact urogenital sphincter.

  6. Unusual anatomical detection of a third molar in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Corega, C; Vaida, L; Festila, D; Bertossi, D

    2013-01-01

    Third molar presence in the infratemporal fossa is a rare event and it has been reported previously only two times in the literature, except for the cases which arise from complications occurring during the extraction of the impacted upper third molar. Due to the presence of important vessel bundles and nerves in this area, third molar removal requires a correct surgical management in order to avoid many possible serious side effects. We report an unusual case of upper third molar detected in the infratemporal fossa, which has been thoroughly investigated radiologically and removed through a safe surgical approach.

  7. [Complications during and after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. Impact of patient related and anatomical factors].

    PubMed

    Voegelin, Thomas C; Suter, Valérie G A; Bornstein, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    The estimation of possible intra- and postoperative complications for surgical removal of third molars in the mandible poses a frequent dilemma in oral surgery. In the present study, the influence of the patient's age and gender, a reduced mouth opening, and the anatomical position of the tooth in the mandible on intra- and postoperative complications were evaluated. In a total of 120 surgically removed third molars, 9.2% intraoperative complications occurred, mainly bleeding. Factors influencing the risk for intraoperative complications were a male patient, a reduced mouth opening, and distally angulated teeth. Postoperative complications were encountered in 6.7%, mainly dry sockets. For this group, a female gender, a higher age, and distally angulated teeth were identified as risk parameters. As most of the patient- and anatomy-related factors are set parameters when evaluating possible risk factors for third molar surgery, only the timepoint of surgery can be influenced by the surgeon. Regarding the increase in intra- and postoperative complications for third molar removal in higher age groups, the prophylactic third molar surgery between the age of 18 and 25 seems justified.

  8. Anatomical evaluation of the root canal diameter and root thickness on the apical third of mesial roots of molars.

    PubMed

    Martos, Josué; Tatsch, Gustavo Henrique; Tatsch, Augusto César; Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen María

    2011-09-01

    The purpose was to determine the diameter of the main root canal and wall thickness in the apical dentin in mesial roots of maxillary and mandibular molars. Forty mesiobuccal and mesial root specimens were sectioned horizontally at 1, 2 and 3 mm from the apex, and measured at each top surface by using optical microscopy to an accuracy of ×20 magnification. The anatomical parameters were established as the following points of reference: AB, two points connected by a line from the outer edge of the mesial wall to the outer edge of the distal one through the center of the root canal to measure the thickness of the root and mesiodistal diameter of the root canal (CD). A second line (EF) was designed to evaluate the diameter of the root canal in the buccolingual direction. All data were summarized, and values were assessed statistically by ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The buccolingual (BL) root canal diameters at 1, 2 and 3 mm in the mandibular and maxillary molars were greater than in the mesiodistal (MD), showing statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The MD root thicknesses at 1, 2 and 3 mm in mandibular and maxillary molars were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The lowest value to 1 mm from the apex in the mandibular molars was 1.219 mm and the highest at 3 mm from the root apex in maxillary molars was 1.741 mm. The BL diameters in maxillary and mandibular molars were higher than the MD diameter. The thickness (MD) of maxillary and mandibular molars decreased as a function of apical proximity.

  9. A micro-computed tomography study of the negotiation and anatomical feature in apical root canal of mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Min, Yi; Ma, Jing-Zhi; Shen, Ya; Cheung, Gary Shun-Pan; Gao, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical negotiation of various apical anatomic features of the mandibular first molars in a Chinese population using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). A total of 152 mandibular first molars were scanned with micro-CT at 30 µm resolution. The apical 5 mm of root canal (ARC) was reconstructed three dimensionally and classified. Subsequently, the access cavity was prepared with the ARC anatomy blinded to the operator. The ARC was negotiated with a size 10 K file with or without precurve. Information on the ability to obtain a reproducible glide path was recorded. The anatomical classification of ARC was Type I with 68.45% in mandibular first molars. The negotiation result of ARC with Category i was 387 canals (74.00%). With a bent negotiating file, 96 canals were negotiated, including 88 reproducible glide paths (Category ii) and 8 irregular glide paths (Category iii). About 7.65% canals could not be negotiated with patency successfully (Category iv). The statistical analyze shown the anatomic feature of ARC had effect on the negotiation of ARC (p < 0.05). In conclusion, ARC anatomic variations had a strong potential impact on the negotiation. The category of negotiation in ARC would be helpful in the using of NiTi rotary instruments. Negotiation of ARC to the working length with patency should be careful and skillful because of the complexities of ARC. SCANNING 38:819-824, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Anatomical and Radiological Aspects of the Supratrochlear Foramen in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Gutfiten-Schlesinger, Gabriel; Leite, Túlio FO; Pires, Lucas AS; Silva, Julio G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The supratrochlear foramen is an anatomic variation of great clinical and anthropologic interest. Although many studies addressed this subject in different ethnic groups, there are no studies regarding Brazilians. Aim To verify the incidence and morphometric measures of the supratrochlear foramen in Brazilian humeri. Materials and Methods A total of 330 dry humeri were analysed and divided in three groups: bones presenting the supratrochlear foramen (Group 1), bones displaying a translucent foramen (Group 2) and humeri without the foramen (Group 3). The aperture was measured with a digital vernier caliper. Radiographic pictures with different incidences were taken. Results Our analysis showed that 22.5% of humeri belonged in Group 1, 41.2% in Group 2, and 36.3% in Group 3. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the supratrochlear foramen on the left side were 2.779±2.050 mm and 2.332±1.23 mm, respectively. The mean vertical diameter and the mean horizontal diameter of the foramen on the right side were 2.778±2.197 mm, and 2.365±1.396 mm, respectively. The student’s t-test showed that there was no significant difference regarding the size of the foramen between both sides. The best X-ray machine setup was 50 kilo voltage and 0.08 milliamperage per second, associated with a slight increase in the distance of the x-ray tube. Conclusion The aperture seems to be the key point during the pre-operative planning of intramedullary fixation, since it has direct relation to the size of the intramedullary canal, thus, being an entity of clinical, anatomical, anthropological, radiological, and surgical interest. PMID:27790415

  11. [The anatomical and physiological aspects in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Graber, T M

    1991-06-01

    The specialty of orthodontics and its relationship to TMJ problems is in the thick of controversy. Several anatomic and physiologic aspects are discussed so as to improve the understanding of the multi-faceted problems. The use of this biologically-based information is likely to make therapy more successful. From a therapeutic point of view, it is incumbent on the dentist to institute early preventive or interceptive procedures.

  12. Multispectral imaging: a review of its technical aspects and applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J R

    2014-01-01

    The field of anatomic pathology has changed significantly over the last decades and, as a result of the technological developments in molecular pathology and genetics, has had increasing pressures put on it to become quantitative and to provide more information about protein expression on a cellular level in tissue sections. Multispectral imaging (MSI) has a long history as an advanced imaging modality and has been used for over a decade now in pathology to improve quantitative accuracy, enable the analysis of multicolor immunohistochemistry, and drastically reduce the impact of contrast-robbing tissue autofluorescence common in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. When combined with advanced software for the automated segmentation of different tissue morphologies (eg, tumor vs stroma) and cellular and subcellular segmentation, MSI can enable the per-cell quantitation of many markers simultaneously. This article covers the role that MSI has played in anatomic pathology in the analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections, discusses the technological aspects of why MSI has been adopted, and provides a review of the literature of the application of MSI in anatomic pathology.

  13. A morpho-anatomical characterisation of Myrothamnus moschatus (Myrothamnaceae) under the aspect of desiccation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Korte, N; Porembski, S

    2012-05-01

    Morpho-anatomical traits of the rarely studied dicotyledonous desiccation-tolerant shrub Myrothamnus moschatus were examined and compared for the first time to Myrothamnus flabellifolius under the aspect of desiccation tolerance. Both species almost exclusively occur on rock outcrops and differ mainly in their geographic range and leaf morphology (fan-shaped in M. flabellifolius, lanceolate in M. moschatus) but have a very similar leaf and wood anatomy, except for the lack of hydathodes in M. moschatus. Both species adopt the parallel leaf venation of monocots, although this is more pronounced in M. moschatus. This provides a mechanical and protective advantage over the net venation pattern of most dicots and facilitates the reversible, drought-induced, accordion-like leaf contraction. The sclerenchyma, as a stabilising tissue, is mainly confined to vascular bundles in leaves of both species. Here, mechanical support seems to be less crucial for survival in long periods of drought than other morpho-anatomical traits (e.g. parallel leaf venation).

  14. Reproductive system of females of the Magdalena river endemic stingray Potamotrygon magdalenae: Anatomical and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    del Mar Pedreros-Sierra, Tania; Arrieta-Prieto, Dagoberto M; Mejía-Falla, Paola A

    2016-05-01

    We studied anatomical and functional aspects of the reproductive system of females of the Magdalena river stingray Potamotrygon magdalenae using microscopic and macroscopic analysis of each organ. Although the reproductive tract was fully functional on both side, the left organs possibly have a greater contribution to reproductive success, because left ovary and uterus were more developed and had higher number of oocytes and embryos, respectively, than the right ones. This species has histotrophic viviparity given by the presence of uterine trophonemata and by glandular character in pregnant and postpartum females. We suggest that the epigonal organ is involved in the degradation of components of atretic follicles and the embryos begin to develop surrounded by a gelatinous tertiary envelope produced by the oviducal gland. This latter organ is composed by three zones in mature females, club, papillary, and baffle zone, as described for other elasmobranchs. From the anatomical observations, a maturity scale comprising six sexual maturity stages (Immature I, Immature II, early mature, pregnant, post-partum, and regenerating) was established for female P. magdalenae, and it can be useful as basis for reproductive studies of other potamotrygonid species. Finally, we propose a continuous reproductive cycle for P. magdalenae.

  15. Conscious midazolam sedation in third molar surgery--aspects of post-operative patient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bremerich, A; Hierl, T

    1995-09-01

    This study was conducted on 426 patients undergoing third molar surgery to evaluate their opinion on surgery and the follow-up period concerning postoperative behaviour, pain, and complaints. Two groups were formed as patients had to choose between local anaesthesia only or additional conscious sedation by means of intravenous midazolam (0.1 mg/kg). Women and younger patients preferred conscious sedation. Surgery was described as significantly less distressing by the sedated group. No difference in the evaluation of the follow-up period between both groups existed. Patients of the midazolam group took more analgesics, tended to stay longer in bed and reported on protracted cooling. Non-sedated persons older than 30 years complained about a slower decrease in postoperative pain. According to these findings, sensitive, cautious patients tend to prefer conscious sedation which is reflected in their behaviour. No relationship between the evaluation of surgery itself and the follow-up period could be found.

  16. Anatomical aspects of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis and its insertion: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Neal M; Eliot, David J

    2007-01-01

    Anatomical variation in the attachment of the gastrocnemius muscle to the soleus muscle has not been studied previously. The gastrocnemius muscle may insert directly onto the tendinous superficial surface of the soleus; however, in most cases, the distal end of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis extends for a variable distance as a thin, tendinous sheet void of muscular attachments. Surgeons performing a gastrocnemius recession may target the exposed inferior portion of the aponeurosis that is not directly covered by muscle. This is the subject of this anatomical study. Fifty-three embalmed cadaveric specimens were dissected to measure the length of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis medially and laterally. Three aponeurosis length categories were subjectively developed according to the ease with which a surgeon might release the gastrocnemius from the soleus: long aponeurosis (minimum aponeurosis length greater than 10 mm; 53% of specimens); short aponeurosis (9%), and direct attachment of the gastrocnemius muscle to the soleus on the medial side, lateral side, or both (38%). The typical gastrocnemius aponeurosis in the sample was distinctly shorter medially and longer laterally. For aponeuroses in the long aponeurosis category, the median length medially was 22.5 mm and median length laterally was 51 mm. In the short aponeurosis category, median medial length was 5 mm and lateral length was 22 mm. The lateral length was 1.8 times greater than the medial length for the long aponeurosis and 5 times greater for the short aponeuroses. Understanding the variation of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis will aid the surgeon in choosing a recession technique, performing the procedure, and preventing iatrogenic complications.

  17. Anatomical differences in lower third molars visualized by 2D and 3D X-ray imaging: clinical outcomes after extraction.

    PubMed

    Jun, S H; Kim, C H; Ahn, J S; Padwa, B L; Kwon, J J

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between third molars and the inferior alveolar canal using panoramic radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and to assess clinical outcomes after third molar removal retrospectively. The degree of superimposition, buccolingual position (buccal, central, and lingual) and physical relationship (separation, contact, and involved) were measured using CBCT scanning. Post-extraction complications were recorded. Based on radiographic evaluation, 45.9% of third molar roots were inside the inferior alveolar canal, 21.3% were in contact with the inferior alveolar canal, and 32.8% were separated from the canal. The frequency at which the mandibular canal was separated from the root apex was significantly higher when the canal was in the buccal position (80.0%) than in the central (20.0%) and lingual positions (0.0%). Although on panoramic radiographs all third molars were directly superimposed on the inferior alveolar canal, CBCT showed direct contact or canal involvement in 67.2% and separation of the canal from the root apex in 32.8%. Complications occurred in nine patients: eight had third molar root apices inside or in contact with the inferior alveolar canal. The prevalence of post-extraction complications correlated with the absence of cortication around the inferior alveolar canal.

  18. Comparing and authenticating on anatomical aspects of Abrus cantoniensis and Abrus mollis by microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Lu, Luyang; Liu, Yuan; Qing, Linsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abrus cantoniensis is popularly used as traditional Chinese medicine and a cool tea in South of China. However, due to diminishing source of A. cantoniensis, it is usually interchanged or adulterated with other species of Abrus genus because of the limited knowledge in identification and differentiation. Especially, Abrus mollis is widely mixed on herbal markets and pharmaceutical preparation. Objective: To ensure safety and efficacy, a detailed comparison was undertaken to carry out an anatomical and micro-morphological study of two species of A. cantoniensis and A. mollis. Materials and Methods: Microscopic characteristics of roots, leaves and stems, including transverse sections and the crude drug powder, were observed using a light microscope according to the usual microscopic techniques. Results: The basic diagnostic features of A. cantoniensis include that stem is extremely thin; xylem vessels of root are radially arranged in 10 or more bundles; pith is hollow in stem, and the palisade tissue is made up of two layers of palisade cells. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy was used to compare nonglandular hairs and the stomata of the leaflet surface. A table of the key authentication parameters based on the analyzed microscopic characteristics was drawn up. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the microscopy and related techniques provided a systematic method that is convenient, feasible, and can be unambiguously applied to the authentication of the species of Abrus. PMID:25829788

  19. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    SciTech Connect

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints.

  20. Molar Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cysts. In a complete molar pregnancy, there's no embryo or normal placental tissue. In a partial molar pregnancy, there's an abnormal embryo and possibly some normal placental tissue. The embryo ...

  1. The high variability of the chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons: Anatomical aspects of tendon transfer in foot surgery.

    PubMed

    Pretterklieber, Bettina

    2017-02-03

    As tendon transfer of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is an established procedure, exact knowledge of the formation of the chiasma plantare is of great interest. Although the quadratus plantae (QP) appears to play a major role, it has been rarely addressed in previous studies. The aim of the present study was to reinvestigate the formation of the chiasma plantare and the composition of the long flexor tendons in order to clarify the inexact and partly contradictory descriptions published from 1865 onward. The chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons in both feet of 50 formalin-fixed specimens of body donors (25 men and women) were analyzed by gross anatomical dissection. It was composed of one (3%), two (69%) or three layers (28%) which were variably established by the tendinous and muscular fibers of the FHL, the FDL and the QP. In 61% the FHL gave one or more slips to the FDL, and in 39% there was a bidirectional interconnection between the two tendons. The slip from the FHL to the FDL largely reinforces the second (45%), or the second and third tendon (46%). Thus, the FHL is involved in the first tendon in all cases, in the second one in 97% of cases, and in the third tendon in about one half of cases (53%). In all instances, the FDL contributes to the third to fourth, in 98% the second, and in at least 39% to the first tendon. The QP reinforces the second to fourth tendon in nearly all cases, the fifth in about one half of cases, and even the first tendon in 14% of cases. In addition, the individual composition of the five long flexor tendons arising from the chiasma plantare was analyzed in detail. Special emphasis was placed on the evaluation of side and sex differences as well as individual symmetry. Furthermore, biomechanical, developmental and phylogenetic aspects were outlined. In terms of the outcome of this study, the FHL appears to be the better donor for tendon transfer to restore lost function, but

  2. Anatomical bases of the second toe composite dorsal flap for simultaneous skin defect coverage and tendinous reconstruction of the dorsal aspect of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Wavreille, G; Cassio, J-B; Chantelot, C; Mares, O; Guinand, R; Fontaine, C

    2007-01-01

    Coverage of the dorsal aspect of the fingers is difficult, especially when the soft tissue defect is large and involves extensor apparatus and joints. Tendinous and/or articular reconstruction is not usually performed simultaneously with cutaneous repair. The aims of this study were: (1) to accurately determine the precise position of the first common dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) on the dorsal aspect of the foot, and (2) to enumerate the anatomical structures which could be harvested 'en-bloc' in order to design composite flaps. The precise position of the FDMA was studied from 22 anatomical specimens after selective injection of the arterial network. Its cutaneous area measured 75 x 40 mm on average. The extensor apparatus of the second toe was supplied by the FDMA and its lateral branch to the second toe by 2.7 branches on average over a length of approximately 75 mm. The medial dorsal digital artery was generally the main source of blood supply to the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP), capsule, ligaments, head of proximal phalanx and base of middle phalanx. It is then possible to design composite flaps including both skin and extensor apparatus, and total or partial PIP joint, if necessary, based on the FDMA and the medial dorsal digital artery, without prejudice to the second toe. The average length of the arterial pedicle (60 mm) makes its suture to the dorsal metacarpal artery, the dorsal carpal branch or the radial artery easy. The harvesting technique for such a flap is described for each anatomical type of FDMA; it has to be adapted to both the type and extent of the defect. Its use is in accordance with the modern classical principle of 'all in one stage with early mobilisation', thanks to adequate coverage whose blood supply does not depend on local vascularisation, and which brings its own physiological vascular supply.

  3. The posteromedial corner revisited. An anatomical description of the passive restraining structures of the medial aspect of the human knee.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J R; Sanchez-Ballester, J; Bull, A M J; Thomas, R de W M; Amis, A A

    2004-07-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the anatomy of the posteromedial peripheral ligamentous structures of the knee and found differing descriptions. Our aim was to clarify the differing descriptions with a simplified interpretation of the anatomy and its contribution to the stability of the knee. We dissected 20 fresh-frozen cadaver knees and the anatomy was recorded using video and still digital photography. The anatomy was described by dividing the medial collateral ligament (MCL) complex into thirds, from anterior to posterior and into superficial and deep layers. The main passive restraining structures of the posteromedial aspect of the knee were found to be superficial MCL (parallel, longitudinal fibres), the deep MCL and the posteromedial capsule (PMC). In the posterior third, the superficial and deep layers blend. Although there are oblique fibres (capsular condensations) running posterodistally from femur to tibia, no discrete ligament was seen. In extension, the PMC appears to be an important functional unit in restraining tibial internal rotation and valgus. Our aim was to clarify and possibly simplify the anatomy of the posteromedial structures. The information would serve as the basis for future biomechanical studies to investigate the contribution of the posteromedial structures to joint stability.

  4. ASPECT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Able to deploy within one hour of notification, EPA's Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) is the nation’s only airborne real-time chemical and radiological detection, infrared and photographic imagery platform.

  5. First permanent molars with molar incisor hypomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Laura; O'Connell, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a common enamel defect presenting in the first permanent molars (FPM) and permanent incisors. This article presents the clinical findings and management considerations for the FPM with MIH to the general practitioner. The various treatment options are described with emphasis placed on early diagnosis as the most important prognostic factor.

  6. Deciduous molar hypomineralization and molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, M E C; ten Cate, J M; Jaddoe, V W V; Hofman, A; Moll, H A; Veerkamp, J S J

    2012-06-01

    This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. This study focused on the relationship between Deciduous Molar Hypomineralization (DMH) and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). First permanent molars develop during a period similar to that of second primary molars, with possible comparable risk factors for hypomineralization. Children with DMH have a greater risk of developing MIH. Clinical photographs of clean, moist teeth were taken with an intra-oral camera in 6,161 children (49.8% girls; mean age 74.3 mos, SD ± 5.8). First permanent molars and second primary molars were scored with respect to DMH or MIH. The prevalence of DMH and MIH was 9.0% and 8.7% at child level, and 4.0% and 5.4% at tooth level. The Odds Ratio for MIH based on DMH was 4.4 (95% CI, 3.1-6.4). The relationship between the occurrence of DMH and MIH suggests a shared cause and indicates that, clinically, DMH can be used as a predictor for MIH.

  7. Role of third molars in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Almpani, Konstantinia; Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis

    2015-01-01

    The role of third molars in the oral cavity has been extensively studied over the years. Literature includes numerous diagnostic and treatment alternatives regarding the third molars. However, an issue that has not been discussed at the same level is their involvement in orthodontic therapy. The aim of this study is to present a review of the contemporary literature regarding the most broadly discussed aspects of the multifactorial role of third molars in orthodontics and which are of general dental interest too. PMID:25685759

  8. Incidence of distal caries in mandibular second molars due to impacted third molars: Nonintervention strategy of asymptomatic third molars causes harm? A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Shetty, Akshay; Goswami, Rahul Dev; Apparaju, Vijay; Bagga, Vivek; Kale, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Removal of impacted third molars is the most common oral surgical procedure. Many investigators have questioned the necessity of removal in patients who are free of symptoms or associated pathologies. Aim: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence of caries on distal aspect of mandibular second molars in patients referred for corresponding third molar assessment and to identify its association with angular position and depth of the impacted mandibular third molars based on the classification of Pell and Gregory. Methodology: Records of 150 patients with impacted third molar presenting to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sri Rajiv Gandhi College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, were assessed retrospectively. The radiographic angulation and depth of mandibular third molar impaction were determined and compared to determine the relationship with incidence of caries on the distal surface of the second molar. Results: According to this study results, 37.5% cases show caries on the distal aspect of mandibular second molars. The incidence of caries with mesioangular impacted third molars was 55%. A majority of these mesioangular cases were Level B and Class I as per the Pell and Gregory classification. Conclusion: The prophylactic extraction of mandibular third molars is indicated if the angulation is between 30° and 70° and is justified by incidence of distal caries in the second molars. PMID:28251102

  9. Molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Erin

    2012-04-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a common condition in New Zealand children and children around the world and can result in a significant defect in first permanent molars. This condition inevitably leads to a large amount of dental treatment for young children and may even result in the removal of their first permanent molars. This lecture will outline the understanding of the physical properties of these teeth and provide an evidence based review of the treatment options for affected teeth.

  10. Clinical significance of computed tomography assessment for third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Kenji; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Surgical extraction of the third molar is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the clinical practice of oral surgery. Third molar surgery is warranted when there is inadequate space for eruption, malpositioning, or risk for cyst or odontogenic tumor formation. Preoperative assessment should include a detailed morphologic analysis of the third molar and its relationship to adjacent structures and surrounding tissues. Due to developments in medical engineering technology, computed tomography (CT) now plays a critical role in providing the clear images required for adequate assessment prior to third molar surgery. Removal of the maxillary third molar is associated with a risk for maxillary sinus perforation, whereas removal of the mandibular third molar can put patients at risk for a neurosensory deficit from damage to the lingual nerve or inferior alveolar nerve. Multiple factors, including demographic, anatomic, and treatment-related factors, influence the incidence of nerve injury during or following removal of the third molar. CT assessment of the third molar prior to surgery can identify some of these risk factors, such as the absence of cortication between the mandibular third molar and the inferior alveolar canal, prior to surgery to reduce the risk for nerve damage. This topic highlight presents an overview of the clinical significance of CT assessment in third molar surgery. PMID:25071882

  11. ["Molar-incisor hypomineralization"].

    PubMed

    Kellerhoff, Nadja-Marina; Lussi, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Hypocalcification of the enamel is the most common developmental disorder observed in teeth. The prevalence of this kind of hypomineralisation is about 10-19%. These molars are often referred to as cheese molars, because the lesions clinically resemble cheese in color and consistency. Other descriptions are: idiopathic enamel hypomineralisation in the permanent first molars, idiopathic enamel opacities in the permanent first molars, non fluoride enamel hypomineralisation in the permanent first molars, non-endemic mottling of enamel in the permanent first molars. Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation is today the proposed expression for this disease. Occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molar are most commonly affected. The lesions are more frequent in the upper jaw than in the lower jaw. The incisors are affected to a lesser degree than the molars. Several aetiological factors can cause these defects. Some studies show a relation between intake of dioxins via mother's milk after prolonged breast feeding and developmental defects of the child's teeth. Because the ameloblasts are very sensitive to oxygen supply, complications involving oxygen shortages during birth or respiratory diseases such as asthma or bronchitis and pneumonia are discussed as further aetiological factors. Renal insufficiency, hypoparothyroidism, diarrhoea, malabsorption and malnutrition and high-fever diseases can be other reasons for the occurrence of these defects. Defective enamel can be a locus of lowered resistance for caries. Histologically there are areas of porosity of varying degrees. The affected teeth can be very sensitive to air, cold, warm and mechanical stimuli. Toothbrushing may create toothache in these teeth. We therefore suggest that these patients receive intensified prevention with fluoride varnish, a fissure sealing, GIZ, composits, stainless steel crowns or implants. In some cases an interdisciplinary approach with an orthodontist can result in the extraction of the molars

  12. Evaluation and endodontic management of a patient with 6 single-rooted molars: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jaikrishnan, S; Kottoor, Jojo; Mathew, Joy; Kumar, Sanjana Ravi; George, Saira; Hari, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with unusual tooth morphology involving the bilateral presence of 6 maxillary and mandibular first and second molars with a single root and a single canal. The article also discusses the endodontic management of a single-rooted maxillary molar and the use of cone beam computed tomography for evaluation and diagnosis of these anatomical variations.

  13. Mandibular Third Molar Impaction: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Classification

    PubMed Central

    Daugela, Povilas

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review impacted mandibular third molar aetiology, clinical anatomy, radiologic examination, surgical treatment and possible complications, as well as to create new mandibular third molar impaction and extraction difficulty degree classification based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular third molar, impacted mandibular third molar, inferior alveolar nerve injury third molar, lingual nerve injury third molar. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1976 to April 2013. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy and oral surgery journals and books was performed. The publications there selected by including clinical and human anatomy studies. Results In total 75 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Impacted mandibular third molar aetiology, clinical anatomy, radiographic examination, surgical extraction of and possible complications, classifications and risk factors were discussed. New mandibular third molar impaction and extraction difficulty degree classification based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results was proposed. Conclusions The classification proposed here based on anatomical and radiological impacted mandibular third molar features is promising to be a helpful tool for impacted tooth assessment as well as for planning for surgical operation. Further clinical studies should be conducted for new classification validation and reliability evaluation. PMID:24422029

  14. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months. PMID:23222992

  15. Taurodontism in deciduous molars

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Yash; Kambalimath, H V; Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Prathibha

    2013-01-01

    Taurodont teeth are characterised by large pulp chambers at the expense of roots. An enlarged pulp chamber, apical displacement of the pulpal floor and no constriction at the level of the cement-enamel junction are the characteristic features of taurodont tooth. It appears more frequently as an isolated anomaly but its association with syndromes and other abnormalities have also been reported. Permanent dentition is more commonly affected than deciduous dentition. This paper presents a case report of taurodontism in relation to mandibular deciduous second molars. PMID:23737594

  16. Molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Karine; Correia, Adriana de Sales Cunha; Cunha, Robson Frederico

    2009-01-01

    Enamel defects are common alterations that can occur in both the primary or permanent dentition. A range of etiological factors related to this pathology can be found in the literature. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a kind of enamel defect alteration that requires complex treatment solutions, and for this reason, it is of great clinical interest for dental practice. This article describes the management of a clinical case of MIH in a 7-year-old child. The different treatment options depending on the extension of the defect, the degree of tooth eruption and the hygiene and diet habits of the patient are also discussed.

  17. Characterization of third molar morphometric variables.

    PubMed

    Trinks, Pablo W; Grifo, María Belén; Pari, Fernando; Amer, Mariano Ar; Sánchez, Gabriel A

    2016-09-01

    The third molar is a tooth of anatomical, surgical, prosthetic and forensic dental interest. However, there is currently a lack of updated data regarding its morphology. The aim of this study was to determine the morphometric features of third molars and their predictive capability as regards dental arch and side. Two calibrated operators (ƙ = 0.83) determined the cervicalocclusalvestibular (COV), cervicalocclusalpalatal (COP) and occlusalapical (OA) distances, mesiodistal (MD), and vestibularpalatal (VP) diameters, number of roots (R) and number of cusps (C) of 961 cadaveric third molars, both upper (n = 462) and lower (n = 499), using a CONCOR 050 thin mandible caliper (resolution 0.01 mm). Median and range for each variable were calculated and compared using Mann Whitney nonparametric test (p < 0.05). Multivariate cluster analysis was used to determine the predictive capability of each variable for dental arch and side. For upper molars (UM), 50.6% were from the right side (RS) and 49.4% from the left side (LS), while for lower molars (LM), 60.9% were from the RS and 39.1% from the LS. No significant difference was found in the study variables in LM according to side. For UM, MD diameter (10.90 mm), COP(7.42 mm) distance and number of R (3) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) forRS, and number of C (3) was higher (p < 0.0001) for LS. They were also significant predictive grouping factors for side. For dental arch, OA (17.84 mm) and COV (7.60 mm) distances, MD (11.26 mm) diameter and the number of C (5) were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for LM, while VP (10.84 mm) and COP (7.34 mm) distances, and the number of R (3) were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for UM. These variables were significant predictive factors for dental arch. Despite the morphometric heterogeneity of third molars, there are intrinsic parameters with predictive capability for dental arch and side, but it would be advisable to supplement this study with data from topographic occlusal

  18. First permanent molar root development arrest associated with compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Sachin A; Patil, Anil; Varekar, Aniruddha

    2013-07-04

    Trauma or infection to the primary tooth may have deleterious effects on the underlying developing tooth buds. Anatomically the root apices of primary teeth are in close proximity to the developing permanent tooth buds; hence spread of infection originating from pulp necrosis of primary tooth may not only affect the underlying tooth bud but may also affect the adjacent tooth buds. The extent of malformation depends on the developmental stage of tooth or the age of patient. Presented here is a rare case of complete arrest of maxillary first permanent molar root growth due to spread of periapical infection originating from second primary molar leading to failure of its eruption and finally extraction. Histopathlogical analysis revealed compound odontoma associated with maxillary first permanent molar.

  19. Primary Mandibular First Molar with Single Root and Single Canal: A Case Report of a Rare Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Ghafourifard, Roya; Soleimani, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Single rooted primary mandibular first molar is a rare developmental anomaly. Literatures reveal that failure of invagination of Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath leads to this unusual root form. Thorough knowledge of root canal morphology and anatomical variations of primary teeth can help a pediatric dentist in successful root canal treatment. Hereby, we describe two cases of primary mandibular first molars with an unusual morphology as a single root called pyramidal molar. PMID:25628671

  20. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Rao, Murali H; Aluru, Srikanth C; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj

    2016-07-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect affecting teeth. High prevalence rates of MIH and its clinical implications are significant for both the patients and clinicians. A wide variation in defect prevalence (2.4-40.2%) is reported. It seems to differ with regions and various birth cohorts. Some of the recent prevalence studies are tabulated. Patient implications include hypersensitive teeth, rapid progression of caries, mastication impairment due to rapid attrition, and esthetic repercussions. Implications for clinicians include complexity in treatment planning and treatment implementation, poor prognosis of the restorations, difficulty in achieving pain control during treatment, and behavior management problems. Intention of this paper is to review the etio-pathogenesis, prevalence, clinical features, diagnostic features, and eventually present a sequential treatment approach, i.e., in accordance with current clinical practice guidelines.

  1. Controversy of the third molars.

    PubMed

    Pitekova, L; Satko, I

    2009-01-01

    Third molars are teeth that have little functional value and a relatively high rate of associated pain and disease. Their value as a part of the dentition of modern people is dubious. Our aim is to review the evolution, morbidity and complications of the third molars (Ref. 19). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  2. 3D imaging reconstruction and impacted third molars: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Tuzi, Andrea; Di Bari, Roberto; Cicconetti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Summary There is a debate in the literature about the need for Computed Tomagraphy (CT) before removing third molars, even if positive radiographic signs are present. In few cases, the third molar is so close to the inferior alveolar nerve that its extraction might expose patients to the risk of post-operative neuro-sensitive alterations of the skin and the mucosa of the homolateral lower lip and chin. Thus, the injury of the inferior alveolar nerve may represent a serious, though infrequent, neurologic complication in the surgery of the third molars rendering necessary a careful pre-operative evaluation of their anatomical relationship with the inferior alveolar nerve by means of radiographic imaging techniques. This contribution presents two case reports showing positive radiographic signs, which are the hallmarks of a possible close relationship between the inferior alveolar nerve and the third molars. We aim at better defining the relationship between third molars and the mandibular canal using Dental CT Scan, DICOM image acquisition and 3D reconstruction with a dedicated software. By our study we deduce that 3D images are not indispensable, but they can provide a very agreeable assistance in the most complicated cases. PMID:23386934

  3. Endodontic therapy of a mandibular third molar with 5 canals: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Adrian; Heilborn, Carlos; Cohenca, Nestor

    2009-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of third molars often becomes part of comprehensive treatment plans, as it represents a more conservative and less invasive approach than its therapeutic alternatives. The frequency of anatomic variations in mandibular molars, particularly root canal configuration, requires 2 periapical radiographs from different angles. Upon reading and interpretation of the radiographs, the clinician should consider the anatomy and level of difficulty of the endodontic procedure and refer the patient to an endodontist, if deemed necessary. The present article discusses the successful treatment and preservation of a mandibular third molar with 5 root canals, as well as methods for its clinical management.

  4. Molar incisor hypomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Greig D

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesThe Medline and Embase databases and hand searches in the journals International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry and European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry.Study selectionEnglish language cohort and case-control studies.Data extraction and synthesisStudy selection was carried out independently by two reviewers with data abstraction being conducted by a single reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Adjusted (aOR) and unadjusted odds ratios (uOR), P-values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from the studies. Meta-analysis was not conducted.ResultsTwenty-eight studies were included; 25 reported on MIH, three on hypomineralised second primary molars (HSPM). Nineteen of the studies were of cohort design (six prospective,13 retrospective) and nine were case controls. There was little evidence of an association between the most frequently investigated prenatal factors (smoking, maternal illness, maternal medication, maternal stress) and MIH. Similarly there was little evidence of an association between MIH and perinatal factors such as prematurity, low birth weight, caesarean delivery and birth complications. Early childhood illness, up to three or four years of age, was widely investigated, with six studies reporting a crude association. Associations between antibiotics, anti-asthma medication and breastfeeding were also evaluated. Only three studies looked at HSPM; one study suggested that maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy is unlikely to be associated with HSPM but maternal alcohol intake may be. Another study reported possible associations with a large number of factors, with perinatal factors and neonatal illness being most common, followed by prenatal factors.ConclusionsPrenatal and perinatal factors are infrequently associated with MIH. However, despite a lack of prospective studies, early childhood illness (in particular fever) appears to

  5. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  6. Finite Element Reconstruction of a Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sara; Mirhashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mandibular first molar is the most important tooth with complicated morphology. In finite element (FE) studies, investigators usually prefer to model anterior teeth with a simple and single straight root; it makes the results deviate from the actual case. The most complicated and time-consuming step in FE studies is modeling of the desired tooth, thus this study was performed to establish a finite element method (FEM) of reconstructing a mandibular first molar with the greatest precision. Materials and Methods An extracted mandibular first molar was digitized, and then radiographed from different aspects to achieve its outer and inner morphology. The solid model of tooth and root canals were constructed according to this data as well as the anatomy of mandibular first molar described in the literature. Result A three-dimensional model of mandibular first molar was created, giving special consideration to shape and root canal system dimensions. Conclusion This model may constitute a basis for investigating the effect of different clinical situations on mandibular first molars in vitro, especially on its root canal system. The method described here seems feasible and reasonably precise foundation for investigations. PMID:23717327

  7. Incidence of lingual nerve paraesthesia following mandibular third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jeevan; Tiwari, Arunesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with minor but expected complications like pain, swelling, bruising and trismus. The lingual nerve damage sometimes occurs after the removal of mandibular third molar producing impaired sensation or permanent sensory loss. This complication is usually unexpected and unacceptable for the patients particularly if no prior warning has been given. Aims: The aim of the present clinical prospective study was to determine the clinical incidence of lingual nerve injury following mandibular third molar removal and to analyze possible factors for the lingual nerve injury. Settings and Design: Clinical prospective study in the Department of Oral Surgery, Punjab Government Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients were selected randomly, amongst the patients, who reported to our department from January 2009 to December 2009 for the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. To minimize the risk of lingual nerve injury, the standard terence wards incision was made in all cases and only buccal flap was raised. Statistical Analysis: The small number of paraesthesia precluded statistical analysis. Results: Out of 90 patients, six patients were diagnosed with lingual nerve paraesthesia. The overall incidence rate of lingual nerve injury was 6.6%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that lingual nerve paraesthesia can occur with or without reflection of lingual flap in spite of all the measures taken to protect it. It may be contributed to the fact of anatomical variations of lingual nerve. PMID:22639500

  8. Complications of third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F; Steed, Martin B; Perciaccante, Vincent J

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses the incidence of specific complications and, where possible, offers a preventive or management strategy. Injuries of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves are significant issues that are discussed separately in this text. Surgical removal of third molars is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus. Factors thought to influence the incidence of complications after third molar removal include age, gender, medical history, oral contraceptives, presence of pericoronitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking, type of impaction, relationship of third molar to the inferior alveolar nerve, surgical time, surgical technique, surgeon experience, use of perioperative antibiotics, use of topical antiseptics, use of intra-socket medications, and anesthetic technique. Complications that are discussed further include alveolar osteitis, postoperative infection, hemorrhage, oro-antral communication, damage to adjacent teeth, displaced teeth, and fractures.

  9. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-08-25

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH.

  10. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

  11. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Boronat-Catalá, M.; Catalá-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9–86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6–88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9–17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47–0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39–35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  12. Comparison of Primary Molar Crown Dimensions with Stainless Steel Crowns in a Sample of Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Kamali Sabeti, Arghavan; Shahrabi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Due to anatomic variation in tooth anatomy between populations, this study compared the buccolingual (BL) and mesiodistal (MD) dimensions of primary molars with those of stainless steel crowns (SSCs) in anIranian population. Materials and methods. Impressions were taken from both dental arches of children, and casts were poured. Teeth with caries, restoration, hypoplasia or other dental anomalies were excluded. 216 primary molars were selected and divided into 4 groups of 54 each (maxillary and mandibular first and second primary molars). MD/BL dimensions were measured using a digital caliper with 0.01 mm precision on casts and SCCs (3M brand). Data were assessed using paired t-test, post hoc test and ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. The MD dimension of the lower first molar SSC and the BL dimension of the lower second molar SSC had the least difference with the corresponding values of the respective teeth. The MD dimension of the upper second molar SSC and the BL dimension of the upper first molar SSC had the greatest difference with the corresponding values in the respective teeth. Comparison of the two different brands of SSCs for the upper first molar revealed that both types had significant differences with the teeth in terms of both MD (P = 0.0) and BL (P = 0.0) dimensions. Conclusion. In the studied population, best adaptation was seen in second lower molars and the least adaptationswere seen in first and second upper molars. PMID:26236433

  13. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  14. Current management of molar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Barry W; Tidy, John A

    2002-05-01

    Molar pregnancy remains an uncommon and still not fully understood disorder. The clinical presentation has changed over recent decades. In developed countries complete moles are now usually diagnosed early (on clinical and/or ultrasound scan criteria) so that the more severe clinical presentations are much less commonly seen. The important differences between complete and partial moles and their risk factors are now well recognized. Common protocols for managing persistent gestational trophoblastic disease are being derived, and molecular genetic studies are advancing our understanding of molar pregnancy and its sequelae. Cure rates approaching 100% should now be the rule rather than the exception. There is a strong case for formal registration and monitoring of all cases through specialist centers.

  15. Morphometric evaluation and planning of anticurvature filing in roots of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho; Venâncio, Jessyca Figueira; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Barbosa Júnior, Nelson; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to guide the planning of anticurvature filing using pre-determined anatomical points on teeth to establish directions for proper implementation of the technique. Two hundred digital periapical radiographs of human molar teeth were selected and divided into two groups (n = 100): MX (maxillary) and MD (mandibular) molars. Mesiobuccal roots were considered for the MX group and mesial roots for the MD group. Pre-determined anatomical points required for planning the anticurvature filing on the root canal path were located, and the distances between these points obtained. The anticurvature filing was simulated in two different protocols for each group, and the region of dentin removal and the remaining dentin thickness were measured in the safety and danger zones of the root canals. Statistical analysis was carried out at a significance level of 5%. The distances between the anatomical points and the thickness of remaining dentin showed significant differences when the two groups were compared (p < 0.001). No significant differences were found between the two experimental groups regarding the area of dentin removal at the root region, but differences were detected in comparison with dentin removal at the crown (p < 0.001). In terms of wear produced after simulation of both anticurvature filing protocols, significant differences were verified for all regions, except for the dentin remaining at the danger zone. The radiographic location of anatomical points allows for planning and implementation of controlled and efficient anticurvature filing and can be performed in the same manner for maxillary and mandibular molars.

  16. Mandibular lip bumper for molar torque control.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Giuseppe; Longobardi, Annalisa; Cannavale, Rosangela; Perillo, Letizia

    2011-01-01

    Treatment effects of lip bumpers alone include flaring of the mandibular incisors, distalization and uprighting of the mandibular first molars, and buccal expansion of the canines, premolars, and molar. Lip forces are transmitted through this appliance onto the molars. Moreover the lip bumper is able to derotate, expand or constrict, upright and reinforce the anchorage whereas torque control is lacking. Aim of this paper is the presentation of a new type of lip bumper that allows the molar torque control.

  17. Predictive factors of difficulty in lower third molar extraction: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Quesada-Gómez, Carmen; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-01-01

    Background Several publications have measured the difficulty of third molar removal, trying to establish the main risk factors, however several important preoperative and intraoperative variables are overlooked. Material and Methods A prospective cohort study comprising a total of 130 consecutive lower third molar extractions was performed. The outcome variables used to measure the difficulty of the extraction were operation time and a 100mm visual analogue scale filled by the surgeon at the end of the surgical procedure. The predictors were divided into 4 different groups (demographic, anatomic, radiographic and operative variables). A descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analysis of the data was performed. Results Patients’ weight, the presence of bulbous roots, the need to perform crown and root sectioning of the lower third molar and Pell and Gregory 123 classification significantly influenced both outcome variables (p< 0.05). Conclusions Certain anatomical, radiological and operative variables appear to be important factors in the assessment of surgical difficulty in the extraction of lower third molars. Key words:Third molar, surgical extraction, surgical difficulty. PMID:27918736

  18. Molar versus as a paradigm clash.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, W M

    2001-01-01

    The molar view of behavior arose in response to the demonstrated inadequacy of explanations based on contiguity. Although Dinsmoor's (2001) modifications to two-factor theory render it irrefutable, a more basic criticism arises when we see that the molar and molecular views differ paradigmatically. The molar view has proven more productive. PMID:11453623

  19. Motivation and Organizational Principles for Anatomical Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Cornelius; Mejino, José L.; Modayur, Bharath R.; Jakobovits, Rex; Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Conceptualization of the physical objects and spaces that constitute the human body at the macroscopic level of organization, specified as a machine-parseable ontology that, in its human-readable form, is comprehensible to both expert and novice users of anatomical information. Design: Conceived as an anatomical enhancement of the UMLS Semantic Network and Metathesaurus, the anatomical ontology was formulated by specifying defining attributes and differentia for classes and subclasses of physical anatomical entities based on their partitive and spatial relationships. The validity of the classification was assessed by instantiating the ontology for the thorax. Several transitive relationships were used for symbolically modeling aspects of the physical organization of the thorax. Results: By declaring Organ as the macroscopic organizational unit of the body, and defining the entities that constitute organs and higher level entities constituted by organs, all anatomical entities could be assigned to one of three top level classes (Anatomical structure, Anatomical spatial entity and Body substance). The ontology accommodates both the systemic and regional (topographical) views of anatomy, as well as diverse clinical naming conventions of anatomical entities. Conclusions: The ontology formulated for the thorax is extendible to microscopic and cellular levels, as well as to other body parts, in that its classes subsume essentially all anatomical entities that constitute the body. Explicit definitions of these entities and their relationships provide the first requirement for standards in anatomical concept representation. Conceived from an anatomical viewpoint, the ontology can be generalized and mapped to other biomedical domains and problem solving tasks that require anatomical knowledge. PMID:9452983

  20. Reference Man anatomical model

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  1. The "anatomic" view of the suprarenals in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Sénécail, B; Colin, D; Person, H; Vallée, B; Lefèvre, C

    1994-01-01

    Based on coordinates derived from three series of anatomic sections, the authors propose a view for tomographic investigation, applicable in MRI and ultrasound, which reconstructs the ideal image of the suprarenal gland in its quadrilateral as described by Testut. This "anatomic" view is 45 degrees vertical and oblique, intermediate between the sagittal and frontal views, which it can advantageously replace. A new aspect of suprarenal tomography, recalling the image of a triskele, is described in the context of this view.

  2. Anatomical entity mention recognition at literature scale

    PubMed Central

    Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Anatomical entities ranging from subcellular structures to organ systems are central to biomedical science, and mentions of these entities are essential to understanding the scientific literature. Despite extensive efforts to automatically analyze various aspects of biomedical text, there have been only few studies focusing on anatomical entities, and no dedicated methods for learning to automatically recognize anatomical entity mentions in free-form text have been introduced. Results: We present AnatomyTagger, a machine learning-based system for anatomical entity mention recognition. The system incorporates a broad array of approaches proposed to benefit tagging, including the use of Unified Medical Language System (UMLS)- and Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO)-based lexical resources, word representations induced from unlabeled text, statistical truecasing and non-local features. We train and evaluate the system on a newly introduced corpus that substantially extends on previously available resources, and apply the resulting tagger to automatically annotate the entire open access scientific domain literature. The resulting analyses have been applied to extend services provided by the Europe PubMed Central literature database. Availability and implementation: All tools and resources introduced in this work are available from http://nactem.ac.uk/anatomytagger. Contact: sophia.ananiadou@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24162468

  3. Anatomic hemispherectomy: historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Robinson, Shenandoah; Nair, Ajith Rajappan; Sivanandapanicker, Jyothish L; Cohen, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The history of surgical treatment for hemispheric epilepsy is rich with colorful twists and turns. The authors trace the evolution of the surgical treatment of hemispheric epilepsy from radical anatomic resections to current less invasive disconnection procedures. Anatomic hemispherectomy (AH) was first described by Dandy in 1928 as a treatment for gliomas. The first report of this technique to control seizures was by McKenzie in 1938. AH gained wide popularity but began to fall out of favor after the description of superficial cerebral hemosiderosis in 1966. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with AH, Rasmussen introduced functional hemispherectomy in 1974. The technique of hemispherotomy was introduced in the 1990 s to minimize the extent of brain removal while maximizing the white matter disconnections. Thus, surgery for hemispheric epilepsy has undergone dramatic transformation since the technique was first introduced. Less invasive techniques have been developed to reduce surgical morbidity. Although optimal seizure control is best achieved with radical AH, the newer less invasive disconnection techniques appear to achieve near-comparable postoperative seizure control with a significantly lower rate of complications.

  4. Endodontic management of mandibular first molar with seven canals using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Banode, Ankur Mahesh; Gade, Vandana; Patil, Sanjay; Gade, Jaykumar

    2016-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of a mandibular molar with aberrant canal configuration can be diagnostically and clinically challenging. Successful endodontic therapy thus depends on the clinician's ability to anticipate and look for these aberrant variations. A mandibular first molar with seven canals represents a rare anatomical variant, particularly when four canals are found in distal root. Based on in vitro studies, its incidence is reported to be between 0.2% and 3%. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as an adjunctive diagnostic aid, the determination of root canal anatomy in teeth with complex canal configurations has become more precise. The present case report discusses successful nonsurgical management of radix entomolaris along with middle mesial canal and middle distal canal in mandibular first molar with seven canals (four canals in distal and three in mesial) employing CBCT as an adjunctive diagnostic aid to conventional radiography. PMID:27307680

  5. Asymmetry in mesial root number and morphology in mandibular second molars: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shashit; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguity in the root morphology of the mandibular second molars is quite common. The most common root canal configuration is 2 roots and 3 canals, nonetheless other possibilities may still exist. The presence of accessory roots is an interesting example of anatomic root variation. While the presence of radix entomolaris or radix paramolaris is regarded as a typical clinical finding of a three-rooted mandibular second permanent molar, the occurrence of an additional mesial root is rather uncommon and represents a possibility of deviation from the regular norms. This case report describes successful endodontic management of a three-rooted mandibular second molar presenting with an unusual accessory mesial root, which was identified with the aid of multiangled radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography imaging. This article also discusses the prevalence, etiology, morphological variations, clinical approach to diagnosis, and significance of supernumerary roots in contemporary clinical dentistry. PMID:24516829

  6. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed

    Snell, J R; Green, R; Stott, G; Van Baerle, S

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk.

  7. A Molar Pregnancy within the Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Charlotte; Nascu, Patricia; Rouse, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Background. Discussion of the incidence of molar pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy. Role of salpingostomy and special considerations for postoperative care. Case. The patient is a 29-year-old G7P4 who presented with vaginal bleeding in the first trimester and was initially thought to have a spontaneous abortion. Ultrasound was performed due to ongoing symptoms and an adnexal mass was noted. She underwent uncomplicated salpingostomy and was later found to have a partial molar ectopic pregnancy. Conclusion. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a molar ectopic pregnancy. There was no indication of molar pregnancy preoperatively and this case highlights the importance of submitting and reviewing pathological specimens. PMID:28044117

  8. Pulp size in molars: underestimation on radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chandler, N P; Ford, T R Pitt; Monteith, B D

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to determine whether radiographs provide a clinically useful indication of pulp size in diseased/restored human first molar teeth, and to investigate accessibility of pulp tissue for diagnostic testing using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Extracted teeth of known age were collected. Restorative materials were removed and teeth with evidence of pulp exposures excluded. Fifty-six teeth were radiographed from buccal and mesial aspects, and then their crowns were sectioned axiobuccolingually and photographed. Images were digitally scanned and measurements made of the total pulp area (above a line across the most superior part of the pulpal floor) and the pulp area in the clinical crown (superior to a line between the amelocemental junctions). The pulp width at the cervix and the highest point of the pulp were also recorded. Data were analysed using Pearson correlations. Pulp areas within the clinical crowns were significantly larger than indicated by radiographs, by 23% in the case of the clinically attainable buccal view (P < 0.05). Pulps may be more accessible to flowmeter testing than they appear. Absence of pulp tissues in the crown was recorded in equal numbers of teeth on radiographs and sections, but with agreement for only one tooth. Sixteen per cent of the teeth had no pulp area in the clinical crown when sectioned, but might still be suitable for testing using LDF.

  9. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia.

  10. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis longus tendon and intracompartmental septations. Results: The average length of the extensor retinaculum from its proximal to distal extent measured approximately 2.2 cm. The distal aspect of the radial styloid was 0.3 cm distal to the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum, and the distance between the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum and the APL-Lister's-Scaphoid juncture was approximately 0.5 cm. A separate compartment for the extensor pollicis brevis was noted in 35% of the specimens. The abductor pollicis longus tendon demonstrated great variability with 1, 2, 3, or 4 slips in 9%, 30%, 43%, or 26% of the specimens, respectively. Conclusion: The superficial bony prominences of the radial wrist can be used reliably as anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. PMID:19092992

  11. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected. PMID:28044087

  12. Statistical Analyses of Femur Parameters for Designing Anatomical Plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Kunjin; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-01-01

    Femur parameters are key prerequisites for scientifically designing anatomical plates. Meanwhile, individual differences in femurs present a challenge to design well-fitting anatomical plates. Therefore, to design anatomical plates more scientifically, analyses of femur parameters with statistical methods were performed in this study. The specific steps were as follows. First, taking eight anatomical femur parameters as variables, 100 femur samples were classified into three classes with factor analysis and Q-type cluster analysis. Second, based on the mean parameter values of the three classes of femurs, three sizes of average anatomical plates corresponding to the three classes of femurs were designed. Finally, based on Bayes discriminant analysis, a new femur could be assigned to the proper class. Thereafter, the average anatomical plate suitable for that new femur was selected from the three available sizes of plates. Experimental results showed that the classification of femurs was quite reasonable based on the anatomical aspects of the femurs. For instance, three sizes of condylar buttress plates were designed. Meanwhile, 20 new femurs are judged to which classes the femurs belong. Thereafter, suitable condylar buttress plates were determined and selected.

  13. Dietary Inference from Upper and Lower Molar Morphology in Platyrrhine Primates

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kari L.; Cooke, Siobhán B.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Kay, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between diet and dental topography is of importance to paleontologists seeking to diagnose ecological adaptations in extinct taxa. Although the subject is well represented in the literature, few studies directly compare methods or evaluate dietary signals conveyed by both upper and lower molars. Here, we address this gap in our knowledge by comparing the efficacy of three measures of functional morphology for classifying an ecologically diverse sample of thirteen medium- to large-bodied platyrrhines by diet category (e.g., folivore, frugivore, hard object feeder). We used Shearing Quotient (SQ), an index derived from linear measurements of molar cutting edges and two indices of crown surface topography, Occlusal Relief (OR) and Relief Index (RFI). Using SQ, OR, and RFI, individuals were then classified by dietary category using Discriminate Function Analysis. Both upper and lower molar variables produce high classification rates in assigning individuals to diet categories, but lower molars are consistently more successful. SQs yield the highest classification rates. RFI and OR generally perform above chance. Upper molar RFI has a success rate below the level of chance. Adding molar length enhances the discriminatory power for all variables. We conclude that upper molar SQs are useful for dietary reconstruction, especially when combined with body size information. Additionally, we find that among our sample of platyrrhines, SQ remains the strongest predictor of diet, while RFI is less useful at signaling dietary differences in absence of body size information. The study demonstrates new ways for inferring the diets of extinct platyrrhine primates when both upper and lower molars are available, or, for taxa known only from upper molars. The techniques are useful in reconstructing diet in stem representatives of anthropoid clade, who share key aspects of molar morphology with extant platyrrhines. PMID:25738266

  14. Dentinal innervation of impacted human third molars.

    PubMed

    Lilja, J; Fagerberg-Mohlin, B

    1984-12-01

    Five totally impacted third molars were studied in the transmission electron microscope for the presence of nervous structures in the dentin before eruption. In contradiction to earlier studies available, nervous structures were found in the predentin and the dentin of the impacted third molars in different parts of the crown and also in the predentin of the root.

  15. [Graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces in a virtual 3D setting. Scanning technologies and soft provides a greater flexibility in the digitization of surfaces and a higher resolution and accuracy. An alternative cheap method for the reconstruction of 3D anatomic surfaces is presented in connection with some studies and international projects developed by Medical Design research team.

  16. The wisdom behind third molar extractions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, S; Rinchuse, D J; Rinchuse, D J

    2009-12-01

    The literature pertaining to the extraction of third molars is extensive. There is a large individual variation and a multitude of practitioners' beliefs and biases relating to the extraction of especially asymptomatic and pathology free third molars. With the current emphasis in dentistry being placed on clinicians to make evidence-based decisions, the routine removal of third molars has been re-assessed and questioned. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate past and present knowledge of third molar extractions and relate it to logical considerations relevant to science and the evidence-based decision-making process. This paper endeavours to encourage and stimulate clinicians to re-evaluate their views on third molar extractions based on suggested guidelines and current evidence.

  17. General technique of third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Farish, Sam E; Bouloux, Gary F

    2007-02-01

    The most commonly performed surgical procedure in most oral and maxillofacial surgery practices is the removal of impacted third molars. Extensive training, skill, and experience allow this procedure to be performed in an atraumatic fashion with local anesthesia, sedation, or general anesthesia. The decision to remove symptomatic third molars is not usually difficult, but the decision to remove asymptomatic third molars is sometimes less clear and requires clinical experience. A wide body of literature (discussed elsewhere in this issue) attempts to establish clinical practice guidelines for dealing with impacted teeth. Data is beginning to accumulate from third molar studies, which hopefully will provide surgeons and their patients with evidence-based guidelines regarding elective third molar surgery.

  18. Patient anxiety and surgical difficulty in impacted lower third molar extractions: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Arasa, L; Figueiredo, R; Valmaseda-Castellón, E; Gay-Escoda, C

    2014-09-01

    Encountering patients who are fearful and anxious is common in dental practice and these factors can increase the complexity of dental procedures. A prospective cohort study was performed to assess whether patient anxiety influences the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and to identify other predictive factors of surgical difficulty; 102 extractions done under local anaesthesia were assessed. Several preoperative variables were recorded (demographic, anatomical, and surgical) and patient anxiety was assessed through the use of various questionnaires. Extraction difficulty was measured using the operation time (OT) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (difficulty VAS) completed by the surgeon. Patients with deep impacted third molars that required bone removal and tooth sectioning showed higher levels of preoperative anxiety. Significant correlations were found between questionnaire scores and the surgical difficulty (OT and difficulty VAS). OT was also related to age, depth of impaction, third molar angulations, proximity of the third molar roots to the mandibular canal, hard and soft tissue coverage, and the need to perform an ostectomy and tooth sectioning. Impacted lower third molar extraction is significantly more difficult in anxious patients. Other demographic, radiological, and surgical factors were also found to be significantly related to the surgical difficulty.

  19. Revolution vs status quo? Non-intervention strategy of asymptomatic third molars causes harm.

    PubMed

    Toedtling, V; Yates, J M

    2015-07-10

    The Faculty of Dental Surgery of the Royal College of Surgeons of England has prompted the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to urgently re-assess the TA1 guidance on extractions of wisdom teeth and highlighted required amendments to the present version in light of published evidence concerning the harm caused by wisdom tooth retention. This article seeks to address the recent concerns relating the increasing frequency of distal-cervical caries in lower second molar teeth when associated with asymptomatic partially erupted mesial or horizontal impacted mandibular third molars. Such acute angle impactions are classified as partially erupted when one of the third molar cusps breached the epithelial attachment of the distal aspect of the second molar, thus prevents the formation of a gingival seal. At its earliest stage the wisdom tooth appears clinically absent or unerupted, yet histologically the architecture of the gingival epithelium has been disrupted allowing ingress of microbes, demineralisation and succeeding cavitation to take place on the distal aspect of the second molar. We hope to highlight the difficulties faced in addressing this growing clinical problem and encourage clinicians to re-evaluate their own caries risk assessment and caries prevention strategy in relation to mesial and horizontal third molar extractions.

  20. Proximity of the mandibular molar root apex from the buccal bone surface: a cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dokyung; Jin, Myoung-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proximity of the mandibular molar apex to the buccal bone surface in order to provide anatomic information for apical surgery. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 127 mandibular first molars and 153 mandibular second molars were analyzed from 160 patients' records. The distance was measured from the buccal bone surface to the root apex and the apical 3.0 mm on the cross-sectional view of CBCT. Results The second molar apex and apical 3 mm were located significantly deeper relative to the buccal bone surface compared with the first molar (p < 0.01). For the mandibular second molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the root apex was significantly shorter in patients over 70 years of age (p < 0.05). Furthermore, this distance was significantly shorter when the first molar was missing compared to nonmissing cases (p < 0.05). For the mandibular first molars, the distance to the distal root apex of one distal-rooted tooth was significantly greater than the distance to the disto-buccal root apex (p < 0.01). In mandibular second molar, the distance to the apex of C-shaped roots was significantly greater than the distance to the mesial root apex of non-C-shaped roots (p < 0.01). Conclusions For apical surgery in mandibular molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the apex and apical 3 mm is significantly affected by the location, patient age, an adjacent missing anterior tooth, and root configuration. PMID:27508159

  1. Controlled, Rapid Uprighting of Molars: A surprisingly Simple Solution The Pivot Arm Appliance.

    PubMed

    Warise, Timothy R; Galella, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    In orthodontic cases where the regional anatomy provides limited room for eruption, there is etiologically a higher occurrence of tipped/impacted second molars. Although second molar extraction with third molar replacement is a useful option, the "Pivot Arm Appliance" encourages the uprighting of the second molar as a preferred treatment. The most unique and important attribute of the "Pivot Arm Appliance" is the rotating tube. In cases of access limitation, the disto-occlusal surface of the molar presents as one area that is accessible. Other features of the "Pivot Arm Appliance" include: The position of the rotator tube delivers optimal rotational force through the pivoting action of the tube/arm complex. The "Pivot Arm Appliance" takes advantage of the efficiency and simplicity of a Class I lever system. The anatomical fulcrum being the dense cortical bone located anterior to the ascending ramus. The vertical spring system is compact, reliable and delivers gentle controlled force in rotational direction. The lingual location of the "Pivot Arm Appliance" does not hinder the function of the tongue, impinge on the soft tissue or interfere with normal masticatory function. The ease of placement of the rotator tube and subsequent insertion of the spring. It is well to note the uprighting appliance provides a very useful and practical approach to the unique problem of severely tipped second molars with limited buccal access. The "Pivot Arm Appliance" does not function only in these situations but can be used in all cases of second molar uprighting of a moderate to severe nature.

  2. Sextant of Sapphires for Molar Distalization

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Yudistar Venkata; Ganugapanta, Vivek Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Space analysis quantifies the amount of crowding within the arches estimating the severity of space discrepancy. The space gaining procedures include extraction and non-extraction procedures like expansion, proximal stripping and molar distalization. Aim To identify features seen in molar distalization cases. Materials and Methods The sample size comprised 20 patients in whom molar distalization was decided as the treatment plan. The study models and lateral cephalograms of all the patients were taken. Occlusograms were obtained. Model analysis and cephalometric analysis were performed. Descriptive statistical analysis like mean, standard deviation, standard error and mode were done. Results The parameters in Question gave following results. The Bolton analysis showed anterior mandibular excess with mean value of 1.56mm±1.07. The first order discrepancy between maxillary central and lateral incisors was 5±1.95. The premolar rotation showed mean value of 16.58±5.12. The molar rotation showed the value of 7.66±2.26. The nasolabial angle showed the mean of 101.25±8.7 IMPA of 101.4±5.74. Conclusion The six features studied in molar distalization cases [First order discrepancy between upper central and lateral incisors; Rotation of premolars and molars; Bolton’s discrepancy in anterior dentition; Average to horizontal growth pattern; Proclined lower incisors and Obtuse nasolabial angle] can be taken as patterns seen in molar distalization cases and considered as a valid treatment plan. PMID:27656572

  3. Technical and anatomical aspects of novalis stereotactic radiosurgery sphenopalatine ganglionectomy

    SciTech Connect

    De Salles, Antonio A.F. . E-mail: adesalles@mednet.ucla.edu; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Golish, S. Raymond Ph.D.; Medin, Paul M.; Malkasian, Dennis; Solberg, Timothy D.; Selch, Michael T.

    2006-11-15

    Background: Several techniques have been applied for destruction of the sphenopalatine ganglion to control cluster headache and ocular pain with sympathetic component. Cluster headache has responded to radiofrequency ablation or phenol destruction. Radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion is promising due to the excellent visualization of the target on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and skull X-rays. Material and Methods: Six patients and one cadaver head were analyzed in this study. The cadaver-head dissection confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion on X-rays and CT imaging. One patient undergoing radiofrequency sphenopalatine ablation participated for confirmation of the location of the ganglion on plain X-rays. Five patients received radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion. One patient had classic unilateral cluster headache. Two patients had neuropathic pain and 1 had bilateral migrainous neuralgia. The fifth patient had bilateral atypical facial pain. All received a single maximal dose of 90 Gy with a 5- or 7.5-mm circular collimator. MRI, CT, and skull X-rays identified and confirmed the target. Results: The sphenopalatine fossa is seen in the skull X-ray as an inverse tear drop just caudal to the sphenoid sinus. This location is readily correlated to the CT target by the stereotactic coordinates and confirmed with the presence of the ganglion visualized in the MRI scan. Only the patient with cluster headache experienced lasting pain relief. Conclusion: Multiple imaging modalities confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion for radiosurgery. The procedure was performed safely with CT and MRI fusion. Radiosurgery was significantly beneficial only on classic cluster headache.

  4. Anatomically Shaped Tooth and Periodontal Regeneration by Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, B.K.; Mao, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-ε-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-µm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications. PMID:20448245

  5. Developmental Dyslexia: Current Anatomical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert

    1983-01-01

    Findings from anatomical research are highlighted in a discussion of the role of anomalous lateralization and asymmetry in the dyslexic brain. Studies of animal asymmetry are cited along with studies of humans. (CL)

  6. Molars and incisors: show your microarray IDs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the key questions in developmental biology is how, from a relatively small number of conserved signaling pathways, is it possible to generate organs displaying a wide range of shapes, tissue organization, and function. The dentition and its distinct specific tooth types represent a valuable system to address the issues of differential molecular signatures. To identify such signatures, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of developing murine lower incisors, mandibular molars and maxillary molars at the developmental cap stage (E14.5). Results 231 genes were identified as being differentially expressed between mandibular incisors and molars, with a fold change higher than 2 and a false discovery rate lower than 0.1, whereas only 96 genes were discovered as being differentially expressed between mandibular and maxillary molars. Numerous genes belonging to specific signaling pathways (the Hedgehog, Notch, Wnt, FGF, TGFβ/BMP, and retinoic acid pathways), and/or to the homeobox gene superfamily, were also uncovered when a less stringent fold change threshold was used. Differential expressions for 10 out of 12 (mandibular incisors versus molars) and 9 out of 10 selected genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of incisor versus molar differentially expressed genes revealed that 143 genes belonged to 9 networks with intermolecular connections. Networks with the highest significance scores were centered on the TNF/NFκB complex and the ERK1/2 kinases. Two networks ERK1/2 kinases and tretinoin were involved in differential molar morphogenesis. Conclusion These data allowed us to build several regulatory networks that may distinguish incisor versus molar identity, and may be useful for further investigations of these tooth-specific ontogenetic programs. These programs may be dysregulated in

  7. Clinical management of the mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Canut, J A

    1975-09-01

    The complex variety of clinical problems posed by the lower molars requires maximum care in diagnosis and in treatment planning. In this article several therapeutic solutions to these problems are presented. The need to treat positional anomalies of the second molars and to control their drifting in cases of bracing and mandibular insertion, may be an effective auxillary means of treatment of those malocclusions in which lengthening of the dental bracing zones is indicated.

  8. A veterinary digital anatomical database.

    PubMed Central

    Snell, J. R.; Green, R.; Stott, G.; Van Baerle, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Veterinary Digital Anatomical Database Project. The purpose of the project is to investigate the construction and use of digitally stored anatomical models. We will be discussing the overall project goals and the results to date. Digital anatomical models are 3 dimensional, solid model representations of normal anatomy. The digital representations are electronically stored and can be manipulated and displayed on a computer graphics workstation. A digital database of anatomical structures can be used in conjunction with gross dissection in teaching normal anatomy to first year students in the professional curriculum. The computer model gives students the opportunity to "discover" relationships between anatomical structures that may have been destroyed or may not be obvious in the gross dissection. By using a digital database, the student will have the ability to view and manipulate anatomical structures in ways that are not available through interactive video disk (IVD). IVD constrains the student to preselected views and sections stored on the disk. Images Figure 1 PMID:1807707

  9. Molar shape variability in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that platyrrhines constitute a monophyletic group represented by three families: Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae. Morphological variability between and within these three families, however, is widely discussed and debated. The aim of this study was to assess molar shape variability in platyrrhines, to explore patterns of interspecific variation among extant species, and to evaluate how molar shape can be used as a taxonomic indicator. The analyses were conducted using standard multivariate analyses of geometric morphometric data from 802 platyrrhine lower molars. The results indicated that the interspecific variation exhibited a highly homoplastic pattern related to functional adaptation of some taxa. However, phylogeny was also an important factor in shaping molar morphological traits, given that some phenotypic similarities were consistent with current phylogenetic positions. Our results show that the phylogenetic and functional signals of lower molar shape vary depending on the taxa and the tooth considered. Based on molar shape, Aotus showed closer similarities to Callicebus, as well as to some Cebidae and Ateles-Lagothrix, due to convergent evolutionary trends caused by similar dietary habits, or due to fast-evolving branches in the Aotus lineage, somewhat similar to the shape of Callicebus and Cebidae.

  10. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-01-01

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation. PMID:24577171

  11. Prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationship.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Faraj; Roy, Rino; Al-Jame, Badreia

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of occlusal asymmetries in the molar and canine regions in a large population-based sample of adolescent Kuwaitis. Using a stratified cluster sampling method, 1299 Kuwaiti adolescents (674 boys mean age 13.3 years and 625 girls mean age 13.2 years), representing approximately 6.7 per cent of that age stratum in the population, were examined clinically for sagittal molar and canine relationships, with a view to recording half and full-step asymmetries. In this sample, 1244 subjects were examined clinically, while for the remaining 55, pre-treatment study models were assessed. All subjects were in the early permanent dentition stage. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to determine the proportion of different molar and canine asymmetries. Antero-posterior asymmetries were found to be a distinctive and common feature of the dental arches, with half-step outweighing full-step asymmetries both in the anterior and posterior regions. The total prevalence of an asymmetric molar or canine relationship was 29.7 and 41.4 per cent, respectively, with more than 95 per cent falling in the mild category. Patient gender did not influence the prevalence or magnitude of asymmetry. The results showed a clinically significant prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationships, which were mainly in the category of half-step asymmetry. Class II half and full-step asymmetries were more prevalent than Class III asymmetries in the molar and canine regions.

  12. Classification of impacted mandibular third molars on cone-beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Michele; Bazzocchi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurological involvement is a serious complication associated to the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars and the radiological investigation is the first mandatory step to assess the risk of a possible post-operative injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). The aim of this study was to introduce a new radiological classification that could be normally used in clinical practice to assess the relationship between an impacted third molar and mandibular canal on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. Material and Methods CBCT images of 80 patients (133 mandibular third molars) were independently studied by three members of the surgical team to draw a classification that could describe all the possible relationships between third molar and IAN on the cross-sectional images. Subsequently, the study population was subdivided according to this classification. The SPSS software, version 15.0 (SPSS® Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for the statistical analysis. Results Eight different classes were proposed (classes 0-7) and six of them (classes 1-6) were subdivided in two subtypes (subtypes A-B). The distribution of classes showed a prevalence of buccal or apical course of the mandibular canal followed by lingual position and inter-radicular one. No differences have resulted in terms of anatomic relationship between males and females apart from a higher risk of real contact without corticalization of the canal when the IAN had a lingual course for female group. Younger patients showed an increased rate of direct contact with a reduced calibre of the canal and/or without corticalization. Conclusions The use of this classification could be a valid support in clinical practice to obtain a common language among operators in order to define the possible relationships between an impacted third molar and the mandibular canal on CBCT images. Key words:CBCT, classification, inferior alveolar nerve, third molars. PMID:26155337

  13. Correlating the clinical assessment of impacted mandibular third molars with panoramic radiograph and intraoral periapical radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Priya, P. Vani; Nasyam, Fazil A.; Ramprasad, M.; Penumatsa, Narendra V.; Akifuddin, Syed; Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aims And Objectives: This study was conducted to compare the clinical assessment of impacted third molars of mandible with panaromic radiograph (OPG) and intraoral periapical radiograph (IOPA) and to assess the efficacy of IOPA and. Moreover, we corroborated the OPG and IOPA findings of impacted mandiblar third molar root apex to inferior alveolar canal. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients with pericoronitis were examined who were indicated for surgical extraction, among which 50 patients were selected for the study. All the patients underwent a radiographic survey with a digital OPG and IOPA of impacted mandibular third molars, along with clinical survey for anatomic relationship, type of impaction, space available, position in relation to second molar, number of roots, root curvature, and proximity of nerve canal. The data was subjected to statistical analysis. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 4.0.1 software was used for analyzing the collected data. Results: The study revealed that IOPA was more accurate in determining a majority of the factors affecting the third molar surgery, including relationship of the external oblique ridge (IOPA vs OPG = 96%:90%), anteroposterior relation with ramus (IOPA vs OPG = 70%:66%), vertical depth of impaction (IOPA vs OPG = 72%:68%), number of roots (P = 0.013), morphology of roots (IOPA vs OPG = 96%:90%); however, OPG was found to be accurate in evaluating the type of impaction (IOPA vs OPG = 88%:94%), canal relation, along with root of impacted molar (IOPA vs OPG = 74%:86%). Conclusion: To conclude, although IOPA has a marginal angle over OPG in assessing various parameters, only the number of roots have a greater accuracy (P < 0.0013) in IOPA than with OPG. However, the OPG is the better choice to be considered when the patient is associated with trismus. PMID:28217540

  14. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information.

  15. Differences between panoramic and Cone Beam-CT in the surgical evaluation of lower third molars

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez y Baena, Ruggero; Beltrami, Riccardo; Tagliabo, Angelo; Rizzo, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to identify the contiguity between the root of the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal (MC) in panoramic radiographs compared with Cone Beam-CT. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs of 326 third molars and CBCT radiographs of 86 cases indicated for surgery and considered at risk were evaluated. The following signs were assessed in panoramic radiographs as risk factors: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, MC narrowing, root narrowing, root deviation, bifid apex, superimposition, and contact between the root third molar and the MC. Results Radiographic signs associated with absence of MC cortical bone are: radiolucent band, loss of MC border, change in MC direction, and superimposition. The number of risk factors was significantly increased with an increasing depth of inclusion. CBCT revealed a significant association between the absence of MC cortical bone and a lingual or interradicular position of the MC. Conclusions In cases in which panoramic radiographs do not exclude contiguity between the MC and tooth, careful assessment the signs and risks on CBCT radiographs is indicated for proper identification of the relationships between anatomic structures. Key words:Panoramic radiography, Cone-Beam computed tomography, third molar, mandibular nerve. PMID:28210446

  16. Delayed removal of a maxillary third molar from the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Gregoire-Ferriol, Johanna; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Removal of an impacted superior third molar is usually a simple and uncomplicated procedure for an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Nevertheless, complications are possible and include infection, facial swallowing, trismus, wound dehiscence, root fracture or even orosinusal fistula. Iatrogenic displacement into the infratemporal fossa is frequently mentioned but rarely reported. This anatomical fossa includes several important structures such as the internal maxillary artery, the venous pterygoid plexus, the sphenopalatine nerve, the coronoid process of the mandible and the pterygoid muscles. Recommended treatment includes immediate surgical removal if possible or initial observation and secondary removal, as necessary, because of infection, limited mandibular movement, inability to extract the tooth, or the patient's psychological unease. Sometimes, the displaced tooth may spontaneously migrate inferiorly and becomes accessible intraorally. This report describes the location and secondary surgical removal of a left maxillary third molar displaced into the infratemporal fossa, two weeks after first attempt at extraction.

  17. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  18. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  19. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  20. Molar heat capacity and molar excess enthalpy measurements in aqueous amine solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poozesh, Saeed

    Experimental measurements of molar heat capacity and molar excess enthalpy for 1, 4-dimethyl piperazine (1, 4-DMPZ), 1-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine (1, 2-HEPZ), I-methyl piperazine (1-MPZ), 3-morpholinopropyl amine (3-MOPA), and 4-(2-hydroxy ethyl) morpholine (4, 2-HEMO) aqueous solutions were carried out in a C80 heat flow calorimeter over a range of temperatures from (298.15 to 353.15) K and for the entire range of the mole fractions. The estimated uncertainty in the measured values of the molar heat capacity and molar excess enthalpy was found to be +/- 2%. Among the five amines studied, 3-MOPA had the highest values of the molar heat capacity and 1-MPZ the lowest. Values of molar heat capacities of amines were dominated by --CH 2, --N, --OH, --O, --NH2 groups and increased with increasing temperature, and contributions of --NH and --CH 3 groups decreased with increasing temperature for these cyclic amines. Molar excess heat capacities were calculated from the measured molar heat capacities and were correlated as a function of the mole fractions employing the Redlich-Kister equation. The molar excess enthalpy values were also correlated as a function of the mole fractions employing the Redlich-Kister equation. Molar enthalpies at infinite dilution were derived. Molar excess enthalpy values were modeled using the solution theory models: NRTL (Non Random Two Liquid) and UNIQUAC (UNIversal QUAsi Chemical) and the modified UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi chemical Functional group Activity Coefficients - Dortmund). The modified UNIFAC was found to be the most accurate and reliable model for the representation and prediction of the molar excess enthalpy values. Among the five amines, the 1-MPZ + water system exhibited the highest values of molar excess enthalpy on the negative side. This study confirmed the conclusion made by Maham et al. (71) that -CH3 group contributed to higher molar excess enthalpies. The negative excess enthalpies were reduced due to the contribution of

  1. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita; Wright, J Timothy

    2006-11-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a relatively common condition that varies in clinical severity and can result in early loss of the permanent 6-year molars. The etiology of MIH remains unclear, and the diagnosis can be confused with more generalized enamel defects such as those that occur in amelogenesis imperfecta. The management of MIH depends largely on the severity of the enamel defect. Degrees of hypomineralization can range from mild enamel opacities to enamel that readily abrades from the tooth as it emerges into the oral cavity. Usually, severely affected molars are extremely hypersensitive, prone to rapid caries development, and can be difficult to manage in young patients. The purpose of this article is to review approaches to diagnosing and treating MIH.

  3. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Noncompliant Molar Distalizing Appliance: Bonded Molar Distalizer

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, A.; Ahmad Akhoundi, M. S.; Rafighii, A.; Arab, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Attempts to treat class II malocclusions without extraction in non-compliant patients have led to utilization of intraoral molar distalizing appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate dental and skeletal effects of Bonded Molar Distalizer (BMD) which is a simple molar distalizing appliance. Materials and Methods Sixteen patients (12 girls, four boys) with bilateral half-cusp class II molar relationship, erupted permanent second molars and normal or vertical growth pattern were selected for bilateral distalization of maxillary molars via BMD. The screws were activated every other day, alternately. Lateral cephalograms and study models were obtained before treatment and after 11 weeks activation of the appliance. Results Significant amounts of molar distalization, molar distal tipping and anchorage loss were observed. The mean maxillary first molar distal movement was 1.22±0.936 mm with a distal tipping of 2.97±3.74 degrees in 11 weeks. The rate of distal movement was 0.48 mm per month. Reciprocal mesial movement of the first premolars was 2.26±1.12 mm with a mesial tipping of 4.25±3.12 degrees. Maxillary incisors moved 3.55±1.46 mm and tipped 9.87±5.03 degrees mesially. Lower anterior face height (LAFH) decreased 1.28±1.36 mm. Conclusion BMD is appropriate for distalizing maxillary molars, especially in patients with critical LAFH, although significant amounts of anchorage loss occur using this appliance. PMID:22457837

  4. Mandibular Second Molar with a Single Root and a Single Canal: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anna; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Suresh, Nandhini

    2013-01-01

    The variability of root canal system morphology of multirooted teeth represents a continuous challenge to endodontic diagnosis and therapeutics. This report extends the range of known possible anatomical variations to include teeth with lesser number of root and root canals. Variations of root canal systems need not always be in the form of extra canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of existence of fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Thus the aim of this article is to present three cases of endodontically managed mandibular second molars with a single root and root canal. PMID:24392427

  5. Molar tubal ectopic pregnancy: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mbarki, Chaouki; Jerbi, Emna; Hsayaoui, Najeh; Zouari, Fatma; Ben Brahim, Ehsen; Oueslati, Hedhili

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic molar pregnancy is a rare occurrence and consequently not often considered as a diagnostic possibility. We report two cases of molar hydatidiform tubal pregnancy. Diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was confirmed on clinical biological and sonographic investigations. Diagnosis of molar pregnancy was done on histopathology. The clinical course was favorable for both patients. Although rare, molar changes can occur at any site of an ectopic pregnancy. Clinical diagnosis of a molar pregnancy is difficult but histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis.

  6. A consensus conference on management of the lower third molar. Italian Society of Odontostomatological Surgery.

    PubMed

    Annibali, S; De Biase, A; Pippi, R; Sfasciotti, G L

    2011-10-01

    During the first Congress of the Italian University Schools of Oral Surgery, held in Rome on 18-20th February, 2010, a task force was convened by the Italian Society of Odontostomatological Surgery (SIdCO) to summarize the data collected from the current literature on selected aspects relating to the mandibular third molar and its removal. The task of the Conference Participants was to review and analyze the pertinent literature and to elaborate conclusive recommendations for the management of the lower third molar. The statements made and the recommendations presented represent the consensus of the Conference, which can be considered the official statement of the SIdCO.

  7. [Anatomical limits of endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Prades, J M; Veyret, C; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    Constant anatomic boundaries of the lateral mass of the ethnoid are described, based on data from microdissections, endoscopic examinations, computed tomography imaging and histology in 12 subjects. As with surgical progression, identification of these boundaries follows the lateral orbital and superior craniofrontal surfaces. The "starred groove formation", ethmoidal roof lamina and ethmoidosphenoidal recesses are the safety beacons for endonasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopic control.

  8. Ectopic molar pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bousfiha, Najoua; Erarhay, Sanaa; Louba, Adnane; Saadi, Hanan; Bouchikhi, Chahrazad; Banani, Abdelaziz; El Fatemi, Hind; Sekkal, Med; Laamarti, Afaf

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of hydatidiform moles is 1 per 1,000 pregnancies. Ectopic pregnancy occurs in 20 per 1,000 pregnancies. Thus, the incidence of the ectopic molar gestation is very rare. We report a case of tubal molar pregnancy diagnosed at the systematic histology exam of an ectopic pregnancy. We report the case of 32 years old nulliparus women who presented a vaginal bleeding, lower abdominal pain and 6 weeks amenorrhea corresponding to the last menstrual period. At the clinical examination, the arterial pressure was 100/60 mmHG. The gynecological examination was difficult because of lower abdominal pain. Serum gonadotropin activity was 3454 ui/l. Pelvic ultrasound revealed an irregular echogenic mass in the left adnexa. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a left-sided unruptured ampullary ectopic pregnancy. A left laparoscopic salpingectomy was performed. The systematic histologic test identified an ectopic partial molar pregnancy, which was confirmed by DNA ploidy image analysis. The patient was followed with weekly quantitative B-hCG titers until three successive B-hCG levels were negative. It is pertinent that clinicians take routine histological examination of tubal specimens in ectopic pregnancy very seriously in order to diagnose cases of ectopic molar gestations early and mount appropriate post treatment surveillance.

  9. Mass versus molar doses, similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, A; Lamparczyk, H

    2008-11-01

    Generally, they are two systems expressing the amounts of active substance in a given drug product, i.e. mass and molar dose. Currently, the dose system based on the mass is widely used in which doses are expressed in grams or milligrams. On the other hand, the molar dose system is in direct relation to the number of molecules. Hence, the objective of this work was to compare both systems in order to find their advantages and disadvantages. Active substances belonging to the groups of antibiotics, nootropic agents, beta-blockers, vitamins, GABA-analog, COX-2 inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, lipid-modifying agents (fibrates), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (profens), estrogens, neuroleptics, analgesics and benzodiazepines were considered. Moreover, products containing two active substances were also taken into account. These are mixtures of hydrochlorothiazide with active substances influencing the renin-angiotensin system and combined oral contraceptives. For each active substance, belonging to the groups mentioned above molar doses were calculated from mass doses and molar mass. Hence, groups of drugs with a single active substance, drugs with similar pharmacological activities, pharmaceutical alternatives, and drugs with a single active ingredient manufactured in different doses were compared in order to find which dose system describes more adequately differences between and within the groups mentioned above. Comparisons were supported by a number of equations, which theoretically justify the data, and relationships derived from calculations.

  10. Uncertainty assessment of Si molar mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Valkiers, S.; Willenberg, G.-D.

    2010-01-01

    The uncertainty of the Si molar mass measurement is theoretically investigated by means of a two-isotope model, with particular emphasis to the role of this measurement in the determination of the Avogadro constant. This model allows an explicit calibration formula to be given and propagation of error analysis to be made. It also shows that calibration cannot correct for non-linearity.

  11. Radix Entomolaris in Mandibular First Molars in Indian Population: A Review and Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Attam, Kanika; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Utneja, Shivani; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this paper is to present cases of mandibular first molars with an additional distolingual root and their management using appropriate instruments and techniques. Basic Procedures and Main Findings. Mandibular molars can sometimes present a variation called radix entomolaris, wherein the tooth has an extra root attached to its lingual aspect. This additional root may complicate the endodontic management of the tooth if it is misdiagnosed or maltreated. This paper reviews the prevalence of such cases in Indian population and reports the management of 6 such teeth. Principal Conclusions. (1) It is crucial to be familiar with variations in tooth/canal anatomy and characteristic features since such knowledge can aid location and negotiation of canals, as well as their subsequent management. (2) Accurate diagnosis and careful application of clinical endodontic skill can favorably alter the prognosis of mandibular molars with this root morphology. PMID:23125938

  12. Assessment of association between molar incisor hypomineralization and hypomineralized second primary molar

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rakesh; Chandak, Shweta; Chandwani, Manisha; Singh, Prabhat; Pimpale, Jitesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) has been described as a clinical entity of systemic origin affecting the enamel of one or all first permanent molars and also the incisors; less frequently the second primary molars have also been reported to develop hypomineralization of the enamel, along with MIH. Aim: To scrutinize the association between hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPMs) and MIH and their prevalence in schoolgoing pupils in Nagpur, Maharashtra, India and the associated severity of dental caries. Design: A sample of 1,109 pupils belonging to 3–12-year-old age group was included. The entire sample was then divided into Group I (3–5 years) and Group II (6–12 years). The scoring criteria proposed by the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry for hypomineralization was used to score HSPM and MIH. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System II (ICDAS II) was used for appraising caries status in the hypomineralized molars. The examination was conducted by a single calibrated dentist in schools in daylight. The results, thus obtained, were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test and odds ratio. Result: Of the children examined, 10 in Group I (4.88%) had HSPM and 63 in Group II (7.11%) had MIH in at least one molar. In Group II, out of 63 subjects diagnosed with MIH, 30 subjects (48%) also had HSPM. Carious lesions with high severity were appreciated in hypomineralized molars. Conclusion: The prevalence of HSPM was 4.88% and of MIH was 7.11%. Approximately half of the affected first permanent molars were associated with HSPM. The likelihood of development of caries increased with the severity of hypomineralization defect. PMID:27011930

  13. Retrospective analysis of the prevalence and incidence of caries in the distal surface of mandibular second molars in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pepper, T; Grimshaw, P; Konarzewski, T; Combes, J

    2017-02-01

    Mandibular third molars are commonly removed because of distal caries in the adjacent tooth. To find out the prevalence of distal caries in mandibular second molars we retrospectively studied the primary care dental records of 720 British military personnel (653 men and 67 women) from various centres. These records are standardised and personnel are required to attend for inspection regularly. Those who had been under 20 years of age at enlistment, who had served for at least five years, and had five recorded dental inspections, were included. The median (IQR) period from the first to last inspection was 15 (9.7 - 19.2) years, and inspections were a median (IQR) of 14.1 (12.8 - 15.8) months apart. A total of 59/1414 (4.2%) mandibular second molars developed caries in their distal surfaces. This was 4% higher when they were associated with a partially-erupted mandibular third molar than when associated with one that was fully erupted or absent (29/414 (7%) compared with 30/1000 (3%); p=0.001). Carious lesions developed in the distal aspect of 22/133 mandibular second molars (16.5%) that were adjacent to a mesioangularly impacted third molar. Of these, 19/22 were successfully restored. Four mesioangularly impacted mandibular third molars would have to be extracted to prevent one case of distal caries in a second molar (number needed to treat=3.25). Second molars that are associated with a partially-erupted mesioangular mandibular third molar have a higher risk of caries, and this can be reduced by removal of the third molar. However, distal caries in second molars seems to be a treatable and slowly-developing phenomenon and we recommend that the merits and risks of the prophylactic removal of third molars should be discussed with the patient, who should have long-term clinical and radiographic checks if the tooth is retained.

  14. Removal of Deeply Impacted Mandibular Molars by Sagittal Split Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Isler, Sabri Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first and second molars do not share the same frequency of occurrence. In rare cases the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots pointing in opposite direction; these are called kissing molars. In some cases, a supernumerary fourth molar can be seen as unerupted and, in this case, such a supernumerary, deeply impacted fourth molar is seen neighboring kissing molars. The extraction of deeply impacted wisdom molars from the mandible may necessitate excessive bone removal and it causes complications such as damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and iatrogenic fractures of the mandible. This case report describes the use of the sagittal split osteotomy technique to avoid extensive bone removal and protect the inferior alveolar nerve during surgical extruction of multiple impacted teeth. PMID:27429810

  15. Determination of the molar absorptivity of NADH.

    PubMed

    McComb, R B; Bond, L W; Burnett, R W; Keech, R C; Bowers, G N

    1976-02-01

    The molar absorptivity of NADH at 340 nm has been determined by an indirect procedure in which high-purity glucose is phosphorylated by ATP in the presence of hexokinase, coupled to oxidation of the glucose-6-phosphate by NAD+ in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The average value from 85 independent determinations is 6317 liter mol-1 cm-1 at 25 degrees C and pH 7.8. The overall uncertainty is -4.0 to +5.5 ppt (6292 to 6352 liter mol-1 cm-1), based on a standard error of the mean of 0.48 ppt and an estimate of systematic error of -2.6 to +4.1 ppt. Effects of pH, buffer, and temperature on the molar absorptivity are also reported.

  16. Impaction of First Permanent Molars-Case Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-10

    maxillary incisors . Impaction of first and second 6 molars is also reported as very uncommon. In a radiographic survey of 5,000 U.S. Army recruits, it was...second molar and fourth molar, maxillary central incisor and maxillary lateral incisor and maxillary first molar. Impacted mandibular central incisors ...old male patient sought treatment for discomfort during chewing on the left lower side of the jaw. A clinical examination revealed deep pocketing and

  17. Frequency of the mesiopalatal canal in upper first permanent molars viewed through computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Carlos Am; Albuquerque, Verbena C; Amorim, Neusinárya Ls; Freitas, Sérgio Ap; Santos, Tanit C; Matos, Francisca Tc; Ferraz, Maria Aal

    2016-04-01

    The success of any endodontic therapy depends on factors such as correct diagnosis and prognosis. Unawareness or failure to locate additional canals, such as the mesiopalatal canal in the upper first molar, may lead to unsuccessful treatment. Hence, it is valid to consider all the resources available for locating this anatomic structure, e.g. the Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study was to verify the frequency of mesiopalatal canals in upper first permanent molars through computed tomography. Tomography images from a digital archive of a diagnostic imaging center were analyzed. Eighty (80) upper right first molars were assessed through CBCT in axial cross sections at 6mm and 3mm from the root apex; 40 were females and 40, males, randomly chosen. The results revealed that the mesiopalatal canals were present in 56.25% of the sections at 6mm from the root apex, and in 23.75% at 3mm from the apical limit. CBCT scan has proved to be a valid resource for locating mesiopalatal canal, especially in cases where location was not feasible through clinical means.

  18. Cusp expression of protostylid in deciduous and permanent molars

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Sandra; Reyes, María Paula; Moreno, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The present article is a case report on the cusp expression of protostylid in the deciduous inferior molars and in the first permanent inferior molar, in which the correspondence and bilateral symmetry of the mentioned expression can be evidenced, as well as the their relation with the foramen cecum of the mesiobuccal furrows of the deciduous and of the permanent inferior molars. PMID:28123270

  19. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  20. Cusp expression of protostylid in deciduous and permanent molars.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Sandra; Reyes, María Paula; Moreno, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The present article is a case report on the cusp expression of protostylid in the deciduous inferior molars and in the first permanent inferior molar, in which the correspondence and bilateral symmetry of the mentioned expression can be evidenced, as well as the their relation with the foramen cecum of the mesiobuccal furrows of the deciduous and of the permanent inferior molars.

  1. Pain control after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Walton, J G

    1984-12-01

    The ideal agent for use after third molar surgery should alleviate pain, reduce swelling and trismus to a minimum, promote healing and have no unwanted effects. Of course, such an agent does not exist. For relief of pain, analgesics are the obvious choice. Where possible, an analgesic with additional anti-inflammatory properties should be used. There seems little to choose between aspirin, 1000 mg; diflunisal, 500 mg; ibuprofen, 400 mg and zomepirac sodium, 50 mg. In the subject allergic to aspirin and aspirin-like compounds, then paracetamol is the poor alternative. Surprisingly, the efficacy of most of the opioids in post-operative third molar pain is poor, and these drugs alone cannot be recommended for this purpose. Long-acting local anaesthetic solutions may be of value in some situations where extreme pain is likely to be a feature in the immediate post-operative period. However, there are no strict criteria for identifying such cases pre-operatively. Recent work on the use of corticosteroids would suggest that these drugs may be of value in reducing post-operative sequelae. Their future in dentistry in this rôle appears interesting and promising, and worthy of further study. Antihistamines and enzymes have been shown to be of little value, and the fact that these agents now receive little attention is evidence in its own right. The use of locally applied antimicrobials has been shown to be of little value in third molar surgery. In any case, their use is probably contraindicated because of the risk of sensitising the patient. The studies reviewed have not pointed to the effectiveness of the routine use of systemic antimicrobials in preventing or reducing postoperative sequelae after removal of impacted third molars in normal circumstances. Particular conditions, for example in patients susceptible to infection, may benefit by the use of prophylactic antimicrobials. However, each case must be judged on its individual merits, bearing in mind the attendant

  2. A New Concept in Maintaining the Emergence Profile in Immediate Posterior Implant Placement: The Anatomic Harmony Abutment.

    PubMed

    Akin, Richard

    2016-12-01

    As the knowledge base in the demanding realm of esthetic management of anterior implant sites continues to expand, there exists a void in the literature on solutions to accelerate posterior implant protocols. This article proposes a new protocol using the anatomic harmony abutment for immediate molar implant placement. This technique preserves the anatomic emergence form with sutureless implant site sealing and improves the predictability of final restoration fabrication and delivery. The purpose of this report is to describe this concept and its numerous benefits to patients, surgeons, laboratories, and restorative dentists.

  3. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  4. Orthodontic uprighting of a horizontally impacted third molar and protraction of mandibular second and third molars into the missing first molar space for a patient with posterior crossbites.

    PubMed

    Baik, Un-Bong; Kim, Myung-Rae; Yoon, Kyu-Ho; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Park, Jae Hyun

    2017-03-01

    A 22-year-old woman came with a unilateral missing mandibular first molar and buccal crossbite. The open space was closed by protraction of the mandibular left second molar and uprighting and protraction of the horizontally impacted third molar using temporary skeletal anchorage devices, and her buccal crossbite was corrected with modified palatal and lingual appliances. The total active treatment time was 36 months. Posttreatment records after 9 months showed excellent results with a stable occlusion.

  5. Complications of third molar surgery and their management.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    The frequency and severity of untoward events associated with surgical procedures are influenced by multiple factors that may be related to the procedure, patient, and/or surgeon. Not every third molar needs to be removed. Full bony impacted lower third molars well below the cervical margin of the second molar crowns should be considered for retention. Certain deviations from normal healing should be considered to be complications. Risk factors associated with third molar removal should be carefully established and explained to the patient. Third molar surgery has a predictable postsoperative course for the average patient.

  6. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  7. Angle Class II, subdivision, with agenesis of mandibular second molars and extrusion of maxillary second molars *

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Rubens Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This clinical case reports the treatment of an Angle Class II malocclusion in a young woman with a balanced face affected by agenesis of second and third mandibular molars and subsequent extrusion of second maxillary molars. The atypical and peculiar occlusal anomaly led to individualized treatment proposed in order to normalize dental malpositions, with subsequent rehabilitation of edentulous areas by means of a multidisciplinary approach. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) in partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25992995

  8. Post-natal effect of overexpressed DKK1 on mandibular molar formation.

    PubMed

    Han, X L; Liu, M; Voisey, A; Ren, Y S; Kurimoto, P; Gao, T; Tefera, L; Dechow, P; Ke, H Z; Feng, J Q

    2011-11-01

    Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1) is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Dkk1-null mutant embryos display severe defects in head induction. Conversely, targeted expression of Dkk1 in dental epithelial cells leads to the formation of dysfunctional enamel knots and subsequent tooth defects during embryonic development. However, its role in post-natal dentinogenesis is largely unknown. To address this issue, we studied the role of DKK1 in post-natal dentin development using 2.3-kb Col1a1-Dkk1 transgenic mice, with the following key findings: (1) The Dkk1 transgene was highly expressed in pulp and odontoblast cells during post-natal developmental stages; (2) the 1(st) molar displayed short roots, an enlarged pulp/root canal region, and a decrease in the dentin formation rate; (3) a small malformed second molar and an absent third molar; (4) an increase of immature odontoblasts, few mature odontoblasts, and sharply reduced dentinal tubules; and (5) a dramatic change in Osx and nestin expression. We propose that DKK1 controls post-natal mandibular molar dentin formation either directly or indirectly via the inhibition of Wnt signaling at the following aspects: (i) post-natal dentin formation, (ii) formation and/or maintenance of the dentin tubular system, (iii) mineralization of the dentin, and (iv) regulation of molecules such as Osx and nestin.

  9. Juvenile paradental cyst: presentation of a rare case involving second molar.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, A E; Grossi, G B; Maridati, P C; Maiorana, C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article was to describe a rare case of paradental cyst of the permanent mandibular second molar. A 14-year-old girl was referred to Oral Surgery Department, Dental Clinic, IRCSS Fondazione Ca' Granda, University of Milan, Italy, for the evaluation of the deep probing located on the buccal aspect of her erupted mandibular left second molar. Clinical signs of inflammation were absent and the mucosa around the second molar appeared clinically normal. Pulp tests for the second molar were positive. The evaluation of the panoramic radiograph did not revealed radiolucency. The Cone-beam tomography showed a well-defined semilunar-shaped radiolucency demarcated by a fine radiopaque line. The cyst was enucleated. The histopathologic analisys revealed the presence of hyperplastic, non-keratinized squamous epithelium with heavy, dense inflammatory cell infiltrate in the epitelium and connective tissue wall. This analysis associated with macroscopic, clinical and radiografic examination confirmed the diagnosis of paradental cyst. A clinic-pathologic correlation, incorporating the surgical, radiographic and histologic findings, is required to obtain the final diagnosis of paradental cyst. Today, the treatment of choice is simple enucleation and thorough curettage of the cyst without extraction of the involved tooth, but if CT demonstrates erosions in the buccal or lingual cortices, marsupialization should be the treatment of choice.

  10. Mechanics analysis of molar tooth splitting.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Chai, Herzl; Lawn, Brian R; Bush, Mark B

    2015-03-01

    A model for the splitting of teeth from wedge loading of molar cusps from a round indenting object is presented. The model is developed in two parts: first, a simple 2D fracture mechanics configuration with the wedged tooth simulated by a compact tension specimen; second, a full 3D numerical analysis using extended finite element modeling (XFEM) with an embedded crack. The result is an explicit equation for splitting load in terms of indenter radius and key tooth dimensions. Fracture experiments on extracted human molars loaded axially with metal spheres are used to quantify the splitting forces and thence to validate the model. The XFEM calculations enable the complex crack propagation, initially in the enamel coat and subsequently in the interior dentin, to be followed incrementally with increasing load. The fracture evolution is shown to be stable prior to failure, so that dentin toughness, not strength, is the controlling material parameter. Critical conditions under which tooth splitting in biological and dental settings are likely to be met, however rare, are considered.

  11. Antibiotic therapy in impacted third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Monaco, G; Staffolani, C; Gatto, M R; Checchi, L

    1999-12-01

    The use of routine antibiotic therapy in patients undergoing surgical third molar extraction is controversial. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy in preventing postoperative complications following surgical third molar extractions was evaluated in 141 patients. In the test group (66 patients), the protocol utilized a regimen of 2 g of amoxicillin orally daily for 5 d postoperatively, starting at the completion of surgery. In the control group (75 patients), no antibiotic therapy was given. No significant difference was found between the test group and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae, i.e. fever, pain, swelling and alveolar osteitis. A statistically significant association between smoking, habitual drinking and increased postoperative pain and fever was found. Patient age > or = 18 yr was positively correlated with an increased incidence of alveolar osteitis. Swelling was found to be gender-related, in that female patients experienced more swelling than male patients. No correlation was found between the time required for surgery or difficulty of extraction and post-operative pain. In conclusion, no difference was found between patients receiving postoperative amoxicillin and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae.

  12. Onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH).

    PubMed

    Fagrell, Tobias G; Salmon, Phil; Melin, Lisa; Norén, Jörgen G

    2013-01-01

    The etiological factors and timing of the onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) are still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine ground radial and sagittal sections from teeth diagnosed with MIH using light microscopy, polarized light microscopy and X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) and to estimate the onset and timing of the MIH and to relate the hypomineralized enamel to the incremental lines. Thirteen extracted permanent first molars diagnosed MIH, were analyzed with light microscopy and XMCT. The hypomineralized areas were mainly located in the mesio-buccal cusps, starting at the enamel-dentin-junction and continuing towards the enamel surface. In a relative gray scale analysis the values decreased from the EDJ towards the enamel surface. The findings indicate that the ameloblasts in the hypomineralized enamel are capable of forming an enamel of normal thickness, but with a substantial reduction of their capacity for maturation of enamel. Chronologically, it is estimated that the timing of the disturbance is at a period during the first 6-7 months of age.

  13. Molar incisor hypomineralization, prevalence, and etiology.

    PubMed

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  14. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Allazzam, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alaki, Sumer Madani; El Meligy, Omar Abdel Sadek

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n = 267) from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM), erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children's medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB), atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P = 0.01). The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P = 0.001), adenoiditis (P = 0.001), asthma (P = 0.001), fever (P = 0.014), and antibiotics intake (P = 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake. PMID:24949012

  15. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  16. Evaluation by dental cone-beam computed tomography of the incidence and sites of branches of the inferior dental canal that supply mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, A; Fukuta, Y; Nakasato, H; Nakasato, S

    2016-12-01

    Our aim was to assess the incidence and anatomical site of branches of the inferior dental canal that supply mandibular third molars using dental cone-beam computed tomography (CT). We evaluated the incidence and diameter of branches of the inferior dental canal using 272 cone-beam CT mandibular scans from 172 patients referred for imaging before the extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. We found three typical branching patterns from the inferior dental canal in the third molar region: the retromolar canal (in the retromolar triangle), the dental canal (that courses directly beneath the socket of the third molar), and the accessory canal (that courses through the socket and leads from the inferior dental canal to a bony ridge). The incidences of retromolar, dental, and accessory canals were 75 (28%), 223 (82%), and 21 (8%), respectively, with mean diameters of 0.9 (0.4), 0.7 (0.5), and 1.1 (0.4) mm, respectively. Operative injury to the neurovascular contents within the branches of the inferior dental canal can lead to excessive bleeding and postoperative paraesthesia, so identification of its branches on preoperative cone-beam CT images may prove useful during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars or when harvesting bone blocks from the region of mandibular third molars. We also describe two cases of branches detected on panoramic and cone-beam CT images that prompted this research.

  17. Primary retention of first permanent mandibular molars in 29 subjects.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe Hauberg; Becktor, Karin Binner; Kjaer, Inger

    2006-12-01

    This study consisted of two parts: the first part describes the aetiology behind primary retention of first permanent mandibular molars by comparing the affected molar region with the contralateral region, and the second the follow-up of the retained molars. The material comprised dental pantomograms from 29 patients (17 males and 12 females; aged 6 years 2 months to 12 years 5 months) which were sent by Danish public dental clinics to the Department of Orthodontics at Copenhagen Dental School for treatment guidance (Part 1). Questionnaires were later sent to the dentists for follow-up information regarding the affected teeth (Part 2). Part 1-aetiological evaluation: From each radiograph, the number and location of the molars, maturity of individual molars, and deviations from normal morphology were recorded. The findings showed that, in an affected region, disruption of normal dental development and eruption had occurred, causing a delay in dental maturity as well as arrested eruption of the first molar. Part 2-follow-up of eruption: Completed questionnaires and radiographs were returned for 25 subjects. In 10, eruption had occurred, six after surgical removal of mucosa covering the retained first molar. In eight patients the molar had been removed while in seven the observation time from first diagnosis was too short to evaluate eruption. The results indicate that retained first permanent mandibular molars have the ability to erupt and suggest that a unilaterally retained first permanent mandibular molar may represent a temporary delay in eruption rather than permanent failure.

  18. Root growth during molar eruption in extant great apes.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Jay; Dean, Christopher; Ross, Sasha

    2009-01-01

    While there is gradually accumulating knowledge about molar crown formation and the timing of molar eruption in extant great apes, very little is known about root formation during the eruption process. We measured mandibular first and second molar root lengths in extant great ape osteological specimens that died while either the first or second molars were in the process of erupting. For most specimens, teeth were removed so that root lengths could be measured directly. When this was not possible, roots were measured radiographically. We were particularly interested in the variation in the lengths of first molar roots near the point of gingival emergence, so specimens were divided into early, middle and late phases of eruption based on the number of cusps that showed protein staining, with one or two cusps stained equated with immediate post-gingival emergence. For first molars at this stage, Gorilla has the longest roots, followed by Pongo and Pan. Variation in first molar mesial root lengths at this stage in Gorilla and Pan, which comprise the largest samples, is relatively low and represents no more than a few months of growth in both taxa. Knowledge of root length at first molar emergence permits an assessment of the contribution of root growth toward differences between great apes and humans in the age at first molar emergence. Root growth makes up a greater percentage of the time between birth and first molar emergence in humans than it does in any of the great apes.

  19. Clinical Success Rate of Compomer and Amalgam Class II Restorations in First Primary Molars: A Two-year Study.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Faezeh; Mardani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The majority of failures in Class II amalgam restorations occur in the first primary molar teeth; in addition, use of compomer instead of amalgam for primary molar teeth restorations is a matter of concern. The aim ofthe present study was to compare the success rate of Class II compomer and amalgam restorations in the first primary molars. Materials and methods. A total of 17 amalgams and 17 compomer restorations were placed in 17 children based on a split-mouth design. Restorations were assessed at 12- and 24-month intervals for marginal integrity, the anatomic form and recurrent caries. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11. Chi-squared test was applied for the analysis. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results. A total 34 restorations of 28 restorations (14 pairs) of the total restorations still survived after 24 months. Compomerrestorations showed significantly better results in marginal integrity. Recurrent caries was significantly lower incompomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. Cumulative success rate at 24-month interval was significantlyhigher in compomer restorations compared to amalgam restorations. There was no statistically significant difference inanatomic form between the two materials. Conclusion. Compomer appears to be a suitable alternative to amalgam for Class II restorations in the first primary mo-lars.

  20. Age estimation and the developing third molar tooth: an analysis of an Australian population using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bassed, Richard B; Briggs, C; Drummer, Olaf H

    2011-09-01

    The third molar tooth is one of the few anatomical sites available for age estimation of unknown age individuals in the late adolescent years. Computed tomography (CT) images were assessed in an Australian population aged from 15 to 25 years for development trends, particularly concerning age estimation at the child/adult transition point of 18 years. The CT images were also compared to conventional radiographs to assess the developmental scoring agreement between the two and it was found that agreement of Demirjian scores between the two imaging modalities was excellent. The relatively wide age ranges (mean ± 2SD) indicate that the third molar is not a precise tool for age estimation (age ranges of 3-8 years) but is, however, a useful tool for discriminating the adult/child transition age of 18 years. In the current study 100% of females and 96% of males with completed roots were over 18 years of age.

  1. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  2. Molar mass distribution and solubility modeling of asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarranton, H.W.; Masliyah, J.H.

    1996-12-01

    Attempts to model asphaltene solubility with Scatchard-Hildebrand theory were hampered by uncertainty in molar volume and solubility parameter distribution within the asphaltenes. By considering asphaltenes as a series of polyaromatic hydrocarbons with randomly distributed associated functional groups, molar volume and solubility parameter distributions are calculated from experimental measurements of molar mass and density. The molar mass distribution of Athabasca asphaltenes is determined from interfacial tension and vapor pressure osmometry measurements together with plasma desorption mass spectrometry determinations from the literature. Asphaltene densities are calculated indirectly from mixtures of known concentration of asphaltene in toluene. Asphaltene density, molar volume, and solubility parameter are correlated with molar mass. Solid-liquid equilibrium calculations based on solubility theory and the asphaltene property correlations successfully predict experimental data for both the precipitation point and the amount of precipitated asphaltenes in toluene-hexane solvent mixtures.

  3. Displacement of maxillary third molar into the lateral pharyngeal space.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doksa; Ishii, Syoichiro; Yakushiji, Noboru

    2013-10-01

    Iatrogenic tooth displacement is a rare complication during extraction of impacted molars, but displacement of a maxillary third molar into the maxillary sinus, infratemporal fossa, buccal space, pterygomandibular space, and lateral pharyngeal space has been reported. Currently, 6 published reports describe third molar displacement into the lateral pharyngeal space, only 1 of which involved the loss of a maxillary third molar into this area, which occurred after an attempted self-extraction by the patient. There have been no reported cases of iatrogenic displacement of the maxillary third molar during an extraction procedure. This article describes the recovery, under general anesthesia, of a maxillary third molar from the lateral pharyngeal space after an iatrogenic displacement.

  4. Cone beam computed tomography evaluation and endodontic management of permanent mandibular second molar with four roots: A rare case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhara, Subhashini; Sharath Chandra, SM; Parthasarathy, Late Bharath

    2014-01-01

    The morphological variation in the number of roots and root canals, especially in multi-rooted teeth is a constant challenge for diagnosis and successful endodontic therapy. Knowledge of the most common anatomic characteristics and their possible variations is fundamental. Although, endodontic management of four-rooted mandibular first molars have been observed on a few occasions in the literature, to the best of our knowledge four-rooted mandibular second molars having two mesial and two distal roots have not been reported. This paper highlights endodontic management of mandibular second molar with four roots (two mesial and two distal) with one canal in each root and its cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) evaluation which was primarily done for post treatment assessment for diagnosing post-endodontic complications, at the same time confirmed our radiographic diagnosis of this variation. This also helped us portraying the anatomy of this rare variation. PMID:25125856

  5. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach.

    PubMed

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  6. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  7. Unusal canal configuration in maxillary and mandibular second molars

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Ramachandran; Ebenezar, A. V. Rajesh; Mohan, Ajit George; Anand, S.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical article describes three different case reports of maxillary and mandibular second molars with the unusual anatomy of single root with a single canal and their endodontic management. An unusual case of bilateralism is observed in the first two cases in the form of single-rooted second mandibular molars in both the quadrant of the same patient. The presence of maxillary second molar with single root and single canal in the third case is unusual. PMID:27829778

  8. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  9. Molar absorptivity and the blank correction factor.

    PubMed

    Kroll, M H; Elin, R J

    1985-03-01

    In photometry, where both the product formed and one or several reactants absorb light at the same wavelength, the absorbance of the "blank" of the sample at the end of the reaction may be less than that measured at the beginning of the reaction, because of consumption of reactant(s). The blank correction factor for the determined result with one light-absorbing reagent is epsilon P / (epsilon P - epsilon R), where epsilon R and epsilon P are the molar absorptivities of the reagent and the product, respectively. We derived a factor for the case when more than one reagent absorbs light at the same wavelength as the measured product. This factor is independent of the concentration of reagent(s) and can correct the determined result or absorbance for the consumption of light-absorbing reagent(s) during the reaction.

  10. Amoxicillin may cause molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Laisi, S; Ess, A; Sahlberg, C; Arvio, P; Lukinmaa, P-L; Alaluusua, S

    2009-02-01

    The etiology of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is unclear. Our hypothesis was that certain antibiotics cause MIH. We examined 141 schoolchildren for MIH and, from their medical files, recorded the use of antibiotics under the age of 4 yrs. MIH was found in 16.3% of children. MIH was more common among those children who had taken, during the first year of life, amoxicillin (OR=2.06; 95% CI, 1.01-4.17) or the rarely prescribed erythromycin (OR=4.14; 95% CI, 1.05-16.4), compared with children who had not received treatment. Mouse E18 teeth were cultured for 10 days with/without amoxicillin at concentrations of 100 microg/mL-4 mg/mL. Amoxicillin increased enamel but not dentin thickness. An altered pattern of amelogenesis may have interfered with mineralization. We conclude that the early use of amoxicillin is among the causative factors of MIH.

  11. Fusion of a supernumerary tooth to right mandibular second molar: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Chao; Ren, Shuangshuang; Lin, Zintong; Miao, Leiying; Sun, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    Gemination or fusion is a rare occurrence in the mandibular posterior teeth. The aim of this article is to describe the problems encountered and the strategy employed in treating such cases. A 34 years old patient came with the complaint of spontaneous and radiating pain in the right mandibular posterior region. The tooth in concern was an anomalous ‘double’ second mandibular molar diagnosed as having necrotic pulp with chronic apical abscess of endodontic origin. The present case emphasizes the importance of identifying anatomical anomalies during treatment of fused teeth with supernumerary tooth, and the need for the use of advanced imaging modalities like CBCT which is a critical aid in the diagnosis of such cases. Fused teeth can be managed quite efficiently by an overall combined treatment including both endodontic and periodontal therapy. PMID:26550101

  12. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-08

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. A Review on Root Anatomy and Canal Configuration of the Maxillary Second Molars

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Samiei, Mohammad; Frough Reyhani, Mohammad; Ranjkesh, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The complexity of the root canal system presents a challenge for the practitioner. This systematic review evaluated the papers published in the field of root canal anatomy and configuration of the root canal system in permanent maxillary second molars. Methods and Materials: All articles related to the root morphology and root canal anatomy of the permanent maxillary second molars were collected by suitable keywords from PubMed database. The exhaustive search included all publications from 1981 to December 2015. The articles relevant to the study were evaluated and data was extracted. The author/year of publication, country, number of the evaluated teeth, type of study (method of the evaluation), number of roots and the canals, type of canals and the morphology of the apical foramen was noted. Results: The highest studied populations were in Brazil and United States. A total of 116 related papers were found, which had investigated 11945 teeth in total. Across all the studied populations, the three-rooted anatomy was most common, while the four-rooted anatomy had the lowest prevalence. The presence of the second mesiobuccal canal ranged from 11.53 % to 93.7%, where type II (2-1) configuration was the predominant type in Brazil and USA and types II and III (1-2-1) in Chinese populations. In 8.8-44% of cases, fusion was observed. The main reported cases were related to palatal root. The major method of anatomical investigation in case reports was periapical radiography, and the chief method in morphological studies was CBCT. Conclusion: The clinicians should be aware of normal morphology and anatomic variations to reduce the treatment failure. PMID:28179915

  14. Collaborative Regression-based Anatomical Landmark Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g., for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods recently have drawn much attention due to robustness and efficiency. In such methods, landmarks are localized through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to 1) inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and 2) lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. 1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localize landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for the informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed in the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. 2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of “difficult-to-detect” landmarks by using spatial guidance from “easy-to-detect” landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography (CT) images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26579736

  15. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Image analysis of anatomical traits in stalk transections of maize and other grasses

    DOE PAGES

    Heckwolf, Sven; Heckwolf, Marlies; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; ...

    2015-04-09

    Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures, functionally support the transport of water and nutrients, and are harvested for multiple agricultural uses. Research on these basic and applied aspects of grass stalks would benefit from improved capabilities for measuring internal anatomical features. In particular, methods suitable for phenotyping populations of plants are needed.

  17. Accuracy of Cameriere's cut-off value for third molar in assessing 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    De Luca, S; Biagi, R; Begnoni, G; Farronato, G; Cingolani, M; Merelli, V; Ferrante, L; Cameriere, R

    2014-02-01

    Due to increasingly numerous international migrations, estimating the age of unaccompanied minors is becoming of enormous significance for forensic professionals who are required to deliver expert opinions. The third molar tooth is one of the few anatomical sites available for estimating the age of individuals in late adolescence. This study verifies the accuracy of Cameriere's cut-off value of the third molar index (I3M) in assessing 18 years of age. For this purpose, a sample of orthopantomographs (OPTs) of 397 living subjects aged between 13 and 22 years (192 female and 205 male) was analyzed. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both males and females. The results show that the sensitivity of the test was 86.6%, with a 95% confidence interval of (80.8%, 91.1%), and its specificity was 95.7%, with a 95% confidence interval of (92.1%, 98%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 91.4%. Estimated post-test probability, p was 95.6%, with a 95% confidence interval of (92%, 98%). Hence, the probability that a subject positive on the test (i.e., I3M<0.08) was 18 years of age or older was 95.6%.

  18. The maxillary molar endodontic access opening: A microscope-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Mamoun, John Sami

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the basic clinical techniques of performing a maxillary molar endodontic access opening, starting from the initial access opening into the pulp chamber, to the point where a size #10 file has been advanced to the apices of all three or four (or more) canals. The article explains how the use of the dental surgical operating microscope or microscope-level loupes magnification of ×6–8 or greater, combined with head-mounted or coaxial illumination, improve the ability of a dentist to identify microscopic root canal orifices, which facilitates the efficient creation of conservative access openings with adequate straight-line access in maxillary molars. Magnified photos illustrate various microscopic anatomical structures or landmarks of the initial access opening. Techniques are explored for implementing an access opening for teeth with vital versus necrotic pulpal tissues. The article also explores the use of piezoelectric or ultrasonic instruments for revealing root canal orifices and for removing pulp stones or calcified pulpal tissue inside the pulp chamber. PMID:27403069

  19. Digital versus conventional panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Szalma, József; Lempel, Edina; Jeges, Sára; Olasz, Lajos

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital panoramic radiography (OPG) in relation to 4 specific high-risk signs (interruption of the superior cortical line, diversion, narrowing of the canal, and dark band of the root), which would indicate a close anatomic relationship between third molar roots and the inferior alveolar canal.Four hundred mandibular third molar surgical removals after conventional and 272 after digital radiographs were evaluated in the study. The association between postoperative inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paresthesia and the presence of any preoperative high-risk signs in the OPG was investigated. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were completed to compare the accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic techniques detecting high-risk signs predicting possible IAN paresthesia.Digital OPG results showed significantly higher sensitivity in diversion (P = 0.014) and narrowing (P < 0.002) of the canal, whereas the specificity of these signs was significantly lower (P < 0.001 and P = 0.035). The likelihood ratio analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the significant difference between digital and conventional imaging according to the examined high-risk signs. Positive predictive values of the signs were found in conventional radiography between 3.6% and 10.9%, whereas in the digital images, it ranged from 2.9% to 7.9%.The results of this study failed to prove significant difference between the accuracy of digital and conventional OPG for predicting IAN paresthesia, whereas low positive predictive values indicate both imaging techniques as inadequate screening methods for predicting IAN paresthesia after mandibular third molar removal.

  20. Toward the Unification of Molecular and Molar Analyses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three categories of behavior analysis may be called molecular, molar, and unified. Molecular analyses focus on how manual shaping segments moment-to-moment behaving into new, unified, hierarchically organized patterns. Manual shaping is largely atheoretical, qualitative, and practical. Molar analyses aggregate behaviors and then compute a numerical average for the aggregate. Typical molar analyses involve average rate of, or average time allocated to, the aggregated behaviors. Some molar analyses have no known relation to any behavior stream. Molar analyses are usually quantitative and often theoretical. Unified analyses combine automated shaping of moment-to-moment behaving and molar aggregates of the shaped patterns. Unified controlling relations suggest that molar controlling relations like matching confound shaping and strengthening effects of reinforcement. If a molecular analysis is about how reinforcement organizes individual behavior moment by moment, and a molar analysis is about how reinforcement encourages more or less of an activity aggregated over time, then a unified analysis handles both kinds of analyses. Only theories engendered by computer simulation appear to be able to unify all three categories of behavior analysis. PMID:28018041

  1. Mandibular First Molar with a Single Root and Single Canal

    PubMed Central

    Sooriaprakas, Chandrasekaran; Ballal, Suma; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2014-01-01

    Successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal is diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. In addition all the mandibular molars and premolars were single rooted on either side. PMID:24715990

  2. Molar incisor hypomineralisation: clinical management of the young patient.

    PubMed

    Daly, Dympna; Waldron, J M

    2009-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. Early diagnosis is essential since rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its clinical management in young children.

  3. Brief communication: Comparative patterns of enamel thickness topography and oblique molar wear in two Early Neolithic and medieval population samples.

    PubMed

    Le Luyer, Mona; Rottier, Stéphane; Bayle, Priscilla

    2014-09-01

    Enamel thickness has been linked to functional aspects of masticatory biomechanics and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary plastic trait, selectively responsive to dietary changes, wear and tooth fracture. European Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers mainly show a flat wear pattern, while oblique molar wear has been reported as characteristic of Neolithic agriculturalists. We investigate the relationships between enamel thickness distribution and molar wear pattern in two Neolithic and medieval populations. Under the assumption that dietary and/or non-dietary constraints result in directional selective pressure leading to variations in enamel thickness, we test the hypothesis that these two populations will exhibit significant differences in wear and enamel thickness patterns. Occlusal wear patterns were scored in upper permanent second molars (UM2) of 64 Neolithic and 311 medieval subadult and adult individuals. Enamel thickness was evaluated by microtomography in subsamples of 17 Neolithic and 25 medieval individuals. Eight variables describing enamel thickness were assessed. The results show that oblique molar wear is dominant in the Neolithic sample (87%), while oblique wear affects only a minority (42%) of the medieval sample. Moreover, in the Neolithic molars, where buccolingually directed oblique wear is dominant and greatest enamel lost occurs in the distolingual quadrant, thickest enamel is found where occlusal stresses are the most important-on the distolingual cusp. These results reveal a correlation between molar wear pattern and enamel thickness that has been associated to dietary changes. In particular, relatively thicker molar enamel may have evolved as a plastic response to resist wear.

  4. An anatomical signature for literacy.

    PubMed

    Carreiras, Manuel; Seghier, Mohamed L; Baquero, Silvia; Estévez, Adelina; Lozano, Alfonso; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2009-10-15

    Language is a uniquely human ability that evolved at some point in the roughly 6,000,000 years since human and chimpanzee lines diverged. Even in the most linguistically impoverished environments, children naturally develop sophisticated language systems. In contrast, reading is a learnt skill that does not develop without intensive tuition and practice. Learning to read is likely to involve ontogenic structural brain changes, but these are nearly impossible to isolate in children owing to concurrent biological, environmental and social maturational changes. In Colombia, guerrillas are re-integrating into mainstream society and learning to read for the first time as adults. This presents a unique opportunity to investigate how literacy changes the brain, without the maturational complications present in children. Here we compare structural brain scans from those who learnt to read as adults (late-literates) with those from a carefully matched set of illiterates. Late-literates had more white matter in the splenium of the corpus callosum and more grey matter in bilateral angular, dorsal occipital, middle temporal, left supramarginal and superior temporal gyri. The importance of these brain regions for skilled reading was investigated in early literates, who learnt to read as children. We found anatomical connections linking the left and right angular and dorsal occipital gyri through the area of the corpus callosum where white matter was higher in late-literates than in illiterates; that reading, relative to object naming, increased the interhemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right angular gyri; and that activation in the left angular gyrus exerts top-down modulation on information flow from the left dorsal occipital gyrus to the left supramarginal gyrus. These findings demonstrate how the regions identified in late-literates interact during reading, relative to object naming, in early literates.

  5. Anatomic study of the prechiasmatic sulcus and its surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Guthikonda, Bharat; Tobler, William D; Froelich, Sebastien C; Leach, James L; Zimmer, Lee A; Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Tew, John M; Keller, Jeffrey T

    2010-09-01

    To address a lack of anatomical descriptions in the literature regarding the prechiasmatic sulcus, we conducted an anatomical study of this sulcal region and discuss its clinical relevance to cranial base surgery. Our systematic morphometric analysis includes the variable types of chiasmatic sulcus and a classification schema that has surgical implications. We examined the sulcal region in 100 dry skulls; bony relationships measured included the interoptic distance, sulcal length/width, planum sphenoidale length, and sulcal angle. The varied anatomy of the prechiasmatic sulcii was classified as four types in combinations of wide to narrow, steep to flat. Its anterior border is the limbus sphenoidale at the posterior aspect of the planum sphenoidale. The sulcus extends posteriorly to the tuberculum sellae and laterally to the posteromedial aspect of each optic strut. Averages included an interoptic distance (19.3 +/- 2.4 mm), sulcal length (7.45 +/- 1.27 mm), planum sphenoidale length (19 +/- 2.35 mm), and sulcal angle (31 +/- 14.2 degrees). Eighteen percent of skulls had a chiasmatic ridge, a bony projection over the chiasmatic sulcus. The four types of prechiasmatic sulcus in our classification hold potential surgical relevance. Near the chiasmatic ridge, meningiomas may be hidden from the surgeon's view during a subfrontal or pterional approach. Preoperative evaluation by thin-cut CT scans of this region can help detect this ridge.

  6. Pulpotomies with Portland cement in human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Conti, Taísa Regina; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Fornetti, Ana Paula Camolese; Moretti, Ana Beatriz Silveira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Abdo, Ruy Cesar Camargo

    2009-01-01

    Two clinical cases in which Portland cement (PC) was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy of mandibular primary molars in children are presented. Pulpotomy using PC was carried out in two mandibular first molars and one mandibular second molar, which were further followed-up. At the 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up appointments, clinical and radiographic examinations of the pulpotomized teeth and their periradicular area revealed that the treatments were successful in maintaining the teeth asymptomatic and preserving pulpal vitality. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC could be observed in the three molars treated. PC may be considered as an effective alternative for primary molar pulpotomies, at least in a short-term period. Randomized clinical trials with human teeth are required in order to determine the suitability of PC before unlimited clinical use can be recommended.

  7. [Molar incisor hypomineralisation in the first permanent teeth].

    PubMed

    Ivanović, Mirjana; Zivojinović, Vesna; Sindolić, Mirjana; Marković, Dejan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to point out the prevalence of hypomineralised molars and incisors and emphasize importance of this condition in paediatric dentistry. This condition is defined as hypomineralisation of one or more first permanent molars frequently affecting incisors and referred to as molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH). Aetiology of MIH has not been fully clarified and numerous aetiological factors have been cited. Hypomineralised molars are more prone to caries, cause severe restorative problems and are frequently extracted due to serious damage and caries complications. Incisors can present demarcated enamel opacities, while enamel breakdown is uncommon. Considering the fact that permanent first molars with severe defects demand complex treatment, they represent a serious problem for the patient as well as for the dentist.

  8. Extinction as discrimination: the molar view.

    PubMed

    Baum, William M

    2012-05-01

    The traditional molecular view of behavior explains extinction as the dissipation or inhibition of strength, formerly built up by contiguous reinforcement. In obstinate opposition to this explanation was the partial-reinforcement extinction effect: a partially reinforced response extinguishes more slowly than a continuously reinforced response. It suggests instead that extinction is discrimination. Four pigeons were exposed to daily sessions in which a variable period of food delivery, produced by pecking on a variable-interval schedule, was followed by extinction. The rate of food delivery was varied over a wide range across conditions. Varying the amount of food per delivery inversely with rate of delivery kept response rate from varying excessively. The results confirmed and extended the partial-reinforcement effect; persistence of pecking and time to extinction were inversely related to rate of obtaining food. The results support the molar view of extinction, not as loss of strength of a particular discrete response, but as a transition from one allocation of time among activities to another. Although molecular theories dismiss discrimination due to repeated training and extinction as an impurity or complication, repeated cycles of availability and privation are probably typical of the environment in which most vertebrate species evolved.

  9. Comparison of micro-computerized tomography and cone-beam computerized tomography in the detection of accessory canals in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Tatar, İlkan; Arıkan, Volkan; Çelik, Hakan Hamdi; Yüksel, Selcen; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the accuracy of micro-computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting accessory canals in primary molars. Materials and Methods Forty-one extracted human primary first and second molars were embedded in wax blocks and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. After the images were taken, the samples were processed using a clearing technique and examined under a stereomicroscope in order to establish the gold standard for this study. The specimens were classified into three groups: maxillary molars, mandibular molars with three canals, and mandibular molars with four canals. Differences between the gold standard and the observations made using the imaging methods were calculated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient test. Results The presence of accessory canals in micro-CT images of maxillary and mandibular root canals showed a statistically significant correlation with the stereomicroscopic images used as a gold standard. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CBCT findings and the stereomicroscopic images. Conclusion Although micro-CT is not suitable for clinical use, it provides more detailed information about minor anatomical structures. However, CBCT is convenient for clinical use but may not be capable of adequately analyzing the internal anatomy of primary teeth. PMID:26730367

  10. Eruption of third permanent molars after the extraction of second permanent molars. Part 2: Functional occlusion and periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Orton-Gibbs, S; Orton, S; Orton, H

    2001-03-01

    Functional occlusion and periodontal health were investigated after orthodontic treatment that involved extraction of second molars and after eruption of the third molars in 37 patients (25 female, 12 male). The mean age was 21 years 9 months (range, 16 years 1 month-30 years 5 months). The third permanent molars invariably erupted into a position that maintained good functional occlusion. Sixty-three percent of patients had canine guidance in lateral excursion; the remainder of patients had satisfactory group function. There were only 2 non-working side interferences in the sample, 1 from a recently erupted mandibular third molar. The periodontal health of the sample was generally excellent. Plaque score and bleeding on probing was very low (1.7% of sites). Periodontal health around both maxillary and mandibular teeth was extremely good. When attachment loss was assessed, 2238 of 2240 sites were clinically healthy. One patient, who had generally poor oral hygiene, had a 4-mm probing depth interproximally on the maxillary first and third molar contact. There was no correlation between periodontal health and mandibular third molar position. Therefore, both functional occlusion and periodontal health in the sample were good after loss of second permanent molars and eruption of the third molars.

  11. Anatomical Basis for the Cardiac Interventional Electrophysiologist

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Doblado-Calatrava, Manuel; Cabrera, José Angel; Macías, Yolanda; Saremi, Farhood

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of radiofrequency catheter ablation techniques as the mainstay in the treatment of tachycardia has renewed new interest in cardiac anatomy. The interventional arrhythmologist has drawn attention not only to the gross anatomic details of the heart but also to architectural and histological characteristics of various cardiac regions that are relevant to the development or recurrence of tachyarrhythmias and procedural related complications of catheter ablation. In this review, therefore, we discuss some anatomic landmarks commonly used in catheter ablations including the terminal crest, sinus node region, Koch's triangle, cavotricuspid isthmus, Eustachian ridge and valve, pulmonary venous orifices, venoatrial junctions, and ventricular outflow tracts. We also discuss the anatomical features of important structures in the vicinity of the atria and pulmonary veins, such as the esophagus and phrenic nerves. This paper provides basic anatomic information to improve understanding of the mapping and ablative procedures for cardiac interventional electrophysiologists. PMID:26665006

  12. Strong links between genomic and anatomical diversity in both mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Eva C; Steiper, Michael E

    2014-05-22

    Mammalian olfaction comprises two chemosensory systems: the odorant-detecting main olfactory system (MOS) and the pheromone-detecting vomeronasal system (VNS). Mammals are diverse in their anatomical and genomic emphases on olfactory chemosensation, including the loss or reduction of these systems in some orders. Despite qualitative evidence linking the genomic evolution of the olfactory systems to specific functions and phenotypes, little work has quantitatively tested whether the genomic aspects of the mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems are correlated to anatomical diversity. We show that the genomic and anatomical variation in these systems is tightly linked in both the VNS and the MOS, though the signature of selection is different in each system. Specifically, the MOS appears to vary based on absolute organ and gene family size while the VNS appears to vary according to the relative proportion of functional genes and relative anatomical size and complexity. Furthermore, there is little evidence that these two systems are evolving in a linked fashion. The relationships between genomic and anatomical diversity strongly support a role for natural selection in shaping both the anatomical and genomic evolution of the olfactory chemosensory systems in mammals.

  13. Giving ourselves: the ethics of anatomical donation.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical appeals might anatomists, physicians, and other health professionals make to patients and family members for anatomical donation? Two models of giving, egoistic and liberal, merit close examination.

  14. [Establishment of anatomical terminology in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    The history of anatomical terminology in Japan began with the publication of Waran Naikei Ihan-teimŏ in 1805 and Chŏtei Kaitai Shinsho in 1826. Although the establishment of Japanese anatomical terminology became necessary during the Meiji era when many western anatomy books imported into Janan were translated, such terminology was not unified during this period and varied among translators. In 1871, Tsukumo Ono's Kaibŏgaku Gosen was published by the Ministry of Education. Although this book is considered to be the first anatomical glossary terms in Japan, its contents were incomplete. Overseas, the German Anatomical Society established a unified anatomical terminology in 1895 called the Basle Nomina Anatomica (B.N.A.). Based on this development, Kaibŏgaku Meishŭ which follows the BNA, by Buntarŏ Suzuki was published in 1905. With the subsequent establishment in 1935 of Jena Nomina Anatomica (J.N.A.), the unification of anatomical terminology was also accelerated in Japan, leading to the further development of terminology.

  15. Comparative analysis of preemptive analgesic effect of tramadol chlorhydrate and nimesulide following third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    da Costa Araújo, Fábio Andrey; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Morais, Hécio Henrique Araújo; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias; Vasconcellos, Ricardo José Holanda

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled, paired trial was to perform a comparative analysis of the preemptive analgesic effect of nimesulide and tramadol chlorhydrate during third molar surgery. The study was carried out between March and November 2009, involving 94 operations in 47 male and female patients with bilateral impacted lower third molars in comparable positions. The sample was divided into two groups. Group A received an oral dose of 100 mg of nimesulide 1 h prior to surgery. Group B received an oral dose of 100 mg of tramadol chlorhydrate 1 h prior to surgery. The following aspects were evaluated in the postoperative period: adverse effects of the drugs; amount of rescue medication used (acetaminophen 750 mg); and pain 5, 6, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 84 h after surgery using a visual analog pain scale. Peak pain occurred 5 h after surgery in both groups, with a mean pain score of 2.3 in Group A and 3.0 in Group B; this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p > 0.141). Based on the sample studied, nimesulide and tramadol chlorhydrate demonstrate similar preemptive analgesic effects when used in lower third molar surgeries.

  16. Variations in the anatomical positioning of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth and their practical implications.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Filo, Katharina; Kruse, Astrid L; Locher, Michael; Grätz, Klaus W; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo

    2014-01-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars is one of the most frequent procedures in oral surgery. Here, three-dimensional (3D) imaging is often used, yet its necessity is still being heavily debated. The aim of the study was to describe the variation in the anatomical positioning of third mandibular molars, and, by doing so, examine the necessity of 3D imaging. A retrospective case study was performed with the patients from an oral surgery department from January 2009 to February 2013. The primary focus of the study was on the spatial relationship to the mandibular canal, as well as angulation, root configuration, and developmental stage of the wisdom tooth. Descriptive statistics were calculated for these variables. A total of 1197 wisdom teeth in 699 patients were evaluated. 46.7% exhibited direct contact to the mandibular canal, another 28.7% showed close proximity and 24.6% a measurable distance. In 29.0%, the mandibular canal was vestibular and in 23.8% lingual to the wisdom tooth. In 7.4%, it was interradicular and in 0.6% intraradicular. Most teeth had one (21.3%) or two (55.3%) roots. Others had three (17.6%), four (2.0%) or five (0.2%) roots. In 31.4% of the teeth, the root perforated the lingual compact bone, and in 4.3% the vestibular compact bone. 44.4% of the teeth had mesial angulation, 9.7% distal angulation, 35.3% lingual and 2.9% buccal angulation. Due to the anatomical variety, the use of 3D imaging is recommended before surgical removal of mandibular third molars if conventional imaging cannot exclude complicated conditions.

  17. [BODIES ARTIFACTS AND ANATOMICAL MODELS].

    PubMed

    Aruta, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Through three different museological approaches, diachronically arranged, the essay intends to introduce some pertinent questions related to the topic of the conference "Bodies and Anatomy: the corpses in the museums from Ruysch to Von Hagens. The first item analyzes a recent line of British museological studies, treating mainly medical British museums of the XVIII and XIX century, with intriguing developments arriving up to nowadays. A second point illustrates several aspects with regards to the donation and the arrangement of the morbid specimina Luigi Gedda collection, coming from the CSS Mendel of Rome to the Museum of Pathological Anatomy of Sapienza University of Rome. Finally, in a crossover between the previous points, it will be presented some recent studies regarding the employment of new communication technologies in the scientific and medical museology.

  18. Periodontal tissue reaction during orthodontic relapse in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Tanya J; Brudvik, Pongsri; Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska

    2013-04-01

    Relapse after orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is an undesirable outcome that involves a number of factors. This study investigated the remodelling of the alveolar bone and related periodontal structures during orthodontic relapse in rat molars. The maxillary right first molars of 35 Wistar rats were moved mesially by a fixed orthodontic appliance for 10 days and the contralateral molars served as controls. The appliances were removed and six animals killed. The molars were allowed to relapse, and the remaining animals were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. The jaws were sectioned and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). One day after appliance removal, the molars relapsed to a mean 62.5 per cent of the achieved OTM and then steadily relapsed to 86.1 per cent at 21 days. The number of osteoclasts situated along the alveolar bone of the first molars was highest at the end of active treatment and significantly decreased during the relapse period. In the OTM group, osteoclasts were most numerous in the pressure side of the periodontal ligament (PDL). As the molars relapsed over time, the osteoclast distribution shifted, and after 7 days of relapse, TRAP-positive cells were registered in previous pressure and tension sides of the first molars. After 21 days, these cells were concentrated in the distal parts of the PDL of all three maxillary right molars. These results indicate that orthodontic relapse in the rat model occurs rapidly and remodelling of the alveolar bone and PDL plays a central role in the relapse processes of both actively moved and adjacent teeth.

  19. A C-Shaped Canal in a Maxillary Second Molar: Prexion 3D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Daniela Siqueira; Câmara, Andréa Cruz; do Nascimento, Monikelly do Carmo Chagas; Farias de Araújo, Luciane

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to present an atypical case of a C-shaped root canal that was present in the vestibular root of a permanent maxillary second molar using PreXion 3-D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a diagnostic device. Materials and Methods: A 50-year-old female patient was referred for routine examination to a private diagnostic imaging clinic in Recife-Pernambuco. During the physical examination, the presence of an unusual C-shaped anatomy in the vestibular canal with a mesiodistal interconnection that extended from the apical to the cervical third was detected in axial slices acquired with a PreXion 3-D scanner. Results: Although C-shaped root canals are most frequently observed in the mandibular second molar, this case presented a rare finding in the permanent maxillary second molar. Conclusions: PreXion 3-D CBCT has emerged as a new high-resolution imaging test technology, thus assisting with the diagnosis of anatomical variations such as C-shaped root canals. However, such imaging technology is not recommended for routine use. PMID:28275283

  20. Postoperative recovery after mandibular third molar surgery: a criteria for selection of type of surgical site closure.

    PubMed

    Damodar, Neeliahgari Durga Akhila; Nandakumar, Hanumanthaiah; Srinath, Narashimha Murthy

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate postoperative recovery after mandibular third molar surgery, with and without the use of sutures. This study utilized 50 healthy subjects (19 females and 31 males, 18-40 years of age) with bilateral impacted third molars. Two impacted teeth were removed from each patient (60 min maximum operating time). For each patient, the surgical site on one side of the mouth was closed for primary healing by using nonresorbable sutures, while the surgical site on the other side of the mouth was left open for secondary healing. Postoperative recovery was assessed by determining pain (using a visual analog scale) and swelling (by measuring anatomical landmarks pre- and postoperatively on Days 2, 5, and 7) Any incidence of socket infection and hemorrhage were considered to be complications. Both statistical analysis and clinical observation showed that the surgical sites with nonresorbable sutures showed greater swelling and a higher intensity of pain than the surgical sites without sutures; however, there were no statistical or clinical differences in pain and swelling postsurgery at Day 7. The results suggest secondary closure (that is, without sutures) after third molar surgery will produce less postoperative discomfort than primary closure (with nonresorbable sutures).

  1. Revascularization/Regeneration performed in immature molars: case reports.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, I S; Akbay Oba, A; Erkmen Almaz, M

    2013-01-01

    These 3 case reports the outcome of revascularization treatment in necrotic immature molars. During treatment, a tri antibiotic mix was used to disinfect the pulp for 2 weeks. Then a blood clot was created in the canal, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. After 24 months, the immature molars showed continuation of root development. The patients were asymptomatic, no sinus tracts were evident and apical periodontitis was resolved Results from these cases show that revascularization/regeneration using 3Mix-MP method could be effective for managing immature permanent molar teeth with pulpal necrosis.

  2. Molar heat capacity and entropy of calcium metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.; Chase, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    The heat capacity of calcium has been measured at 85 mean temperatures between T ??? 8 K and T ??? 369 K using an adiabatically-shielded calorimeter in an intermittent heating mode. At T = 298.15 K, the recommended values for the molar heat capacity, molar entropy, and molar enthalpy increment referred to T = 0 are (25.77 ?? 0.08) J??K-1??mol-1, (42.90 ?? 0.11) J??K-1??mol-1, and (5811 ?? 12) J??mol-1, respectively. The uncertainties are twice the standard deviation of the mean. ?? 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  3. Crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the maxillary molars in Tupaia glis were measured, and the most common molar size sequence was M1 > M2 > M3. The M2 and M3 molars were smaller than the M1 in the mesiodistal crown diameters. With regard to the buccolingual diameters, the distal part of M1 and mesial part of M2 were relatively larger and less variable in size. This stable area corresponded to the inflection point of the maxillary arch curve. These results could be explained from a functional morphological standpoint.

  4. Regulatory aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    At this time, there is no US legislation that is specifically aimed at regulating the environmental release of genetically engineered organisms or their modified components, either during the research and development stage or during application. There are some statutes, administered by several federal agencies, whose language is broad enough to allow the extension of intended coverage to include certain aspects of biotechnology. The one possible exception is FIFRA, which has already brought about the registration of several natural microbial pesticides but which also has provision for requiring the registration of “strain improved” microbial pesticides. Nevertheless, there may be gaps in coverage even if all pertinent statutes were to be actively applied to the control of environmental release of genetically modified substances. The decision to regulate biotechnology under TSCA was justified, in part, on the basis of its intended role as a gap-filling piece of environmental legislation. The advantage of regulating biotechnology under TSCA is that this statute, unlike others, is concerned with all media of exposure (air, water, soil, sediment, biota) that may pose health and environmental hazards. Experience may show that extending existing legislation to regulate biotechnology is a poor compromise compared to the promulgation of new legislation specifically designed for this purpose. It appears that many other countries are ultimately going to take the latter course to regulate biotechnology.

  5. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of molar distalization with a palatal plate, pendulum, and headgear according to molar eruption stage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Man; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Oh, Moonbee; Park, Chong Ook; Mo, Sung-Seo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effects of maxillary second and third molar eruption status on the distalization of first molars with a modified palatal anchorage plate (MPAP), and (2) compare the results to the outcomes of the use of a pendulum and that of a headgear using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Methods Three eruption stages were established: an erupting second molar at the cervical one-third of the first molar root (Stage 1), a fully erupted second molar (Stage 2), and an erupting third molar at the cervical one-third of the second molar root (Stage 3). Retraction forces were applied via three anchorage appliance models: an MPAP with bracket and archwire, a bone-anchored pendulum appliance, and cervical-pull headgear. Results An MPAP showed greater root movement of the first molar than crown movement, and this was more noticeable in Stages 2 and 3. With the other devices, the first molar showed distal tipping. Transversely, the first molar had mesial-out rotation with headgear and mesial-in rotation with the other devices. Vertically, the first molar was intruded with an MPAP, and extruded with the other appliances. Conclusions The second molar eruption stage had an effect on molar distalization, but the third molar follicle had no effect. The application of an MPAP may be an effective treatment option for maxillary molar distalization. PMID:27668192

  6. Caries Management Strategies for Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, R.M.; Innes, N.P.T.; Machiulskiene, V.; Evans, D.J.P.; Splieth, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care–based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists’ level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful

  7. Determining Molar Combining Ratios Using Radioisotopes--A Student Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Jerry A.

    1976-01-01

    Outlines an experimental procedure in which an iodine radioisotope is used to determine molar combining ratios of lead and silver with the iodine. Tables and graphs show the definitive results that should be attainable. (CP)

  8. On the Etiology of Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Kup, Elaine

    Molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a condition that is defined based on its peculiar clinical presentation. Reports on the etiology of the condition and possible risk factors are inconclusive and the original suggestion that MIH is an idiopathic condition is often cited. Our group was the first to suggest MIH has a genetic component that involves genetic variation in genes expressed during dental enamel formation. In this report, we provide a rationale to explain the preferential affection of molars and incisors. We suggest that MIH is a genetic condition based on its prevalence, which varies depending on the geographic location, and the evidence that on occasion second primary molars, permanent canines, and premolars can show signs of hypomineralization of enamel when molars and incisors are affected.

  9. Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH): clinical presentation, aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the current knowledge about Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is presented. MIH is defined as hypomineralization of systemic origin of one to four permanent first molars frequently associated with affected incisors and these molars are related to major clinical problems in severe cases. At the moment, only limited data are available to describe the magnitude of the phenomenon. The prevalence of MIH in the different studies ranges from 3.6-25% and seems to differ in certain regions and birth cohorts. Several aetiological factors (for example, frequent childhood diseases) are mentioned as the cause of the defect. Children at risk should be monitored very carefully during the period of eruption of their first permanent molars. Treatment planning should consider the long-term prognosis of these teeth.

  10. Cementoblastoma Relating to Right Mandibular Second Primary Molar

    PubMed Central

    Manepalli, Swapna; Mohapatra, Abinash

    2016-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a benign lesion of the odontogenic ectomesenchymal origin. It rarely occurs in primary dentition. This report describes a case of a cementoblastoma relating to the right mandibular second primary molar in a 7-year-old girl. Her panoramic radiograph revealed a well-defined radiopaque lesion with a radiolucent border extending from the distal surface of the mandibular right first primary molar to the distal surface of mandibular second primary molar. The tumor was attached to the mesial root of primary second molar and was excised along with the teeth involved and sent for histopathological evaluation, which showed irregular trabeculae of mineralized tissue interspersed with fibrovascular connective tissue, trabeculae of mineralized tissue with prominent reversal lines, and peripheral rimming of the mineralized tissue with blast cells. On a six-month follow-up, there has been no recurrence of the lesion. PMID:27738532

  11. Anatomical eponyms - unloved names in medical terminology.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Dworzański, W; Cendrowska-Pinkosz, M; Burdan, M; Dworzańska, A

    2016-01-01

    Uniform international terminology is a fundamental issue of medicine. Names of various organs or structures have developed since early human history. The first proper anatomical books were written by Hippocrates, Aristotle and Galen. For this reason the modern terms originated from Latin or Greek. In a modern time the terminology was improved in particular by Vasalius, Fabricius and Harvey. Presently each known structure has internationally approved term that is explained in anatomical or histological terminology. However, some elements received eponyms, terms that incorporate the surname of the people that usually describe them for the first time or studied them (e.g., circle of Willis, follicle of Graff, fossa of Sylvious, foramen of Monro, Adamkiewicz artery). Literature and historical hero also influenced medical vocabulary (e.g. Achilles tendon and Atlas). According to various scientists, all the eponyms bring colour to medicine, embed medical traditions and culture to our history but lack accuracy, lead of confusion, and hamper scientific discussion. The current article presents a wide list of the anatomical eponyms with their proper anatomical term or description according to international anatomical terminology. However, since different eponyms are used in various countries, the list could be expanded.

  12. Influence of molar ratios on properties of magnesium oxychloride cement

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zongjin . E-mail: zongjin@ust.hk; Chau, C.K.

    2007-06-15

    A parametric study has been conducted to investigate the influences of the molar ratios of MgO/MgCl{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/MgCl{sub 2} on the properties of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement. By an integrated assessment of the experimental studies of strength development and X-ray diffractograms, together with application of the relevant phase diagram, it is recognized that the molar ratios of MgO/MgCl{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/MgCl{sub 2} can significantly affect the properties of MOC cement. For a MOC cement paste possessing a dominance of 5MgO.MgCl{sub 2}.8H{sub 2}O (phase 5) crystals, the molar ratios of MgO/MgCl{sub 2} of 11-17 and H{sub 2}O/MgCl{sub 2} of 12-18 are found to be the most favorite ranges for design purpose. The choose of the molar ratio of H{sub 2}O/MgCl{sub 2} is, however, largely depends on the molar ratio of MgO/MgCl{sub 2} mainly for controlling workability of paste. Therefore, the most critical parameter to be selected in the design process is the molar ratio of MgO/MgCl{sub 2}, although the reactivity of the MgO powder is also important. Besides, the molar ratio can also be affected by the reactivity of the MgO powder to be employed. It is believed that a molar ratio of MgO/MgCl{sub 2} of 13, the most suitable one shown in this study, can be used as a starting point in the normal practice.

  13. Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum After Third Molar Extraction.

    PubMed

    Picard, Maxime; Pham Dang, Nathalie; Mondie, Jean Michel; Barthelemy, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Third molar extraction is one of the most common interventions in dental and maxillofacial surgery. Complications are frequent and well documented, with swelling, pain, bleeding, infection, and lingual or alveolar nerve injury being the most common. This report describes a case of subcutaneous extensive emphysema and pneumomediastinum that occurred 4 days after extraction of an impacted right mandibular third molar. The management and etiology of this case and those reported in the literature are discussed.

  14. Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Two Palatal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin; Talebzadeh, Bita; Norlouoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the morphology and internal anatomy of the root canal system is essential, because it determines the successful outcome of endodontic treatment. The main goal of endodontic treatment is to prevent apical periodontitis and/or to promote the healing of periapical lesion. Presence of two canals or roots on the palatal side of the first maxillary molar has rarely been reported. This case report presents a maxillary first molar with two separate palatal roots. PMID:26523146

  15. An epidemiologic study of deciduous molar relations in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Infante, P F

    1975-01-01

    This study indicated that distoclusion decreased significantly with age and was more prevalent in siblings of children with Class II molar relation as compared with the prevalence for the total population. Children of middle socioeconomic status (SES) and girls with Class I molar relation had prevalences of posterior crossbite significantly greater than lower SES children and boys, respectively. Finger habits were highly associated with posterior crossbite (P less than 0.001).

  16. Prevalence of Taurodont molars in a North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Chandra, Anil; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Arya, Deeksha

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is very important for dentists to be familiar with anomalies of teeth not only for the clinical complications but also their management. Taurodontism also provides a valuable clue in detecting its association with various syndromes and other systemic conditions. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Taurodont molars among a North Indian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 patients’ full-mouth periapical radiographs were screened. The radiographs were evaluated under optimal conditions using double magnifying glasses. A total of 7615 molars (including third molars) were evaluated. The relative incidence and the correlations regarding the location of Taurodont teeth (right versus left side and maxillary versus mandibular) were analyzed using the Chi-square test. Results: Twenty-eight patients were found to have a Taurodont molar (11 women and 17 men [P = 0.250]). The prevalence of Taurodont molar was 2.8%. Males had a higher prevalence rate than females (3.4% vs. 2.2%, respectively). A cluster analysis of total Taurodonts in the mandible (45%) versus maxilla (55%) of both males and females combined showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The occurrence of Taurodontism is basically based on racial expression in different populations. These variations in prevalence between different populations may be due to ethnic variations. The occurrence of Taurodont molars among this Indian population was rare. PMID:25767357

  17. Prediction of maxillary third molar impaction in adolescent orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Artun, Jon; Behbehani, Faraj; Thalib, Lukman

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for maxillary third molar impaction in adolescent orthodontic patients. Radiographs made before treatment (T1) and after treatment (T2) and at a minimum of 10 years postretention (T3) of 132 patients that allowed accurate diagnosis of impaction vs eruption of one or both maxillary third molars were evaluated. Although univariate logistic regression revealed that the decision to extract premolars reduced the risk of impaction by 76% (P < .01), this parameter was not included in the final prediction model at T1. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that third molar impaction could be predicted at T1 according to the size of the retromolar space and the amount of mesial molar movement that will occur during active appliance therapy, reducing the risk of impaction by 22% and 34% for every millimeter increase in distance, respectively (P < .01). At T2, multiple logistic regression revealed that the odds of impaction were more than 60 times higher (P < .01) if the third molar was angulated mesially as compared with less than 30 degrees distally relative to the occlusal plane and almost five times (P < .05) higher if the third molar was angulated more than 30 degrees distally as compared with less than 30 degrees distally. Similar analyses at T2 showed 29% reduced risk of impaction for every millimeter increase in retromolar space and 18% reduced risk for every degree increase in angle MP/SN (P < .01).

  18. Bonded molar tubes: a retrospective evaluation of clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Millett, D T; Hallgren, A; Fornell, A C; Robertson, M

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated time to first failure of stainless steel orthodontic first permanent molar tubes (Ormco Corp) bonded with a light-cured resin adhesive (Transbond) and assessed whether this was related to patient gender, age of the patient at the start of treatment, the presenting malocclusion, or the operator. All first molar tubes were bonded to intact buccal enamel, free of any restoration. Survival analysis was carried out on data from 483 patients with 1190 bonded first molar tubes. For each case, a single molar tube, either that which was first to fail or had the shortest follow-up time, was chosen for analysis. The median time until first bonded tube failure was 699 days with an overall failure rate of 21% recorded. There was no significant difference in time to first failure of molar tubes with respect to patient gender or presenting malocclusion but significant differences were recorded with respect to the patients' age at the start of treatment and the operator. Age at the start of treatment and operator were identified as independently useful predictors of bonded molar tube survival.

  19. Third molar impaction and agenesis: influence on anterior crowding.

    PubMed

    Esan, Temitope; Schepartz, Lynne A

    2017-02-01

    Background Third molar influence on anterior crowding is controversial, but they are assumed to play a major role in compromising dental arch space. Aim To evaluate the relationship among impaction, agenesis and crowding in black South African males. Subjects and method Mandibles and maxillae of 535 black South African males in the Raymond A. Dart Collection of Human Skeletons, University of the Witwatersrand were examined for anterior crowding and third molar agenesis and impaction. Dental crowding was determined using Little's irregularity index. Results Individuals with impaction showed more moderate-to-extreme crowding than those with agenesis. Bilateral third molar presence was more frequently associated with ideal-to-minimal crowding. Weak positive but significant correlations between crowding and impaction were found (mandible, ρ = 0.154, p = 0.000; maxilla ρ = 0.130, p = 0.000). The direction was the opposite for bilateral presence of molars (mandible, ρ = -0.135, p = 0.02; maxilla, ρ = -0.111, p = 0.010). Odds of mandibular crowding were greatest in individuals with impaction (OR = 3.22, CI = 1.716-6.05, p < 0.001). Maxillary results were similar. Conclusion Third molar impaction plays a role in anterior crowding. Third molar presence was not associated with anterior crowding, while agenesis did not explain absence of crowding.

  20. Role of the Molar Volume on Estimated Diffusion Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Sangeeta; Paul, Aloke

    2015-09-01

    The role of the molar volume on the estimated diffusion parameters has been speculated for decades. The Matano-Boltzmann method was the first to be developed for the estimation of the variation of the interdiffusion coefficients with composition. However, this could be used only when the molar volume varies ideally or remains constant. Although there are no such systems, this method is still being used to consider the ideal variation. More efficient methods were developed by Sauer-Freise, Den Broeder, and Wagner to tackle this problem. However, there is a lack of research indicating the most efficient method. We have shown that Wagner's method is the most suitable one when the molar volume deviates from the ideal value. Similarly, there are two methods for the estimation of the ratio of intrinsic diffusion coefficients at the Kirkendall marker plane proposed by Heumann and van Loo. The Heumann method, like the Matano-Boltzmann method, is suitable to use only when the molar volume varies more or less ideally or remains constant. In most of the real systems, where molar volume deviates from the ideality, it is safe to use the van Loo method. We have shown that the Heumann method introduces large errors even for a very small deviation of the molar volume from the ideal value. On the other hand, the van Loo method is relatively less sensitive to it. Overall, the estimation of the intrinsic diffusion coefficient is more sensitive than the interdiffusion coefficient.

  1. Root canal morphology of South Asian Indian maxillary molar teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian Maxillary molars using a tooth clearing technique. Materials and Methods: Hundred teeth each comprising of first, second, and third molars collected from different dental schools and clinics in India were subjected to standard dye penetration, decalcification and clearing procedure before being studied. Results: The first molar mesiobuccal roots exhibited 69% Type I, 24% Type II, 4% Type IV, 2% Type V, and 1% exhibited a Vertuccis Type VIII canal anatomy. In the group with three separate roots the second molar mesiobuccal roots in exhibited 80.6% Type I, 15.3% Type II, 2.7% Type IV, and 1.4% Type V canal anatomy while the third molars mesiobuccal roots exhibited 57.4% Type I, 32% Type II, 2.1% Type III, 8.5% Type IV, 1% had a Type V canal anatomy in the similar group. Conclusion: A varied root canal anatomy was seen in the mesiobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars. PMID:25713497

  2. Kissing molars extraction: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Arjona-Amo, Manuel; Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Batista-Cruzado, Antonio; Serrera-Figallo, Maria-Angeles; Crespo-Torres, Santos; Belmonte-Caro, Rodolfo; Albisu-Andrade, Claudio; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Kissing molars are a very rare form of inclusion defined as molars included in the same quadrant, with occlusal surfaces contacting each other within a single dental follicle. We present four cases of this pathology: a 35 year-old male, referred to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Hospital Virgen del Rocio in Seville, and three females of 24, 26, and 31 years, all of which had kissing molars that were treated by tooth extraction. We have found only 10 cases published in the medical literature in which this type of inclusion is briefly described, none of which elaborate on the surgical technique employed. In these cases, the indication for surgery is established when there is a history of recurring infections or cystic lesions associated with dental inclusions. The extraction of kissing molars requires an exhaustive comprehension of the anatomy of the region involved, sufficiently developed surgical abilities, and an extensive planning process. Key words:Impacted molar, kissing molar, surgical extraction. PMID:26855716

  3. Anatomical variations in human carotid bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Q; Heath, D; Smith, P

    1988-01-01

    The variations in anatomical structure and position of both carotid bodies were noted in 100 consecutive subjects who came to necropsy. Considerable variations in form were found. Although most carotid bodies (83% on the right and 86% on the left) were of the classic ovoid type, an appreciable minority was bilobed (9% on the right and 7% on the left) or double (7% on the right and 6% on the left); 1% were leaf shaped. All these anatomical variants have to be distinguished from the pathologically enlarged carotid body that may have a smooth or finely nodular surface. Anatomical variants (such as the bilobed) may themselves enlarge as a consequence of carotid body hyperplasia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3209707

  4. Anatomical significance in aortoiliac occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Candace; Hayat, Munawar; du Plessis, Maira; Cesmebasi, Alper; Koesterer, Michael; Daly, Kevin P; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    Aortoiliac occlusive disease is a subset of peripheral arterial disease involving an atheromatous occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, common iliac arteries, or both. The disease, as it is known today, was described by the French surgeon René Leriche as a thrombotic occlusion of the end of the aorta. Leriche successfully linked the anatomic location of the occlusion with a unique triad of symptoms, including claudication, impotence, and decreased peripheral pulses. The anatomical location of the atheromatous lesions also has a direct influence on classification of the disease, as well as choice of treatment modality. Considering its impact on diagnosis and treatment, we aimed to provide a detailed understanding of the anatomical structures involved in aortoiliac occlusive disease. Familiarity with these structures will aid the physician in interpretation of radiologic images and surgical planning.

  5. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Chatzimarkos, Markos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Safioleas, Michail

    2016-01-01

    Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones. PMID:27047690

  6. Joint detection and localization of multiple anatomical landmarks through learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, Mert; Zhan, Yiqiang; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2008-03-01

    Reliable landmark detection in medical images provides the essential groundwork for successful automation of various open problems such as localization, segmentation, and registration of anatomical structures. In this paper, we present a learning-based system to jointly detect (is it there?) and localize (where?) multiple anatomical landmarks in medical images. The contributions of this work exist in two aspects. First, this method takes the advantage from the learning scenario that is able to automatically extract the most distinctive features for multi-landmark detection. Therefore, it is easily adaptable to detect arbitrary landmarks in various kinds of imaging modalities, e.g., CT, MRI and PET. Second, the use of multi-class/cascaded classifier architecture in different phases of the detection stage combined with robust features that are highly efficient in terms of computation time enables a seemingly real time performance, with very high localization accuracy. This method is validated on CT scans of different body sections, e.g., whole body scans, chest scans and abdominal scans. Aside from improved robustness (due to the exploitation of spatial correlations), it gains a run time efficiency in landmark detection. It also shows good scalability performance under increasing number of landmarks.

  7. Isolated Male Epispadias: Anatomic Functional Restoration Is the Primary Goal

    PubMed Central

    Bruneel, Elke; Ploumidis, Achilles; Van Laecke, Erik; Hoebeke, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Isolated male epispadias (IME) is a rare congenital penile malformation, as often part of bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC). In its isolated presentation, it consists in a defect of the dorsal aspect of the penis, leaving the urethral plate open. Occurrence of urinary incontinence is related to the degree of dorsal displacement of the meatus and the underlying underdevelopment of the urethral sphincter. The technique for primary IME reconstruction, based on anatomic restoration of the urethra and bladder neck, is here illustrated. Patients and Methods. A retrospective database was created with patients who underwent primary IME repair between June 1998 and February 2014. Intraoperative variables, postoperative complications, and outcomes were assessed. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results and Limitations. Eight patients underwent primary repair, with penopubic epispadias (PPE) in 3, penile epispadias (PE) in 2, and glandular epispadias (GE) in 3. Median age at surgery was 13.0 months [7–47]; median follow-up was 52 months [9–120]. Complications requiring further surgery were reported in two patients, while further esthetic surgeries were required in 4 patients. Conclusion. Anatomical restoration in primary IME is safe and effective, with acceptable results given the initial pathology. PMID:27722172

  8. The anatomical and functional specialization of the fusiform gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Zilles, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform gyrus (FG) is commonly included in anatomical atlases and is considered a key structure for functionally-specialized computations of high-level vision such as face perception, object recognition, and reading. However, it is not widely known that the FG has a contentious history. In this review, we first provide a historical analysis of the discovery of the FG and why certain features, such as the mid-fusiform sulcus, were discovered and then forgotten. We then discuss how observer-independent methods for identifying cytoarchitectonical boundaries of the cortex revolutionized our understanding of cytoarchitecture and the correspondence between those boundaries and cortical folding patterns of the FG. We further explain that the co-occurrence between cortical folding patterns and cytoarchitectonical boundaries are more common than classically thought and also, are functionally meaningful especially on the FG and probably in high-level visual cortex more generally. We conclude by proposing a series of alternatives for how the anatomical organization of the FG can accommodate seemingly different theoretical aspects of functional processing, such as domain specificity and perceptual expertise. PMID:26119921

  9. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  10. Standardised studies on Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM): a need.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, M E C; Ghanim, A; Manton, D J; Weerheijm, K L

    2015-06-01

    In November 2014, a review of literature concerning prevalence data of Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM) was performed. A search of PubMed online databases was conducted for relevant articles published until November 2014. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were hand-searched. Studies were included after assessing the eligibility of the full-text article. Out of 1078 manuscripts, a total of 157 English written publications were selected based on title and abstract. Of these 157, 60 were included in the study and allocated as 52 MIH and 5 HSPM, and 3 for both MIH and HSPM. These studies utilised the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry judgment criteria, the modified index of developmental defects of enamel (mDDE) and self-devised criteria, and demonstrated a wide variation in the reported prevalence (MIH 2.9-44 %; HSPM 0-21.8 %). Most values mentioned were representative for specific areas. More studies were performed in cities compared with rural areas. A great variation was found in calibration methods, number of participants, number of examiners and research protocols between the studies. The majority of the prevalence studies also investigated possible aetiological factors. To compare MIH and HSPM prevalence and or aetiological data around the world, standardisation of such studies seems essential. Standardisation of the research protocol should include a clearly described sample of children (minimum number of 300 for prevalence and 1000 for aetiology studies) and use of the same calibration sets and methods whereas aetiological studies need to be prospective in nature. A standardised protocol for future MIH and HSPM prevalence and aetiology studies is recommended.

  11. Anatomical Volume Visualization with Weighted Distance Fields.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Thomas; Hittle, Brad; Shen, Han-Wei; Stredney, Don; Wiet, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    We describe the use of the weighted distance transform (WDT) to enhance applications designed for volume visualization of segmented anatomical datasets. The WDT is presented as a general technique to generate a derived characteristic of a scalar field that can be used in multiple ways during rendering. We obtain real-time interaction with the volume by calculating the WDT on the graphics card. Several examples of this technique as it applies to an application for teaching anatomical structures are detailed, including rendering embedded structures, fuzzy boundaries, outlining, and indirect lighting estimation.

  12. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  13. Variation in Cuspal Morphology in Maxillary First Permanent Molar with Report of 3 Cusp Molar- A Prevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human teeth has always been known for morphological variations in both the crown and root structures. The corono-morphological variations can be in the form of extra cusp or missing cusp. Permanent maxillary first molars are the biggest teeth in maxillary arch and have a high anchorage value and are known for their four cusp and five cusp patterns, if present with cusp of Carebelli. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cuspal variations and quantification of cusps of permanent maxillary first molar in Malwa population. Materials and Methods A total of 1249 individuals were studied at Government College of Dentistry, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India, to evaluate the number of cusps in permanent maxillary first molars. Results Of the studied 1249 individuals, permanent maxillary first molars had five cusps in 407 (32.6%) cases while 838 (67.08%) cases had four cusp and four (0.32%) cases had three cusps. The four cases having three cusp permanent maxillary first molars were present unilaterally and only in females. Conclusion This article emphasizes the presence of permanent maxillary first molar with only three cusps in the Malwa population of India. It also reviews the literature in respect to this rare anomaly and calls for continuous and close monitoring to report such cases in the future. PMID:27790576

  14. Craniofacial pain and anatomical abnormalities of the nasal cavities.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Jeferson Cedaro de; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    The causal relation between anatomical variations of the nose and headaches and facial pain is analyzed through literature review of the topic. The pathogenesis that can be involved in this relation proves to be wider than simple alteration of nasal septum and turbinates that can cause mechanical stimulus through contact between these structures, which covers infectious factors, neurogenic inflammation, correlation with migraines and the role of nasal obstruction. The clinical findings of a lot of authors including the test with topical anesthetic to prove this causal relation, the indication of surgical treatment, in addition to good results of this treatment, are reported. The mechanism of pain relief obtained through surgical correction of nasal septum and turbinate is discussed. These data make us conclude that there are multiple etiologic factors involved, which makes us question the fundamental role of the mechanical aspect.

  15. Clarification of the anatomic definition of the bunion deformity.

    PubMed

    Dayton, Paul; Kauwe, Merrell; Feilmeier, Mindi

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of the terminology applied to the bunion deformity has progressed in parallel with our changing understanding of the deformity itself. Along this path of progression have been multiple terms, sometimes with multiple meanings. Hallux valgus and metatarsus primus varus are 2 of the most common terms for the deformity. Although commonly used, these descriptors can have multiple meanings, and inconsistencies in interpretation can lead to confusion. We propose a more detailed terminology to provide a more accurate description of the entire bunion deformity in 3 planes and for both the hallux and the metatarsal component of the deformity. The term we propose is hallux abducto valgus with metatarsus primus adducto valgus. An accurate understanding of the multiplanar position of the deformed foot is important for planning deformity correction. The descriptors in the terminology proposed will keep in the forefront the aspects of correction required for the first ray and hallux to be returned to an anatomically correct position.

  16. Molar Intrusion in Open-bite Adults Using Zygomatic Miniplates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Eiman S; Abdallah, Essam Mohamed; El-Kenany, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes that arise after intrusion of the maxillary molars using zygomatic miniplates in adult skeletal anterior open bite patients. In addition to measuring the amount and rate of molar intrusion; with special emphasis on changes in the axial inclination of the intruded molars. The study group was composed of 13 anterior open bite patients (mean age 18 years, 8 months ± 2 years, 2 months) with posterior dentoalveolar excess. Mini-plates were placed in the zygomatic buttress bilaterally. The upper arch was segmentally leveled and a double Trans-Palatal Arch (TPA) was bonded. Closed NiTi coil spring was placed bilaterally between the book of the mini-plate just mesial and distal to the first molar buccal tube applying intrusive force of 450 gper side. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken before intrusion (T1: post upper segmental leveling) and after intrusion (T2). Comparison between means before and after the intrusion was done using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test (WSRT). Mandibular autorotation followed the molar intrusion, SNB and SN-Pog angles significantly increased while the ANB, MP-SN angle and N-S-Gn angle significantly decreased. The mean amount of accomplished molar intrusion was 3.1mm ± 0.74mm, with a rate of 0.36mm per month ± 0.08mm per month and a bite closure of 6.55mm ± 1.83mm. There was no significant buccal tip in the right and left molars upon intrusion. Conclusion: Miniplates zygomatic anchorage can be used effectively for skeletal open bite correction through posterior dento-alveolar intrusion. Intrusion of the posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage induced counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and, as a consequence, corrected the anteroposterior intermaxillary relationship with a dramatic improvement in the facial soft tissue convexity.

  17. Erupted complex odontoma delayed eruption of permanent molar.

    PubMed

    Ohtawa, Yumi; Ichinohe, Saori; Kimura, Eri; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, benign tumors that develop in the jaw, rarely erupt into the oral cavity. We report an erupted odontoma which delayed eruption of the first molar. The patient was a 10-year-old Japanese girl who came to our hospital due to delayed eruption of the right maxillary first molar. All the deciduous teeth had been shed. The second premolar on the right side had erupted, but not the first molar. Slight inflammation of the alveolar mucosa around the first molar had exposed a tooth-like, hard tissue. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiopaque mass indicating a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter. The border of the image was clear, and part of the mass was situated close to the occlusal surface of the first molar. The root of the maxillary right first molar was only half-developed. A clinical diagnosis of odontoma was made. The odontoma was subsequently extracted, allowing the crown of the first molar to erupt almost 5 months later. The dental germ of the permanent tooth had been displaced by the odontoma. However, after the odontoma had been extracted, the permanent tooth was still able to erupt spontaneously, as eruptive force still remained. When the eruption of a tooth is significantly delayed, we believe that it is necessary to examine the area radiographically. If there is any radiographic evidence of a physical obstruction that might delay eruption, that obstruction should be removed before any problems can arise. Regular dental checkups at schools might improve our ability to detect evidence of delayed eruption earlier.

  18. First molar health status in different craniofacial relationships

    PubMed Central

    Linjawi, Amal I

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the health status of permanent first molars and different craniofacial relationships among adolescents. Study design This is a retrospective study on patients’ records aged 11–15 years. Sex, skeletal relationship, vertical growth pattern, malocclusion, overjet, and overbite were assessed. The health status of permanent first molars was recorded from the orthopantomograms and intraoral photographs as “sound” and “not sound”. Chi-square, Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to analyze and correlate the assessed variables. Significance level was set at P<0.05. Results A total of 210 records were evaluated; 81 were male, 68 had Class I and 91 had Class II skeletal relationships. More than half of the subjects had normal (n=67) to moderate deep bite (n=72); normal (n=91), moderately increased (n=54), to severely increased (n=50) overjet; and Class I (n=106) and Class II division 1 (n=75) malocclusion. Significant differences were found in the health status of the permanent first molars with respect to sex (P=0.034), vertical growth pattern (P=0.01), and overbite (P=0.047). Strong correlations were only found between the health status of the permanent first molars and the following variables: sex (P=0.036) and vertical growth pattern (P=0.004). Significant correlation was further found between the upper left first molar health status and sex (P=0.019) and the lower right first molar health status and the vertical growth pattern (P=0.001). No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships (P>0.05). Conclusion Sex difference and vertical growth patterns were found to be potential predictors of the health status of the permanent first molars. No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships. PMID:27462176

  19. Anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth with special regard to the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Lanzer, Martin; Pejicic, Rada; Kruse, Astrid L; Schneider, Thomas; Grätz, Klaus W; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-01-01

    The removal of wisdom teeth is one of the most common interventions in oral surgery. In order to avoid complications, a profound knowledge of the anatomy of teeth and adjacent tissues is crucial. In the case of maxillary wisdom teeth, their relationship to the maxillary sinus, to the pterygoid fossa, to the maxillary tuber and the adjacent venous plexus is particularly important. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging, for example by means of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), is increasingly utilized in practice. However, the necessity of CBCT imaging is still a matter of intensive debate. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomic (positional) variation of maxillary wisdom teeth and, based on these findings, to elucidate the additional benefit of such imaging. A retrospective case study was performed using patients examined by means of CBCT imaging in the Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology during the period from 2008 to 2013. Primary study variables comprised the spatial relationship of the teeth to the maxillary sinus, the degree of retention and root development, the covering of the root with bone and mucosa, the root configuration, and the developmental stage of the tooth. In addition, the association of the inclination of teeth in the transversal and sagittal plane with the above variables was evaluated. Descriptive statistical parameters were calculated for all results of the examination. In total, CBCT recordings of 713 maxillary wisdom teeth from 430 patients were evaluated. Their mean age was 29.8 years, and the proportion of male patients slightly prevailed (54.4%). Most teeth exhibited fully developed roots (64.1%). Overall 22.9% of third molars were impacted, 32.3% were retained, and 6.5% were erupting. In more than a third of the patients, wisdom teeth were in occlusion. The inclination of the third molars both in the transversal and sagittal plane was significantly associated with the distance of the root from the maxillary sinus as well

  20. Sex estimation using diagonal diameter measurements of molar teeth in African American populations.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Meek, Susan; Dilkie, Natasha; Mussett, Michelle

    2015-11-01

    Teeth are often recovered in forensic cases due to their postmortem longevity. The goal of the present research was to investigate the degree of sexual dimorphism in the permanent molars of African Americans using crown and cervical diagonal diameters. Discriminant functions developed from a modern Greek population were tested for accuracy of sex estimation in an African American population. One hundred and three (53 males and 50 females) individuals ranging in age from 16 years to 66 years old were used from the Robert J. Terry Anatomical Skeletal Collection. Four diagonal diameter measurements were taken for each of the left mandibular and maxillary molars: mesiobuccal-distolingual crown diameter, mesiolingual-distobuccal crown diameter, mesiobuccal-distolingual cervical diameter, and mesiolingual-distobuccal cervical diameter. The overall percentage of accuracy of the modern Greek discriminant functions when applied to the African American sample was between 53.8% and 63.6%. Males were more accurately classified (93.6%-100%) than females (0%-18.2%). The African American population specific direct discriminant functions showed accuracy rates from 72.6% to 100% for the original data and 40%-72.3% for the cross-validated data. The African American stepwise discriminant functions showed accuracy rates from 63.9% to 77.6% for the original and cross-validated data. Comparisons to other populations were made. The results suggest that, in teeth, there is variation in the degree of sexual dimorphism between populations and discriminant functions for sex estimation in dentition are population specific.

  1. FATE OF FLUORIDE-INDUCED SUBAMELOBLASTIC CYSTS IN DEVELOPING HAMSTER MOLAR TOOTH GERMS

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, DM; Alberga, JMR; Kwee, NCH; Bervoets, TJM; Bronckers, ALJJ; DenBesten, PK

    2016-01-01

    White opacities and pits are developmental defects in enamel caused by high intake of fluoride (F) during amelogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that these enamel pits develop at locations where F induces the formation of sub-ameloblastic cysts. We followed the fate of these cysts during molar development over time. Mandibles from hamster pups injected with 20 mg NaF/kg at postnatal day 4 were excised from 1 h after injection till shortly after tooth eruption, 8 days later. Tissues were histologically processed and cysts located and measured. Cysts were formed at early secretory stage and transitional stage of amelogenesis and detected as early 1 h after injection. The number of cysts increased from 1 to almost 4 per molar during the first 16 h post-injection. The size of the cysts was about the same, i.e., 0.46±0.29 ×106 μm3 at 2hr and 0.50±0.35×106 μm3 at 16 h post-injection. By detachment of the ameloblasts the forming enamel surface below the cyst was cell-free the first 16 h post-injection. With time new ameloblasts repopulated and covered the enamel surface in the cystic area. Three days after injection all cysts had disappeared and the integrity of the ameloblastic layer restored. After eruption, white opaque areas with intact enamel surface were found occlusally at similar anatomical locations as late secretory stage cysts were seen pre-eruptively. We conclude that at this moderate F dose, the opaque sub-surface defects with intact surface enamel (white spots) are the consequence of the fluoride-induced cystic lesions formed earlier under the late secretory–transitional stage ameloblasts. PMID:21277565

  2. Anatomic reference for computed tomography of paranasal sinuses and their communication in the Egyptian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Alsafy, M A M; El-Gendy, S A A; El Sharaby, A A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an anatomic reference for computed tomography (CT) for the paranasal sinuses of adult buffalo fit the use of anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. CT images with the most closely corresponding cross sections of the head were selected and studied serially in a rostral to caudal progression from the level of the interdental space to the level of the nuchal line. The anatomical features were compared with the dissected heads and skulls. The paranasal sinuses of buffalo comprise dorsal conchal, middle conchal, maxillary, frontal, palatine, sphenoidal (inconstant, small and shallow when present), lacrimal and ethmoidal that were identified and labelled according to the premolar and molar teeth as landmarks. The topographic description of all the compartments, diverticula, septa and communication of the paranasal sinuses in buffalo has been presented. The relationship between the various air cavities and paranasal sinuses was easily visualized.

  3. Anatomical Data for Analyzing Human Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plagenhoef, Stanley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Anatomical data obtained from cadavers and from water displacement studies with living subjects were used to determine the weight, center of gravity, and radius of gyration for 16 body segments. A lead model was used to study movement patterns of the trunk section of the body. (Authors/PP)

  4. Giving Ourselves: The Ethics of Anatomical Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical…

  5. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  6. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  7. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  8. [Anatomic variants of Meckel's cave on MRI].

    PubMed

    Benoudiba, F; Hadj-Rabia, M; Iffenecker, C; Fuerxer, F; Bekkali, F; Francke, J P; Doyon, D

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives an accurate analysis of Meckel's cave variability. Images were acquired in 50 patients with several sections for anatomical comparison. Using several sections, MRI is a suitable method for better analysis of the trigeminal cistern. The most frequent findings are symmetrical trigeminal cisterns. Expansion of Meckel's cave or its disappearance has pathological significance.

  9. Endodontic management of a C-shaped maxillary first molar with three independent buccal root canals by using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Karanxha, Lorena; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hong, Sung-Ok; Lee, Wan; Kim, Pyung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a method for endodontic management of a maxillary first molar with unusual C-shaped morphology of the buccal root verified by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. This rare anatomical variation was confirmed using CBCT, and nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed by meticulous evaluation of the pulpal floor. Posttreatment image revealed 3 independent canals in the buccal root obturated efficiently to the accepted lengths in all 3 canals. Our study describes a unique C-shaped variation of the root canal system in a maxillary first molar, involving the 3 buccal canals. In addition, our study highlights the usefulness of CBCT imaging for accurate diagnosis and management of this unusual canal morphology. PMID:23429761

  10. Anatomically corrected malposition of great arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R H; Becker, A E; Losekoot, T G; Gerlis, L M

    1975-01-01

    Four anomalous hearts are described in which the great arteries arise in unusual fashion from their morphologically appropriate ventricles. This malformation, previously termed anatomically corrected transposition, is now termed anatomically corrected malposition. This is because, following the precedent of Van Praagh and his associates, we now reserve the term 'transposition' to describe the situation in which both great arteries arise from separate morphologically inappropriate ventricles. All the hearts examined exhibited atrioventricular concordance, I with viscero-atrial situs inversus, and 3 with situs solitus. However, there were considerable variations in ventricular morphology between the cases. Thus, 2 cases exhibited atresia of the right atrioventricular valve, and in the remaining 2 cases right and levt ventricular sinuses were both identified. Two of the cases also had pulmonary atresia, and coronary artery anomalies were present in all 4. The cases emphasize the fact that the term anatomically corrected malposition describes not a discrete anomaly but only a ventriculo-arterial relation, which is one of ventriculo-arterial concordance. Doubt has previously been cast upon the existence of this as an anatomical entity. It is concluded that the relation does indeed exist, and furthermore can coexist with all varieties of atrioventricular relations. It is suggested that the differing atrioventricular relations can be distinguished by usage of the terms 'concordant' or 'discordant' anatomically corrected malposition. Finally, it is emphasized that it is necessary to distinguish this anomaly, which in most cases presents with left-sided anterior aorta, from the left-sided anterior aorta more frequently encountered in classically corrected transposition'. Images PMID:1191424

  11. Sex discrimination potential of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, P J

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the potential usefulness of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters for sex discrimination of poorly preserved skeletal remains. Cusp diameters were measured from standardized occlusal view photographs in a sample of black South Africans consisting of 130 males and 105 females. Results demonstrated that all cusp dimensions for both first and second maxillary molars exhibited significant sexual dimorphism (p < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate discriminant function equations permitted low to moderate classification accuracy in discriminating sex (58.3%-73.6%). The allocation accuracies for cusp diameter measurements were as high as, and even surpassed, those observed for conventional crown length and breadth dimensions of the same teeth. The most accurate result (73.6%, with a sex bias of only 0.5%) was obtained when all cusp diameters from both maxillary molars were used concurrently. However, only slightly less accurate results (~70.0%) were achieved when selected dimensions from only one of the molars, or even a single cusp, were utilized. Although not as reliable at predicting sex as other skeletal elements in black South Africans, the derived odontometric standards can be used with highly fragmentary skeletal material, as well as immature remains in which crown formation of the maxillary molars is complete.

  12. Mandibular first molar with six root canals: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad; Rahman, Munawar; Saad, Najeeb

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been an ongoing trend of case reports that highlight the presence of more than four root canals in mandibular first molars. This tendency warns clinicians to be more prudent when dealing with mandibular first molars requiring endodontic treatment. Moreover, radiographic examination should be taken as a clue providing tool rather than as an absolute guide to anatomy and its associated aberrances. This case reports the successful non-surgical endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems with three canals in the mesial root and three in the distal root. The classification of root canal systems found in this case was Sert and Bayirli type XV in both the roots. After non-surgical endodontic treatment, the tooth was restored definitively with a resin composite core followed by porcelain fused to the metal crown. This case adds to the library of previously reported cases of mandibular first molars with six root canals and further emphasises on the importance of rare morphological deviations that may occur in the mandibular first molars. PMID:25082869

  13. Radicular anatomy of permanent mandibular second molars in an Iranian population: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Nahid M.; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashadi; Mohammadi, Mostafa; Shamloo, Mohammad Reza Karami; Radmehr, Orkideh; Kaviani, Ramin; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Root morphology is of utmost importance to endodontic sciences. Since there are a few studies on the morphology of mandibular second molars' roots, and some anatomical variables are not evaluated before, the aim of this study was to investigate thoroughly radicular anatomy of this tooth. Materials and Methods: This ex vivo study was performed on 150 intact mandibular second molars. After access cavity preparation and ensuring canal patency, Indian ink was injected into root canals from the orifices. The teeth became transparent using methyl salicylate storage. Then, they were inspected by an endodontist under a ×10 stereomicroscope regarding numerous root morphological variables. Data were analyzed using chi-square test and analysis of variance (α = 0.05). Results: About 86.7% of teeth had two roots and 13.3% were single-rooted (P = 0.0001), of which, 50% were C-shaped (6.7% of all teeth, P = 0.0001). 86.7% of mesial roots were double canalled, whereas 75.3% of distal roots were single canalled (P = 0.0001). 71.45% and 95.3% of the mesial and distal roots had one apical foramen, respectively (P = 0.0001). Apical foramens were mostly central followed by lingual in most cases. Distances between apical foramen and apical constriction ranged between 0.27 and 0.40 mm (P = 0.0545). Distances between apical foramen and root apices ranged between 0.30 and 0.47 mm (P = 0.0001). Vertucci classifications of mesial canals were Type II in 62.6% and Type IV in 37.4%. 86.2% of single-canal distal roots were Type I. 66.7% of double-canal distal roots were Type II and 33.3% were Type IV (P = 0.0001). The mean root lengths from cervical to apex of mesial, distal, and single roots were 14.02 ± 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 13.87–14.17), 13.35 ± 0.91 (95% CI = 13.19–13.50), and 14.25 ± 0.72 mm (95% CI = 13.91–14.58), respectively. The extents of canal curvatures varied between 20° and 31° buccolingually (P = 0.0000), and between 19° and 27

  14. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Amit; Agarwal, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early and timely pedo-orthodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating the disturbances of skeletal or dentoalveolar development, to harmonize the stomatognathic system before the full eruption of all permanent teeth. The advantages of pendulum appliance are its minimal dependence on patient’s compliance (child cooperation), ease of fabrication, onetime activation and adjustment of the springs if necessary to correct minor transverse and vertical molar positions. This article reports a successful treatment method of class II malocclusion with pendulum appliance in mixed dentition phase. Distalization of maxillary molar was done, followed by guidance of canine impaction orthodontically and other dental correction using 0.022 MBT appliances. Posttreatment results were stable and remarkable. How to cite this article: Patil RU, Prakash A, Agarwal A. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):67-73. PMID:27274159

  15. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition.

    PubMed

    Patil, Raju Umaji; Prakash, Amit; Agarwal, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Early and timely pedo-orthodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating the disturbances of skeletal or dentoalveolar development, to harmonize the stomatognathic system before the full eruption of all permanent teeth. The advantages of pendulum appliance are its minimal dependence on patient's compliance (child cooperation), ease of fabrication, onetime activation and adjustment of the springs if necessary to correct minor transverse and vertical molar positions. This article reports a successful treatment method of class II malocclusion with pendulum appliance in mixed dentition phase. Distalization of maxillary molar was done, followed by guidance of canine impaction orthodontically and other dental correction using 0.022 MBT appliances. Posttreatment results were stable and remarkable. How to cite this article: Patil RU, Prakash A, Agarwal A. Pendulum Therapy of Molar Distalization in Mixed Dentition. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):67-73.

  16. Use of sevoflurane inhalation sedation for outpatient third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Ganzberg, S; Weaver, J; Beck, F M; McCaffrey, G

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if sevoflurane in oxygen inhaled via a nasal hood as a sole sedative agent would provide an appropriate level of deep sedation for outpatient third molar surgery. Twenty-four patients scheduled for third molar removal were randomly assigned to receive either nasal hood inhalation sevoflurane or an intravenous deep sedation using midazolam and fentanyl followed by a propofol infusion. In addition to measuring patient, surgeon, and dentist anesthesiologist subjective satisfaction with the technique, physiological parameters, amnesia, and psychomotor recovery were also assessed. No statistically significant difference was found between the sevoflurane and midazolam-fentanyl-propofol sedative groups in physiological parameters, degree of amnesia, reported quality of sedation, or patient willingness to again undergo a similar deep sedation. A trend toward earlier recovery in the sevoflurane group was identified. Sevoflurane can be successfully employed as a deep sedative rather than a general anesthetic for extraction of third molars in healthy subjects.

  17. Rapid palatal expander: an anchor unit for second molar distalization in Angle Class II treatment.

    PubMed

    Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis; Papadopoulou, Alexandra K

    2010-01-01

    Distal movement of maxillary molars is a common approach for nonextraction treatment of Angle Class II patients. Because of known difficulties involving moving the maxillary first molars distally in the presence of second molars, this article describes how the distally directed force is applied immediately to the second molars. A rapid palatal expander can be used as a reliable unit to facilitate the distal movement of the second maxillary molars.

  18. Anatomical calibration for wearable motion capture systems: Video calibrated anatomical system technique.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita; Caroselli, Alessio; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Inertial sensors are becoming widely used for the assessment of human movement in both clinical and research applications, thanks to their usability out of the laboratory. This work aims to propose a method for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame with an ease to use, portable and low cost device. An off-the-shelf camera, a stick and a pattern, attached to the inertial sensor, compose the device. The proposed technique is referred to as video Calibrated Anatomical System Technique (vCAST). The absolute orientation of a synthetic femur was tracked both using the vCAST together with an inertial sensor and using stereo-photogrammetry as reference. Anatomical landmark calibration showed mean absolute error of 0.6±0.5 mm: these errors are smaller than those affecting the in-vivo identification of anatomical landmarks. The roll, pitch and yaw anatomical frame orientations showed root mean square errors close to the accuracy limit of the wearable sensor used (1°), highlighting the reliability of the proposed technique. In conclusion, the present paper proposes and preliminarily verifies the performance of a method (vCAST) for calibrating anatomical landmark position in the wearable sensor reference frame: the technique is low time consuming, highly portable, easy to implement and usable outside laboratory.

  19. Efficacy of 5 machining instruments in scaling of molar furcations.

    PubMed

    Takacs, V J; Lie, T; Perala, D G; Adams, D F

    1993-03-01

    The scaling efficacy of machining instruments was studied in the furcations of 100 extracted molars. The molars were divided into 5 groups with similar furcation anatomy, painted with artificial calculus, partly submerged in stone blocks, and the furcation entrances covered with a heavy rubber dam material. Ten mandibular and 10 maxillary molars were scaled by an experienced operator with each of the following instruments/inserts: ultrasonic instrument with either a prototype ball point insert or with a new pointed insert; ultrasonic instrument with a ball point insert; reciprocating hand-piece with new inserts for furcations; and a sonic scaler with a universal insert. The molar groups were coded and graded in a stereomicroscope by 2 independent examiners, and the rankings were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the multiple comparisons between treatments test. The results revealed statistically significant differences between the instruments, as well as between different topographical areas of the furcations. The sonic scaler with a universal insert and the ultrasonic instrument with ball point inserts were significantly more efficient (P < 0.05) than the reciprocating handpiece with inserts in most of the areas studied. For mandibular molars, significantly better results (P < 0.05) were obtained for lingual furcation entrances than for furcation roofs. For maxillary molars, significantly better results (P < 0.05) were obtained for distal and buccal entrance areas than for furcation roofs and inside of mesial roots. The present study may give some guidance to the practitioner in choosing machining instruments for furcation cleaning as well as identifying the most difficult topographical areas to instrument.

  20. Partial molar quantity of an intensive mother function.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-09-28

    A new formal definition is given to the partial molar quantity of a component i for an intensive mother function. We perturb the entire system by increasing the amount of the target component by δn(i) keeping others constant and measure the response of the system in terms of an intensive mother function, Φ, δΦ. We then define its partial molar quantity of the ith component, φ(i), as φ(i) = [δΦ∕{δn(i)∕(N + δn(i))

  1. Infraocclusion of secondary deciduous molars--an unusual outcome.

    PubMed

    Ponduri, Sirisha; Birnie, David J; Sandy, Jonathan R

    2009-09-01

    Infraocclusion is a condition frequently associated with primary molars. The infraoccluded primary teeth remain in a fixed position, while the teeth adjacent to them continue to erupt, moving occlusally. It is generally accepted that the cause of the altered occlusal level is ankylosis of the affected tooth. This report describes a case in which a short course of interceptive treatment with a 2 x 4 fixed appliance resulted in resolution of the infrocclusion. Recreating space for a severely infraoccluded second deciduous molar resulted in 'eruption' of the tooth without the need for extraction.

  2. Detection and management of a complex canal configuration in mesiobuccal root of maxillary first molar using three dimensional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L.; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Yadla, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    This case report discusses the identification and management of complex canal configuration of 3-2-1 in the mesiobuccal (MB) root of the maxillary left first molar. Careful attention to details of the pulpal floor and applying the knowledge of the laws of orifice location along with deepening the subpulpal groove with ultrasonic tips helped in identifying the three MB canals. Manual scouting helped in understanding the anatomic configuration; the use of three-dimensional imaging technique and spiral computed tomography (SCT) confirmed the same. SCT images showed buccolingually wide and bulbous mesiobuccal root with three separate canals at coronal third that merged into two canals in the middle and exited as a single canal at the apex. This article highlights the role of SCT in three-dimensionally analyzing the unseen rarest canal configurations that ultimately enabled the clinician to thoroughly explore, debride, and obturate the entire root canal system. PMID:27195233

  3. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  4. Anatomical and functional imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    In endocrine hypertension, hormonal excess results in clinically significant hypertension. The functional imaging (such as radionuclide imaging) complements anatomy-based imaging (such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) to facilitate diagnostic localization of a lesion causing endocrine hypertension. The aim of this review article is to familiarize general radiologists, endocrinologists, and clinicians with various anatomical and functional imaging techniques used in patients with endocrine hypertension. PMID:23087854

  5. Modeling anatomical spatial relations with description logics.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Hahn, U.; Romacker, M.

    2000-01-01

    Although spatial relations are essential for the anatomy domain, spatial reasoning is only weakly supported by medical knowledge representation systems. To remedy this shortcoming we express spatial relations that can intuitively be applied to anatomical objects (such as 'disconnected', 'externally connected', 'partial overlap' and 'proper part') within the formal framework of description logics. A special encoding of concept descriptions (in terms of SEP triplets) allows us to emulate spatial reasoning by classification-based reasoning. PMID:11079990

  6. Procedure Planning: Anatomical Determinants of Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hanratty, Colm; Walsh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary practice there are three main methods that can be employed when attempting to open a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of a coronary artery; antegrade or retrograde wire escalation, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde dissection re-entry. This editorial will attempt to clarify the anatomical features that can be identified to help when deciding which of these strategies to employ initially and help understand the reasons for this decision. PMID:24694102

  7. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  8. Engineering anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Warren L; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Chan, M Ete; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Wan, Leo Q; Liu, X Sherry; Guo, X Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-02-23

    The ability to engineer anatomically correct pieces of viable and functional human bone would have tremendous potential for bone reconstructions after congenital defects, cancer resections, and trauma. We report that clinically sized, anatomically shaped, viable human bone grafts can be engineered by using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and a "biomimetic" scaffold-bioreactor system. We selected the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar bone as our tissue model, because of its clinical importance and the challenges associated with its complex shape. Anatomically shaped scaffolds were generated from fully decellularized trabecular bone by using digitized clinical images, seeded with hMSCs, and cultured with interstitial flow of culture medium. A bioreactor with a chamber in the exact shape of a human TMJ was designed for controllable perfusion throughout the engineered construct. By 5 weeks of cultivation, tissue growth was evidenced by the formation of confluent layers of lamellar bone (by scanning electron microscopy), markedly increased volume of mineralized matrix (by quantitative microcomputer tomography), and the formation of osteoids (histologically). Within bone grafts of this size and complexity cells were fully viable at a physiologic density, likely an important factor of graft function. Moreover, the density and architecture of bone matrix correlated with the intensity and pattern of the interstitial flow, as determined in experimental and modeling studies. This approach has potential to overcome a critical hurdle-in vitro cultivation of viable bone grafts of complex geometries-to provide patient-specific bone grafts for craniofacial and orthopedic reconstructions.

  9. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of a cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to a magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1 mm×1.4 mm in about 6 min of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discussed. We discuss several measures to increase the sensitivity to reach a resolution 1 mm×1 mm.

  10. Endodontic retreatment of a mandibular first molar with five root canal systems: an important clinical lesson

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad; Umer, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    The objective of root canal treatment is to perform complete debridement of the root canals and subsequent obturation to facilitate healing of periapical pathosis. However, this process becomes complicated with the presence of additional root canal systems. The purpose of the present article is to report successful non-surgical retreatment of a mandibular first molar with five canals. This case report discusses the clinical management of a previously root filled mandibular firstmolar with two missed canal systems; distolingual and an additional mesial canal known as the middle mesial canal. The post-treatment radiographs show successful obturation to length in all canals. The middle mesial canal was found to be associated with mesiolingual canal and categorised as confluent. The configuration of canals in the mesial root was type XV, based on the classification given by Sert and Bayirli. This case report highlights the importance of knowledge and its application in the management of abnormal anatomic variants which play a crucial role in the success of endodontic retreatment. PMID:24654237

  11. Flap design and mandibular third molar surgery: a split mouth randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Baqain, Z H; Al-Shafii, A; Hamdan, A A; Sawair, F A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two commonly used flap designs (envelope and triangular) used for the removal of mandibular third molars (M3) on postoperative morbidity. 19 patients with bilateral symmetrically impacted mandibular M3 were studied using a split mouth design. Swelling, pain and trismus measures were recorded on days 2, 7 and 14; periodontal indices were recorded on days 7 and 14, one final measure of probing depth on the distal aspect of the mandibular second molar (M2) was taken at the last follow up appointment. Data were analysed using the χ(2) test, the Mann-Whitney U-test and Pearson's correlations. The mean age of the patients was 21.4 ± 2.3 years (± SD). Facial swelling and the reduction in mouth opening were significantly greater in the early postoperative period (P<0.05) with pyramidal flap designs. There was no significant difference in pain scores, plaque accumulation and bleeding on probing indices between the two flap designs (P>0.05). Probing depth was significantly greater with envelope flaps in the early postoperative period (P<0.005). In conclusion, flap design in mandibular M3 surgery has an effect on postoperative recovery.

  12. Variations in the mechanical properties of Alouatta palliata molar enamel.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Laura A; Teaford, Mark F; Livi, Kenneth J T; Weihs, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    Teeth have provided insights into many topics including primate diet, paleobiology, and evolution, due to the fact that they are largely composed of inorganic materials and may remain intact long after an animal is deceased. Previous studies have reported that the mechanical properties, chemistry, and microstructure of human enamel vary with location. This study uses nanoindentation to map out the mechanical properties of Alouatta palliata molar enamel on an axial cross-section of an unworn permanent third molar, a worn permanent first molar, and a worn deciduous first molar. Variations were then correlated with changes in microstructure and chemistry using scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe techniques. The hardness and Young's modulus varied with location throughout the cross-sections from the occlusal surface to the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), from the buccal to lingual sides, and also from one tooth to another. These changes in mechanical properties correlated with changes in the organic content of the tooth, which was shown to increase from approximately 6% near the occlusal surface to approximately 20% just before the DEJ. Compared to human enamel, the Alouatta enamel showed similar microstructures, chemical constituents, and magnitudes of mechanical properties, but showed less variation in hardness and Young's modulus, despite the very different diet of this species.

  13. Endodontic and restorative management of incompletely fractured molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, J L; Rakusin, H

    1994-11-01

    The treatment of fractured teeth poses significant problems for the practitioner. However, once the treatment planning decision has been made to attempt to retain the tooth, various practical regimens are available to effect this goal. This paper addresses the specific use of glass ionomer in the restorative management of incompletely, vertically fractured molar teeth integrated with specific root canal treatment techniques.

  14. Evaluation of the surgical difficulty in lower third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Torres, José; Diniz-Freitas, Marcio; Lago-Méndez, Lucía; Gude-Sampedro, Francisco; Gándara-Rey, José-Manuel; García-García, Abel

    2010-11-01

    The ability to predict the surgical difficulty of lower third molar extraction facilitates the design of treatment plans by minimizing complications and improving the preparation of patients and assistants in terms of the postoperative management of inflammation and pain. The aims of this study were to evaluate the value of panoramic radiographs in predicting lower third molar extraction difficulty and technique and to determine if the experience of the practitioner had any influence on this predictive ability. Fourteen dental practitioners with varying levels of experience evaluate the difficulty of lower third molar extraction in a group of patients using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and a modified version of a surgical difficulty scale. The results were then compared to postoperative scores calculated using the same scale. A tendency to underestimate the difficulty of procedures that was more pronounced in observers with greater levels of experience was observed. A low level of agreement between preoperative and postoperative evaluations using the surgical difficulty scale as well as an association between difficulty assessed preoperatively using the VAS and difficulty assessed postoperatively using the surgical difficulty scale was also found. The use of panoramic radiographs does not allow practitioners to accurately predict lower third molar extraction difficulty and technique, regardless of their level of experience.

  15. Long term effects of primary molar pulpotomies on succedaneous bicuspids.

    PubMed

    Messer, L B; Cline, J T; Korf, N W

    1980-02-01

    Forty-three bicuspids which replaced successfully pulpotomized vital or non-vital primary molars, and twenty bicuspids, which erupted following unsuccessful pulpotomies requiring extraction of the preceding teeth, were examined for defects of position and enamel. In comparison with contralateral control teeth, test teeth in both groups showed an increased prevalence of rotation and enamel surface defects.

  16. Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

  17. Non-compliance Appliances for Upper Molar Distalization: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Tooth Size Arch-length Discrepancy (TSALD) is a common problem in orthodontics. Its clinical signs are tooth crowding, impaction and incisor proclination. The treatment options are dental arch expansion or tooth mass reduction (stripping or extraction). The "extraction versus non-extraction" controversy has been widely debated in the orthodontic literature. Distalization is a kind of arch expansion in anetro-posterior dimension. Several studies have evaluated both the therapeutic effectiveness and the side effects of the appliances for this method of space gaining. In some cases molar distalization is preferred, e.g., a patient with acceptable profile and skeletal pattern and half cusp Class II molar malocclusion or even less. In some cases molar distalization is the only way, e.g., the patient with previous upper premolar extraction and excessive overijet, or a skeletal Class III patient with previous upper premolar extraction needed upper anterior teeth retraction to create reverse overjet aspre surgical orthodontic decompensation. In this review article, we described non-compliance upper molar distalizing appliances.

  18. Zaleplon (Sonata) Oral Sedation for Outpatient Third Molar Extraction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ganzberg, Steven I; Dietrich, Thomas; Valerin, Manuel; Beck, F. Michael

    2005-01-01

    Zalpelon was compared with triazolam for oral sedation in a third molar surgery model using a double-blind crossover design. Factors such as anxiolysis, amnesia, and quality of sedation were assessed. Of the 14 participants who completed the study, zaleplon sedation was found to be similar to triazolam sedation in all regards except that recovery from zaleplon was more rapid. PMID:16596911

  19. Molar incisor hypomineralization: review and recommendations for clinical management.

    PubMed

    William, Vanessa; Messer, Louise B; Burrow, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) describes the clinical picture of hypomineralization of systemic origin affecting one or more first permanent molars (FPMs) that are associated frequently with affected incisors. Etiological associations with systemic conditions or environmental insults during the child's first 3 years have been implicated. The complex care involved in treating affected children must address their behavior and anxiety, aiming to provide a durable restoration under pain-free conditions. The challenges include adequate anaesthesia, suitable cavity design, and choice of restorative materials. Restorations in hypomineralized molars appear to fail frequently; there is little evidence-based literature to facilitate clinical decisions on cavity design and material choice. A 6-step approach to management is described: (1) risk identification; (2) early diagnosis; (3) remineralization and desensitization; (4) prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown; (5) restorations and extractions; and (6) maintenance. The high prevalence of MIH indicates the need for research to clarify etiological factors and improve the durability of restorations in affected teeth. The purpose of this paper was to describe the diagnosis, prevalence, putative etiological factors, and features of hypomineralized enamel in molar incisor hypomineralization and to present a sequential approach to management.

  20. Factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization in Thai children.

    PubMed

    Pitiphat, Waranuch; Luangchaichaweng, Sarunporn; Pungchanchaikul, Patimaporn; Angwaravong, Onauma; Chansamak, Nusara

    2014-08-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative developmental enamel defect that affects one to four permanent first molars, with or without involvement of permanent incisors. Its etiology is of systemic origin, but is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted this cross-sectional study to examine pre-, peri-, and postnatal risk factors for MIH among children, 7-8 yr of age, in urban areas of Khon Kaen, Thailand. Molar incisor hypomineralization defects were diagnosed using the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria. Mothers or primary caregivers were interviewed on maternal medical history and habits during pregnancy, pregnancy and delivery complications, and the child's medical history. Molar incisor hypomineralization defects were observed in 78 (27.7%) of 282 children. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed a statistically significant association between the development of MIH and Cesarean section (adjusted OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.7), complications during vaginal delivery (adjusted OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 1.9-11.0), and severe/chronic illness when under 3 yr of age (adjusted OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.6-5.0). There was no association of preterm birth and low birth weight with MIH. The results suggest that Cesarean section, complications during vaginal delivery, and poor health during the first 3 yr of life are independent risk factors for MIH.

  1. Unilateral maxillary molar distalization with zygoma-gear appliance.

    PubMed

    Kilkis, Dogan; Bayram, Mehmet; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Nur, Metin

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the orthodontic treatment of a 15-year-old boy with a unilateral maxillary molar distalization system, called the zygoma-gear appliance. It consisted of a zygomatic anchorage miniplate, an inner bow, and a Sentalloy closed coil spring (GAC International, Bohemia, NY). A distalizing force of 350 g was used during the distalization period. The unilateral Class II malocclusion was corrected in 5 months with the zygoma-gear appliance. The maxillary left first molar showed distalization of 4 mm with an inclination of 3°. The maxillary premolars moved distally with the help of the transseptal fibers. In addition, there were slight decreases in overjet (-0.5 mm) and maxillary incisor inclination (-1°), indicating no anchorage loss from the zygoma-gear appliance. Preadjusted fixed appliances (0.022 × 0.028-in, MBT system; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were placed in both arches to achieve leveling and alignment. After 14 months of unilateral distalization with the zygoma-gear appliance and fixed appliances, Class I molar and canine relationships were established with satisfactory interdigitation of the posterior teeth. Acceptable overjet and overbite were also achieved. This article shows that this new system, the zygoma-gear appliance, can be used for unilateral maxillary molar distalization without anchorage loss.

  2. Effect of the route of administration of methylprednisolone on oedema and trismus in impacted lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Koçer, G; Yuce, E; Tuzuner Oncul, A; Dereci, O; Koskan, O

    2014-05-01

    Due to their anatomical position, the surgical removal of impacted third molars results in oedema, pain, and trismus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of supraperiosteal injection of methylprednisolone compared with an oral tablet form and intravenous (i.v.) injection in the prevention of postoperative pain and oedema associated with inflammation. This randomized, prospective, and controlled study included 44 patients. The patients were randomly divided into four groups: group 1 (control; no steroids), group 2 (local injection), group 3 (oral tablets), and group 4 (i.v. injection). On days 2 and 7 following surgery, linear oedema was determined using facial landmarks, and maximal mouth opening was measured. Postoperative mouth opening and swelling were evaluated for each route of methylprednisolone administration and compared. The female (59%) to male (41%) ratio was 1.44; the mean age of the patients was 29.6 years. The level of significance was set at P<0.01 for mouth opening and P<0.05 for oedema. With regard to trismus, all three routes of administration demonstrated better efficacy in comparison to the control. While oral administration and i.v. injection of methylprednisolone achieved similar results, masseter injection provided better results in reducing oedema and trismus when compared to the control following lower third molar surgery.

  3. Odontometric analysis of permanent maxillary first molar in gender determination

    PubMed Central

    Shireen, Ayesha; Ara, Syeda Arshiya

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study was conducted to assess the sex determination potential from mesiodistal (MD) and buccolingual (BL) dimensions of permanent maxillary first molar. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Al-Badar Rural Dental College and Hospital, Gulbarga, Karnataka, on 600 subjects (300 male and 300 female), aged 17–25 years. The subjects were selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria set forth for the study. After obtaining informed consent, the intraoral measurements of MD and BL dimensions on casts of the first maxillary molars were taken using digital vernier caliper with resolution of 0.01 mm. Statistical Analysis Used: The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using paired and unpaired t-test to compare MD and BL dimensions between males and females. P ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean MD width of the first maxillary molar was 10.60 ± 0.6644 mm (right) and 10.60 ± 0.6644 mm (left) in males and 10.40 ± 0.6255 mm (right) and 10.40 ± 0.6255 mm (left) in females. The mean BL width of the first maxillary molar was 11.60 ± 1.2227 mm (right) and 11.60 ± 1.2227 mm (left) in males and 11.20 ± 0.8440 mm (right) and 11.20 ± 0.8440 mm (left) in females. The differences between males and females in MD and BL dimensions measured were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Right and left MD dimensions exhibited sexual dimorphism of 1.92% and right and left BL dimensions exhibited sexual dimorphism of 3.57%. Conclusions: The MD and BL dimensions of the maxillary first molars may be used as an aid in sex discrimination. PMID:28123268

  4. Development of the Anatomical Quality Assurance (AQUA) checklist: Guidelines for reporting original anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kumar Ramakrishnan, Piravin; Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2017-01-01

    The rise of evidence-based anatomy has emphasized the need for original anatomical studies with high clarity, transparency, and comprehensiveness in reporting. Currently, inconsistencies in the quality and reporting of such studies have placed limits on accurate reliability and impact assessment. Our aim was to develop a checklist of reporting items that should be addressed by authors of original anatomical studies. The study steering committee formulated a preliminary conceptual design and began to generate items on the basis of a literature review and expert opinion. This led to the development of a preliminary checklist. The validity of this checklist was assessed by a Delphi procedure, and feedback from the Delphi panelists, who were experts in the area of anatomical research, was used to improve it. The Delphi procedure involved 12 experts in anatomical research. It comprised two rounds, after which unanimous consensus was reached regarding the items to be included in the checklist. The steering committee agreed to name the checklist AQUA. The preliminary AQUA Checklist consisted of 26 items divided into eight sections. Following round 1, some of the items underwent major revision and three new ones were introduced. The checklist was revised only for minor language inaccuracies after round 2. The final version of the AQUA Checklist consisted of the initial eight sections with a total of 29 items. The steering committee hopes the AQUA Checklist will improve the quality and reporting of anatomical studies. Clin. Anat. 30:14-20, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation and Diagnosis of Mandibular First Molar with 6 Canals

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shiraz; Chaitanya, Bathula Vimala; Somisetty, Kusum Valli

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment of tooth with aberrant root canal morphology is very challenging. So thorough knowledge of both the external and internal anatomy of teeth is an important aspect of root canal treatment. With the advancement in technology it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as magnification devices, CBCT, microscopes, and RVG to confirm the presence of these aberrant configurations. However, in everyday endodontic practice, clinicians have to treat teeth with atypical configurations for root canal treatment to be successful. This case report presents the management of a mandibular first molar with six root canals, four in mesial and two in distal root, and also emphasizes the use and importance of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) as a diagnostic tool in endodontics. PMID:26904310

  6. The anatomical diaspora: evidence of early American anatomical traditions in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Phoebe R

    2011-09-01

    The current focus in forensic anthropology on increasing scientific certainty in ancestry determination reinforces the need to examine the ancestry of skeletal remains used for osteology instruction. Human skeletal remains were discovered on the University of North Dakota campus in 2007. After recovery, the osteological examination resulted in a profile for a 33- to 46-year-old woman of African descent with stature ranging from 56.3 to 61.0 in. The pattern of postmortem damage indicated that the remains had been prepared for use as an anatomical teaching specimen. Review of the American history of anatomical teaching revealed a preference for Black subjects, which apparently extended to states like North Dakota despite extremely low resident populations of people of African descent. This study emphasizes the need to examine the ancestry of older teaching specimens that lack provenience, rather than assuming they are derived from typical (i.e., Indian) sources of anatomical material.

  7. Morphology of the occlusal surfaces of premolar and molar teeth as an indicator of age in the horse.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, J L; Allen, A L

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of cheek tooth occlusal surface morphology as an indicator of age in the horse using a blinded cross-sectional design. Twenty horses of varying age, breed and sex were used. Horses of known age (foaling date) were euthanized for reasons other than dental disease. Following disarticulation of the head and sectioning of the mandibles, cheek teeth were cleaned using running water and photographs were taken of each arcade. Using a computer-based program, the total surface area of each premolar and molar, the outer enamel ridge perimeter distance, infundibular surface areas and perimeter distances were measured. Further anatomical data were calculated from these measurements and a statistical analysis of the relationship between horse age and cheek tooth occlusal morphology was performed. Results indicated that multiple anatomical regions within the occlusal surface of the equine cheek tooth can be used as an indicator of age. There are important differences between mandibular and maxillary teeth as well as between teeth in the same dental arcade. Horse size is also of significance. The mesial infundibular surface area as a percentage of the total surface area of tooth 111, and the mesiodistal length of 1/2/3/4 09 teeth, most closely approximates age within our mathematical model. Cheek tooth morphological data can be used to predict age in horses that possess all their permanent dentition. In cases in which the age of horses cannot be accurately determined from incisor examination, cheek teeth may be used.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  9. Piezoelectric Versus Conventional Rotary Techniques for Impacted Third Molar Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Yating; Yang, Chi; Yang, Jingyun; Chen, Minjie; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Impacted third molars are frequently encountered in clinical work. Surgical removal of impacted third molars is often required to prevent clinical symptoms. Traditional rotary cutting instruments are potentially injurious, and piezosurgery, as a new osteotomy technique, has been introduced in oral and maxillofacial surgery. No consistent conclusion has been reached regarding whether this new technique is associated with fewer or less severe postoperative sequelae after third molar extraction. The aim of this study was to compare piezosurgery with rotary osteotomy techniques, with regard to surgery time and the severity of postoperative sequelae, including pain, swelling, and trismus. We conducted a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar. The eligibility criteria of this study included the following: the patients were clearly diagnosed as having impacted mandibular third molars; the patients underwent piezosurgery osteotomy, and in the control group rotary osteotomy techniques, for removing impacted third molars; the outcomes of interest include surgery time, trismus, swelling or pain; the studies are randomized controlled trials. We used random-effects models to calculate the difference in the outcomes, and the corresponding 95% confidence interval. We calculated the weighted mean difference if the trials used the same measurement, and a standardized mean difference if otherwise. A total of seven studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analysis. Compared with rotary osteotomy, patients undergoing piezosurgery experienced longer surgery time (mean difference 4.13 minutes, 95% confidence interval 2.75–5.52, P < 0.0001). Patients receiving the piezoelectric technique had less swelling at postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (all Ps ≤0.023). Additionally, there was a trend of less postoperative pain and trismus in the piezosurgery groups. The number of included randomized controlled

  10. Steps towards automatic building of anatomical atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subsol, Gerard; Thirion, Jean-Philippe; Ayache, Nicholas

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a general scheme for the building of anatomical atlases. We propose to use specific and stable features, the crest lines (or ridge lines) which are automatically extracted from 3D images by differential geometry operators. We have developed non-rigid registration techniques based on polynomial transformations to find correspondences between lines. We got encouraging results for the building of atlases of the crest lines of the skull and of the brain based on several CT-Scan and MRI images of different patients.

  11. Bronchopulmonary segments approximation using anatomical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busayarat, Sata; Zrimec, Tatjana

    2007-03-01

    Bronchopulmonary segments are valuable as they give more accurate localization than lung lobes. Traditionally, determining the segments requires segmentation and identification of segmental bronchi, which, in turn, require volumetric imaging data. In this paper, we present a method for approximating the bronchopulmonary segments for sparse data by effectively using an anatomical atlas. The atlas is constructed from a volumetric data and contains accurate information about bronchopulmonary segments. A new ray-tracing based image registration is used for transferring the information from the atlas to a query image. Results show that the method is able to approximate the segments on sparse HRCT data with slice gap up to 25 millimeters.

  12. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  13. Anatomical considerations on the discomalleolar ligament

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-VÁZQUEZ, J. F.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. R.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. A.; JIMÉNEZ-COLLADO, J.

    1998-01-01

    A study was carried out on the discomalleolar ligament by dissection of adult human cadavers. The ligament corresponds to the most internal portion of the superior lamina of the temporomandibular joint capsule. It extends from the posterointernal portion of the temporomandibular joint disc, penetrates the petrotympanic fissure and reaches the malleus of the middle ear. Because of its morphology and anatomical arrangement the discomalleolar ligament should be considered as an intrinsic ligament of the temporomandibular joint and distinguished from the tympanic portion of the sphenomandibular ligament (anterior ligament of the malleus). PMID:9723988

  14. Effects of anatomical constraints on tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capogrosso Sansone, B.; Delsanto, P. P.; Magnano, M.; Scalerandi, M.

    2001-08-01

    Competition for available nutrients and the presence of anatomical barriers are major determinants of tumor growth in vivo. We extend a model recently proposed to simulate the growth of neoplasms in real tissues to include geometrical constraints mimicking pressure effects on the tumor surface induced by the presence of rigid or semirigid structures. Different tissues have different diffusivities for nutrients and cells. Despite the simplicity of the approach, based on a few inherently local mechanisms, the numerical results agree qualitatively with clinical data (computed tomography scans of neoplasms) for the larynx and the oral cavity.

  15. Spontaneous emergence of overgrown molar teeth in a colony of Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Jheon, Andrew H; Prochazkova, Michaela; Sherman, Michael; Manoli, Devanand S; Shah, Nirao M; Carbone, Lawrence; Klein, Ophir

    2015-03-23

    Continuously growing incisors are common to all rodents, which include the Microtus genus of voles. However, unlike many rodents, voles also possess continuously growing molars. Here, we report spontaneous molar defects in a population of Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). We identified bilateral protuberances on the ventral surface of the mandible in several voles in our colony. In some cases, the protuberances broke through the cortical bone. The mandibular molars became exposed and infected, and the maxillary molars entered the cranial vault. Visualisation upon soft tissue removal and microcomputed tomography (microCT) analyses confirmed that the protuberances were caused by the overgrowth of the apical ends of the molar teeth. We speculate that the unrestricted growth of the molars was due to the misregulation of the molar dental stem cell niche. Further study of this molar phenotype may yield additional insight into stem cell regulation and the evolution and development of continuously growing teeth.

  16. Guided tissue regeneration in Class II furcation involved maxillary molars: a controlled study of 8 split-mouth cases.

    PubMed

    Avera, J B; Camargo, P M; Klokkevold, P R; Kenney, E B; Lekovic, V

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the effectiveness of polytetrafluoroethylene membranes in the healing of interproximal Class II furcation defects in maxillary molars using a surgical treatment technique based on the principles of guided tissue regeneration. Eight subjects with similar bilateral Class II furcation lesions on the mesial aspect of maxillary first molars participated in this study. Patients received initial therapy consisting of oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing, and occlusal adjustment if necessary. Clinical parameters evaluated included plaque index, sulcular bleeding index, probing depth, attachment level, gingival recession, and open horizontal and vertical furcation fill. An acrylic occlusal stent was used to assure reproducibility of measurements. Experimental sites received a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane following surgical exposure of the furcation. Control sites were treated in the exact same manner but without a membrane. Membranes were removed at 6 weeks after the first surgery. Reentry surgeries were performed at 9 months. Postsurgical results showed a significant improvement in probing depth, attachment level, and open horizontal furcation fill for both groups when compared to baseline values, with experimental sites performing significantly better than controls. Control sites showed a slight loss in open vertical furcation fill while experimental sites remained unchanged. This study suggests that guided tissue regeneration using polytetrafluoroethylene membranes is of some but limited value in the treatment of maxillary molar interpoximal Class II furcation lesions.

  17. On the apparent molar volumes of nonelectrolytes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Anderko, A.; Chan, J.P.; Pitzer, K.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Apparent molar volumes of aqueous solutions of argon and xenon have been calculated using a previously developed comprehensive equation of state for nonelectrolyte systems. The equation consists of a virial expansion truncated after the fourth virial coefficient and a closed-form term approximating higher coefficients. Mixing rules are based on the composition dependence of virial coefficients, which is known from statistical mechanics. The equation accurately represents vapor-liquid and gas-gas equilibria for the Ar + H[sub 2]O and Xe + H[sub 2]O systems over wide ranges of pressure and temperature using two binary parameters. With the binary parameters determined from phase equilibrium data, the equation accurately predicts apparent molar volumes V[sub [phi

  18. Natal molars in Pfeiffer syndrome type 3: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M P; Crespi, P V; Shanske, A L

    1993-01-01

    The following report is the first documented case of natal teeth associated with a recently described new entity, Pfeiffer syndrome type 3. The clinical manifestations consistent with the spectrum of this rare disorder are described with an emphasis on the concomitant natal teeth. Pfeiffer syndrome type 3 is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes and has been described in only two patients to date. Both mandibular incisors and maxillary molar natal teeth were found. Natal teeth are teeth, which are present in the oral cavity at birth. They are often associated with developmental abnormalities and recognized syndromes. Their incidence ranges from 1 in 2,000 to 3,500 births. The natal teeth found in this infant included both the mandibular primary incisors and maxillary primary first molars bilaterally. The clinical and histological considerations of natal teeth and their management are discussed. The presence of multiple natal teeth is extremely rare.

  19. Dentigerous cyst associated with a formocresol pulpotomized deciduous molar.

    PubMed

    Asián-González, Eugenia; Pereira-Maestre, Manuela; Conde-Fernández, Dolores; Vilchez, Ignacio; Segura-Egea, Juan José; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2007-04-01

    This report presents a case of dentigerous cyst associated with a formocresol pulpotomized deciduous molar detected during routine examination. Dentigerous cyst is an epithelial-lined developmental cavity that encloses the crown of an unerupted tooth at the cementoenamel junction. The present case describes a 9-year-old girl sent to the dental clinic by her dentist, who had accidentally discovered in the panoramic radiograph a single, unilocular, well-defined, radiolucent area enclosing the second left unerupted mandibular premolar. The second left primary molar had been pulpotomized 2 years before and buccal swelling without redness occurred near the tooth, evidencing bone expansion. Surgical treatment was carried out, the tooth was extracted, and a cystectomy was performed under local anesthesia in the dental office. The histological study confirmed the suspected diagnosis of dentigerous cyst. The relation between pulpotomy and dentigerous cysts is discussed.

  20. Molar distalization with the assistance of Temporary Anchorage Devices.

    PubMed

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes efficient techniques for distalization of maxillary and mandibular molars with the assistance of Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs). There are numerous occasions where the distalization of molars is required in lieu of the odontectomy of bicuspids. In the past, extra-oral force has been used, (i.e. Cervical or Combination Head Gear, or intra-oral force, i.e. Posterior Sagittal Appliance, Modified Greenfield Appliance, Williams DMJ 20001, CD Distalizer, Magill Sagittal, Pendulum Appliance, etc.). All the intra-oral appliances have a common denominator the orthodontic clinician has to deal with, the undesirable expression of the Third Law of Newton. The utilization of TADs allows us to circumvent this shortcoming, establishing an absolute anchorage, and thus completely negate the expression of the Third Law of Newton.

  1. Replacement of missing molar teeth--a prosthodontic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Devlin, H

    1994-01-08

    In deciding whether to replace lost lower molar teeth with a denture or accept the status quo, the dentist is faced with a choice of equally unfavourable alternatives. Dentures tend to accumulate plaque, the main cause of periodontal destruction, but failure to provide a prosthesis may also disadvantage the patient. Whether or not the provision of a replacement partial denture following molar tooth extraction helps to maintain the periodontium of the remaining dentition is not known. Patients are also aware of the dilemma. Many surveys have shown that a large proportion of replacement lower, free-end saddle dentures are never worn. However, a failure to provide partial dentures may have many adverse effects, especially in young adults.

  2. Thermal correction to the molar polarizability of a Boltzmann gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Puchalski, M.; Mohr, P. J.

    2011-12-15

    Metrology in atomic physics has been crucial for a number of advanced determinations of fundamental constants. In addition to very precise frequency measurements, the molar polarizability of an atomic gas has recently also been measured very accurately. Part of the motivation for the measurements is due to ongoing efforts to redefine the International System of Units (SI), for which an accurate value of the Boltzmann constant is needed. Here we calculate the dominant shift of the molar polarizability in an atomic gas due to thermal effects. It is given by the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction, which emerges when the probing electric field is Lorentz transformed into the rest frame of the atoms that undergo thermal motion. While this effect is small when compared to currently available experimental accuracy, the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction is much larger than the thermal shift of the polarizability induced by blackbody radiation.

  3. Anatomical modeling of the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Gerrit; Klinder, Tobias; Blaffert, Thomas; Bülow, Thomas; Wiemker, Rafael; Lorenz, Cristian

    2010-02-01

    The bronchial tree is of direct clinical importance in the context of respective diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It furthermore constitutes a reference structure for object localization in the lungs and it finally provides access to lung tissue in, e.g., bronchoscope based procedures for diagnosis and therapy. This paper presents a comprehensive anatomical model for the bronchial tree, including statistics of position, relative and absolute orientation, length, and radius of 34 bronchial segments, going beyond previously published results. The model has been built from 16 manually annotated CT scans, covering several branching variants. The model is represented as a centerline/tree structure but can also be converted in a surface representation. Possible model applications are either to anatomically label extracted bronchial trees or to improve the tree extraction itself by identifying missing segments or sub-trees, e.g., if located beyond a bronchial stenosis. Bronchial tree labeling is achieved using a naïve Bayesian classifier based on the segment properties contained in the model in combination with tree matching. The tree matching step makes use of branching variations covered by the model. An evaluation of the model has been performed in a leaveone- out manner. In total, 87% of the branches resulting from preceding airway tree segmentation could be correctly labeled. The individualized model enables the detection of missing branches, allowing a targeted search, e.g., a local rerun of the tree-segmentation segmentation.

  4. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  5. Retinal vascular tree reconstruction with anatomical realism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Shun; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Chih-Hsiangng; Sofka, Michal; Chen, Shih-Jen; Lin, Wei-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of automatically extracting vessel segments and constructing retinal vascular trees with anatomical realism, this paper presents and analyses an algorithm that combines vessel segmentation and grouping of the extracted vessel segments. The proposed method aims to restore the topology of the vascular trees with anatomical realism for clinical studies and diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases, which manifest abnormalities in either venous and/or arterial vascular systems. Vessel segments are grouped using extended Kalman filter which takes into account continuities in curvature, width, and intensity changes at the bifurcation or crossover point. At a junction, the proposed method applies the minimum-cost matching algorithm to resolve the conflict in grouping due to error in tracing. The system was trained with 20 images from the DRIVE dataset, and tested using the remaining 20 images. The dataset contained a mixture of normal and pathological images. In addition, six pathological fluorescein angiogram sequences were also included in this study. The results were compared against the groundtruth images provided by a physician, achieving average success rates of 88.79% and 90.09%, respectively.

  6. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

  7. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  8. Extrusion of impacted mandibular second molar using removable appliance

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M. K.; Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Saravanan, R.; Vikram, N. Raj; Kumar, R. Vinoth; Prasath, R. Eshwara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the principles of case management of impacted mandibular molars and to illustrate their potential to respond well to treatment. Although the scope of treatment may be influenced by the patient's age, past dental history, severity of impaction, dentoalveolar development, and root form, the case reports demonstrate the inherent potential for good treatment outcome even in the most unfavorable circumstances. PMID:25210378

  9. Fate of the Molar Dental Lamina in the Monophyodont Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dosedělová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S.; Veselá, Iva; Krejčí, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  10. Formation and development of maxillary first molars with delayed eruption.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsuki; Kameda, Takashi; Terashima, Yukari; Batbayar, Nomintsetseg; Terada, Kazuto

    2015-09-01

    Cases of congenitally missing and delayed eruption of the maxillary first molar are rare. However, in recent years, we have experienced cases of suspected delayed eruption of or congenitally missing first molars. The purpose of this study was to analyze the formation of delayed erupted maxillary first molars (M1) (>2 standard deviations), which play important roles in occlusion, and normal eruption of the maxillary first molars (U6). The frequency of M1 among patients born between 1974 and 1994 in one institution with a clear total patient number and personal oral histories was 1.55 % [80 % bilateral eruption in 8 of 806 male patients (0.99 %) and 23 of 1195 female patients (1.92 %)]. To evaluate the formation and eruption of M1 according to Moorrees's tooth formation stages, panoramic X-ray films were obtained every year for 73 patients with M1 from 3 institutions (20 male and 53 female patients, total 131 M1s) without systematic histories or genetic disorders. The development/growth curve of M1 was fitted to both the logistic curve and U6 curve. The M1 development/growth curve was started behind with U6 curve; however, the straight part of the M1 curve exhibited steep inclination compared with the straight part of the U6 curve. The curve of the eruption pathway of M1 also exhibited a sigmoid S shape. These results indicate that the development and migration speed of M1 are faster than that of U6, excluding the delayed start point. These results may help orthodontists in treatment planning for patients with M1.

  11. Anatomic and dynamic aspects of stomatognathic structures in osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Adriana de Oliveira L; Rosa, Vera L M; Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Ciamponi, Ana L; Guimarães, Antonio S; Alonso, Luis G

    2007-04-01

    The osteogenesis imperfecta congenita (OMIM 166210) type II phenotype can be caused by mutation in either the COL1A1 gene or the COL1A2 gene that encode the chains of type I procollagen, the major protein in bones. Patients can therefore present a combination of features, including multiple long bone fractures and deformities, growth deficiency, joint laxity, hearing loss, blue sclera, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. The purpose of this study is to describe a clinical case of this syndrome, focusing on the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that was assessed using computed tomography (CT) method. Clinical examination included evaluation of mandibular dynamics and investigation of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD).

  12. Physio-anatomic aspects on the initial growth of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Scalon, Silvana P Q; Pereira, Heloisa H G; Glaeser, Daniele F; Silva, Jocemar J; Betoni, Roseli; Mussury, Rosilda M

    2011-06-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the initial growth of "mutambo" seedlings in different conditions of light intensity and treatments with gibberellic acid (GA). The seedlings were kept under full sun and 50% of shading. Sixty days after the emergence, seedlings were sprayed with: 1) 100 mg L(-1) GA(3); 2) 200 mg L(-1) GA(3); 3) control. At the end of the appraisals, seedlings height under 50% of shading was compared to the height that were growing under full sun with 200 mg L(-1) GA. Stem diameter was lower under shading. Leaf area did not vary among the treatments, but the root system growth was higher under full sun and did not vary among GA levels. The number of stomata, trichomes and epidermal cells on adaxial and abaxial sides was higher under full sun. Total dry masses of leaf and root were highe runder full sun and with 200 mg L(-1) GA application. "Mutambo" seedlings presented a higher initial growth under full sun, although with a lower height, diameter, and lenght of the largest root and total dry masses of leaf and root were higher. A concentration with 200 mg L(-1) promoted a higher growth.

  13. Observations on anatomical aspects of the fruit, leaf and stem tissues of four Citrullus spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphological characteristics of the fruit, stem and leaf tissues of four species of Citrullus (L.) Schrad. were examined using standard histological methods. Plant materials included the cultivated watermelon (C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) and three of its related species; C. colocynthis (...

  14. Anatomical aspects of the lacrimal gland of the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella).

    PubMed Central

    Veiga Neto, E R; Tamega, O J; Zorzetto, N L; Dall Pai, V

    1992-01-01

    In the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella) the main lacrimal gland is composed of 2 distinct portions with an intraorbital and extraorbital localisation, interconnected by a bridge of glandular tissue which crosses the lateral orbital wall through the lateral orbital fissure located in the sphenozygomatic suture. The intraorbital lacrimal gland is flattened and extremely thin, with a variable outline. It lies on the upper and outer third of the globe of the eye, and the aponeurosis and the belly of the lateral rectus muscle, extending antero-posteriorly from the upper lateral angle of the orbit midway along the orbital cavity. The extraorbital lacrimal gland is compact, halfmoon-shaped, with 3 surfaces, 3 borders and 2 extremities. It lies in the temporal fossa between the temporalis muscle and the temporal surface of the zygomatic bone, fitting into a depression in this bone, and totally surrounded by adipose tissue. The secretory cells have a flocculent appearance and either low or high density. They possess a basal region containing the nucleus and rich in granular endoplasmic reticulum, and an apical region filled with secretory granules varying in size, form and density. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:1452484

  15. A debate about ultrasound and anatomic aspects of the cervix in spontaneous preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Munteanu, O; Turcan, N; Baros, A; Bodean, O; Voicu, D; Cîrstoiu, MM

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is the legal first global cause of neonatal death. The cervix has two roles: it has to stay closed to allow the fetus to undergo a normal development during gestation, and at term, the cervix has to dilate under the pressure of uterine contractions to allow the delivery. The purpose of this article is to establish if the ultrasound measured length of the cervix and its appearance are predictive for the spontaneous preterm birth. Cervical insufficiency can be described by painless cervical dilatation leading to pregnancy losses/ births, with no other risk factors present. During gestation, the physiological softening of the cervix is determined by the extracellular matrix components, particular decorin, and thrombospondin 2. The direction of the collagen fibers remains the same – circumferential direction, but the collagen solubility increases. Therefore, during pregnancy, the cervical tissue is more hydrated and has higher collagen extractability than non-pregnant tissue. Women with cervical incompetence have increased levels of smooth muscle cells than normal pregnant women, the number of elastic fibers is low, and also the concentration of hydroxyproline is decreased. Transvaginal ultrasound is the suitable gold standard exam that can offer essential information about the cervical length and state of the internal os in early asymptomatic stage of cervical insufficiency for predicting and preventing preterm birth. In our experience, a transvaginal ultrasound screening for the measurement of the cervix is required. We consider that the proper gestational age for the prediction of a preterm birth is at 18-22 weeks of gestation for the general population and earlier for patients with a history of preterm birth. Just from an observational point of view, we concluded with the fact that the cerclage of the cervix is unnecessary if the cervical length is above 2 cm and if the internal cervical os is closed. In the absence of funneling, the probability of cervical incompetence is low and the best prophylactic option is progesterone administration. PMID:27928435

  16. From molecular to molar: a paradigm shift in behavior analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2002-01-01

    A paradigm clash is occurring within behavior analysis. In the older paradigm, the molecular view, behavior consists of momentary or discrete responses that constitute instances of classes. Variation in response rate reflects variation in the strength or probability of the response class. The newer paradigm, the molar view, sees behavior as composed of activities that take up varying amounts of time. Whereas the molecular view takes response rate and choice to be "derived" measures and hence abstractions, the molar view takes response rate and choice to be concrete temporally extended behavioral allocations and regards momentary "responses" as abstractions. Research findings that point to variation in tempo, asymmetry in concurrent performance, and paradoxical resistance to change are readily interpretable when seen in the light of reinforcement and stimulus control of extended behavioral allocations or activities. Seen in the light of the ontological distinction between classes and individuals, extended behavioral allocations, like species in evolutionary taxonomy, constitute individuals, entities that change without changing their identity. Seeing allocations as individuals implies that less extended activities constitute parts of larger wholes rather than instances of classes. Both laboratory research and everyday behavior are explained plausibly in the light of concrete extended activities and their nesting. The molecular- view, because it requires discrete responses and contiguous events, relies on hypothetical stimuli and consequences to account for the same phenomena. One may prefer the molar view on grounds of elegance, integrative power, and plausibility. PMID:12144313

  17. Molar Macrowear Reveals Neanderthal Eco-Geographic Dietary Variation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenza, Luca; Benazzi, Stefano; Tausch, Jeremy; Kullmer, Ottmar; Bromage, Timothy G.; Schrenk, Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    Neanderthal diets are reported to be based mainly on the consumption of large and medium sized herbivores, while the exploitation of other food types including plants has also been demonstrated. Though some studies conclude that early Homo sapiens were active hunters, the analyses of faunal assemblages, stone tool technologies and stable isotopic studies indicate that they exploited broader dietary resources than Neanderthals. Whereas previous studies assume taxon-specific dietary specializations, we suggest here that the diet of both Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens is determined by ecological conditions. We analyzed molar wear patterns using occlusal fingerprint analysis derived from optical 3D topometry. Molar macrowear accumulates during the lifespan of an individual and thus reflects diet over long periods. Neanderthal and early Homo sapiens maxillary molar macrowear indicates strong eco-geographic dietary variation independent of taxonomic affinities. Based on comparisons with modern hunter-gatherer populations with known diets, Neanderthals as well as early Homo sapiens show high dietary variability in Mediterranean evergreen habitats but a more restricted diet in upper latitude steppe/coniferous forest environments, suggesting a significant consumption of high protein meat resources. PMID:21445243

  18. Efficacy of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy in Third Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reddy B, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar is the most frequently performed procedure in oral surgery. This procedure is associated with significant postoperative sequelae such as trismus, swelling, pain and infection. The need of antibiotic therapy during the removal of mandibular third molar has been a contentious issue. Method: This study investigated a regimen by using amoxycillin and metronidazole in one group and without using antibiotics in the other. Both the groups were assessed postoperatively on the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th and 10th days by the same observer for post operative mouth opening (interincisal distance), presence of a purulent discharge at the site of surgery, pain and swelling. Result: Overall, no statistically significant difference was seen between both the treatment groups when interincisal distance, pain, swelling and purulent discharge were considered. Conclusion: The results of this study failed to show any advantage which was associated with the routine postoperative use of antibiotics in asymptomatic third molar surgeries. PMID:24995236

  19. Variable permanent mandibular first molar: Review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ballullaya, Srinidhi V; Vemuri, Sayesh; Kumar, Pabbati Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The success of root canal therapy depends on the locations of all the canals, thourough debridement and proper sealing. At times the clinicians are challenged with variations in morphology of root canal. This review article attempts to list out all the variations of permanent mandibular first molar published so for in the literature. Materials and Methods: An exhaustive search was undertaken using PUBMED database to identify published literature from 1900 to 2010 relating to the root canal morphology of permanent first molar by using key words. The selected artcles were obtained and reviewed. Results: Total ninty seven articles were selected out of which 50 were original article and forty seven were case reports. The incidence of third canal in mesial root was 0.95% to 15%. The incidence of three rooted mandibular first molar was 3% to 33%. Only ninety cases reported with c-shape canal configuration. Incidence of Taurodintism without congenital disorder was very rare. Conclusion: The root canal treatment requires proper knowlegde of variations in root canal morphology in order to recognise, disinfect and seal all portal of exit. This can be accomplished with proper diagnosis using newer modes, modification in access preparation, use of operating microscope, enhanced methods of disinfecting and sealing of all canals. PMID:23716959

  20. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500–750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end. PMID:26739600

  1. Quality of life following third molar removal under conscious sedation

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and degree of satisfaction among outpatients subjected to surgical extraction of all four third molars under conscious sedation. A second objective was to describe the evolution of self-reported pain measured in a visual analogue scale (VAS) in the 7 days after extraction. Study design: Fifty patients received a questionnaire assessing social isolation, working isolation, eating and speaking ability, diet modifications, sleep impairment, changes in physical appearance, discomfort at suture removal and overall satisfaction at days 4 and 7 after surgery. Pain was recorded by patients on a 100-mm pain visual analogue scale (VAS) every day after extraction until day 7. Results: Thirty-nine patients fulfilled correctly the questionnaire. Postoperative pain values suffered small fluctuations until day 5 (range: 23 to 33 mm in a 100-mm VAS), when dicreased significantly. A positive association was observed between difficult ranked surgeries and higher postoperative pain levels. The average number of days for which the patient stopped working was 4.9. Conclusion: The removal of all third molars in a single appointment causes an important deterioration of the patient’s QoL during the first postoperative week, especially due to local pain and eating discomfort. Key words:Third molar removal, quality of life, sedation. PMID:22926461

  2. Subcutaneous emphysema during third molar surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Umberto; Galanakis, Alexandros; Lerario, Francesco; Daniele, Gabriele Maria; Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of third molars is the most common surgical procedure performed in oral surgery on a daily basis and, despite surgical skills and expertise, complications may occur. Complications observed during or after third molar removal may include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, sinus perforation and nerve damage. Fortunately, with a proper management and a good surgical technique, the incidence of such events is low. Subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental extraction occurs when the air from the high-speed dental handpiece is forced into the soft tissue through the reflected flap and invades the adjacent tissues, leading to swelling, crepitus on palpation and occasionally spreading through the tissue spaces of the fascial planes. Although rare, iatrogenic subcutaneous emphysema can have serious and potentially life-threatening consequences. Care should be taken when using air-driven handpieces. The access of air into the facial tissues is not limited to tooth extractions, but may also occur through other portals of entrance, such as endodontically treated teeth, periodontium and lacerations of intraoral soft tissues. When subcutaneous emphysema occurs, it must be quickly diagnosed and properly managed to reduce the risk of further complications. This report presents a case of subcutaneous emphysema occurred during extraction of a mandibular third molar extraction with the use of an air turbine handpiece. Case management is described and issues relative to the diagnosis and prevention of this surgical complication are discussed.

  3. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-07

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (∼2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end.

  4. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (~2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks <750 Ma. Here, on the basis of Mg and S isotopes, we show that molar tooth structures may have formed within sediments where microbial sulphate reduction and methanogenesis converged. The convergence was driven by the abundant production of methyl sulphides (dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end.

  5. A Neanderthal lower molar from Stajnia Cave, Poland.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, P; Nowaczewska, W; Stringer, C B; Compton, T; Kruszyński, R; Nadachowski, A; Stefaniak, K; Urbanowski, M

    2013-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to conduct a taxonomic assessment of the second of three isolated human teeth found in the Stajnia Cave (north of the Carpathians, Poland) in 2008. The specimen was located near a human tooth (S5000), which was identified by Urbanowski et al. (2010) as a Neanderthal permanent upper molar. Both of these teeth were excavated from the D2 layer, which belongs to the D stratigraphic complex comprising the archaeological assemblage associated with the Micoquian tradition. An Ursus spelaeus bone and Mammuthus primigenius tooth that were also excavated from the D2 layer were dated to >49,000 years BP (by AMS (14)C) and 52.9 ka BP (by U-Th), respectively. The sediment overlying stratigraphic complex D was dated to 45.9 ka BP by the OSL method. The S4300 tooth is a lower first or second permanent molar belonging to an individual other than that who once possessed the S5000 tooth. The S4300 tooth exhibits a combination of traits typical of Neanderthal lower molars, including a mid-trigonid crest, large anterior fovea, taurodontism and subvertical grooves on the interproximal face, indicating that this tooth belonged to a Neanderthal individual. The S4300 tooth from Stajnia Cave is one of the oldest human remains found in Poland.

  6. The Use of Narrow Diameter Implants in the Molar Area

    PubMed Central

    Saad, M.; Assaf, A.; Gerges, E.

    2016-01-01

    Implant rehabilitations in the posterior jaw are influenced by many factors such as the condition of the remaining teeth, the force factors related to the patient, the quality of the bone, the maintenance of the hygiene, the limited bone height, the type and extent of edentulism, and the nature of the opposing arch. The gold standard is to place a regular diameter implant (>3.7 mm) or a wide one to replace every missing molar. Unfortunately, due to horizontal bone resorption, this option is not possible without lateral bone augmentation. In this situation, narrow diameter implant (NDI < 3.5 mm) could be the alternative to lateral bone augmentation procedures. This paper presents a clinical study where NDIs were used for the replacement of missing molars. They were followed up to 11 years. Special considerations were observed and many parameters were evaluated. NDI could be used to replace missing molar in case of moderate horizontal bone resorption if strict guidelines are respected. Yet, future controlled prospective clinical trials are required to admit their use as scientific evidence. PMID:27293436

  7. 3-D diagnosis-assisted management of anomalous mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Neelam; Narang, Isha

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the successful non-surgical endodontic management of carious exposed three-rooted mandibular molar with four root canals detected on the pre-operative radiograph taken with 20 degrees mesial angulation and confirmed with a 64-slice helical computed tomography scan-assisted 3-D-reconstructed images. Access cavity shape was modified to locate the extra canal with respect to the distolingual root in the left mandibular first molar. Copious irrigation was accomplished with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. Biomechanical preparation was done using protapers. Calcium hydroxide dressing was done for 1 week. The tooth was obturated using gutta percha and AH 26 root canal sealer, and it was permanently restored with composite. Clinical examination on follow-up visits revealed no sensitivity to percussion and palpation in the left mandibular first molar. Thorough knowledge of root canal variations and use of advanced diagnostic modalities lead to successful non-surgical management of the complex cases. PMID:22629067

  8. An odontometric study of the maxillary molars in Australian marsupials. I. The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryuji; Iimura, Akira; Yoshida, Shunji; Kondo, Kenji; Sato, Iwao; Henneberg, Maciej; Townsend, Grant C

    2010-02-01

    Crown dimensions of the maxillary molars were measured in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). There were no significant differences in crown diameters between the first and second molars, however the fourth molars were reduced in all crown diameters. The third molar was smaller than the first or second molars in buccolingual crown diameters but there were no significant differences in mesiodistal crown diameters. It is proposed that the similar shapes of the first and second molars are associated with similar types of masticatory activity involving these teeth, The shape of the third molar, which is reduced in size buccolingually, may be linked to the koala's occlusal function which is characterized by a condylar action that leads to differences in movement between opposing anterior and posterior molar teeth during the occlusal stroke. The fourth molar, the smallest of the molar teeth in crown diameter, erupts significantly later than the other molars, and its reduction may be explained by the terminal and distal reduction theories. It is proposed that the pattern of molar morphology in the koala is associated with both masticatory activity linked to its characteristic occlusal function, as well as reflecting the sequence of tooth emergence.

  9. The origin of the lower fourth molar in canids, inferred by individual variation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background An increase in tooth number is an exception during mammalian evolution. The acquisition of the lower fourth molar in the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis, Canidae, Carnivora, Mammalia) is one example; however, its developmental origin is not clear. In some canids (Canidae), individual variation exist as supernumerary molar M4. This study focuses on the acquisition of the lower fourth molar in canids and proposes that the inhibitory cascade model can explain its origin. Methods Occlusal view projected area of lower molars was determined from 740 mandibles obtained from Canis latrans, Nyctereutes procyonoides, and Urocyon cinereoargenteus museum specimens. For each molar, relative sizes of molars (M2/M1 and M3/M1 scores) affected by inhibition/activation dynamics during development, were compared between individuals with and without supernumerary molar (M4). Results Possession of a supernumerary molar was associated with significantly larger M2/M1 score in Canis latrans, M3/M1 score in Nyctereutes procyonoides, and M2/M1 and M3/M1 scores in Urocyon cinereoargenteus compared to individuals of these species that lacked supernumerary molars. Discussion We propose that, in canids, the supernumerary fourth molar is attributable to reduced inhibition and greater activation during molar development. In the bat-eared fox, altered inhibition and activation dynamics of dental development during omnivorous-insectivorous adaptation may be a contributing factor in the origin of the lower fourth molar. PMID:27843722

  10. Sub-10-Minute Characterization of an Ultrahigh Molar Mass Polymer by Multi-detector Hydrodynamic Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molar mass averages, distributions, and architectural information of polymers are routinely obtained using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). It has previously been shown that ultrahigh molar mass polymers may experience degradation during SEC analysis, leading to inaccurate molar mass averages a...

  11. Molar Mass and Second Virial Coefficient of Polyethylene Glycol by Vapor Pressure Osmometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Checkal, Caleb; Saksa, Brian; Baka, Nadia; Modi, Kalpit; Rivera, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students determine the number-average molar masses and second virial coefficients of polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers ranging in molar mass from 200 to 1500 g mol[superscript -1] using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). Students assess VPO in relation to accurate molar mass calculations of PEG polymers. Additionally,…

  12. Potential Moderating Effects of Selenium on Mercury Uptake and Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Fish From Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site - 12086

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Donio, Mark; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-07-01

    Mercury contamination is an important remediation issue at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and to a lesser extent at other DOE sites because of the hazard it presents, potential consequences to humans and eco-receptors, and completed pathways, to offsite receptors. Recent work has emphasized that selenium might ameliorate the toxicity of mercury, and we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in fish from Oak Ridge, and compare them to Se:Hg molar ratios in fish from the Savannah River. Selenium/mercury molar ratios varied considerably among and within fish species. There was considerable variation in the molar ratios for individual fish (as opposed to mean ratios by species) for freshwater fish from both sites. The inter-individual variation in molar ratios indicates that such that the molar ratios of mean Se and Hg concentrations may not be representative. Even for fish species with relatively low mercury levels, some individual fish have molar ratios less than unity, the value sometime thought to be protective. Selenium levels varied narrowly regardless of fish size, consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential trace element. The data indicate that considerable attention will need to be directed toward variations and variances, as well as the mechanisms of the interaction of selenium and mercury, before risk assessment and risk management policies can use this information to manage mercury pollution and risk. Even so, if there are high levels of selenium in the fish from Poplar Creek on Oak Ridge, then the potential exists for some amelioration of adverse health effects, on the fish themselves, predators that eat them, and people who consume them. This work will aid DOE because it will allow managers and scientists to understand another aspect that affects fate and transport of mercury, as well as the potential effects of methylmercury in fish for human and ecological receptors. The variability within fish

  13. Association between Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Schoolchildren and Both Prenatal and Postnatal Factors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Bendo, Cristiane Baccin; Zarzar, Patrícia Maria; Vale, Miriam Pimenta

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies throughout the world have investigated potential factors involved in the occurrence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH), the findings are varied and inconclusive. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of MIH and identify associated prenatal, perinatal and postnatal factors among Brazilian schoolchildren aged 8 and 9 years. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with a randomly selected population-based sample of 1181 schoolchildren. Information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as prenatal, perinatal and postnatal aspects was obtained through questionnaires. The clinical examination included the investigation of MIH based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. Dental caries in the permanent dentition and developmental defects of enamel (DDE) on the primary second molars were also recorded. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, bivariate tests and Poisson regression with robust variance. Results The prevalence of MIH was 20.4%. MIH was more frequent among children with dental caries in the permanent dentition (PR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.98–3.61), those with DDE on the primary second molars (PR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.87–3.45) and those who experienced asthma/bronchitis in the first four years of life (PR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.45–2.56). Conclusions The prevalence of MIH was high and was associated with dental caries, the presence of DDE on primary second molars and the experience of asthma/bronchitis in early life. These findings could be useful in the identification of children in need of shorter recall intervals to prevent the consequences of MIH, such as enamel breakdown dental caries. PMID:27280451

  14. Anatomical Variations of the Circulus Arteriosus in Cadaveric Human Brains

    PubMed Central

    Gunnal, S. A.; Farooqui, M. S.; Wabale, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Circulus arteriosus/circle of Willis (CW) is a polygonal anastomotic channel at the base of the brain which unites the internal carotid and vertebrobasilar system. It maintains the steady and constant supply to the brain. The variations of CW are seen often. The Aim of the present work is to find out the percentage of normal pattern of CW, and the frequency of variations of the CW and to study the morphological and morphometric aspects of all components of CW. Methods. Circulus arteriosus of 150 formalin preserved brains were dissected. Dimensions of all the components forming circles were measured. Variations of all the segments were noted and well photographed. The variations such as aplasia, hypoplasia, duplication, fenestrations, and difference in dimensions with opposite segments were noted. The data collected in the study was analyzed. Results. Twenty-one different types of CW were found in the present study. Normal and complete CW was found in 60%. CW with gross morphological variations was seen in 40%. Maximum variations were seen in the PCoA followed by the ACoA in 50% and 40%, respectively. Conclusion. As it confirms high percentage of variations, all surgical interventions should be preceded by angiography. Awareness of these anatomical variations is important in neurovascular procedures. PMID:24891951

  15. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  16. Patient with oligodontia treated with a miniscrew for unilateral mesial movement of the maxillary molars and alignment of an impacted third molar.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Aya; Sakoguchi, Yoko; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the treatment of a 20-year-old woman with a dental midline deviation and 7 congenitally missing premolars. She had retained a maxillary right deciduous canine and 4 deciduous second molars, and she had an impacted maxillary right third molar. The maxillary right deciduous second molar was extracted, and the space was nearly closed by mesial movement of the maxillary right molars using an edgewise appliance and a miniscrew for absolute anchorage. The miniscrew was removed, and the extraction space of the maxillary right deciduous canine was closed, correcting the dental midline deviation. After the mesial movement of the maxillary right molars, the impacted right third molar was aligned. To prevent root resorption, the retained left deciduous second molars were not aligned by the edgewise appliance. The occlusal contact area and the maximum occlusal force increased over the 2 years of retention. The miniscrew was useful for absolute anchorage for unilateral mesial movement of the maxillary molars and for the creation of eruption space and alignment of the impacted third molar in a patient with oligodontia.

  17. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ja of... - Molar Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Content of Fuel Gas Constituents 1 Table 1 to Subpart Ja of Part 60 Protection of Environment... Exhaust Volumes and Molar Heat Content of Fuel Gas Constituents Constituent MEVa dscf/mol MHCb Btu/mol Methane (CH4) 7.29 842 Ethane (C2H6) 12.96 1,475 Hydrogen (H2) 1.61 269 Ethene (C2H4) 11.34 1,335...

  18. Nomina anatomica. Anatomic terminology and the old French terminology.

    PubMed

    Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Passos, Luiz Fernando De Souza; Euzébio Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo

    A surprising finding in our seminars in Latin America and Spain was that approximately half of the participants continued to use the old French anatomical nomenclature. The substance of this paper is a table in which we compare the anatomical names for the items reviewed in our seminar, in a Spanish version of the old French nomenclature and in the Spanish, Portuguese, and English versions of the currently employed anatomical terms.

  19. Well Ordered Melts from Low Molar Mass Pluronic Copolymers Blended with Poly (acrylic acid): Effect of Homopolymer Molar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Vikram; Tirumala, Vijay; Romang, Alvin; Lin, Eric; Watkins, James

    2008-03-01

    The use of short chain block copolymer melts as nanostructured templates is often limited by their low segregation strength (χN). Since increasing molar mass to strengthen segregation also increases the interdomain spacing, it is more desirable to increase the segment-segment interaction parameter, χ to produce strong segregation. We have recently shown that block copolymer melts with a molar mass less than 15 kg/mol undergo disorder-to-order transition without a significant increase in interdomain spacing when blended with a selectively associating homopolymer, due to an apparent increase in effective χ. Here, we study the effect of homopolymer molar mass on the segregation of a disordered poly (oxyethylene-oxypropylene-oxyethylene) copolymer melt that forms lamellar microstructure in the ordered phase. Based on small-angle scattering measurements, we find that the melts remain ordered over a broad range of homopolymer chain lengths, ranging up to ten times that of the copolymer. This approach has many implications for the use of commodity block copolymer surfactants as inexpensive nanostructured templates for commercial applications.

  20. An investigation of anatomical competence in junior medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A T M; Kooloos, Jan G M; Bolhuis, Sanneke M; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an attempt to delineate the nature of anatomical competence. The research question is: what kind of anatomical knowledge do junior medical doctors use during a consultation with a patient presenting with a shoulder complaint? Ten junior medical doctors participated in this stimulated recall study. Each of them was videotaped while performing a consultation with a standardized patient with a complex shoulder complaint. The recording was viewed immediately after. Participants were videotaped again while verbalizing the thoughts they remembered having during the consultation. Verbatim transcriptions were coded by two coders using the qualitative data analysis ATLAS.ti software. Results were that these junior medical doctors used anatomical knowledge in all phases of the consultation, especially during physical examination. The use of anatomical terms was strongly associated with clinical reasoning and it was apparent that every subject visualized relevant anatomical information. Conclusion is that young medical doctors actively use their anatomical knowledge and it seems that the relevant anatomy consists largely of adequate visual representations in memory. Anatomy teachers should focus the students' learning activity on building an adequate visual representation of anatomical structures. This should be supported by assessments that test the quality of the students' visual representations.

  1. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  2. Bidirectional mereological reasoning in anatomical knowledge bases.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mereological relationships--relationships between parts and wholes--are essential for ontological engineering in the anatomical domain. We propose a knowledge engineering approach that emulates mereological reasoning by taxonomic reasoning based on SEP triplets, a special data structure for the encoding of part-whole relations, which is fully embedded in the formal framework of standard description logics. We extend the SEP formalism in order to account not only for the part-of but also for the has-part relation, both being considered transitive in our domain. Furthermore we analyze the distinction between the ontological primitives singletons, collections and mass concepts in the anatomy domain and sketch how reasoning about these kinds of concepts can be accounted for in a knowledge representation language, using the extended SEP formalism. PMID:11825258

  3. Ballistics and anatomical modelling - A review.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2016-11-01

    Ballistics is the study of a projectiles motion and can be broken down into four stages: internal, intermediate, external and terminal ballistics. The study of the effects a projectile has on a living tissue is referred to as wound ballistics and falls within terminal ballistics. To understand the effects a projectile has on living tissues the mechanisms of wounding need to be understood. These include the permanent and temporary cavities, energy, yawing, tumbling and fragmenting. Much ballistics research has been conducted including using cadavers, animal models and simulants such as ballistics ordnance gelatine. Further research is being conducted into developing anatomical, 3D, experimental and computational models. However, these models need to accurately represent the human body and its heterogeneous nature which involves understanding the biomechanical properties of the different tissues and organs. Further research is needed to accurately represent the human tissues with simulants and is slowly being conducted.

  4. Visualizing the spine using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Craig W.; Fellingham, Linda L.

    1990-08-01

    In vivo anatomy is now routinely displayed as 2-D and 3-D images obtained from Computed X-ray Tomograpy (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and other diagnostic modalities. Most current medical visualization methods rely on pixel intensities to segment the data into tissues. However, structural features must be differentiated by a human operator, and geometric measurements of the anatomy are tedious and error prone to compute. This paper describes processing and imaging methods to aid the interpretation of CT studies of the spine. These procedures incorporate knowledge of the symmetry, shapes, and spatial relationships of vertebrae to locate the spinal cord and major components of vertebral bone from CT slices of the spine and automatically compute anatomical measurements. Results of these methods are shown as applied to the cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions of the spine.

  5. Anatomic brain asymmetry in vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Scheibel, Kevin; Abaryan, Zvart; Lee, Chris; Service, Susan K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Fairbanks, Lynn A; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Woods, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetry is a prominent feature of human brains with important functional consequences. Many asymmetric traits show population bias, but little is known about the genetic and environmental sources contributing to inter-individual variance. Anatomic asymmetry has been observed in Old World monkeys, but the evidence for the direction and extent of asymmetry is equivocal and only one study has estimated the genetic contributions to inter-individual variance. In this study we characterize a range of qualitative and quantitative asymmetry measures in structural brain MRIs acquired from an extended pedigree of Old World vervet monkeys (n = 357), and implement variance component methods to estimate the proportion of trait variance attributable to genetic and environmental sources. Four of six asymmetry measures show pedigree-level bias and one of the traits has a significant heritability estimate of about 30%. We also found that environmental variables more significantly influence the width of the right compared to the left prefrontal lobe.

  6. Mandibular alveolar neurovascular bundle injury associated with impacted third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Ruga, Emanuele; Gallesio, Cesare; Boffano, Paolo

    2010-07-01

    Inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IANB) injury is one of the most common complications of third molar removal and involves important medicolegal issues. An accurate preoperative radiographic assessment of surgical difficulty is necessary to correctly plan the removal of impacted third molars and to estimate the risk of IANB injury. Therefore, the preoperative knowledge of the exact location of the third molar roots in relation to the mandibular canal is mandatory. A direct contact between the tooth and neurovascular bundle is suggested by a radiotransparent band across the roots of the impacted third molar on panoramic radiograph. We present the management of a patient with IANB damage associated with third molar surgery.

  7. MRI anatomical variants of mammillary bodies.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, Micaela; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallucci, Massimo; Caulo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MBs) are classically defined as a pair of small round structures located on the undersurface of the diencephalon. The systematic observation of MR brain images of patients with neurological diseases, but also of healthy subjects enrolled in research protocols, reveals, however, a greater anatomical variability. The aim of the present study was to define the spectrum of such variability using spatial normalized 3D TFE T1-weighted MR images in a group of 151 healthy right-handed young subjects (78 females, age range 16-39 years). The MBs were identified on reformatted coronal and axial images and classified according to morphological, positional and numerical criteria. On the basis of coronal images, MBs were first divided into symmetrical (86.1 %) and asymmetrical (13.9 %), depending on their respective height. Symmetrical MBs were further subdivided into three variants [type A (2.7 %), B (76.2 %), C (7.3 %)] according to the depth of the intermammillary sulcus. Two morphological variants were defined on axial images, depending on whether the MBs were circular (63.6 %) or elliptic (36.4 %). This latter group was further divided in two subgroups, depending on whether the MBs were parallel (21.9 %) or convergent (14.6 %). Finally, two subjects (1.3 %) presented a supernumeral MB. The transverse size of the third ventricle was greater in the type A compared to the type B and C groups. Gender did not significantly affect the frequency of MBs variants, except for the three symmetrical subgroups in which the variants A and C were more frequent in males than in females. These findings suggest the presence of an anatomical variability of the MBs, in contrast to their classical definition. Therefore, atypical presentation of MBs can be the expression of this variability rather than a marker of neurological disorders (i.e. cerebral malformation, mesial temporal sclerosis, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome).

  8. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel.

  9. Anatomical landmarks for the localization of the greater palatine foramen – a study of 1200 head CTs, 150 dry skulls, systematic review of literature and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Pena, Iwona Z; Urbanik, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Michał; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of greater palatine foramen (GPF) anatomy is necessary when performing a variety of anaesthesiological, dental or surgical procedures. The first aim of this study was to localize the GPF in relation to multiple anatomical landmarks. The second aim was to perform a systematic review of literature, and to conduct a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF position to aid clinicians in their practice. One-hundred and fifty dry, adult, human skulls and 1200 archived head computed tomography scans were assessed and measured in terms of GPF relation to other anatomical reference points. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases, and a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF relation to the maxillary molars was conducted. On average, in the Polish population, the GPF was positioned 15.9 ± 1.5 mm from the midline maxillary suture (MMS), 3.0 ± 1.2 mm from the alveolar ridge (AR) and 17.0 ± 1.5 mm from the posterior nasal spine (PNS); 74.7% of GPF were positioned opposite the third maxillary molar (M3). Twenty-seven studies were included in the systematic review and 23 in the meta-analysis (n = 6927 GPF). The pooled prevalence of the GPF being positioned opposite the M3 was 63.9% (95% confidence interval = 56.6–70.9%). Concluding, the GPF is most often located opposite the M3 in the majority of the world's populations. The maxillary molars are the best landmarks for locating the GPF. In edentulous patients the most useful points for approximating the position of the GPF are the AR, MMS and PNS. This study introduces an easy and repeatable classification to reference the GPF to the maxillary molars. PMID:25131842

  10. Anatomical landmarks for the localization of the greater palatine foramen--a study of 1200 head CTs, 150 dry skulls, systematic review of literature and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Pena, Iwona Z; Urbanik, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Michał; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of greater palatine foramen (GPF) anatomy is necessary when performing a variety of anaesthesiological, dental or surgical procedures. The first aim of this study was to localize the GPF in relation to multiple anatomical landmarks. The second aim was to perform a systematic review of literature, and to conduct a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF position to aid clinicians in their practice. One-hundred and fifty dry, adult, human skulls and 1200 archived head computed tomography scans were assessed and measured in terms of GPF relation to other anatomical reference points. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases, and a meta-analysis on the subject of GPF relation to the maxillary molars was conducted. On average, in the Polish population, the GPF was positioned 15.9 ± 1.5 mm from the midline maxillary suture (MMS), 3.0 ± 1.2 mm from the alveolar ridge (AR) and 17.0 ± 1.5 mm from the posterior nasal spine (PNS); 74.7% of GPF were positioned opposite the third maxillary molar (M3). Twenty-seven studies were included in the systematic review and 23 in the meta-analysis (n = 6927 GPF). The pooled prevalence of the GPF being positioned opposite the M3 was 63.9% (95% confidence interval = 56.6-70.9%). Concluding, the GPF is most often located opposite the M3 in the majority of the world's populations. The maxillary molars are the best landmarks for locating the GPF. In edentulous patients the most useful points for approximating the position of the GPF are the AR, MMS and PNS. This study introduces an easy and repeatable classification to reference the GPF to the maxillary molars.

  11. Assessment of the relationship between the maxillary molars and adjacent structures using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun-Hoa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and measured the distances between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus floor as well as the thickness of the bone between the root and the alveolar cortical plate. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 83 patients with normally erupted bilateral maxillary first and second molars. A total of 332 maxillary molars were examined using CBCT images. The vertical relationship of each root with the maxillary sinus was classified into four types on CBCT cross-sectional images. The distance between the sinus floor and root and the bone thickness between the root and alveolar cortical plate were measured. Results In the buccal roots of the maxillary molars, a root protruding into the sinus occurred most frequently. A root projecting laterally along the sinus cavity was most common in the palatal roots of the maxillary first molars. The mesiobuccal roots of the maxillary second molar were closest to the sinus. The mesiobuccal roots of the first molars were closest to the cortical plate. Conclusion The relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus differed between the buccal and palatal roots. A root protruding into the sinus occurred more frequent in the buccal roots of the maxillary molars. The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary second molar was closest to the maxillary sinus floor and farthest from the alveolar cortical plate. PMID:23301207

  12. Compensation trends of the angulation of first molars: retrospective study of 1 403 malocclusion cases

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong; Han, Bing; Li, Sa; Na, Bin; Ma, Wen; Xu, Tian-Min

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the compensatory trends of mesiodistal angulation of first molars in malocclusion cases. We compared differences in the angulation of first molars in different developmental stages, malocclusion classifications and skeletal patterns. The medical records and lateral cephalogrammes of 1 403 malocclusion cases taken before treatment were measured to evaluate compensation of molar angulation in relation to the skeletal jaw. The cases were stratified by age, Angle classification and skeletal patterns. Differences in the mesiodistal angulation of the first molars were compared among the stratifications. We observed three main phenomena. First, angulation of the upper first molar varied significantly with age and tipped most distally in cases aged <12 years and least distally in cases aged >16 years. The lower first molar did not show such differences. Second, in Angle Class II or skeletal Class II cases, the upper first molar was the most distally tipped, the lower first molar was the most mesially tipped, and opposite angulation compensation was observed in Class III cases. Third, in high-angle cases, the upper and lower first molars were the most distally tipped, and opposite angulation compensation was observed in low-angle cases. These data suggest that the angulation of the molars compensated for various growth patterns and malocclusion types. Hence, awareness of molar angulation compensation would help to adjust occlusal relationships, control anchorage and increase the chances of long-term stability. PMID:24699185

  13. Biological aspects of gender disorders.

    PubMed

    Corsello, S M; Di Donna, V; Senes, P; Luotto, V; Ricciato, M P; Paragliola, R M; Pontecorvi, A

    2011-12-01

    The scientific community is very interested in the biological aspects of gender disorders and sexual orientation. There are different levels to define an individual's sex: chromosomal, gonadic, and phenotypic sex. Concerning the psychological sex, men and women are different by virtue of their own gender identity, which means they recognize themselves as belonging to a determinate sex. They are different also as a result of their own role identity, a set of behaviors, tendencies, and cognitive and emotional attitudes, commonly defined as "male" and "female". Transsexuality is a disorder characterized by the development of a gender identity opposed to phenotypic sex, whereas homosexuality is not a disturbance of gender identity but only of sexual attraction, expressing sexual orientation towards people of the same sex. We started from a critical review of literature on genetic and hormonal mechanisms involved in sexual differentiation. We re-examined the neuro-anatomic and functional differences between men and women, with special reference to their role in psychosexual differentiation and to their possible implication in the genesis of homosexuality and identity gender disorders. Homosexuality and transsexuality are conditions without a well defined etiology. Although the influence of educational and environmental factors in humans is undeniable, it seems that organic neurohormonal prenatal and postnatal factors might contribute in a determinant way in the development of these two conditions. This "organicistic neurohormal theory" might find support in the study of particular situations in which the human fetus is exposed to an abnormal hormonal environment in utero.

  14. Correlation of Third Molar Status with Incidence of Condylar and Angle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Menon, Suresh; Kumar, Veerendra; V, Srihari; Priyadarshini, Yogitha

    2016-09-01

    The mandibular angle and condylar regions are most prone to fractures and this has been attributed to the presence/absence or the position of the third molars. This retrospective study was undertaken to analyze the correlation between the third molars and incidence of condylar and angle fractures in 104 patients treated for these fractures during the period from June 2009 to December 2013. Clinical and radiographic records of these patients were studied to look for the presence and position of third molars and their relation to incidence of condylar or angle fractures. There was a definite positive relation to impacted third molars and increased incidence of angle fractures. The condylar fractures were more commonly seen when the third molars were fully erupted or missing. Third molar impactions predispose to angle fractures and missing or fully erupted third molars predispose to condylar fractures.

  15. Peri-operative second molar tube failure during orthognathic surgery: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Wenger, N A; Atack, N E; Mitchell, C N; Ireland, A J

    2007-06-01

    With improvements in bonding techniques, bracket base design and bond strengths, molar tubes are becoming more popular in orthodontics. Molar tubes make an attractive alternative to conventional banding due to a reduction in clinical bonding time and ease of placement on partially erupted teeth. The use of molar tubes negates the need for orthodontic separation and subsequent cementation of bands, and offers improved periodontal health. Their use on terminal molars, however, should be limited to non-orthognathic cases. This paper presents two cases of peri-operative second molar tube failure during orthognathic surgery. They are presented in the hope that it will highlight the importance of banding the distal terminal molar in orthognathic cases to prevent loss of molar tubes and peri-operative contamination of the surgical wound site.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT compared with panoramic images in predicting retromolar canal during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars

    PubMed Central

    Sisman, Yıldıray; Payveren-Arıkan, Mehtap; Sahman, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical significance of the existence of a retromolar canal and of its neurovascular content is not yet clear.The aim of the present study was to assess the visibility, diameter and course of the mandibular retromolarcanal (MRC) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan -had been taken for pre-operative radiographic evaluation of impacted mandibular third molars- compared to panoramic radiographs. Study Design: Subjects eligible for study enrollment were those who underwent preoperative CBCT scan for the extraction of impactedmandibular third molars were determined to be extremely close to the mandibular canal on panoramic radiographs. Radiographs were screened for the presence and course of retromolar canals, and linear measurements. Results: 947hemimandibles in 632 patients were examined.A total of 253 MRCs (144 left, 109 right) were detected with CBCT images (26.7%). Only 29 of these canals were also seen on the corresponding panoramic radiographs. Most MRCs had a vertical course (type VI, 28.46%), followed by slightly curved (type I, 26.09%). The visibility of the MRC on the OPGs, according to the increase in the diameter, was not statistically significant for both sides (p>.05).Statistically difference were found for the width at the point of origin from the mandibular canal (p: .037), the mean distance from the MRC to the second molar (p: .042) and height of MRC when compared the gender. Conclusions: The findings suggest that the MRC isn’t a rare anatomical structure. This study therefore clearly establishes the incidence and importance of the MRC. The detection of the presence of the MRC using CBCT may be crucial for extraction of mandibular third molars. Key words:Accessory innervation, cone beam computed tomography, mandibular anatomy, panoramic radiographs, retromolar canal, retromolar foramen. PMID:25475767

  17. Reliability of CBCT as an assessment tool for mandibular molars furcation defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, Adrian George; Boariu, Marius; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Ogodescu, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In numerous clinical situations it is not possible to have an exact clinical evaluation of the furcation defects. Recently the use of CBCT in periodontology has led to an increased precision in diagnostic. Aim. To determine the accuracy of CBCT as diagnostic tool of the furcation defects. Material and method. 19 patients with generalised advanced chronic periodontitis were included in this study, presenting a total of 25 lower molars with different degrees of furcation defects. Clinical and digital measurements (in mm) were performed on all the molars involved. The data obtained has been compared and statistically analysed. Results. The analysis of primary data has demonstrated that all the furcation grade II and III defects were revealed using the CBCT technique. Regarding the incipient defects (grade I Hamp < 3mm), the dimensions measured on CBCT images were slightly bigger. The results have shown that 84% of the defects detected by CBCT have been confirmed by clinical measurements. These data are similar to those revealed by other studies1. Conclusions. The use of CBCT technique in evaluation and diagnosis of human mandibular furcation defects can provide many important information regarding the size and aspect of the interradicular defect, efficiently and noninvasively. CBCT technique is used more effectively in detection of advanced furcation degree compared to incipient ones. However, the CBCT examination cannot replace, at least in this stage of development, the clinical measurements, especially the intraoperative ones, which are considered to represent the „golden standard" in this domain.

  18. [Historical development of modern anatomical education in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuo

    2008-12-01

    The medical schools in the beginning of Meiji era were diverse both in the founders and in the way of education, frequently employing foreign teachers of various nationalities. In 1871, German teachers were appointed to organized medical education at the medical school of the university of Tokyo. The anatomical education in the school was conducted by German teachers, i.e. Miller (1871-1873), Dönitz (1873-1877), Gierke (1877-1880) and Disse (1880-1885), followed by Koganei who returned from the study in Germany. In 1882 (Meiji 15th), the general rule for medical school was enforced so that the medical schools were practically obliged to employ numbers of graduates of the university of Tokyo. In 1887 (Meiji 20th), the educational system was reformed so that many of the medical schools were closed, and the medical schools were integrated into one university, five national senior high schools and three prefectural ones in addition to four private ones. After that most of anatomical teachers were either graduates of the university of Tokyo or those who studied in the anatomical department of the university. Before 1877 (Meiji 10th), the anatomical books were mainly translated from English books, and foreign teachers of various nationality were employed in many medical schools in Japan. After 1877 (Meiji 10th), the anatomical books based on the lectures by German teachers at the university of Tokyo were published. The anatomical books after 1887 (Meiji 20th) were written based on German books, and the German anatomical terms were utilized. After 1905 (Meiji 38th), the original Japanese anatomical books appeared, employing international anatomical terms. At the first meeting of Japanese Association of Anatomists in 1893 (Meiji 26th), the Japanese anatomical teachers met together and most of them were graduates of the university of Tokyo or fellows of its anatomical department.

  19. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    PubMed Central

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort. PMID:25309338

  20. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: a method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections.

    PubMed

    Pyka, Martin; Klatt, Sebastian; Cheng, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM), to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: (i) the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, (ii) the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort.

  1. Patterning by heritage in mouse molar row development.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Jan; Pantalacci, Sophie; Churava, Svatava; Rothova, Michaela; Lambert, Anne; Lesot, Hervé; Klein, Ophir; Peterka, Miroslav; Laudet, Vincent; Peterkova, Renata

    2010-08-31

    It is known from paleontology studies that two premolars have been lost during mouse evolution. During mouse mandible development, two bud-like structures transiently form that may represent rudimentary precursors of the lost premolars. However, the interpretation of these structures and their significance for mouse molar development are highly controversial because of a lack of molecular data. Here, we searched for typical tooth signaling centers in these two bud-like structures, and followed their fate using molecular markers, 3D reconstructions, and lineage tracing in vitro. Transient signaling centers were indeed found to be located at the tips of both the anterior and posterior rudimentary buds. These centers expressed a similar set of molecular markers as the "primary enamel knot" (pEK), the signaling center of the first molar (M1). These two transient signaling centers were sequentially patterned before and anterior to the M1 pEK. We also determined the dynamics of the M1 pEK, which, slightly later during development, spread up to the field formerly occupied by the posterior transient signaling center. It can be concluded that two rudimentary tooth buds initiate the sequential development of the mouse molars and these have previously been mistaken for early stages of M1 development. Although neither rudiment progresses to form an adult tooth, the posterior one merges with the adjacent M1, which may explain the anterior enlargement of the M1 during mouse family evolution. This study highlights how rudiments of lost structures can stay integrated and participate in morphogenesis of functional organs and help in understanding their evolution, as Darwin suspected long ago.

  2. Etiology, Diagnosis, Consequences and Treatment of Infraoccluded Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Arhakis, Aristidis; Boutiou, Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Infraocclusion is a condition where teeth are found with their occlusal surface below the adjacent teeth, long after they should have reached occlusion. Many terms have been used to describe this condition; the most commonly used being submergence and ankylosis. Infraocclusion is classified as slight, moderate or severe. Studies have shown the commonness ratio of infraocclusion in kids being 1.3-8.9% with an equal male: female ratio. The frequency of infraocclusion of primary molars of mandible is 10-fold higher in contrast to those of the maxilla. Some studies showed that the first mandibular primary molars are most often affected, but others support the second one. Infraoccluded primary molars appear with an increase in 3 year-old children reaching a peak in 8-9 years of age. The main cause is ankylosis, followed by heredity, trauma, infection and various other theories. However, the etiology is still uncertain. Radiographically, an obliteration of the periodontal ligament can be seen using conventional methods and the CT-method can also be used to reveal greater detail. Clinically, other than submersion, a sharp, solid sound is heard on percussion, in contrast to a softer sound in the normal teeth. Infraoccluded primary teeth can cause occlusal disturbances, tilting of the adjacent teeth, supra-eruption of the antagonists, ectopic eruption or impaction of the successor premolars. A treatment decision must take into account whether there is a permanent successor or not. In the first case, patient monitoring is recommended, because these primary teeth usually exfoliate normally. However, in the second case, the therapeutic approach is not standard. The aim of this review of literature was to elucidate the available evidence concerning infraocclusion, its etiology, diagnosis, clinical characteristics, consequences and treatment. PMID:28217186

  3. Patterning by heritage in mouse molar row development

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, Jan; Pantalacci, Sophie; Churava, Svatava; Rothova, Michaela; Lambert, Anne; Lesot, Hervé; Klein, Ophir; Peterka, Miroslav; Laudet, Vincent; Peterkova, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is known from paleontology studies that two premolars have been lost during mouse evolution. During mouse mandible development, two bud-like structures transiently form that may represent rudimentary precursors of the lost premolars. However, the interpretation of these structures and their significance for mouse molar development are highly controversial because of a lack of molecular data. Here, we searched for typical tooth signaling centers in these two bud-like structures, and followed their fate using molecular markers, 3D reconstructions, and lineage tracing in vitro. Transient signaling centers were indeed found to be located at the tips of both the anterior and posterior rudimentary buds. These centers expressed a similar set of molecular markers as the “primary enamel knot” (pEK), the signaling center of the first molar (M1). These two transient signaling centers were sequentially patterned before and anterior to the M1 pEK. We also determined the dynamics of the M1 pEK, which, slightly later during development, spread up to the field formerly occupied by the posterior transient signaling center. It can be concluded that two rudimentary tooth buds initiate the sequential development of the mouse molars and these have previously been mistaken for early stages of M1 development. Although neither rudiment progresses to form an adult tooth, the posterior one merges with the adjacent M1, which may explain the anterior enlargement of the M1 during mouse family evolution. This study highlights how rudiments of lost structures can stay integrated and participate in morphogenesis of functional organs and help in understanding their evolution, as Darwin suspected long ago. PMID:20709958

  4. [Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH)--a literature review].

    PubMed

    Gotler, M; Ratson, T

    2010-04-01

    MIH was defined by Weerheijm (2001) as "hypomineralisation of systemic origin of 1-4 permanent first molars, frequently associated with affected incisors". The prevalence of MIH varies between 2.8% and 25%, dependent upon the study. At their sixth congress in 2003, The European Association of pediatric dentistry defined criteria for diagnosis of the phenomena. It included the presence of demarcated opacity, posteruptive enamel breakdown, atypical restoration, extracted molar due to MIH and unerupted teeth. According to the teeth involved and to the time of the crown formation, researches focused on environmental and systemic conditions as possible reasons for MIH.The etiologies were divided into five groups: Exposure to environmental contaminants, pre/peri and neonatal problems, exposure to fluoride, common childhood illnesses and medically compromised children. The clinical implications include highly sensitive teeth, difficulty to achieve adequate anesthesia, behavioral problems and anxiety, rapid progression of caries and the esthetic implications. A six step approach to management was described suggested: risk identification, early diagnosis, remineralization and desensitization, prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown, restorations and extractions and finally maintenance. Restoring an affected molar can vary from adhesive intra coronal restorations (resin composite is the material of choice) to extra coronal restorations (e.g. preformed metal crown). Esthetic solutions to affected incisors may include microabrasion (that shows little improvement) and resin composite or porcelain veneer. The key for a successful treatment is early diagnosis, intense follow up and usage of remineralizating agents as soon as the teeth erupt. There is still need for further research to clarify the etiological factors and improve the durability of restoration in affected teeth.

  5. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after upper third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Cakarer, Sirmahan; Can, Taylan; Cankaya, Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Yazici, Sinem; Ayintap, Emre; Özden, Ali Veysel; Keskin, Cengizhan

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis (PFNP) after mandibular interventions has been reported in the literature. In most cases, paralysis begins immediately after the injection of the mandibular anesthesia, and duration of facial weakness is less than 12 hours. However, there are few documented cases of PFNP after maxillary dental or surgical procedures. A variety of mechanisms have been associated to PFNP, including viral reactivation, demyelination, edema, vasospasm, and trauma. The purpose of this presentation was to report a rare case of facial paralysis that occurred after an upper third molar extraction. The cause of the PFNP and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the management are emphasized.

  6. Histological evaluation of mandibular third molar roots retrieved after coronectomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vinod; Sproat, Chris; Kwok, Jerry; Beneng, Kiran; Thavaraj, Selvam; McGurk, Mark

    2014-05-01

    There is a resurgence of interest in coronectomy for the management of mandibular third molars because it has a low risk of injury to the inferior dental nerve. However, there is concern that the root that is left in place will eventually become a source of infection. We describe the histological evaluation of 26 consecutive symptomatic coronectomy roots in 21 patients. All roots had vital tissue in the pulp chamber and there was no evidence of periradicular inflammation. Persistent postoperative symptoms related predominantly to inflammation of the soft tissue, which was caused by partially erupted roots or failure of the socket to heal.

  7. Ethanol sorption and partial molar volume in cellulose acetate films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, B.A.; Kint, S.; Bailey, G.F.; Scherer, J.R.

    1986-03-13

    The absorption characteristics of cellulose acetate (CA398) and cellulose triacetate membranes for ethanol vapor were determined by integrated optical techniques. Changes in the refractive index and film thicknesses are used to calculate the ethanol concentration within the membrane, to calculate the partial molar volume of sorbed ethanol as a function of ethanol concentration, and to estimate the average void volume of the dry film. The refractive index is shown to be very sensitive to the available void space within the membrane. The average total void space for the films considered here was less than 1% of the dry polymer volume. 22 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  8. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Molars Using All Ceramic Endocrowns

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Roopak Bose; Thomas Nainan, Mohan; Pradhan, Shamina; Roshni Sharma; Benjamin, Shiny; Rose, Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Clinical success of endodontically treated posterior teeth is determined by the postendodontic restoration. Several options have been proposed to restore endodontically treated teeth. Endocrowns represent a conservative and esthetic restorative alternative to full coverage crowns. The preparation consists of a circular equigingival butt-joint margin and central retention cavity into the entire pulp chamber constructing both the crown and the core as a single unit. The case reports discussed here are moderately damaged endodontically treated molars restored using all ceramic endocrowns fabricated using two different systems, namely, CAD/CAM and pressed ceramic. PMID:24455318

  9. Association between the presence of a partially erupted mandibular third molar and the existence of caries in the distal of the second molars.

    PubMed

    Falci, S G M; de Castro, C R; Santos, R C; de Souza Lima, L D; Ramos-Jorge, M L; Botelho, A M; Dos Santos, C R R

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to verify, using periapical radiographs, whether a partially erupted mandibular third molar is a factor in the presence of dental caries on the distal surface of the adjacent second molar. Two-forty six high quality periapical radiographs were selected, each showing a partially erupted mandibular third molar. The variables analyzed were: tooth number; gender; age; radiographic presence of caries on the distal surface of the adjacent molar; Pell and Gregory classification; Winter classification; angulation and distance between the second and mandibular third molar. The examiners were previously calibrated to collect data (kappa statistics from 0.87 to 1.0). The prevalence rate of caries on the distal surface of the second molar was 13.4%. In the logistical multivariate regression analysis, the angulation (OR=8.5; IC95%: 1.7-43.8; p=0.011) and the gender (OR=3.3; IC95%: 1.4-7.7; p=0.005) remained statistically significant after an age adjustment was made. The results indicate that the presence of a partially erupted mandibular third molar with an angulation of 31 degrees or more, is a risk factor for caries on the distal surface of the mandibular second molars.

  10. An Investigation of Anatomical Competence in Junior Medical Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an…

  11. Incorporating anatomical side information into PET reconstruction using nonlocal regularization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2013-10-01

    With the introduction of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) or PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, there is an increasing emphasis on reconstructing PET images with the aid of the anatomical side information obtained from X-ray CT or MRI scanners. In this paper, we propose a new approach to incorporating prior anatomical information into PET reconstruction using the nonlocal regularization method. The nonlocal regularizer developed for this application is designed to selectively consider the anatomical information only when it is reliable. As our proposed nonlocal regularization method does not directly use anatomical edges or boundaries which are often used in conventional methods, it is not only free from additional processes to extract anatomical boundaries or segmented regions, but also more robust to the signal mismatch problem that is caused by the indirect relationship between the PET image and the anatomical image. We perform simulations with digital phantoms. According to our experimental results, compared to the conventional method based on the traditional local regularization method, our nonlocal regularization method performs well even with the imperfect prior anatomical information or in the presence of signal mismatch between the PET image and the anatomical image.

  12. Complex vestibular macular anatomical relationships need a synthetic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian vestibular maculae are anatomically organized for complex parallel processing of linear acceleration information. Anatomical findings in rat maculae are provided in order to underscore this complexity, which is little understood functionally. This report emphasizes that a synthetic approach is critical to understanding how maculae function and the kind of information they conduct to the brain.

  13. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  18. Unilateral failure of development of mandibular premolars and molars in an Eastern Grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) and its effects on molar progression.

    PubMed

    Barber, D; Campbell, J; Davey, J; Luke, T; Agren, E; Beveridge, I

    2008-01-01

    An adult male Eastern Grey kangaroo from a wildlife reserve near Melbourne was submitted for necropsy examination and was discovered to have abnormal dentition. There was no evidence that any premolars or molars had ever been present on the right mandible, whilst the incisors were normal. The age of the kangaroo was estimated to be 1 year 9 months using the right maxillary molars and 2 years 4 months old using the contralateral side, presumably due to the asymmetry of the dental arcades. 'Lumpy jaw', a common periodontal disease of kangaroos, from which Bacteroides sp was cultured, was present on the base of the vertical ramus of the left mandible. Complete unilateral absence of premolar and molar teeth in the mandible of a kangaroo has not been described. This condition affected molar progression in both sets of maxillary molars.

  19. Characterizing anatomical variability in breast CT images

    PubMed Central

    Metheany, Kathrine G.; Abbey, Craig K.; Packard, Nathan; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work [Burgess , Med. Phys. 28, 419–437 (2001)] has shown that anatomical noise in projection mammography results in a power spectrum well modeled over a range of frequencies by a power law, and the exponent (β) of this power law plays a critical role in determining the size at which a growing lesion reaches the threshold for detection. In this study, the authors evaluated the power-law model for breast computed tomography (bCT) images, which can be thought of as thin sections through a three-dimensional (3D) volume. Under the assumption of a 3D power law describing the distribution of attenuation coefficients in the breast parenchyma, the authors derived the relationship between the power-law exponents of bCT and projection images and found it to be βsection=βproj−1. They evaluated this relationship on clinical images by comparing bCT images from a set of 43 patients to Burgess’ findings in mammography. They were able to make a direct comparison for 6 of these patients who had both a bCT exam and a digitized film-screen mammogram. They also evaluated segmented bCT images to investigate the extent to which the bCT power-law exponent can be explained by a binary model of attenuation coefficients based on the different attenuation of glandular and adipose tissue. The power-law model was found to be a good fit for bCT data over frequencies from 0.07to0.45cyc∕mm, where anatomical variability dominates the spectrum. The average exponent for bCT images was 1.86. This value is close to the theoretical prediction using Burgess’ published data for projection mammography and for the limited set of mammography data available from the authors’ patient sample. Exponents from the segmented bCT images (average value: 2.06) were systematically slightly higher than bCT images, with substantial correlation between the two (r=0.84). PMID:18975714

  20. [On the artful, yet pernicious body. A cultural-historical interpretation of Bidloo's anatomical atlas].

    PubMed

    Knoeff, Rina

    2003-01-01

    Among historians of science and medicine it is well known that early modern anatomical representations, in addition to illustrating ideas on the body, also teach a moral lesson. The anatomical cabinets of Frederik Ruysch (1638-1731) are exemplary. His exhibits show 1) the divine design of the body and 2) the fragility of life and man's dependence on God for his existence. Govard Bidloo (1649-1713), in his anatomical atlas, the Anatomia humani corporis (1685), does not seem to answer this standard view on the 'moral teaching' of anatomy. It has been argued that his depictions of dead and mutilated (parts of) bodies indicate a more realistic way of representation, devoid of metaphor and morality. Yet, taking the fierce controversy between Bidloo and Ruysch as my starting point, I show that in fact there is a moral lesson in Bidloo's anatomy. It reflects two important aspects of Bidloo's Mennonite faith, i.e. the aversion against beautiful decoration and the fascination with suffering and death found in martyr stories.

  1. Extraction of the human cerebral ventricular system from MRI: inclusion of anatomical knowledge and clinical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Aamer; Hu, Qingmao; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.

    2004-04-01

    The human cerebral ventricular system is a complex structure that is essential for the well being and changes in which reflect disease. It is clinically imperative that the ventricular system be studied in details. For this reason computer assisted algorithms are essential to be developed. We have developed a novel (patent pending) and robust anatomical knowledge-driven algorithm for automatic extraction of the cerebral ventricular system from MRI. The algorithm is not only unique in its image processing aspect but also incorporates knowledge of neuroanatomy, radiological properties, and variability of the ventricular system. The ventricular system is divided into six 3D regions based on the anatomy and its variability. Within each ventricular region a 2D region of interest (ROI) is defined and is then further subdivided into sub-regions. Various strict conditions that detect and prevent leakage into the extra-ventricular space are specified for each sub-region based on anatomical knowledge. Each ROI is processed to calculate its local statistics, local intensity ranges of cerebrospinal fluid and grey and white matters, set a seed point within the ROI, grow region directionally in 3D, check anti-leakage conditions and correct growing if leakage occurs and connects all unconnected regions grown by relaxing growing conditions. The algorithm was tested qualitatively and quantitatively on normal and pathological MRI cases and worked well. In this paper we discuss in more detail inclusion of anatomical knowledge in the algorithm and usefulness of our approach from clinical perspective.

  2. Effectiveness of a personalized device in the evaluation of mandibular second molar periodontal healing after surgical extraction of adjacent third molar

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim The primary aim of the present study was to validate the effectiveness of a personalized device able to guide periodontal probing in evaluation of second molar periodontal healing after adjacent third molar surgical extraction. Secondarily, the study analyzed if any patient and tooth related factors affected the second molar periodontal healing as well as if they were able to affect the periodontal probing depth performed with or without the personalized device. Materials and methods Thirty-five lower second molars were evaluated after extraction of the adjacent third molar. Pre-operative as well as 3 and 12 month post-operative probing depths of the distal surface of the second molar were evaluated. All measurements were taken by two different methods: standard two-point and four-point probing using a personalized onlay-type guide. Periapical radiographs were also evaluated. The Pearson product moment and the general linear model with backward stepwise procedure were used for inferential statistics. Results The mean 12-month post-operative probing depth/mean pre-operative probing depth ratio obtained with the guided probing method showed a highly significant effect on the 12-month radiographic post-operative/pre-operative radiographic measure ratio. None of the examined patient- or tooth-related factors showed a significant effect on pre-operative/12-month post-operative radiographic measure ratio. Conclusions The use of the proposed personalized device seems to provide a more reliable estimate of second molar periodontal healing after adjacent third molar surgical extraction. No patient-or tooth-related factors seem to be able to affect either second molar periodontal healing or probing depth measures obtained with or without the personalized device in individuals younger than 25 years old. It can be therefore recommended that lower third molar surgical extraction be performed in young adults. PMID:24611086

  3. Evolutionary novelty in a rat with no molars

    PubMed Central

    Esselstyn, Jacob A.; Achmadi, Anang Setiawan; Rowe, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Rodents are important ecological components of virtually every terrestrial ecosystem. Their success is a result of their gnawing incisors, battery of grinding molars and diastema that spatially and functionally separates the incisors from the molars. Until now these traits defined all rodents. Here, we describe a new species and genus of shrew-rat from Sulawesi Island, Indonesia that is distinguished from all other rodents by the absence of cheek teeth. Moreover, rather than gnawing incisors, this animal has bicuspid upper incisors, also unique among the more than 2200 species of rodents. Stomach contents from a single specimen suggest that the species consumes only earthworms. We posit that by specializing on soft-bodied prey, this species has had no need to process food by chewing, allowing its dentition to evolve for the sole purpose of procuring food. Thus, the removal of functional constraints, often considered a source of evolutionary innovations, may also lead to the loss of the very same traits that fuelled evolutionary diversification in the past. PMID:22915626

  4. Nanomechanical Behavior of Human Molars Soaked in Slight Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Kang, Shao-Hui; Chu, Chia-Chun

    This paper studied the mechanical and chemical properties of hydroxyl apatite (HA) crystal structure in the teeth when human molars were soaked in slight acid solution. First, we soaked the ground and polished molars respectively in the liquor of 30 wt.% H2CO3 and the liquor of 30 wt.% H2O2 for 10, 20, or 60 minutes. Next, we used a nanoindenter to measure the hardness and Young's modulus. Finally, we used a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to analyze the variation of Ca, P and Na in teeth, a high resolution transmitting electron microscope (HRTEM) to observe the arrangement of crystallization phase of HA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to analyze the crystallinity of the hexagonal phase of HA. The results showed that the demineralization phenomenon of the calcium-phosphorous compound in teeth made the teeth reduce sharply in hardness and Young's modulus after they were soaked in the two slight acid solutions for 10 minutes, but the re-mineralization phenomenon made the hardness and Young's modulus ascend gradually when the time lasted longer. With the same period of time, the teeth soaked in H2CO3 were lower in the hardness and Young's modulus than that in H2O2.

  5. Maxillary infiltration anaesthesia by ropivacaine for upper third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Brkovic, B M B; Zlatkovic, M; Jovanovic, D; Stojic, D

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and haemodynamic effects of ropivacaine for infiltration anaesthesia in patients undergoing surgical removal of upper third molars. The safety profile of ropivacaine was also studied by investigating the maximal venous plasma concentration of ropivacaine and the reactivity to ropivacaine of isolated human infraorbital arteries. Ropivacaine in concentrations of 0.5, 0.75 and 1% achieved dose-dependent parameters of maxillary infiltration aneasthesia, clinically relevant in concentrations 0.75 and 1%. Postoperative needs for analgesics were observed in 67-100% of patients. Haemodynamic parameters were stable during surgery with significant changes occuring 10 min after surgery. After maxillary infiltration of 2.0 ml 1% ropivacaine, the maximum venous plasma concentration (Cmax) was 82+/-15 microg/l. On isolated human infraorbital artery, ropivacaine (10(-4)M) induced endothelium-independent contraction. This study suggests that 0.75 and 1% ropivacaine offers adequate and safe intraoperative analgesia but not successful postoperative pain control for the surgical removal of upper third molars.

  6. Nanoparticle Counting: Towards Accurate Determination of the Molar Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Gao, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Innovations in nanotechnology have brought tremendous opportunities for the advancement of many research frontiers, ranging from electronics, photonics, energy, to medicine. To maximize the benefits of nano-scaled materials in different devices and systems, precise control of their concentration is a prerequisite. While concentrations of nanoparticles have been provided in other forms (e.g., mass), accurate determination of molar concentration, arguably the most useful one for chemical reactions and applications, has been a major challenge (especially for nanoparticles smaller than 30 nm). Towards this significant yet chronic problem, a variety of strategies are currently under development. Most of these strategies are applicable to a specialized group of nanoparticles due to their restrictions on the composition and size ranges of nanoparticles. As research and uses of nanomaterials being explored in an unprecedented speed, it is necessary to develop universal strategies that are easy to use, and compatible with nanoparticles of different sizes, compositions, and shapes. This review outlines the theories and applications of current strategies to measure nanoparticle molar concentration, discusses the advantages and limitations of these methods, and provides insights into future directions. PMID:25099190

  7. A comparison of results of second molar and first premolar extraction treatment.

    PubMed

    Staggers, J A

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine treatment results of maxillary and mandibular second molar extraction cases and compare them with treatment results of maxillary and mandibular first-premolar extraction cases. Records of 22 maxillary and mandibular second-molar extraction cases and 22 maxillary and mandibular first-premolar extraction cases were evaluated. For each case, pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalograms were traced and several cephalometric parameters were compared. From the pretreatment and posttreatment panoramic radiographs, angulations of the maxillary and mandibular third molars were evaluated. Average treatment time, in months, was recorded for both groups. The data obtained from each group were analyzed for statistical difference. The results showed that the two groups had fewer differences than indicated by advocates of second-molar extractions. Analysis of the cephalometric data demonstrated only a few statistical differences between the groups. The maxillary and mandibular incisors in the premolar group were retracted a significantly greater amount than in the second-molar group. The maxillary and mandibular first molars were protracted a greater amount in the premolar group than in the second-molar group. The lower lips in the premolar group were retracted a greater amount than in the second-molar group. The resulting facial profile after extraction of second-molars appears to be no different from that obtained after extraction of first premolars. The pantographic evaluation of the changes in third-molar angulation were not statistically different. In both groups, the maxillary third molars showed an improvement in third-molar angulation, while the mandibular third-molars showed an undesirable increase in angulation. The average treatment time for both groups was not statistically different.

  8. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kleber M.; Costa, Suelen F.; Sampaio, Francisco J.B.; Favorito, Luciano A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes) with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes) with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV). To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (p <0.05). Results: The fetuses ranged in age from 26 to 35 weeks post-conception (WPC) and the 20 patients with retractile testis ranged in ages from 1 to 12 years (average of 5.8). Of the 50 fetal testes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4%) and epididymal anomalies (EAs) in 1 testis (2%). Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4%) and EA in 4 (14.28%). When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116). Conclusions: Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processus vaginalis and epididymal anomalies. PMID:27564294

  9. Anatomic basis for delayed diagnosis of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Poole, G V

    1990-07-01

    Gangrene or perforation of the appendix is often caused by failure to make an early diagnosis of appendicitis. Variability in the anatomic location of the appendix can be responsible for atypical manifestations of appendicitis and diagnostic errors. Over a 52-month period, 125 appendectomies were done for suspected appendicitis at a military hospital. After excluding cases in which the location of the appendix was not provided, 106 cases were available for review. Fifteen patients (14%) did not have appendicitis. The appendix was found in the true pelvis, was behind the ileum or ileocolic mesentery, or was both retrocolic and retroperitoneal in 11 of 16 patients (69%) with gangrenous or perforative appendicitis. In contrast, the appendix was in one of these three sites in only four of 75 patients (5%) with simple appendicitis (P less than .001). Both physicians and patients were responsible for diagnostic delays, but the paucity of symptoms and signs in patients with a "hidden" appendix was the most likely cause of failure to diagnose appendicitis before perforation.

  10. Ipsilesional neglect: behavioural and anatomical features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M; Na, D; Kim, G; Adair, J; Lee, K; Heilman, K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To learn more about the behavioural and anatomical features of ipsilesional neglect.
METHODS—Thirty consecutive patients with spatial neglect were tested on cancellation and line bisection tasks. To learn if patients with ipsilesional neglect demonstrate the sensory-attentional or motor-intentional type of neglect, a video apparatus was used that dissociates these determinants.
RESULTS—Five patients showed evidence of ipsilesional neglect. This phenomenon was seen only on the line bisection task. All patients with ipsilesional neglect had lesions involving frontal-subcortical regions. Although ipsilesional neglect evolved from early in three of five cases, the other patients displayed ipsilesional neglect without initial contralateral neglect, suggesting that ipsilesional neglect cannot be fully attributed to a compensatory strategy. The results of the tests that used the video apparatus indicate that right sided frontal or subcortical injury may induce contralateral attentional or intentional "approach" behaviours.
CONCLUSIONS—Ipsilesional neglect is most often associated with frontal-subcortical lesions, cannot be entirely attributed to a compensatory strategy, and may be induced by an attentional bias, an intentional bias, or both.

 PMID:10369819

  11. The anatomical distribution of genetic associations

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Alan; Kopp, Nathan; Xu, Xiaoxiao; O'Brien, David R.; Yang, Wei; Nehorai, Arye; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Kopan, Raphael; Dougherty, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Deeper understanding of the anatomical intermediaries for disease and other complex genetic traits is essential to understanding mechanisms and developing new interventions. Existing ontology tools provide functional, curated annotations for many genes and can be used to develop mechanistic hypotheses; yet information about the spatial expression of genes may be equally useful in interpreting results and forming novel hypotheses for a trait. Therefore, we developed an approach for statistically testing the relationship between gene expression across the body and sets of candidate genes from across the genome. We validated this tool and tested its utility on three applications. First, we show that the expression of genes in associated loci from GWA studies implicates specific tissues for 57 out of 98 traits. Second, we tested the ability of the tool to identify novel relationships between gene expression and phenotypes. Specifically, we experimentally confirmed an underappreciated prediction highlighted by our tool: that white blood cell count – a quantitative trait of the immune system – is genetically modulated by genes expressed in the skin. Finally, using gene lists derived from exome sequencing data, we show that human genes under selective constraint are disproportionately expressed in nervous system tissues. PMID:26586807

  12. The anatomic basis of parathyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, C

    1976-03-01

    A study of 645 normal adult parathyroid glands in 160 cadavers revealed that there is a definite pattern of anatomic distribution on the basis of the embryologic development of the parathyroid, thyroid, and thymic glands. The sites of predilection of the upper gland (Parathyroid IV) are, in order of frequency, the cricothyroid junction; the dorsum of the upper pole of the thyroid; and the retropharyngeal space. Those of the lower gland (Parathyroid III) are at the lower pole of the thyroid and the thymic tongue; rarely in the upper, the lateral neck, or the mediastinum. An understanding of the developmental relationship of the parathyroid glands to the thyroid and the thymus is fundamental in the delineation of the embryologic origin of the parathyroid glands. The parathyroid gland, located within the surgical capsule of the thyroid (subcapsular), when diseased, remains in place locally. A gland outside of the capsule (extracapsular) is often displaced into the posterior or anterior mediastinum. A collective assessment of the size, weight, color, shape, and consistency of the parathyroid gland is mandatory in the determination of its normalcy. Frozen section examination for stromal and intracellular fatty content is an added assurance of normalcy. That parathyroid glands sink in saline solution, and fat globules float, may aid in differentiating the two types of tissue. Supernumerary, fused, and intrathyroidal parathyroids, albeit rare, are of surgical importance.

  13. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  14. Anatomical considerations on the corona mortis.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cergan, Romica; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Folescu, Roxana; Pop, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The corona mortis (CMOR) represents the vascular connection of the obturator and external iliac systems. We aimed to evaluate by dissections the morphological possibilities of the CMOR and their individual combinations. For the study we used 20 human adult cadavers that were bilaterally dissected (40 hemipelvises), with evidences of the vascular elements at the level of the superior pubic branch in 32 (80%) of hemipelvises. The morphological patterns we identified were classified in three types (I-III): I. arterial CMOR (10 hemipelvises): I.1. obturator artery (OA) from the external iliac artery (EIA); I.2. OA from the inferior epigastric artery (IEA); I.3. anastomosis of the OA and IEA; I.4. pubic branches of the OA, in the absence of any anastomosis with the EIA system; II. venous CMOR (6 hemipelvises): II.1. obturator vein (OV) draining into the external iliac vein (EIV); II.2. OV draining into the inferior epigastric vein (IEV); II.3. venous anastomosis of the OV and IEV and III combined, arterial and venous CMOR (16 hemipelvises). We classified the combined coronae mortis in nine different subtypes that mainly (but not exclusively) correspond to various combinations of types I and II. The surgical relevance of the vascular relations of the superior branch of pubis (in trauma, orthopedic approaches, hernia repair, embolizations and intra-arterial infusions) recommends a detailed knowledge of the morphological and topographical possibilities of the crown of death and the individual evaluation of this risky anatomical structure.

  15. Anatomical constraints for neuromagnetic source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, John S.; Lewis, Paul S.; Ranken, D. M.; Kaplan, L.; Wood, C. C.

    1991-07-01

    The localization of neural electromagnetic sources from measurements at the head surface requires the solution of an inverse problem; that is, the determination of the number, location, spatial configuration, strength, and time-course of the neuronal currents that give rise to the magnetic field or potential distribution. In most general form, the neuromagnetic and electrical inverse problems are ill-posed and have no unique solution; however, approximate solutions are possible if assumptions are made regarding the shape and conductivity of the head and the number and configuration of neuronal currents responsible for the surface distributions. To help resolve ambiguities and to reduce the number and range of free parameters required to model complex neuromagnetic sources, the authors are investigating strategies to constrain the locations of allowable sources, based on a knowledge of individual anatomy. The key assumption, justified by both physiological evidence and theoretical considerations, is that the dominant neuromagnetic sources which contribute to surface field distributions reside within the cortex. It is demonstrated that anatomically constrained source modeling strategies can produce significant improvements in source localization; however, the conclusion is that additional improvements in model fitting or source reconstruction procedures are required.

  16. Is the cervical fascia an anatomical proteus?

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Condino, Sara; Stecco, Antonio; Soldani, Paola; Belmonte, Monica Mattioli; Gesi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The cervical fasciae have always represented a matter of debate. Indeed, in the literature, it is quite impossible to find two authors reporting the same description of the neck fascia. In the present review, a historical background was outlined, confirming that the Malgaigne's definition of the cervical fascia as an anatomical Proteus is widely justified. In an attempt to provide an essential and a more comprehensive classification, a fixed pattern of description of cervical fasciae is proposed. Based on the morphogenetic criteria, two fascial groups have been recognized: (1) fasciae which derive from primitive fibro-muscular laminae (muscular fasciae or myofasciae); (2) fasciae which derive from connective thickening (visceral fasciae). Topographic and comparative approaches allowed to distinguish three different types of fasciae in the neck: the superficial, the deep and the visceral fasciae. The first is most connected to the skin, the second to the muscles and the third to the viscera. The muscular fascia could be further divided into three layers according to the relationship with the different muscles.

  17. A student proposal for ethical guidelines in anatomical education: Ethical and policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Peter A; Gardin, Tova M

    2016-01-01

    The recent publication of a story regarding anatomical dissection in a medical school has revealed the need for increased attention to the ethical and policy aspects of anatomical education. While most of the attention devoted to these questions thus far has been focused on procedures before and after dissection, from the perspective of medical students, there are important considerations during the process of dissection itself. This proposal was developed by two third-year medical students through a review of the relevant published literature, reflection upon their personal experiences in anatomy courses in two separate institutions, and informal discussion of these topics with peers. The proposal is that basic ethical guidelines should be established and monitored by an independent committee tasked with reviewing them. The proposed guidelines include: First, a clear set of expectations about what the student is expected to learn with respect to anatomical knowledge and dissection technique; second, the establishment by schools or national bodies of minimal ethical standards regarding respectful behavior toward the donor bodies, and the communication of these standards to teachers and students involved in educational dissections; third, the use of materials that encourage students to view their donors with respect and ensure proper treatment of them; and fourth, the establishment of an oversight group (at each medical school and at national level) comprising students, faculty, community members, and staff, who will regularly review the anatomical education program and update these ethical guidelines as appropriate. While many of these proposals are already implemented in some anatomy departments, the establishment of clear guidelines at a national as well as a school-by-school level will permit students the freedom to participate fully in their education, knowing they have met the highest ethical standards as they prepare for a career as a humanistic physician.

  18. Foramen of Civinini: A New Anatomical Guide for Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Saran, R Sharmila; Ananthi, K Suba; Subramaniam, Aruna; Balaji, MS Thotakura; Vinaitha, D; Vaithianathan, G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Study on Morphometric and radiological aspect on existence of foramen of civinini. Sphenoid bone comprises of some rare ossified ligaments, may encounter difficulty in surgical procedures. Incidence of Pterygospinous bars various with different racial groups and they are genetically controlled. Complete ossification of pterygospinous ligament form foramen of civinini. Entrapments of vessels or nerves may occur due to existence of pterygospinous bar. The bar may locate medially or inferiorly to formen ovale as seen in Hawaiian and lemurs. Co – existence of bar with the wide lateral pterygoid plate exhibits development of the bar from herbivore, carnivore and old world monkeys. Comparatively absence or small spine of civinini noted in new world monkeys, rodents and platyrrhines. Pterygospinousbar represents the phylogenetic remnant of Human beings. Material and Methods: By using digital vernier caliper, the measurements of length, width of the pterygospinous bar and area of foramen of civinini including the length and breadth of lateral pterygoid plate were measured. Using X rays the radiological view was determined. Results: In this study from 160 cases of skull and sphenoid bones revealed that complete and incomplete foramen of civinini in 1.25% and 7.5% of cases respectively. Peculiarly accessory foramen of civinini noticed in 1.25% of cases. Maximum area of foramen of civinini was 94.2mm2. The maximum width of lateral pterygoid was noted as 19.6mm respectively. Mentocoronal view of skiagram clearly shows the bar. Conclusion: During Anaesthesia for trigeminal neuralgia may encounter difficult to pass the needle. The bar compress the mandibular nerve branches can cause lingual numbness, pain and speech impairment. Conductive anaesthesia on the mandibular nerve through the lateral subzygomatic route may be difficult to approach. Exploring the anatomical and clinical updates of pterygospinous bar may guide the surgeons and radiologists to overcome any

  19. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They

  20. Thoughts on practical core elements of an ethical anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    While questions of ethics in body procurement have become a focus of attention in many medical schools around the world, the recent report by a medical student regarding disturbing incidences in an anatomical dissection course (Terry, ) underlines the importance of a discussion of ethical practices in anatomical education. Here thoughts on core elements of instruction are proposed which are based on the premise that both, ethical body procurement and ethical anatomical education, are the foundation for a humanism-based professional training of students in medicine. As the anatomical dissection course presents an exceptional situation for students, practical guidelines for a curriculum founded on ethical considerations are essential. They include a preparatory phase before the start of the course in which students are asked about their expectations and fears concerning anatomical dissection; an introduction to the history and ethics of anatomy; a time for reflection in the dissection room before the start of dissection; a regular opportunity for reflections on dissection in parallel to the course with students and faculty; and a memorial service for the donors organized by students for faculty, students and donor families. Finally, anatomical faculty should undergo training in ethical educational practices. Many anatomy programs have incorporated various of these ideas, while others have not done so. Guidelines for ethical anatomical practices can strengthen the foundation of a humanistic approach to medicine in future physicians and health care workers.

  1. Efficiency of two protocols for maxillary molar intrusion with mini-implants

    PubMed Central

    Paccini, Juliana Volpato Curi; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio Augusto; Ferreira, Flávio Vellini; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore; Cançado, Rodrigo Hermont; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of two protocols for maxillary molar intrusion with two or three mini-implants. Methods: Twenty five maxillary first molars extruded for loss of their antagonists in adult subjects were selected. The sample was divided into two groups, according to the intrusion protocol with two or three mini-implants. Group 1 consisted of 15 molars that were intruded by two mini-implants. Group 2 consisted of 10 molars intruded by three mini-implants. Changes with treatment were analyzed in lateral cephalograms at the beginning and at the end of intrusion of maxillary molars. Results: Results showed that there was no difference in efficiency for the two intrusion protocols. It was concluded that extruded maxillary molars can be intruded with two or three mini-implants with similar efficiency. PMID:27409654

  2. A morphological study on the crown dimensions of the mandibular molars in Tupaia glis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hanamura, H; Wakatsuki, E

    1994-03-01

    The crown dimensions of the mandibular molars in Tupaia glis were measured. All the mean values of crown diameters and areas were larger for the M1 molar than for the M2 and M3. The last two molars were more reduced in the talonid component than in the trigonid compared to the M1, and were more reduced in the buccolingual than in the mesiodistal direction. The most common molar size sequence (MSS) was M1 > M2 > M3, and this pattern was more frequently observed in the talonid component than in the trigonid. In the canonical discriminant analysis, all the cases of the M3 were discriminated correctly, but some cases of the first two molars were confused with each other. The molars size of the mandible was closely related to that of the maxilla.

  3. Saving the 2nd Molar from the 3rd Is it Really the Guilt of the Tilt?

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankaj; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians often relate the distal caries in second molars to angulated third molars, which if left undetected can lead to gross decay that may further require removal of the tooth. Due to this fact, many third molars are advised for prophylactic removal to prevent decay in the second molar. But this approach would only be justified when the incidence of decay/loss of second molar due to third molar are reasonably high. We sought to determine incidence of caries experience and also sequel extraction in second molars associated with the third molars. Aim The study was conducted to answer the basic question that whether the incidence of caries and subsequent extraction of second molar due to angulated third molars is high enough to justify the prophylactic removal of third molar or not. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on radiographic records of 1187 patients. The effect of tilted third molar on the second molar was measured in relation with three parameters namely level & position of third molar with respect to second molar and the distribution among arches. Results The results indicated that out of total number of teeth examined only 5.4% of maxillary and 9.6% of mandibular second molars were affected by tilted third molars. Further, only 2.2% of mandibular and 2.9% of maxillary second molars were indicated for extraction. The data was statistically insignificant. Conclusion It was concluded that distal caries in second molars is not very common. It may be present in some cases of third molar impactions and prophylactic removal of these impacted teeth may not be considered appropriate. PMID:27437353

  4. Management of over-retained mandibular deciduous second molars with and without permanent successors.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the various clinical situations of prolonged retention of mandibular deciduous second molars. Indications for orthodontic space closure in the absence of permanent successors and treatment alternatives in space opening, including retaining the deciduous molars, are described. Periodic monitoring, composite buildups, and indications and timing of extraction of infraoccluded and ankylosed deciduous molars with and without permanent successors are reviewed.

  5. Automatic Molar Extraction from Dental Panoramic Radiographs for Forensic Personal Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samopa, Febriliyan; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira

    Measurement of an individual molar provides rich information for forensic personal identification. We propose a computer-based system for extracting an individual molar from dental panoramic radiographs. A molar is obtained by extracting the region-of-interest, separating the maxilla and mandible, and extracting the boundaries between teeth. The proposed system is almost fully automatic; all that the user has to do is clicking three points on the boundary between the maxilla and the mandible.

  6. Age estimation using development of third molars in South Indian population: A radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Priyadharshini, K. Indra; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Sivapathasundaram, B.; Mohanbabu, V.; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the estimation of chronological age based on the stages of third molar development following the eight stages (A–H) method of Demirjian et al. in Chennai population of South India. Materials and Methods: A sample consisting of 848 individuals (471 males and 377 females) aged between 14 and 30 years was randomly selected for the clinical evaluation and 323 orthopantomograms with clinically missing third molars were taken for radiological evaluation using Demirjian's method from a Chennai population of known chronological age and sex. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's Chi-square test and mean values were compared between the study groups using t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's highly significant difference (HSD). In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The results showed that the mean age of having clinically completely erupted maxillary third molars was 22.41 years in male subjects and 23.81 years in female subjects and that of mandibular third molars was 21.49 years in male subjects and 23.34 years in female subjects. Mandibular third molars were clinically missing more often in females than in males. Eruption of mandibular third molars was generally ahead of the emergence of maxillary third molars into the oral cavity. Third molar development between male and female subjects showed statistically significant differences at calcification stage F and stage G in maxillary third molars and stage F in mandibular third molars (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There are differences indicating that maxillary and mandibular third molar eruption reached Demirjian's formation stages earlier in males than in females. It is suggested that in future studies, to increase the accuracy of age determination, indications of sexual maturity and ossification should also be evaluated in addition to third molar mineralization. PMID:25984465

  7. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56-57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8-9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes.

  8. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56–57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8–9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes. PMID:25384452

  9. Anatomical Variation of Human Collector Channel Orifices

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Michael D.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the anatomical variation of normal human collector channel orifices and their relationship with Schlemm's canal. Methods Ten human anterior segments fixed by immersion or perfusion were dissected radially and further divided by fine dissection into corresponding inner and outer wall segments. The tissues were dehydrated, critical-point dried, sputter coated, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Images were obtained at magnifications from ×200 to ×10,000. Selected radial collector channel regions were processed for plastic embedding. Results Two classes of collector channel orifices were identified. Simple oval orifices (54.7 ± 4.6–μm diameter) were lined with endothelial cells and most often occurred on a planar region of Schlemm's canal outer wall. Complex orifices (62.7 ± 3.4–μm diameter) were often found associated with septal columns and bridges, and typically covered with flap-like structures (10–40 μm) that extended between the inner and outer wall and over the collector channel orifices. Both simple and complex orifices had complete or partial lip-like rims. In orifices with partial rims, a trough-like groove was often visible on the outer wall surface opposite the lip. Transected septa and inner and outer wall adhesion sites were often found in association with complex collector channel orifices. Conclusions Collector channel orifice structure varied from simple ovals to complex tethered flaps and bridges. Collector channel orifices with complex flaps connect the inner and outer walls of Schlemm's canal, and may serve to enhance and regulate aqueous outflow in these regions. PMID:26975026

  10. A reusable anatomically segmented digital mannequin for public health communication.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Kaori; Okubo, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing development of world wide web technologies has facilitated a change in health communication, which has now become bi-directional and encompasses people with diverse backgrounds. To enable an even greater role for medical illustrations, a data set, BodyParts3D, has been generated and its data set can be used by anyone to create and exchange customised three-dimensional (3D) anatomical images. BP3D comprises more than 3000 3D object files created by segmenting a digital mannequin in accordance with anatomical naming conventions. This paper describes the methodologies and features used to generate an anatomically correct male mannequin.

  11. Anatomic changes due to interspecific grafting in cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Bomfim, N; Ribeiro, D G; Nassar, N M A

    2011-05-31

    Cassava rootstocks of varieties UnB 201 and UnB 122 grafted with scions of Manihot fortalezensis were prepared for anatomic study. The roots were cut, stained with safranin and alcian blue, and examined microscopically, comparing them with sections taken from ungrafted roots. There was a significant decrease in number of pericyclic fibers, vascular vessels and tyloses in rootstocks. They exhibited significant larger vessels. These changes in anatomic structure are a consequence of genetic effects caused by transference of genetic material from scion to rootstock. The same ungrafted species was compared. This is the first report on anatomic changes due to grafting in cassava.

  12. Rotation of rectangular wire in rectangular molar tubes. Part I.

    PubMed

    Raphael, E; Sandrik, J L; Klapper, L

    1981-08-01

    The degree of angular rotation of rectangular orthodontic wires in rectangular molar tubes was measured using a rotatable mechanical stage on a Unitron metallograph and compared to theoretical data. It was found that square 0.016 inch wire did not bind in 0.018 by 0.022 inch or larger mandrel- or inconel-formed tubes, whereas rotations of 11 to 23 degrees were noted in cast tubes of this dimension. Although 0.016 by 0.022 inch wire did bind in these tubes, the degree of rotation was far greater than expected on the basis of theoretical calculations or clinical expectations. The results indicated that it was unrealistic to expect fine control of a few degrees of torque to occur as expected for delicate clinical control.

  13. Molar extinction coefficients of some carbohydrates in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Sandhu, G. K.; Lark, B. S.; Sud, S. P.

    2002-03-01

    Molar extinction coefficients of some carbohydrates viz. L-arabinose (C5H10O5), D-glucose (C6H12O6), D-mannose (C6H12O6), D-galactose (C6H12O6), D(-) fructose (C6H12O6) and maltose (C12H24O12) in aqueous solutions have been determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV by gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. These coefficients have been found to depend upon the photon energy following a 4-parameter polynomial. These extinction coefficients for different sugars having the same molecular formula have same values varying within experimental uncertainty. Within concentration ranges studied, Beer--Lambert law is obeyed very well.

  14. Calculations of Molar Fractions of the IPR C78 Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlík, Filip; Slanina, Zdeněk

    2002-10-01

    There are five isolated-pentagon-rule (IPR) satisfying isomers of C78. In contradiction to theoretical predictions, only three isomers were observed in experiments and the fourth one was not identified until very recently. In this work we calculate structural and energetic data of the five IPR C78 fullerenes, namely we optimized their geometries with the B3LYP density-functional method using the standard 4-31G basis set (B3LYP/4-31G), calculated separation energies at the B3LYP/6-311G* level (B3LYP/6-311G*//B3LYP/4-31G), estimated energies of low lying electronic states with the ZINDO semiempirical method and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies with the semiempirical SAM1 method. From the obtained data we constructed chirality respecting isomeric partition functions and evaluated molar fractions in the equilibrium isomeric mixture for a wide temperature interval.

  15. Transmission electron microscope characterisation of molar-incisor-hypomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zonghan; Kilpatrick, Nicky M; Swain, Michael V; Munroe, Paul R; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-10-01

    Molar-incisor-hypomineralisation (MIH), one of the major developmental defects in dental enamel, is presenting challenge to clinicians due, in part, to the limited understanding of microstructural changes in affected teeth. Difficulties in the preparation of site-specific transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are partly responsible for this deficit. In this study, a dual-beam field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) milling instrument was used to prepare electron transparent specimens of sound and hypomineralised enamel. Microstructural analysis revealed that the hypomineralised areas in enamel were associated with marked changes in microstructure; loosely packed apatite crystals within prisms and wider sheath regions were identified. Microstructural changes appear to occur during enamel maturation and may be responsible for the dramatic reduction in mechanical properties of the affected regions. An enhanced knowledge of the degradation of structural integrity in hypomineralised enamel could shed light on more appropriate management strategies for these developmental defects.

  16. Fast Track to Molar-Mass Distributions of Technical Lignins.

    PubMed

    Sulaeva, Irina; Zinovyev, Grigory; Plankeele, Jean-Michel; Sumerskii, Ivan; Rosenau, Thomas; Potthast, Antje

    2017-02-08

    Technical lignins (waste products obtained from wood pulping or biorefinery processes) have so far required lengthy analysis procedures and different eluents for molar-mass analysis by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). This challenge has become more pressing recently since attempts to utilize lignins have increased, leading to skyrocketing numbers of samples to be analyzed. A new approach, which uses the eluent DMSO/LiBr (0.5 % w/v) and converts lignosulfonate salts into their acidic form before analysis, overcomes these limitations by enabling measurement of all kinds of lignins (kraft, organosolv, soda, lignosulfonates) in the same size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) system without the necessity of prior time-consuming derivatization steps. In combination with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), analysis times are shortened to one tenth of classical lignin GPC. The new approach is presented, along with a comparison of GPC and UPLC methods and a critical discussion of the analytical parameters.

  17. A Prospective Study of Clinical Outcomes Related to Third Molar Removal or Retention

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Rothen, Marilynn; Spiekerman, Charles; Drangsholt, Mark; Anderson, Loren; Roset, Gayle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated outcomes of third molar removal or retention in adolescents and young adults. Methods. We recruited patients aged 16 to 22 years from a dental practice–based research network in the Pacific Northwest from May 2009 through September 2010 who had at least 1 third molar present and had never undergone third molar removal. Data were acquired via questionnaire and clinical examination at baseline, periodic online questionnaires, and clinical examination at 24 months. Results. A total of 801 patients participated. Among patients undergoing third molar removal, rates of paresthesia and jaw joint symptoms lasting more than 1 month were 6.3 and 34.3 per 100 person-years, respectively. Among patients not undergoing removal, corresponding rates were 0.7 and 8.8. Periodontal attachment loss at distal sites of second molars did not significantly differ by third molar removal status. Incident caries at the distal surfaces of second molars occurred in fewer than 1% of all sites. Conclusions. Rates of paresthesia and temporomandibular joint disorder were higher after third molar removal. Periodontal attachment loss and incident caries at the distal sites of second molars were not affected by extraction status. PMID:24524521

  18. The evolution of molar occlusion in the Cercopithecidae and early Catarrhines.

    PubMed

    Kay, R F

    1977-03-01

    Those Eocene prosimians which are possible catarrhine ancestors have four blade-like crests on each lower molar. Each crest shears in sequence across two upper molar crests. Occluding crests are concavely curved to hold the foods being sheared. Each of two medial lower molar crests bordering the principal crushing surface shear past single upper molar crests at about the same time the lateral lower molar crests contact the second rank of upper molar crests. Grinding and crushing areas are restricted to hypoconid, trigonid, and protocone surfaces. Oligocene catarrhine molars have increased crushing-grinding capacities and maintained but modify their shearing. As the crushing surface of the protocone expands and a crushing hypocone is added, the "second rank" upper molar shearing crests are functionally reduced. At the same time medial crests are increasingly emphasized so that the total shearing capacity remains virtually unchanged. Marginal shearing blades are straight edged; leading edges of occluding blades are set at different angles to the occlusal plane so that blades contact at only one point at any given time. Early Primates have separate crushing basins surrounded by shearing blades. Catarrhines tend to link explanding crushing surfaces anteroposteriorly into a continuous surface between all molars. A cladistic analysis based on both new and previously recognized characters indicates that: 1. Apidium may be more closely related to Aegyptopithecus than to Parapithecus; 2. cercopithecids are derived from a Parapithecus-related stock; 3. Oreopithecus could equally well have come from an Apidium or Aegyptopithecus stock.

  19. Do antibiotics reduce the frequency of surgical site infections after impacted mandibular third molar surgery?

    PubMed

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Sharaf, Basel; Dodson, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars remains the most common procedure performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Given the abundance of host bacteria within the operative sites, surgical site infections are among the most common complications of third molar removal, with an estimated frequency of 1% to 30%. In this setting, significant controversy has surrounded the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the surgical management of impacted third molars. This article provides a comprehensive review of the available data on antibiotic prophylaxis in impacted third molar surgery and offers specific recommendations on antibiotic use.

  20. Appositional enamel growth in molars of South African fossil hominids.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G

    2006-07-01

    Enamel is formed incrementally by the secretory activity of ameloblast cells. Variable stages of secretion result in the formation of structures known as cross striations along enamel prisms, for which experimental data demonstrate a correspondence with daily periods of secretion. Patterns of variation in this daily growth are important to understanding mechanisms of tooth formation and the development of enamel thickness. Transmitted light microscopy (TLM) of histological ground sections and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of bulk specimens or their surface replicas are the usual methods for investigating cross striations. However, these methods pose some constraints on the study of these features in Plio-Pleistocene hominid enamel, the specimens of which may only rarely be sectioned for TLM or examined on only their most superficial surfaces for SEM. The recent development of portable confocal scanning optical microscopy (PCSOM) resolves some of the restrictions on fractured enamel surfaces, allowing the visualization of cross striations by direct examination. This technology has been applied here to the study of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus hominid molars from the Plio-Pleistocene of South Africa. We hypothesize that these taxa have increased enamel appositional rates compared with modern humans, because despite having thicker enamelled molars (particularly P. robustus), the enamel crowns of these fossil taxa take an equivalent or reduced amount of time to form. Cross striations were measured in cuspal, lateral and cervical regions of the enamel crowns, and, within each region, the inner, middle and outer zones. Values obtained for A. africanus outer zones of the enamel crown are, in general, lower than those for P. robustus, indicating faster forming enamel in the latter, while both taxa show higher rates of enamel growth than modern humans and the African great apes. This demonstrates a relatively high degree of variability in the

  1. Brief communication: Molar development and crown areas in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Ramirez Rozzi, Fernando V; Wood, Bernard A; Bromage, Timothy G

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the hypodigms representing the two earliest Australopithecus (Au. anamensis and Au. afarensis) form an ancestor-descendant lineage. Understanding the details of this possible transition is important comparative evidence for assessing the likelihood of other examples of ancestor-descendant lineages within the hominin clade. To this end we have analyzed crown and cusp base areas of high resolution replicas of the mandibular molars of Au. anamensis (Allia Bay and Kanapoi sites) and those of Au. afarensis (Hadar, Laetoli, and Maka). We found no statistically significant differences in crown areas between these hypodigms although the mean of M(1) crowns was smaller in Au. anamensis, being the smallest of any Australopithecus species sampled to date. Intraspecies comparison of the areas of mesial cusps for each molar type using Wilcoxon signed rank test showed no differences for Au. anamensis. Significant differences were found between the protoconid and metaconid of Au. afarensis M(2)s and M(3)s. Furthermore, the area formed by the posterior cusps as a whole relative to the anterior cusps showed significant differences in Au. afarensis M(1)s and in Au. anamensis M(2)s but no differences were noted for M(3)s of either taxon. Developmental information derived from microstructural details in enamel shows that M(1) crown formation in Au. anamensis is similar to Pan and shorter than in H. sapiens. Taken together, these data suggests that the overall trend in the Au. anamensis-Au. afarensis transition may have involved a moderate increase in M(1) crown areas with relative expansion of distal cusps.

  2. Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) following third molar surgery in Sub-Saharan Africans: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Ndukwe, Kizito Chioma; Owotade, Foluso John; Aregbesola, Stephen Babatunde

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical extraction of the impacted third molar is one of the commonest minor oral surgical procedures carried out in oral surgery. Problems created by the disturbances in post-extraction wound healing and physiologic sequelae of third molar surgery can significantly affect the patient's quality of life. Methods The study population consisted of 135 subjects that required surgical extraction of mandibular third molar under local anesthesia and met the inclusion criteria. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and post-operatively on days 1,3,5,7, and 14 using the United Kingdom Oral Health related Quality of Life questionnaire (UK-OHRQoL). Results This study also showed that surgical removal of impacted teeth exerted a negative influence on patient's Quality of life (QoL) across various physical, social, psychological aspects of life. UK-OHRQoL-16 mean scores showed that severe difficulty in eating was experienced by 106 (78%) patients on postoperative day (POD) 1. The symptom however improved within the first week with only 16 (11.9%) experiencing this symptom by POD 7 and none by POD 14. Conclusion There was a deterioration in oral health related quality of life in the immediate postoperative period particularly POD 1 and 3 following third molar surgery, which slowly returned to preoperative level by 7th day. Routines such as eating, laughing and smiling, work and speech were also affected. Patients need to be informed of these symptoms after third molar removal so as to enable them prepare very well for the procedure and its sequelae. PMID:28292060

  3. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takumi; Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs.

  4. Anatomical brain atlas for NIRS measurements of brain activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffini, Matteo; Zucchelli, Lucia; Contini, Davide; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Boas, David; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Anatomical brain atlases have been introduced in the analysis NIRS data of brain activation and good spatial activation localization has been proved. We applied this method to visualize NIRS data from different protocols.

  5. Anatomical terminology and nomenclature: past, present and highlights.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav; Bozdechova, Ivana; Cech, Pavel; Musil, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    The anatomical terminology is a base for medical communication. It is elaborated into a nomenclature in Latin. Its history goes back to 1895, when the first Latin anatomical nomenclature was published as Basiliensia Nomina Anatomica. It was followed by seven revisions (Jenaiensia Nomina Anatomica 1935, Parisiensia Nomina Anatomica 1955, Nomina Anatomica 2nd to 6th edition 1960-1989). The last revision, Terminologia Anatomica, (TA) created by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology and approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, was published in 1998. Apart from the official Latin anatomical terminology, it includes a list of recommended English equivalents. In this article, major changes and pitfalls of the nomenclature are discussed, as well as the clinical anatomy terms. The last revision (TA) is highly recommended to the attention of not only teachers, students and researchers, but also to clinicians, doctors, translators, editors and publishers to be followed in their activities.

  6. Matching and anatomical labeling of human airway tree

    PubMed Central

    Tschirren, Juerg; McLennan, Geoffrey; Palágyi, Kálmán; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Matching of corresponding branchpoints between two human airway trees, as well as assigning anatomical names to the segments and branchpoints of the human airway tree, are of significant interest for clinical applications and physiological studies. In the past these tasks were often performed manually due to the lack of automated algorithms that can tolerate false branches and anatomical variability typical for in vivo trees. In this paper we present algorithms that perform both matching of branchpoints and anatomical labeling of in vivo trees without any human intervention and within a short computing time. No hand-pruning of false branches is required. The results from the automated methods show a high degree of accuracy when validated against reference data provided by human experts. 92.9% of the verifiable branchpoint matches found by the computer agree with experts’ results. For anatomical labeling, 97.1% of the automatically assigned segment labels were found to be correct. PMID:16353371

  7. Anatomically-aided PET reconstruction using the kernel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchcroft, Will; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T.; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper extends the kernel method that was proposed previously for dynamic PET reconstruction, to incorporate anatomical side information into the PET reconstruction model. In contrast to existing methods that incorporate anatomical information using a penalized likelihood framework, the proposed method incorporates this information in the simpler maximum likelihood (ML) formulation and is amenable to ordered subsets. The new method also does not require any segmentation of the anatomical image to obtain edge information. We compare the kernel method with the Bowsher method for anatomically-aided PET image reconstruction through a simulated data set. Computer simulations demonstrate that the kernel method offers advantages over the Bowsher method in region of interest quantification. Additionally the kernel method is applied to a 3D patient data set. The kernel method results in reduced noise at a matched contrast level compared with the conventional ML expectation maximization algorithm.

  8. Anatomical Consideration in Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G Neal

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are ventricular tachycardias (VTs) or premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with a mechanism that is not related to myocardial scar. The sites of successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VA origins have been progressively elucidated and include both the endocardium and, less commonly, the epicardium. Idiopathic VAs usually originate from specific anatomical structures such as the ventricular outflow tracts, aortic root, atrioventricular (AV) annuli, papillary muscles, Purkinje network and so on, and exhibit characteristic electrocardiograms based on their anatomical background. Catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs is usually safe and highly successful, but can sometimes be challenging because of the anatomical obstacles such as the coronary arteries, epicardial fat pads, intramural and epicardial origins, AV conduction system and so on. Therefore, understanding the relevant anatomy is important to achieve a safe and successful catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. This review describes the anatomical consideration in the catheter ablation of idiopathic VAs. PMID:28116086

  9. Partial ACL tears: anatomic reconstruction versus nonanatomic augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Parma, Alessandro; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Luciani, Deianira; Ramponi, Laura; Castagnini, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears requires ACL remnant preservation. The goal of this study was to compare the outcome of anatomic reconstruction of the torn bundle with nonanatomic augmentation using the over-the-top femoral route. Fifty-two athletes (mean age, 23.3 years) with partial ACL lesions underwent anatomic reconstruction (n=26) or nonanatomic augmentation (n=26). Intraoperative damage of the healthy bundle that required a standard ACL reconstruction occurred in 2 patients in the anatomic reconstruction group. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner score, and arthrometer evaluation were used pre-operatively and at follow-up for up to 5 years postoperatively. One failure occurred in the anatomic reconstruction group. Mean IKDC subjective score at follow-up was 88.2 ± 5.7 in the anatomic reconstruction group and 90.2 ± 4.7 in the nonanatomic augmentation group. According to the IKDC objective score at final follow-up, 96% of knees in the nonanatomic augmentation group were normal vs 87.5% in the anatomic reconstruction group. No significative differences were observed between the 2 groups at final follow-up. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction showed significantly lower IKDC subjective and objective scores and higher residual instability values as evaluated with the arthrometer compared with posterolateral bundle reconstruction (P=.017). The surgical treatment of ACL partial tears is demanding. Adapted portals, perfect control of the tunnel drilling process, and intercondylar space management are required in anatomic reconstruction. The nonanatomic augmentation technique is simpler, providing excellent durable results over time with a lower complication rate. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction is associated with a poorer outcome, especially when performed with anatomic reconstruction.

  10. Probabilistic predictions of penetrating injury to anatomic structures.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, O.; Webber, B.; Clarke, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive 3D graphical system which allows the user to visualize different bullet path hypotheses and stab wound paths and computes the probability that an anatomical structure associated with a given penetration path is injured. Probabilities can help to identify those anatomical structures which have potentially critical damage from penetrating trauma and differentiate these from structures that are not seriously injured. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9357718

  11. Electro-Anatomical Four-Dimensional Mapping of Ventricular Tachycardia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pulmonary vein (PV) region reported ulterior stenosis . Anatomic reconstruction by CT has helped understand the frequency of occurrence and effects of PV... stenosis [1]. Our group presented that the bi-atrial activation sequence became well understood when cardiac activity data and anatomic information...through the Aortic Valve, and of deploying the ICE catheter into the LV transseptally via the IVC, through the Fossa Ovalis and through the Mitral

  12. [Clinical aspects of congenital maxillofacial deformities].

    PubMed

    Sólya, Kitti; Dézsi, Csilla; Vanya, Melinda; Szabó, János; Sikovanyecz, János; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Szili, Károly

    2015-09-13

    The cleft lip and palate deformity is one of the most common type of congenital abnormalities. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature knowledge about cleft lip and/or palate. The authors review and discuss international literature data on the prevention, genetic and environmental predisposing factors, anatomical and embryological features, as well as pre- and post-natal diagnosis and treatment of these deformities. The aetiology is multifactorial, driven by both genetic and environmental factors which lead to multifaceted phenotypes and clinical features of these malformations. The lack of the multidisciplinary knowledge about prenatal diagnosis, prevention, genetic aspects and treatment strategy could result in serious diagnostic errors, hence clinical teamwork is critically important to solve the problems of this pathology. Only the professional teamwork and multidisciplinary cooperation can guarantee the optimal level of health care and better quality of life for these patients and their families.

  13. Accuracy of Panoramic Radiograph in Assessment of the Relationship Between Mandibular Canal and Impacted Third Molars

    PubMed Central

    Tantanapornkul, Weeraya; Mavin, Darika; Prapaiphittayakun, Jaruthai; Phipatboonyarat, Natnicha; Julphantong, Wanchanok

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between impacted mandibular third molar and mandibular canal is important for removal of this tooth. Panoramic radiography is one of the commonly used diagnostic tools for evaluating the relationship of these two structures. Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of panoramic radiographic findings in predicting direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images, and to define panoramic criterion in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Methods: Two observers examined panoramic radiographs of 178 patients (256 impacted mandibular third molars). Panoramic findings of interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root, diversion of mandibular canal and narrowing of third molar root were evaluated for 3D digital radiography. Direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images was then correlated with panoramic findings. Panoramic criterion was also defined in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Results: Panoramic findings of interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root were statistically significantly correlated with direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images (p < 0.005), and were defined as panoramic criteria in predicting direct contact between the two structures. Conclusion: Interruption of mandibular canal wall, isolated or with darkening of third molar root observed on panoramic radiographs were effective in predicting direct contact between mandibular canal and impacted third molars on 3D digital images. Panoramic radiography is one of the efficient diagnostic tools for pre-operative assessment of impacted mandibular third molars. PMID:27398105

  14. Toledo School of Translators and their influence on anatomical terminology.

    PubMed

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Bueno-López, José-L; Raio, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Translation facilitates transmission of knowledge between cultures. The fundamental transfer of anatomic terminology from the Ancient Greek and Islamic Golden Age cultures, to medieval Latin Christendom took place in the so-called Toledo School of Translators in the 12th-13th centuries. Translations made in Toledo circulated widely across Europe. They were the foundation of scientific thinking that was born in the boards of first universities. In Toledo, Gerard of Cremona translated Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, the key work of Islamic Golden Age of medicine. Albertus Magnus, Mondino de Luzzi and Guy de Chauliac, the leading authors of anatomical Latin words in the Middle Ages, founded their books on Gerard's translations. The anatomical terms of the Canon retain auctoritas up to the Renaissance. Thus, terms coined by Gerard such as diaphragm, orbit, pupil or sagittal remain relevant in the current official anatomical terminology. The aim of the present paper is to bring new attention to the highly significant influence that the Toledo School of Translators had in anatomical terminology. For this, we shall review here the onomastic origins of a number of anatomical terms (additamentum; coracoid process; coxal; false ribs; femur; panniculus; spondylus; squamous sutures; thorax; xiphoid process, etc.) which are still used today.

  15. Cognitive Aspects of Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajfel, Henri

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of a contribution to a symposium on the "Biosocial Aspects of Race," held in London, September, 1968; symposium was published in the "Journal of Biosocial Science," Supplement No. 1, July, 1969. (RJ)

  16. Analysis of C-shaped canal systems in mandibular second molars using surgical operating microscope and cone beam computed tomography: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Sanjay; Yadav, Seema; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The study was aimed to acquire better understanding of C-shaped canal systems in mandibular second molar teeth through a clinical approach using sophisticated techniques such as surgical operating microscope and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: A total of 42 extracted mandibular second molar teeth with fused roots and longitudinal grooves were collected randomly from native Indian population. Pulp chamber floors of all specimens were examined under surgical operating microscope and classified into four types (Min's method). Subsequently, samples were subjected to CBCT scan after insertion of K-files size #10 or 15 into each canal orifice and evaluated using the cross-sectional and 3-dimensional images in consultation with dental radiologist so as to obtain more accurate results. Minimum distance between the external root surface on the groove and initial file placed in the canal was also measured at different levels and statistically analyzed. Results: Out of 42 teeth, maximum number of samples (15) belonged to Type-II category. A total of 100 files were inserted in 86 orifices of various types of specimens. Evaluation of the CBCT scan images of the teeth revealed that a total of 21 canals were missing completely or partially at different levels. The mean values for the minimum thickness were highest at coronal followed by middle and apical third levels in all the categories. Lowest values were obtained for teeth with Type-III category at all three levels. Conclusions: The present study revealed anatomical variations of C-shaped canal system in mandibular second molars. The prognosis of such complex canal anatomies can be improved by simultaneous employment of modern techniques such as surgical operating microscope and CBCT. PMID:24944447

  17. Contribution to the anatomical nomenclature concerning general anatomy and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, David; Musil, Vladimir; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-09-01

    Nomenclature of the general and variant anatomy belongs to the most neglected parts of the Latin anatomical nomenclature in Terminologia Anatomica. Although many important small structures are included in Terminologia Anatomica, when describing and teaching particular anatomy of any part of the human body, the general terms are necessary, such as planes, lines and flexion grooves. Moreover, Terminologia Anatomica contains only 149 terms of variant structures, enlisted in the parentheses to differentiate them from constant ones. They are only a rather representative selection and some more should be added, both from the educational and clinical point of view. The authors present some terms, completed with their definitions or explanations concerning the general and variant anatomy to evoke broader discussion on this topic which should issue in incorporation of proposed terms (or their equivalents) into the Terminologia Anatomica.

  18. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mass-based and molar-based exhaust... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.610 Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations. (a) Calculate your total mass of emissions over a test cycle...

  19. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mass-based and molar-based exhaust... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.610 Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations. (a) Calculate your total mass of emissions over a test cycle...

  20. Immediate changes in the mandibular dentition after maxillary molar distalization using headgear

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Ja; Kim, Hyun-Hee; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate immediate changes in the mandibular dentition after maxillary molar distalization using headgear in non-growing patients. Sixteen patients (mean age, 18.9 ± 2.0 years) with Class II molar relationship and crowding were included in the present study. To correct the molar relationship, headgear was used for maxillary molar distalization. Cone-beam computed tomography-generated half-cephalograms (CG Cephs) and dental casts were used to evaluate dental changes for each subject before and immediately after molar distalization using headgear. The mean duration that subjects wore the headgear was 6.3 months. CG Cephs showed that the first maxillary molars were distalized 4.2 ± 1.6 mm with 9.7° ± 6.1° of distal angulation. The intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar widths of the mandible increased after maxillary molar distalization. The present study's results suggest that maxillary molar distalization using headgear induces a spontaneous response in the untreated mandibular dentition of non-growing patients. PMID:28337423

  1. Degradation of Ultra-High Molar Mass Polymers in Size-Exclusion Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The degradation of high molar mass polymers during size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis has been a topic of interest for several decades. Should a polymer degrade during analysis, the accuracy of the molar mass (M) and architectural information obtained will be compromised. To this effect,...

  2. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  3. A Noble, Easy and Conceptual Radiographic Analysis to Assess the Type of Tooth Movement (Molar Distalization)

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anaveri Thimmappa; Deepthi; Naik, Atri

    2015-01-01

    Context and Aim Bodily tooth movement is desirable in the field of Orthodontics and so is with molar distalization. Till date there is no such analysis available which could gauge and quantify the molar distalization and the type of tooth movement achieved, therefore one was required. Materials and Methods An OPG and Lateral cephalogram was used taking Inter orbitale plane and FH plane respectively as reference lines and the analysis was devised to measure the amount and type of tooth movement achieved in distalization of molar. Conclusion This analysis is a noble, easy and conceptual analysis to assess the type of tooth movement achieved during molar distalization and other molar movements using Lateral cephalogram and orthopantomogram. PMID:26436040

  4. Iatrogenic mandibular fracture associated with third molar removal after mandibular angle osteotectomy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Jie; Teng, Li; Jin, Xiao-Lei; Lu, Jian-Jian; Zhang, Chao

    2014-05-01

    The extraction of mandibular third molars is a common dental procedure. The complications include hemorrhage, pain, dental fracture, the displacement of teeth or fragments, iatrogenic damage or luxation of the second molar, neurologic injuries, soft tissue damage, subcutaneous emphysema, trismus, swelling, infection, and iatrogenic mandibular fracture. Fracture of the angle of the mandible associated with third molar removal is a rare but severe complication. This article describes a case of mandibular angle fracture associated with third molar extraction after mandibular angle osteotectomy, including a brief review of the literature. The removal of the mandibular angle and the outer cortex of the mandible, especially the external oblique ridge, may contribute to the bone fracture. We conclude that the extraction of the lower third molar must be before the removal of the mandibular angle, and a soft diet for at least 4 weeks postoperatively is essential to prevent late mandible fracture.

  5. Prevalence of third molar impaction in orthodontic patients treated nonextraction and with extraction of 4 premolars.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Artun, Jon; Behbehani, Faraj; Artese, Flavia

    2003-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to confirm that premolar extraction treatment is associated with mesial movement of the molars concomitant with an increase in the eruption space for the third molars and to test the hypothesis that such treatment reduces the frequency of third molar impaction. Lateral cephalograms, panoramic or periapical radiographs, and study models made before (T1) and after (T2) treatment and a minimum of 10 years postretention (T3) of 157 patients were selected from the postretention sample at the Department of Orthodontics of the University of Washington, Seattle. Treatment for 105 patients included the extraction of 4 premolars; the other 53 were treated nonextraction. These patients represented all the extraction and nonextraction patients in the sample who had at least 1 third molar at T1 or T2 and who showed evidence of full eruption or closure of the root apex at T2 or T3. Student t tests showed higher scores for third molar impaction (P <.01), less mesial movement of the molars from T1 to T2 (P <.01), and smaller retromolar space at T2 (P <.001) in both arches of the nonex patients than in the ex patients. Similarly, molar movement was more mesial from T1 to T2 in the maxilla (P <.01) and in the mandible (P <.05), and the retromolar space was larger in both arches (P <.001) of the patients with eruption than in those with impaction of the third molars. Our results suggest that premolar extraction therapy reduces the frequency of third molar impaction because of increased eruption space concomitant with mesial movement of the molars during space closure.

  6. Characterization of stem and progenitor cells in the dental pulp of erupted and unerupted murine molars

    PubMed Central

    Balic, Anamaria; Aguila, H. Leonardo; Caimano, Melissa J.; Francone, Victor P.; Mina, Mina

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years there have been significant advances in the identification of putative stem cells also referred to as “mesenchymal stem cells” (MSC) in dental tissues including the dental pulp. It is thought that MSC in dental pulp share certain similarities with MSC isolated from other tissues. However, cells in dental pulp are still poorly characterized. This study focused on the characterization of progenitor and stem cells in dental pulps of erupted and unerupted mice molars. Our study showed that dental pulps from unerupted molars contain a significant number of cells expressing CD90+/CD45-, CD117+/CD45-, Sca-1+/CD45- and little if any CD45+ cells. Our in vitro functional studies showed that dental pulp cells from unerupted molars displayed extensive osteo-dentinogenic potential but were unable to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes. Dental pulp from erupted molars displayed a reduced number of cells, contained higher percentage of CD45+ and lower percentage of cells expressing CD90+/CD45-, CD117+/CD45- as compared to unerupted molars. In vitro functional assays demonstrated the ability of a small fraction of cells to differentiate into odontoblasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. There was a significant reduction in the osteo-dentinogenic potential of the pulp cells derived from erupted molars compared to unerupted molars. Furthermore, the adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of pulp cells from erupted molars was dependent on a long induction period and infrequent. Based on these findings we propose that the dental pulp of the erupted molars contain a small population of multipotent cells, whereas the dental pulp of the unerupted molars does not contain multipotent cells but is enriched in osteo-dentinogenic progenitors engaged in the formation of coronal and radicular odontoblasts. PMID:20193787

  7. Complications in surgical removal of mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Clauser, B; Barone, R; Briccoli, L; Baleani, A

    2009-01-01

    The most frequent complications after surgical removal of an impacted mandibular third molar are the following: alveolar osteitis, infections, neurological damage involving the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves. All of these postoperative complications are more frequent in older patients. Their increase starts at about 25 years of age. Alveolar osteitis is the most frequent postoperative complication, but it is easily handled; its pathogenesis remains unknown, even if cigarette smoking enhances its incidence; other putative risk factors have not been confirmed. An effective etiologic therapy is not yet available, but the symptoms can be managed by means of local medication. Postoperative infections can still cause very severe problems, especially in elderly patients, if the treatment is not correct and timely. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated in selected cases. The possibility of neurological complications is often associated with anxiety both in the patient and doctor: fortunately, their incidence has been lowered by improved surgical techniques; moreover, risk indicators have been identified on the panoramic radiographs; three-dimensional imaging is useful in planning the surgical intervention in risky cases.

  8. Biodentine Pulpotomy in Mature Permanent Molar: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible pulpitis is the most common reason for endodontic treatment in primary and permanent teeth. Root canal therapy and extraction are the two viable and most documented treatment options for the same. Studies with regards to management of mature permanent teeth with carious exposure and treatment with vital pulp therapies such as adult permanent tooth pulpotomy are scarce. However, permanent tooth pulpotomy with the new calcium-silicate based cements (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Biodentine) can help preserve the tooth pulp vitality and promote healing and repair foregoing the more invasive root canal therapy procedure. A 12-year old male patient with irreversible pulpitis in right mandibular first permanent molar was treated with complete coronal pulpotomy with placement of Biodentine in the pulp chamber and a full coronal coverage using stainless steel crown. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at three, six, twelve and eighteen months. At the end of 18 months, the patient was completely asymptomatic and the tooth was free of any clinical and radiographic signs of inflammation and infection. PMID:27630966

  9. Molar crown inner structural organization in Javanese Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Zanolli, Clément

    2015-01-01

    This contribution investigates the inner organizational pattern (tooth tissue proportions and enamel-dentine junction morphology) of seven Homo erectus permanent molar crowns from the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation of the Sangiran Dome (Central Java, Indonesia). The previous study of their external characteristics confirmed the degree of time-related structural reduction occurred in Javanese H. erectus, and also revealed a combination of nonmetric features which are rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene dental record, but more frequently found in recent humans. In accordance with their outer occlusal morphology, the specimens exhibit a set of derived internal features, such as thick to hyperthick enamel, an incomplete expression of the crest patterns at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) level, a sharp EDJ topography. As a whole, these features differ from those expressed in some penecontemporaneous specimens/samples representing African H. erectus/ergaster and H. heidelbergensis, as well as in Neanderthals, but occur in recent human populations. Further research in virtual dental paleoanthropology to be developed at macroregional scale would clarify the polarity and intensity of the intermittent exchanges between continental and insular Southeast Asia around the Lower to Middle Pleistocene boundary, as well as should shed light on the still poorly understood longitudinal evolutionary dynamics across continental Asia.

  10. What Counts as Behavior? The Molar Multiscale View.

    PubMed

    Baum, William M

    2013-01-01

    Because the definition of behavior changes as our understanding of behavior changes, giving a final definition is impossible. One can, however, rule out some possibilities and propose some others based on what we currently know. Behavior is not simply movement, but must be defined by its function. Also, our understanding of behavior must agree with evolutionary theory. I suggest 4 basic principles: (a) only whole organisms behave; (b) behavior is purposive; (c) behavior takes time; and (d) behavior is choice. Saying that parts of an organism behave is nonsense, and, moreover, evolutionary theory explains the existence of organisms mainly through their adaptive behavior. Behavior is purposive in that behavior is shaped by its consequences, through an organism's lifetime or through interactions with the environment across many generations of natural selection. Behavior takes time in that behavior is interaction with the environment that cannot take place at a moment. Moreover, at a moment in time, one cannot definitely identify the function of behavior. Identification of an activity requires a span of time. Behavior is choice in the sense that a suitable span of time always includes time spent in more than 1 activity. Activities include parts that are themselves activities on a smaller time scale and compete for time. Thus, behavior constitutes time allocation. An accounting problem arises whenever any behavior is attributed to multiple consequences. In the molar multiscale view, this raises the question of whether 2 activities can occur at the same time. The question remains open.

  11. Mass or molar? Recommendations for reporting concentrations of therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Graham R D; Bryant, Stewart; Fullinfaw, Robert; Ilett, Ken; Miners, John O; Morris, Raymond G; Doogue, Matthew P

    2013-04-15

    A working party (WP) from the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists, Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists, Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia and Royal Australasian College of Physicians recommends the following: *mass units should be used for reporting therapeutic drug concentrations in Australia and New Zealand; and the litre (L) should be used as the denominator when expressing concentration. Examples of these units are mg/L and μg/L Exceptions to these principles include: *drugs for which there is current uniformity of reporting and supporting information using molar units, notably lithium (mmol/L) and methotrexate (μmol/L); *drugs that are also present as endogenous substances, where the units used routinely should continue to be used. This applies to many substances, including minerals (eg, iron; μmol/L), vitamins (eg, vitamin D; nmol/L) and hormones (eg, thyroxine; pmol/L). *drugs for which the denominator is not a 198 of fluid and there is international uniformity of reporting (eg, thiopurine metabolites; per 109 red blood cells). These recommendations relate to drugs that are used therapeutically, whether measured for therapeutic drug monitoring purposes or for assessment of overdose. Other substances, such as drugs of misuse, heavy metals or environmental toxins, were not considered by the WP and are thus not covered by this document. These recommendations should also be applied to other supporting documentation such as published guidelines, journal articles and websites. The implementation of these recommendations in New Zealand is subject to local confirmation.

  12. Use of opioid pain relievers following extraction of third molars.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Breanna M; Wach, Anthony G; Kanar, Brent P; Castele, Matthew T; Sosovicka, Mark F; Cooke, Matthew R; Moore, Paul A

    2015-02-01

    Following extraction of third molars, it is common practice for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to provide a prescription for an opioid-containing analgesic such as hydrocodone with acetaminophen. Because the instructions for use most often indicate that these analgesics are to be taken "as needed for pain," it is unknown how many of the prescribed postoperative analgesic tablets are needed and actually taken. Therefore, an assessment of patient pain experiences and actual opioid analgesic usage was carried out using structured telephone interviews of patients performed 1 and 7 days following their thirdmolar extraction surgery. Forty-eight adolescents and young adults, ages 15 to 30 years, participated in this assessment. A review of the surgeon's notes indicated that the median number of prescribed opioid-containing analgesics (ie, Vicodin®, Norco®, Lorcet®, Percocet®) was 20 tablets (range 10 to 40). The median consumption during the first 24 hours was reported to be three tablets (range 0 to 10), and the total consumption for all 7 days was eight tablets (range 0 to 34). Four patients reported nausea or vomiting in the first 24 hours, and six patients reported nausea or vomiting during the following 6 days of recovery. The initial prescriptions provided adequate relief for 45 of the 48 patients. Higher consumption of opioid pain relievers (OPRs) was associated with a longer duration of surgery and the occurrence of postoperative infections.

  13. MTA pulpotomy of human permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed; Baglue, Reza Ali; Parirokh, Masoud; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2009-04-01

    The histological success of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy for treatment of irreversible pulpitis in human teeth as an alternative treatment was investigated in this study. Fourteen molars which had to be extracted were selected from patients 16-28 years old. The selection criteria include carious pulp exposure with a history of lingering pain. After isolation, caries removal and pulp exposure, MTA was used in pulpotomy treatment. Patients were evaluated for pain after 24 h. Two patients were lost from this study. Twelve teeth were extracted after 2 months and were assessed histologically. Recall examinations confirmed that none of the patients experienced pain after pulpotomy. Histological observation revealed that all samples had dentin bridge formation completely and that the pulps were vital and free of inflammation. Although the results favour the use of MTA as a pulpotomy material, more studies with larger samples and a longer recall period are suggested to justify the use of MTA for treatment of irreversible pulpitis in human permanent teeth.

  14. Experience versus complication rate in third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; El-Maaytah, Mohammed; Swinson, Brian; Banu, Bilquis; Upile, Tahwinder; D'Sa, Sapna; Al-Khawalde, Mohammed; Chaib, Boussad; Hopper, Colin

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The records of 1087 patients who underwent surgical removal of third molar teeth were prospectively examined to analyse the possible relationship between postoperative complications and the surgeon's experience parameter. Method and materials Seven surgeons (three specialists in surgical dentistry [specialists SD] and four oral and maxillofacial Senior House Officers [OMFS residents]) carried out the surgical procedures. For each patient, several variables were recorded including age, gender, radiographic position of extracted teeth, treating surgeon, duration of surgery and postoperative complications. Results Analysis of the data revealed some differences in the incidence of complications produced by the specialists SD and OMFS residents. The main statistically relevant differences were increase the incidences of trismus, nerve paraesthesia, alveolar osteitis and infection in the resident-treated group, while the specialist-treated group showed higher rates of post-operative bleeding. Conclusion The higher rate of postoperative complications in the resident-treated group suggests that at least some of the complications might be related to surgical experience. Further work needs to compare specialists of training programmes with different years of experience, using large cross – sectional studies. PMID:16725024

  15. Removal of an Upper Third Molar from the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Klinger de Souza; da Silva, Vanessa Tavares; da Cunha, Rafael Soares; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; São Mateus, Carla Rocha; Souza, Liane Maciel de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary sinus or antrum is the largest of the paranasal sinuses. It is located in the maxillary bone and has a proximity to the apexes of upper molars and premolars, which allows it to form a direct link between the sinus and the oral cavity. Dislocation of a foreign body or tooth to the interior of a paranasal sinus is a situation that can occur as a result of car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogenic in surgical procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to know how to treat this kind of situation. This study's objective is to report the case of a 23-year-old female patient, leucoderma, who sought treatment from the Surgical Unit at the Dental Faculty of the Federal University of Sergipe. She had a history of pain and edema in the right side of the genian region and two failed attempts at removing dental unit (DU) 18. The extraoral clinical exam revealed intense edema of the left hemiface with signs of infection, excoriation of the labial commissure, hematoma, a body temperature of 39°C, and a limited ability to open her mouth. The patient was medicated and treated surgically. The tooth was removed from the maxillary sinus with caution, as should have been done initially. PMID:25705524

  16. Enamel prism morphology in molar teeth of small eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Dumont, E R

    1996-01-01

    Data summarizing enamel prism shape, size and spacing are reported for the molar enamel of 55 species of small eutherian mammals including primates, bats, tree shrews, flying lemurs, insectivorans and representatives of a variety of fossil families. Confocal photomicrographs reveal that the subsurface enamel of most species is characterized by arc-shaped prisms. The lack of a clear distinction between pattern 2 and pattern 3 prism configurations within single specimens suggests that the broad category "arc-shaped prisms" is the most appropriate descriptive grouping for these species. Of the total sample, three species exhibit only circular prisms while no evidence of prismatic enamel was found in two bats. Prism shape is not an informative phylogenetic character at the ordinal level for these morphologically primitive and relatively thin-enameled taxa. Significant differences between species in several prism size and spacing variables (central distance between prisms, prism diameter, prism area and the ratio of prism area to estimated ameloblast area) suggest the potential for further analyses of quantitative variation to document evolutionary relationships within or among family-level groups.

  17. Molar incisor hypomineralization in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natália Silva; Pontes, Alessandra Silva; de Sousa Paz, Hélvis Enri; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Moura, Lúcia de Fátima Almeida de Deus; Lima, Marina de Deus Mourade

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among individuals between 7 and 15 years old infected or noninfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The study was conducted with 33 HIV-infected individuals (study group; SG) and 66 non-HIV-infected schoolchildren (control group; CG), paired by gender and age. Data collection was based on medical records (SG), a questionnaire for caregivers and oral examination for diagnosis of MIH (European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria) and caries (DMFT index and ICDAS). Data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests and logistic regression. In SG, MIH (45.5%) and caries (87.9%) had higher prevalence. MIH was associated with use of protease inhibitors in SG (OR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.21 to 3.77) and incubator need in CG (OR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.71 to 9.10). HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of MIH and dental caries in the permanent dentition.

  18. What Counts as Behavior? The Molar Multiscale View

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Because the definition of behavior changes as our understanding of behavior changes, giving a final definition is impossible. One can, however, rule out some possibilities and propose some others based on what we currently know. Behavior is not simply movement, but must be defined by its function. Also, our understanding of behavior must agree with evolutionary theory. I suggest 4 basic principles: (a) only whole organisms behave; (b) behavior is purposive; (c) behavior takes time; and (d) behavior is choice. Saying that parts of an organism behave is nonsense, and, moreover, evolutionary theory explains the existence of organisms mainly through their adaptive behavior. Behavior is purposive in that behavior is shaped by its consequences, through an organism's lifetime or through interactions with the environment across many generations of natural selection. Behavior takes time in that behavior is interaction with the environment that cannot take place at a moment. Moreover, at a moment in time, one cannot definitely identify the function of behavior. Identification of an activity requires a span of time. Behavior is choice in the sense that a suitable span of time always includes time spent in more than 1 activity. Activities include parts that are themselves activities on a smaller time scale and compete for time. Thus, behavior constitutes time allocation. An accounting problem arises whenever any behavior is attributed to multiple consequences. In the molar multiscale view, this raises the question of whether 2 activities can occur at the same time. The question remains open. PMID:28018040

  19. Variability of Australopithecus second maxillary molars from Sterkfontein Member 4.

    PubMed

    Fornai, Cinzia; Bookstein, Fred L; Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-08-01

    The question of how many Australopithecus species lived at Sterkfontein Member 4 and Makapansgat continues to be controversial inasmuch as the fossils are poorly preserved, the stratigraphy is difficult to interpret, and the cranial, dental, and postcranial remains are mostly not associated. To proceed we applied the most intensive modern methods of 3D geometric morphometrics to dental form, specifically the shapes of the upper second molars (M(2)s) in a sample combining 13 Australopithecus, 11 Paranthropus, and 23 Homo. We analyzed outer and inner crown surfaces, as well as crown and cervical outlines both separately and together, using a total of 16 landmarks, 51 curve semilandmarks, and 48 pseudolandmarks over the four structures. Outer and inner enamel surfaces are highly correlated in this dataset, while crown outline is the least informative of the four structures. Homo was easily distinguished from both Australopithecus and Paranthropus by these methods, likewise Homo sapiens from Homo neanderthalensis. There were, however, no stable classes within the Australopithecus sample or between Australopithecus and Paranthropus. Instead, there was a gradient along which Australopithecus prometheus and Australopithecus africanus lie toward the extremes, with Paranthropus overlapping both. If there are indeed different species at this site, then either their M(2) morphologies are uninformative or else the present sample is too small to make an accurate assessment. Our findings suggest that the variability of the Australopithecus specimens will be difficult to interpret authoritatively, independent of the method used.

  20. Quantitative determination of total molar concentrations of bioaccumulatable organic micropollutants in water using C18 empore disk and molar detection techniques.

    PubMed

    van Loon, W M; Wijnker, F G; Verwoerd, M E; Hermens, J L

    1996-09-01

    A highly sensitive and quantitative group parameter to determine total molar concentrations of organic micropollutants that can bioaccumulate in the lipid phase of aquatic organisms from effluents, surface water, and drinking water has been developed. C18 empore disk was used as a surrogate lipid phase. The partition process between water and C18 empore disk was employed to simulate the bioaccumulation process. After partition extraction of the water sample, the empore disk was extracted with cyclohexane, and total molar concentrations were determined in these extracts using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), respectively. Total molar concentrations bioaccumulated in aquatic biota were estimated from the cyclohexane concentrations. Good accuracy for the total molar determination was obtained using VPO, due to the practically constant molar response factors (43.1 +/- 1.7 V/M) for a wide compound range and to excellent additivity of individual compound responses. Satisfying reproducibility (0-8.3%) of VPO was obtained for sample extracts. The detection limit of VPO in cyclohexane extracts corresponded to 0.60 mM in the lipid phase of aquatic biota. A minimal separation GC/MS system was developed, which enabled highly sensitive and sufficiently accurate total molar determinations. The reproducibility of the GC/MS determination for samples ranged from 0.7 to 22%. The detection limit of GC/MS in cyclohexane extracts corresponded to 0.044 mM in the lipid phase. The determined total molar concentrations in the lipid phase of aquatic biota were in the range of 0.139-168 mM for effluents, 0.26-1.34 mM for surface water systems, and < 0.044 mM for drinking water.

  1. [Parameters of cardiac muscle repolarization on the electrocardiogram when changing anatomical and electric position of the heart].

    PubMed

    Chaĭkovskiĭ, I A; Baum, O V; Popov, L A; Voloshin, V I; Budnik, N N; Frolov, Iu A; Kovalenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    While discussing the diagnostic value of the single channel electrocardiogram a set of theoretical considerations emerges inevitably, one of the most important among them is the question about dependence of the electrocardiogram parameters from the direction of electrical axis of heart. In other words, changes in what of electrocardiogram parameters are in fact liable to reflect pathological processes in myocardium, and what ones are determined by extracardiac factors, primarily by anatomic characteristics of patients. It is arguable that while analyzing electrocardiogram it is necessary to orient to such physiologically based informative indexes as ST segment displacement. Also, symmetry of the T wave shape is an important parameter which is independent of patients anatomic features. The results obtained are of interest for theoretical and applied aspects of the biophysics of the cardiac electric field.

  2. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  3. [Anatomic and functional features of venous valves].

    PubMed

    Griton, P; Vanet, P; Cloarec, M

    1997-05-01

    The comparison of the venous system in the human organism, and in particular the venous valves of the lower limbs, with studies conducted in animal models helped us to understand better the mechanisms involved in adapting to the upright position and walking. We examined work conducted in several species from the horse to the dog, especially in animals who often take on an upright position such as the chimpanzee and the kangouroo, in search for structures comparable to those in man. Different types of valves can be described in man: flotting valves (bicuspid, pigeon nest valves); reinforced valves (mid-thigh); reinforcing valves (periarticular zone in the knee); finally, "flat" valves which are highly resistant formations but with little anti-back flow action. We also describe valvular structures with muscle cells found in the plantar aspect of the foot and the veins of the quadriceps muscle, these valves may have an active hematopropulsive action (Bassi). These results allowed us to identify certain common points between the structures observed in the posterior legs of certain animals and to propose models for investigating venous diseases.

  4. From chalkboard, slides, and paper to e-learning: How computing technologies have transformed anatomical sciences education.

    PubMed

    Trelease, Robert B

    2016-11-01

    Until the late-twentieth century, primary anatomical sciences education was relatively unenhanced by advanced technology and dependent on the mainstays of printed textbooks, chalkboard- and photographic projection-based classroom lectures, and cadaver dissection laboratories. But over the past three decades, diffusion of innovations in computer technology transformed the practices of anatomical education and research, along with other aspects of work and daily life. Increasing adoption of first-generation personal computers (PCs) in the 1980s paved the way for the first practical educational applications, and visionary anatomists foresaw the usefulness of computers for teaching. While early computers lacked high-resolution graphics capabilities and interactive user interfaces, applications with video discs demonstrated the practicality of programming digital multimedia linking descriptive text with anatomical imaging. Desktop publishing established that computers could be used for producing enhanced lecture notes, and commercial presentation software made it possible to give lectures using anatomical and medical imaging, as well as animations. Concurrently, computer processing supported the deployment of medical imaging modalities, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound, that were subsequently integrated into anatomy instruction. Following its public birth in the mid-1990s, the World Wide Web became the ubiquitous multimedia networking technology underlying the conduct of contemporary education and research. Digital video, structural simulations, and mobile devices have been more recently applied to education. Progressive implementation of computer-based learning methods interacted with waves of ongoing curricular change, and such technologies have been deemed crucial for continuing medical education reforms, providing new challenges and opportunities for anatomical sciences educators. Anat Sci Educ 9: 583-602. © 2016 American

  5. [Anatomical names of foramina and canales in skeleton].

    PubMed

    Shikano, S; Yamashita, Y

    1998-03-01

    Latin anatomical names of Foramina and Canales in skeleton were analyzed and compared with Japanese anatomical names for better understanding of the structures of the human body and for possible revision in the future. The conclusions were as follows: 1. In general, short tunnels were called Foramina (singular: Foramen), and long tunnels Canales (singular: Canalis). 2. One end of Canalis was sometimes called Foramen. In this case, Canalis and Foramen were usually modified by the same words. 3. Each name of Foramina contained the word which means form, state, absolute size, region of existence, one of the contents or function of Foramina. 4. Each name of Canales contained the word which means region of existence, one of the contents or function of Canales. 5. Some names of Foramina and Canales that were supposed to mean the region of existence meant one of the contents of the structures. 6. As for Latin anatomical names, the relation between words were relatively clear by the proper use of noun, adjective, nominative, and genitive. 7. Since different Chinese characters were sometimes pronounced similarly in Japanese anatomical names, different structures might be confused. 8. It seemed that some Japanese anatomical names needed partial correction.

  6. Presentation of Anatomical Variations Using the Aurasma Mobile App.

    PubMed

    Hong, Trudy; Bézard, Georg; Lozanoff, Beth K; Labrash, Steven; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of anatomical variations is critical to avoid clinical complications and it enables an understanding of morphogenetic mechanisms. Depictions are comprised of photographs or illustrations often limiting appreciation of three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships. The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for presenting anatomical variations utilizing video clips emphasizing 3D anatomical relationships delivered on personal electronic devices. An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) was an incidental finding in a routine dissection of an 89-year-old man cadaver during a medical student instructional laboratory. The specimen was photographed and physical measurements were recorded. Three-dimensional models were lofted and rendered with Maya software and converted as Quicktime animations. Photographs of the first frame of the animations were recorded and registered with Aurasma Mobile App software (www.aurasma.com). Resulting animations were viewed on mobile devices. The ARSA model can be manipulated on the mobile device enabling the student to view and appreciate spatial relationships. Model elements can be de-constructed to provide even greater spatial resolution of anatomical relationships. Animations provide a useful approach for visualizing anatomical variations. Future work will be directed at creating a library of variants and underlying mechanism of formation for presentation through the Aurasma application.

  7. Combining multiple anatomical MRI measures improves Alzheimer's disease classification.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Frank; Schouten, Tijn M; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Dopper, Elise G P; van Swieten, John C; de Rooij, Mark; van der Grond, Jeroen; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2016-05-01

    Several anatomical MRI markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been identified. Hippocampal volume, cortical thickness, and grey matter density have been used successfully to discriminate AD patients from controls. These anatomical MRI measures have so far mainly been used separately. The full potential of anatomical MRI scans for AD diagnosis might thus not yet have been used optimally. In this study, we therefore combined multiple anatomical MRI measures to improve diagnostic classification of AD. For 21 clinically diagnosed AD patients and 21 cognitively normal controls, we calculated (i) cortical thickness, (ii) cortical area, (iii) cortical curvature, (iv) grey matter density, (v) subcortical volumes, and (vi) hippocampal shape. These six measures were used separately and combined as predictors in an elastic net logistic regression. We made receiver operating curve plots and calculated the area under the curve (AUC) to determine classification performance. AUC values for the single measures ranged from 0.67 (cortical thickness) to 0.94 (grey matter density). The combination of all six measures resulted in an AUC of 0.98. Our results demonstrate that the different anatomical MRI measures contain complementary information. A combination of these measures may therefore improve accuracy of AD diagnosis in clinical practice. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1920-1929, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  9. [ANATOMICAL PREPARATIONS IN MUSEUMS A SPECIAL CATEGORY OF CULTURAL HERITAGE].

    PubMed

    Monza, Francesca; Licata, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The international debate on the issue of human remains in museums and on the ethical issues related to their exhibition stimulates reflection on the Italian anatomical collections and on their preparations. A definition of human remains or of anatomical preparation does not exist in the Italian legislation. The anatomical specimens in museums are protected by the laws of Cultural Heritage as part of public collections, but their status is not well defined. By their nature of human material they would in fact be considered as a special category of Cultural Heritage. Because they are part of a cadaver they can be regarded as res nullius, but since treated with special techniques they could also change their meaning and being considered a species nova. Finally, it reflects on the possibility of creating a museum in Italy composed by new anatomical preparations. The article outline the contours of a museological issue that deserves to be investigated in order to better identify the anatomical preparations and their management in museums.

  10. Requirements Engineering and Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yijun; Niu, Nan; González-Baixauli, Bruno; Mylopoulos, John; Easterbrook, Steve; Do Prado Leite, Julio Cesar Sampaio

    A fundamental problem with requirements engineering (RE) is to validate that a design does satisfy stakeholder requirements. Some requirements can be fulfilled locally by designed modules, where others must be accommodated globally by multiple modules together. These global requirements often crosscut with other local requirements and as such lead to scattered concerns. We explore the possibility of borrowing concepts from aspect-oriented programming (AOP) to tackle these problems in early requirements. In order to validate the design against such early aspects, we propose a framework to trace them into coding and testing aspects. We demonstrate the approach using an open-source e-commerce platform. In the conclusion of this work, we reflect on the lessons learnt from the case study on how to fit RE and AOP research together.

  11. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  12. Organisational aspects of care.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Pegram, Anne

    2015-03-04

    Organisational aspects of care, the second essential skills cluster, identifies the need for registered nurses to systematically assess, plan and provide holistic patient care in accordance with individual needs. Safeguarding, supporting and protecting adults and children in vulnerable situations; leading, co-ordinating and managing care; functioning as an effective and confident member of the multidisciplinary team; and managing risk while maintaining a safe environment for patients and colleagues, are vital aspects of this cluster. This article discusses the roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse. Throughout their education, nursing students work towards attaining this knowledge and these skills in preparation for their future roles as nurses.

  13. Loss of Permanent First Molars in the Mixed Dentition: Circumstances Resulting in Extraction and Requiring Orthodontic Management.

    PubMed

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita R; Kennedy, David B

    2016-10-15

    Extraction of significantly compromised permanent first molars may be indicated during the mixed dentition stage of occlusal development. The purpose of this article was to review circumstances that can result in the loss of a permanent first molar-including dental caries, molar incisor hypomineralization, eruption disturbances of permanent teeth, and failure of restorative treatment to affirm that a complete dental arch is not necessary for the existence of a functional dental arch. The extraction of permanent first molar(s) with subsequent orthodontic treatment in a young patient can be considered a cost-effective alternative to placing complex restorations that require replacement over the lifespan. Approaches to establish a functional dental arch in the event of the loss of a permanent first molar(s) are outlined. Additionally, orthodontic diagnostic and treatment principles are reviewed. Case histories are provided to illustrate the clinical management of permanent first molar extractions to achieve a functional dental arch.

  14. Synthesis of an anionically chargeable, high-molar-mass, second-generation dendronized polymer and the observation of branching by scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasëmi, Edis; Zhuang, Wei; Rabe, Jürgen P; Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred; Colussi, Martin; Keul, Helmut; Yi, Ding; Cölfen, Helmut; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2006-04-19

    An efficient synthesis of a methacrylate-based, second-generation (G2) dendronized macromonomer and its free radical polymerization to the corresponding high-molar-mass G2 dendronized polymer are described. The molar mass is determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), light-scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation and compared with values estimated from a scanning force microscopy (SFM) contour lengths analysis of individualized polymer strands on mica. The polymer carries terminal tert-butyl-protected carboxyl groups, the degree of deprotection of which with trifluoroacetic acid is quantified by NMR spectroscopy using the highest molar mass sample. SFM imaging of both protected (noncharged) and unprotected (charged) dendronized polymers on solid substrates reveals mostly linear chains but also some with main-chain branches. The nature of these branches is investigated and the degree roughly estimated to which they are formed. Finally, a synthetic model experiment is described which sheds some light on the aspect of whether chain transfer, a process that could lead to covalent branching, is of importance in the synthesis of the present dendronized polymers.

  15. Comparison of Piezosurgery and Conventional Rotary Instruments for Removal of Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: A Randomized Controlled Clinical and Radiographic Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shokry, Mohamed; Aboelsaad, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars using piezosurgery versus the conventional surgical technique on postoperative sequelae and bone healing. Material and Methods. This study was carried out as a randomized controlled clinical trial: split mouth design. Twenty patients with bilateral mandibular third molar mesioangular impaction class II position B indicated for surgical extraction were treated randomly using either the piezosurgery or the conventional bur technique on each site. Duration of the procedure, postoperative edema, trismus, pain, healing, and bone density and quantity were evaluated up to 6 months postoperatively. Results. Test and control sites were compared using paired t-test. There was statistical significance in reduction of pain and swelling in test sites, where the time of the procedure was statistically increased in test site. For bone quantity and quality, statistical difference was found where test site showed better results. Conclusion. Piezosurgery technique improves quality of patient's life in form of decrease of postoperative pain, trismus, and swelling. Furthermore, it enhances bone quality within the extraction socket and bone quantity along the distal aspect of the mandibular second molar. PMID:27597866

  16. Growth and treatment changes distal to the mandibular first molar: a lateral cephalometric study.

    PubMed

    Sable, Daniel L; Woods, Michael G

    2004-06-01

    This study examined space changes occurring distal to the mandibular first molar in growing patients treated using two different approaches. Two groups of 50 patients were selected for the study. The patients in group I were treated with the extraction of mandibular second premolars, whereas those in group II were treated without mandibular premolar extractions, by holding E-spaces with utility arches. Lateral cephalograms taken before and after treatment were used to measure space changes within the mandible. Follow-up written treatment records and radiographs were also examined to ascertain whether the mandibular third molars were ultimately extracted or retained. A greater mean space increase between Xi point and the mandibular first molar was found in boys and girls treated with second premolar extractions. The mean space increase between Xi point and the mandibular first molar, as well as the average increase in total mandibular length, was greater in boys than in girls for both treatment modalities. This reflects a greater amount of growth in boys during the treatment period. The greater mean space increase in the groups treated with second premolar extractions could be attributed to the fact that the first molar generally moved further mesially during treatment in the extraction subjects, whereas in the E-space subjects, the first molars were perhaps held back. It was noted that the mandibular third molars were ultimately more likely to have been extracted in the E-space groups than in the second premolar extraction groups within this sample.

  17. Preoperative removal of lower third molars and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Rice, Steven; Serrant, Paul; Laverick, Sean; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-06-01

    To find out what consultants in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) in the UK think about complications of bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) in relation to lower third molars we organised a national postal questionnaire during 2012-13. Of 378 consultants, 192 practised orthognathic surgery of whom 132 replied (a 69% response rate). Eighty-one respondents routinely removed lower third molars before BSSO; 51 did not. Eighty-nine respondents thought that there was an increased risk of complications if third molars were present at the time of BSSO, mainly an increased risk of unfavourable fractures. Forty-three respondents did not think there was an increased risk of complications of BSSO when third molars were present. Of the 81 who routinely removed the lower third molars, 13 removed them within the six-month period before BSSO, 56 removed them 6-12 months before, and 11 removed them more than 12 months before. There seemed to be no difference in self-reported unfavourable fracture rates between those surgeons who routinely removed lower third molars and those who did not. The results of the questionnaire showed that there was considerable variation in surgical practice across the UK in the management of lower third molars before BSSO, both in terms of whether or not to remove these teeth at all, and if so, when to remove them.

  18. National clinical guidelines for the extraction of first permanent molars in children.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, M T; Williams, A; Harrison, M

    2014-12-05

    This article summarises recently updated guidelines produced by the Clinical Governance Directorate of the British Orthodontic Society through the Clinical Standards Committee of the Faculty of Dental Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons of England (FDSRCS) on the extraction of first permanent molars in children. The first permanent molar is susceptible to chronological enamel defects, molar-incisor hypomineralisation and caries, which may necessitate enforced extraction in the developing dentition. In the right circumstances, the extraction of these teeth can be followed by successful eruption of the second permanent molar and ultimately, third molar eruption to complete the molar dentition. For this reason, elective extraction of first permanent molars with a questionable long-term prognosis should be considered when planning enforced extractions. However, a number of factors can influence the decision-making process, including the necessity for a general anaesthetic to allow extraction, potential cooperation with restorative or orthodontic treatment and likely future preventative practice within the family. Moreover, the presence of any underlying malocclusion also needs to be evaluated within the context of extraction planning. The current available evidence has been evaluated and awarded a grade based upon those recommended by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network.

  19. Review of flap design influence on the health of the periodontium after mandibular third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Inci; Simşek, Sebnem; Uğar, Dilek; Bozkaya, Süleyman

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the effect of flap design in terms of periodontal status of the preceding second molar after lower third molar surgery. Impacted lower third molar surgery may result in periodontal complications on the distal surface of the adjacent second molar. Flap design that is used during impacted third molar surgery is important to prevent those complications. Several different flap techniques, mainly envelope, triangular (vertical) flaps, and their modifications have been developed to minimize those complications. Each technique has some advantages as well as disadvantages. It is also reported that the selection of a flap design does not seem to have a lasting effect on the health of periodontal tissue. The effect of the type of flap used for lower third molar surgery on the periodontal status of the second molar, as well as the factors that may influence this outcome, has been uncertain. The decision to use on one or the other of the flaps should be based on surgeon's preference.

  20. Morphometric variation of extant platyrrhine molars: taxonomic implications for fossil platyrrhines

    PubMed Central

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of many fossil platyrrhines with respect to extant ones is not yet clear. Two main hypotheses have been proposed: the layered or successive radiations hypothesis suggests that Patagonian fossils are Middle Miocene stem platyrrhines lacking modern descendants, whereas the long lineage hypothesis argues for an evolutionary continuity of all fossil platyrrhines with the extant ones. Our geometric morphometric analysis of a 15 landmark-based configuration of platyrrhines’ first and second lower molars suggest that morphological stasis may explain the reduced molar shape variation observed. Platyrrhine lower molar shape might be a primitive retention of the ancestral state affected by strong ecological constraints throughout the radiation of the main platyrrhine families. The Patagonian fossil specimens showed two distinct morphological patterns of lower molars, Callicebus—like and Saguinus—like, which might be the precursors of the extant forms, whereas the Middle Miocene specimens, though showing morphological resemblances with the Patagonian fossils, also displayed new, derived molar patterns, Alouatta—like and Pitheciinae—like, thereby suggesting that despite the overall morphological stasis of molars, phenotypic diversification of molar shape was already settled during the Middle Miocene. PMID:27190704

  1. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, J.; Zaror, C.; Monardes, H.; Hermosilla, V.; Muñoz, C.; Cantin, M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3–5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24–0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25–0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully. PMID:25937698

  2. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, J; Zaror, C; Monardes, H; Hermosilla, V; Muñoz, C; Cantin, M

    2014-06-01

    Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3-5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24-0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25-0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully.

  3. Enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) morphology distinguishes the lower molars of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Matthew M; Gunz, Philipp; Wood, Bernard A; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2008-12-01

    Tooth crown morphology plays a central role in hominin systematics, but the removal of the original outer enamel surface by dental attrition often eliminates from consideration the type of detailed crown morphology that has been shown to discriminate among hominin taxa. This reduces the size of samples available for study. The enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) is the developmental precursor and primary contributor to the morphology of the unworn outer enamel surface, and its morphology is only affected after considerable attrition. In this paper, we explore whether the form of the EDJ can be used to distinguish between the mandibular molars of two southern African fossil hominins: Paranthropus (or Australopithecus) robustus and Australopithecus africanus. After micro-computed tomographic scanning the molar sample, we made high-resolution images of the EDJ and used geometric morphometrics to compare EDJ shape differences between species, in addition to documenting metameric variation along the molar row within each species. Landmarks were collected along the marginal ridge that runs between adjacent dentine horns and around the circumference of the cervix. Our results suggest that the morphology of the EDJ can distinguish lower molars of these southern African hominins, and it can discriminate first, second, and third molars within each taxon. These results confirm previous findings that the EDJ preserves taxonomically valuable shape information in worn teeth. Mean differences in EDJ shape, in particular dentine horn height, crown height, and cervix shape, are more marked between adjacent molars within each taxon than for the same molar between the two taxa.

  4. Third molar surgery: the patient's and the clinician's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Kafas, Panagiotis; Abbas, Syedda; Rob, Jubli; McCarthy, Eileen; McCarthy, Peter; Hopper, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Background In this report, the problems of third molar surgery have been reviewed from the perspective of both patient and clinician; additionally an overall analysis of preoperative imaging investigations was carried out. Specifically, three main areas of interest were investigated: the prediction of surgical difficulty and potential complications; the assessment of stress and anxiety and finally the assessment of postoperative complications and the surgeon's experience. Findings In the first study, the prediction of surgical difficulty and potential injury to the inferior alveolar nerve was assessed. This was achieved by examining the patient's orthopantomograms and by using the Pederson Difficulty Index (PDI). Several radiological signs were identified and a classification tree was created to help predict the incidence of such event. In the second study, a prospective assessment addressing the patient's stress and anxiety pre-, intra- and postoperatively was employed. Midazolam was the active drug used against placebo. Objective and subjective parameters were assessed, including measuring the cortisol level in saliva. Midazolam was found to significantly reduce anxiety levels and salivary cortisol was identified as an accurate anxiety marker. In the third study, postoperative complications and the surgeon's experience were examined. Few patients in this study suffered permanent nerve dysfunction. Junior surgeons reported a higher complication rate particularly in trismus, alveolar osteitis, infection and paraesthesia over the distributions of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves. In apparent contrast, senior surgeons reported higher incidence of postoperative bleeding. Discussion These studies if well employed can lead to favourable alteration in patient management and might have a positive impact on future healthcare service. PMID:19852848

  5. A rare case of diplopodia and syndactyly: anatomical and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kadir, Kamarulzaman Haji M S; Abdul Rashid, Abdul Halim; Das, Srijit; Ibrahim, Sharaf

    2011-01-01

    Diplopodia is a rare congenital disorder that has not been extensively discussed in textbooks, and case reports appear to be the main source of information. Although the exact cause of diplopodia remains unknown, the presence of extra digits as well as metatarsals and tarsals allows it to be differentiated from pedal polydactyly. Syndactyly refers to the congenital fusion of the digits. Concomitant bilateral syndactyly and diplopodia is extremely unusual, and in this report we describe a case of right diplopodia and left polydactyly combined with bilateral manual syndactyly in a 15-year-old girl who was ultimately treated with through-the-knee amputation. Radiological examination of the right leg revealed tibial hypoplasia and the right foot displayed 8 digits with corresponding metatarsals and tarsals, whereas the left leg revealed 2 extra digits on the medial aspect of the foot with corresponding metatarsal and tarsal bones. Anatomical dissection of the right foot revealed that it was divided into halves consisting of 8 toes with corresponding metatarsals and tarsals, as well as tibial hypoplasia and absence of the great toe. Diplopodia associated with tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly can be treated surgically, and the present case report details the clinical, radiological, and anatomical elements of this rare deformity.

  6. Anatomical insights into the interaction of emotion and cognition in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rebecca; Zald, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Ray, R. and D. Zald. Anatomical insights into the interaction of emotion and cognition in the prefrontal cortex. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV 36(X) XXX-XXX, 2011. -Psychological research increasingly indicates that emotional processes interact with other aspects of cognition. Studies have demonstrated both the ability of emotional stimuli to influence a broad range of cognitive operations, and the ability of humans to use top-down cognitive control mechanisms to regulate emotional responses. Portions of the prefrontal cortex appear to play a significant role in these interactions. However, the manner in which these interactions are implemented remains only partially elucidated. In the present review we describe the anatomical connections between ventral and dorsal prefrontal areas as well as their connections with limbic regions. Only a subset of prefrontal areas are likely to directly influence amygdalar processing, and as such models of prefrontal control of emotions and models of emotional regulation should be constrained to plausible pathways of influence. We also focus on how the specific pattern of feedforward and feedback connections between these regions may dictate the nature of information flow between ventral and dorsal prefrontal areas and the amygdala. These patterns of connections are inconsistent with several commonly expressed assumptions about the nature of communications between emotion and cognition. PMID:21889953

  7. Sequencing human ribs into anatomical order by quantitative multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Henneberg, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Little research has focussed on methods to anatomically sequence ribs. Correct anatomical sequencing of ribs assists in determining the location and distribution of regional trauma, age estimation, number of puncture wounds, number of individuals, and personal identification. The aim of the current study is to develop a method for placing fragmented and incomplete rib sets into correct anatomical position. Ribs 2-10 were used from eleven cadavers of an Australian population. Seven variables were measured from anatomical locations on the rib. General descriptive statistics were calculated for each variable along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ANOVA with Bonferroni statistics. Considerable overlap was observed between ribs for univariate methods. Bivariate and multivariate methods were then applied. Results of the ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni statistics show that ratios of various dimensions of a single rib could be used to sequence it within adjacent ribs. Using multiple regression formulae, the most accurate estimation of the anatomical rib number occurs when the entire rib is found in isolation. This however, is not always possible. Even when only the head and neck of the rib are preserved, a modified multivariate regression formula assigned 91.95% of ribs into correct anatomical position or as an adjacent rib. Using multivariate methods it is possible to sequence a single human rib with a high level of accuracy and they are superior to univariate methods. Left and right ribs were found to be highly symmetrical. Some rib dimensions were greater in males than in females, but overall the level of sexual dimorphism was low.

  8. [Videothoracoscopic anatomic pulmonary segmentary: an initial single-center experience].

    PubMed

    Reis, João Eurico; Bravio, Ivan; Baptista, Pedro; Martelo, Fernando Palma

    2012-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of lung cancer has been growing worldwide. Between May 2008 and November 2012, we performed 24 videothoracoscopic anatomical lung resections in our department. This includes 22 lobectomies and 2 anatomic segmentectomies, which is known to be a more complex surgery, since it demands a finer dissection of sub-lobar structures. We report the clinical cases of two patients who underwent anatomic segmentectomies. The first one was a 63 year old woman, smoker and with a history of breast cancer 20 years earlier. An incidental 9 mm node was found in the lingula. The patient underwent an anatomic lingulectomy and the frozen section was suggestive of a primary lung cancer. Therefore, we proceeded to a full lymphadenectomy. The final pathology evaluation showed a typical carcinoid tumour (pT1aN0). The second patient was a 50 year old woman, a smoker and with a heavy family history of lung cancer. In a screening CT scan a 8 mm ground glass opacity was identified in the left lower lobe (segment VI). After a VATS wedge resection of the node the frozen section evaluation was compatible with adenocarcinoma. We then proceeded to an anatomic segmentectomy with lymphadenectomy. The definitive pathology evaluation confirmed that it was a pT1a N0 bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma. The patients now have 5 and 2 months of follow up respectivelly and neither of them has signs of recurrence and the surgical incision showed a good aesthetic result. Anatomic segmentectomy is the indicated surgery especially in patients with low grade tumours, in early stage lung cancers or in patients without pulmonary function for a lobar resection, and it can be done safely using VATS.

  9. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational…

  10. Aspects of Marine Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations to impart ocean science understanding, specifically, aspects of marine ecology, to high school students. The course objectives include the ability of…

  11. Global aspects of monsoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent developments are studied in three areas of monsoon research: (1) global aspects of the monsoon onset, (2) the orographic influence of the Tibetan Plateau on the summer monsoon circulations, and (3) tropical 40 to 50 day oscillations. Reference was made only to those studies that are primarily based on FGGE Level IIIb data. A brief summary is given.

  12. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  13. Selection of instruments for the successful extraction of molar teeth: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Babarinde, Bolaji Adebayo

    2009-01-01

    We report the result of a pilot study that was designed to test the effectiveness of a chart that gives advice about the choice of extraction instruments and the techniques necessary to remove molar teeth successfully. It was designed from experience gained from the extraction of several molar teeth under local anaesthesia, and includes 20 blocks that cover a combination of five clinical presentations of tooth decay with four clinical presentations of tooth mobility. Recent graduates who used the chart were able to extract more molar teeth successfully than those who did not, and its use can also reduce the amount of supervision time necessary without compromising the guidance required.

  14. Vital Pulp Therapy with Three Different Pulpotomy Agents in Immature Molars: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Azadeh; Forghani, Maryam; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This case report describes apexogenesis treatment of three molar teeth of an 8-year-old boy using three different pulpotomy agents. Methods Pulpotomy was performed on decayed immature molar teeth with established irreversible pulpitis and the remaining pulp was capped with either zinc oxide eugenol, ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Teeth were restored with stainless steel crowns. Results Eighteen months clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed successful preservation of pulpal vitality with continued root development in all treated teeth. Conclusion Based on this case report, CEM cement may be an alternative option for pulpotomy treatment of immature permanent molars. PMID:23922578

  15. A New Orthodontic Appliance with a Mini Screw for Upper Molar Distalization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new upper molar distalization appliance called Cise distalizer designed as intraoral device supported with orthodontic mini screw for upper permanent molar distalization. The new appliance consists of eight main components. In order to understand the optimum force level, the appliance under static loading is tested by using strain gage measurement techniques. Results show that one of the open coils produces approximately 300 gr distalization force. Cise distalizer can provide totally 600 gr distalization force. This range of force level is enough for distalization of upper first and second molar teeth. PMID:27528796

  16. Lymphosome concept: Anatomical study of the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Suami, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    The gross anatomical study of the lymphatic system in humans and animals has been suspended for almost 100 years. This article introduces the author's technique for investigating the lymphatic system using the concept of the lymphosome. In revisiting the anatomical study of the lymphatic system, our updated knowledge can potentially be utilized either to reassure surgeons about their current procedures in the surgical management of cancers and lymphedema or assist them to refine them. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:13-17. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Robust Morphological Averages in Three Dimensions for Anatomical Atlas Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Jorge; Bloch, Isabelle; Schmitt, Francis

    2004-09-01

    We present original methods for obtaining robust, anatomical shape-based averages of features of the human head anatomy from a normal population. Our goals are computerized atlas construction with representative anatomical features and morphopometry for specific populations. A method for true-morphological averaging is proposed, consisting of a suitable blend of shape-related information for N objects to obtain a progressive average. It is made robust by penalizing, in a morphological sense, the contributions of features less similar to the current average. Morphological error and similarity, as well as penalization, are based on the same paradigm as the morphological averaging.

  18. Anatomical eponyms, Part 2: The other side of the coin.

    PubMed

    Olry, Regis

    2014-11-01

    Over a century after they were removed, at least officially, from anatomical terminology, eponyms remain an obviously controversial topic. In the first part of this paper we acted as their defense counsel, aiming to demonstrate that the 1895 first edition of the Nomina Anatomica and subsequently the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) probably put the cart before the horse. However, their authors advanced arguments supporting their decision, and it is now time to develop these arguments. Let us now become the public prosecutor of eponyms.

  19. Subduction modelling with ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cédric; Spakman, Wim; Quinquis, Matthieu; Buiter, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion) is a promising new code designed for modelling thermal convection in the mantle (Kronbichler et al. 2012). The code uses state-of-the-art numerical methods, such as high performance solvers and adaptive mesh refinement. It builds on tried-and-well-tested libraries and works with plug-ins allowing easy extension to fine-tune it to the user's specific needs. We make use of the promising features of ASPECT, especially Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), for modelling lithosphere subduction in 2D and 3D geometries. The AMR allows for mesh refinement where needed and mesh coarsening in regions less important to the parameters under investigation. In the context of subduction, this amounts to having very small grid cells at material interfaces and larger cells in more uniform mantle regions. As lithosphere subduction modelling is not standard to ASPECT, we explore the necessary adaptive grid refinement and test ASPECT with widely accepted benchmarks. We showcase examples of mechanical and thermo-mechanical oceanic subduction in which we vary the number of materials making up the overriding and subducting plates as well as the rheology (from linear viscous to more complicated rheologies). Both 2D and 3D geometries are used, as ASPECT easily extends to three dimensions (Kronbichler et al. 2012). Based on these models, we discuss the advection of compositional fields coupled to material properties and the ability of AMR to trace the slab's path through the mantle. Kronbichler, M., T. Heister and W. Bangerth (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29.

  20. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon: clinical and imaging findings, with anatomic correlations.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, Frederic E; Demondion, Xavier; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Malghem, Jacques

    2005-11-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings in two elderly female patients with spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon from the lesser trochanter of the femur. We emphasize the key contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to this diagnosis and provide an anatomic correlation. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute groin pain in the elderly. MR imaging enables positive diagnosis, by showing mass effect on the anterior aspect of the hip joint, proximal muscle thickening, and abnormal signal intensity, and by demonstrating interruption of the psoas tendon, whereas the distal insertion of the lateral portion of the iliacus muscle remains muscular and is preserved.

  1. Urodynamics in the anatomical work of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519).

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D; Grünewald, V; Jonas, U

    1999-06-01

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) incorporates the symbiosis of art and medicine and can be addressed as the founder of medical illustration in the time of the Renaissance. His anatomy studies were not published in his time, which explains why Leonardo's outstanding knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and medicine had no impact on his scientific contemporaries and is therefore primarily of retrospective importance in the history of medicine. The collection of anatomical illustrations remained unknown until their rediscovery in the eighteenth century and their wide publication at the beginning of our century. This article systematically reviews Leonardo's genitourinary drawings with regard to urodynamic aspects of the upper and lower urinary tract, highlighting topics such as vesicoureteral reflux and urinary sphincter mechanisms.

  2. A guide to modelling cardiac electrical activity in anatomically detailed ventricles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, R H; Panfilov, A V

    2008-01-01

    One of the most recent trends in cardiac electrophysiology is the development of integrative anatomically accurate models of the heart, which include description of cardiac activity from sub-cellular and cellular level to the level of the whole organ. In order to construct this type of model, a researcher needs to collect a wide range of information from books and journal articles on various aspects of biology, physiology, electrophysiology, numerical mathematics and computer programming. The aim of this methodological article is to survey recent developments in integrative modelling of electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart, and to provide a practical guide to the resources and tools that are available for work in this exciting and challenging area.

  3. Family-Based Genetic Association for Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Pierri, Ricardo A G; Souza, Juliana F; Fragelli, Camila Maria B; Restrepo, Manuel; Finoti, Livia S; Bussaneli, Diego G; Cordeiro, Rita C L; Secolin, Rodrigo; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Despite some evidence of genetic and environmental factors on molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), its aetiology remains unclear. This family-based genetic association study aimed more comprehensively to investigate the genetic carriage potentially involved in MIH development. DNA was obtained from buccal cells of 391 individuals who were birth family members of 101 Brazilian nuclear families. Sixty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated in 21 candidate genes related to amelogenesis using the TaqMan™ OpenArray™ Genotyping platform. All SNPs were genotyped in 165 birth family members unaffected by MIH, 96 with unknown MIH status and 130 affected individuals (50.7% with severe MIH). Association analysis was performed by the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT), and statistical results were corrected using the false discovery rate. Significant results were obtained for SNPs rs7821494 (FAM83H gene, OR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.75-7.78), rs34367704 (AMBN gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.16-6.58), rs3789334 (BMP2 gene, OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.34-6.35), rs6099486 (BMP7 gene, OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.14-4.38), rs762642 (BMP4 gene, OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.38-3.65), rs7664896 (ENAM gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.19-3.51), rs1711399 (MMP20 gene, OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.72), rs1711423 (MMP20 gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.18-3.61), rs2278163 (DLX3 gene, OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.26-6.41), rs6996321 (FGFR1 gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.20-5.88), and rs5979395 (AMELX gene, OR = 11.7; 95% CI = 1.63-84.74). Through this family-based association study, we concluded that variations in genes related to amelogenesis were associated with the susceptibility to develop MIH. This result is in agreement with the multifactorial idea of the MIH aetiology, but further studies are necessary to investigate more thoroughly the factors that could influence MIH.

  4. An Ex-vivo Shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes bonded using different techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alwahadni, Ahed

    2017-01-01

    Background Molar bonding procedures need continuous improvement to be widely accepted clinically and eventually replace molar bands. Material and Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of enamel micro-abrasion and silane coating of the base of molar tubes on shear and tensile bond strengths of orthodontic molar tubes. A total of 200 third molars were randomly allocated into five groups of 40 teeth as follows: group 1: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid gel; control group); group 2: molar tubes bonded to etched teeth (37% phosphoric acid) with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 3: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with 18% hydrochloric acid and pumice (micro-abrasion); group 4: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes; group 5: molar tubes bonded to teeth pre-treated with microabrasion before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of molar tubes. The bond strength testing was performed using a computer control electromechanical universal testing machine. Results The highest mean shear and tensile bond strengths were recorded in group 5 (13.81±2.54MPa and 13.97±2.29 MPa, respectively). Micro-abrasion alone (group 3) and the combination of enamel micro-abrasion and the addition of silane (group 4) produced bond strength values comparable to the control. Conclusions Enamel surface pre-treatment (micro abrasion) before conventional acid etching combined with the addition of silane to the base of the molar tube produced the highest bond strengths among all tested groups. Key words:Molar, shear strength, tensile strength, orthodontic appliances. PMID:28298990

  5. Behavioural aspects of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Leistedt, Samuel J

    2013-05-10

    Behavioural and social sciences are useful in collecting and analysing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. This article aims to examine the psychopathological concepts of terrorism and discusses the developing roles for behavioural scientists. A systematic review was conducted of studies investigating behavioural aspects of terrorism. These studies were identified by a systematic search of databases, textbooks, and a supplementary manual search of references. Several fundamental concepts were identified that continue to influence the motives and the majority of the behaviours of those who support or engage in this kind of specific violence. Regardless of the psychological aspects and new roles for psychiatrists, the behavioural sciences will continue to be called upon to assist in developing better methods to gather and analyse intelligence, to understand terrorism, and perhaps to stem the radicalisation process.

  6. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    PubMed Central

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  7. [Niccolo Paganini: medical aspects of his life and work].

    PubMed

    Miranda C, Marcelo; Navarrete T, Luz; Zúñiga N, Gonzalo

    2008-07-01

    Niccolo Paganini is the most virtuous violinist of the history of music. He even received the nick name of "the violinist of the evil" for his outstanding skills on stage performance. It has been suggested that he had syphilis and tuberculosis, the commonest diseases of that time, but this hypothesis remains speculative. There are suggestions that he was the victim of iatrogenic mercurial poisoning. Furthermore, his body build suggests the presence of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome which could give him special anatomical conditions allowing him to achieve an amazing level of vírtuousness in his art. We herein review the medical aspects of this brilliant musician's life.

  8. Effects of ozone therapy on pain, swelling, and trismus following third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Kazancioglu, H O; Kurklu, E; Ezirganli, S

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic ozone application in the management of pain, swelling, and trismus associated with the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty consecutive patients with asymptomatic bilateral impacted mandibular third molars were recruited into the study. Randomly, by use of envelops, the molar on one side was extracted and ozone therapy was given (study side); the molar on the other side was extracted 2 weeks later and sham ozone therapy was given (negative control side). The mean age of the 60 patients was 22.6±2.3 years (range 18-25 years). No differences were found between the two sides for mouth opening or swelling. The degree of pain and the number of analgesic tablets taken was significantly lower for the study side. This study showed ozone therapy to have a positive effect on OHIP-14 questionnaire results.

  9. Management of Chronic Hyperplastic Pulpitis in Mandibular Molars of Middle Aged Adults- A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lingeswaran, Somiya; Ari, Geetha; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Logaranjani, Anitha

    2016-01-01

    The molar tooth of children and young adults is a common site for chronic hyperplastic pulpitis (pulp polyp). It rarely occurs in middle aged adults. This condition is usually characterized by extensive involvement of the pulp, dictating the extraction of involved tooth. Extraction of permanent molars can lead to transient or permanent malocclusion, aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems. Here we report a case of pulp polyp in mandibular first molar of a 33-year-old woman that grew into the carious cavity. The aim of this case report is to describe the diagnosis of a chronic hyperplastic pulpitis involving the permanent molar as well as to describe its management in order to preserve them as a functional unit of the dentition. PMID:26894192

  10. How Many Digits Should We Use in Formula or Molar Mass Calculations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Christer

    2004-01-01

    The calculations of uncertainties in the formula or molar masses of compounds are streamlined. Three rules of increasing complexity are proposed, which overestimate the uncertainty so there is little if any risk that the true values are missed.

  11. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene in molar oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Arte, S; Tanner, D; Paulin, L; Alaluusua, S; Thesleff, I; Pirinen, S

    2001-10-01

    Development of dentition is controlled by numerous genes, as has been shown by experimental animal studies and mutations that have been identified by genetic studies in man. Here we report a nonsense mutation in the PAX9 gene that is associated with molar tooth agenesis in a Finnish family. The A340T transversion creates a stop codon at lysine 114, and truncates the coded PAX9 protein at the end of the DNA-binding paired-box. All the affected members of the family were heterozygous for the mutation. The tooth agenesis phenotype involves all permanent second and third molars and most of the first molars and resembles the earlier reported phenotype that was also associated with a PAX9 mutation. The phenotype is presumably a consequence of haploinsufficiency of PAX9. In another Finnish family with molar tooth agenesis, we could not find similar sequence changes in PAX9.

  12. Simplifying Chemical Reactor Design by using Molar Quantities Instead of Fractional Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee F.; Falconer, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Explains the advantages of using molar quantities in chemical reactor design. Advocates the use of differential versions of reactor mass balances rather than the integrated forms. Provides specific examples and cases to illustrate the principles. (ML)

  13. Molar incisor hypomineralization: considerations about treatment in a controlled longitudinal case.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Daniela Cristina; Favretto, Carla Oliveira; Cunha, Robson Frederico

    2015-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a defect in the tooth enamel of systemic origin and may affect one or all four first permanent molars frequently associated with the permanent incisors. This case reports a 7-year-old child with severe MIH in the permanent molars associated with tooth decay and intense pain. In the first stage of treatment, therapy was performed with fluoride varnish and restoration with glass ionomer cement (GIC). After 6 years of clinical and radiographic follow-up, the restorations presented wear and fractures on the margins, indicating their replacement with composite resin. Severe cases of MIH in the early permanent molars can be treated with varnish and GIC to restore the patient's comfort and strengthen the hypomineralized dental structures. The clinical and radiographic monitoring frequently indicated when the restoration with composite resin should be performed.

  14. Root Canal Morphology of Mandibular First Permanent Molars in an Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chourasia, Hemant Ramesh; Meshram, Ganesh K.; Warhadpande, Manjusha; Dakshindas, Darshan

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro study was performed to determine the number of roots, root canals per tooth, root canal configurations, and frequency of isthmi and apical deltas in mandibular first permanent molars in an Indian population. Hundred and fifty mandibular first permanent molars were collected and subjected to clearing technique. The cleared teeth were examined in a stereomicroscope under 7.5x magnifications. The canal configurations were categorized using Vertucci's classification. Overall 94.6% of the mandibular first molars had two roots, and 5.3% had extradistal roots (distolingual root). In addition, 64% of the specimens had three root canals, and 36% had four root canals. The most common canal configurations of mesial and distal roots were Vertucci type IV (54%) and type I (65.3%), respectively. Clinician should be aware of the complex root canal morphology of mandibular first molars among the Indian population before and during the root canal treatment. PMID:22287965

  15. Aspects of B physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-14

    Various aspects of weak decays are commented on. Probing of the standard model and of phenomena beyond the standard model are discussed, followed by a theoretical view of B mesons and some experimental observations on B mesons. The point is made that any data on B decay would be interesting in that it would provide powerful new constraints in analyses of the standard model and extensions thereof. (LEW)

  16. Validation and detection of vessel landmarks by using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Bernhardt, Dominik; Biermann, Christina; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    The detection of anatomical landmarks is an important prerequisite to analyze medical images fully automatically. Several machine learning approaches have been proposed to parse 3D CT datasets and to determine the location of landmarks with associated uncertainty. However, it is a challenging task to incorporate high-level anatomical knowledge to improve these classification results. We propose a new approach to validate candidates for vessel bifurcation landmarks which is also applied to systematically search missed and to validate ambiguous landmarks. A knowledge base is trained providing human-readable geometric information of the vascular system, mainly vessel lengths, radii and curvature information, for validation of landmarks and to guide the search process. To analyze the bifurcation area surrounding a vessel landmark of interest, a new approach is proposed which is based on Fast Marching and incorporates anatomical information from the knowledge base. Using the proposed algorithms, an anatomical knowledge base has been generated based on 90 manually annotated CT images containing different parts of the body. To evaluate the landmark validation a set of 50 carotid datasets has been tested in combination with a state of the art landmark detector with excellent results. Beside the carotid bifurcation the algorithm is designed to handle a wide range of vascular landmarks, e.g. celiac, superior mesenteric, renal, aortic, iliac and femoral bifurcation.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  18. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  19. Recent advances in medical imaging: anatomical and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Bruno; Mainard, Laurence; Delion, Matthieu; Hodez, Claude; Oldrini, Guillaume

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to present an overview of the most important recent advances in medical imaging and their potential clinical and anatomical applications. Dramatic changes have been particularly observed in the field of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography (CT) has been completely overturned by the successive development of helical acquisition, multidetector and large area-detector acquisition. Visualising brain function has become a new challenge for MRI, which is called functional MRI, currently based principally on blood oxygenation level-dependent sequences, which could be completed or replaced by other techniques such as diffusion MRI (DWI). Based on molecular diffusion due to the thermal energy of free water, DWI offers a spectrum of anatomical and clinical applications, ranging from brain ischemia to visualisation of large fibrous structures of the human body such as the anatomical bundles of white matter with diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. In the field of X-ray projection imaging, a new low-dose device called EOS has been developed through new highly sensitive detectors of X-rays, allowing for acquiring frontal and lateral images simultaneously. Other improvements have been briefly mentioned. Technical principles have been considered in order to understand what is most useful in clinical practice as well as in the field of anatomical applications. Nuclear medicine has not been included.

  20. CAVEman: Standardized Anatomical Context for Biomedical Data Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turinsky, Andrei L.; Fanea, Elena; Trinh, Quang; Wat, Stephen; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Dong, Xiaoli; Shu, Xueling; Stromer, Julie N.; Hill, Jonathan W.; Edwards, Carol; Grosenick, Brenda; Yajima, Masumi; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have created a software system called the CAVEman, for the visual integration and exploration of heterogeneous anatomical and biomedical data. The CAVEman can be applied for both education and research tasks. The main component of the system is a three-dimensional digital atlas of the adult male human anatomy, structured according to…