Science.gov

Sample records for molding lithographic applications

  1. Contamination of PDMS microchannels by lithographic molds.

    PubMed

    Bubendorfer, Andrea J; Ingham, Bridget; Kennedy, John V; Arnold, W Mike

    2013-11-21

    By use of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we show the SU-8 soft lithographic process contaminates PDMS. Residues of the antimony containing photoinitiator are transferred from the master mold to the surface of PDMS, uncontrollably intensifying the surface potential, leading to electroosmotic flow variability in PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:24080639

  2. Alternative high-resolution lithographic technologies for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitner, Uwe D.; Weichelt, Tina; Bourgin, Yannick; Kinder, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Modern optical applications have special demands on the lithographic fabrication technologies. This relates to the lateral shape of the structures as well as to their three dimensional surface profile. On the other hand optical nano-structures are often periodic which allows for the use of dedicated lithographic exposure principles. The paper briefly reviews actual developments in the field of optical nano-structure generation. Special emphasis will be given to two technologies: electron-beam lithography based on a flexible cell-projection method and the actual developments in diffractive mask aligner lithography. Both offer a cost effective fabrication alternative for high resolution structures or three-dimensional optical surface profiles.

  3. Thermophilic molds: Biology and applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijender; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J; Johri, B N; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-11-01

    Thermophilic molds thrive in a variety of natural habitats including soils, composts, wood chip piles, nesting materials of birds and other animals, municipal refuse and others, and ubiquitous in their distribution. These molds grow in simple media containing carbon and nitrogen sources and mineral salts. Polyamines are synthesized in these molds and the composition of lipids varies considerably, predominantly containing palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids with low levels of lauric, palmiotoleic and stearic acids. Thermophilic molds are capable of efficiently degrading organic materials by secreting thermostable enzymes, which are useful in the bioremediation of industrial wastes and effluents that are rich in oil, heavy metals, anti-nutritional factors such as phytic acid and polysaccharides. Thermophilic molds synthesize several antimicrobial substances and biotechnologically useful miscellaneous enzymes. The analysis of genomes of thermophilic molds reveals high G:C contents, shorter introns and intergenic regions with lesser repetitive sequences, and further confirms their ability to degrade agro-residues efficiently. Genetic engineering has aided in ameliorating the characteristics of the enzymes of thermophilic molds. This review is aimed at focusing on the biology of thermophilic molds with emphasis on recent developments in the analysis of genomes, genetic engineering and potential applications.

  4. Thermophilic molds: Biology and applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijender; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J; Johri, B N; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-11-01

    Thermophilic molds thrive in a variety of natural habitats including soils, composts, wood chip piles, nesting materials of birds and other animals, municipal refuse and others, and ubiquitous in their distribution. These molds grow in simple media containing carbon and nitrogen sources and mineral salts. Polyamines are synthesized in these molds and the composition of lipids varies considerably, predominantly containing palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids with low levels of lauric, palmiotoleic and stearic acids. Thermophilic molds are capable of efficiently degrading organic materials by secreting thermostable enzymes, which are useful in the bioremediation of industrial wastes and effluents that are rich in oil, heavy metals, anti-nutritional factors such as phytic acid and polysaccharides. Thermophilic molds synthesize several antimicrobial substances and biotechnologically useful miscellaneous enzymes. The analysis of genomes of thermophilic molds reveals high G:C contents, shorter introns and intergenic regions with lesser repetitive sequences, and further confirms their ability to degrade agro-residues efficiently. Genetic engineering has aided in ameliorating the characteristics of the enzymes of thermophilic molds. This review is aimed at focusing on the biology of thermophilic molds with emphasis on recent developments in the analysis of genomes, genetic engineering and potential applications. PMID:26777293

  5. Lithographically Encrypted Inverse Opals for Anti-Counterfeiting Applications.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yongjoon; Kang, Hyelim; Lee, Joon-Seok; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals possess inimitable optical properties of iridescent structural colors and unique spectral shape, which render them useful for security materials. This work reports a novel method to encrypt graphical and spectral codes in polymeric inverse opals to provide advanced security. To accomplish this, this study prepares lithographically featured micropatterns on the top surface of hydrophobic inverse opals, which serve as shadow masks against the surface modification of air cavities to achieve hydrophilicity. The resultant inverse opals allow rapid infiltration of aqueous solution into the hydrophilic cavities while retaining air in the hydrophobic cavities. Therefore, the structural color of inverse opals is regioselectively red-shifted, disclosing the encrypted graphical codes. The decoded inverse opals also deliver unique reflectance spectral codes originated from two distinct regions. The combinatorial code composed of graphical and optical codes is revealed only when the aqueous solution agreed in advance is used for decoding. In addition, the encrypted inverse opals are chemically stable, providing invariant codes with high reproducibility. In addition, high mechanical stability enables the transfer of the films onto any surfaces. This novel encryption technology will provide a new opportunity in a wide range of security applications. PMID:27259060

  6. Lithographically Encrypted Inverse Opals for Anti-Counterfeiting Applications.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yongjoon; Kang, Hyelim; Lee, Joon-Seok; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals possess inimitable optical properties of iridescent structural colors and unique spectral shape, which render them useful for security materials. This work reports a novel method to encrypt graphical and spectral codes in polymeric inverse opals to provide advanced security. To accomplish this, this study prepares lithographically featured micropatterns on the top surface of hydrophobic inverse opals, which serve as shadow masks against the surface modification of air cavities to achieve hydrophilicity. The resultant inverse opals allow rapid infiltration of aqueous solution into the hydrophilic cavities while retaining air in the hydrophobic cavities. Therefore, the structural color of inverse opals is regioselectively red-shifted, disclosing the encrypted graphical codes. The decoded inverse opals also deliver unique reflectance spectral codes originated from two distinct regions. The combinatorial code composed of graphical and optical codes is revealed only when the aqueous solution agreed in advance is used for decoding. In addition, the encrypted inverse opals are chemically stable, providing invariant codes with high reproducibility. In addition, high mechanical stability enables the transfer of the films onto any surfaces. This novel encryption technology will provide a new opportunity in a wide range of security applications.

  7. Applications of two- and three-dimensional microstructures formed by soft lithographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Rebecca Jane

    This thesis describes the development of several soft lithographic techniques. Each of these techniques has applications in two- and three-dimensional microfabrication or in the design of microreactor systems. All soft lithographic techniques make use of an elastomeric element that is formed by casting and curing a prepolymer against a planar substrate having three-dimensional (3D) relief. Chapters 1--3 (and Appendices I--VII) describe the use of a soft lithographic technique, microcontact printing (muCP), to produce patterns with micron-scale resolution on both planar and non-planar substrates. Electrodeposition transforms patterns produced by muCP into functional, 3D structures. It is an additive method that: (i) strengthens the metallic patterns; (ii) increases the conductivity of the structures; (iii) enables high-strain deformations to be performed on the structures; and (iv) welds non-connected structures. Applications for cylindrical microstructures, formed by the combination of muCP and electroplating, are presented. Some important classes of materials---biological macromolecules, gels, sol-gels, some polymers, low molecular weight organic and organometallic species---are often incompatible with conventional patterning techniques. Chapters 4 and 5 describe the use of elastomeric membranes as dry resists or as masks in dry lift-off to produce simple features as small as 5 mum from these and other materials on both planar and non-planar surfaces. These procedures are "dry" because the membranes conformed and sealed reversibly to surfaces without the use of solvents. This technique, for example, produced a simple electroluminescent device. By using two membranes simultaneously, multicolored, photoluminescent patterns of organic materials were created. Membranes were also used in sequential, dry-lift off steps to produce patterns with greater complexity. Chapter 6 (and Appendix XII) demonstrates that the ability to mold elastomers enables the fabrication of

  8. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  9. Lithographically defined shape-specific polymeric particulates for nanomedicine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li

    Size and shape are fundamental properties of micro/nano particles that are critically important for nanomedicine applications. Extensive studies have revealed the effect particle size has on spherical particles with respect to biological behaviors such as blood circulation time or targeting efficacy to specific receptors on the cell. In contrast, the importance of particle shape has been less understood. The major contributing factor is that conventional bottom-up fabrication methods are limited in their ability to control the shape of polymeric particles precisely. This dissertation will mainly focus on the development of top-down platforms to fabricate shape-specific polymeric particles. Shape-specific polymeric particles incorporated with fluorescent or magnetic agents were demonstrated with high uniformity. Microfluidic testing platform was built to verify the shape effect on the flow behavior of fabricated particles. The fabrication platform developed here opened up the opportunity to perform fundamental study on how shape can alter the biological behavior of polymeric nanomedicine, thus leading to a more rational design of nanomedicine with enhanced efficacy but reduced toxicity.

  10. Molds

    MedlinePlus

    Molds are fungi that can be found both outdoors and indoors. They grow best in warm, damp and humid conditions. If ... spots in your house, you will probably get mold. Molds can cause health problems. Inhaling or touching ...

  11. Flow Controlled Solvent Vapor Annealing of Block Copolymers for Lithographic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotrik, Kevin Willy

    Self-assembly of block copolymer thin-films may provide an inexpensive alternative to patterning lithographic features below the resolution limits of traditional optical methods. Block copolymers (BCPs) are polymers made of two or more distinct monomer /block units that are covalently bonded. Due to their differences in surface energy, the different blocks tend to phase segregate like oil and water; but because of the covalent linkage, this segregation is practically limited to size scales ranging from only a few nm to ≈ 100 nm. A thin film of a BCP can be used in much the same way as a photoresist in the lithographic process, whereas a desired pattern morphology can be obtained by etching one block away and leaving behind a self-assembled hard mask for the underlying substrate. After a thin film of BCP is coated onto a given substrate, the BCP must be given an annealing step, where the disordered entangled polymer networks can be allowed to diffuse and equilibrate into lower free energy configurations which result in periodic patterns of micelles with different morphologies such as spheres, in/out of plane cylinders, etc. This work explored the technique of solvent vapor annealing, where organic solvents were allowed to interact with BCP thin films to facilitate annealing and act as surrogates for the different BCP polymer blocks. This allowed for a wide range of control over the BCP self-assembly (morphology, periodicity, etc.) for a given molecular weight BCP. Additionally, by adding heat at critical times during the self-assembly, time scales for solvent vapor enhanced self-assembly could be reduced from hours to seconds making the prospects for this technology to become industrially applicable more promising. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  12. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  13. An efficient lithographic hotspot severity analysis methodology using Calibre PATTERN MATCHING and DRC application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, ZeXi; Du, ChunShan; Hong, Lin; Zhang, LiGuo; Wang, JinYan

    2015-03-01

    As the IC industry moves forward to advanced nodes, especially under 28nm technology, the printability issue is becoming more and more challenging because layouts are more congested with a smaller critical feature size and the manufacturing process window is tighter. Consequently, design-process co-optimization plays an important role in achieving a higher yield in a shorter tape-out time. A great effort has to be made to analyze the process defects and build checking kits to deliver the manufacturing information, by utilizing EDA software, to designers to dig out the potential manufacturing issues and quickly identify hotspots and prioritize how to fix them according to the severity levels. This paper presents a unique hotspot pattern analysis flow that SMIC has built for advanced technology to analyze the potential yield detractor patterns in millions of patterns from real designs and rank them with severity levels related to real fab process. The flow uses Mentor Graphics Calibre® PM (Calibre® Pattern Matching) technology for pattern library creation and pattern clustering; meanwhile it incorporates Calibre® LFD (Calibre® Litho-Friendly Design) technology for accurate simulation-based lithographic hotspot checking. Pattern building, clustering, scoring, ranking and fixing are introduced in detail in this paper.

  14. Tailorable 3D microfabrication for photonic applications: two-polymer microtransfer molding (proceedings paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; kim, Chang-Hwan; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2006-02-28

    For photonic devices, extending beyond the planar regime to the third dimension can allow a higher degree of integration and novel functionalities for applications such as photonic crystals and integrated optical circuits. Although conventional photolithography can achieve both high quality and structural control, it is still costly and slow for three-dimensional (3D) fabrication. Moreover, as diverse functional polymers emerge, there is potential to develop new techniques for quick and economical fabrication of 3D structures. We present a 3D microfabrication technique based on the soft lithographic technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-{micro}TM) to accomplish low cost, high structural fidelity and tailorable 3D microfabrication for polymers. Using 2P-{micro}TM, highly layered polymeric microstructures are achievable by stacking planar structures layer by layer. For increased processing control, the surface chemistry of the polymers is characterized as a function of changing ultraviolet dosage to optimize yield in layer transfer. We discuss the application of the 2P-{micro}TM to build polymer templates for woodpile photonic crystals, and demonstrate methods for converting the polymer templates to dielectric and metallic photonic crystal structures. Finally, we will show that 2P-{micro}TM is promising for fabricating 3D polymeric optical waveguides.

  15. Metal Injection Molding of Alloy 718 for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Eric A.; Peretti, Michael W.

    2012-02-01

    The metal injection molding process, used in the automotive, medical, and consumer markets for several decades, was investigated for application to superalloys for small, complex-shaped, aerospace components. With sufficient control on processing, inclusion risks, and chemistry, the process can successfully be applied to superalloy 718 components. Assessments included tensile and fatigue property evaluation, characterization of microstructure, and development of an AMS specification.

  16. Applications of thin carbon coatings and films in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Eusebio Duarte

    In this research, the technical feasibility of two novel applications of thin carbon coatings is demonstrated. The first application consists of using thin carbon coatings on molds for molding ultra-thin plastic parts (<0.5 mm thickness) with lower pressures by promoting wall slip. The second application consists of a new approach to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding for plastic parts using in mold coated nanoparticle thin films or nanopapers to create a conductive top layer. During this research, the technical feasibility of a new approach was proven which provides injection molding of ultra-thin parts at lower pressures, without the need of fast heating/fast cooling or other expensive mold modification. An in-house developed procedure by other members of our group, was employed for coating the mold surface using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulting in a graphene coating with carbide bonding to the mold surface. The coating resulted in a significant decrease of surface friction and consequently easiness of flow when compared to their uncoated counterparts. Thermoplastic polymers and their composites are a very attractive alternative but are hindered by the non-conductive nature of polymers. There are two general approaches used to date to achieve EMI shielding for plastic products. One is to spray a conductive metal coating onto the plastic surface forming a layer that must maintain its shielding effectiveness (SE), and its adhesion to the plastic throughout the expected life of the product. However, metal coatings add undesirable weight and tend to corrode over time. Furthermore, scratching the coating may create shielding failure; therefore, a protective topcoat may be required. The other approach is to use polymer composites filled with conductive fillers such as carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF), and carbon nanotube (CNT). While conductive fillers may increase the electrical conductivity of polymer composites, the loading of

  17. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  18. Lithographic microfabrication of biocompatible polymers for tissue engineering and lab-on-a-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balciunas, Evaldas; Jonusauskas, Linas; Valuckas, Vytautas; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Gadonas, Roaldas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a combination of Direct Laser Writing (DLW), PoliDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography and UV lithography was used to create cm- scale microstructured polymer scaolds for cell culture experiments out of dierent biocompatible materials: novel hybrid organic-inorganic SZ2080, PDMS elastomer, biodegradable PEG- DA-258 and SU-8. Rabbit muscle-derived stem cells were seeded on the fabricated dierent periodicity scaolds to evaluate if the relief surface had any eect on cell proliferation. An array of microlenses was fabricated using DLW out of SZ2080 and replicated in PDMS and PEG-DA-258, showing good potential applicability of the used techniques in many other elds like micro- and nano- uidics, photonics, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The synergetic employment of three dierent fabrication techniques allowed to produce desired objects with low cost, high throughput and precision as well as use materials that are dicult to process by other means (PDMS and PEG-DA-258). DLW is a relatively slow fabrication method, since the object has to be written point-by-point. By applying PDMS soft lithography, we were enabled to replicate laser-fabricated scaolds for stem cell growth and micro-optical elements for lab-on-a-chip applications with high speed, low cost and good reproducible quality.

  19. Nanoscale electrode arrays produced with microscale lithographic techniques for use in biomedical sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Terry, Jonathan G; Schmüser, Ilka; Underwood, Ian; Corrigan, Damion K; Freeman, Neville J; Bunting, Andrew S; Mount, Andrew R; Walton, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    A novel technique for the production of nanoscale electrode arrays that uses standard microfabrication processes and micron-scale photolithography is reported here in detail. These microsquare nanoband edge electrode (MNEE) arrays have been fabricated with highly reproducible control of the key array dimensions, including the size and pitch of the individual elements and, most importantly, the width of the nanoband electrodes. The definition of lateral features to nanoscale dimensions typically requires expensive patterning techniques that are complex and low-throughput. However, the fabrication methodology used here relies on the fact that vertical dimensions (i.e. layer thicknesses) have long been manufacturable at the nanoscale using thin film deposition techniques that are well established in mainstream microelectronics. The authors report for the first time two aspects that highlight the particular suitability of these MNEE array systems for probe monolayer biosensing. The first is simulation, which shows the enhanced sensitivity to the redox reaction of the solution redox couple. The second is the enhancement of probe film functionalisation observed for the probe film model molecule, 6-mercapto-1-hexanol compared with microsquare electrodes. Such surface modification for specific probe layer biosensing and detection is of significance for a wide range of biomedical and other sensing and analytical applications. PMID:24206769

  20. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications.

    PubMed

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-12-07

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson's ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process.

  1. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson’s ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process. PMID:26640124

  2. Nanoscale electrode arrays produced with microscale lithographic techniques for use in biomedical sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Terry, Jonathan G; Schmüser, Ilka; Underwood, Ian; Corrigan, Damion K; Freeman, Neville J; Bunting, Andrew S; Mount, Andrew R; Walton, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    A novel technique for the production of nanoscale electrode arrays that uses standard microfabrication processes and micron-scale photolithography is reported here in detail. These microsquare nanoband edge electrode (MNEE) arrays have been fabricated with highly reproducible control of the key array dimensions, including the size and pitch of the individual elements and, most importantly, the width of the nanoband electrodes. The definition of lateral features to nanoscale dimensions typically requires expensive patterning techniques that are complex and low-throughput. However, the fabrication methodology used here relies on the fact that vertical dimensions (i.e. layer thicknesses) have long been manufacturable at the nanoscale using thin film deposition techniques that are well established in mainstream microelectronics. The authors report for the first time two aspects that highlight the particular suitability of these MNEE array systems for probe monolayer biosensing. The first is simulation, which shows the enhanced sensitivity to the redox reaction of the solution redox couple. The second is the enhancement of probe film functionalisation observed for the probe film model molecule, 6-mercapto-1-hexanol compared with microsquare electrodes. Such surface modification for specific probe layer biosensing and detection is of significance for a wide range of biomedical and other sensing and analytical applications.

  3. Buckling assisted and lithographically micropatterned fully flexible sensors for conformal integration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Debanjan; Wala, Jyoti; Das, Soumen

    2015-12-01

    Development of flexible sensors/electronics over substrates thicker than 100 μm is of immense importance for its practical feasibility. However, unlike over ultrathin films, large bending stress hinders its flexibility. Here we have employed a novel technique of fabricating sensors over a non-planar ridge topology under pre-stretched condition which not only helps in spontaneous generation of large and uniform parallel buckles upon release, but also acts as stress reduction zones thereby preventing Poisson’s ratio induced lateral cracking. Further, we propose a complete lithography compatible process to realize flexible sensors over pre-stretched substrates thicker than 100 μm that are released through dissolution of a water soluble sacrificial layer of polyvinyl alcohol. These buckling assisted flexible sensors demonstrated superior performance along different flexible modalities. Based on the above concept, we also realized a micro thermal flow sensor, conformally wrapped around angiographic catheters to detect flow abnormalities for potential applications in interventional catheterization process.

  4. Development of Nanosphere Lithography Technique with Enhanced Lithographical Accuracy on Periodic Si Nanostructure for Thin Si Solar Cell Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeayoung

    In this thesis, a novel silica nanosphere (SNS) lithography technique has been developed to offer a fast, cost-effective, and large area applicable nano-lithography approach. The SNS can be easily deposited with a simple spin-coating process after introducing a N,N-dimethyl-formamide (DMF) solvent which can produce a highly close packed SNS monolayer over large silicon (Si) surface area, since DMF offers greatly improved wetting, capillary and convective forces in addition to slow solvent evaporation rate. Since the period and dimension of the surface pattern can be conveniently changed and controlled by introducing a desired size of SNS, and additional SNS size reduction with dry etching process, using SNS for lithography provides a highly effective nano-lithography approach for periodically arrayed nano-/micro-scale surface patterns with a desired dimension and period. Various Si nanostructures ( i.e., nanopillar, nanotip, inverted pyramid, nanohole) are successfully fabricated with the SNS nano-lithography technique by using different etching technique like anisotropic alkaline solution (i.e., KOH) etching, reactive-ion etching (RIE), and metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE). In this research, computational optical modeling is also introduced to design the Si nanostructure, specifically nanopillars (NPs) with a desired period and dimension. The optical properties of Si NP are calculated with two different optical modeling techniques, which are the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods. By using these two different optical modeling techniques, the optical properties of Si NPs with different periods and dimensions have been investigated to design ideal Si NP which can be potentially used for thin c-Si solar cell applications. From the results of the computational and experimental work, it was observed that low aspect ratio Si NPs fabricated in a periodic hexagonal array can provide highly enhanced light absorption

  5. Lithographic fabrication of nanoapertures

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of silicon-based lithographically defined nanoapertures and processes for their fabrication using conventional silicon microprocessing technology have been invented. The new ability to create and control such structures should significantly extend our ability to design and implement chemically selective devices and processes.

  6. Order and defectivity nanometrology by image processing and analysis of sub-20 nm BCPs features for lithographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, C.; Tuchapsky, D.; Khunsin, W.; Amann, A.; Morris, M. A.; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia

    2014-05-01

    The line patterns obtained by the self-assembly of the block copolymer (BCP) polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO) was investigated. The hexagonal PS-b-PEO 42k-11.5k in a thin film was solvent annealed in a chlorophorm saturated atmosphere for three different annealing times. The microphase segregation of this BCP returned 18nm cylinders of PEO through the PS matrix, with an approximately 40 n periodicity, as expected. Under chlorophorm vapours, the PEO cylinders oriented perpendicular to the silicon substrate while increasing the annealing time. These cylinders formed linear patterns with different alignment. To achieve insights about the percentage of alignment, defect type pareto and density, and order quantification to compare the three annealing recipes, the samples were analysed with innovative image analysis software specifically developed in our laboratory to identify elements and defects of line arrays from block copolymer self-assembly. From this technique, it was extracted dimensional metrology estimating pitch size and placement error, and the line-width of the lines was estimated. Secondly, the methodology allows identification and quantification of typical defects observable in BCP systems, such as turning points, disclination or branching points, break or lone points and end points. The defect density and the quantification of the alignment were estimated using our technique. The methodology presented here represents a step forward in dimensional metrology and defect analysis of BCP DSA systems and can be readily used to analyze other lithographic or non-lithographic patterns.

  7. Resin transfer molding of textile preforms for aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasko, Gregory H.; Dexter, H. Benson; Weideman, Mark H.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and supporting research to develop cost-effective fabrication methods that are applicable to primary composite aircraft structures. One of the most promising fabrication methods that has evolved is resin transfer molding (RTM) of dry textile material forms. RTM has been used for many years for secondary structures, but has received increased emphasis because it is an excellent method for applying resin to damage-tolerant textile preforms at low cost. Textile preforms based on processes such as weaving, braiding, knitting, stitching, and combinations of these have been shown to offer significant improvements in damage tolerance compared to laminated tape composites. The use of low-cost resins combined with textile preforms could provide a major breakthrough in achieving cost-effective composite aircraft structures. RTM uses resin in its lowest cost form, and storage and spoilage costs are minimal. Near net shape textile preforms are expected to be cost-effective because automated machines can be used to produce the preforms, post-cure operations such as machining and fastening are minimized, and material scrap rate may be reduced in comparison with traditional prepreg molding. The purpose of this paper is to discuss experimental and analytical techniques that are under development at NASA Langley to aid the engineer in developing RTM processes for airframe structural elements. Included are experimental techniques to characterize preform and resin behavior and analytical methods that were developed to predict resin flow and cure kinetics.

  8. Chemorheology of in-mold coating for compression molded SMC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seunghyun; Straus, Elliott J.; Castro, Jose M.

    2015-05-01

    In-mold coating (IMC) is applied to compression molded sheet molding compound (SMC) exterior automotive or truck body panels as an environmentally friendly alternative to make the surface conductive for subsequent electrostatic painting operations. The coating is a thermosetting liquid that when injected onto the surface of the part cures and bonds to provide a smooth conductive surface. In order to optimize the IMC process, it is essential to predict the time available for flow, that is the time before the thermosetting reaction starts (inhibition time) as well as the time when the coating has enough structural integrity so that the mold can be opened without damaging the part surface (cure time). To predict both the inhibition time and the cure time, it is critical to study the chemorheology of IMC. In this paper, we study the chemorheology for a typical commercial IMC system, and show its relevance to both the flow and cure time for the IMC stage during SMC compression molding.

  9. Crack-resistant siloxane molding compounds. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, J.W.; Swearngin, C.B.

    1980-11-03

    The crack resistance of phenyl silicone molding resins containing siliceous fillers is improved by incorporating therein about 0.5 to 5.5% by weight of ..beta..-eucryptite, a lithium aluminum silicate having a negative thermal expansion coefficient. These molding resins are particularly suitable for encapsulating electronic devices such as diodes, coils, resistors, and the like.

  10. Lithographically Defined Three-dimensional Pore-patterned Carbon with Nitrogen Doping for High-Performance Ultrathin Supercapacitor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Da-Young; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Supercapacitors that exhibit long cycle lives and fast charge/discharge rates are a promising energy-storage technology for next-generation mobile or wearable electronic systems. A great challenge facing the fabrication of ultrathin supercapacitor components, specifically their porous electrodes, is whether such components can be integrated with the fabrication of electronic devices, i.e., semiconductor fabrication processes. Here, we introduce the lithographic fabrication of micrometre-thick, submicrometre-pore-patterned carbon for supercapacitor electrodes. The pore patterns designed by multi-beam interference lithography and direct carbonisation of the photoresist pattern produced pore-patterned carbon films. A facile doping process was subsequently employed to introduce nitrogen atoms into the carbon, which was intended to further enhance the carbon's capacitive properties. Specifically, during these fabrication steps, we developed an approach that uses a supporting shell on the surface of the pore patterns to maintain their structural integrity. The nitrogen-doped, pore-patterned carbon electrodes exhibited an areal specific capacitance of 32.7 mF/cm2 at 0.5 mA/cm2 when used as supercapacitor electrodes, which is approximately 20 times greater than that of commercially available MWCNT films measured under the same conditions. PMID:24953307

  11. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  12. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  13. Solvent driven motion of lithographically fabricated gels.

    PubMed

    Bassik, Noy; Abebe, Beza T; Gracias, David H

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the solvent driven motion of lithographically structured poly- N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAm) gels. The gels were soaked in ethanol and then transferred to water, where they moved spontaneously. This movement was driven by the expulsion of the ethanol from the gel and subsequent ethanol spreading at the air-water interface. We utilized lithographic patterning of the gels at the micron-millimeter length scales to investigate the effect of size, shape and symmetry. Lithographic patterning allowed the structures to be fabricated in an identical manner, thereby allowing a single variable (such as shape, size, or symmetry) to be altered while minimizing change in other variables such as thickness, roughness and swelling characteristics. The diverse range of motions including translation, precession and rotation could be controlled and were recorded using videography. Gels were lithographically patterned with features less than 100 microm, and exhibited remarkably high linear and rotational velocities of up to 31 cm/s and 3529 rpm over time spans of seconds to minutes. We observed a reciprocal dependence of maximum rotational velocity on linear dimension. The linear velocity for all types of motion, along a line or curve, was analyzed and found to be similar across different shapes and sizes. This velocity was in the range of 17-39 cm/s even though our sizes and shapes varied across orders of magnitude. We postulate that this velocity is related to the velocity of spreading of ethanol on water, which is approximately 53 cm/s. Additionally, since this solvent powered motion is a clean, quiet and reusable source of motive power, with no need for on-board wiring or batteries, we explored applications in moving lithographically integrated metallic payloads on top of the gels and utilized the gels to move larger floating objects.

  14. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded,...

  15. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded,...

  16. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.70 Section 428.70... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Large-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.70 Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded,...

  17. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.50 Section 428.50... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Small-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.50 Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded,...

  18. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.50 Section 428.50... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Small-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.50 Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded,...

  19. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.50 Section 428.50... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Small-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.50 Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded,...

  20. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.70 Section 428.70... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Large-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.70 Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded,...

  1. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.70 Section 428.70... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Large-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.70 Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded,...

  2. Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush, Jr.; Dale T. Peters; Stephen P. Midson; Darryl J. Van Son

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the study, Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency, was to support the Copper Development Association (CDA) in its effort to design, fabricate and demonstrate mold technologies designed to withstand the copper motor rotor die casting environment for an economically acceptable life. The anticipated result from the compiled data and tests were to: (1) identify materials suitable for die casting copper, (2) fabricate motor rotor molds and (3) supply copper rotor motors for testing in actual compressor systems. Compressor manufacturers can apply the results to assess the technical and economical viability of copper rotor motors.

  3. Holistic, model-based optimization of edge leveling as an enabler for lithographic focus control: application to a memory use case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, T.; Kang, Y.-S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Park, S.-J.; Jang, S.-Y.; Hu, K.-Y.; Koop, E. J.; Hinnen, P. C.; Voncken, M. M. A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Advancement of the next generation technology nodes and emerging memory devices demand tighter lithographic focus control. Although the leveling performance of the latest-generation scanners is state of the art, challenges remain at the wafer edge due to large process variations. There are several customer configurable leveling control options available in ASML scanners, some of which are application specific in their scope of leveling improvement. In this paper, we assess the usability of leveling non-correctable error models to identify yield limiting edge dies. We introduce a novel dies-inspec based holistic methodology for leveling optimization to guide tool users in selecting an optimal configuration of leveling options. Significant focus gain, and consequently yield gain, can be achieved with this integrated approach. The Samsung site in Hwaseong observed an improved edge focus performance in a production of a mid-end memory product layer running on an ASML NXT 1960 system. 50% improvement in focus and a 1.5%p gain in edge yield were measured with the optimized configurations.

  4. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Mold Allergy Share | Mold Allergy Overview Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Mold Allergy Overview Molds are tiny fungi whose spores ...

  5. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  6. Use of directly molded poly(methyl methacrylate) channels for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hoon; Kang, Do Hyun; Kim, Hong Nam; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-12-01

    A direct molding method for creating a homogeneous, polymer microfluidic channel is presented. By utilizing capillary rise and subsequent absorption of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solution into a solvent-permeable poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) mold, various circular or elliptic polymer microchannels were fabricated without channel bonding and additional surface modification processes. In addition, the channel diameter was tunable from several micrometres to several hundreds of micrometres by controlling concentration and initial amount of polymer solution for a given PDMS mold geometry. The molded PMMA channels were used for two applications: blocking absorption of Rhodamine B dye and constructing artificial endothelial cell-cultured capillaries. It was observed that the molded PMMA channels effectively prevented absorption and diffusion of Rhodamine molecules over 5 h time span, demonstrating approximately 40 times higher blocking efficiency as compared to porous PDMS channels. Also, calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) adhered, spread, and proliferated uniformly within the molded microchannels to form near confluency within 3 days and remained viable at day 6 without notable cell death, suggesting high biocompatibility and possibility for emulating in vivo-like three-dimensional architecture of blood vessels. PMID:20938498

  7. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  8. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  9. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60... (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants Subcategory § 428.60 Applicability; description of the medium-sized general...

  10. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Allergist Health Professionals Partners Media Donate Allergies Mold Allergy What Is a Mold Allergy? If you have an allergy that occurs ... or basement. What Are the Symptoms of a Mold Allergy? The symptoms of mold allergy are very ...

  11. Application of statistical methods for analyzing the relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer in sand molds

    SciTech Connect

    Y. A. Owusu

    1999-03-31

    This report presents a statistical method of evaluating geometric tolerances of casting products using point cloud data generated by coordinate measuring machine (CMM) process. The focus of this report is to present a statistical-based approach to evaluate the differences in dimensional and form variations or tolerances of casting products as affected by casting gating system, molding material, casting thickness, and casting orientation at the mold-metal interface. Form parameters such as flatness, parallelism, and other geometric profiles such as angularity, casting length, and height of casting products were obtained and analyzed from CMM point cloud data. In order to relate the dimensional and form errors to the factors under consideration such as flatness and parallelism, a factorial analysis of variance and statistical test means methods were performed to identify the factors that contributed to the casting distortion at the mold-metal interface.

  12. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory § 428.100 Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory....

  13. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory § 428.100 Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory....

  14. Molded GASIR ® infrared optics for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimond, Y.; Bellec, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Umicore IR Glass has developed an industrial process to manufacture low cost chalcogenide glasses. These materials called GASIR® are transparent in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows which allows to use them in all the sensing and thermal imaging applications where Germanium and ZnSe usually stands. During the past 5 years, Umicore has developed and produced with and for its customers various GASIR ® optics in low and medium volume for military and civilian applications. But from the beginning of last year, the company is also very active in the automotive market. For that reason, a huge work of development on optics quality has been done to comply with automotive requests. Umicore's GASIR ® optics are used for instance in the night vision system that BMW launched in September 2005 on its 7-series. This system which will be described in this paper was developed by Umicore's customer, automotive TIER1 producer Autoliv.

  15. Modeling and control of flow during impregnation of heterogeneous porous media, with application to composite mold-filling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickerton, Simon

    Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) encompasses a growing list of composite material manufacturing techniques. These processes have provided the promise for complex fiber reinforced plastics parts, manufactured from a single molding step. In recent years a significant research effort has been invested in development of process simulations, providing tools that have advanced current LCM technology and broadened the range of applications. The requirement for manufacture of larger, more complex parts has motivated investigation of active control of LCM processes. Due to the unlimited variety of part geometries that can be produced, finite element based process simulations will be used to some extent in design of actively controlled processes. Ongoing efforts are being made to improve material parameter specification for process simulations, increasing their value as design tools. Several phenomena occurring during mold filling have been addressed through flow visualization experimentation and analysis of manufactured composite parts. The influence of well defined air channels within a mold cavity is investigated, incorporating their effects within existing filling simulations. Three different flow configurations have been addressed, testing the application of 'equivalent permeabilities', effectively approximating air channels as representative porous media. LCM parts having doubly curved regions require preform fabrics to undergo significant, and varying deformation throughout a mold cavity. Existing methods for predicting preform deformation, and the resulting permeability distribution have been applied to a conical mold geometry. Comparisons between experiment and simulation are promising, while the geometry studied has required large deformation over much of the part, shearing the preform fabric beyond the scope of the models applied. An investigational study was performed to determine the magnitude of effect, if any, on mold filling caused by corners within LCM mold

  16. Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  17. MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, P.G.

    1963-10-01

    Molding apparatus capable of coating multiple elements each molding cycle is described. The apparatus comprises a centrally disposed reservoir penetrated by a plurality of circumferentially arranged and radially extending passageways. These passageways, in turn, communicate with passages in a separable annular member that retains selectively configured molds and mold seating arrangements. Each mold, which is readily removable from its respective seat, is adapted to retain an element therein in spaced relation to the interior of the mold by utilizing element positioning means within the mold seat and the mold so that coating material may flow about the entire outer surface of the element. (AEC)

  18. 3D lithographically fabricated nanoliter containers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Randall, Christina L; Leong, Timothy G; Bassik, Noy; Gracias, David H

    2007-12-22

    Lithographic patterning offers the possibility for precise structuring of drug delivery devices. The fabrication process can also facilitate the incorporation of advanced functionality for imaging, sensing, telemetry and actuation. However, a major limitation of present day lithographic fabrication is the inherent two-dimensionality of the patterning process. We review a new approach to construct three dimensional (3D) patterned containers by lithographically patterning two dimensional (2D) templates with liquefiable hinges that spontaneously fold upon heating into hollow polyhedral containers. The containers have finite encapsulation volumes, can be made small enough to pass through a hypodermic needle, and the 3D profile of the containers facilitates enhanced diffusion with the surrounding medium as compared to reservoir systems fabricated in planar substrates. We compare the features of the containers to those of present day drug delivery systems. These features include ease of manufacture, versatility in size and shape, monodisperse porosity, ability for spatial manipulation and remote triggering to release drugs on-demand, the incorporation of electronic modules, cell encapsulation, biocompatibility and stability. We also review possible applications in drug delivery and cell encapsulation therapy (CET). The results summarized in this review suggest a new strategy to enable construction of "smart", three dimensional drug delivery systems using lithography.

  19. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  20. Application of Anisotropic Conductive Film to Fabrication of Molybdenum Field Emitter Arrays Using Transfer Mold Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eou Sik; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2008-08-01

    In the fabrication of molybdenum field emitter arrays (Mo FEA) by the transfer mold technique, anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was applied to the bond between the inverted mold structure and the transferred glass substrate. Without any electrical treatment of electrostatic bonding, the inverted mold was successfully bonded to an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate under optimized thermal and pressure conditions. No additional conductive layers were used in the bonding process, and the bonded ACF was not chemically affected in the wet-etch process of the silicon inverted mold structure. The fabricated Mo FEA was structurally and electrically investigated and an anode current of 10 nA per emitter was obtained at a gate bias of 94 V. The results demonstrate the possibility of selective conduction in the fabrication of transfer mold FEA using ACF bonding.

  1. Application of Non-Arrhenius Models to the Viscosity of Mold Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-06-01

    The mold flux in continuous casting mold experiences a significant temperature gradient ranging from more than 1773 K (1500 °C) to room temperature, and the viscosity of the mold flux would therefore have a non-Arrhenius temperature dependency in such a wide temperature region. Three non-Arrhenius models, including Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT), Adam and Gibbs (AG), and Avramov (AV), were conducted to describe the relationship between the viscosity and temperature of mold flux in the temperature gradient existing in the casting mold. It found that the results predicted by the VFT and AG models are closer to the measured ones than those by the AV model and that they are much better than the Arrhenius model in characterizing the variation of viscosity of mold flux vs temperature. In addition, the VFT temperature and AG temperature can be considered to be key benchmarks in characterizing the lubrication ability of mold flux beyond the break temperature and glass transition temperature.

  2. A wide variety of injection molding technologies is now applicable to small series and mass production

    SciTech Connect

    Bloß, P. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Jüttner, G. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Jacob, S. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Löser, C. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Michaelis, J. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de; Krajewsky, P. E-mail: juettner@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: loeser@kuz-leipzig.de E-mail: krajewsky@kuz-leipzig.de

    2014-05-15

    Micro plastic parts open new fields for application, e. g., to electronics, sensor technologies, optics, and medical engineering. Before micro parts can go to mass production, there is a strong need of having the possibility for testing different designs and materials including material combinations. Hence, flexible individual technical and technological solutions for processing are necessary. To manufacture high quality micro parts, a micro injection moulding machine named formicaPlast based on a two-step plunger injection technology was developed. Resulting from its design, the residence time and the accuracy problems for managing small shot volumes with reproducible high accuracy are uncompromisingly solved. Due to their simple geometry possessing smooth transitions and non adherent inner surfaces, the plunger units allow to process 'all' thermoplastics from polyolefines to high performance polymers, optical clear polymers, thermally sensitive bioresorbables, highly filled systems (the so-called powder injection molding PIM), and liquid silicon rubber (LSR, here with a special kit). The applied platform strategy in the 1K and 2K version allows integrating automation for assembling, handling and packaging. A perpendicular arrangement allows encapsulation of inserts, also partially, and integration of this machine into process chains. Considering a wide variety of different parts consisting of different materials, the high potential of the technology is demonstrated. Based on challenging industrial parts from electronic applications (2K micro MID and bump mat, where both are highly structured parts), the technological solutions are presented in more detail.

  3. A wide variety of injection molding technologies is now applicable to small series and mass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloß, P.; Jüttner, G.; Jacob, S.; Löser, C.; Michaelis, J.; Krajewsky, P.

    2014-05-01

    Micro plastic parts open new fields for application, e. g., to electronics, sensor technologies, optics, and medical engineering. Before micro parts can go to mass production, there is a strong need of having the possibility for testing different designs and materials including material combinations. Hence, flexible individual technical and technological solutions for processing are necessary. To manufacture high quality micro parts, a micro injection moulding machine named formicaPlast based on a two-step plunger injection technology was developed. Resulting from its design, the residence time and the accuracy problems for managing small shot volumes with reproducible high accuracy are uncompromisingly solved. Due to their simple geometry possessing smooth transitions and non adherent inner surfaces, the plunger units allow to process "all" thermoplastics from polyolefines to high performance polymers, optical clear polymers, thermally sensitive bioresorbables, highly filled systems (the so-called powder injection molding PIM), and liquid silicon rubber (LSR, here with a special kit). The applied platform strategy in the 1K and 2K version allows integrating automation for assembling, handling and packaging. A perpendicular arrangement allows encapsulation of inserts, also partially, and integration of this machine into process chains. Considering a wide variety of different parts consisting of different materials, the high potential of the technology is demonstrated. Based on challenging industrial parts from electronic applications (2K micro MID and bump mat, where both are highly structured parts), the technological solutions are presented in more detail.

  4. Processing study of injection molding of silicon nitride for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorabaugh, M. E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high hardness of silicon nitride, which is currently under consideration as a structural material for such hot engine components as turbine blades, renders machining of the material prohibitively costly; the near net shape forming technique of injection molding is accordingly favored as a means for component fabrication. Attention is presently given to the relationships between injection molding processing parameters and the resulting microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting engine parts. An experimental program has been conducted under NASA sponsorship which tests the quality of injection molded bars of silicon nitride at various stages of processing.

  5. Applicability of the environmental relative moldiness index for quantification of residential mold contamination in an air pollution health effects study.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ali; Burke, Janet; Vesper, Stephen; Batterman, Stuart; Vette, Alan; Godwin, Christopher; Chavez-Camarena, Marina; Norris, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS) investigated the impact of exposure to traffic-related air pollution on the respiratory health of asthmatic children in Detroit, Michigan. Since indoor mold exposure may also contribute to asthma, floor dust samples were collected in participants homes (n = 112) to assess mold contamination using the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI). The repeatability of the ERMI over time, as well as ERMI differences between rooms and dust collection methods, was evaluated for insights into the application of the ERMI metric. ERMI values for the standard settled floor dust samples had a mean ± standard deviation of 14.5 ± 7.9, indicating high levels of mold contamination. ERMI values for samples collected from the same home 1 to 7 months apart (n = 52) were consistent and without systematic bias. ERMI values for separate bedroom and living room samples were highly correlated (r = 0.69, n = 66). Vacuum bag dust ERMI values were lower than for floor dust but correlated (r = 0.58, n = 28). These results support the use of the ERMI to evaluate residential mold exposure as a confounder in air pollution health effects studies.

  6. Applicability of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index for Quantification of Residential Mold Contamination in an Air Pollution Health Effects Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ali; Vesper, Stephen; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chavez-Camarena, Marina; Norris, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS) investigated the impact of exposure to traffic-related air pollution on the respiratory health of asthmatic children in Detroit, Michigan. Since indoor mold exposure may also contribute to asthma, floor dust samples were collected in participants homes (n = 112) to assess mold contamination using the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI). The repeatability of the ERMI over time, as well as ERMI differences between rooms and dust collection methods, was evaluated for insights into the application of the ERMI metric. ERMI values for the standard settled floor dust samples had a mean ± standard deviation of 14.5 ± 7.9, indicating high levels of mold contamination. ERMI values for samples collected from the same home 1 to 7 months apart (n = 52) were consistent and without systematic bias. ERMI values for separate bedroom and living room samples were highly correlated (r = 0.69, n = 66). Vacuum bag dust ERMI values were lower than for floor dust but correlated (r = 0.58, n = 28). These results support the use of the ERMI to evaluate residential mold exposure as a confounder in air pollution health effects studies. PMID:25431602

  7. ) Mold Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of basicity (CaO/SiO2), B2O3, and Li2O addition on the crystallization behaviors of lime-silica-based mold fluxes have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and single hot thermocouple technique. It was found that the crystallization temperature of cuspidine increased with increasing the basicity of mold fluxes. The crystallization of wollastonite was suppressed with increasing the mold flux basicity due to the enhancement of cuspidine crystallization. The addition of B2O3 suppresses the crystallization of mold flux. The crystallization temperature of mold flux decreases with Li2O addition. The size of cuspidine increases, while the number of cuspidine decreases with increasing mold flux basicity. The morphology of cuspidine in mold fluxes with lower basicity is largely dendritic. The dendritic cuspidine in mold fluxes is composed of many fine cuspidine crystals. On the contrary, in mold fluxes with higher basicity, the cuspidine crystals are larger in size with mainly faceted morphology. The crystalline phase evolution was also calculated using a thermodynamic database, and compared with the experimental results determined by DSC and XRD. The results of thermodynamic calculation of crystalline phase formation are in accordance with the results determined by DSC and XRD.

  8. Influence of Mold Surface Treatments on Flow of Polymer in Injection Moulding. Application to Weldlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chailly, M.; Charmeau, J.-Y.; Bereaux, Y.; Monasse, B.

    2007-04-01

    Due to increasing expectations from the market, the aspect of molded parts has to be improved constantly. Some of the defects observed on these parts such as weldlines are related to the filling stage. To limit this, we investigated the influence on weldlines using various surface deposits on the mold surface, mainly PVD and PACVD deposits : Chromium nitride (CrN), Titanium nitride (TiN), Diamond like Carbon (DLC), Chromium and polished steel (PG) on an instrumented plate mold. Injection campaign was led on three polymers which differ in terms of nature (amorphous, semi-crystalline, copolymers). We studied the evolution of the dimensions of weldlines appearing on the plate using the same injection parameters for a given polymer, but with various deposits and thicknesses. Another aspect that had been investigated is the morphology of the weldline through the thickness of the part, depending on polymer nature. Adhesion of polymer at the flow front with the mold surface proved to change. The modification of the initial contact in the filling stage and thus the thermal resistance at the mold implied a change in the process, increasing or reducing the pressure loss in the flow and differential shrinkage in the final part. The induced impact on dimensions of the weldlines allowed to distinguish which surface treatments were able to reduce the defect. A complementary study was led on both polymers in molten state and deposits in terms of wetting using a sessile drop method to confirm the adhesion at the polymer/mold interface. This study proved the influence of the use of surface treatments has clearly an impact on the filling stage of the injection molding process, and it is necessary to get a better knowledge of the interactions between physical adhesion, tribology of polymer/mold contact, and thermal properties of the coatings and their impact on solidification of the polymer.

  9. Pollution-preventing anionic lithographic inks.

    PubMed

    Maji, Chandrakant S; Bhaskarwar, Ashok N

    2003-12-12

    Lithographic printing presses use aliphatic and aromatic solvents for cleaning various surfaces, which are coated with the ink. The conventional printing inks also contain volatile solvents. During printing and cleaning operations, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the inks and cleaning solvents are lost to the atmosphere by evaporation and these losses are quantifiable and alarmingly high. A new type of ink based on castor oil, which completely eliminates emissions of VOCs, has been developed. Synthesis of resins and the kinetics of washing of the ink, similar to the recently announced pollution-preventing ink [development of a VOC-free lithographic printing system. TAGA Proc., 324], with water at a slightly elevated pH are studied. A correlation between the mass-transfer coefficient characterizing the washing of ink and the experimental process variables is confirmed. New data are also reported on flake-formation dynamics. PMID:14623422

  10. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  11. Mold Charlatans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Offers a primer on toxic mold and its removal, warning against ignorant or unethical mold remediation companies and offering five considerations (checking references, considering the big picture, sampling more than the air, considering release, and considering the source) when hiring such services. (EV)

  12. MOLD POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mold pollution is the growth of molds in a building resulting in a negative impact on the use of that structure. The negative impacts generally fall into two categories: destruction of the structure itself and adverse health impacts on the building's occupants. It is estimated...

  13. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  14. Molded, wafer level optics for long wave infra-red applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, John

    2016-05-01

    For many years, the Thermal Imaging market has been driven by the high volume consumer market. The first signs of this came with the launch of night vision systems for cars, first by Cadillac and Honda and then, more successfully by BMW, Daimler and Audi. For the first time, simple thermal imaging systems were being manufactured at the rate of more than 10,000 units a year. This step change in volumes enabled a step change in system costs, with thermal imaging moving into the consumer's price range. Today we see that the consumer awareness and the consumer market continues to increase with the launch of a number of consumer focused smart phone add-ons. This has brought a further step change in system costs, with the possibility to turn your mobile phone into a thermal imager for under $250. As the detector technology has matured, the pixel pitches have dropped from 50μm in 2002 to 12 μm or even 10μm in today's detectors. This dramatic shrinkage in size has had an equally dramatic effect on the optics required to produce the image on the detector. A moderate field of view that would have required a focal length of 40mm in 2002 now requires a focal length of 8mm. For wide field of view applications and small detector formats, focal lengths in the range 1mm to 5mm are becoming common. For lenses, the quantity manufactured, quality and costs will require a new approach to high volume Infra-Red (IR) manufacturing to meet customer expectations. This, taken with the SwaP-C requirements and the emerging requirement for very small lenses driven by the new detectors, suggests that wafer scale optics are part of the solution. Umicore can now present initial results from an intensive research and development program to mold and coat wafer level optics, using its chalcogenide glass, GASIR®.

  15. Spray-formed Tooling for Injection Molding and Die Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Hugh, Kevin Matthew

    2000-06-01

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) ToolingTM is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  16. Spray-formed tooling for injection molding and die casting applications

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. McHugh; B. R. Wickham

    2000-06-26

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  17. A simple soft lithographic nanopatterning of gold on gallium arsenide via galvanic displacement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyuneui; Noh, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Geun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Maboudian, Roya

    2010-08-01

    Nanoscale patterning of gold layers on GaAs substrate is demonstrated using a combination of soft lithographic molding and galvanic displacement deposition. First, an electroless deposition method has been developed to plate gold on GaAs with ease and cost-effectiveness. The electroless metallization process is performed by dipping the GaAs substrates into a gold salt solution without any reducing agents or additives. The deposition proceeds via galvanic displacement in which gold ions in the aqueous solution are reduced by electrons arising from the GaAs substrate itself. The deposition rate, surface morphology and adhesion property can be modulated by the plating parameters such as the choice of acids and the immersion time. Second, soft lithographic patterning of nanodots, nanorings, and nanolines are demonstrated on GaAs substrates with hard-polydimethylsiloxane (h-PDMS) mold and plasma etching. This method can be easily applied to the metallization and nanopatterning of gold on GaAs surfaces.

  18. Inhibitory effect of gamma irradiation and its application for control of postharvest green mold decay of Satsuma mandarins.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Chu, Eun-Hee; Lee, Gun Woong; Cho, Chuloh; Park, Hae-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Gamma irradiation has been shown to be effective for the control of postharvest fungi in vitro, but little is known regarding antifungal action, responses to gamma irradiation, and its application to fresh produce. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum on Satsuma mandarin fruits. Green mold was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma irradiation showed a complete inhibition of spore germination, germ tube elongation, and mycelial growth of P. digitatum, particularly at 1.0kGy. To further investigate the mechanisms by which gamma irradiation inhibits fungal growth, the membrane integrity and cellular leakage of conidia were tested, indicating that gamma irradiation results in the loss of plasma membrane integrity, causing the release of intracellular contents such as soluble proteins. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses can completely inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens, but such high doses cause severe fruit damage. Thus, to eliminate the negative impact on fruit quality, gamma irradiation at lower doses was evaluated for inhibition of P. digitatum, in combination with a chlorine donor, sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione (NaDCC). Interestingly, only a combined treatment with 0.4kGy of gamma irradiation and 10ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against green mold decay. The mechanisms by which the combined treatment decreased the green mold decay of mandarin fruits can be directly associated with the disruption of cell membrane of the fungal pathogen, which resulted in a loss of cytoplasmic material from the hyphae. These findings suggest that a synergistic effect of combining treatment with gamma irradiation with NaDCC has potential as an antifungal approach to reduce the severity of green mold in mandarin fruits.

  19. Inhibitory effect of gamma irradiation and its application for control of postharvest green mold decay of Satsuma mandarins.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Chu, Eun-Hee; Lee, Gun Woong; Cho, Chuloh; Park, Hae-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Gamma irradiation has been shown to be effective for the control of postharvest fungi in vitro, but little is known regarding antifungal action, responses to gamma irradiation, and its application to fresh produce. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum on Satsuma mandarin fruits. Green mold was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma irradiation showed a complete inhibition of spore germination, germ tube elongation, and mycelial growth of P. digitatum, particularly at 1.0kGy. To further investigate the mechanisms by which gamma irradiation inhibits fungal growth, the membrane integrity and cellular leakage of conidia were tested, indicating that gamma irradiation results in the loss of plasma membrane integrity, causing the release of intracellular contents such as soluble proteins. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses can completely inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens, but such high doses cause severe fruit damage. Thus, to eliminate the negative impact on fruit quality, gamma irradiation at lower doses was evaluated for inhibition of P. digitatum, in combination with a chlorine donor, sodium dichloro-s-triazinetrione (NaDCC). Interestingly, only a combined treatment with 0.4kGy of gamma irradiation and 10ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against green mold decay. The mechanisms by which the combined treatment decreased the green mold decay of mandarin fruits can be directly associated with the disruption of cell membrane of the fungal pathogen, which resulted in a loss of cytoplasmic material from the hyphae. These findings suggest that a synergistic effect of combining treatment with gamma irradiation with NaDCC has potential as an antifungal approach to reduce the severity of green mold in mandarin fruits. PMID:27356109

  20. REAL TIME PCR ANALYSIS OF INDOOR MOLDS: PRINCIPLES, PROCEDURES AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will endeavor to present an overview of the real time polymerase chain reaction method developed for indoor mold detection and quantification by the EPA. It will begin with a brief discussion of the PCR technology that provides the basis for this method and how ...

  1. An application of CO{sub 2} laser interference heating for polymer injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Takushi; Satoh, Isao; Kurosaki, Yasuo

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the authors studied the small scale (less than 1 mm) local heat transfer control of injection molded polymer products by using CO{sub 2} laser interferometry. This technique could provide precise local temperature control of the product surface during the process. Residual birefringence of the irradiated surface was successfully distributed according to the interference pattern. This scale of heat transfer control has not been realized through common conductive heat transfer methods. To establish the laser interference heating, a CO{sub 2} laser, a set of optical equipment, and a transparent window of Zinc-selenide were used. To control the heat transfer on the molded polymer surface, the interfered laser beam was introduced through the window. Polystyrene resin was used to investigate the feasibility of this method. In the experiment, the control ability of the property distribution on a molded polymer surface was studied under various conditions. To confirm the viability of this technique, optical strain frozen in the molded polymer surface was measured with a polarizing microscope as birefringence. As the result, it was clearly shown that the residual birefringence had an equal spaced distribution. Also, the contrast between the irradiated and un-irradiated portions was obvious regardless of the polymer melt velocity and radiation intensity. This method may be applied to the production of diffraction gratings which have geometrically smooth surfaces.

  2. Self-assembly of lithographically patterned nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    The construction of three dimensional (3D) objects, with any desired surface patterns, is both critical to and easily achieved in macroscale, science and engineering. However, on the nanoscale, 3D fabrication is limited to particles with only very limited surface patterning. Here, we demonstrate a self-assembly strategy that harnesses the strengths of well established 2D nanoscale patterning techniques and additionally enables the construction of stable 3D polyhedral nanoparticles. As a proof of the concept, we self-assembled cubic particles with sizes as small as 100 nm and with specific and lithographically defined surface patterns. PMID:19681638

  3. Silicon micro-mold and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-01-11

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon micro-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  4. Preparation of Microstructure Molds of Montmorillonite/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate Nanocomposites for Miniaturized Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Woo, Youngjae; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Man; Kang, Bong Keun; Park, Juyoung

    2015-10-01

    Environmentally friendly microstructure molds with montmorillonite (MMT) or multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) nanocomposites have been prepared for miniaturized device applications. The micropatterning of MMT/PEGDA and MWCNT/PEGDA with 0.5 to 2.0 wt% of MMTs and MWCNTs was achieved through a UV curing process with micro-patterned masks. Hexagonal dot arrays and complex patterns for microstructures of the nanocomposites were produced and characterized with an optical microscope; their thermal properties were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The TGA results showed that these nanocomposites were thermally stable up to 350 °C. Polydimethylsiloxane thin replicas with different microstructures were prepared by a casting method using the microstructured nanocomposites as molds. It is considered that these microstructure molds of the nanocomposites can be used as microchip molds to fabricate nanobio-chips and medical diagnostic chip devices. PMID:26726429

  5. Preparation of Microstructure Molds of Montmorillonite/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate Nanocomposites for Miniaturized Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Woo, Youngjae; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Man; Kang, Bong Keun; Park, Juyoung

    2015-10-01

    Environmentally friendly microstructure molds with montmorillonite (MMT) or multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) nanocomposites have been prepared for miniaturized device applications. The micropatterning of MMT/PEGDA and MWCNT/PEGDA with 0.5 to 2.0 wt% of MMTs and MWCNTs was achieved through a UV curing process with micro-patterned masks. Hexagonal dot arrays and complex patterns for microstructures of the nanocomposites were produced and characterized with an optical microscope; their thermal properties were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The TGA results showed that these nanocomposites were thermally stable up to 350 °C. Polydimethylsiloxane thin replicas with different microstructures were prepared by a casting method using the microstructured nanocomposites as molds. It is considered that these microstructure molds of the nanocomposites can be used as microchip molds to fabricate nanobio-chips and medical diagnostic chip devices.

  6. Thermal stresses in chemically hardening elastic media with application to the molding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitsky, M.; Shaffer, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    A method has been formulated for the determination of thermal stresses in materials which harden in the presence of an exothermic chemical reaction. Hardening is described by the transformation of the material from an inviscid liquid-like state into an elastic solid, where intermediate states consist of a mixture of the two, in a ratio which is determined by the degree of chemical reaction. The method is illustrated in terms of an infinite slab cast between two rigid mold surfaces. It is found that the stress component normal to the slab surfaces vanishes in the residual state, so that removal of the slab from the mold leaves the remaining residual stress unchanged. On the other hand, the residual stress component parallel to the slab surfaces does not vanish. Its distribution is described as a function of the parameters of the hardening process.

  7. Foil assisted replica molding for fabrication of microfluidic devices and their application in vitro.

    PubMed

    Micheal, Issac J; Vidyasagar, Aditya J; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Mekala, Naveen Kumar; Asthana, Amit; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2014-10-01

    We present a simple, rapid, benchtop, Foil Assisted Rapid Molding (FARM) method for the fabrication of microfluidic devices. This novel technique involves the use of aluminium foil, pen and an X-Y plotter to create semi-circular or plano-concave, shallow microchannels. It is an easy do-it-yourself (DIY) technique for creating a microfluidic device in three simple steps: (1) create a channel design using the CAD software, (2) plot the patterns on aluminium foil and (3) use the reverse of the engraved foil as a mold to create microfluidic devices. In this report, we present a detailed study of the proposed method by varying a range of parameters such as foil thickness, tip material, and tip sizes and by investigating their effect on the creation of channels with varying geometry. Furthermore, we demonstrated the cytocompatibility of these devices in vitro. PMID:25102283

  8. Application of Matrix Projection Exposure Using a Liquid Crystal Display Panel to Fabricate Thick Resist Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Hirotoshi; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    The patterning characteristics of matrix projection exposure using an analog liquid crystal display (LCD) panel in place of a reticle were investigated, in particular for oblique patterns. In addition, a new method for fabricating practical thick resist molds was developed. At first, an exposure system fabricated in past research was reconstructed. Changes in the illumination optics and the projection lens were the main improvements. Using fly's eye lenses, the illumination light intensity distribution was homogenized. The projection lens was changed from a common camera lens to a higher-grade telecentric lens. In addition, although the same metal halide lamp was used as an exposure light source, the central exposure wavelength was slightly shortened from 480 to 450 nm to obtain higher resist sensitivity while maintaining almost equivalent contrast between black and white. Circular and radial patterns with linewidths of approximately 6 µm were uniformly printed in all directions throughout the exposure field owing to these improvements. The patterns were smoothly printed without accompanying stepwise roughness caused by the cell matrix array. On the bases of these results, a new method of fabricating thick resist molds for electroplating was investigated. It is known that thick resist molds fabricated using the negative resist SU-8 (Micro Chem) are useful because very high aspect patterns are printable and the side walls are perpendicular to the substrate surfaces. However, the most suitable exposure wavelength of SU-8 is 365 nm, and SU-8 is insensitive to light of 450 nm wavelength, which is most appropriate for LCD matrix exposure. For this reason, a novel multilayer resist process was proposed, and micromolds of SU-8 of 50 µm thickness were successfully obtained. As a result, feasibility for fabricating complex resist molds including oblique patterns was demonstrated.

  9. Topographic design and application of hierarchical polymer surfaces replicated by microinjection compression molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Wei-Sheng; Huang, Han-Xiong; Wang, Bin

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the fast growing demand for biomimetic surfaces featuring unique wettability and functionality in various fields highlights the necessity of developing a reliable technique for mass production. In this work, hierarchical topography designs of templates were applied to prepare superhydrophobic surfaces via microinjection compression molding, comprehensively considering the feasibility of mechanical demolding and the superhydrophobicity and mechanical robustness of the molded polypropylene parts. Mimicking the wettability of a lotus leaf or rose petal, superhydrophobic surfaces were replicated. An unstable wetting state formed on the surface exhibiting the petal effect. On such a surface, the increased water pressure could cause water penetration into the micro gaps between the hierarchical asperities featuring low-roughness sidewalls and bottom surface; the resultant water membrane led to drastically increased water adhesion of the surface. Moreover, the low-adhesion superhydrophobicity of the molded surface was changed into superhydrophilicity, by means of introducing carbonyl groups via ultraviolet/ozone treatment and the subsequent water membrane preserved in microstructures via the pre-wetting process. Patterning the superhydrophilic micro channel on the superhydrophobic surface developed the surface microfluidic devices for micro-liter fluid pumping and mixing processes driven by surface tension.

  10. Lithographically-directed self-assembly of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, J. Alexander; Cui, Yi; Alivisatos, Paul

    2004-09-21

    The combination of lithography and self-assembly provides apowerful means of organizing solution-synthesized nanostructures for awide variety of applications. We have developed a fluidic assembly methodthat relies on the local pinning of a moving liquid contact line bylithographically produced topographic features to concentratenanoparticles at those features. The final stages of the assembly processare controlled first by long-range immersion capillary forces and then bythe short-range electrostatic and Van der Waal's interactions. We havesuccessfully assembled nanoparticles from 50 nm to 2 nm in size usingthis technique and have also demonstrated the controlled positioning ofmore complex nanotetrapod structures. We have used this process toassemble Au nanoparticles into pre-patterned electrode structures andhave performed preliminary electrical characterization of the devices soformed. The fluidic assembly method is capable of very high yield, interms of positioning nanostructures at each lithographically-definedlocation, and of excellent specificity, with essentially no particledeposition between features.

  11. Solar system lithograph set for earth and space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A color lithographs of many of the celestial bodies within our solar system are contained in this educational set of materials. Printed on the back of each lithograph is information regarding the particular celestial body. A sheet with information listing NASA resources and electronic resources for education is included.

  12. 4. Photocopy of lithograph (from Thompson and West, Historical Atlas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of lithograph (from Thompson and West, Historical Atlas of Solano County, San Francisco, 1878, p. 52) Lithographer unknown 1878 ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, SHOWING SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF WINGFIELD HOUSE - Bishop J. H. D. Wingfield House, 36 Wingfield Way, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  13. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, J.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  14. Fabrication of a roller type PDMS stamp using SU-8 concave molds and its application for roll contact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongho; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-03-01

    Continuous fabrication of micropatterns at low-cost is attracting attention in various applications within industrial fields. To meet such demands, we have demonstrated a roll contact printing technique, using roller type polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Roller type PDMS stamps for roll contact printing were fabricated using a custom-made metal support and SU-8 microstructures fabricated on concave substrates as a mold. The molding/casting method which we developed here provided faster and easier fabrication than conventional methods for roller type stamps. Next, roll contact printing was performed using fabricated roller type PDMS stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Patterns with minimum widths of 3 μm and 2.1 μm were continuously fabricated for each stage, respectively. In addition, the relationship between applied pressures and dimensional changes of roll contact printed patterns was investigated. Finally, we confirmed that roll contact printing and the new fabrication method for roller stamps presented in this study demonstrated the feasibility for industrial applications.

  15. Method for protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2001-07-03

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  16. Soft-Lithographical Fabrication of Three-dimensional Photonic Crystals in the Optical Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes several projects to realize low-cost and high-quality three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication using non-photolithographic techniques for layer-by-layer photonic crystals. Low-cost, efficient 3D microfabrication is a demanding technique not only for 3D photonic crystals but also for all other scientific areas, since it may create new functionalities beyond the limit of planar structures. However, a novel 3D microfabrication technique for photonic crystals implies the development of a complete set of sub-techniques for basic layer-by-layer stacking, inter-layer alignment, and material conversion. One of the conventional soft lithographic techniques, called microtransfer molding (μTM), was developed by the Whitesides group in 1996. Although μTM technique potentially has a number of advantages to overcome the limit of conventional photolithographic techniques in building up 3D microstructures, it has not been studied intensively after its demonstration. This is mainly because of technical challenges in the nature of layer-by-layer fabrication, such as the demand of very high yield in fabrication. After two years of study on conventional μTM, We have developed an advanced microtransfer molding technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-μTM) that shows an extremely high yield in layer-by-layer microfabrication sufficient to produce highly layered microstructures. The use of two different photo-curable prepolymers, a filler and an adhesive, allows for fabrication of layered microstructures without thin films between layers. The capabilities of 2P-μTM are demonstrated by the fabrication of a wide-area 12-layer microstructure with high structural fidelity. Second, we also had to develop an alignment technique. We studied the 1st-order diffracted moire fringes of transparent multilayered structures comprised of irregularly deformed periodic patterns. By a comparison study of the diffracted moire fringe pattern and detailed

  17. A process for co-molding a visible-wavelength photonic crystal and microfluidic channel for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srungarapu, Maurya; Snyder, Chloe E.; Kadiyala, Anand; Hamza, Bashar; Liu, Yuxin; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2013-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis systems show promise for reduced DNA analysis times and can be used by untrained operators in point-of-use applications. Throughput improvements can be gained by reducing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cycle count, which is used in conventional DNA processing to amplify the DNA to an easily measurable amount. A Photonic Crystal (PhC) can be integrated within a microfluidic channel to enhance fluorescence emission, enabling a reduction in PCR cycling. Most PhCs are fabricated using serial top-down fabrication techniques, resulting in a structure that is challenging to integrate with microfluidic system components. Here, we present a co-integration process for fabricating a Silicon master mold consisting of a visible range PhC lattice and a microfluidic channel. This process can be used to co-fabricate microscale channel and nanoscale lattice structures in polymer or thermoplastic materials. Two dimensional visible range PhCs are fabricated by patterning electron beam resist via E-Beam Lithography (EBL). The patterned features (100-300nm features with 200-450nm pitch) are cured to a glass-like material that is used as a direct etch mask for Reactive Ion Etching. A 200μm wide and 25μm high ridge "strip" is fabricated around the PhC region using Photolithography and Deep RIE etching to form the completed channel and lattice mold. Results indicating the quality of nanoscale features resulting from the molding process in Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) will be discussed.

  18. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  19. INGOT MOLD

    DOEpatents

    Mangold, A.J. Jr.; MaHaffey, J.W.; Reese, S.L.

    1958-04-29

    An improved ingot-mold assembly is described, consisting of a body having a cavity and a recess extending through to the bottom of the body from the cavity, and the bottom of the cavity having an internal shoulder extending downward and a plug having an external shoulder. The plug extends above the shoulders and below the bottom of the body.

  20. The application of bioactive compounds from the food industry to control mold growth in indoor waterborne coatings.

    PubMed

    Bellotti, N; Salvatore, L; Deyá, C; Del Panno, M T; del Amo, B; Romagnoli, R

    2013-04-01

    Microbial growth in indoor environments creates health problems, especially in people with asthma; approximately 80% of these patients are allergic to mold. Antimicrobial coatings are formulated to generate surfaces that are easy to clean and may also incorporate active agents, commonly called biocides, which inhibit microbial colonization, subsequent growth and bio-deterioration of the substrates. Some research lines seek to replace traditional organometallic and organochlorines biocides with environmentally acceptable ones. The aim of this research was, primarily, to explore the possible application of different compounds used in food industry like preservatives to be used as antimicrobial additives for antimicrobial coatings. Four biocides were tested against two different ambient molds isolated from an interior painted wall (Chaetomium globosum and Alternaria alternate). The selected biocides were zinc salicylate, zinc benzoate, calcium benzoate and potassium sorbate. The resulting paints were subjected to biological and physical tests (viscosity, hiding power, humidity absorption and biocides leaching rate). Bioassays revealed that zinc benzoate and zinc salicylate resulted active against both fungi. PMID:23298599

  1. Magnesium Powder Injection Molding (MIM) of Orthopedic Implants for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M.; Schaper, J. G.; Suckert, M. R.; Dahms, M.; Ebel, T.; Willumeit-Römer, R.; Klassen, T.

    2016-04-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) has a high potential for the economic near-net-shape mass production of small-sized and complex-shaped parts. The motivation for launching Mg into the MIM processing chain for manufacturing biodegradable medical implants is related to its compatibility with human bone and its degradation in a non-toxic matter. It has been recognized that the load-bearing capacity of MIM Mg parts is superior to that of biodegradable polymeric components. However, the choice of appropriate polymeric binder components and alloying elements enabling defect-free injection molding and sintering is a major challenge for the use of MIM Mg parts. This study considered the full processing chain for MIM of Mg-Ca alloys to achieve ultimate tensile strength of up to 141 MPa with tensile yield strength of 73 MPa, elongation at fracture Af of 7% and a Young's modulus of 38 GPa. To achieve these mechanical properties, a thermal debinding study was performed to determine optimal furnace and atmosphere conditions, sintering temperature, heating rates, sintering time and pressure.

  2. Application of Molded Interconnect Device technology to the realization of a self-biased circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laur, Vincent; Mattei, Jean-Luc; Vérissimo, Grégory; Queffelec, Patrick; Lebourgeois, Richard; Ganne, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the first electromagnetic characterization of a self-biased circulator in molded interconnect device (MID) technology. The circulator was designed using a 3D full-wave commercial simulator. It consists of microstrip access lines connected to a Y-junction in Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) technology. Unlike classical technologies, the SIW Y-junction was not fabricated using metallic vias but by a Laser Direct Structuring (LDS) technique. A molded Cyclo-Olefin Polymer (COP) was used as a substrate and 3D metallized. The microwave properties of LDS-compatible COP are not well known so we investigated them through the use of cavity-perturbation and rectangular waveguide characterization methods. The device was then machined to insert a pre-oriented strontium hexaferrite puck doped with cobalt and lanthanum (Sr0,7La0,3Fe11,7Co0,3O19). The characteristics of the MID circulator were assessed between 28 and 32 GHz. Without magnets, insertion losses of 3.32 dB were measured at 30.7 GHz. At the same frequency, an isolation level of 13.89 dB and return losses of 19.89 dB were observed. These measurements demonstrate for the first time the high potential of MID technology for the realization of low-cost non-reciprocal devices.

  3. Experimental studies on the toxicity of lithographic developer solution.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takeichi, S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the toxicity of a lithographic developer solution which contains hydroquinone is caused by hydroquinone or the alkaline lithographic developer solution. Male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups. In four groups, rats were dosed orally with 3% hydroquinone or 3% hydroquinone in 3% lithographic developer solution. Hydroquinone levels were measured after one and 24 hours. In two groups, rats were dosed orally with 6% hydroquinone or 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution. In the seventh group, rats received the alkaline solution only. Hydroquinone measurement was made using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hydroquinone was rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and subsequently distributed throughout the body. Nearly all hydroquinone was excreted in the urine as either a glucuronide or a sulfate (78-82%) within 24 hours. All rats administered 6% hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle died, but the mortality rate of rats administered 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution was 60%. Tissue hydroquinone was lower at one hour and 24 hours after administration in lithographic developer solution than in equal dose of hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle suggesting decreased absorption in an alkaline pH. Hydroquinone was not associated with gross pathologic changes of the intestine but all animals treated with lithographic developer solution or alkaline solution had congestion, hemorrhagic petechiae and purple-brown discoloration throughout the small intestine. The combination of alkaline/formaldehyde diluent with hydroquinone may delay hydroquinone absorption but increase the risk of intestinal necrosis.

  4. Processing studies in sheet molding compound compression molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Lisa Marie

    Due to its high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and low cost. Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) production offers great potential for growth in the automotive and trucking industry. Much attention is now being given to improving the economy of SMC compression molding by reducing the cycle time required to produce acceptable parts in steady production. One of the fastest growing applications of Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) compression molding panels is the manufacture of truck body panels. Due to their large size, the molding forces developed are substantial and have a major influence in the molding cycle. The relevant process models for SMC flow are reviewed and a procedure is developed that can be used to obtain the closing force and calculate the needed material parameters. Experiments were done using commercially made SMC varying quantities of glass, filler, and thickener to verify the validity of this model and the compression force was predicted for commercially made automotive hoods. It was found that glass and filler had a significant impact on the material parameters. When the amount of glass was increased, both material parameters m/deltan and eta increased. Similar trends were seen when increasing the amount of filler. For the thickener used in this research (magnesium oxide), it was found that it had minimal effect on the material parameters. Molding conditions and initial SMC charge configurations were also varied to see their effects on molding force and material parameters. Initial charge dimensions and volume as well as mold closing speed showed no effect on material parameters, while molding temperature showed a minimal effect. Material parameters were calculated for each SMC composition. These parameters were used to predict the compression force for the Corvette hood and Fiero hood. These predictions were compared with actual Corvette and Fiero hoods manufactured in industry. They predicted the commercially made parts quite well.

  5. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Two Nickel-Based Superalloys Produced by Metal Injection Molding for Aero Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Benedikt; Völkl, Rainer; Glatzel, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    For different high-temperature applications like aero engines or turbochargers, metal injection molding (MIM) of superalloys is an interesting processing alternative. For operation at high temperatures, oxidation behavior of superalloys produced by MIM needs to match the standard of cast or forged material. The oxidation behavior of nickel-based superalloys Inconel 713 and MAR-M247 in the temperature interval from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) is investigated and compared to cast material. Weight gain is measured discontinuously at different oxidation temperatures and times. Analysis of oxidized samples is done via SEM and EDX-measurements. MIM samples exhibit homogeneous oxide layers with a thickness up to 4 µm. After processing by MIM, Inconel 713 exhibits lower weight gain and thinner oxide layers than MAR-M247.

  6. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  7. 1. Photocopy of lithograph (from Annual Report of the Supervising ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of lithograph (from Annual Report of the Supervising Architect to the Secretary for the Calendar Year Ending December 31, 1888) GENERAL VIEW, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION - Old U.S. Mint, Chestnut & Juniper Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 10. Photocopy of lithograph (from Mrs. D. Hanson Grubb, San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of lithograph (from Mrs. D. Hanson Grubb, San Francisco) 'Moss Eng. Co., N.Y.' Date unknown 'THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BENICIA, CAL.' WEST SIDE - St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 120 East J Street, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  9. 3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by Mrs. Arthur Williams, owner of the house in 1960. JOSHUA DYER HOUSE FROM THE REAR - Joshua Dyer House, North Pamet Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  10. Hybrid Direct Write Lithographic Strategies for Complex Hierarchical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan P.

    With the number of alternative lithographic techniques for high resolution and 3D patterning rapidly increasing, there is a need to identify a set of scalable techniques which balances the ability to arbitrarily control every detail of a target pattern and to produce these complex patterns at a high rate. It is in this way that metamaterial devices put forward on a lab scale for applications such as phononics, photonics, and plasmonics can be realized in the industrial scale. This thesis, in approaching this challenge, utilizes combinations of patterning techniques, leveraging the ability for "large" scale alternative lithographic techniques, such as interference lithography or self-assembly, to create the same nanostructured morphology over a large area combined with laser direct write. The process of drawing a single line or isolated voxel can result in a hierarchical pattern defined by the latent motif of the larger-scale technique. The net resuh is to shift the burden of high resolution patterning from the direct write to the large scale technique, effectively decoupling the correlation between the level of detail and the patterning speed and control. More specifically, the following combinations with laser direct writing were investigated: (1) proximity field nanopatterning for the predefinition of diffraction-order-defined 3D resonators which were applied as "stand-up" plasmodic microresonators, (2) dewetting to conduct development-free 2D patterning of isolated sub-micron lines, and, via overlap effects, nanoscale ( <1 00 nm) gratings, (3) block copolymer self-assembly to initiate the simultaneous annealing and alignment of near-equilibrium microdomains from a metastable starting morphology, and (4) interference lithography to fabricate 3D sub-micron periodic and quasiperiodic hierarchical structures with controllable positioning and tunable fill fraction that has potential for applications to microphotonics. In conjunction with the experimental components

  11. "Surface Transfer/Rear Shrinkage" in Injection Molding-The Mechanism and Possibility of Application to Practical Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwami, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Masayoshi; Saito, Takushi; Hamada, Hiroyuki

    In injection molding, the basic method of upgrading the surface quality in molded articles has remained undeveloped. This paper proposed a technique for obtaining sinkmark-free moldings with fine surface under low injection pressure, instead of conventional shrinkage-compensation molding under high pressure. The technique is based on controlling the amount of heat-discharge originated from the difference in contact thermal resistance between a molten polymer/the cavity surface and the melt/the core surface. The temperature difference arising between both of the resin surfaces by controlling the heat discharge, acts as a driving force to move the resin to the lower cavity side from the higher core side. This results in compensating cooling shrinkage only on the cavity side. A pair mold having different surface roughness was firstly used. Its cavity surface was mirror-polished and core surface was blasted. Secondly the following combination of the mold surfaces was tried as expected to be more effective; the wettable and insulating cavity surface, treated with SiO2/the repellent and insulating core surface, treated with teflon-dispersed Ni-plating. The both of the experiments gave us useful information for understanding the idea of new molding technique named "surface transfer/rear shrinkage." In this report we discussed the generation mechanism of the phenomenon and the possibility of developing an effective mold system for practical use.

  12. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication.

  13. Patterned Taping: A High-Efficiency Soft Lithographic Method for Universal Thin Film Patterning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangyoon; Park, Sang Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Cho, Illhun; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Park, Soo Young

    2016-03-22

    As a universal lithographic technique for microscale/nanoscale film patterns, we develop a strategy for the use of soft lithographically patterned pressure-sensitive tape (patterned tape) as a pattern-transporting stamp material. Patterning was successfully implemented through the selective detachment and/or attachment of various thin films, including organic and metallic layers demanding no subsequent physical, thermal, or chemical treatment, as this incurs the risk of the deformation of the thin film and the deterioration of its functionalities. Its features of universal adhesion and flexibility enable pressure-sensitive tapes to form patterns on a variety of surfaces: organic, polymeric, and inorganic surfaces as well as flat, curved, uneven, and flexible substrates. Moreover, the proposed technique boasts the unique and distinct advantages of short operation time, supreme patterning yield, and multilayer stacking capability, which suggest considerable potential for their application to advanced optoelectronic device fabrication. PMID:26863506

  14. COMPRESSION MOLDED, BIO-FIBER REINFORCED, HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOSET COMPOSITES FOR STRUCTURAL AND SEMI-STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-09-15

    Major goals for the future of transportation materials include reduced weight of components, reduced cost of materials and increased use of renewable content. Reinforcement of transportation composites with plant fibers has the potential to decrease component weight relative to glass fiber reinforcement, reduce cost of materials relative to carbon fiber reinforcement, and significantly increase the fraction of composite components from a renewable source. Barriers to widespread application of natural fiber reinforced components in structural and semi-structural vehicle applications have included the natural propensity of these materials to uptake moisture and the corresponding loss of mechanical properties with exposure to moisture. Through novel advances in fiber treatment, processing and molding to address moisture absorption and resin interfacing, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is reducing these barriers. Herein we demonstrate natural fiber reinforced composites that are 1) composed of more than 50wt% renewable content, 2) weigh 17% less than glass fiber composites with the same fiber volume, and 3) exhibit wet mechanical properties suitable for semi-structural application. Lower cost, lower energy in production, and reduced greenhouse gas production are anticipated advantages of the described PNNL technologies.

  15. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste water discharges resulting from the production of molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber products.... Specifically excluded from the provisions of this subpart are the discharges resulting from the production...

  16. 40 CFR 428.50 - Applicability; description of the small-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste water discharges resulting from the production of molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber products.... Specifically excluded from the provisions of this subpart are the discharges resulting from the production...

  17. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste water discharges resulting from the production of molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber products.... Specifically excluded from the provisions of this subpart are the discharges resulting from the production...

  18. 40 CFR 428.70 - Applicability; description of the large-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste water discharges resulting from the production of molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber products.... Specifically excluded from the provisions of this subpart are the discharges resulting from the production...

  19. Results on powder injection molding of Ni{sub 3}Al and application to other intermetallic compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.M.

    1992-12-31

    Net forming processes are under development to allow affordable production of intermetallic components. Powder injection molding (PIM) mav be employed for the production of complex-shaped intermetallic geometries. Proper choice of powder parameters and processing conditions can lead to the formation of fullv dense structures through pressure-less sintering. In this study, Ni{sub 3}Al with 0.04 wt.-% boron has been successfully injection molded and sintered to full density. A yield strength of 340 MPa, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 591 MPa, and 8% elongation were attained for injection molded and sintered tensile bars. Powder characteristics and sintering behavior are given for the nickel aluminide employed in this study to highlight the powder attributes needed for injection molding. Molding parameters, debinding and sintering schedules, along, with mechanical properties are presented to indicate the viability of PIM for intermetallics. This approach based on the understanding of key powder characteristics and use of the reactive synthesis powder process mav be extended to the successful injection molding of other intermetallic systems.

  20. Results on powder injection molding of Ni[sub 3]Al and application to other intermetallic compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Net forming processes are under development to allow affordable production of intermetallic components. Powder injection molding (PIM) mav be employed for the production of complex-shaped intermetallic geometries. Proper choice of powder parameters and processing conditions can lead to the formation of fullv dense structures through pressure-less sintering. In this study, Ni[sub 3]Al with 0.04 wt.-% boron has been successfully injection molded and sintered to full density. A yield strength of 340 MPa, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 591 MPa, and 8% elongation were attained for injection molded and sintered tensile bars. Powder characteristics and sintering behavior are given for the nickel aluminide employed in this study to highlight the powder attributes needed for injection molding. Molding parameters, debinding and sintering schedules, along, with mechanical properties are presented to indicate the viability of PIM for intermetallics. This approach based on the understanding of key powder characteristics and use of the reactive synthesis powder process mav be extended to the successful injection molding of other intermetallic systems.

  1. Calculation and uses of the lithographic aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Smith, Daniel G.

    2012-09-01

    Beginning with the seminal Dill papers of 1975, the aerial image has been essential for understanding the process of microlithography. From the aerial image, we can predict the performance of a given lithographic process in terms of depth of focus, exposure latitude, etc. As lithographic technologies improved, reaching smaller and smaller printed features, the sophistication of aerial image calculations has had to increase from simple incoherent imaging theory, to partial coherence, polarization effects, thin film effects at the resist, thick mask effects, and so on. This tutorial provides an overview and semihistorical development of the aerial image calculation and then provides a review of some of the various ways in which the aerial image is typically used to estimate the performance of the lithographic process.

  2. Improving lithographic masks with the assistance of indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying-Nan; Li, Xu-Feng; Pan, Shi; Wang, Qiao; Wang, Shuo; Wu, Yong-Kuan

    2012-05-01

    Indentations etched on the output surface of a metallic mask are proposed to produce fine lithographic patterns with a resolution of 500 nm using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. Such a designed mask is capable of enhancing near field lithography (NFL) resolution more than three times compared with the structure without indentations. The simulation results show that the interference disturbance between the adjacent lithographic channels can be eliminated efficiently by employing the indentations. As a straightforward consequence, the channel-to-channel interspaces can be shortened significantly, maintaining a uniform field distribution and high contrast.

  3. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  4. Field application of safe chemical elicitors induced the expression of some resistance genes against grey mold and cottony rot diseases during snap bean pods storage.

    PubMed

    El-Garhy, Hoda A S; Rashid, Ismail A S; Abou-Ali, Rania M; Moustafa, Mahmoud M A

    2016-01-15

    Phaseolus vulgaris is subjected to serious post-harvest diseases such as grey mold and cottony rot diseases caused by Botrytis cinerea and Pythium aphanidermatum, respectively. In current study, potassium silicate (KSi), potassium thiosulfate (KTS) and potassium sulfate (KS) suppressed moderately the growth of B. cinerea and P. aphanidermatum in vitro. The applied treatments significantly suppressed grey mold and cottony rot of Xera and Valentino snap beans varieties' pods stored at 7 ± 1°C and 90-95% RH for 20 days. Ethylene responsive factor (ERF), polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP), phosphatase associated to defense (PA) and pathogenesis-related protein (PR1) defense genes were over-expressed in leaves tissue of both bean varieties responding positively to potassium salts field application. The expression of these genes was influenced by plant genotype and environment as it varied by snap bean varieties. Accumulation of ERF, GIP, PA and PR1 genes transcript under KTS at 4000 ppm treatment were the highest in Xera tissues (3.5-, 4.8-, 4- and 4.8-fold, respectively). In conclusion, pre-harvest potassium salt in vivo application could be used as effective safe alternatives to fungicides against grey mold and cottony rot diseases of snap beans during storage for up to 20 days at 7 ± 1°C.

  5. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of microvalve arrays in PDMS using laser cut molds with application to C. elegans manipulation in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, R.; Thacker, C. M.; Maricq, A. V.; Gale, B. K.

    2014-09-01

    We present a new fabrication protocol for fabricating pneumatically controlled microvalve arrays (consisting of 100 s of microvalves) in PDMS substrates. The protocol utilizes rapid and cost-effective fabrication of molds using laser cutting of adhesive vinyl tapes and replica molding of PDMS. Hence the protocol is fast, simple and avoids cleanroom use. The results show that effective doormat-style microvalves can be easily fabricated in arrays by manipulating the stiffness of the actuating membrane through varying the valve-chamber area/shape. Three frequently used valve-chamber shapes (circle, square and capsule) were tested and all showed advantages in different situations. Circular valve chambers were best for small valves, square valves were best for medium-sized valves, and the capsule valves were best for larger valves. An application of this protocol has been demonstrated in the fabrication of a microfluidic 32-well plate for high-throughput manipulation of C. elegans for biomedical research.

  6. Lithographic VCSEL array multimode and single mode sources for sensing and 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshin, J.; Li, M.; Beadsworth, J.; Yang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Tucker, F.; Eifert, L.; Deppe, D. G.

    2016-05-01

    Sensing applications along with free space data links can benefit from advanced laser sources that produce novel radiation patterns and tight spectral control for optical filtering. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are being developed for these applications. While oxide VCSELs are being produced by most companies, a new type of oxide-free VCSEL is demonstrating many advantages in beam pattern, spectral control, and reliability. These lithographic VCSELs offer increased power density from a given aperture size, and enable dense integration of high efficiency and single mode elements that improve beam pattern. In this paper we present results for lithographic VCSELs and describes integration into military systems for very low cost pulsed applications, as well as continuouswave applications in novel sensing applications. The VCSELs are being developed for U.S. Army for soldier weapon engagement simulation training to improve beam pattern and spectral control. Wavelengths in the 904 nm to 990 nm ranges are being developed with the spectral control designed to eliminate unwanted water absorption bands from the data links. Multiple beams and radiation patterns based on highly compact packages are being investigated for improved target sensing and transmission fidelity in free space data links. These novel features based on the new VCSEL sources are also expected to find applications in 3-D imaging, proximity sensing and motion control, as well as single mode sensors such as atomic clocks and high speed data transmission.

  7. 3. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING INTERIOR OF CHURCH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING INTERIOR OF CHURCH OF ST. VINCENT de PAUL, from the collection of American Catholic Historical Society. Please use the following credit line: American Catholic Historical Society Ryan Memorial Library Historical Collections St. Charles Seminary Overbrook Philadelphia, Pa. 19151 - Church of St. Vincent de Paul (Roman Catholic), 101-107 East Price Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 1. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING EXTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING EXTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH, from the collection of American Catholic Historical Society. Please use the following credit line: American Catholic Historical Society Ryan Memorial Library Historical Collections St. Charles Seminary Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa. 19151 - Church of the Immaculate Conception, 1020 North Front Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 3. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING EXTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy: CA. 1880 LITHOGRAPH SHOWING EXTERIOR VIEW OF CHURCH, from the collection of American Catholic Historical Society. Please use the following credit line: American Catholic Historic Society Ryan Memorial Library Historical Collections St. Charles Seminary Overbrook Philadelphia, Pa. 19151 - Church of St. Philip de Neri (Roman Catholic), 220-228 Queen Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. 1. Photocopy of lithograph (from Annual Report of the Supervising ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of lithograph (from Annual Report of the Supervising Architect to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Calender Year Ending December 31, 1888. Wahsington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1889. Will A. Freret, Supervising Architect) THREE-QUARTER VIEW OF FRONT ELEVATION (RIVERSIDE), FLOOR PLANS - U. S. Courthouse & Post Office, Binghamton, Broome County, NY

  11. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  12. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  13. Molds in the Environment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program in Brief Related Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ... ng Việt [PDF - 273 KB] Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ...

  14. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  15. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOEpatents

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  16. Applicability of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index for Quantification of Residential Mold Contamination in an Air Pollution Health Effects Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS) investigating the respiratory health impacts of traffic-related air pollutants on asthmatic children in Detroit, Michigan, residential dust samples were collected to quantify mold exposure. Sett...

  17. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  18. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  19. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  20. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  1. Mold and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuscano, Antoinette

    1998-01-01

    Mold can seriously affect the health of children with asthma or allergies. Indoor air problems related to mold can be difficult to identify, but when several students who spend time in the same classroom area show allergic symptoms, it is important to consider mold and air quality. Failure to respond promptly can have serious consequences. (SM)

  2. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  3. Ultrafast optical properties of lithographically defined quantum dot amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Verma, V. B.; Mirin, R. P.; Silverman, K. L.; Coleman, J. J.

    2014-02-10

    We measure the ultrafast optical response of lithographically defined quantum dot amplifiers at 40 K. Recovery of the gain mostly occurs in less than 1 picosecond, with some longer-term transients attributable to carrier heating. Recovery of the absorption proceeds on a much longer timescale, representative of relaxation between quantum dot levels and carrier recombination. We also measure transparency current-density in these devices.

  4. Computational study of a high-temperature thermal nanoimprint lithographic (TNIL) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Nicolas Joseph

    As an emerging manufacturing technique, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) can fabricate micro and nanoscale features of microfluidic devices at very high accuracy and reliability. The process parameters such as pressure, temperature, and material properties play critical roles in the NIL process. In this work, the process of thermal nanoimprint lithography (TNIL) is studied computationally and the developed model can accurately predict the nano and micro-pattern geometry and quality from TNIL processes based on complex mold-resist interaction. Applications of this modeling technique range from micro- and nano-patterns used in micro-channels for biomedical devices to other applications such as biological/particle sensors or superhydrophobic surfaces. In high-temperature TNIL process, a polymer melt such as polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is heated beyond the melting temperature so that it behaves predominantly as a fluid during the imprint process. The effects of surface tension and shear thinning become significant at or above the melting point, whereas the polymer melt can be modeled as a viscoelastic solid, solved with finite element analysis, when process temperature remains between the glass transition and melting temperatures. Additionally, the mold used in TNIL can deform since it is made of soft-rubbery elastomer such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and it is of interest to include the effect of subsequent mold deformation. Leakage between channels or significant variation in channel width can occur in micro-fluidic devices if mold deformation exceeds design tolerances. In the current work, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) technology is leveraged to solve for significant mold deformation and its effect on the polymer melt flow field during TNIL process. The simulation result is compared to experimental results. The FSI simulation result is also compared to the equivalent case with a rigid mold in place of flexible material, which shows results of differing mold

  5. Botryticidal activity of nanosized silver-chitosan composite and its application for the control of gray mold in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Shaaban H; Tayel, Ahmed A; Alsohim, Abdullah S; Abdallah, Reda R

    2013-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea Pers, the gray mold fungus, is among the most dangerous plant pathogens that cause great losses in agricultural crops. The botryticidal activities of nanosized silver (nano Ag), fungal chitosan (CTS) irradiated fungal chitosan (IrCTS), and nano Ag-IrCTS composite were investigated. All of the examined materials exhibited powerful antifungal activity against B. cinerea. The most effective compound was nano Ag-IrCTS composite with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 125 μg/mL. The microscopic examination, of treated B. cinerea with the composite, revealed that an obvious alteration in mycelial shape was appeared accompanied and moderate lysis in fungal hyphae. With the prolongation of treatment, most of the fungal mycelia were lysed into small and elastic fragments. The consequence of strawberries coating, with antifungal composite based solution, was the disappearance of gray mold infection signs in 90% of the contaminated fruits after 7 d of storage, treated fruits had a fresh-like appearance at the end of storage. Coating with nano Ag-IrCTS solution could be highly recommended regarding its efficiency in prohibiting B. cinerea growth, preventing gray mold decay and enhancing the overall quality of coated strawberry fruits.

  6. Botryticidal activity of nanosized silver-chitosan composite and its application for the control of gray mold in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Shaaban H; Tayel, Ahmed A; Alsohim, Abdullah S; Abdallah, Reda R

    2013-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea Pers, the gray mold fungus, is among the most dangerous plant pathogens that cause great losses in agricultural crops. The botryticidal activities of nanosized silver (nano Ag), fungal chitosan (CTS) irradiated fungal chitosan (IrCTS), and nano Ag-IrCTS composite were investigated. All of the examined materials exhibited powerful antifungal activity against B. cinerea. The most effective compound was nano Ag-IrCTS composite with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 125 μg/mL. The microscopic examination, of treated B. cinerea with the composite, revealed that an obvious alteration in mycelial shape was appeared accompanied and moderate lysis in fungal hyphae. With the prolongation of treatment, most of the fungal mycelia were lysed into small and elastic fragments. The consequence of strawberries coating, with antifungal composite based solution, was the disappearance of gray mold infection signs in 90% of the contaminated fruits after 7 d of storage, treated fruits had a fresh-like appearance at the end of storage. Coating with nano Ag-IrCTS solution could be highly recommended regarding its efficiency in prohibiting B. cinerea growth, preventing gray mold decay and enhancing the overall quality of coated strawberry fruits. PMID:24025030

  7. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  8. Printing thermoresponsive reverse molds for the creation of patterned two-component hydrogels for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Müller, Michael; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology that has its origins in the rapid prototyping industry. The different printing processes can be divided into contact bioprinting(1-4) (extrusion, dip pen and soft lithography), contactless bioprinting(5-7) (laser forward transfer, ink-jet deposition) and laser based techniques such as two photon photopolymerization(8). It can be used for many applications such as tissue engineering(9-13), biosensor microfabrication(14-16) and as a tool to answer basic biological questions such as influences of co-culturing of different cell types(17). Unlike common photolithographic or soft-lithographic methods, extrusion bioprinting has the advantage that it does not require a separate mask or stamp. Using CAD software, the design of the structure can quickly be changed and adjusted according to the requirements of the operator. This makes bioprinting more flexible than lithography-based approaches. Here we demonstrate the printing of a sacrificial mold to create a multi-material 3D structure using an array of pillars within a hydrogel as an example. These pillars could represent hollow structures for a vascular network or the tubes within a nerve guide conduit. The material chosen for the sacrificial mold was poloxamer 407, a thermoresponsive polymer with excellent printing properties which is liquid at 4 °C and a solid above its gelation temperature ~20 °C for 24.5% w/v solutions(18). This property allows the poloxamer-based sacrificial mold to be eluted on demand and has advantages over the slow dissolution of a solid material especially for narrow geometries. Poloxamer was printed on microscope glass slides to create the sacrificial mold. Agarose was pipetted into the mold and cooled until gelation. After elution of the poloxamer in ice cold water, the voids in the agarose mold were filled with alginate methacrylate spiked with FITC labeled fibrinogen. The filled voids were then cross-linked with UV and the construct was imaged with an

  9. Printing Thermoresponsive Reverse Molds for the Creation of Patterned Two-component Hydrogels for 3D Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michael; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology that has its origins in the rapid prototyping industry. The different printing processes can be divided into contact bioprinting1-4 (extrusion, dip pen and soft lithography), contactless bioprinting5-7 (laser forward transfer, ink-jet deposition) and laser based techniques such as two photon photopolymerization8. It can be used for many applications such as tissue engineering9-13, biosensor microfabrication14-16 and as a tool to answer basic biological questions such as influences of co-culturing of different cell types17. Unlike common photolithographic or soft-lithographic methods, extrusion bioprinting has the advantage that it does not require a separate mask or stamp. Using CAD software, the design of the structure can quickly be changed and adjusted according to the requirements of the operator. This makes bioprinting more flexible than lithography-based approaches. Here we demonstrate the printing of a sacrificial mold to create a multi-material 3D structure using an array of pillars within a hydrogel as an example. These pillars could represent hollow structures for a vascular network or the tubes within a nerve guide conduit. The material chosen for the sacrificial mold was poloxamer 407, a thermoresponsive polymer with excellent printing properties which is liquid at 4 °C and a solid above its gelation temperature ~20 °C for 24.5% w/v solutions18. This property allows the poloxamer-based sacrificial mold to be eluted on demand and has advantages over the slow dissolution of a solid material especially for narrow geometries. Poloxamer was printed on microscope glass slides to create the sacrificial mold. Agarose was pipetted into the mold and cooled until gelation. After elution of the poloxamer in ice cold water, the voids in the agarose mold were filled with alginate methacrylate spiked with FITC labeled fibrinogen. The filled voids were then cross-linked with UV and the construct was imaged with an epi

  10. 40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63.5728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations § 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin application operation meets the definition of closed molding specified in §...

  11. 40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63.5728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations § 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin application operation meets the definition of closed molding specified in §...

  12. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  13. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease. PMID:24057512

  14. 53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  15. Lithographically defined 3-dimensional graphene scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Polsky, Ronen

    2015-09-01

    Interferometrically defined 3D photoresist scaffolds are formed through a series of three successive two-beam interference exposures, a post exposure bake and development. Heating the resist scaffold in a reducing atmosphere to > 1000 °C, results in the conversion of the resist structure into a carbon scaffold through pyrolysis, resulting in a 3D sp3- bonded glassy carbon scaffold which maintains the same in-plane morphology as the resist despite significant shrinkage. The carbon scaffolds are readily modified using a variety of deposition methods such as electrochemical, sputtering and CVD/ALD. Remarkably, sputtering metal into scaffolds with ~ 5 unit cells tall results in conformal coating of the scaffold with the metal. When the metal is a transition metal such as nickel, the scaffold can be re-annealed, during which time the carbon diffuses through the nickel, emerging on the exterior of the nickel as sp2-bonded carbon, termed 3D graphene. This paper details the fabrication, characterization and some potential applications for these structures.

  16. Lithographic stress control for the self-assembly of polymer MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-W.; Sameoto, D.; Mahanfar, A.; Parameswaran, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present a novel self-assembly mechanism to produce an assortment of predetermined three-dimensional micromechanical structures in polymer MEMS technology using lithographically defined areas of stress and mechanical reinforcement within a single structural material. This self-assembly technology is based on the tensile stress that arises during the cross-linking of the negative tone, epoxy-based photoresist SU-8. Two different thicknesses of SU-8 are used in a single compliant structure. The first SU-8 layer forms the main structural element and the second SU-8 layer determines the aspects of self-assembly. The second SU-8 layer thickness acts to both to create a stress differential within the structure as well as define the direction in which the induced stress will cause the structure to deform. In this manner, both the magnitude and direction of self-assembled structures can be controlled using a single lithographic step. Although this technique uses a single structural material, the basic concept may be adapted for other processes, with different material choices, for a wide variety of applications.

  17. Fabrication, Densification, and Replica Molding of 3D Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Copic, Davor; Park, Sei Jin; Tawfick, Sameh; De Volder, Michael; Hart, A. John

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new materials and processes to microfabrication has, in large part, enabled many important advances in microsystems, lab-on-a-chip devices, and their applications. In particular, capabilities for cost-effective fabrication of polymer microstructures were transformed by the advent of soft lithography and other micromolding techniques 1, 2, and this led a revolution in applications of microfabrication to biomedical engineering and biology. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to fabricate microstructures with well-defined nanoscale surface textures, and to fabricate arbitrary 3D shapes at the micro-scale. Robustness of master molds and maintenance of shape integrity is especially important to achieve high fidelity replication of complex structures and preserving their nanoscale surface texture. The combination of hierarchical textures, and heterogeneous shapes, is a profound challenge to existing microfabrication methods that largely rely upon top-down etching using fixed mask templates. On the other hand, the bottom-up synthesis of nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires can offer new capabilities to microfabrication, in particular by taking advantage of the collective self-organization of nanostructures, and local control of their growth behavior with respect to microfabricated patterns. Our goal is to introduce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which we refer to as CNT "forests", as a new microfabrication material. We present details of a suite of related methods recently developed by our group: fabrication of CNT forest microstructures by thermal CVD from lithographically patterned catalyst thin films; self-directed elastocapillary densification of CNT microstructures; and replica molding of polymer microstructures using CNT composite master molds. In particular, our work shows that self-directed capillary densification ("capillary forming"), which is performed by condensation of a solvent onto the substrate with CNT

  18. Comparative sampling molds evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrard, L.; Jarry, P.; Charbonnier, J.; Rigaut, C.

    1996-10-01

    The metallurgical industry needs to cast alloys with narrow tolerances in their chemical composition in order to reduce variability of their use properties. Therefore appropriate sampling practices and analytical methods are required. Both accuracy and precision of the analytical results are limited by the non-homogeneity of as-cast disk or cylinder samples, which results from macrosegregation phenomenon. This paper presents a comparison between six commonly used molds: four molds recommended by ASTM standards (center-pour molds type B and vacuum mold), mushroom shaped and cylinder molds. Two complementary approaches are exhibited for the different molds designs: (1) solidification modeling in order to predict macrosegregation localization using the Simulor software; (2) experimental characterization. Radial and axial segregation profiles are determined by Analytical Scanning Electron Microscopy in addition to analytical precision evaluation by spark optical emission and X-Ray fluorescence spectrometries for a given machining depth.

  19. Guide to Molds at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., Albany, NY.

    Asserting that molds growing in schools can be harmful to children's health and learning, this guide offers information about the issue. It provides an overview of the basics, then addresses testing, types of molds, molds and health, monitoring schools for mold, mold prevention and clean-up tips for schools, and what parents should do if they…

  20. Application of Rapid Prototyping and Wire Arc Spray to the Fabrication of Injection Mold Tools (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is a layer-by-layer-based additive manufacturing process for constructing three-dimensional representations of a computer design from a wax, plastic, or similar material. Wire arc spray (WAS) is a metal spray forming technique, which deposits thin layers of metal onto a substrate or pattern. Marshall Space Flight Center currently has both capabilities in-house, and this project proposed merging the two processes into an innovative manufacturing technique, in which intermediate injection molding tool halves were to be fabricated with RP and WAS metal forming.

  1. Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  2. Mold production for polymer optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Raab, Jonas; Speich, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The fields of application for polymer optics are huge and thus the need for polymer optics is steadily growing. Most polymer optics are produced in high numbers by injection molding. Therefore molds and dies that fulfill special requirements are needed. Polishing is usually the last process in the common process chain for production of molds for polymer optics. Usually this process step is done manually by experienced polishers. Due to the small number of skilled professionals and health problems because of the monotonous work the idea was to support or probably supersede manual polishing. Polishing using an industrial robot as movement system enables totally new possibilities in automated polishing. This work focuses on the surface generation with a newly designed polishing setup and on the code generation for the robot movement. The process starts on ground surfaces and with different tools and polishing agents surfaces that fulfill the requirements for injection molding of optics can be achieved. To achieve this the attention has to be focused not only on the process itself but also on tool path generation. A proprietary software developed in the Centre for Optical Technologies in Aalen University allows the tool path generation on almost any surface. This allows the usage of the newly developed polishing processes on different surfaces and enables an easy adaption. Details of process and software development will be presented as well as results from different polishing tests on different surfaces.

  3. Lithographically patterned and self-folded bio-origami scaffolds for three-dimensional cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, Mustapha

    The ability to control both cell placement and chemical gradients within micropatterned three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is important for tissue engineering. Several layer-by-layer microfabrication techniques such as direct-write printing, molding and sequential photolithographic patterning have been adapted to culture cells within 3D blocks of hydrogels and in microfluidic chips. However, patterning cell populations into curved, anatomically relevant 3D geometries still remains a considerable challenge, especially at small-length scales. In this dissertation, we characterize three methods that we have developed to culture cells in 3D. Our strategy involves the wafer-scale assembly of initially planar templates that are engineered to self-fold into intricate "bio-origami" 3D geometries. We first introduce the concept of self-folding bio-origami by engineering curved, nanometer-scale-thick bilayer films of chromium and gold. Lift-off metallization was used to pattern the thermally evaporated bilayers and upon release from the underlying wafer, intrinsic stresses within the films drove the self-folding process. Fibroblasts were cultured on these 3D micropatterned scaffolds and conventional imaging techniques such as fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy could be readily performed. We then develop a differential photocrosslinking method to achieve reversible self-folding of single-layered polymeric films of SU-8. These films could be integrated with other materials, and the incorporation of microfluidic channels enabled the self-folding of curved and flexible microfluidic devices. Moreover, the inclusion of lithographically defined pores in the device walls enabled localized delivery of biochemicals to externally cultured cells in 3D. Lastly, we develop a facile method to self-fold cell-laden hydrogel bilayers for long-term 3D cell culture in curved and micropatterned geometries. The difference in molecular weights of the constituent hydrogel layers resulted

  4. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Lithographic tool dynamic coordinate calibration for CDU improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Mao, Fanglin; Bourov, Anatoly; Cheng, Jianrui; He, Le

    2012-03-01

    In lithographic scanner, many different physical factors could impact to image quality and CD uniformity. In optical systems, the pupil filling quality (source shape), wavefront error and stray light can decrease the intensity contrast and shrink the process window. In mechanical domain, the vibration and scanning synchronization error have the similar effect to imaging process. Imaging in scanner is a dynamic exposure process and in this process, aerial image should keep the same relative position to the wafer. It requests the lithographic tool must have a very stable mechanical frame and very good motion control performance. In addition, the wafer stage, reticle stage's coordinate and projection lens' grid should be matched exactly, include the scanning direction and velocity ratio. The tool's alignment system can calibrate the statistic coordinate for overlay, but it cannot calibrate the dynamic coordinate in scanning direction very well because projection lens' grid has a small asymmetric signiture. This systematic error should be calibrated for CDU improvement. An imaging model considering the motion blurring is represented in this paper and based on this model, the dynamic coordinate's error could be analyzed. Furthermore, exposure method can be used to calibrate the dynamic coordinate and improve the CD uniformity. Exposure latitude will be used to check and calibrate the lithographic tool's dynamic coordinate. We designed a special calibration process to obtain the best dynamic coordinate setting for scanner. In this process, some tool's coordinate parameters (scanning skew and scale) have been changed for every field to obtain the multi-dimensions' exposure information. Exposure window can be represented from this result, and in this exposure window, the best dynamic coordinate setting could be found. After the dynamic coordinate calibrated, the CDU is improved.

  6. Coating strategy for enhancing illumination uniformity in a lithographic condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, D.P.; Vernon, S.P.; Sommargren, G.E.; Kania, D.R.

    1995-01-26

    A three-element Koehler condenser system has been fabricated, characterized, and integrated into an EUV lithographic system. The multilayer coatings deposited on the optics were designed to provide optimal radiation transport efficiency and illumination uniformity. Extensive EUV characterization measurements performed on the individual optics and follow-on system measurements indicated that the condenser was operating close to design goals. Multilayer d-spacings were within 0.05 nm of specifications, and reflectances were approximately 60%. Illumination uniformity was better than {plus_minus}10%. The broadband transport efficiency was 11%.

  7. Silicone plesiotherapy molds

    SciTech Connect

    Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

    1983-04-01

    Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

  8. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  9. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  10. The lithographer's dilemma: shrinking without breaking the bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2013-10-01

    It can no longer be assumed that the lithographic scaling which has previously driven Moore's Law will lead in the future to reduced cost per transistor. Until recently, higher prices for lithography tools were offset by improvements in scanner productivity. The necessity of using double patterning to extend scaling beyond the single exposure resolution limit of optical lithography has resulted in a sharp increase in the cost of patterning a critical construction layer that has not been offset by improvements in exposure tool productivity. Double patterning has also substantially increased the cost of mask sets. EUV lithography represents a single patterning option, but the combination of very high exposure tools prices, moderate throughput, high maintenance costs, and expensive mask blanks makes this a solution more expensive than optical double patterning but less expensive than triple patterning. Directed self-assembly (DSA) could potentially improve wafer costs, but this technology currently is immature. There are also design layout and process integration issues associated with DSA that need to be solved in order to obtain full benefit from tighter pitches. There are many approaches for improving the cost effectiveness of lithography. Innovative double patterning schemes lead to smaller die. EUV lithography productivity can be improved with higher power light sources and improved reliability. There are many technical and business challenges for extending EUV lithography to higher numerical apertures. Efficient contact hole and cut mask solutions are needed, as well as very tight overlay control, regardless of lithographic solution.

  11. Alternative lithographic methods for variable aspect ratio vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepis, Anthony R.

    The foundation of semiconductor industry has historically been driven by scaling. Device size reduction is enabled by increased pattern density, enhancing functionality and effectively reducing cost per chip. Aggressive reductions in memory cell size have resulted in systems with diminishing area between parallel bit/word lines. This affords an even greater challenge in the patterning of contact level features that are inherently difficult to resolve because of their relatively small area, a product of their two domain critical dimension image. To accommodate these trends there has been a shift toward the implementation of elliptical contact features. This empowers designers to maximize the use of free space between bit/word lines and gate stacks while preserving contact area; effectively reducing the minor via axis dimension while maintaining a patternable threshold in increasingly dense circuitry. It is therefore critical to provide methods that enhance the resolving capacity of varying aspect ratio vias for implementation in electronic design systems. This work separately investigates two unique, non-traditional lithographic techniques in the integration of an optical vortex mask as well as a polymer assembly system as means to augment ellipticity while facilitating contact feature scaling. This document affords a fundamental overview of imaging theory, details previous literature as to the technological trends enabling the resolving of contact features and demonstrates simulated & empirical evidence that the described methods have great potential to extend the resolution of variable aspect ratio vias using lithographic technologies.

  12. Glass molding process with mold lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Davey, Richard G.

    1978-06-27

    Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

  13. Electrical and structural properties of ZnO synthesized via infiltration of lithographically defined polymer templates

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong Stein, Aaron; Kisslinger, Kim; Black, Charles T.

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electrical and structural properties of infiltration-synthesized ZnO. In-plane ZnO nanowire arrays with prescribed positional registrations are generated by infiltrating diethlyzinc and water vapor into lithographically defined SU-8 polymer templates and removing organic matrix by oxygen plasma ashing. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that homogeneously amorphous as-infiltrated polymer templates transform into highly nanocrystalline ZnO upon removal of organic matrix. Field-effect transistor device measurements show that the synthesized ZnO after thermal annealing displays a typical n-type behavior, ∼10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} carrier density, and ∼0.1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} electron mobility, reflecting highly nanocrystalline internal structure. The results demonstrate the potential application of infiltration synthesis in fabricating metal oxide electronic devices.

  14. Electrical and structural properties of ZnO synthesized via infiltration of lithographically defined polymer templates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang-Yong Nam; Stein, Aaron; Kisslinger, Kim; Black, Charles T.

    2015-11-17

    We investigate the electrical and structural properties of infiltration-synthesized ZnO. In-plane ZnO nanowire arrays with prescribed positional registrations are generated by infiltrating diethlyzinc and water vapor into lithographically defined SU-8 polymer templates and removing organic matrix by oxygen plasma ashing. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that homogeneously amorphous as-infiltrated polymer templates transform into highly nanocrystalline ZnO upon removal of organic matrix. Field-effect transistor device measurements show that the synthesized ZnO after thermal annealing displays a typical n-type behavior, ~1019 cm-3 carrier density, and ~0.1 cm2 V-1 s-1 electron mobility, reflecting highly nanocrystalline internal structure. The results demonstrate the potential application ofmore » infiltration synthesis in fabricating metal oxide electronic devices.« less

  15. Electrical and structural properties of ZnO synthesized via infiltration of lithographically defined polymer templates

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yong Nam; Stein, Aaron; Kisslinger, Kim; Black, Charles T.

    2015-11-17

    We investigate the electrical and structural properties of infiltration-synthesized ZnO. In-plane ZnO nanowire arrays with prescribed positional registrations are generated by infiltrating diethlyzinc and water vapor into lithographically defined SU-8 polymer templates and removing organic matrix by oxygen plasma ashing. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that homogeneously amorphous as-infiltrated polymer templates transform into highly nanocrystalline ZnO upon removal of organic matrix. Field-effect transistor device measurements show that the synthesized ZnO after thermal annealing displays a typical n-type behavior, ~1019 cm-3 carrier density, and ~0.1 cm2 V-1 s-1 electron mobility, reflecting highly nanocrystalline internal structure. The results demonstrate the potential application of infiltration synthesis in fabricating metal oxide electronic devices.

  16. Lithographically-generated 3D lamella layers and their structural color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang; Lu, Bingrui; Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Xu, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the structural color from the multilayer nanophotonic structures in Morpho butterfly wing scales, 3D lamellae layers in dielectric polymers (polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA) with n ~ 1.5 were designed and fabricated by standard top-down electron beam lithography with one-step exposure followed by an alternating development/dissolution process of PMMA/LOR (lift-off resist) multilayers. This work offers direct proof of the structural blue/green color via lithographically-replicated PMMA/air multilayers, analogous to those in real Morpho butterfly wings. The success of nanolithography in this work for the 3D lamellae structures in dielectric polymers not only enables us to gain deeper insight into the mysterious blue color of the Morpho butterfly wings, but also breaks through the bottleneck in technical development toward broad applications in gas/liquid sensors, 3D meta-materials, coloring media, and infrared imaging devices, etc.

  17. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  18. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  19. Lithographer 3 and 2: Naval Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The rate training manual and nonresident career course (RTM/NRCC) form is a self-study package that will enable third class and second class lithographers to fulfill the requirements for that rating. Chapter one provides a brief history of printing and discusses the duties and qualifications of the Navy lithographer. Chapters two through eighteen…

  20. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  1. 92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-53. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  2. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory §...

  3. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory §...

  4. 40 CFR 428.100 - Applicability; description of the latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... latex-dipped, latex-extruded, and latex-molded rubber subcategory. 428.100 Section 428.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Latex-Dipped, Latex-Extruded, and Latex-Molded Rubber Subcategory §...

  5. Newborn head molding

    MedlinePlus

    ... molding. In: Graham JM, Sanchez-Lara PA, eds. Smiths' Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Smith J. Initial evaluation. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar SU, ...

  6. Breaking the Mold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Using the example of a Texas elementary school, describes how to eliminate mold and mildew from school facilities, including discovering the problem, responding quickly, reconstructing the area, and crisis planning and prevention. (EV)

  7. Mold After a Disaster

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Disaster Mold Removal After a Disaster Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  8. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  9. Lithographic qualification of high-transmission mask blank for 10nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongan; Faure, Tom; Viswanathan, Ramya; Lobb, Granger; Wistrom, Richard; Burns, Sean; Hu, Lin; Graur, Ioana; Bleiman, Ben; Fischer, Dan; Mignot, Yann; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi; Toda, Yusuke; Bolton, John; Bailey, Todd; Felix, Nelson; Arnold, John; Colburn, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss the lithographic qualification of high transmission (High T) mask for Via and contact hole applications in 10nm node and beyond. First, the simulated MEEF and depth of focus (DoF) data are compared between the 6% and High T attnPSM masks with the transmission of High T mask blank varying from 12% to 20%. The 12% High T blank shows significantly better MEEF and larger DoF than those of 6% attnPSM mask blank, which are consistent with our wafer data. However, the simulations show no obvious advantage in MEEF and DoF when the blank transmittance is larger than 12%. From our wafer data, it has been seen that the common process window from High T mask is 40nm bigger than that from the 6% attnPSM mask. In the elongated bar structure with smaller aspect ratio, 1.26, the 12% High T mask shows significantly less develop CD pull back in the major direction. Compared to the High T mask, the optimized new illumination condition for 6% attnPSM shows limited improvement in MEEF and the DoF through pitch. In addition, by using the High T mask blank, we have also investigated the SRAF printing, side lobe printing and the resist profile through cross sections, and no patterning risk has been found for manufacturing. As part of this work new 12% High T mask blank materials and processes were developed, and a brief overview of key mask technology development results have been shared. Overall, it is concluded that the High T mask, 12% transmission, provides the most robust and extendable lithographic solution for 10nm node and beyond.

  10. Resin transfer molding speeds composite making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, Michael

    1992-11-01

    Fabrication resin transfer molding (RTM) composite parts for different industrial applications is discussed. These applications include composite aerospace parts, sports car components, and high performance sporting equipment. It is pointed out that RTM parts are lighter than metals and can be formulated to have superior durability. But like all composite parts, they are expensive and are made in limited runs.

  11. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  12. Fabrication of low-cost beta-type Ti-Mn alloys for biomedical applications by metal injection molding process and their mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro Fernandes; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Liu, Huihong; Cho, Ken; Nakai, Masaaki; Itoh, Yoshinori; Narushima, Takayuki; Ikeda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Titanium and its alloys are suitable for biomedical applications owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Beta-type Ti-Mn alloys (8-17 mass% Mn) were fabricated by metal injection molding (MIM) as a potential low cost material for use in biomedical applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of the alloys were evaluated. For up to 13 mass% Mn, the tensile strength (1162-938MPa) and hardness (308-294HV) of the MIM fabricated alloys are comparable to those of Ti-Mn alloys fabricated by cold crucible levitation melting. Ti-9Mn exhibits the best balance of ultimate tensile strength (1046MPa) and elongation (4.7%) among the tested alloys, and has a Young's modulus of 89GPa. The observed low elongation of the alloys is attributed to the combined effects of high oxygen content, with the presence of interconnected pores and titanium carbides, the formation of which is due to carbon pickup during the debinding process. The elongation and tensile strength of the alloys decrease with increasing Mn content. The Ti-Mn alloys show good compressive properties, with Ti-17Mn showing a compressive 0.2% proof stress of 1034MPa, and a compressive strain of 50%. PMID:26999621

  13. Fabrication of low-cost beta-type Ti-Mn alloys for biomedical applications by metal injection molding process and their mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro Fernandes; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Liu, Huihong; Cho, Ken; Nakai, Masaaki; Itoh, Yoshinori; Narushima, Takayuki; Ikeda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Titanium and its alloys are suitable for biomedical applications owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Beta-type Ti-Mn alloys (8-17 mass% Mn) were fabricated by metal injection molding (MIM) as a potential low cost material for use in biomedical applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of the alloys were evaluated. For up to 13 mass% Mn, the tensile strength (1162-938MPa) and hardness (308-294HV) of the MIM fabricated alloys are comparable to those of Ti-Mn alloys fabricated by cold crucible levitation melting. Ti-9Mn exhibits the best balance of ultimate tensile strength (1046MPa) and elongation (4.7%) among the tested alloys, and has a Young's modulus of 89GPa. The observed low elongation of the alloys is attributed to the combined effects of high oxygen content, with the presence of interconnected pores and titanium carbides, the formation of which is due to carbon pickup during the debinding process. The elongation and tensile strength of the alloys decrease with increasing Mn content. The Ti-Mn alloys show good compressive properties, with Ti-17Mn showing a compressive 0.2% proof stress of 1034MPa, and a compressive strain of 50%.

  14. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  15. FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG (BMM) FROM MOBILE LADLE. EMPTY BULL LADLE IN FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD TO CONTAINMENT CHAMBER IS CONTINUOUS CASTING OPERATOR, CALVIN ANDERS. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  17. 1. Copy of early 20th Century lithograph looking north showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Copy of early 20th Century lithograph looking north showing aerial view of company. Rendering owned by the Crawford Auto- aviation Museum, 10825 East Blvd, Cleveland, Ohio. - Winton Motor Carriage Company, Berea Road & Madison Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. 77 FR 43000 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Offset Lithographic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... environmental effects, using practicable and legally permissible methods, under Executive Order 12898 (59 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Lithographic Printing and Letterpress Printing Regulations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  19. Guideline series: Control of volatile organic compound emissions from offset lithographic printing. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The report is a draft control techniques guideline (CTG) document for control of volatile organic compound emissions from offset lithographic printing. The document address sheet fed, non-heatset web, newspapers, and heat-set web offset lithographic printing. The principle emission sources addressed are fountain solution, cleaning solvents (blanket and roller washes) and heatset dryers. The purpose of a CTG document is to assist state and local air pollution agencies in developing regulations to limit emissions of volatile organic compounds.

  20. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  1. Molding process for imidazopyrrolone polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for producing shaped articles of imidazopyrrolone polymers comprising molding imidazopyrrolone polymer molding power under pressure and at a temperature greater than 475 C. Moderate pressures may be employed. Preferably, prior to molding, a preform is prepared by isostatic compression. The preform may be molded at a relatively low initial pressure and temperature; as the temperature is increased to a value greater than 475 C., the pressure is also increased.

  2. Injection molding of iPP samples in controlled conditions and resulting morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessa, Nino De Santis, Felice Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-17

    Injection molded parts are driven down in size and weight especially for electronic applications. In this work, an investigation was carried out on the process of injection molding of thin iPP samples and on the morphology of these parts. Melt flow in the mold cavity was analyzed and described with a mathematical model. Influence of mold temperature and injection pressure was analyzed. Samples orientation was studied using optical microscopy.

  3. Injection molding of iPP samples in controlled conditions and resulting morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, Nino; De Santis, Felice; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Injection molded parts are driven down in size and weight especially for electronic applications. In this work, an investigation was carried out on the process of injection molding of thin iPP samples and on the morphology of these parts. Melt flow in the mold cavity was analyzed and described with a mathematical model. Influence of mold temperature and injection pressure was analyzed. Samples orientation was studied using optical microscopy.

  4. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    sprue-wells should be evaluated. In order for a runner extension to operate efficiently, it must have a small squared cross-section. If it is tapered, the first metal to enter the first metal to enter the system is not effectively trapped. If the cross section is large, there is less turbulence when the aluminum enters the mold cavity in comparison to the smaller cross sectioned, squared runner. However, a large runner reduces yield. In bottom-feeding gating systems, a filter can significantly improve the filling of the casting. The filter helps to slow the metal flow rate enough to reduce jetting into the mold cavity. In top feeding gating systems, a filter can initially slow the metal flow rate, but because the metal drops after passing the filter, high velocities are achieved during free fall when a filter is in place. Side feeding gating systems provide less turbulent flow into the mold cavity. The flow is comparable to a bottom-feeding gating system with a filter. Using properly designed side-gating system instead of a bottom-feeding system with a filter can potentially save the cost of the filter. Rough coatings promote better fill than smooth coatings. This conclusion seems at first counter intuitive. One tends to assume a rough coating creates more friction resistance to the flow of molten metal. In actuality the molten aluminum stream flows inside an oxide film envelope. When this film rests on top of the ridges of a rough coating the microscopic air pockets between the coating and the oxide film provide more thermal insulation than in a smooth coating. This insulation promotes longer feeding distances in the mold as demonstrated in the experiments. Much of this work is applicable to vertically parted sand molds as well, although the heat transfer conditions do vary from a metal mold generally used in permanent molding of aluminum. The flow measurements were conducted using graphite molds and real time X-Ray radiography recorded at a rate of 30 images per

  5. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  6. Soft lithographic fabrication of high Q polymer microcavity arrays.

    PubMed

    Armani, Andrea M; Srinivasan, Akil; Vahala, Kerry J

    2007-06-01

    As new synthetic, low-loss polymers are developed, polymer optical cavities are experiencing a revolution, in both fabrication design and functionality. Recently, a fabrication technique was developed that enabled planar arrays of polymeric resonators to achieve cavity Q factors greater than 1 million. In the present letter, this molding technique is expanded to fabricate resonators from polymers that have either thermal or UV curing mechanisms. The quality factors and broad band spectrum of these devices are determined at 680, 1300, and 1550 nm. These resonant cavities demonstrate quality factors which are competitive with photonic crystals and microdisk resonators.

  7. MOLDED SEALING ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bradford, B.W.; Skinner, W.J.

    1959-03-24

    Molded sealing elements suitable for use under conditions involving exposure to uranium hexafluoride vapor are described. Such sealing elements are made by subjecting graphitic carbons to a preliminary treatment with uranium hexafluoride vapor, and then incorporating polytetrafluorethylene in them. The resulting composition has good wear resistant and frictional properties and is resistant to disintegration by uranium hexafluoride over long periods of exposure.

  8. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has patented a mold ID technology (#6,387,652) licensed by 15 companies in the US and EU. This technology is based upon DNA sequences. In conjunction with HUD, this technology will be used in a National Survey of Homes.

  9. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon molds for precision glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Replication techniques for diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in soft materials such as plastic injection molding are state of the art. For precision glass molding in glasses with high transition temperatures, molds with extreme thermal resistivity, low chemical reactivity and high mechanical strength are needed. Glassy Carbon can be operated up to 2000°C making it possible to mold almost all glasses including Fused Silica with a transition temperatures above 1060°C. For the structuring of Glassy Carbon wafers photolithography and a RIE process is used. We have developed a process using Si as a hard mask material. If the flow rates of the etching gases O2 and SF6 are chosen properly, high selectivity of GC to Si 19:1 can be achieved, which provides excellent conditions to realize high resolution elements with feature size down to 1 micron and fulfills requirements for optical applications. We fabricated several multilevel GC molds with 8 levels of structuring. Two different optical functionalities were implemented: 6x6 array beamsplitter and 1x4 linear beamsplitter. The molds were applied for precision glass molding of a low Tg glass L-BAL 42 (from Ohara) with a transition temperature of 565°C. Their optical performance was measured. A more detailed analysis of the impact of mold fabrication defects on optical performance is done. Rigorous coupled wave analysis simulations are performed, where we included fabrication constrains such as duty cycle, edge depth errors, wall verticality and misalignment errors. We will compare the results with the design specifications and discuss the influence of fabrication errors introduced during the different process steps.

  10. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  11. Hydrogel microparticles from lithographic processes: novel materials for fundamental and applied colloid science

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Chapin, Stephen C.; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a surge in methods to synthesize geometrically and chemically complex microparticles. Analogous to atoms, the concept of a “periodic table” of particles has emerged and continues to be expanded upon. Complementing the natural intellectual curiosity that drives the creation of increasingly intricate particles is the pull from applications that take advantage of such high-value materials. Complex particles are now being used in fields ranging from diagnostics and catalysis to self-assembly and rheology, where material composition and microstructure are closely linked with particle function. This is especially true of polymer hydrogels, which offer an attractive and broad class of base materials for synthesis. Lithography affords the ability to engineer particle properties a priori and leads to the production of homogenous ensembles of particles. This review summarizes recent advances in synthesizing hydrogel microparticles using lithographic processes and highlight a number of emerging applications. We discuss advantages and limitations of current strategies, and conclude with an outlook on future trends in the field. PMID:21516212

  12. High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high pattern density sub-20 nm features: A fundamental materials approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Stuart S; Samulski, Edward; Lopez, Renee; Ruiz, Ricardo; DeSimone, Joseph; Retterer, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Described herein is the development and investigation of PFPE-based elastomers for high resolution replica molding applications. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface energies (<25 mN/m). Using practically relevant large area master templates, we show that the resolution of the molds is strongly dependant upon the elastomeric mold modulus. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nano-grating structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  13. Standard Molded Composite Rocket Pyrogen Igniter - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    The pyrogen igniter has the function to furnish a controlled, high temperature, high pressure gas to ignite solid propellant surfaces in a rocket motor. Present pyrogens consist of numerous inert components. The Standard Molded Pyrogen Igniter (SMPI) consists of three basic parts, a cap with several integrally molded features, an ignition pellet retainer plate, and a tube with additional integrally molded features. A description is presented of an investigation which indicates that the SMPI concept is a viable approach to the design and manufacture of pyrogen igniters for solid propellant rocket motors. For some applications, combining the structural and thermal properties of molded composites can result in the manufacture of lighter assemblies at considerable cost reduction. It is demonstrated that high strength, thin walled tubes with high length to diameter ratios can be fabricated from reinforced plastic molding compound using the displacement compression process.

  14. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES FOR MOLD RELEASE AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the processes, materials, installation practices, and emission characteristics associated with the application of mold release agents (MRAs). Emissions were estimated based on available information on MRA composition and consumption. V...

  15. A fabrication method of microneedle molds with controlled microstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi Lei; Zhu, Dan Dan; Chen, Yang; Guo, Xin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Microneedle (MN) offers an attractive, painless and minimally invasive approach for transdermal drug delivery. Polymer microneedles are normally fabricated by using the micromolding method employing a MN mold, which is suitable for mass production due to high production efficiency and repeat-using of the mold. Most of the MN molds are prepared by pouring sylgard polymer over a MN master to make an inverse one after curing, which is limited in optimizing or controlling the MN structures and failing to keep the sharpness of MNs. In this work we describe a fabrication method of MN mold with controlled microstructures, which is meaningful for the fabrication of polymer MNs with different geometries. Laser micro-machining method was employed to drill on the surface of PDMS sheets to obtain MN molds. In the fabrication process, the microstructures of MN molds are precisely controlled by changing laser parameters and imported patterns. The MNs prepared from these molds are sharp enough to penetrate the skin. This scalable MN mold fabrication method is helpful for future applications of MNs. PMID:27157736

  16. A fabrication method of microneedle molds with controlled microstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi Lei; Zhu, Dan Dan; Chen, Yang; Guo, Xin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Microneedle (MN) offers an attractive, painless and minimally invasive approach for transdermal drug delivery. Polymer microneedles are normally fabricated by using the micromolding method employing a MN mold, which is suitable for mass production due to high production efficiency and repeat-using of the mold. Most of the MN molds are prepared by pouring sylgard polymer over a MN master to make an inverse one after curing, which is limited in optimizing or controlling the MN structures and failing to keep the sharpness of MNs. In this work we describe a fabrication method of MN mold with controlled microstructures, which is meaningful for the fabrication of polymer MNs with different geometries. Laser micro-machining method was employed to drill on the surface of PDMS sheets to obtain MN molds. In the fabrication process, the microstructures of MN molds are precisely controlled by changing laser parameters and imported patterns. The MNs prepared from these molds are sharp enough to penetrate the skin. This scalable MN mold fabrication method is helpful for future applications of MNs.

  17. The multi-spacer patterning technique: a non-lithographic technique for terascale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Amato, P.; Romano, E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the pioneering paper of Aviram and Ratner it has become progressively clearer and clearer that molecules can perform electrical functions so sophisticated as to mimic the behavior of electronic devices, hence the idea of exploiting them for molecular electronics. The practical exploitation of the electronic properties of molecules for computing (i.e., the transformation of a collection of molecules into a device) is, however, a major problem not yet solved. In the last few years the expertise in molecular design and synthesis combined with (i) the identification of a new structure, the crossbar, able to replace those based on a planar arrangement of field effect transistors, and (ii) the development of sub-lithographic techniques for the definition of a random or ordered planar arrangement of nanometre-sized features, has nonetheless led to consider as realistic the hypothesis that molecular devices might replace silicon-based devices when the basic element of the integrated circuit, the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, will no longer admit further shrinking. This work is addressed to identify in which ways features (i) and (ii) can be exploited for application in molecular electronics.

  18. A new soft lithographic route for the facile fabrication of hydrophilic sandwich microchips.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Bi, Xiaodong; Yu, Jianzhao; Ren, Carolyn L; Liu, Zhen

    2012-08-01

    Manufacturing materials are an essential element for the fabrication of microfluidic chips. PDMS, the most widely used polymeric material, is associated with apparent disadvantages such as hydrophobic nature, while other materials also suffer from some limitations. In this paper, a new soft lithographic route was proposed for the facile manufacturing of hydrophilic sandwich microchips, using bisphenol A based epoxy acrylate (BABEA) as a new patterning material. The BABEA copolymers are hydrophilic, highly transparent in visible range while highly untransparent when the wavelength is less than 290 nm, and of high replication fidelity. By combining with appropriate monomers, including glycidyl methacrylate, methylmethacrylate, and acrylic acid, the copolymers contain active functional groups, which allows for easy postmodification for desirable functional units. A fabrication procedure was proposed for manufacturing hybrid quartz/BABEA copolymer/quartz microchips. In the procedure, no micromachining equipments, wet etching, or imprinting techniques were involved, making the fabrication approach applicable in ordinary chemistry laboratories. The performance of the prepared microchips was demonstrated in terms of CIEF with UV-whole channel imaging detection. The hydrophilic microchannel ensures stable focusing while the polymeric middle layer acts as a perfectly aligned optical slit for whole channel UV absorbance detection.

  19. Injection molded polymeric micropatterns for bone regeneration study.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, Erika; Guidi, Enrica; Della Giustina, Gioia; Sorgato, Marco; Krampera, Mauro; Bassi, Giulio; Di Liddo, Rosa; Lucchetta, Giovanni; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    An industrially feasible process for the fast mass-production of molded polymeric micro-patterned substrates is here presented. Microstructured polystyrene (PS) surfaces were obtained through micro injection molding (μIM) technique on directly patterned stamps realized with a new zirconia-based hybrid spin-on system able to withstand 300 cycles at 90 °C. The use of directly patterned stamps entails a great advantage on the overall manufacturing process as it allows a fast, flexible, and simple one-step process with respect to the use of milling, laser machining, electroforming techniques, or conventional lithographic processes for stamp fabrication. Among the different obtainable geometries, we focused our attention on PS replicas reporting 2, 3, and 4 μm diameter pillars with 8, 9, 10 μm center-to-center distance, respectively. This enabled us to study the effect of the substrate topography on human mesenchymal stem cells behavior without any osteogenic growth factors. Our data show that microtopography affected cell behavior. In particular, calcium deposition and osteocalcin expression enhanced as diameter and interpillar distance size increases, and the 4-10 surface was the most effective to induce osteogenic differentiation. PMID:25756304

  20. The Fabrication of Nanoimprinted P3HT Nanograting by Patterned ETFE Mold at Room Temperature and Its Application for Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guangzhu; Wang, Kaixuan; Li, Xiaohui; Chen, Qing; Hu, Zhijun; Liu, Jieping

    2016-05-01

    Nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) is investigated as a promising method to define nanostructure; however, finding a practical method to achieve large area patterning of conjugated polymer remains a challenge. We demonstrate here that a simple and cost-effective technique is proposed to fabricate the nanoimprinted P3HT nanograting by solvent-assisted room temperature NIL (SART-NIL) method with patterned ETFE film as mold. The patterned ETFE template is produced by embossing ETFE film into a patterned silicon master and is used as template to transfer nanogratings during the SART-NIL process. It indicates that highly reproducible and well-controlled P3HT nanograting film is obtained successfully with feature size of nanogratings ranging from 130 to 700 nm, due to the flexibility, stiffness, and low surface energy of ETFE mold. Moreover, the SART-NIL method using ETFE mold is able to fabricate nanogratings but not to induce the change of molecular orientation within conjugated polymer. The conducting ability of P3HT nanograting in the vertical direction is also not damaged after patterning. Finally, we further apply P3HT nanograting for the fabrication of active layer of OBHJ solar cell device, to investigate the morphology role presented by ETFE mold in device performance. The device performance of OBHJ solar cell is preferential to that of PBHJ device obviously.

  1. Effect of Zr, Nb and Ti addition on injection molded 316L stainless steel for bio-applications: Mechanical, electrochemical and biocompatibility properties.

    PubMed

    Gulsoy, H Ozkan; Pazarlioglu, Serdar; Gulsoy, Nagihan; Gundede, Busra; Mutlu, Ozal

    2015-11-01

    The research investigated the effect of Zr, Nb and Ti additions on mechanical, electrochemical properties and biocompatibility of injection molded 316L stainless steel. Addition of elemental powder is promoted to get high performance of sintered 316L stainless steels. The amount of additive powder plays a role in determining the sintered microstructure and all properties. In this study, 316L stainless steel powders used with the elemental Zr, Nb and Ti powders. A feedstock containing 62.5 wt% powders loading was molded at different injection molded temperature. The binders were completely removed from molded components by solvent and thermal debinding at different temperatures. The debinded samples were sintered at 1350°C for 60 min. Mechanical, electrochemical property and biocompatibility of the sintered samples were performed mechanical, electrochemical, SBF immersion tests and cell culture experiments. Results of study showed that sintered 316L and 316L with additives samples exhibited high corrosion properties and biocompatibility in a physiological environment. PMID:26275484

  2. The Fabrication of Nanoimprinted P3HT Nanograting by Patterned ETFE Mold at Room Temperature and Its Application for Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guangzhu; Wang, Kaixuan; Li, Xiaohui; Chen, Qing; Hu, Zhijun; Liu, Jieping

    2016-12-01

    Nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) is investigated as a promising method to define nanostructure; however, finding a practical method to achieve large area patterning of conjugated polymer remains a challenge. We demonstrate here that a simple and cost-effective technique is proposed to fabricate the nanoimprinted P3HT nanograting by solvent-assisted room temperature NIL (SART-NIL) method with patterned ETFE film as mold. The patterned ETFE template is produced by embossing ETFE film into a patterned silicon master and is used as template to transfer nanogratings during the SART-NIL process. It indicates that highly reproducible and well-controlled P3HT nanograting film is obtained successfully with feature size of nanogratings ranging from 130 to 700 nm, due to the flexibility, stiffness, and low surface energy of ETFE mold. Moreover, the SART-NIL method using ETFE mold is able to fabricate nanogratings but not to induce the change of molecular orientation within conjugated polymer. The conducting ability of P3HT nanograting in the vertical direction is also not damaged after patterning. Finally, we further apply P3HT nanograting for the fabrication of active layer of OBHJ solar cell device, to investigate the morphology role presented by ETFE mold in device performance. The device performance of OBHJ solar cell is preferential to that of PBHJ device obviously. PMID:27206643

  3. Vacuum isostatic micro/macro molding of PTFE materials for laser beam shaping in environmental applications: large scale UV laser water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2009-08-01

    Accessibility to fresh clean water has determined the location and survival of civilizations throughout the ages [1]. The tangible economic value of water is demonstrated by industry's need for water in fields such as semiconductor, food and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Economic stability for all sectors of industry depends on access to reliable volumes of good quality water. As can be seen on television a nation's economy is seriously affected by water shortages through drought or mismanagement and as such those water resources must therefore be managed both for the public interest and the economic future. For over 50 years ultraviolet water purification has been the mainstay technology for water treatment, killing potential microbiological agents in water for leisure activities such as swimming pools to large scale waste water treatment facilities where the UV light photo-oxidizes various pollutants and contaminants. Well tailored to the task, UV provides a cost effective way to reduce the use of chemicals in sanitization and anti-biological applications. Predominantly based on low pressure Hg UV discharge lamps, the system is plagued with lifetime issues (~1 year normal operation), the last ten years has shown that the technology continues to advance and larger scale systems are turning to more advanced lamp designs and evaluating solidstate UV light sources and more powerful laser sources. One of the issues facing the treatment of water with UV lasers is an appropriate means of delivering laser light efficiently over larger volumes or cross sections of water. This paper examines the potential advantages of laser beam shaping components made from isostatically micro molding microstructured PTFE materials for integration into large scale water purification and sterilization systems, for both lamps and laser sources. Applying a unique patented fabrication method engineers can form micro and macro scale diffractive, holographic and faceted reflective structures

  4. Precision lens molding of asphero diffractive surfaces in chalcogenide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Schwertz, K.; Bagwell, J.

    2015-10-01

    Finished lens molding, and the similar process of precision lens molding, have long been practiced for high volume, accurate replication of optical surfaces on oxide glass. The physics surrounding these processes are well understood, and the processes are capable of producing high quality optics with great fidelity. However, several limitations exist due to properties inherent with oxide glasses. Tooling materials that can withstand the severe environmental conditions of oxide glass molding cannot easily be machined to produce complex geometries such as diffractive surfaces, lens arrays, and off axis features. Current machining technologies coupled with a limited selection of tool materials greatly limits the type of structures that can be molded into the finished optic. Tooling for chalcogenide glasses are not bound by these restrictions since the molding temperatures required are much lower than for oxide glasses. Innovations in tooling materials and manufacturing techniques have enabled the production of complex geometries to optical quality specifications and have demonstrated the viability of creating tools for molding diffractive surfaces, off axis features, datums, and arrays. Applications for optics having these features are found in automotive, defense, security, medical, and industrial domains. This paper will discuss results achieved in the study of various molding techniques for the formation of positive diffractive features on a concave spherical surface molded from As2Se3 chalcogenide glass. Examples and results of molding with tools having CTE match with the glass and non CTE match will be reviewed. The formation of stress within the glass during molding will be discussed, and methods of stress management will also be demonstrated and discussed. Results of process development methods and production of good diffractive surfaces will be shown.

  5. Predicting and preventing mold spoilage of food products.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    This article is a review of how to quantify mold spoilage and consequently shelf life of a food product. Mold spoilage results from having a product contaminated with fungal spores that germinate and form a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. The spoilage can be then expressed as the combination of the probability of having a product contaminated and the probability of mold growth (germination and proliferation) up to a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. For products packed before being distributed to the retailers, the probability of having a product contaminated is a function of factors strictly linked to the factory design, process, and environment. The in-factory fungal contamination of a product might be controlled by good manufacturing hygiene practices and reduced by particular processing practices such as an adequate air-renewal system. To determine the probability of mold growth, both germination and mycelium proliferation can be mathematically described by primary models. When mold contamination on the product is scarce, the spores are spread on the product and more than a few spores are unlikely to be found at the same spot. In such a case, models applicable for a single spore should be used. Secondary models can be used to describe the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on either the germination or proliferation of molds. Several polynomial models and gamma-type models quantifying the effect of water activity and temperature on mold growth are available. To a lesser extent, the effect of pH, ethanol, heat treatment, addition of preservatives, and modified atmospheres on mold growth also have been quantified. However, mold species variability has not yet been properly addressed, and only a few secondary models have been validated for food products. Once the probability of having mold spoilage is calculated for various shelf lives and product formulations, the model can be implemented as part of a risk management

  6. Predicting and preventing mold spoilage of food products.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    This article is a review of how to quantify mold spoilage and consequently shelf life of a food product. Mold spoilage results from having a product contaminated with fungal spores that germinate and form a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. The spoilage can be then expressed as the combination of the probability of having a product contaminated and the probability of mold growth (germination and proliferation) up to a visible mycelium before the end of the shelf life. For products packed before being distributed to the retailers, the probability of having a product contaminated is a function of factors strictly linked to the factory design, process, and environment. The in-factory fungal contamination of a product might be controlled by good manufacturing hygiene practices and reduced by particular processing practices such as an adequate air-renewal system. To determine the probability of mold growth, both germination and mycelium proliferation can be mathematically described by primary models. When mold contamination on the product is scarce, the spores are spread on the product and more than a few spores are unlikely to be found at the same spot. In such a case, models applicable for a single spore should be used. Secondary models can be used to describe the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on either the germination or proliferation of molds. Several polynomial models and gamma-type models quantifying the effect of water activity and temperature on mold growth are available. To a lesser extent, the effect of pH, ethanol, heat treatment, addition of preservatives, and modified atmospheres on mold growth also have been quantified. However, mold species variability has not yet been properly addressed, and only a few secondary models have been validated for food products. Once the probability of having mold spoilage is calculated for various shelf lives and product formulations, the model can be implemented as part of a risk management

  7. Numerical simulation of mold shape’s influence on NbTi cold-pressing superconducting joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Junsheng; Dai, Yinming; Wang, Qiuliang; Yan, Luguang

    2014-03-01

    The cold-pressing welding methods are employed to fabricate joints between NbTi multi-filamentary conductors, and a series of joints are made with the molds of different shapes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet applications. The Abaqus-Explicit method was used to do a quasi-static analysis of the cold-pressing welding process. In the simulation, we analyzed four molds with different shapes: plate mold, cap mold, square mold, and radial compression. The simulation shows that the deformation of filaments is the most uniform in the case of radial compression and the square mold is the optimum one for decreasing joint resistance.

  8. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  9. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  10. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of medical devices using 3D printed molds for liquid injection molding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E; Liu, Jonathan A; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications. PMID:24998993

  11. Rapid and Low-cost Prototyping of Medical Devices Using 3D Printed Molds for Liquid Injection Molding

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J. Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E.; Liu, Jonathan A.; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications. PMID:24998993

  12. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of medical devices using 3D printed molds for liquid injection molding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E; Liu, Jonathan A; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-06-27

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications.

  13. Implementing safer alternatives to lithographic cleanup solvents to protect the health of workers and the environment.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Patrice; Wolf, Katy; Quint, Julia

    2009-03-01

    The use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in lithographic printing cleanup is an environmental and occupational hazard. Regulations to reduce ambient ozone levels limited VOC emissions from lithographic cleanup operations and spurred the development of low-VOC alternatives. The purpose of this project was to promote the substitution of hazardous cleanup solvents with less toxic chemicals to protect the health of workers and the environment. A convenience sample of printers, employers, union, industry, and government representatives was constructed. Data regarding the lithographic printing work force and the use of cleanup solvents and alternatives were collected through: (1) work site walk-throughs, (2) a focus group, (3) key informant interviews, (4) a half-day workshop, and (5) demonstration projects. Overall, 66 individuals from 15 different print shops, 10 government agencies, the lithographic printing industry, and one printer's union participated in one or more aspects of the project. Printer inhalation exposure to hazardous cleanup solvents was prevalent and printers were not aware of safer alternatives. Employers should implement low-VOC, low-toxicity cleanup products in a timely manner to protect the health of printers and the environment. Use of low-VOC lithographic cleanup products does not mitigate the potential for printer dermal exposure and may carry safety and ergonomic implications. Lithographic cleanup solvent manufacturers should seek low-VOC ingredients that do not pose a dermal exposure hazard. Linking environmental and occupational health prevented the development of substitutes that would have introduced worker hazards and provided an opportunity to circumvent some of the inadequacies of the current occupational health regulatory apparatus. Governmental organizations should establish and maintain institutional interdisciplinary mechanisms to support these linkages. PMID:19142792

  14. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  15. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Method of continuously producing compression molded coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, H.; Ishihara, N.; Kuwashima, S.

    1986-08-19

    This patent describes a method of producing a continuous cake of compression molded coal for chamber type coke ovens comprising steps of charging raw material coking coal into a molding box, and pressurizing the raw material coking coal with a pressing plate to obtain compression molded coal and to push the compression molded coal out of the molding box through an outlet. The improvement described here includes: the coking coal having a water content of more than 8.5% is charged into a chamber of the molding box at a side opposite the outlet, the pressing plate in the chamber is so advanced in the molding box to compression mold the coking coal into the preceding compression molded coal at a pressure no more than about 100 Kg/cm/sup 2/ so that the molded coal has a bulk density of at least 1.0 wet ton/m/sup 3/, and to push the molded coal in the molding box toward the outlet, the molded coal pressurized by the pressing plate partly remains in the molding box for supporting the coking coal freshly charged for the following cycle of the operation, and the freshly charged coal is pressed by the pressing plate so that the subsequent molded coal is combined with the preceding compression molded coal and the preceding molded coal is pushed out of the molding box whereby by repeating the serial steps of the operation, continuous cake of compression molded coal is produced.

  17. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  18. Replication of optical microlens array using photoresist coated molds.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, M; Dam-Hansen, C; Stubager, J; Pedersen, T F; Pedersen, H C

    2016-05-01

    A cost reduced method of producing injection molding tools is reported and demonstrated for the fabrication of optical microlens arrays. A standard computer-numerical-control (CNC) milling machine was used to make a rough mold in steel. Surface treatment of the steel mold by spray coating with photoresist is used to smooth the mold surface providing good optical quality. The tool and process are demonstrated for the fabrication of an ø50 mm beam homogenizer for a color mixing LED light engine. The acceptance angle of the microlens array is optimized, in order to maximize the optical efficiency from the light engine. Polymer injection molded microlens arrays were produced from both the rough and coated molds and have been characterized for lenslet parameters, surface quality, light scattering, and acceptance angle. The surface roughness (Ra) is improved approximately by a factor of two after the coating process and the light scattering is reduced so that the molded microlens array can be used for the color mixing application. The measured accepted angle of the microlens array is 40° which is in agreement with simulations. PMID:27137566

  19. Replication of optical microlens array using photoresist coated molds.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, M; Dam-Hansen, C; Stubager, J; Pedersen, T F; Pedersen, H C

    2016-05-01

    A cost reduced method of producing injection molding tools is reported and demonstrated for the fabrication of optical microlens arrays. A standard computer-numerical-control (CNC) milling machine was used to make a rough mold in steel. Surface treatment of the steel mold by spray coating with photoresist is used to smooth the mold surface providing good optical quality. The tool and process are demonstrated for the fabrication of an ø50 mm beam homogenizer for a color mixing LED light engine. The acceptance angle of the microlens array is optimized, in order to maximize the optical efficiency from the light engine. Polymer injection molded microlens arrays were produced from both the rough and coated molds and have been characterized for lenslet parameters, surface quality, light scattering, and acceptance angle. The surface roughness (Ra) is improved approximately by a factor of two after the coating process and the light scattering is reduced so that the molded microlens array can be used for the color mixing application. The measured accepted angle of the microlens array is 40° which is in agreement with simulations.

  20. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  1. Improvement in Mechanical Properties of A356 Tensile Test Bars Cast in a Permanent Mold by Application of a Knife Ingate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaou; Schwam, David; Neff, David V.; Chen, Chai-Jung; Zhu, Xuejun

    2012-03-01

    As a standard test-bar permanent mold, the "Stahl" Mold has been widely used in foundries to assess the properties of cast alloys. However, inferior mechanical properties are often obtained with this mold due to shrinkage-induced microporosity in the gage section. In order to improve the mechanical properties, a design modification comprising a thin knife ingate between the feeder and test-bar cavity was evaluated in this work. The new design was studied by computer-aided simulation. Simulations predicted that the knife ingate improved the metal feeding capability and reduced the shrinkage microporosity at the gage section from 3 to 1 pct. Experimental verification work has been undertaken with aluminum alloy A356, and the results were analyzed by a statistics theory-based factorial analysis method. The new design resulted in main effects with ultimate tensile strength (UTS) improvement of 20 MPa (relative 12 pct) and elongation increment of 2 pct (relative 45 pct) for the as-cast test bars.

  2. Twistable mold for helicopter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. S.; Kiely, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of mold for fabrication of blades composed of sets of aerodynamic shells having same airfoil section characteristics but different distributions. Mold consists of opposing stacks of thin templates held together by long bolts. When bolts are loosened, templates can be set at different positions with respect to each other and then locked in place.

  3. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  4. Effect of partial deprotection on lithographic properties of t-butoxycarbonyloxystyrene-containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixon, David A.; Bohrer, M. P.; Alonzo, J. C.

    1994-05-01

    In chemically amplified resist polymers containing t-butoxycarbonyloxystyrene (TBS), a photogenerated acid catalytically removes the t-butoxycarbonyl (TBOC) protecting groups, yielding hydroxystyrene (HS) and thereby promoting aqueous base solubility of the exposed resist. Areas of concern in the lithographic use of positive tone resist polymers containing TBS include radiation sensitivity, substrate adhesion, optical density, and the loss of mass that accompanies TBOC deprotection. One approach to optimization of the lithographic performance of TBS-containing resists is to partially deprotect the matrix polymer prior to lithographic exposure. Partial deprotection yields a polymer comprised of a mixture of TBS and HS functionalities within the same chain. An easily controlled and reproducible process has been developed that causes partial conversion of TBS to HS in any TBS-containing polymer, prior to resist solution formulation. Lithographic tests of these materials were carried out using a deep UV exposure tool ((lambda) equals248 nm) and a nitrobenzyl sulfonate photoacid generator. Partial deprotection of these polymers, prior to use in lithography, is shown to substantially increase the resist sensitivity and reduce film shrinkage induced by post-exposure bake. The extent of deprotection has also been found to strongly affect the optical density at 248 nm of the sulfone-containing polymers, but to have minimal effect on the optical density of the sulfone-free polymer.

  5. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Morris, Macdonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1997-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks.

  6. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  7. Selection of di(meth)acrylate monomers for low pollution of fluorinated mold surfaces in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Kobayashi, Kei; Hattori, Azusa N; Ito, Shunya; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Kubo, Shoichi; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-04-14

    We used fluorescence microscopy to show that low adsorption of resin components by a mold surface was necessary for continuous ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting, as well as generation of a low release energy on detachment of a cured resin from a template mold. This is because with low mold pollution, fracture on demolding occurred at the interface between the mold and cured resin surfaces rather than at the outermost part of the cured resin. To achieve low mold pollution, we investigated the radical photopolymerization behaviors of fluorescent UV-curable resins and the mechanical properties (fracture toughness, surface hardness, and release energy) of the cured resin films for six types of di(meth)acrylate-based monomers with similar chemical structures, in which polar hydroxy and aromatic bulky bisphenol moieties and methacryloyl or acryloyl reactive groups were present or absent. As a result, we selected bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BPAGDM), which contains hydroxy, bisphenol, and methacryloyl moieties, which give good mechanical properties, monomer bulkiness, and mild reactivity, respectively, as a suitable base monomer for UV nanoimprinting under an easily condensable alternative chlorofluorocarbon (HFC-245fa) atmosphere. The fluorescent UV-curable BPAGDM resin was used for UV nanoimprinting and lithographic reactive ion etching of a silicon surface with 32 nm line-and-space patterns without a hard metal layer. PMID:25793911

  8. Mold prevention strategies and possible health effects in the aftermath of hurricanes and major floods.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mary; Brown, Clive; Burkhart, Joe; Burton, Nancy; Cox-Ganser, Jean; Damon, Scott; Falk, Henry; Fridkin, Scott; Garbe, Paul; McGeehin, Mike; Morgan, Juliette; Page, Elena; Rao, Carol; Redd, Stephen; Sinks, Tom; Trout, Douglas; Wallingford, Kenneth; Warnock, David; Weissman, David

    2006-06-01

    Extensive water damage after major hurricanes and floods increases the likelihood of mold contamination in buildings. This report provides information on how to limit exposure to mold and how to identify and prevent mold-related health effects. Where uncertainties in scientific knowledge exist, practical applications designed to be protective of a person's health are presented. Evidence is included about assessing exposure, clean-up and prevention, personal protective equipment, health effects, and public health strategies and recommendations. The recommendations assume that, in the aftermath of major hurricanes or floods, buildings wet for <48 hours will generally support visible and extensive mold growth and should be remediated, and excessive exposure to mold-contaminated materials can cause adverse health effects in susceptible persons regardless of the type of mold or the extent of contamination. For the majority of persons, undisturbed mold is not a substantial health hazard. Mold is a greater hazard for persons with conditions such as impaired host defenses or mold allergies. To prevent exposure that could result in adverse health effects from disturbed mold, persons should 1) avoid areas where mold contamination is obvious; 2) use environmental controls; 3) use personal protective equipment; and 4) keep hands, skin, and clothing clean and free from mold-contaminated dust. Clinical evaluation of suspected mold-related illness should follow conventional clinical guidelines. In addition, in the aftermath of extensive flooding, health-care providers should be watchful for unusual mold-related diseases. The development of a public health surveillance strategy among persons repopulating areas after extensive flooding is recommended to assess potential health effects and the effectiveness of prevention efforts. Such a surveillance program will help CDC and state and local public health officials refine the guidelines for exposure avoidance, personal protection

  9. Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis results from macrophage- and lymphocyte-driven inflammation, which may be attributable to contaminated humidifiers or heating-ventilation systems or sources in homes, schools, or workplaces. A case may be suspected when there is water intrusion or inadequate drainage. Some fungal causes include species of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cryptostroma, Penicillium, Pullularia, Rhodotorula, and Trichosporon. The differential diagnosis includes mold-induced asthma, sick building syndrome, mass psychogenic illness (epidemic hysteria), unjustified fears of "toxic" molds, and conditions causing recurrent pneumonitis. PMID:15510579

  10. Foaming morphology control of microcellular injection molded parts with gas counter pressure and dynamic mold temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Tai-Yi; Huang, Chao-Tsai; Chang, Rong-Yu; Hwang, Shyh-Shin

    2014-05-01

    Microcellular injection molding process is a promising solution for products with special requirements such as weight reduction, extra thin wall, high dimensional stability, clamping force reduction, etc. Despite microcellular foaming application used in reciprocating screw injection molding machine was built more than a decade, some limitations, such as poor surface quality or poor foaming control, confine the usage of this technology. Earlier CAE simulation tool for microcellular injection molding was not successful due to insufficient physical and computational considerations, limited by complicated bubble growth mechanism; so that, an economic and efficient tool for examining foaming quality of injection foaming product was lack. In this study, a recent developed three-dimensional simulation tool is used to predict injection foaming process. Predictions are carried out with commodity polypropylene and polystyrene with nitrogen and carbon dioxide supercritical fluids (SCFs). Comparisons of simulations between microcellular injection molding with and without counter pressure are discussed to provide insights into the correlation of surface quality and cell size distribution near the surface of product. Furthermore, comparisons between simulation predictions and experimental results of molding process, which is featured with dynamic mold temperature and gas counter pressure, are given for understanding quality improvement by controlling foaming morphology, and benefit of industrial application.

  11. ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF SOME COMMON MOLDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, MARION N.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A PICTURE GUIDE FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF TEN COMMON MOLDS. IT IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH THE ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT "MICROGARDENING" AND IS SUGGESTED FOR UPPER ELEMENTARY GRADES. INCLUDED FOR EACH MOLD ARE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS AND PHOTOMICROGRAPHS OF THE INTACT MOLD MASS AND OF THE MOLD'S SPORE PRODUCING STRUCTURES. ALSO…

  12. Transfer molding of PMR-15 polyimide resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. P.; Moyer, D. W.; Nowak, B. E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer molding is an economically viable method of producing small shapes of PMR-15 polyimide. It is shown that with regard to flexural, compressive, and tribological properties transfer-molded PMR-15 polyimide is essentially equivalent to PMR-15 polyimide produced by the more common method of compression molding. Minor variations in anisotropy are predictable effects of molding design and secondary finishing operations.

  13. Fabrication of injection molded sintered alpha SiC turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, R. S.; Ohnsorg, R. W.; Frechette, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Fabrication of a sintered alpha silicon carbide turbine blade by injection molding is described. An extensive process variation matrix was carried out to define the optimum fabrication conditions. Variation of molding parameters had a significant impact on yield. Turbine blades were produced in a reasonable yield which met a rigid quality and dimensional specification. Application of injection molding technology to more complex components such as integral rotors is also described.

  14. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Liparoti, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; Hunag, Tsang Min; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2015-05-22

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  15. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  16. [Health effects of indoor molds].

    PubMed

    Buzina, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Molds are found almost everywhere in the environment. Their airborne propagules (conidia, spores, hyphal fragments) can--under certain circumstances--cause a variety of health problems like mycotic infections, allergies, asthma, irritations or toxic syndromes. PMID:18030548

  17. Galvanotaxis of slime mold.

    PubMed

    ANDERSON, J D

    1951-09-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum reacts to direct current by migration toward the cathode. Cathodal migration was obtained upon a variety of substrata such as baked clay, paper, cellophane, and agar with a current density in the substratum of 1.0 microa./mm.(2) Injury was produced by current densities of 8.0 to 12.0 microa./mm.(2) The negative galvanotactic response was not due to electrode products. Attempts to demonstrate that the response was due to gradients or orientation in the substratum, pH changes in the mold, cataphoresis, electroosmosis, or endosmosis were not successful. The addition of salts (CaCl(2), LiCl, NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), NaHCO(3), KCl, MgSO(4), sodium citrate, and sea water) to agar indicated that change of cations had more effect than anions upon galvanotaxis and that the effect was upon threshold values. K ion (0.01 M KCl) increased the lower threshold value to 8.0 microa./mm.(2) and the upper threshold value to 32.0 microa./mm.(2), whereas the Li ion (0.01 M LiCl) increased the lower threshold to only 4.0 microa./mm.(2) and the upper threshold to only 16.0 microa./mm.(2) The passage of electric current produced no increase in the rate of cathodal migration; neither was there a decrease until injurious current densities were reached. With increase of subthreshold current densities there was a progressive decrease in rate of migration toward the anode until complete anodal inhibition occurred. There was orientation at right angles to the electrodes in alternating current (60 cycle) with current density of 4.0 microa./mm.(2) and in direct current of 5.0 microa./mm.(2) when polarity of current was reversed every minute. It is concluded that the negative galvanotactic response of P. polycephalum is due to inhibition of migration on the anodal side of the plasmodium and that this inhibition results in the limitation of the normal migration of the mold to a cathodal direction. The mechanism of the anodal inhibition has not been elucidated.

  18. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  19. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  20. Oscillator for continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, G.

    1993-06-15

    In a continuous casting machine comprising a chilled mold disposed to receive molten metal which is discharged from the mold as a curved casting having a predetermined casting radius, and an oscillating drive for oscillating the mold relative to the casting, wherein the improvement described comprises mold guidance means having a first tensile element having an inner end and an outer end, the outer end being anchored to a fixed external frame and the inner end being secured to move with the mold, the first tensile element lying on a first radius extending from the center of curvature of said pre-determined casting radius; and a second tensile element having an inner and an outer end both anchored to a fixed external frame and secured to move with the mold intermediate the inner and outer ends, at least one end having variable tensioning means adapted to apply a tensile force to the second tensile element, the second tensile element lying on a second radius extending from the center of curvature of said predetermined casting radius.

  1. Experimental study of the fabrication of chalcogenide glass lenses by using precision glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Du Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Hye-Jeong

    2014-11-01

    Although the development of small formats (640 × 480 pixel arrays) and amorphous silicon microbolometers has greatly decreased detector cost, another important component of a thermal camera, the optics, still prohibit a breakthrough for high-volume commercial systems. The aspheric lenses used in thermal imaging are typically made using the costly single-point diamond turning (SPDT) process with expensive single-crystal materials (Ge, ZnS, etc.). As a potential solution to reduce cost, the compression molding method using chalcogenide glass has become attractive for fabricating IR optics. The present paper reports the fabrication of a mold and a molded chalcogenide glass lens for a thermal security camera. In addition, the molded chalcogenide glass lens was evaluated using the form error, roughness and decentration for each surface of the molded lens. From the evaluation results, we verified that the molded lens was capable of being used for thermal imaging applications.

  2. Refractive index and dispersion variation in precision optical glass molding by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Yang; Shen, Lianguan; Yi, Allen Y

    2009-07-01

    Glass compression molding is an alternative manufacturing method for efficient, high-quality, low-cost optical component manufacturing. However, in compression molding, refractive index variation is inadvertently introduced to glass, which can influence optical performance of molded glass lenses, especially for lenses used in high precision applications. In order to study refractive index variation and dispersion in molded glass lenses after cooling, a group of BK7 cylindrical glass lenses were thermally treated with various heating and cooling conditions. The molded glass lenses were measured by use of an optical setup based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with red, green, and blue lasers separately. Using the wavefront information extracted from fringe patterns, refractive index and dispersion variation in molded glass lenses were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Furthermore, refractive index and dispersion variation at different cooling rates and different soaking temperatures were investigated.

  3. Lithographically defined few-electron silicon quantum dots based on a silicon-on-insulator substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, Kosuke; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2015-02-23

    Silicon quantum dot (QD) devices with a proximal single-electron transistor (SET) charge sensor have been fabricated in a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure based on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. The charge state of the QDs was clearly read out using the charge sensor via the SET current. The lithographically defined small QDs enabled clear observation of the few-electron regime of a single QD and a double QD by charge sensing. Tunnel coupling on tunnel barriers of the QDs can be controlled by tuning the top-gate voltages, which can be used for manipulation of the spin quantum bit via exchange interaction between tunnel-coupled QDs. The lithographically defined silicon QD device reported here is technologically simple and does not require electrical gates to create QD confinement potentials, which is advantageous for the integration of complicated constructs such as multiple QD structures with SET charge sensors for the purpose of spin-based quantum computing.

  4. Reduction of birefringence in a skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips using CO{sub 2} laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Yasuo; Satoh, Isao; Saito, Takushi

    1995-12-31

    Injection molding of polymers is currently utilized for numerous industrial applications. Because of high productivity and stable quality of molded products, the injection-molding process makes the production costs lower, and therefore, is expected to spread more widely in the future. This paper deals with a technique for improving the optical quality of injection molded polymer products using radiative heating. The birefringence frozen in a skin-layer of the molded part was reduced by CO{sub 2} laser heating, and the efficiency of this technique was investigated experimentally. Namely, a simple numerical calculation was performed to estimate the heating efficiency of CO{sub 2} laser in the polymer, effects of radiation heating on the skin-layer of the molded polymer were observed by using a mold with transparent windows, and the residual birefringence frozen in the final molded specimen was measured. The results clearly showed that the birefringence in the skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips was reduced with CO{sub 2} laser heating. The authors believe that the proposed method for reducing the birefringence frozen in injection-molded polymer products is suitable for practical molding, because process time required for the injection-molding is only slightly increased with this method.

  5. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  6. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  7. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  8. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1996-11-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  9. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, E.A.; Lipshutz, R.J.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1997-01-14

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  10. Flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Yang, Baoxi; Huang, Huijie

    2016-08-01

    To meet the uniform dose exposure in optical lithography, it is desirable to get uniform illumination in the scanning direction on wafer for the step-and-scan lithographic system. We present a flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system in this paper. Through flat Gauss illumination in scanning direction, pulse quantization effect could be reduced effectively. Correspondingly, the uniformity of the reticle and wafer is improved. Compared with the trapezoid illumination, flat Gauss illumination could keep the slit edge fixed, and pulse quantization effect will not be enhanced. Moreover flat Gauss illumination could be obtained directly without defocusing and blocking, which results in high energy efficiency and high throughput of the lithography. A design strategy for flat Gauss illumination is also proposed which offers high uniformity illumination, fixed slope and integral energy of flat Gauss illumination in different coherence factors. The strategy describes a light uniform device which contains first microlens array, second microlens array, one-dimensional Gauss diffuser and a Fourier lens. The device produces flat Gauss illumination directly at the scanning slit. The design and simulation results show that the uniformity of flat Gauss illumination in two directions satisfy the requirements of lithographic illumination system and the slope. In addition, slit edge of flat Gauss illumination does not change.

  11. Electronic Characterization of Lithographically Patterned Microcoils for High Sensitivity NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Demas, V; Bernhardt, A; Malba, V; Adams, K L; Evans, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R S; Herberg, J L

    2009-01-13

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a non-destructive, powerful, structure-specific analytical method for the identification of chemical and biological systems. The use of radio frequency (RF) microcoils has been shown to increase the sensitivity in mass limited samples. Recent advances in micro-receiver technology have further demonstrated a substantial increase in mass sensitivity [1]. Lithographic methods for producing solenoid microcoils possess a level of flexibility and reproducibility that exceeds previous production methods, such as hand winding microcoils. This paper presents electrical characterizations of RF microcoils produced by a unique laser lithography system that can pattern three dimensional surfaces and compares calculated and experimental results to those for wire wound RF microcoils. We show that existing optimization conditions for RF coil design still hold true for RF microcoils produced by lithography. Current lithographic microcoils show somewhat inferior performance to wire wound RF microcoils due to limitations in the existing electroplating technique. In principle, however, when the pitch of the RF microcoil is less than 100 {micro}m lithographic coils should show comparable performance to wire wound coils. In the cases of larger pitch, wire cross sections can be significantly larger and resistances lower than microfabricated conductors.

  12. Electronic characterization of lithographically patterned microcoils for high sensitivity NMR detection.

    PubMed

    Demas, Vasiliki; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vince; Adams, Kristl L; Evans, Lee; Harvey, Christopher; Maxwell, Robert S; Herberg, Julie L

    2009-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a non-destructive, powerful, structure-specific analytical method for the identification of chemical and biological systems. The use of radio frequency (RF) microcoils has been shown to increase the sensitivity in mass-limited samples. Recent advances in micro-receiver technology have further demonstrated a substantial increase in mass sensitivity [D.L. Olson, T.L. Peck, A.G. Webb, R.L. Magin, J.V. Sweedler, High-resolution microcoil H-1-NMR for mass-limited, nanoliter-volume samples, Science 270 (5244) (1995) 1967-1970]. Lithographic methods for producing solenoid microcoils possess a level of flexibility and reproducibility that exceeds previous production methods, such as hand winding microcoils. This paper presents electrical characterizations of RF microcoils produced by a unique laser lithography system that can pattern three dimensional surfaces and compares calculated and experimental results to those for wire wound RF microcoils. We show that existing optimization conditions for RF coil design still hold true for RF microcoils produced by lithography. Current lithographic microcoils show somewhat inferior performance to wire wound RF microcoils due to limitations in the existing electroplating technique. In principle, however, when the pitch of the RF microcoil is less than 100mum lithographic coils should show comparable performance to wire wound coils. In the cases of larger pitch, wire cross sections can be significantly larger and resistances lower than microfabricated conductors.

  13. A state-of-the-art hotspot recognition system for full chip verification with lithographic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mark C.; Kang, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Youngkeun; Park, Joung Il; Paek, Seung weon; Kim, Kee-sup

    2011-04-01

    In today's semiconductor industry, prior to wafer fabrication, it has become a desirable practice to scan layout designs for lithography-induced defects using advanced process window simulations in conjunction with corresponding manufacturing checks. This methodology has been proven to provide the highest level of accuracy when correlating systematic defects found on the wafer with those identified through simulation. To date, when directly applying this methodology at the full chip level, there has been unfavorable expenses incurred that are associated with simulation which are currently overshadowing its primary benefit of accuracy - namely, long runtimes and the requirement for an abundance of cpus. Considering the aforementioned, the industry has begun to lean towards a more practical application for hotspot identification that revolves around topological pattern recognition in an attempt to sidestep the simulation runtime. This solution can be much less costly when weighing against the negative runtime overhead of simulation. The apparent benefits of pattern matching are, however, counterbalanced with a fundamental concern regarding detection accuracy; topological pattern identification can only detect polygonal configurations, or some derivative of a configuration, which have been previously identified. It is evident that both systems have their strengths and their weaknesses, and that one system's strength is the other's weakness, and vice-versa. A novel hotspot detection methodology that utilizes pattern matching combined with lithographic simulation will be introduced. This system will attempt to minimize the negative aspects of both pattern matching and simulation. The proposed methodology has a high potential to decrease the amount of processing time spent during simulation, to relax the high cpu count requirement, and to maximize pattern matching accuracy by incorporating a multi-staged pattern matching flow prior to performing simulation on a reduced

  14. Mathematical modeling of the in-mold coating process for injection-molded thermoplastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu

    In-Mold Coating (IMC) has been successfully used for many years for exterior body panels made from compression molded Sheet Molding Compound (SMC). The coating material is a single component reactive fluid, designed to improve the surface quality of SMC moldings in terms of functional and cosmetic properties. When injected onto a cured SMC part, IMC cures and bonds to provide a pain-like surface. Because of its distinct advantages, IMC is being considered for application to injection molded thermoplastic parts. For a successful in mold coating operation, there are two key issues related to the flow of the coating. First, the injection nozzle should be located such that the thermoplastic substrate is totally covered and the potential for air trapping is minimized. The selected location should be cosmetically acceptable since it most likely will leave a mark on the coated surface. The nozzle location also needs to be accessible for easy of maintenance. Secondly, the hydraulic force generated by the coating injection pressure should not exceed the available clamping tonnage. If the clamping force is exceeded, coating leakage will occur. In this study, mathematical models for IMC flow on the compressible thermoplastic substrate have been developed. Finite Difference Method (FDM) is first used to solve the 1 dimensional (1D) IMC flow problem. In order to investigate the application of Control Volume based Finite Element Method (CV/FEM) to more complicated two dimensional IMC flow, that method is first evaluated by solving the 1D IMC flow problem. An analytical solution, which can be obtained when a linear relationship between the coating thickness and coating injection pressure is assumed, is used to verify the numerical results. The mathematical models for the 2 dimensional (2D) IMC flow are based on the generalized Hele-Shaw approximation. It has been found experimentally that the power law viscosity model adequately predicts the rheological behavior of the coating

  15. Experimental study of glass molding process and transcription characteristics of mold surface in molding of aspheric glass lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Du Hwan; Park, Heung Su; Hwang, Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Hye-Jeong

    2011-03-01

    The effects of the process parameters in the molding of aspheric glass lenses for camera phone modules have been investigated experimentally and the surface topographies of the mold and the molded lens were compared to ascertain the transcription characteristics. The molding conditions were optimized with respect to the form error (PV) (the response variable) of the molded lens. The experimental conditions were obtained by employing a factorial design method. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and P-value (significance level), the slow cooling rate was found to affect the response variable most significantly. For the form topography, the lens molded under the optimum molding condition showed a transcription ratio of 93.4% against the mold.

  16. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  17. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  18. Quantitive analysis of the proximity effect in optical lithographic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sang-Man; Kim, Hung-Eil; Ham, Young-Mog; Moon, Seung-Chan; Choi, Soo-Han

    1994-05-01

    As the density of VLSI circuits increases, the proximity effect has been one of the critical issues in optical lithography. In general, the linewidth difference between dense and isolated patterns corresponds to 0.08 micrometers when a conventional i-line single resist process using a 0.54 NA is applied to the half-micron geometry on a flat wafer. Therefore, this linewidth difference has significantly affected the process stability in the real process applications. This paper describes the dependency of the proximity effects on the pattern size, line and space duty ratio, kinds of substrate film, defocus effect during exposure, and resist process conditions related to the variation of the resist thickness and develop time. Critical dimension (CD) deviation caused by the different latent image contrast is also experimentally monitored using two different photoresists. A simulation is performed for the purpose of obtaining the optimum resist thickness to reduce CD difference caused by the variations of resist thickness in the real topography.

  19. Flow behavior in liquid molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D.; Phelan, F.; Parnas, R.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid molding (LM) process for manufacturing polymer composites with structural properties has the potential to significantly lower fabrication costs and increase production rates. LM includes both resin transfer molding and structural reaction injection molding. To achieve this potential, however, the underlying science base must be improved to facilitate effective process optimization and implementation of on-line process control. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a major program in LM that includes materials characterization, process simulation models, on-line process monitoring and control, and the fabrication of test specimens. The results of this program are applied to real parts through cooperative projects with industry. The key feature in the effort is a comprehensive and integrated approach to the processing science aspects of LM. This paper briefly outlines the NIST program and uses several examples to illustrate the work.

  20. Lithographic chip identification: meeting the failure analysis challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Lynn; Riddell, Kevin G.; Flack, Warren W.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method using stepper photolithography to uniquely identify individual chips for permanent traceability. A commercially available 1X stepper is used to mark chips with an identifier or `serial number' which can be encoded with relevant information for the integrated circuit manufacturer. The permanent identification of individual chips can improve current methods of quality control, failure analysis, and inventory control. The need for this technology is escalating as manufacturers seek to provide six sigma quality control for their products and trace fabrication problems to their source. This need is especially acute for parts that fail after packaging and are returned to the manufacturer for analysis. Using this novel approach, failure analysis data can be tied back to a particular batch, wafer, or even a position within a wafer. Process control can be enhanced by identifying the root cause of chip failures. Chip identification also addresses manufacturers concerns with increasing incidences of chip theft. Since chips currently carry no identification other than the manufacturer's name and part number, recovery efforts are hampered by the inability to determine the sales history of a specific packaged chip. A definitive identifier or serial number for each chip would address this concern. The results of chip identification (patent pending) are easily viewed through a low power microscope. Batch number, wafer number, exposure step, and chip location within the exposure step can be recorded, as can dates and other items of interest. An explanation of the chip identification procedure and processing requirements are described. Experimental testing and results are presented, and potential applications are discussed.

  1. Soft lithographic printing and transfer of photosensitive polymers: facile fabrication of free-standing structures and patterning fragile and unconventional substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaozhong; Han, Jea-Hyeoung; Zhu, Likun; Shannon, Mark A.; Yeom, Junghoon

    2014-11-01

    Dry film photoresists (DF PRs) are widely used to perform photolithography on non-traditional substrates such as printing circuit boards, plastic sheets, or non-planar surfaces. Commercially available DF PRs are usually in a negative tone and rather thick, limiting lithographic resolution and versatility. The relatively large pressure required for lamination also prevents the technology from being used for delicate substrates. Here we present a modified soft-lithographic process, namely photoresist blanket transfer (PR BT), transferring a spin-coated PR film from a flat elastomeric stamp to a substrate. The elastomeric stamp is highly compliant, bringing the PR film into intimate contact with the substrate and eliminating the need for a large lamination pressure. Photolithography on unconventional substrates such as etched, fragile, and porous ones is demonstrated. Single or multiple transfers of PRs by BT are utilized to fabricate multilayer, free-standing, and re-entrant polymeric microstructures. A fragile and porous substrate such as an anodized aluminum oxide membrane can also be patterned using PR BT. Moreover, a reliable method to create metal electrodes and high surface area catalysts inside microchannels is discussed for novel microfluidic applications.

  2. On the applicability of the decentralized control mechanism extracted from the true slime mold: a robotic case study with a serpentine robot.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahide; Kano, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Akio

    2011-06-01

    A systematic method for an autonomous decentralized control system is still lacking, despite its appealing concept. In order to alleviate this, we focused on the amoeboid locomotion of the true slime mold, and extracted a design scheme for the decentralized control mechanism that leads to adaptive behavior for the entire system, based on the so-called discrepancy function. In this paper, we intensively investigate the universality of this design scheme by applying it to a different type of locomotion based on a 'synthetic approach'. As a first step, we implement this design scheme to the control of a real physical two-dimensional serpentine robot that exhibits slithering locomotion. The experimental results show that the robot exhibits adaptive behavior and responds to the environmental changes; it is also robust against malfunctions of the body segments due to the local sensory feedback control that is based on the discrepancy function. We expect the results to shed new light on the methodology of autonomous decentralized control systems.

  3. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program in Brief Related Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ... be removed. Â Top of Page Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ...

  4. MOLD-SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds can cause health problems like infections and allergies, destroy crops, and contaminate our food or pharmaceuticals. We can't avoid molds. Molds are essential players in the biological processes on earth, but we can now identify and quantify the molds that will be most pr...

  5. Making Internal Molds Of Long, Curved Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Mold material carried to internal weld joint and removed after impression taken. Remotely operated device makes impression mold of interior surface of tube at weld joint. Mold provides indication of extent of mismatch between members at joint. Maneuvered to weld inspected through curved tube 3 in. in diameter by 50 in. long. Readily adapted to making molds to measure depth of corrosion in boiler tubes or other pipes.

  6. Fabrication of ceramic components using mold shape deposition manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Alexander G.

    Mold Shape Deposition Manufacturing (Mold SDM) is a new process for the fabrication of geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. This thesis describes the development of the Mold SDM process, including process steps, materials selection, planning strategies and automation. Initial characterization results are presented and these are used to compare the process to competing manufacturing processes. A range of current and potential applications for ceramic, as well as metal and polymer parts are discussed. The benefits and limitations of ceramic materials for structural applications are discussed to motivate the need for a manufacturing process capable of rapidly producing high quality, geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. The Mold SDM process was developed to address this need. Mold SDM is based on Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) and uses SDM techniques to build fugitive wax molds which can then be used to build ceramic parts by gelcasting. SDM is an additive-subtractive layered manufacturing process which allows it to build geometrically complex parts. The subtraction step differentiates Mold SDM from other layered manufacturing processes and allows accurate, high quality surfaces to be produced. The performance of the process was increased by identifying the key material properties and then selecting improved materials combinations. Candidate materials were evaluated in terms of machinability, shrinkage, heat resistance and chemical compatibility. A number of preferred materials combinations were developed and used to produce ceramic, metal and polymer parts. A number of new process planning strategies and build techniques were developed. The manufacturability analysis determines whether a part is manufacturable and the orientation selection guidelines help in the selection of optimum build directions. New decomposition techniques take advantage of process capabilities to improve part quality and build rate. Initial process

  7. The Mold that Almost Ate the Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Wayne; Bishop, Chuck; Byars, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    New-building mold was a bane for many home construction companies and new homeowners during the 1990s. It was not unusual to read or watch the news and see the tragedy played out in one's local community. Untold, however, is the story of the toll new-building mold can take on school systems and their principals, especially as these mold problems…

  8. Attack of the Killer Mold Spores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences at the Arkansas State University at Jonesboro library when mold was discovered in a large portion of the monograph collection. Discusses causes of mold formation, equipment needed, news media coverage, staff involvement in the cleanup, and possible health hazards from mold. (LRW)

  9. Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

    2001-02-22

    The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

  10. Method for Molding Structural Parts Utilizing Modified Silicone Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor); Snoha, John J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention improves upon a method for molding structural parts from preform material. Preform material to be used for the part is provided. A silicone rubber composition containing entrained air voids is prepared. The silicone rubber and preform material assembly is situated within a rigid mold cavity used to shape the preform material to die desired shape. The entire assembly is heated in a standard heating device so that the thermal expansion of the silicone rubber exerts the pressure necessary to force the preform material into contact with the mold container. The introduction of discrete air voids into the silicone rubber allows for accurately controlled pressure application on the preform material at the cure temperature.

  11. Computer-controlled compression molding system for composite processing

    SciTech Connect

    Farouk, A.; Kwon, T.H. )

    1990-07-01

    A simple, inexpensive yet flexible compression molding and cure monitoring system has been developed and used in studying the processing of advanced polymer composites. Compression molding is a promising method for manufacturing thermoset polymer composites which find usage in aerospace applications. The processing history of these composites determines their final properties. To improve quality and enable mass production, the processing-property relations need to be studied in detail. Process control and process monitoring as well as provision for user intervention during processing is essential in studying such problems. The computer-controlled molding system together with the control and data acquisition software aims at demonstrating how such a system may be built from off-the-shelf components.

  12. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  13. Emittance of investment casting molds

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M.A.

    1994-07-15

    This document describes measurements of the directional spectral emittance of four ceramic mold materials. The work was performed with the samples at {approximately} 900{degree}C in a vacuum vessel pumped to {approximately}3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}Torr. Results conform to expectations derived from prior work done with similar samples.

  14. Is Mold the New Asbestos?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Mold and indoor air quality (IAQ) are matters of major concern to architects and their educational clients. The Environmental Protection Agency's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program offers help to districts seeking to tackle IAQ issues. Strengthening community relations is one way to be ready in case of a bad environmental or IAQ report.…

  15. ANIMAL MODELS OF MOLD ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of molds as causative agents for allergy/asthma is not new. In fact many fungal genera have been associated with allergic lung disease, but only a few fungi are well studied and even fewer fungal allergens well characterized. The complexity and variety of fungal pro...

  16. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  17. Formation of Thick, Large-Area Nanoparticle Superlatices in Lithographically Defined Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Akey, A.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.; Herman, I.P.

    2010-03-31

    Superlattices of colloidal nanocrystals hold the promise of new nanomaterials with tunable properties. The positioning and size of these structures are often poorly controlled after self-assembly from the solution phase, making studies of their properties difficult. We report the fabrication of {approx}100 layer thick, three-dimensional superlattices on a substrate with controlled lateral placement. This novel fabrication technique generates long-range order over the micrometer scale and controlled placement by employing lithographic patterning and microfluidic flow. Keywords: Nanoparticles; superlattice; self assembly; microfluidics; ordered array.

  18. Lithographed spectrometers for tomographic line mapping of the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brient, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Crites, A.; Duan, R.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hunacek, J.; LeDuc, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Staniszewski, Z.; Turner, A.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-08-01

    The Tomographic Ionized carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) is a multi-phased experiment that will topographically map [CII] emission from the Epoch of Reionization. We are developing lithographed spectrometers that couple to TES bolometers in anticipation of the second generation instrument. Our design intentionally mirrors many features of the parallel SuperSpec project, inductively coupling power from a trunk-line microstrip onto half-wave resonators. The resonators couple to a rat-race hybrids that feeds TES bolometers. Our 25 channel prototype shows spectrally positioned lines roughly matching design with a receiver optical efficiency of 15-20%, a level that is dominated by loss in components outside the spectrometer.

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  20. Injection molding ceramics to high green densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, J. A.; Williams, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The injection molding behavior of a concentrated suspension of Si powder in wax was studied. It was found that the injection molding behavior was a function of the processing techniques used to generate the powder. Dry ball-milled powders had the best molding behavior, while air classified and impact-milled powders demonstrated poorer injection moldability. The relative viscosity of these molding batches was studied as a function of powder properties: distribution shape, surface area, packing density, and particle morphology. The experimental behavior, in all cases, followed existing theories. The relative viscosity of an injection molding composition composed of dry ball-milled powders could be expressed using Farris' relation.

  1. Process influences and correction possibilities for high precision injection molded freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Lars; Risse, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Modern injection molding processes offer a cost-efficient method for manufacturing high precision plastic optics for high volume applications. Besides form deviation of molded freeform optics, internal material stress is a relevant influencing factor for the functionality of a freeform optics in an optical system. This paper illustrates dominant influence parameters of an injection molding process relating to form deviation and internal material stress based on a freeform demonstrator geometry. Furthermore, a deterministic and efficient way for 3D mold correcting of systematic, asymmetrical shrinkage errors is shown to reach micrometer range shape accuracy at diameters up to 40 mm. In a second case, a stress-optimized parameter combination using unusual molding conditions was 3D corrected to reach high precision and low stress freeform polymer optics.

  2. Effect of permanganate treatment on through mold vias for an embedded wafer level package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Young-Ho

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a through mold via (TMV) interconnect was developed for an embedded wafer level package (EMWLP) to enable 3D packing applications. The effects of the shape and surface roughness of the epoxy molding wafer on the quality of electroless Cu metallization were investigated for the vertical interconnection. The mold compound is a composite material composed of epoxy resin and filler particles. Therefore, the effect of the amount of filler particles was studied to optimize the shape of the epoxy molding by applying two types of laser drilling modes. In addition, the electroless Cu plating process was optimized to deposit a Cu seed layer along the TMV sidewall. To optimize the TMV process, a desmear process was applied to improve the shape of the TMV sidewall and adhesion between the epoxy molding compound and the dielectric polymer for multilayer metallization.

  3. Soft lithographic functionalization and patterning oxide-free silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Carleen M; Toone, Eric J; Clark, Robert L; Shestopalov, Alexander A

    2011-12-16

    The development of hybrid electronic devices relies in large part on the integration of (bio)organic materials and inorganic semiconductors through a stable interface that permits efficient electron transport and protects underlying substrates from oxidative degradation. Group IV semiconductors can be effectively protected with highly-ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of simple alkyl chains that act as impervious barriers to both organic and aqueous solutions. Simple alkyl SAMs, however, are inert and not amenable to traditional patterning techniques. The motivation for immobilizing organic molecular systems on semiconductors is to impart new functionality to the surface that can provide optical, electronic, and mechanical function, as well as chemical and biological activity. Microcontact printing (μCP) is a soft-lithographic technique for patterning SAMs on myriad surfaces. Despite its simplicity and versatility, the approach has been largely limited to noble metal surfaces and has not been well developed for pattern transfer to technologically important substrates such as oxide-free silicon and germanium. Furthermore, because this technique relies on the ink diffusion to transfer pattern from the elastomer to substrate, the resolution of such traditional printing is essentially limited to near 1 μm. In contrast to traditional printing, inkless μCP patterning relies on a specific reaction between a surface-immobilized substrate and a stamp-bound catalyst. Because the technique does not rely on diffusive SAM formation, it significantly expands the diversity of patternable surfaces. In addition, the inkless technique obviates the feature size limitations imposed by molecular diffusion, facilitating replication of very small (<200 nm) features. However, up till now, inkless μCP has been mainly used for patterning relatively disordered molecular systems, which do not protect underlying surfaces from degradation. Here, we report a simple, reliable

  4. Soft lithographic functionalization and patterning oxide-free silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Carleen M; Toone, Eric J; Clark, Robert L; Shestopalov, Alexander A

    2011-01-01

    The development of hybrid electronic devices relies in large part on the integration of (bio)organic materials and inorganic semiconductors through a stable interface that permits efficient electron transport and protects underlying substrates from oxidative degradation. Group IV semiconductors can be effectively protected with highly-ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of simple alkyl chains that act as impervious barriers to both organic and aqueous solutions. Simple alkyl SAMs, however, are inert and not amenable to traditional patterning techniques. The motivation for immobilizing organic molecular systems on semiconductors is to impart new functionality to the surface that can provide optical, electronic, and mechanical function, as well as chemical and biological activity. Microcontact printing (μCP) is a soft-lithographic technique for patterning SAMs on myriad surfaces. Despite its simplicity and versatility, the approach has been largely limited to noble metal surfaces and has not been well developed for pattern transfer to technologically important substrates such as oxide-free silicon and germanium. Furthermore, because this technique relies on the ink diffusion to transfer pattern from the elastomer to substrate, the resolution of such traditional printing is essentially limited to near 1 μm. In contrast to traditional printing, inkless μCP patterning relies on a specific reaction between a surface-immobilized substrate and a stamp-bound catalyst. Because the technique does not rely on diffusive SAM formation, it significantly expands the diversity of patternable surfaces. In addition, the inkless technique obviates the feature size limitations imposed by molecular diffusion, facilitating replication of very small (<200 nm) features. However, up till now, inkless μCP has been mainly used for patterning relatively disordered molecular systems, which do not protect underlying surfaces from degradation. Here, we report a simple, reliable

  5. Influence of mold length and mold heat transfer on horizontal continuous casting of nonferrous alloy rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwijs, J. P.; Weckman, D. C.

    1988-04-01

    The influence of mold length and mold heat transfer on the conventional hot-top D.C. continuous casting process was studied through numerical simulations and experiments with horizontally cast 20 mm diameter lead and zinc rods. The minimum casting speed was found to be a nonlinear function of the mold length. For short molds, an inverse relationship between mold length and minimum casting speed was observed. However, the minimum casting speed for zinc cast from molds longer than 12 mm was constant at 2.5 mm/s. For lead cast in molds longer than 12 mm, the minimum observed casting speed was constant at 4.0 mm/s. The observed nonlinear relationship between minimum casting speed and mold length was predicted using a numerical model of the process. For this, an analytical expression for the mold boundary conditions was derived which included the influence of gas gap formation between the rod and the mold due to thermoelastic deformations of both the rod and the mold. Correlation between observed and predicted behavior was demonstrated for both the lead and zinc rods. Maximum casting speed was observed to increase with increased mold length; however, this speed was found to be critically dependent on process attributes such as mold and pinch wheel alignment and mold lubrication.

  6. Precision compression molding of chalcogenide glass optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chaowei; Ma, Tao; Chen, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Precision glass molding process (GMP) is a promising process to manufacture small precision optical elements in large volume. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of a molded chalcogenide glass lens as an optical element. A set of mold was designed and manufactured with silicon carbide material for the molding test. The structure of the mold set was semi-closed and detachable which can make the molded lens easy releasing with non-invasion. The surfaces of the mold cores are coated with thin protecting DLC film to relieve adhesion problem and increase the working life. Experiments were also performed using a precision glass molding machine Toshiba GMP-311V to determine the molding parameters i.e. molding temperature, pressure and cooling rate. The glass lens breakage during precision molding process was analyzed according to the glass property and the molding parameters. By modifying the mold design and optimization the processing parameters, ultimately achieve the desired molded lens.

  7. New directions in the design of lithographic resist materials: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Reichmanis, E.

    1993-12-31

    In the last decade, major advances in fabricating VLSI electronic devices have placed increasing demands on microlithography, the technology used to generate today`s integrated circuits. In 1976, state-of-the-art integrated circuits contained several thousand transistors with minimum features of 5 to 6 {mu}m. Today, they have several million transistors and minimum features of less than 0.7 {mu}m. Within the next 10 to 15 years, a new form of lithography will be required that routinely produces features of less than 0.25{mu}m. Short-wavelength (deep-UV) photolithography and scanning electron-beam, X-ray, and scanning ion-beam lithography are the possible alternatives to conventional photolithography. However, each needs new resists and processes. When deep-UV photolithography is implemented, it will represent the first widespread use in manufacture of a lithographic technology that requires an entirely new resist technology. The authors describe the processes involved in the development of a resist system for this lithographic technique.

  8. EUV and optical lithographic pattern shift at the 5nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Thiruvengadam, Sathish; Cantone, Jason R.; Civay, Deniz E.; Schroeder, Uwe P.

    2016-03-01

    At the 5 nm technology node there are competing strategies for patterning: high-NA EUV, double patterning 0.33 NA EUV and a combination of optical self-aligned solutions with EUV. This paper investigates the impact of pattern shift based on the selected patterning strategy. A logic standard cell connection between TS and M0 is simulated to determine the impact of lithographic pattern shift on the overlay budget. At 5 nm node dimensions, high-NA EUV is necessary to expose the most critical layers with a single lithography exposure. The impact of high-NA EUV lithography is illustrated by comparing the pattern shift resulting from 0.33 NA vs. 0.5x NA. For the example 5 nm transistor, cost-beneficial lithography layers are patterned with EUV and the other layers are patterned optically. Both EUV and optical lithography simulations are performed to determine the maximum net pattern shift. Here, lithographic pattern shift is quantified in terms of through-focus error as well as pattern-placement error. The overlay error associated with a hybrid optical/self-aligned and EUV cut patterning scheme is compared with the results of an all EUV solution, providing an assessment of two potential patterning solutions and their impact the overall overlay budget.

  9. Lithographically patterned magnetic calorimeter X-ray detectors with integrated SQUID readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, B. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.; Ullom, J. N.; Huber, M. E.

    2004-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and performance of a fully lithographically patterned magnetic microcalorimeter X-ray detector. The detector is fabricated on the same chip as a low-noise SQUID that measures the change in the magnetic sensor film's magnetization as the film is heated by absorbed X-rays. Our proof-of-principle detectors use a 100 μm×100 μm-2 μm paramagnetic Au:Er film coupled to a low-noise on-chip SQUID via a meandering superconducting pickup loop that also provides the magnetic field bias to the film. Absorption of 6 keV X-rays in the film causes heating on the order of 1 mK with a decay time of 1 ms or less, the fastest reported using a magnetic calorimeter. However, the resolution is currently poor due to poor Au:Er film properties and non-optimized coupling to the SQUID. We describe the design and fabrication of this device and present measurements of the heat capacity, decay time constant and effective thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter as a function of temperature. Because the SQUID and calorimeter are lithographically patterned on the same substrate, this technology can be readily applied to the fabrication of arrays of multiplexed magnetic microcalorimeter detectors.

  10. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  11. Onychomycosis due to opportunistic molds*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Erick Obed; Arroyo-Camarena, Stefanie; Tejada-García, Diana Luz; Porras-López, Carlos Francisco; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis are caused by dermatophytes and Candida, but rarely by non- dermatophyte molds. These opportunistic agents are filamentous fungi found as soil and plant pathogens. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of opportunistic molds in onychomycosis. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 4,220 cases with onychomycosis, diagnosed in a 39-month period at the Institute of Dermatology and Skin surgery "Prof. Dr. Fernando A. Cordero C." in Guatemala City, and confirmed with a positive KOH test and culture. RESULTS: 32 cases (0.76%) of onychomycosis caused by opportunistic molds were confirmed. The most affected age group ranged from 41 to 65 years (15 patients, 46.9%) and females were more commonly affected (21 cases, 65.6%) than males. Lateral and distal subungual onychomycosis (OSD-L) was detected in 20 cases (62.5%). The microscopic examination with KOH showed filaments in 19 cases (59.4%), dermatophytoma in 9 cases (28.1%), spores in 2 cases (6.25%), and filaments and spores in 2 cases (6.25%). Etiologic agents: Aspergillus sp., 11 cases (34.4%); Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, 8 cases (25.0%); Cladosporium sp., 3 cases (9.4%); Acremonium sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Paecilomyces sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Tritirachium oryzae, 2 cases (6.25%); Fusarium sp., Phialophora sp., Rhizopus sp. and Alternaria alternate, 1 case (3.1%) each. CONCLUSIONS: We found onychomycosis by opportunistic molds in 0.76% of the cases and DLSO was present in 62.5%. The most frequent isolated etiological agents were: Aspergillus sp. and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. PMID:26131862

  12. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  13. Transfer molding processes for nanoscale patterning of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Rabin; Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana; Kim, Jaeyoun

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale patterned structures composed of biomaterials exhibit great potential for the fabrication of functional biostructures. In this paper, we report cost-effective, rapid, and highly reproducible soft lithographic transfer-molding techniques for creating periodic micro- and nano-scale textures on poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) surface. These artificial textures can increase the overall surface area and change the release dynamics of the therapeutic agents coated on it. Specifically, we use the double replication technique in which the master pattern is first transferred to the PDMS mold and the pattern on PDMS is then transferred to the PLLA films through drop-casting as well as nano-imprinting. The ensuing comparison studies reveal that the drop-cast PLLA allows pattern transfer at higher levels of fidelity, enabling the realization of nano-hole and nano-cone arrays with pitch down to ~700 nm. The nano-patterned PLLA film was then coated with rapamycin to make it drug-eluting.

  14. Adaptive wettability-enhanced surfaces ordered on molded etched substrates using shrink film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayadev, Shreshta; Pegan, Jonathan; Dyer, David; McLane, Jolie; Lim, Jessica; Khine, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces in nature exhibit desirable properties including self-cleaning, bacterial resistance, and flight efficiency. However, creating such intricate multi-scale features with conventional fabrication approaches is difficult, expensive, and not scalable. By patterning photoresist on pre-stressed shrink-wrap film, which contracts by 95% in surface area when heated, such features over large areas can be obtained easily. Photoresist serves as a dry etch mask to create complex and high-aspect ratio microstructures in the film. Using a double-shrink process, we introduce adaptive wettability-enhanced surfaces ordered on molded etched (AWESOME) substrates. We first create a mask out of the children’s toy ‘Shrinky-Dinks’ by printing dots using a laserjet printer. Heating this thermoplastic sheet causes the printed dots to shrink to a fraction of their original size. We then lithographically transfer the inverse pattern onto photoresist-coated shrink-wrap polyolefin film. The film is then plasma etched. After shrinking, the film serves as a high-aspect ratio mold for polydimethylsiloxane, creating a superhydrophobic surface with water contact angles >150° and sliding angles <10°. We pattern a microarray of ‘sticky’ spots with a dramatically different sliding angle compared to that of the superhydrophobic region, enabling microtiter-plate type assays without the need for a well plate.

  15. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days.

  16. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days. PMID:25666444

  17. Injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers for microstructured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkar, Smita

    Amorphous and semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymers have been widely investigated for injection molding of parts with microstructured surfaces. Microstructured surfaces injection molded from thermoplastic elastomers have emerging applications as superhydrobic surfaces and patterned adhesives, but there is a limited understanding of the factors affecting replication with these materials. This research was a continued investigation of block copolymer thermoplastic elastomers as well as the first in-depth examination of thermoplastic vulcanizates for injection molding microfeatures. The first focus of this research was the interactions between tooling aspect ratio and feature orientation (negative and positive tooling) and thermoplastic elastomer hard segment content on microfeature replication. Electroformed nickel tooling having positive and negative features with different geometries and aspect ratios of 0.02:1 to 2:1 were molded from three copolyester thermoplastic elastomers with similar chemistry and different hardness values. The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Results were correlated with elastomer properties. In the second parts of this research, the effects of microfeature spacing on the replication of thermoplastic elastomer features was investigated using micropillars with two diameters (10 and 20 mum) and three spacing ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, and 2:1). The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Feature spacing significantly affected the replication of micropillars using a thermoplastic elastomer. This replication was competition between cooling and pressurization of the melt. Wider spacing between smaller features allowed cooling in the tooling lands to dominate the feature filling. Higher pressures did

  18. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  19. Amorphous materials molded IR lens progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, A. R., Sr.; McCord, James; Timm, Ronald; Le Blanc, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    Amorphous Materials began in 2000 a joint program with Lockheed Martin in Orlando to develop molding technology required to produce infrared lenses from chalcogenide glasses. Preliminary results were reported at this SPIE meeting by Amy Graham1 in 2003. The program ended in 2004. Since that time, AMI has concentrated on improving results from two low softening glasses, Amtir 4&5. Both glasses have been fully characterized and antireflection coatings have been developed for each. Lenses have been molded from both glasses, from Amtir 6 and from C1 Core glass. A Zygo unit is used to evaluate the results of each molded lens as a guide to improving the molding process. Expansion into a larger building has provided room for five production molding units. Molded lens sizes have ranged from 8 mm to 136 mm in diameter. Recent results will be presented

  20. Lithographic overlay measurement precision and calibration and their effect on pattern registration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavecz, Terrence E.

    1992-06-01

    Overlay of pattern registration is considered by some to be the most yield critical metrology element monitored in the semiconductor manufacturing process. Over the years, the aggressive demands of competitive chip design have constantly maintained these specifications at the process capability limit. This has driven the lithographer from somewhat simple process control techniques like optically read verniers, to computer automated overlay measurement systems whose outputs are applied to the estimation and correction of full field systematic error sources primarily as modeled wafer and lens pattern distortions. When modeled pattern distortions are used to optimize the lithographic overlay process, the point measurement of registration error is no longer the parameter of interest. Instead the lithographer wishes to measure and minimize the surface modeled pattern distortions such as translation, rotation, and magnification. Yet, often neglected is the fact that estimates of these parameters are influenced by measurement system errors resulting in a loss of precision in the estimate of the distortions and the false introduction of otherwise nonexistent distortions leading to improper determination of the true values for the lens. This paper describes the results of a screening simulation designed to determine the relative effects of measurement system errors on the distortion coefficient estimates produced by a pattern distortion model. The simulation confirms the somewhat obvious result that tool induced shift (TIS) translates directly into the estimate of the offset term of the model. In addition, the simulation indicates that errors in the measurement system pixel scale calibration directly scale all distortion estimates by the same factor. The variance of the measurement system sums with the variance of the stepper and inflates the standard error of the regression as well as the uncertainty of each lens parameter's estimate. Higher order nonlinearities or

  1. Laser removal of mold growth from paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, C.; Ciofini, D.; Osticioli, I.; Giorgi, R.; Tegli, S.; Siano, S.

    2014-10-01

    The potential of laser ablation in conservation of paper artifacts of cultural interest is under investigation since the second half of nineties. However, the works carried out on the topic are relatively a few as compared with those dedicated to stone, metal and painted artworks. Furthermore, in the latter cases, widespread applications have been successfully carried out, whereas laser cleaning of aged paper is still far from the conservation practice. There are serious risks to produce short- and/or long-term chemical alterations and/or mechanical damages at relatively low fluences. Here, we report a systematic investigation on laser removal of mold growths from prepared and naturally aged paper samples. Fundamental wavelength and second harmonic of QS Nd:YAG laser are tested and compared through optical and spectroscopic characterizations. This allowed defining optimized irradiation conditions and foreseeing further improvements from pulse duration optimization.

  2. Hydrogen silsesquioxane mold coatings for improved replication of nanopatterns by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobæk, Thor Christian; Matschuk, Maria; Kafka, Jan; Pranov, Henrik J.; Larsen, Niels B.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the replication of nanosized pillars in polymer (cyclic olefin copolymer) by injection molding using nanostructured thermally cured hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) ceramic coatings on stainless steel mold inserts with mold nanostructures produced by a simple embossing process. At isothermal mold conditions, the average pillar height increases by up to 100% and a more uniform height distribution is observed compared to a traditional metal mold insert. Thermal heat transfer simulations predict that the HSQ film retards the cooling of the polymer melt during the initial stages of replication, thus allowing more time to fill the nanoscale cavities compared to standard metal molds. A monolayer of a fluorinated silane (heptadecafluorotrichlorosilane) deposited on the mold surface reduces the mold/polymer interfacial energy to support demolding of the polymer replica. The mechanical stability of thermally cured HSQ makes it a promising material for nanopattern replication on an industrial scale without the need for slow and energy intensive variotherm processes.

  3. Mold in My School: What Do I Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, Washington, DC.

    This publication provides information on the most important indoor mold-related health concerns and discusses how school districts can keep school facilities mold-free and avoid these problems. The document addresses when to be concerned, how molds cause health problems, symptoms caused by mold allergies, indoor molds that form toxins, who is most…

  4. Mold For Casting Radius-Inspection Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Thin replicas viewed on comparator without sectioning. New mold machined from piece of transparent poly(methyl methacrylate). Fits around base of post. Two slots machined into inner surface form channels for casting inspection sections. Bottom of mold fits flush against surface around bottom of post. When surface slanted, mold automatically aligns in proper orientation. Time required to inspect elliptical radii located at bottoms of series of small posts reduced from 18 hours to 3 hours.

  5. Anemone-like nanostructures for non-lithographic, reproducible, large-area, and ultra-sensitive SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglar, Bihter; Demirel, Gokcen Birlik; Khudiyev, Tural; Dogan, Tamer; Tobail, Osama; Altuntas, Sevde; Buyukserin, Fatih; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    The melt-infiltration technique enables the fabrication of complex nanostructures for a wide range of applications in optics, electronics, biomaterials, and catalysis. Here, anemone-like nanostructures are produced for the first time under the surface/interface principles of melt-infiltration as a non-lithographic method. Functionalized anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are used as templates to provide large-area production of nanostructures, and polycarbonate (PC) films are used as active phase materials. In order to understand formation dynamics of anemone-like structures finite element method (FEM) simulations are performed and it is found that wetting behaviour of the polymer is responsible for the formation of cavities at the caps of the structures. These nanostructures are examined in the surface-enhanced-Raman-spectroscopy (SERS) experiment and they exhibit great potential in this field. Reproducible SERS signals are detected with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.2-12.6% for about 10 000 individual spots. SERS measurements are demonstrated at low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), even at the picomolar level, with an enhancement factor of ~1011. This high enhancement factor is ascribed to the significant electric field enhancement at the cavities of nanostructures and nanogaps between them, which is supported by finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. These novel nanostructured films can be further optimized to be used in chemical and plasmonic sensors and as a single molecule SERS detection platform.The melt-infiltration technique enables the fabrication of complex nanostructures for a wide range of applications in optics, electronics, biomaterials, and catalysis. Here, anemone-like nanostructures are produced for the first time under the surface/interface principles of melt-infiltration as a non-lithographic method. Functionalized anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are used as templates to provide large-area production of

  6. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  7. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  8. Si nanowires by a single-step metal-assisted chemical etching process on lithographically defined areas: formation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the formation kinetics of Si nanowires [SiNWs] on lithographically defined areas using a single-step metal-assisted chemical etching process in an aqueous HF/AgNO3 solution. We show that the etch rate of Si, and consequently, the SiNW length, is much higher on the lithographically defined areas compared with that on the non-patterned areas. A comparative study of the etch rate in the two cases under the same experimental conditions showed that this effect is much more pronounced at the beginning of the etching process. Moreover, it was found that in both cases, the nanowire formation rate is linear with temperature in the range from 20°C to 50°C, with almost the same activation energy, as obtained from an Arrhenius plot (0.37 eV in the case of non-patterned areas, while 0.38 eV in the case of lithographically patterned areas). The higher etch rate on lithographically defined areas is mainly attributed to Si surface modification during the photolithographic process. PACS: 68; 68.65-k. PMID:22087735

  9. Magnetic flux penetration in Nb superconducting films with lithographically defined microindentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, J.; Adami, O.-A.; Avila, J. I.; Motta, M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Nguyen, N. D.; Vanderbemden, P.; Vanderheyden, B.; Kramer, R. B. G.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We present a thorough investigation by magneto-optical imaging of the magnetic flux penetration in Nb thin films with lithographically defined border indentations. We demonstrate that discontinuity lines (d lines), caused by the abrupt bending of current streamlines around the indentations, depart from the expected parabolic trend close to the defect and depend on the shape and size of the indentation as well as on the temperature. These findings are backed up and compared with theoretical results obtained by numerical simulations and analytical calculations highlighting the key role played by demagnetization effects and the creep exponent n . In addition, we show that the presence of nearby indentations and submicrometer random roughness of the sample border can severely modify the flux front topology and dynamics. Strikingly, in contrast to what has been repeatedly predicted in the literature, we do not observe that indentations act as nucleation spots for flux avalanches, but they instead help to release the flux pressure and avoid thermomagnetic instabilities.

  10. Bandgap-customizable germanium using lithographically determined biaxial tensile strain for silicon-compatible optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Sukhdeo, David S; Nam, Donguk; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Saraswat, Krishna C

    2015-06-29

    Strain engineering has proven to be vital for germanium-based photonics, in particular light emission. However, applying a large permanent biaxial tensile strain to germanium has been a challenge. We present a simple, CMOS-compatible technique to conveniently induce a large, spatially homogenous strain in circular structures patterned within germanium nanomembranes. Our technique works by concentrating and amplifying a pre-existing small strain into a circular region. Biaxial tensile strains as large as 1.11% are observed by Raman spectroscopy and are further confirmed by photoluminescence measurements, which show enhanced and redshifted light emission from the strained germanium. Our technique allows the amount of biaxial strain to be customized lithographically, allowing the bandgaps of different germanium structures to be independently customized in a single mask process.

  11. Self-assembly of block copolymers on lithographically patterned template with ordered posts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Liu, Hong; Xue, Yao-Hong; Sun, Yan-Bo

    2015-12-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations are employed to study the self-assembly of block copolymers on a template modified with ordered posts. Templates with hexagonally arranged and rectangularly arranged posts are both studied. For the systems with hexagonally arranged posts, morphologies with bending alignments are seen most often. We find that the different kinds of patterns, which can be directly observed in experiments, are substantially induced by the pattern of the bottom layer. In the simulations with a template modified with rectangularly arranged posts, by finely adjusting the distances between neighboring posts in both x and y directions, mesh-shaped structures with different angles between the bottom and the sub-bottom layers can be obtained. These results shed light on the better design of lithographically patterned materials on the scale of 10 nm via the directed self-assembly of BCPs by templating. PMID:26566140

  12. Controlled fabrication of silicon nanowires via nanosphere lithograph and metal assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Shi, Tielin; Sheng, Wenjun; Liao, Guanglan

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the controlled fabrication of uniform vertical aligned silicon nanowires with desired length, diameter and location by combining nanosphere lithograph and metal assisted chemical etching techniques. The close-packed polystyrene nanospheres array was obtained by self-assemble technique, followed by reactive ion etching to acquire a non-close-packed monolayer template. Subsequently, the template was used to create a metal film with nanoholes array, which enable the controlled fabrication of ordered silicon nanowires via metal assisted chemical etching technique. By adjusting the monolayer of polystyrene nanospheres and the conditions for the metal assisted chemical etching, we obtained uniform distributed silicon nanowires with desired morphology. The aspect ratio of the silicon nanowires can reach to about 86:1. Furthermore, we have obtained the double-layer silicon nanowires by slight modifying the process. The influences of various conditions during etching were also discussed for improving the controlled fabrication.

  13. Influence of thermal load on 450 mm Si-wafer IPD during lithographic patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Thomas; Kalkowski, Gerhard; Eberhardt, Ramona

    2012-03-01

    We report on Finite Element Modeling (FEM) of the influence of heat load due to the lithographic exposure on the inplane distortion (IPD) of 450 mm Si-wafers and hence on the effect of the heat load on the achievable image placement accuracy. Based on a scenario of electron beam writing at an exposure power of 20 mW, the thermo-mechanical behavior of the chuck and the attached Si wafer is modeled and used to derive corresponding IPD values. To account for the pin structured chuck surface, an effective layer model is derived. Different materials for the wafer chuck are compared with respect to their influence on wafer IPD and thermal characteristics of the exposure process. Guidelines for the selection of the chuck material und suggestions for its cooling and corrective strategies on e-beam steering during exposure are derived.

  14. STARR: Stepper Test Alignment Resolution Reticle For The Lithographic Characterization Of A Sub-Micron Stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Robert P.; Gulden, Mark P.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a custom reticle developed as part of a sub-micron stepper evaluation program. The 5X reticle was designed so that all major commercially available steppers could be directly compared. It has a unique arrangement of optical and electrical registration test structures allowing for three levels of processing which provides a true measure of the registration capabilities of a system. The reticle has a number of structures which can be used to evaluate the imaging quality of a stepper system. These include a "Focus Star" structure designed to allow easy evaluation of resolution, focus, and astigmatism, a defect structure to measure the printability of commonly seen reticle defects, and L-bar patterns. The remainder of the reticle is intended for use in analyzing other lithographic problems such as proximity effects, substrate induced reflections, step coverage, and critical dimension control.

  15. Lithographically defined carbon growth templates for ELOG of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. B.; Fan, Hongyou; Thaler, G.; Koleske, D. D.

    2008-06-01

    We report the initial use of lithographically defined carbon growth templates for use as an epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) mask for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) heteroepitaxial GaN on sapphire. Interferometric lithography is used to define high aspect ratio structures in SU-8, which are then pyrolyzed in a reducing atmosphere up to 1200 °C. The resist structures convert to amorphous carbon, shrinking 80% in the vertical direction and 53% in the horizontal direction, but maintain their pattern geometry and adhesion to the substrate. These templates are capable of surviving GaN nucleation layer growth temperatures (˜530 °C), GaN crystal growth and high-temperature annealing up to 1050 °C. This new approach to ELOG offers several advantages, requiring fewer processing steps, and favorable selectivity tendencies as well as the capability to create growth masks which are difficult or impossible to fabricate using a top-down etching approach.

  16. Technology for fabricating micro-lens arrays utilizing lithographically replicated concave resist patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Noa; Sasaki, Ryunosuke; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Lithography has been generally used for printing two-dimensional patterns on flat wafers. Recently, however, it is also applied to a three-dimensional patterning for fabricating various MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) components. The purpose of this research is to develop a new method for fabricating micro-lens arrays. At first, resist (Tokyo Ohka Kogyo, PMER LA-900PM) mold patterns with densely arrayed square or hexagonal concaves were replicated by intentionally shifting the focal position of projection exposure. The size of resist-mold was 2 mm square, and the initial thickness of the resist was 10 μm. Next, the wafer with the concave resist patterns was cut into small chips, and each wafer chip was fixed at the bottom of a paper cup using an adhesive tape. Then the epoxy resin (Nissin resin, Crystal resin Neo) was poured on the concave resist-mold patterns, and the resin was coagulated. Afterward, the hardened resin was grooved along the wafer chip using a cutter knife, and the wafer chip with the resist-mold patterns was forcibly removed using a pair of tweezers. Finally, both sides of the resin block were polished, and the thickness was reduced. Although the transparency and roughness of the resin block surfaces should be improved, epoxy micro-lens arrays were certainly fabricated. The mean values of curvature radius and lens height were 28.3μm and 4.9 μm, respectively.

  17. Analysis of optical properties in injection-molded and compression-molded optical lenses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung Yen; Wang, Pei Jen

    2014-04-10

    Numerical mold-flow simulations and experimental measurements for injection-molded lenses have been investigated in form accuracy on a two-cavity mold with various process conditions. First, form profiles of the molded lenses have been measured together with the corresponding simulated mold-temperature distribution and displacement distribution of the lens in the z direction. A flow-through type layout of cooling channels has been devised for balance of mold-temperature distribution in mold cavities with various parametric distances for assessments in uniformity of temperature distribution. Finally, a compression-molding process is proposed for the post-process of birefringence relaxation as well as adequate form accuracy of lenses. In conclusion, optimization of process parameters to achieve good form accuracy in a multicavity mold with symmetric geometry but nonuniform cooling conditions is difficult. A good design of cooling channels plus optimized process conditions could provide uniform mold-temperature distribution so that molded lenses of good quality would be possible. Then, the profile deviation of lenses could be further compensated by profile geometry corrections. In conclusion, the post-compression-molding process could make birefringence-free plastic lenses with good form accuracy.

  18. Indoor mold and Children's health

    PubMed

    Etzel; Rylander

    1999-06-01

    Reactive airways disease in children is increasing in many countries around the world. The clinical diagnosis of asthma or reactive airways disease includes a variable airflow and an increased sensitivity in the airways. This condition can develop after an augmented reaction to a specific agent (allergen) and may cause a life-threatening situation within a very short period of exposure. It can also develop after a long-term exposure to irritating agents that cause an inflammation in the airways in the absence of an allergen. (paragraph) Several environmental agents have been shown to be associated with the increased incidence of childhood asthma. They include allergens, cat dander, outdoor as well as indoor air pollution, cooking fumes, and infections. There is, however, increasing evidence that mold growth indoors in damp buildings is an important risk factor. About 30 investigations from various countries around the world have demonstrated a close relationship between living in damp homes or homes with mold growth, and the extent of adverse respiratory symptoms in children. Some studies show a relation between dampness/mold and objective measures of lung function. Apart from airways symptoms, some studies demonstrate the presence of general symptoms that include fatigue and headache and symptoms from the central nervous system. At excessive exposures, an increased risk for hemorraghic pneumonia and death among infants has been reported. (paragraph) The described effects may have important consequences for children in the early years of life. A child's immune system is developing from birth to adolescence and requires a natural, physiologic stimulation with antigens as well as inflammatory agents. Any disturbances of this normal maturing process will increase the risk for abnormal reactions to inhaled antigens and inflammagenic agents in the environment. (paragraph) The knowledge about health risks due to mold exposure is not widespread and health authorities in

  19. Use of acrylic sheet molds for elastomeric products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Koerner, A. E.; Messineo, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Molds constructed of acrylic sheet are more easily machined than metal, are transparent to ensure complete filling during injection, and have smooth surfaces free of contamination. Technique eliminates flashing on molded parts and mold release agents.

  20. Plastic molds reduce cost of encapsulating electric cable connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, D.

    1964-01-01

    Resin casting of the aluminum master pattern forms a plastic mold for encapsulating a cable connector. An elastomer is injected into the mold and cured. The mold is disassembled leaving an elastomeric encapsulation around the connector.

  1. Commercial and Residential Water Damage: The Mold Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Del

    2002-01-01

    Describes the problem of toxic mold in residential and commercial property resulting from excess moisture. Includes common sources of unwanted moisture, design and construction flaws, determining the presence of mold, and advice for identifying and hiring reputable mold remediators. (PKP)

  2. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER FREDERICK THOMAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER FREDERICK THOMAS MOLDING A NO. 8507. - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. BRANDY, MOLDING A RAIL CASTING (LAWLER NO. 1337). - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Effect of fast mold surface temperature evolution on iPP part morphology gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liparoti, Sara; Sorrentino, Andrea; Guzman, Gustavo; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that affects the sample surface morphology as well as the structural gradients (orientation crystal size, and type) as well as cooling stresses. The frozen layer thickness formed during the filling stage also has a very significant effect on the flow resistance and thus on the resulting pressure drop and flow length in thin wall parts. The possibility to have a hot mold during filling and a quick cooling soon afterward is a significant process enhancement particularly for specialized applications such as micro injection molding and for the reproduction of micro structured surfaces. Up to now, several methods (electromagnetic, infrared, hot vapor fleshing etc,) were tried to achieve fast temperature evolution of the mold. Unfortunately, all these methods require a complex balance between thermal and mechanical problems, equipment cost, energy consumption, safety, molding cycle time and part quality achievable. In this work, a thin electrical resistance was designed and used to generate a fast and confined temperature variation on mold surface (by joule effect). Since the whole temperature evolution can take place in a few seconds, one can couple the advantages of a high surface temperature during filling with the advantages of a low mold temperature, fast cooling and low heating dissipation. Some experiments were performed with a commercial iPP resin. The effects of the surface temperature and of the heating time (under constant electric power) on surface finishing and on the final morphology (thickness and structure of the different layers) are explored and discussed.

  5. Effects of process parameters on the molding quality of the micro-needle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Z. J.; Ma, Z.; Gao, S.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-needle array, which is used in medical applications, is a kind of typical injection molded products with microstructures. Due to its tiny micro-features size and high aspect ratios, it is more likely to produce short shots defects, leading to poor molding quality. The injection molding process of the micro-needle array was studied in this paper to find the effects of the process parameters on the molding quality of the micro-needle array and to provide theoretical guidance for practical production of high-quality products. With the shrinkage ratio and warpage of micro needles as the evaluation indices of the molding quality, the orthogonal experiment was conducted and the analysis of variance was carried out. According to the results, the contribution rates were calculated to determine the influence of various process parameters on molding quality. The single parameter method was used to analyse the main process parameter. It was found that the contribution rate of the holding pressure on shrinkage ratio and warpage reached 83.55% and 94.71% respectively, far higher than that of the other parameters. The study revealed that the holding pressure is the main factor which affects the molding quality of micro-needle array so that it should be focused on in order to obtain plastic parts with high quality in the practical production.

  6. Materials processing research opportunities in powder injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    German, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    Materials processing is an active area with many research opportunities for advanced instrumentation, control, and modeling. Among new materials processing routes, powder injection molding (PIM) has rapidly grown from a curiosity to a viable production technique over just a few years. This manufacturing technique is applicable to all materials, and is the preferred fabrication route for many complex-shaped, high-performance components for surgical tools, computer hardware, automotive systems, consumer products, and turbine components. This presentation introduces the use of a computer controlled injection molding machine to shape powders (metal, carbide, composite, and ceramic) in a high productivity setting. After molding the organic is extracted and the powder structure is sintered to full density. Much research is needed in process modeling, control, inspection, and optimization. This presentation summarizes the basic technology and several important factors relevant to manufacturing. An important development is in minimization of molding defects via closed-loop feedback control using pressure, temperature, and optical sensors. Recent progress has occurred using in situ guided waves for ultrasonic inspection of the molded part. Neural networks are being generated to allow assessment of processing changes as required from the integrated robot, visual imaging, pressure, and ultrasonic sensors. Similar, but less refined efforts are occurring in die compaction technology. As another example, computer simulation of heat transfer is needed during sintering to understand sources of component warpage during densification. A furnace equipped with visual imaging and residual gas analysis is being used to assist in verification of such computer simulations. These tools are still in the research stage, so future integration into the manufacturing environment will bring new challenges.

  7. Mold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clin Immunol 130(1):267–270. 12 Chulada PC, Kennedy S, Mvula MM, Jaffee K, Wildfire J, Thornton ... 120(11): 1592–1599. 13 Grimsley LF, Chulada PC, Kennedy S, White L, Wildfire J, Cohn RD, Mitchell ...

  8. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  9. Process for Making Ceramic Mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for slip casting molds that can be more economically automated and that also exhibits greater dimensional stability is disclosed. The process involves subjecting an investment pattern, preferably made from wax, to successive cycles of wet-dipping in a slurry of colloidal, silica-based binder and dry powder-coating, or stuccoing with plaster of Paris or calcium sulfate mixtures to produce a multi-layer shell over the pattern. The invention as claimed entails applying a primary and a secondary coating to the investment pattern. At least two wet-dipping on in a primary slurry and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the primary coating, and an additional two wet-dippings and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the secondary, or back-up, coating. The primary and secondary coatings produce a multi-layered shell pattern. The multi-layered shell pattern is placed in a furnace first to cure and harden, and then to vaporize the investment pattern, leaving a detailed, high precision shell mold.

  10. The Thermal Distortion of a Funnel Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Schimmel, Ronald C.; Abbel, Gert

    2012-10-01

    This article investigates the thermal distortion of a funnel mold for continuous casting of thin slabs and explores the implications on taper and solidification of the steel shell. The three-dimensional mold temperatures are calculated using shell-mold heat flux and cooling water profiles that were calibrated with plant measurements. The thermal stresses and distorted shape of the mold are calculated with a detailed finite-element model of a symmetric fourth of the entire mold and waterbox assembly, and they are validated with plant thermocouple data and measurements of the wear of the narrow-face copper mold plates. The narrow-face mold distorts into the typical parabolic arc, and the wide face distorts into a "W" shape owing to the large variation in bolt stiffnesses. The thermal expansion of the wide face works against the applied narrow-face taper and funnel effects, so the effect of thermal distortion must be considered to accurately predict the ideal mold taper.

  11. Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This document describes how to investigate and evaluate moisture and mold problems in educational facilities, and presents the key steps for implementing a remediation plan. A checklist is provided for conducting mold remediation efforts along with a resource list of helpful organizations and governmental agencies. Appendices contain a glossary,…

  12. Dynamic Feed Control For Injection Molding

    DOEpatents

    Kazmer, David O.

    1996-09-17

    The invention provides methods and apparatus in which mold material flows through a gate into a mold cavity that defines the shape of a desired part. An adjustable valve is provided that is operable to change dynamically the effective size of the gate to control the flow of mold material through the gate. The valve is adjustable while the mold material is flowing through the gate into the mold cavity. A sensor is provided for sensing a process condition while the part is being molded. During molding, the valve is adjusted based at least in part on information from the sensor. In the preferred embodiment, the adjustable valve is controlled by a digital computer, which includes circuitry for acquiring data from the sensor, processing circuitry for computing a desired position of the valve based on the data from the sensor and a control data file containing target process conditions, and control circuitry for generating signals to control a valve driver to adjust the position of the valve. More complex embodiments include a plurality of gates, sensors, and controllable valves. Each valve is individually controllable so that process conditions corresponding to each gate can be adjusted independently. This allows for great flexibility in the control of injection molding to produce complex, high-quality parts.

  13. 21ST CENTURY MOLD ANALYSIS IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, the indoor air community has relied on mold analysis performed by either microscopic observations or the culturing of molds on various media to assess indoor air quality. These techniques were developed in the 19th century and are very laborious and time consumin...

  14. EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children now spend more than 90% of their time indoors. Thus, any exposure to indoor pollutants may be critical to their health. Molds are one of the most important pollutants children are exposed to indoors. Molds produce hundreds of allergens and toxins. These products ha...

  15. Strong, easy-to-mold, spiral buttress thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Buttress thread with steep taper connects two molded plastic cylinders without changing wall thickness or sacrificing longitudinal strength at the juncture. Technique lends itself to conventional molding methods.

  16. Material removal mechanisms in abrasive vibration polishing of complex molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinksmeier, E.; Riemer, O.; Schulte, H.

    2010-10-01

    Optical and medical industries are demanding a large variety of optical elements exhibiting complex geometries and multitude opto-functional areas in the range of a few millimeters [1]. Therefore, mold inserts made of steel or carbides must be finished by polishing for the replication of glass and plastic lenses [2]. For polishing theses complex components in the shape of localized cavities or grooves the application of rotating polishing pads is very limited. Established polishing processes are not applicable, so state of the art is a time consuming and therefore expensive polishing procedures by hand. An automated process with conventional polishing machines is impossible because of the complex mold insert geometry. The authors will present the development of a new abrasive polishing process for finishing these complex mold geometries to optical quality. The necessary relative velocity in the contact area between polishing pad and workpiece surface is exclusively realized by vibration motions which is an advantage over vibration assisted rotating polishing processes. The absence of rotation of the pad opens up the possibility to machine new types of surface geometries. The specific influence factors of vibration polishing were analyzed and will be presented. The determination of material removal behavior and polishing effect on planar steel samples has shown that the conventional abrasive polishing hypothesis of Preston is applicable to the novel vibration polishing process. No overlaid chemical material removal appears.

  17. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  18. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of fiber optical components for application in guiding, sensing and molding of THz and mid-IR radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhorova, Anna

    The terahertz (THz) range refers to electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 100 GHz and 10 THz, or wavelengths between 3 mm and 30 µm. Light between radio waves and infrared has some unique properties. Within the scope of this work I would like to address three main research topics. In Chapter 2, I describe fabrication method and THz characterization of composite films containing either aligned metallic (tin alloy) microwires or chalcogenide As2Se3 microwires. The microwire arrays are made by stack-and-draw fiber fabrication technique using multi-step co-drawing of low-melting-temperature metals or semiconductor glasses together with polymers. Fibers are then stacked together and pressed into composite films. Transmission through metamaterial films is studied in the whole THz range (0.1-20 THz) using a combination of FTIR and TDS. Metal containing metamaterials are found to have strong polarizing properties, while semiconductor containing materials are polarization independent and could have a designable high refractive index. Using the transfer matrix theory, it was shown how to retrieve the complex polarization dependent refractive index of the composite films. We then detail the selfconsistent algorithm for retrieving the optical properties of the metal alloy used in the fabrication of the metamaterial layers by using an effective medium approximation. Finally, we study challenges in fabrication of metamaterials with sub-micrometer metallic wires by repeated stack-and-draw process by comparing samples made using 2, 3 and 4 consecutive drawings. When using metallic alloys we observe phase separation effects and nano-grids formation on small metallic wires. In Chapter 3, we have studied fabrication and bacteria detection application of the lowloss subwavelength THz microstructured fibers. One of the key difficulties in the design of terahertz waveguides lies in the fact that almost all materials are highly absorbing in the terahertz region. Since the

  20. Fabrication and characterization of fiber optical components for application in guiding, sensing and molding of THz and mid-IR radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhorova, Anna

    The terahertz (THz) range refers to electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 100 GHz and 10 THz, or wavelengths between 3 mm and 30 µm. Light between radio waves and infrared has some unique properties. Within the scope of this work I would like to address three main research topics. In Chapter 2, I describe fabrication method and THz characterization of composite films containing either aligned metallic (tin alloy) microwires or chalcogenide As2Se3 microwires. The microwire arrays are made by stack-and-draw fiber fabrication technique using multi-step co-drawing of low-melting-temperature metals or semiconductor glasses together with polymers. Fibers are then stacked together and pressed into composite films. Transmission through metamaterial films is studied in the whole THz range (0.1-20 THz) using a combination of FTIR and TDS. Metal containing metamaterials are found to have strong polarizing properties, while semiconductor containing materials are polarization independent and could have a designable high refractive index. Using the transfer matrix theory, it was shown how to retrieve the complex polarization dependent refractive index of the composite films. We then detail the selfconsistent algorithm for retrieving the optical properties of the metal alloy used in the fabrication of the metamaterial layers by using an effective medium approximation. Finally, we study challenges in fabrication of metamaterials with sub-micrometer metallic wires by repeated stack-and-draw process by comparing samples made using 2, 3 and 4 consecutive drawings. When using metallic alloys we observe phase separation effects and nano-grids formation on small metallic wires. In Chapter 3, we have studied fabrication and bacteria detection application of the lowloss subwavelength THz microstructured fibers. One of the key difficulties in the design of terahertz waveguides lies in the fact that almost all materials are highly absorbing in the terahertz region. Since the

  1. Fabrication of metallic nanodots in large-area arrays by mold-to-mold cross imprinting (MTMCI).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunghoon; Yan, Xiaoming; Contreras, Anthony M; Liddle, J Alexander; Somorjai, Gabor A; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    We have developed a mold-to-mold cross imprint (MTMCI) process, which redefines an imprint mold with another imprint mold. By performing MTMCI on two identical imprint molds with silicon spacer nanowires in a perpendicular arrangement, we fabricated a large array of sub-30-nm silicon nanopillars. Large-area arrays of Pt dots are then produced using nanoimprint lithography with the silicon nanopillar mold. PMID:16351215

  2. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  3. -Based Mold Flux Used for High Al-TRIP Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huan; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Lejun; Lu, Boxun; Kang, Youn-Bae

    2014-08-01

    An investigation was carried out to study the effect of MnO on crystallization, melting, and heat transfer of lime-alumina-based mold flux used for high Al-TRIP steel casting, through applying the infrared emitter technique (IET) and the double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT). The results of IET tests showed that MnO could improve the general heat transfer rate through promoting the melting and inhibiting the crystallization of mold flux; meanwhile the radiative heat flux was being attenuated. DHTT experiments indicated that the crystallization fraction, melting temperature of mold flux decreased with the addition of MnO. The results of this study can further elucidate the properties of the CaO-Al2O3 slag system and reinforce the basis for the application of lime-alumina system mold fluxes for casting high Al steels.

  4. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm. PMID:27409126

  5. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm.

  6. Effect of volatile removal during molding on the properties of two phenolic-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Lucy, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the effect of three volatile-removing techniques during molding on the properties of phenolic-fiber composites. The first technique involved heating the molding compound from one side, initiating the volatile-producing reactions, and driving these volatiles through the compound toward the cooler side. The second technique involved the application of a vacuum to the molding cavity before and during the cure cycle. The third technique was a combination of the first two. These techniques were used in the compression molding of phenolic-asbestos and phenolic-glass composites. The effects of both the individual and combined techniques on the mechanical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composites are reported.

  7. Novel Lithographic Techniques for the Production of Monodisperse Colloids: LithoParticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Joseph; Chowdhury, Sutirtha Roy

    This dissertation discusses the production of colloidal particles using lithographic techniques. Most colloids produced are spherical but with these lithographic methods, diverse colloids, having exotic shapes and different sizes are produced. The physical properties of the particles are also changed providing another dimension to the particles that can be exploited. The first methods used to produce LithoParticles use a stepper based system. Both, a single layer of resist or two different layers of resist can be used to produce the particles. The single layer system combines the development and the lift-off while using two layers, one being a sacrificial layer, decouples them. Each method produces monodisperse high fidelity colloids with different shapes and sub-micron sizes. The addition of organic dyes to the resist is also described which makes the particles fluoresce in the red, green, and blue. The particles produced using SU-8 can have their surface modified using highly charged silane molecules which ensure their long term stabilization. Their physical properties can be changed as well. Colloids which can be controlled magnetically, have a conductive layer, or have a three-dimensional shape, Janus particles, have been produced. The addition of magnetite to the SU-8 photoresist creates particles that can be controlled using a neodymium magnet. A gold coating is sputtered on the surface of the particles creating a conductive layer and thus particles with both insulating and conductive properties. The steppers capabilities to align multiple photomasks allows for the overlay of different shapes, creating three dimensional figures. The production of particles using pillar deposition templating and well deposition templating is described. Each method allows for the manufacture of monodisperse colloids with the limited use of the stepper. The wells and posts are etched into silicon using either chlorine etching or deep reactive ion etching and can be reused

  8. Planar Lithographed Superconducting LC Resonators for Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotermund, K.; Barch, B.; Chapman, S.; Hattori, K.; Lee, A.; Palaio, N.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Tran, C.

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments are increasing the number of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers to increase sensitivity. In order to maintain low thermal loading of the sub-Kelvin stage, the frequency-domain multiplexing (FDM) factor has to increase accordingly. FDM is achieved by placing TES bolometers in series with inductor-capacitor (LC) resonators, which select the readout frequency. The multiplexing factor can be raised with a large total readout bandwidth and small frequency spacing between channels. The inductance is kept constant to maintain a uniform readout bandwidth across detectors, while the maximum acceptable value is determined by bolometer stability. Current technology relies on commercially available ceramic chip capacitors. These have high scatter in their capacitance thereby requiring large frequency spacing. Furthermore, they have high equivalent series resistance (ESR) at higher frequencies and are time consuming and tedious to hand assemble via soldering. A solution lies in lithographed, planar spiral inductors (currently in use by some experiments) combined with interdigitated capacitors on a silicon (Si) substrate. To maintain reasonable device dimensions, we have reduced trace and gap widths of the LCs to 4 \\upmu m. We increased the inductance from 16 to 60 \\upmu H to achieve a higher packing density, a requirement for FDM systems with large multiplexing factors. Additionally, the Si substrate yields low ESR values across the entire frequency range and lithography makes mass production of LC pairs possible. We reduced mutual inductance between inductors by placing them in a checkerboard pattern with the capacitors, thereby increasing physical distances between adjacent inductors. We also reduce magnetic coupling of inductors with external sources by evaporating a superconducting ground plane onto the backside of the substrate. We report on the development of lithographed LCs in the 1-5 MHz range for use

  9. Achieving clean epitaxial graphene surfaces suitable for device applications by improved lithographic process

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, A. Rao, M. V.; Koehler, A. D.; Jernigan, G. G.; Wheeler, V. D.; Hite, J. K.; Hernández, S. C.; Robinson, Z. R.; Myers-Ward, R. L.; Eddy, C. R.; Gaskill, D. K.; Garces, N. Y.

    2014-06-02

    It is well-known that the performance of graphene electronic devices is often limited by extrinsic scattering related to resist residue from transfer, lithography, and other processes. Here, we report a polymer-assisted fabrication procedure that produces a clean graphene surface following device fabrication by a standard lithography process. The effectiveness of this improved lithography process is demonstrated by examining the temperature dependence of epitaxial graphene-metal contact resistance using the transfer length method for Ti/Au (10 nm/50 nm) metallization. The Landauer-Buttiker model was used to explain carrier transport at the graphene-metal interface as a function of temperature. At room temperature, a contact resistance of 140 Ω-μm was obtained after a thermal anneal at 523 K for 2 hr under vacuum, which is comparable to state-of-the-art values.

  10. Characterization of fiberglass-filled diallyl phthalate plastic molding resins and molded parts

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.B.; Glaub, J.E.; Bonekowski, N.R.; Gillham, P.D.

    1980-12-01

    Characterization of diallyl phthalate (DAP) molding resins was undertaken by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC)/low angle laser light scattering (LALLS) in order to better predict moldability and storage life limits. Completeness of cure of molded parts, before and after any post-curing, was also determined by thermal analysis. Molecular weights and molecular weight distributions of the DAP molding resins by SEC/LALLS indicated that the better molding resins have lower M/sub w//M/sub n/ ratios. Association effects were observed, which could not be overcome by solvent modification alone. Determination of DAP molding resin heats of reaction by DSC indicated a linear relation between ..delta..H/sub R/ and weight percent filler for the good molding resins. DSC analyses of molded DAP parts showed that 95% cure was achieved in some as-molded parts, with a post-cure temperature of 165/sup 0/C being required to complete the cure to 100%. Thickness of the parts was a factor, with the thicker parts being 100% cured as molded. The glass transition temperature (T/sub g/) of the molded parts increased as cure was completed, to approx. 160 to 165/sup 0/C maximum. These results are consistent with a model of thermoset resin curing behavior which states that 100% cure can be achieved only if a post-curing operation is conducted above the T/sub g infinity/ (T/sub g/ at complete cure) of the polymer.

  11. Surface micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. This makes it also a suitable candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. To fabricate molds for diffractive optics a highresolution structuring technique is needed. We introduce a process that allows the micro-structuring of glassy carbon by reactive ion etching. Key parameters such as uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are discussed. They are the most relevant parameters for a stamp in optical applications. The use of titanium as a hard mask makes it possible to achieve a reasonable selectivity of 4:1, which has so far been one of the main problems in microstructuring of glassy carbon. We investigate the titanium surface structure with its 5-10 nm thick layer of TiO2 grains and its influence on the shape of the hard mask. In our fabrication procedure we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of more than 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 μm and at 700 nm depth. The fabricated glassy carbon molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto different glasses. Glassy carbon molds with 1 mm thickness were tested with binary optical structures. Our experiments show the suitability of glassy carbon as molds for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  12. Higher Potassium Concentration in Shoots Reduces Gray Mold in Sweet Basil.

    PubMed

    Yermiyahu, Uri; Israeli, Lior; David, Dalia Rav; Faingold, Inna; Elad, Yigal

    2015-08-01

    Nutritional elements can affect plant susceptibility to plant pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea. We tested the effect of potassium (K) fertilization on gray mold in sweet basil grown in pots, containers, and soil. Increased K in the irrigation water and in the sweet basil tissue resulted in an exponential decrease in gray mold severity. Potassium supplied to plants by foliar application resulted in a significant decrease in gray mold in plants grown with a low rate of K fertigation. Lower K fertigation resulted in a significant increase in B. cinerea infection under semi-commercial conditions. Gray mold severity in harvested shoots was significantly negatively correlated with K concentration in the irrigation solution, revealing resistance to B. cinerea infection as a result of high K concentration in sweet basil tissue. Gray mold was reduced following K foliar application of the plants. In general, there was no synergy between the fertigation and foliar spray treatments. Proper K fertilization can replace some of the required chemical fungicide treatments and it may be integrated into gray mold management for improved disease suppression. PMID:25760521

  13. Higher Potassium Concentration in Shoots Reduces Gray Mold in Sweet Basil.

    PubMed

    Yermiyahu, Uri; Israeli, Lior; David, Dalia Rav; Faingold, Inna; Elad, Yigal

    2015-08-01

    Nutritional elements can affect plant susceptibility to plant pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea. We tested the effect of potassium (K) fertilization on gray mold in sweet basil grown in pots, containers, and soil. Increased K in the irrigation water and in the sweet basil tissue resulted in an exponential decrease in gray mold severity. Potassium supplied to plants by foliar application resulted in a significant decrease in gray mold in plants grown with a low rate of K fertigation. Lower K fertigation resulted in a significant increase in B. cinerea infection under semi-commercial conditions. Gray mold severity in harvested shoots was significantly negatively correlated with K concentration in the irrigation solution, revealing resistance to B. cinerea infection as a result of high K concentration in sweet basil tissue. Gray mold was reduced following K foliar application of the plants. In general, there was no synergy between the fertigation and foliar spray treatments. Proper K fertilization can replace some of the required chemical fungicide treatments and it may be integrated into gray mold management for improved disease suppression.

  14. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p < 0.05). Steam-vapor was significantly better than the alternative methods (p <0.001) with over 99% efficiency in mold spore decline from wetted carpet after 24 hr and 30 days, and over 92% efficiency after 7 days. The alternative methods exhibited lower efficiencies with a decline over time, from a maximum of 82% and 81% at 24 hr down to 60% and 43% at 30 days for detergent-hot water and high-flow, hot water extraction, respectively. The net effect of the mold management study demonstrates that while steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  15. Study on heat flux from resin to mold in injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Nobuhiko; Hori, Sankei

    1999-07-01

    Recently, an injection molding of thermoplastic is widely used in many industries, because this manufacturing method is very suitable for mass production. For injection molding processes, a number of software packages for simulating an injection molding process have been developed. It is assumed in these software packages that the heat transfer coefficient between the resin and the mold surface is constant at the filling or cooling stages. In general, when melted resin flows into the mold, heat is generated in the flowing resin because of the high viscosity at the filling stage. Moreover at the cooling stage, a separation of the molded part from the mold surface generally occurs because of shrinkage of the molded material. Therefore, the heat transfer coefficient has not been accurately obtained yet at these stages. In this paper, the temperature near the surface of the mold cavity has been experimentally measured, so the heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been able to be analytically estimated by an inverse conduction method. On the other hand, the separating behavior of the resin from the mold surface has been measured using an ultrasonic transducer attached to the outer surface of the stationary mold. The heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been analytically estimated. The apparent heat transfer coefficient can be obtained from the heat flux and the representative temperature difference, which is measured by an ultrasonic technique. It was discovered that the heat flux and the apparent heat transfer coefficient are hardly influenced by the separation.

  16. Investigation of foaming behaviors in injection molding using mold pressure profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W. S.

    This thesis is intended to improve the understanding of foaming behaviors in various foam injection molding processes: structural foam molding, gas counter pressure molding, and gas counter pressure with mold opening. The foaming behavior in foam injection molding is different from foam extrusion in two ways. First, foaming occurs in a confined volume, which consists of a mold, whereas, it occurs in an open environment in foam extrusion. And second, while the foaming behavior in foam extrusion does not change with time once the steady state is reached, foam injection molding is on the other hand, time-dependent. These differences made it very challenging to study the foaming behaviors in foam injection molding. In this thesis, experiments were first conducted in foam extrusion to understand the effects of processing and material parameters on cell nucleation and growth behaviors. Subsequently, the knowledge obtained from the foam extrusion experiments was transferred to the foam injection molding process and the fundamental foaming mechanisms in foam injection molding were developed by conducting extensive experiments. Four processing parameters were mainly studied in this thesis: injection speed, void fraction setting (i.e., shot size), nitrogen content, and gate resistance. The experimental results revealed that the mold pressure profile during the foam injection molding process governed its foaming behaviors. Furthermore, by analyzing the mold pressure profile during the structural foam molding, it was possible to predict the achievable cell density in structural foam molding based on the foam extrusion results. When the gas counter pressure was employed, the analysis of the foaming behavior was relatively easier since the cell nucleation did not occur during the injection stage. However, the cell density that was achieved by using the gas counter pressure was generally lower than that obtained in structural foam molding due to the lower pressure drop rate

  17. Slimeware: engineering devices with slime mold.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The plasmodium of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a gigantic single cell visible to the unaided eye. The cell shows a rich spectrum of behavioral patterns in response to environmental conditions. In a series of simple experiments we demonstrate how to make computing, sensing, and actuating devices from the slime mold. We show how to program living slime mold machines by configurations of repelling and attracting gradients and demonstrate the workability of the living machines on tasks of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetic.

  18. Slimeware: engineering devices with slime mold.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The plasmodium of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a gigantic single cell visible to the unaided eye. The cell shows a rich spectrum of behavioral patterns in response to environmental conditions. In a series of simple experiments we demonstrate how to make computing, sensing, and actuating devices from the slime mold. We show how to program living slime mold machines by configurations of repelling and attracting gradients and demonstrate the workability of the living machines on tasks of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetic. PMID:23834592

  19. Mucormycosis, Pseudallescheriasis, and Other Uncommon Mold Infections

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Clifford; Spellberg, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Serious infections due to non-Aspergillus molds are being encountered with increasing frequency. Factors likely responsible for the rise of these infections include aging populations in countries with advanced medical technologies, the resultant increase in incidence of many cancers, increasingly intensive myeloablative therapies for these cancers, increasingly intensive care for critically ill patients, and increases in the frequency of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have improved, mortality rates for invasive mold infections remain high. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about non-Aspergillus mold infections of the chest, with a focus on risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:20463250

  20. Residual stresses in injection molded products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the molding process residual stresses are formed due to thermal contraction during cooling as well as the local pressure history during solidification. In this paper a simple analytical model is reviewed which relates residual stresses, product shrinkage as well as warpage to the temperature and pressure histories during molding. Precise excimer laser layer removal measurements were performed to verify the predicted residual stress distributions. In addition, detailed shrinkage and warpage measurements on a large series of polymers and for different molding conditions were performed and are shown to compare well with the model predictions.

  1. Wafer-based aberration metrology for lithographic systems using overlay measurements on targets imaged from phase-shift gratings.

    PubMed

    van Haver, Sven; Coene, Wim M J; D'havé, Koen; Geypen, Niels; van Adrichem, Paul; de Winter, Laurens; Janssen, Augustus J E M; Cheng, Shaunee

    2014-04-20

    In this paper, a new methodology is presented to derive the aberration state of a lithographic projection system from wafer metrology data. For this purpose, new types of phase-shift gratings (PSGs) are introduced, with special features that give rise to a simple linear relation between the PSG image displacement and the phase aberration function of the imaging system. By using the PSGs as the top grating in a diffraction-based overlay stack, their displacement can be measured as an overlay error using a standard wafer metrology tool. In this way, the overlay error can be used as a measurand based on which the phase aberration function in the exit pupil of the lithographic system can be reconstructed. In practice, the overlay error is measured for a set of different PSG targets, after which this information serves as input to a least-squares optimization problem that, upon solving, provides estimates for the Zernike coefficients describing the aberration state of the lithographic system. In addition to a detailed method description, this paper also deals with the additional complications that arise when the method is implemented experimentally and this leads to a number of model refinements and a required calibration step. Finally, the overall performance of the method is assessed through a number of experiments in which the aberration state of the lithographic system is intentionally detuned and subsequently estimated by the new method. These experiments show a remarkably good agreement, with an error smaller than 5  mλ, among the requested aberrations, the aberrations measured by the on-tool aberration sensor, and the results of the new wafer-based method.

  2. Extreme wettability of nanostructured glass fabricated by non-lithographic, anisotropic etching

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Eusun; Kim, Seul-Cham; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Functional glass surfaces with the properties of superhydrophobicity/or superhydrohydrophilicity, anti-condensation or low reflectance require nano- or micro-scale roughness, which is difficult to fabricate directly on glass surfaces. Here, we report a novel non-lithographic method for the fabrication of nanostructures on glass; this method introduces a sacrificial SiO2 layer for anisotropic plasma etching. The first step was to form nanopillars on SiO2 layer-coated glass by using preferential CF4 plasma etching. With continuous plasma etching, the SiO2 pillars become etch-resistant masks on the glass; thus, the glass regions covered by the SiO2 pillars are etched slowly, and the regions with no SiO2 pillars are etched rapidly, resulting in nanopatterned glass. The glass surface that is etched with CF4 plasma becomes superhydrophilic because of its high surface energy, as well as its nano-scale roughness and high aspect ratio. Upon applying a subsequent hydrophobic coating to the nanostructured glass, a superhydrophobic surface was achieved. The light transmission of the glass was relatively unaffected by the nanostructures, whereas the reflectance was significantly reduced by the increase in nanopattern roughness on the glass. PMID:25791414

  3. Selective Area Control of Self-Assembled Pattern Architecture Using a Lithographically Patternable Block Copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C.T.; Bosworth, J.K.; Obert C.K.

    2009-07-01

    We leverage distinctive chemical properties of the diblock copolymer poly({alpha}-methylstyrene)-block-poly(4-hydroxystyrene) to create for the first time high-resolution selective-area regions of two different block copolymer phase morphologies. Exposure of thin films of poly({alpha}-methylstyrene)-block-poly(4-hydroxystyrene) to nonselective or block-selective solvent vapors results in polymer phase separation and self-assembly of patterns of cylindrical-phase or kinetically trapped spherical-phases, respectively. Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) acts as a high-resolution negative-tone photoresist in the presence of small amounts of a photoacid generator and cross-linker, undergoing radiation-induced cross-linking upon exposure to ultraviolet light or an electron beam. We use lithographic exposure to lock one self-assembled phase morphology in specific sample areas as small as 100 nm in width prior to film exposure to a subsequent solvent vapor to form a second self-assembled morphology in unexposed wafer areas.

  4. Chemical composition distribution analysis of photoresist copolymers and influence on ArF lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Hikaru; Yasuda, Atsushi; Ueda, Akifumi; Iseki, Takayuki; Ute, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Ryo; Kitayama, Tatsuki

    2007-03-01

    For getting information about the distribution of chemical composition, several model polymers were prepared under different polymerization conditions and were measured by critical adsorption point-liquid chromatography (CAP-LC). In the copolymer system of 8- and 9- (4-oxatricyclo[5.2.1.0 2,6]decane-3-one) acrylate (OTDA) and 2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate (EAdMA), the peak shapes of the CAP-LC chromatogram varied according to the polymerization condition although they indicated same molecular weight and averaged chemical composition. The difference of the CAP-LC elution curves was related to the chemical composition distribution of copolymers for CAP-LC measurement combined with proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The terpolymers consisted of α-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone methacrylate (GBLMA), 2-methyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate (MAdMA) and 1-hydroxy-3-adamantyl methacrylate (HAdMA) were prepared under various polymerization conditions. In the terpolymer system that had same molecular weight and average chemical composition, the solubility parameter (δ) and the dissolution rate were measured. The δ value and the dissolution rate curve were different among these terpolymers. It was suggested that the δ value and the chemical composition distribution of these terpolymers have a significant influence on the lithographic performance.

  5. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  6. A Chemical Approach to 3-D Lithographic Patterning of Si and GeNanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Robinson, J.T.; Dubon, O.D.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-12-12

    Ion implantation into silica followed by thermal annealingis an established growth method for Si and Ge nanocrystals. Wedemonstrate that growth of Group IV semiconductor nanocrystals can besuppressed by co-implantation of oxygen prior to annealing. For Sinanocrystals, at low Si/O dose ratios, oxygen co-implantation leads to areduction of the average nanocrystal size and a blue-shift of thephotoluminescence emission energy. For both Si and Ge nanocrystals, atlarger Si/O or Ge/O dose ratios, the implanted specie is oxidized andnanocrystals do not form. This chemical deactivation was utilized toachieve patterned growth of Si and Ge nanocrystals. Si was implanted intoa thin SiO2 film on a Si substrate followed by oxygen implantationthrough an electron beam lithographically defined stencil mask. Thermalannealing of the co-implanted structure yields two-dimensionallypatterned growth of Si nanocrystals under the masked regions. We applieda previously developed process to obtain exposed nanocrystals byselective HF etching of the silica matrix to these patterned structures.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of etched structures revealed that exposednanocrystals are not laterally displaced from their original positionsduring the etching process. Therefore, this process provides a means ofachieving patterned structures of exposed nanocrystals. The possibilitiesfor scaling this chemical-based lithography process to smaller featuresand for extending it to 3-D patterning is discussed.

  7. The control of press cleaning solvent vapors in a small lithographic printing establishment.

    PubMed

    Crouch, K G; Gressel, M G

    1999-05-01

    Small businesses frequently have inadequate in-house expertise to solve a variety of safety and health problems. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has therefore conducted a demonstration project in the commercial lithographic printing industry, which consists largely of small companies, in an effort to establish suitable control technology for airborne solvent vapors released primarily during press cleaning operations. These solvent vapors have a number of potential adverse health effects, including narcosis, kidney and liver damage, and cancer. Also, airborne anti-offset powder is a potential allergic sensitizer and cause of occupational asthma. As a means of controlling worker exposures to the vapors and dust, a local exhaust inlet was attached to the side of the press adjacent to the paper delivery point. Tempered outside air was introduced through ceiling outlets installed to make up for the exhausted air. Measurements of press operator exposure and area concentrations of solvent vapors and area concentration of anti-offset powder were made before and after installation of the new ventilation controls. Vapor concentrations were reduced by 73 percent for the press operators. Area concentrations of the vapors were reduced by 86 percent and dust concentration by 67 percent. The ventilation system was found to be suitable for vapor and dust control, although substitution of a cleaning solution containing non-carcinogenic solvents for solutions containing carcinogens was recommended.

  8. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition: a method for patterning electrically continuous metal nanowires on dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chenxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Yang, Fan; Thompson, Michael A; Güell, Aleix G; Yang, Yongan; Penner, Reginald M

    2008-09-23

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M(1)=silver or nickel) layer, 5-100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A (+) photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut approximately 300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of the M(1) layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M(2) is electrodeposited (M(2)=gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M(1) layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 microm sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowire-nanowire junctions. PMID:19206435

  9. The control of press cleaning solvent vapors in a small lithographic printing establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, K.G.; Gressel, M.G. . Div. of Physical Sciences and Engineering)

    1999-05-01

    Small businesses frequently have inadequate in-house expertise to solve a variety of safety and health problems. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has therefore conducted a demonstration project in the commercial lithographic printing industry, which consists largely of small companies, in a effort to establish suitable control technology for airborne solvent vapors released primarily during press cleaning operations. These solvent vapors have a number of potential adverse health effects, including narcosis, kidney and liver damage, and cancer. Also, airborne anti-offset powder is a potential allergic sensitizer and cause of occupational asthma. As a means of controlling worker exposures to the vapors and dust, a local exhaust inlet was attached to the side of the press adjacent to the paper delivery point. Tempered outside air was introduced through ceiling outlets installed to make up for the exhausted air. Measurements of press operator exposure and area concentrations of solvent vapors and area concentration of anti-offset powder were made before and after installation of the new ventilation controls. Vapor concentrations were reduced by 73% for the press operators. Area concentrations of the vapors were reduced by 86% and dust concentration by 67%. The ventilation system was found to be suitable for vapor and dust control, although substitution of a cleaning solution containing non-carcinogenic solvents for solutions containing carcinogens was recommended.

  10. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition: a method for patterning electrically continuous metal nanowires on dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chenxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Yang, Fan; Thompson, Michael A; Güell, Aleix G; Yang, Yongan; Penner, Reginald M

    2008-09-23

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M(1)=silver or nickel) layer, 5-100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A (+) photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut approximately 300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of the M(1) layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M(2) is electrodeposited (M(2)=gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M(1) layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 microm sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowire-nanowire junctions.

  11. Ultra-precision engineering in lithographic exposure equipment for the semiconductor industry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert-H Munnig

    2012-08-28

    The developments in lithographic tools for the production of an integrated circuit (IC) are ruled by 'Moore's Law': the density of components on an IC doubles in about every two years. The corresponding size reduction of the smallest detail in an IC entails several technological breakthroughs. The wafer scanner, the exposure system that defines those details, is the determining factor in these developments. This review deals with those aspects of the positioning systems inside these wafer scanners that enable the extension of Moore's Law into the future. The design of these systems is increasingly difficult because of the accuracy levels in the sub-nanometre range coupled with motion velocities of several metres per second. In addition to the use of feedback control for the reduction of errors, high-precision model-based feed-forward control is required with an almost ideally reproducible motion-system behaviour and a strict limitation of random disturbing events. The full mastering of this behaviour even includes material drift on an atomic scale and is decisive for the future success of these machines.

  12. A Left Handed Compliment: A newly discovered, early nineteenth-century lithograph by John Lewis Marks.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Snowman, Janet

    2010-01-01

    A newly discovered, early nineteenth-century lithograph by John Lewis Marks (b. ca. 1795-1796, d. ca. 1857-1861), entitled A Left Handed Compliment, is described. In this humorous print a young boy is using his left hand to draw the face of an elderly woman who is his grandmother, and she is shocked at the boy's suggestion that he will, “just see if I can't touch off your old Phizog left handed”. The source of the joke about the left-handed compliment is obscure, but more than likely it is sexual in origin. Glued to the verso of the print are early versions of two prints by Robert Seymour (1798-1836), the illustrator of Dickens' Pickwick Papers, suggesting a possible link between Marks and Seymour. From the hatch patterns on the Seymour engravings, it appears that Seymour may himself have been left-handed and perhaps therefore the butt of the joke. An alternative possibility is that Phizog is a reference to Dickens' later illustrator whose pseudonym was Phiz. It is also just conceivable that the young boy is Marks's own young son, Jacob. The print can be placed in the context of a scatological English vernacular humour that extends from Shakespeare through to Donald McGill and into the present day.

  13. High-temperature morphological evolution of lithographically introduced cavities in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Narushima, Takayuki; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-12-01

    Internal cavities of controlled geometry and crystallography were introduced in 6H silicon carbide single crystals by combining lithographic methods, ion beam etching, and solid-state diffusion bonding. The morphological evolution of these internal cavities (negative crystals) in response to anneals of up to 128 h duration at 1900 degrees C was examined using optical microscopy. Surface energy anisotropy and faceting have a strong influence on both the geometric and kinetic characteristics of evolution. Decomposition of 12{bar 1}0 cavity edges into 101{bar 0} facets was observed after 16 h anneals, indicating that 12{bar 1}0 faces are not components of the Wulff shape. The shape evolution kinetics of penny-shaped cavities were also investigated. Experimentally observed evolution rates decreased much more rapidly with those predicted by a model in which surface diffusion is assumed to be rate-limiting. This suggests that the development of facets, and the associated loss of ledges and terraces during the initial stages of evolution results in an evolution process limited by the nucleation rate of attachment/detachment sites (ledges) on the facets.

  14. Composite materials molding simulation for purpose of automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Ł.; Baier, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2016-08-01

    Composite materials loom large increasingly important role in the overall industry. Composite material have a special role in the ever-evolving automotive industry. Every year the composite materials are used in a growing number of elements included in the cars construction. Development requires the search for ever new applications of composite materials in areas where previously were used only metal materials. Requirements for modern solutions, such as reducing the weight of vehicles, the required strength and vibration damping characteristics go hand in hand with the properties of modern composite materials. The designers faced the challenge of the use of modern composite materials in the construction of bodies of power steering systems in vehicles. The initial choice of method for producing composite bodies was the method of molding injection of composite material. Molding injection of polymeric materials is a widely known and used for many years, but the molding injection of composite materials is a relatively new issue, innovative, it is not very common and is characterized by different conditions, parameters and properties in relation to the classical method. Therefore, for the purpose of selecting the appropriate composite material for injection for the body of power steering system computer analysis using Siemens NX 10.0 environment, including Moldex 3d and EasyFill Advanced tool to simulate the injection of materials from the group of possible solutions were carried out. Analyses were carried out on a model of a modernized wheel case of power steering system. During analysis, input parameters, such as temperature, pressure injectors, temperature charts have been analysed. An important part of the analysis was to analyse the propagation of material inside the mold during injection, so that allowed to determine the shape formability and the existence of possible imperfections of shapes and locations air traps. A very important parameter received from

  15. Mold allergy in the Mediterranean Island of Crete, Greece: a 10-year volumetric, aerobiological study with dermal sensitization correlations.

    PubMed

    Gonianakis, Michael I; Neonakis, Ioannis K; Gonianakis, Ioannis M; Baritaki, Maria A; Bouros, Demosthenis; Potamias, George; Kontou-Fili, Kalliopi S

    2006-01-01

    Mold spores are universal outdoor and indoor components and generally are recognized as possible sources of respiratory allergies. A 10-year aerobiological study (1994-2003) was conducted in the city of Heraklion located at the center of the Mediterranean island of Crete, Greece. Eighteen mold species exhibiting a normal annual seasonal pattern have been identified and recorded. The most abundant mold species include (a) Cladosporium, (b) Alternaria, (c) miscellaneous ascosporas (d) Leptosphaeria, and (e) basidiomycete Coprinus. In parallel, 571 atopic individuals were tested by skin-prick tests (SPTs). Among these 571 patients 42.5% showed dermal positivity to mold allergens. Most positive SPTs were those of (a) Alternaria, (b) Cladosporium, (c) Fusarium, (d) Aspergillus, and (e) Mucor. No linear relationship was noted between SPT frequencies and percentages of mold species. All of these aerobiological and sensitization data constitute a firm basis for further medical and biological research and application.

  16. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. BRANDY MOLDING A RAIL CASTING (LAWLER NO. 1337, A 16' x 35' MOLD WITH A 5' COPE AND A 4' DRAG). DRAG IS FILLED WITH SAND. - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  18. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  19. Hydraulically-assisted compression molding material and process development

    SciTech Connect

    Collister, J.E.; Butler, K.I.; Rinz, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    The Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) industry has recently seen an introduction of novel materials which are claimed to allow molders of SMC parts to alter their process to mold at substantially lower molding pressures. Although this is viewed as a major advantage for SMC molders, little description of molding processes has been given which take full advantage of these novel materials. The work reported in this paper describes one possible alternative process which will enable molders to capture the low-cost potential of reducing the required molding pressures. This process involves the use of low-cost mold construction, and the use of a novel method of applying molding pressure that obviates the need for a high-cost compression press, which causes the authors to apply a new name to this process; Hydraulic-Assisted Compression Molding. Molding results are presented for SMC which was designed to be molded at reduced pressures and temperatures (6.9 bar and 100 C).

  20. Assessment of mold concentrations in Singapore shopping centers using mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) analysis.

    PubMed

    Yap, Jennifer; Toh, Zhen Ann; Goh, Vivien; Ng, Lee Chen; Vesper, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    Molds can pose a human health threat and may amplify in buildings in humid climates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mold growth in Singapore shopping centers based on the collection of 40 dust samples from 15 shopping centers, including one with a history of water damage. The dust was analyzed by a DNA-based technology called mold-specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR). In a water-damaged shopping center, most of the 26 water-damage indicator species were detected at some concentration and many were much more abundant than the average in the shopping centers. MSQPCR is a useful method for quantifying indoor molds in tropical climates.

  1. Natural Fiber Composite Retting, Preform Manufacture and Molding (Project 18988/Agreement 16313)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Howe, Daniel T.; Laddha, Sachin; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2009-12-31

    Plant-based natural fibers can be used in place of glass in fiber reinforced automotive composites to reduce weight, cost and provide environmental benefits. Current automotive applications use natural fibers in injection molded thermoplastics for interior, non-structural applications. Compression molded natural fiber reinforced thermosets have the opportunity to extend natural fiber composite applications to structural and semi-structural parts and exterior parts realizing further vehicle weight savings. The development of low cost molding and fiber processing techniques for large volumes of natural fibers has helped in understanding the barriers of non-aqueous retting. The retting process has a significant effect on the fiber quality and its processing ability that is related to the natural fiber composite mechanical properties. PNNL has developed a compression molded fiber reinforced composite system of which is the basis for future preforming activities and fiber treatment. We are using this process to develop preforming techniques and to validate fiber treatment methods relative to OEM provided application specifications. It is anticipated for next fiscal year that demonstration of larger quantities of SMC materials and molding of larger, more complex components with a more complete testing regimen in coordination with Tier suppliers under OEM guidance.

  2. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  3. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-16

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  4. Antimicrobial Treatments of Indoor Mold and Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological contaminants especially mold in buildings are known to act as sources of indoor air pollution, discomfort, asthma and pulmonary disease to building occupants. Sick buildings are evidence of extremely problematic indoor air quality (IAQ), often resulting from unacceptab...

  5. Organic materials for ceramic molding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramic molding processes are examined. Binders, wetting agents, lubricants, plasticizers, surface active agents, dispersants, etc., for pressing, rubber pressing, sip casting, injection casting, taping, extrusion, etc., are described, together with forming machines.

  6. Indoor Molds and Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A Comparison of Selected Molds and House Dust Mite Induced Responses in a Mouse Model**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases. Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold's role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. The molds selected for these studies are commonl...

  7. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  8. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-03-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  9. The shrinkage behavior and surface topographical investigation for micro metal injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A.; Giannekas, N.; Marhöfer, D. M.; Tosello, G.; Hansen, H. N.

    2015-05-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a near net shape manufacturing technology that can produce highly complex and dimensionally stable parts for high end engineering applications. Despite the recent growth and industrial interest, micro metal molding is yet to be the field of extensive research especially when it is compared with micro molding of thermoplastics. The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of metal injection molding where it systematically characterizes the effects of important process conditions on the shrinkage and surface quality of molded parts with micro features. Effects of geometrical factors like feature dimensions and distance from the gate on the replication quality are studied. The influence of process conditions on the achievable roughness for the final metal parts is discussed based on the experimental findings. The test geometry is characterized by 2½D surface structures containing thin ribs of different aspect ratios and thicknesses in the sub-mm dimensional range. The test parts were molded from Catamold 316L with a conventional injection molding machine. Afterwards, the parts were de-binded and sintered to produce the final test samples. Among the different process parameters studied, the melt temperature was the most influential parameters for better replication and dimensional stability of the final part. The results presented in the paper clearly show that the shrinkage in metal part is not uniform in the micro scale. It depends on the feature dimensions and also on the process conditions. A thin section of the part exhibits higher relative shrinkage compared with a thicker section. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that a micro part molded by MIM process will have higher relative shrinkage compared to a macro part made with the same process.

  10. Optimization of injection molding parameters for poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittipaldi, Mauro; Garcia, Carla; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Grace, Landon R.

    2016-03-01

    Poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) is a widely used thermoplastic elastomer in bioimplantable devices due to its inherent stability in vivo. However, the properties of the material are highly dependent on the fabrication conditions, molecular weight, and styrene content. An optimization method for injection molding is herein proposed which can be applied to varying SIBS formulations in order to maximize ultimate tensile strength, which is critical to certain load-bearing implantable applications. The number of injection molded samples required to ascertain the optimum conditions for maximum ultimate tensile strength is limited in order to minimize experimental time and effort. Injection molding parameters including nozzle temperature (three levels: 218, 246, and 274 °C), mold temperature (three levels: 50, 85, and 120 °C), injection speed (three levels: slow, medium and fast) and holding pressure time (three levels: 2, 6, and 10 seconds) were varied to fabricate dumbbell specimens for tensile testing. A three-level L9 Taguchi method utilizing orthogonal arrays was used in order to rank the importance of the different injection molding parameters and to find an optimal parameter setting to maximize the ultimate tensile strength of the thermoplastic elastomer. Based on the Taguchi design results, a Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied in order to build a model to predict the tensile strength of the material at different injection parameters. Finally, the model was optimized to find the injection molding parameters providing maximum ultimate tensile strength. Subsequently, the theoretically-optimum injection molding parameters were used to fabricate additional dumbbell specimens. The experimentally-determined ultimate tensile strength of these samples was found to be in close agreement (1.2%) with the theoretical results, successfully demonstrating the suitability of the Taguchi Method and RSM for optimizing injection molding parameters of SIBS.

  11. Injection molded 1{endash}3 piezocomposite velocity sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Gentilman, R.L.; Bowen, L.J.; Fiore, D.F.; Pham, H.T.; Serwatka, W.J.

    1996-04-01

    A cost-effective technology has been developed for producing 1{endash}3 piezoelectric ceramic/polymer composites and transducers for underwater actuators, pressure sensors, and velocity sensors. Applications include active and passive sonar, underwater imaging, and active surface control. The key technology in the manufacturing process in the PZT ceramic injection molding process, in which an entire array of piezoelectric elements is molded to final net shape in one operation. Several designs of low-profile, area-averaging 1{endash}3 piezocomposite accelerometers have been fabricated. The initial breadboard accelerometers were made using a prepoled 50{times}50 mm injection molded 1{endash}3 PZT-5H preforms, containing 361 identical rods on a common baseplate. Additional mass was attached to the baseplate, which was metallized to serve as an electrode, and the free ends of the PZT rods were bonded to a fixed surface, which also functions as the other electrode. Subsequently, a manufacturing process was developed to create accelerometer {open_quote}{open_quote}islands{close_quote}{close_quote} within a 1{endash}3 piezocomposite transducer. The accelerometers can be made in arbitrary areas, shapes, and arrangements within the transducer panel, with the remaining area used either as a hydrophone or an actuator. This integral accelerometer technology is being optimized as part of an ARPA-funded active surface control program. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art of injection molded piezocomposite transducers and describes some of the velocity sensor configurations made using this technology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Finite element analysis and simulation of rheological properties of bulk molding compound (BMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, M. Fatih; Aydin, Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Bulk molding compound (BMC) is one of the important composite materials with various engineering applications. BMC is a thermoset plastic resin blend of various inert fillers, fiber reinforcements, catalysts, stabilizers and pigments that form a viscous, molding compound. Depending on the end-use application, bulk molding compounds are formulated to achieve close dimensional control, flame and scratch resistance, electrical insulation, corrosion and stain resistance, superior mechanical properties, low shrink and color stability. Its excellent flow characteristics, dielectric properties, and flame resistance make this thermoset material well-suited to a wide variety of applications requiring precision in detail and dimensions as well as high performance. When a BMC is used for these purposes, the rheological behavior and properties of the BMC is the main concern. In this paper, finite element analysis of rheological properties of bulk molding composite material was studied. For this purpose, standard samples of composite material were obtained by means of uniaxial hot pressing. 3 point flexural tests were then carried out by using a universal testing machine. Finite element analyses were then performed with defined material properties within a specific constitutive material behavior. Experimental and numerical results were then compared. Good correlation between the numerical simulation and the experimental results was obtained. It was expected with this study that effects of various process parameters and boundary conditions on the rheological behavior of bulk molding compounds could be determined by means of numerical analysis without detailed experimental work.

  13. Electrical and dielectric properties of foam injection-molded polypropylene/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Hossieny, N.; Park, C. B.; Pötschke, P.

    2015-05-01

    A combination of high dielectric permittivity (ɛ') and low dielectric loss (tan δ) is required for charge storage applications. In percolative systems such as conductive polymer composites, however, obtaining high ɛ' and low tan δ is very challenging due to the sharp insulation-conduction transition near the threshold region. Due to the particular arrangement of conductive fillers induced by both foaming and injection molding processes, they may address this issue. Therefore, this work evaluates the application of foam injection molding process in fabricating polymer nanocomposites for energy storage. Polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP-MWCNT) composites were prepared by melt mixing and foamed in an injection molding process. Electrical conductivity (σ), ɛ' and tan δ were then characterized. Also, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) was used to investigate the carbon nanotube's arrangement as well as cellular morphology. The results showed that foam injection-molded composites exhibited highly superior dielectric properties to those of solid counterparts. For instance, foamed samples had ɛ'=68.3 and tan δ =0.05 (at 1.25 vol.% MWCNT), as opposed to ɛ'=17.8 and tan δ=0.04 in solid samples (at 2.56 vol.% MWCNT). The results of this work reveal that high performance dielectric nanocomposites can be developed using foam injection molding technologies for charge storage applications.

  14. Electrical and dielectric properties of foam injection-molded polypropylene/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Hossieny, N.; Park, C. B.; Pötschke, P.

    2015-05-22

    A combination of high dielectric permittivity (ε′) and low dielectric loss (tan δ) is required for charge storage applications. In percolative systems such as conductive polymer composites, however, obtaining high ε′ and low tan δ is very challenging due to the sharp insulation-conduction transition near the threshold region. Due to the particular arrangement of conductive fillers induced by both foaming and injection molding processes, they may address this issue. Therefore, this work evaluates the application of foam injection molding process in fabricating polymer nanocomposites for energy storage. Polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP-MWCNT) composites were prepared by melt mixing and foamed in an injection molding process. Electrical conductivity (σ), ε′ and tan δ were then characterized. Also, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) was used to investigate the carbon nanotube’s arrangement as well as cellular morphology. The results showed that foam injection-molded composites exhibited highly superior dielectric properties to those of solid counterparts. For instance, foamed samples had ε′=68.3 and tan δ =0.05 (at 1.25 vol.% MWCNT), as opposed to ε′=17.8 and tan δ=0.04 in solid samples (at 2.56 vol.% MWCNT). The results of this work reveal that high performance dielectric nanocomposites can be developed using foam injection molding technologies for charge storage applications.

  15. Impact of the lithographic discontinuities on the karst conduit development - insights from modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Karst formation is controlled by the processes of the fluid flow and reactant transport coupled to the chemical erosion of the limestone rock [1]. The coupling between these processes can lead to a number of different instabilities, resulting in the formation of dissolutional voids, caverns and conduits. Arguably the simplest systems of this kind are solution pipes, in which gravitationally driven water movement carves vertical conduits in limestone rocks. In the homogeneous rocks these conduits are often cylindrical, with almost a constant diameter along their length. However, in a stratified medium, the morphology of the pipes changes. For example, if a number of less porous layers is introduced in an otherwise homogeneous medium, then the pipes are observed to narrow as they cross the layers and then widen up to form bulbous caverns as they emerge from the layer [1]. In this communication, we investigate these effects more closely, considering different kind of lithographic discontinuities to be present in the system: the layers of increased/decreased porosity and/or permeability as well as the solubility which is different from the rest of the system. Using a Darcy-scale numerical model we analyze the effects these layers have on the shape and growth of solution pipes and compare the results on the piping morphologies observed in nature. Finally we comment on the possible relevance of these results to the cave-formation phenomena and the inception horizon concept [3]. References: 1.Howard A. D., The development of karst features, Bull. Natl. Spel. Soc. 25, 45-65 (1963) 2. Petrus, K. and Szymczak, P., Influence of layering on the formation and growth of solution pipes. Frontiers in Physics (submitted) 3.Filipponi , M., Jeannin, P. and Tacher, L., Evidence of inception horizons in karst conduit networks, Geomorphology, 106, 86-99 (2009)

  16. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for clinical opportunistic yeast and mold isolates collected from 2010 to 2011: application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of geographic and temporal trends of antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Woosley, Leah N; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  17. A Mold by Any Other Name: One Librarian's Battle Against a Mold Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Laura Katz

    1997-01-01

    Describes how library staff at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University cleaned up materials after a mold bloom in the rare book room. Includes advice for controlling mold: set up a hygrothermograph, clean dust from books, set up fans, do a "skin" test at regular intervals, keep windows closed, have dehumidifiers available. (PEN)

  18. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process: Effect of packing pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liparoti, Sara; Sorrentino, Andrea; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    A thorough analysis of the effect of operative conditions of injection molding process on the morphology distribution inside the obtained molded is performed, with particular reference to semi- crystalline polymers. In particular, fully characterized injection molding tests are presented using an isotactic polypropylene, previously carefully characterized as far as most of properties of interest. The effects of mold temperature and packing conditions are analyzed. The mold temperature was controlled by a thin heating device, composed by polyimide as insulating layer and polyimide loaded carbon black as electrical conductive layer, that is able to increase temperature on mold surface in few seconds (70°C/s) by joule effect and cool down soon after. The shear layer thickness in the molded is reduced in the samples produced at high mold temperatures, that means high electrical power and long heating time, and this reduction is more significant at lower packing pressures, indeed, at 360bar as packing pressure and 20s as heating time the shear layer disappear. The resulting morphology was analyzed by optical microscope.

  19. Study on 100 Gbit/inch2 Density Molding Using Double-Sided Heat Insulated Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kazuo; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Eiji; Masuhara, Shin; Kaneko, Masahiko

    2004-07-01

    Previously we showed substrates without any pit deformation in the case of injection molding a 40 Gbit/inch2 read only memory (ROM) substrate using the single-sided heat insulated mold, in which a heat insulating plate was located below a stamper, and the slow mold opening method. This type of mold is characterized by the fact that pits on the substrates can be replicated at a low mold temperature, to avoid the twisting of substrates. However, it was found that the radial tilt was large. Therefore, we investigated this phenomenon using simulations, and fabricated a double-sided heat insulated mold with a symmetric structure in the thickness direction of the substrates. We showed that performing injection molding using this double-sided mold rendered the radial tilt of substrates controllable, so that it was possible to obtain flat disks. Furthermore, we obtained a 120-mm-diameter 100 Gbit/inch2 ROM substrate, which had no pit deformation over the entire pit area even though the pit wall angle was greater than 80 deg. This density corresponds to approximately 140 Gbyte.

  20. Onychomycosis Due to Nondermatophytic Molds

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Min; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there have been many studies about onychomycosis due to nondermatophytic molds (NDM), few studies about etiologic agents including NDM in onychomycosis have been reported in Korea. Objective: This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Objective This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Methods In the 10-year period from 1999~2009, we reviewed 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM. The etiologic agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. In some cases, internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis was done. NDM isolated considered pathogens when the presence of fungal elements was identified by direct microscopy observation and in follow-up cultures yielding the same fungi. Results Onychomycosis due to NDM comprised 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM, 84.7% were toenail onychomycosis and 15.3% were fingernail onychomycosis. The incidence rate was highest in the fifth decade (27.1%). The ratio of male to female patients was 1:1.6. The frequency of associated diseases, in descending order, was hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral hematoma. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (86.4%) was the most common clinical type of onychomycosis. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated etiologic agent of onychomycosis due to NDM (83.0%). Other causative agents were Scopulariopsis brevicaulis (10.2%), Acremonium spp. (3.4%), Fusarium solani (1.7%), and Chaetomium globosum (1.7%). Conclusion Because of the increase in onychomycosis due to NDM, we suggest the need of a careful mycological examination in patients with onychomycosis. PMID:22577268

  1. Development of sheet molding compound solar collectors with molded-in silvered glass reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, R. L.; Allred, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    An approach to the fabrication of a line-focusng parabolic trough reflector structure which offers the potential of high performance while utilizing mass production type technology with potential for low cost is discussed. The concept is one of a molded structure of fiber reinforced plastic with an integrally molded silvered glass reflective surface. Sheet molding compound (SMC), a mixture of glass fibers and inorganic fillers in polyester resin, has been selected for evaluation as representative of reinforced plastic molding materials. The purpose of the work was to establish the feasibility of molding glass mirrors into SMC structural trough panels. If the effort proved successful, the next stage of development would be demonstration of the structure in a trough collector which incorporates individual SMC reflector panels. The trough has a 2 x 6 m aperture with six individual SMC panels mounted on a torque tube as the main support structure. Results are described. (WHK)

  2. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  3. Creating mold-free buildings: a key to avoiding health effects of indoor molds.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce M

    2003-08-01

    In view of the high costs of building diagnostics and repair subsequent to water damage--as well as the large medical diagnostic and healthcare costs associated with mold growth in buildings--commitment to a philosophy of proactive preventive maintenance for home, apartment, school, and commercial buildings could result in considerable cost savings and avoidance of major health problems among building occupants. The author identifies common causes of mold growth in buildings and summarizes key building design and construction principles essential for preventing mold contamination indoors. Physicians and healthcare workers must be made aware of conditions within buildings that can give rise to mold growth, and of resulting health problems. Timely advice provided to patients already sensitized by exposure to molds could save these individuals, and their families, from further exposures as a result of inadequate building maintenance or an inappropriate choice of replacement housing. PMID:15259432

  4. Mathematical modeling of the process of filling a mold during injection molding of ceramic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkov, S. N.; Korobenkov, M. V.; Bragin, N. A.

    2015-10-01

    Using the software package Fluent it have been predicted of the filling of a mold in injection molding of ceramic products is of great importance, because the strength of the final product is directly related to the presence of voids in the molding, making possible early prediction of inaccuracies in the mold prior to manufacturing. The calculations were performed in the formulation of mathematical modeling of hydrodynamic turbulent process of filling a predetermined volume of a viscous liquid. The model used to determine the filling forms evaluated the influence of density and viscosity of the feedstock, and the injection pressure on the mold filling process to predict the formation of voids in the area caused by the shape defect geometry.

  5. Injection molding simulation with variothermal mold temperature control of highly filled polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, A.; Tschiersky, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    For the installation of a fuel cell stack to convert chemical energy into electricity it is common to apply bipolar plates to separate and distribute reaction gases and cooling agents. For reducing manufacturing costs of bipolar plates a fully automated injection molding process is examined. The high performance thermoplastic matrix material, polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), defies against the chemical setting and the operation temperature up to 200 °C. To adjust also high electrical and thermal conductivity, PPS is highly filled with various carbon fillers up to an amount of 65 percentage by volume. In the first step two different structural plates (one-sided) with three different gate heights and molds are designed according to the characteristics of a bipolar plate. To cope with the approach that this plate should be producible on standard injection molding machines with variothermal mold temperature control, injection molding simulation is used. Additionally, the simulation should allow to formulate a quality prediction model, which is transferrable to bipolar plates. Obviously, the basis for a precise simulation output is an accurate description of the material properties and behavior of the highly filled compound. This, the design of the structural plate and mold and the optimization via simulation is presented, as well. The influence of the injection molding process parameters, e.g. injection time, cycle times, packing pressure, mold temperature, and melt temperature on the form filling have been simulated to determine optimal process conditions. With the aid of the simulation and the variothermal mold temperature control it was possible to reduce the required melt temperature below the decomposition temperature of PPS. Thereby, hazardous decomposition products as hydrogen sulfide are obviated. Thus, the health of the processor, the longevity of the injection molding machine as well as the material and product properties can be protected.

  6. High T(sub g) Polymides for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.; Shonkwiler, Brian; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Baochau; McCorkle, Linda S.; Hardy-Green, DeNise

    2005-01-01

    A series of new polyimide resins with low melt viscosities and high glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)'s) of 340-350 C were developed for resin transfer molding (RTM) applications. The viscosities of these polyimide resins, based on 2,3,3'4'-Biphenyltetracarboxylic Dianhydride (a-BPDA), are in the range of 10-30 poise. The composites were fabricated successfully at 260-280 C with a pot life of 30-60 minutes by the RTM process. The viscosity profiles of the polyimide resins and the mechanical properties of the polyimide carbon fiber composites will be discussed.

  7. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 – 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  8. Modeling the thin-slab continuous-casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.G. . Applied Superconductivity Group); Dantzig, J.A. . Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to compute the thermomechanical state in the mold of thin-slab continuous casters. The thin-slab mold differs from those used in conventional slab casters in that the upper portion of the broad side walls defines a funnel-shaped chamber which allows the nozzle to be submerged into the liquid metal. The chamber converges with distance down the mold, reducing to the rectangular cross section of the finished casting near the mold exit. The new mold, along with casting speeds up to 6 m/min, allows slabs to be cast 50--60 mm thick, compared with 150 to 350 mm in conventional continuous slab casting. However, the mold shape and high casting speed lead to higher mold temperatures and shorter mold life than are found in conventional slab casters. In this article, the author develop mathematical models of the process to determine the role of various process parameters in determining the mold life. Finite-element analysis is used to determine the temperatures in the mold and cast slab, and these data are then used in an elastic-viscoplastic analysis to investigate the deformation of the mold wall in service. Cyclic inelastic strains up to 1.75 pct are found in a region below the meniscus along the funnel edge. These large strains result from the combination of locally high temperatures coupled with geometric restraint of the mold. The deformation leads to short mold life because of thermal fatigue cracking of the mold. The computed locations and time to failure of the mold in fatigue agree very well with observations of the appearance of mold surface cracks in an operating caster. The models are also used to develop an improved mold design.

  9. Modeling the thin-slab continuous-casting mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnor, Thomas G.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1994-06-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to compute the thermomechanical state in the mold of thin-slab continuous casters. The thin-slab mold differs from those used in conventional slab casters in that the upper portion of the broad side walls defines a funnel-shaped chamber which allows the nozzle to be submerged into the liquid metal. The chamber converges with distance down the mold, reducing to the rectangular cross section of the finished casting near the mold exit. The new mold, along with casting speeds up to 6 m/min, allows slabs to be cast 50 60 mm thick, compared with 150 to 350 mm in conventional continuous slab casting. However, the mold shape and high casting speed lead to higher mold temperatures and shorter mold life than are found in conventional slab casters. In this article, we develop mathematical models of the process to determine the role of various process parameters in determining the mold life. Finite-element analysis is used to determine the temperatures in the mold and cast slab, and these data are then used in an elastic-viscoplastic analysis to investigate the deformation of the mold wall in service. Cyclic inelastic strains up to 1.75 Pct are found in a region below the meniscus along the funnel edge. These large strains result from the combination of locally high temperatures coupled with geometric restraint of the mold. The deformation leads to short mold life because of thermal fatigue cracking of the mold. The computed locations and time to failure of the mold in fatigue agree very well with observations of the appearance of mold surface cracks in an operating caster. The models are also used to develop an improved mold design.

  10. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  11. Development of a silicone transfer molding compound

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1992-05-01

    Molding compound MS 2072067, designated BRP 50206, is currently used in the manufacture of bobbins and coils. This material was developed as a compression molding compound and is reinforced with 1/4 inch glass fibers. The production yield for coils and bobbins has improved over the years; however, it is still not at a desirable level. A milled glass reinforced version of MS 2072067 silicone molding compound was developed in the laboratory. Milled glass fibers with lengths of 1/32, 1/16, and 1/8 inch were used in place of the 1/4 inch chopped glass fibers in the formulations. The tensile strength, tensile moduli, thermal expansion, and flow properties of these materials were evaluated. These materials exhibited improved flow properties over the existing 1/4 inch glass fiber reinforced material. The new materials also had the same or better tensile strength, as compared to the current production material, and maintained similar thermal expansion characteristics.

  12. Neonatal Ear Molding: Timing and Technique.

    PubMed

    Anstadt, Erin Elizabeth; Johns, Dana Nicole; Kwok, Alvin Chi-Ming; Siddiqi, Faizi; Gociman, Barbu

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of auricular deformities is believed to be ∼11.5 per 10,000 births, excluding children with microtia. Although not life-threatening, auricular deformities can cause undue distress for patients and their families. Although surgical procedures have traditionally been used to reconstruct congenital auricular deformities, ear molding has been gaining acceptance as an efficacious, noninvasive alternative for the treatment of newborns with ear deformations. We present the successful correction of bilateral Stahl's ear deformity in a newborn through a straightforward, nonsurgical method implemented on the first day of life. The aim of this report is to make pediatric practitioners aware of an effective and simple molding technique appropriate for correction of congenital auricular anomalies. In addition, it stresses the importance of very early initiation of ear cartilage molding for achieving the desired outcome.

  13. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  14. Permeability characterization and quality control of reinforcement in resin transfer molding by the gas flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opperer, Jeremy G.

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) requires the permeation of a viscous fluid through a mold enclosed preform. The in-plane flow pattern, rate of flow, and gate pressures are essential to the design of an efficient RTM process. This information can be calculated using Darcy's Law, which is dependent on the constituent material properties, fluid viscosity and preform permeability. Established methods and databases are available to determine viscosity, however, there are no established procedures for quantifying RTM preform permeability. This work discusses previous techniques for permeability estimation using liquid flow methods. Problems associated with such approaches are addressed and experienced firsthand, through laboratory experimentation. A gas flow method (GFM) for permeability measurement is introduced. It is proven to be robust and facilitates the rapid acquisition of permeability data without contaminating the material while it is in the mold. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated using a mold with multiple ports for gas injection and pressure measurement, and yielded consistent and reliable results. The GFM is applied to determine the quality of fibrous preforms in an RTM mold prior to resin injection. Defects resulting from preform misplacement, accidental inclusions, material preparation, etc., are quantified. Unintentional permeability variations, due to such defects, can result in defective part production and excessive part scrapping. Pressure profiles generated during steady-state gas flow are affected by such variations. To determine the anomaly type, location, and severity, a multivariate statistical approach called discriminant analysis (DA) is applied to compare measured quantities from a test preform with quantities obtained from known groups. The tested preform is then classified into a defect free group or any one of several groups associated with specific types of defects, such as inclusions, shear, and race tracking. Application of this

  15. Mold filling of titanium alloys in two different wedge-shaped molds.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Habu, T; Takada, Y; Watanabe, K; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2002-06-01

    Pure titanium and titanium alloys are potential materials for the fabrication of cast dental appliances. One important factor in producing sound castings is the capacity of the metal to fill the mold. This study used a wedge-shaped mold to compare the mold filling of titanium with that of conventional dental casting alloys. The metals used were CP Ti, Ti-6Al-7Nb, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti with 1 and 4wt% Cu and ADA Type III gold alloy and an Ni-Cr alloy. The castings were cut into four pieces parallel to the triangular surface. Mold filling was evaluated as the distance between the tip of the cast wedge and theoretical tip of the triangle. The mold filling of the gold alloy was superior compared to all the metals tested, while the mold filling of the Ni-Cr alloy was the worst. There were no statistical differences at the 30 degrees marginal angle for all the cast titanium metals. At the sharper 15 degrees angle, CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb was superior to both the Ti-Cu alloys. Although the mold filling of titanium was inferior compared to the gold alloy, the data justify the use of titanium for the production of dental appliances.

  16. 40 CFR 464.01 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 464.01 Applicability. (a) This part applies to metal molding and casting facilities that discharge or may discharge pollutants...

  17. 40 CFR 464.01 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 464.01 Applicability. (a) This part applies to metal molding and casting facilities that discharge or may discharge pollutants...

  18. 40 CFR 464.01 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 464.01 Applicability. (a) This part applies to metal molding and casting facilities that discharge or may discharge pollutants to waters of...

  19. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  20. Nickel electroplating for nanostructure mold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Dou, Xinyuan; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Ray T

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrated a practical process of fabricating nickel molds for nanoimprinting. Dual-side polished glass is chosen as the substrate on which nickel nanostructures are successfully electroplated. Photonic crystal structures with 242 nm diameters and other nanoscale pillars down to 9 nm diameters are achieved over a large area. The electroplating parameters are investigated and optimized. This process extends the feasibility of electroplating process to nanoscale and shows great potential in nanoimprint mold fabrication with its low cost, straightforward process and controllable pattern structures.

  1. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  2. Chemotaxis in the Plasmodial Slime Mold, Physarum polycephalum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.; Martin, Denise A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a biology unit designed so that students pose their own questions and perform experiments to answer these questions. Plasmodial slime mold is employed as the focus of the study with background information about the mold provided. (DDR)

  3. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR FOR RAPID IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  4. 27. June 1962 WINDOW JAMB MOLDING DETAILMOLDING CAN BE REMOVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. June 1962 WINDOW JAMB MOLDING DETAIL--MOLDING CAN BE REMOVED BY TURNING WOODEN THUMBSCREWS; WINDOW FRAMES CAN THEN BE REMOVED FOR CLEANING, ETC. - Shaker Church Family Main Dwelling House, U.S. Route 20, Hancock, Berkshire County, MA

  5. MOLD MACHINE, BRASS FOUNDRY, USED TO COMPRESS CONDITIONED SAND IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MOLD MACHINE, BRASS FOUNDRY, USED TO COMPRESS CONDITIONED SAND IN FLASKS OVER PATTERNS TO CREATE MOLD CAVITIES WHICH ARE LATER FILLED WITH MOLTEN BRONZE. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A MOLD SURROUNDING A MATCHPLATE PATTERN, DENNIS GRAY OPERATOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripeer building at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripeer building at a mold being stripped from an ingot. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 20. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CORE SET IN MOLD HALF IN BOX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CORE SET IN MOLD HALF IN BOX FLOOR AREA. AWAITING OTHER MOLD HALF TO BE PLACED ON TOP. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. 19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH IRON POURERS FILLING COMPLETED MOLDS ON GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES THE SAME AS THE TWO LARGER TRUFLOS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWO HUNTER 20S. EACH GONDOLA IS CONNECTED TO THE NEXT AND RIDES ON A SINGLE TRACK RAIL FROM MOLDING MACHINES THROUGH POURING AREAS CARRYING A MOLD AROUND TWICE BEFORE THE MOLD IS PUSHED OFF ONTO A VIBRATING SHAKEOUT CONVEYOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. ORIGINAL MOLDS. THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAS APPROXIMATELY 6,000 PLASTER MOLDS OF VARIOUS TYPES, INCLUDING THE DEEP CAVITY MOLDS IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THESE MOLDS PRODUCED ALLEGORICAL FIGURES TO BE INSTALLED AROUND THE CORNICES OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  13. Dense vertical SU-8 microneedles drawn from a heated mold with precisely controlled volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zhuolin; Wang, Hao; Kanna Murugappan, Suresh; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Pastorin, Giorgia; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-02-01

    Drawing lithography technology has recently become a popular technique to fabricate (3D) microneedles. The conventional drawing process shows some limitations in fabricating dense, scale-up and small microneedles. In this study, we demonstrate a new drawing lithography process from a self-loading mold which is able to overcome these challenges. Different from the conventional molds which have difficult alignment and loading issues, a released SU-8 membrane is attached onto a SU-8 coated wafer to generate an innovative self-loading mold. The physically distinct SU-8 colloid in this mold successfully avoids the merging of the microneedle tips in the drawing process. Meanwhile, the same SU-8 colloid in mold can provide microneedles with uniform lengths on a large surface area. Furthermore, a low temperature drawing process with this improved technique prevents sharp tips from bending during the solidification stage. Remarkably, this new drawing lithography technology can fabricate microneedles with various lengths and they are strong enough to penetrate the outermost skin layer, namely the stratum corneum. The spacing between two adjacent microneedles is optimized to maximize the penetration rate through the skin. Histology images and drug diffusion testing demonstrate that microchannels are successfully created and the drugs can permeate the tissue under the skin. The fabricated microneedles are demonstrated to deliver insulin in vivo and lower blood glucose levels, suggesting future possible applications for minimally invasive transdermal delivery of macromolecules.

  14. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. PMID:24411373

  15. Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites: from Process Modeling to Property Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Smith, Mark T.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, long-fiber filled thermoplastics have become a great interest to the automotive industry since these materials offer much better property performance (e.g. elastic moduli, strength, durability…) than their short-fiber analogues, and they can be processed through injection molding with some specific tool design. However, in order that long-fiber thermoplastic injection molded composites can be used efficiently for automotive applications, there is a tremendous need to develop process and constitutive models as well as computational tools to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite, and its resulting properties and macroscopic responses from processing to the final product. The microstructure and properties of such a composite are governed by i) flow-induced fiber orientation, ii) fiber breakage during injection molding, and iii) processing conditions (e,g. pressure, mold and melt temperatures, mold geometries, injection speed, etc.). This paper highlights our efforts to address these challenging issues. The work is an integrated part of a research program supported by the US Department of Energy, which includes • The development of process models for long-fiber filled thermoplastics, • The construction of an interface between process modeling and property prediction as well as the development of new constitutive models to perform linear and nonlinear structural analyses, • Experimental characterization of model parameters and verification of the model predictions.

  16. Rapid fabrication method of a microneedle mold with controllable needle height and width.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lee, I-Chi; Hsu, Wei-Chieh; Hsu, Ching-Hong; Chang, Kai-Ping; Gao, Shao-Syuan

    2016-10-01

    The main issue of transdermal drug delivery is that macromolecular drugs cannot diffuse through the stratum corneum of skin. Many studies have pursued micro-sized needles encapsulated with drugs to overcome this problem, as these needles can pierce the stratum corneum and allow drugs to enter the circulatory system of the human body. However, most microneedle fabrication processes are time-consuming and require expensive equipment. In this study, we demonstrate a rapid method for fabricating a microneedle mold using drawing lithography and a UV-cured resin. The mold was filled with a water-soluble material, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was then demolded to produce a water-soluble microneedle array. The results of an in vitro skin insertion test using PVP microneedles and pig ear skin demonstrated the feasibility of the microneedle mold. In addition, by controlling the viscosity of the UV-cured resin through various heat treatments, microneedles with different heights and aspect ratios were produced. Compared with other methods, this technology significantly simplifies and accelerates the mold fabrication process. In addition, the required equipment is relatively simple and inexpensive. Through this technology, we can rapidly fabricate microneedle molds with controllable dimensions for various applications. PMID:27565822

  17. A modified presurgical orthopedic (nasoalveolar molding) device in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Chitravelu Siva; Prasad, N. K. K. Koteswara; Chitharanjan, Arun B.; Liou, Eric Jein Wein

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) can be done effectively to reshape the nasal cartilage and mold the maxillary dentoalveolar arch before surgical cleft lip repair and primary rhinoplasty. Presurgical NAM helps as an adjunct procedure to enhance the esthetic and functional outcome of the surgical procedures. We have developed a modified NAM device to suit to the needs of the patients coming from distant places for the treatment. This device helps in reducing the number of frequent visits the patient needs to take to the craniofacial center. The purpose of this presentation is to report this treatment technique and discuss its application. PMID:27403068

  18. A modified presurgical orthopedic (nasoalveolar molding) device in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Chitravelu Siva; Prasad, N K K Koteswara; Chitharanjan, Arun B; Liou, Eric Jein Wein

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) can be done effectively to reshape the nasal cartilage and mold the maxillary dentoalveolar arch before surgical cleft lip repair and primary rhinoplasty. Presurgical NAM helps as an adjunct procedure to enhance the esthetic and functional outcome of the surgical procedures. We have developed a modified NAM device to suit to the needs of the patients coming from distant places for the treatment. This device helps in reducing the number of frequent visits the patient needs to take to the craniofacial center. The purpose of this presentation is to report this treatment technique and discuss its application. PMID:27403068

  19. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  20. Improved mold release for filled-silicone compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accountius, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    Ceramic and filled-plastic materials used for fabrication of tiles are relatively brittle and easily break as they are being removed from molds. Dusting mold surfaces with commercially available glass microspheres provides mold release superior to existing spray releases. Glass-microsphere dusting also permits removal of uncured tile which has very little strength.

  1. 17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR SHOWING CHAIN HELD WEIGHTS THAT TRAVEL AT THE SAME SPEED AS THE CONVEYOR AND REST ON COMPLETED MOLDS TO HOLD THE SAND SEAMS TOGETHER AS MOLTED IRON IS POURED INTO THE MOLD CAVITY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  3. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  4. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  5. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE HUNTER 10 AND OTHER HUNTER 20 COMPRESSES BOTH MOLD HALVES OVER A DOUBLE-SIDED MATCH PLATE PATTERN. DENNIS GRAY TESTS A MOLD'S HARDNESS TO ENSURE SAND MIXTURE AND MACHINE COMPRESSIBILITY ARE CORRECT. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. 1928 MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MOLD CONVEYOR #1 SHOWING CONVEYOR AND TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1928 MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MOLD CONVEYOR #1 SHOWING CONVEYOR AND TRACK ARRANGEMENTS WITH OVERHEAD POURING WEIGHTS THAT REST ON A MOLD'S TOP SURFACE TO ENSURE THAT IRON DOES NOT FLOW OUT OF THE MOLD WHEN IT IS BEING POURED THROUGH THE OPENING IN THE WEIGHT. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. 14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF FROM THE PATTERN ON THE MOLDING MACHINE, REVEALING THE CAVITY THAT WILL BE FILLED WITH MOLTEN IRON AFTER IT IS ASSEMBLED WITH THE OTHER MOLD HALF INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Suppression of Botrytis Gray Mold in Hiemalis Begonia with Potting Mix Amendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis gray mold, arguably the most prevalent disease of hiemalis begonia in the greenhouse, causes lesions on flowers, leaves and stems throughout the cropping cycle. Traditional control recommendations rely heavily on cultural practices and the regular application of fungicides. Since Botrytis...

  9. Acrylic Resin Molding Based Head Fixation Technique in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mootaek; Lee, Kyungmin; Jang, Il-Sung; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2016-01-12

    Head fixation is a technique of immobilizing animal's head by attaching a head-post on the skull for rigid clamping. Traditional head fixation requires surgical attachment of metallic frames on the skull. The attached frames are then clamped to a stationary platform resulting in immobilization of the head. However, metallic frames for head fixation have been technically difficult to design and implement in general laboratory environment. In this study, we provide a novel head fixation method. Using a custom-made head fixation bar, head mounter is constructed during implantation surgery. After the application of acrylic resin for affixing implants such as electrodes and cannula on the skull, additional resins applied on top of that to build a mold matching to the port of the fixation bar. The molded head mounter serves as a guide rails, investigators conveniently fixate the animal's head by inserting the head mounter into the port of the fixation bar. This method could be easily applicable if implantation surgery using dental acrylics is necessary and might be useful for laboratories that cannot easily fabricate CNC machined metal head-posts.

  10. Rapid fabrication of nickel molds for prototyping embossed plastic microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard; Ranu, Navpreet; Mathies, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The production of hot embossed plastic microfluidic devices is demonstrated in 1–2 h by exploiting vinyl adhesive stickers as masks for electroplating nickel molds. The sticker masks are cut directly from a CAD design using a cutting plotter and transferred to steel wafers for nickel electroplating. The resulting nickel molds are used to hot emboss a variety of plastic substrates, including cyclo-olefin copolymer and THV fluorinated thermoplastic elastomer. Completed devices are formed by bonding a blank sheet to the embossed layer using a solvent-assisted lamination method. For example, a microfluidic valve array or automaton and a droplet generator were fabricated with less than 100 µm x-y plane feature resolution, to within 9% of the target height, and with 90±11% height uniformity over 5 cm. This approach for mold fabrication, embossing, and bonding reduces fabrication time and cost for research applications by avoiding photoresists, lithography masks, and the cleanroom. PMID:23450308

  11. Rapid fabrication of nickel molds for prototyping embossed plastic microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Novak, Richard; Ranu, Navpreet; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-04-21

    The production of hot embossed plastic microfluidic devices is demonstrated in 1-2 h by exploiting vinyl adhesive stickers as masks for electroplating nickel molds. The sticker masks are cut directly from a CAD design using a cutting plotter and transferred to steel wafers for nickel electroplating. The resulting nickel molds are used to hot emboss a variety of plastic substrates, including cyclo-olefin copolymer and THV fluorinated thermoplastic elastomer. Completed devices are formed by bonding a blank sheet to the embossed layer using a solvent-assisted lamination method. For example, a microfluidic valve array or automaton and a droplet generator were fabricated with less than 100 μm x-y plane feature resolution, to within 9% of the target height, and with 90 ± 11% height uniformity over 5 cm. This approach for mold fabrication, embossing, and bonding reduces fabrication time and cost for research applications by avoiding photoresists, lithography masks, and the cleanroom.

  12. Experimental Determination of Heat Transfer Within the Metal/Mold Gap in a DC Casting Mold: Part II. Effect of Casting Metal, Mold Material, and Other Casting Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arvind; Bainbridge, Ian F.

    2013-07-01

    Extensive experimental studies were conducted to quantify the effect of different parameters that can affect the heat transfer from the metal to the mold during the steady-state phase of DC casting. In the first part previously published, the experimental technique was established and results were reported for the effect of gas type (atmosphere within the mold) and the gap between the metal and the mold. The results showed the significant effect of gas thermal conductivity and the metal-mold gap on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient. In this second publication on heat transfer in the mold wall region of a DC casting mold, the results from the effect of casting temperature, gas flow rate, casting alloy, mold material, and the mold insert material on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient are described. The experiments reported in the current paper show that these additional factors tested do not affect the heat flux through the mold wall to the same extent as the gap size or the gas type. The heat transfer coefficient changes by less than 5 pct when casting temperature is changed by ±25 K, less than 15 pct when the gas flow rate within the metal-mold gap flows at up to 3 LPM, and approximately 30 pct when the mold material is changed from stainless steel to AA601 to copper. Similar results were obtained when different insert materials were used. These results are explained with the help of an electrical analogy of heat transfer and are consistent with the heat transfer theory.

  13. Molding cork sheets to complex shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    Partially cured cork sheet is easily formed to complex shapes and then final-cured. Temperature and pressure levels required for process depend upon resin system used and final density and strength desired. Sheet can be bonded to surface during final cure, or can be first-formed in mold and bonded to surface in separate step.

  14. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Plastics Molding Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in the plastics molding industry. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State Board of Education, Illinois Community…

  15. Foundry air contaminants from green sand molds.

    PubMed

    Scott, W D; James, R H; Bates, C E

    1976-06-01

    The major gases evolved from foundry molds have been determined in the laboratory. The principal gases evolved during pouring and shakeout of castings include hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons with smaller amounts of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, and sulfur dioxide. PMID:937172

  16. Streaming instability of aggregating slime mold amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert; Reynolds, William

    1991-05-01

    We propose a new model of aggregation in the cellular slime mold D. Discoideum. Our approach couples the excitable signaling system to amoeba chemotaxis; the resultant system of equations is tractable to analytical and numerical approaches. Using our model, we derive the existence of a streaming instability for the concentric target aggregation pattern.

  17. Bell X-5 Model and Molds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    A Langley model maker examines the molds used to form a model of the Bell X-5, a variable sweep craft that first flew in June of 1951. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 64), by James Schultz.

  18. Flexible Interior-Impression-Molding Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1991-01-01

    Device used inside combustion chamber of complicated shape for nondestructive evaluation of qualities of welds, including such features as offset, warping, misalignment of parts, and dropthrough. Includes flexible polypropylene tray trimmed to fit desired interior surface contour. Two neodymium boron magnets and inflatable bladder attached to tray. Tray and putty inserted in cavity to make mold of interior surface.

  19. Molding Compound For Inspection Of Internal Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim; Ricklefs, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Material clean, sets rapidly, and easy to use. Silicone elastomer, Citrocon or equivalent, commonly used in dentistry, in combination with mold-release agent (Also see MFS-29240), speeds and facilitates making of impressions of interior surfaces so surface contours examined. Elastomer easily moved around in cavity until required location found.

  20. A REVOLUTION IN MOLD IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 100 assay were developed to identify and quantify indoor molds using quantitiative PCR (QPCR) assays. This technology incorporates fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan�) chemistry directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2...

  1. Mold Die Making. 439-322/324.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunke, P.; And Others

    Each unit in this curriculum guide on mold die making contains an introduction, objectives, materials required, lessons, space for notes, figures, and diagrams. There are 10 units in this guide: (1) introduction to Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM); (2) EDM principles; (3) the single pulse; (4) EDM safety; (5) electrode material; (6) electrode…

  2. Epidemics of mold poisoning past and present.

    PubMed

    Meggs, William J

    2009-01-01

    Molds are ubiquitous throughout the biosphere of planet earth and cause infectious, allergic, and toxic diseases. Toxic diseases arise from exposure to mycotoxins produced by molds. Throughout history, there have been a number of toxic epidemics associated with exposure to mycotoxins. Acute epidemics of ergotism are caused by consumption of grain infested by fungi of the genus Claviceps, which produce the bioactive amine ergotamine that mimics the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine. Acute aflatoxin outbreaks have occurred from ingestion of corn stored in damp conditions that potentiate growth of the molds of the species Aspergillus. Contemporary construction methods that use cellulose substrates such as fiber board and indoor moisture have caused an outbreak of contaminated buildings with Stachybotrys chartarum, with the extent of health effects still a subject of debate and ongoing research. This article reviews several of the more prominent epidemics and discusses the nature of the toxins. Two diseases that were leading causes of childhood mortality in England in the 1970s and vanished with changing dietary habits, putrid malignant fever, and slow nervous fever were most likely toxic mold epidemics. PMID:19808743

  3. Onychomycosis by molds. Report of 78 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Cruz-Aguilar, Pamela; Ponce, Rosa María

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective study of onychomycohosis by molds was carried out during a 14-year period (1992-2005). All cases were clinically and mycologically proven (repetitive KOH and culture) and then each of the molds was identified. A total of 5,221 cases of onychomycosis were evaluated, 78 of which were molds (1.49%). Mean patient age was 44.1 years. 75/78 cases occurred in toenails. Associated factors were detected in 39/78 (50.0%) cases, with the major ones being: peripheral vascular disease, contact with soil, and trauma. The most frequent clinical presentation was distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO), in 54/78 cases (69%). The most frequent causative agents were: Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in 34/78 cases and Aspergillus niger in 13/78 cases. Onychomycoses by molds are infrequent; in this study they accounted for 1.49% of cases. The clinical features are virtually similar to those caused by dermatophytes, which makes the clinicomycological tests necessary.

  4. Clinical reactivity to ingestion challenge with mixed mold extract may be enhanced in subjects sensitized to molds.

    PubMed

    Luccioli, Stefano; Malka-Rais, Jonathan; Nsouli, Talal M; Bellanti, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Manifestations of mold allergy are classically associated with inhalation of mold spores leading to symptoms of asthma and other respiratory illnesses. It is largely unknown, however, whether ingestion of aeroallergenic molds, mold spores, or other fungi found in food can also elicit hypersensitivity reactions in mold-sensitive individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between exposure to molds by oral challenge and elicitation of symptoms in mold- versus nonmold-sensitive individuals. Thirty-four adult atopic subjects were randomized into mold-sensitive groups based on skin test reactivity by skin percutaneous testing (SPT) and/or intradermal (ID) testing to a mixed mold (MM) extract preparation. All subjects underwent a single-blinded, placebo-controlled food challenge to the MM preparation. A modified scoring system was used to grade the clinical severity of symptoms elicited by challenge. All subjects tolerated challenges to the maximal oral mold dose concentration. However, higher symptom scores after challenge were found in mold-sensitive subjects compared with nonmold-sensitive subjects (p = 0.01). When mold-sensitive subjects were compared based on SPT and/or ID reactivity, higher symptom scores and lower symptom-eliciting concentrations of mold were associated with the SPT reactive subgroup compared with the subgroup with ID reactivity alone. In summary, based on our challenge results and scoring model, mold-sensitive subjects compared with nonmold-sensitive subjects experienced cumulatively higher symptom scores after oral challenge to an MM extract preparation. Future studies are warranted to confirm whether ingestion of aeroallergenic molds in food may be another contributor to symptoms in mold-sensitive individuals.

  5. Alternative control techniques document: Offset lithographic printing. Supplemental information based on public comment on draft control techniques guideline announced in Federal Register on November 8, 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    This is an alternative control techniques (ACT) document for control of volatile organic compound emissions from offset lithographic printing. The document provides supplemental information based on public comment on the draft control techniques guideline (CTG) announced in the Federal Register on November 8, 1993 (EPA-453/D-95-001). The document addresses sheet fed, on-heatset web, newspaper, and heat-set web offset lithographic printing. The principle emission sources addressed are fountain solution, cleaning solvents (blanket and roller washed) and headset dryers. The purpose of an ACT document is to assist state and local air pollution agencies in developing regulations to limit emissions of volatile organic compounds.

  6. Process-induced damage evolution and management in resin transfer molding of composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yean-Der

    2000-10-01

    design analysis for characterization and management of process-induced damage in composite panels. Experimental investigation of resin transfer molding of composite panels made of epoxy resin (EPON 826) and eight-harness graphite fiber mats, indicates that low cure temperature, moderate heating rate and high rate of cooling after cure would minimize damage during curing. Furthermore the experimental measurements are in agreement with the degree of damage predicted by the numerical models and hence verifying the effectiveness of these models. The models and methods developed in the present work are of broader applicability to process design and optimization of resin transfer molding of composite structures.

  7. Indoor Molds and Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A Comparison of Selected Molds and House Dust Mite Induced Responses in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction/Study Goal Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases including allergic lung diseases. The Institute of Medicine reports and WHO gUidelines concluded that the role of molds in asthma induction is not clear bu...

  8. Pressurized Shell Molds For Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday K.; Lusignea, Richard N.; Cornie, James

    1993-01-01

    Balanced-pressure molds used to make parts in complex shapes from fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite materials. In single step, molding process makes parts in nearly final shapes; only minor finishing needed. Because molding pressure same on inside and outside, mold does not have to be especially strong and can be made of cheap, nonstructural material like glass or graphite. Fibers do not have to be cut to conform to molds. Method produces parts with high content of continuous fibers. Parts stiff but light in weight, and coefficients of thermal expansion adjusted. Parts resistant to mechanical and thermal fatigue superior to similar parts made by prior fabrication methods.

  9. Brightness field distributions of microlens arrays using micro molding.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Lin, Yi; Shen, Yung-Kang

    2010-12-20

    This study describes the brightness field distributions of microlens arrays fabricated by micro injection molding (μIM) and micro injection-compression molding (μICM). The process for fabricating microlens arrays used room-temperature imprint lithography, photoresist reflow, electroforming, μIM, μICM, and optical properties measurement. Analytical results indicate that the brightness field distribution of the molded microlens arrays generated by μICM is better than those made using μIM. Our results further demonstrate that mold temperature is the most important processing parameter for brightness field distribution of molded microlens arrays made by μIM or μICM.

  10. Direct micropatterning of polymer materials by ice mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Luan, Shifang; Wang, Zhe; Han, Yanchun

    2006-10-01

    Micropatterning of functional polymer materials by micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC) with ice mold is reported in this paper. Ice mold was selected due to its thaw or sublimation. Thus, the mold can be easily removed. Furthermore, the polymer solution did not react with, swell, or adhere to the ice mold, so the method is suitable for many kinds of materials (such as P3HT, PMMA Alq 3/PVK, PEDOT: PSS, PS, P2VP, etc.). Freestanding polymer microstructures, binary polymer pattern, and microchannels have been fabricated by the use of ice mold freely.

  11. A comparison of molding procedures - Contact, injection and vacuum injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathiard, G.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the contact, injection and vacuum injection molding of reinforced plastic components are compared for the example of a tractor roof with a gel-coated surface. Consideration is given to the possibility of reinforcement, number of smooth faces, condition of the gel-coated surface, reliability, and labor and workplace requirements of the three processes, and advantages of molding between the mold and a countermold in smooth faces, reliability, labor requirements, working surface and industrial hygiene are pointed out. The times and labor requirements of each step in the molding cycles are examined, and material requirements and yields, investment costs, amortization and product cost prices of the processes are compared. It is concluded that, for the specific component examined, the processes of vacuum injection and injection molding appear very interesting, with injection molding processes resulting in lower cost prices than contact molding for any production volume.

  12. Mold exposure and health effects following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Deborah N; Grimsley, L Faye; White, LuAnn E; El-Dahr, Jane M; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The extensive flooding in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita created conditions ideal for indoor mold growth, raising concerns about the possible adverse health effects associated with indoor mold exposure. Studies evaluating the levels of indoor and outdoor molds in the months following the hurricanes found high levels of mold growth. Homes with greater flood damage, especially those with >3 feet of indoor flooding, demonstrated higher levels of mold growth compared with homes with little or no flooding. Water intrusion due to roof damage was also associated with mold growth. However, no increase in the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has been observed in published reports to date. This article considers reasons why studies of mold exposure after the hurricane do not show a greater health impact.

  13. Transfer molding of nanoscale oxides using water-soluble templates.

    PubMed

    Bass, John D; Schaper, Charles D; Rettner, Charles T; Arellano, Noel; Alharbi, Fahhad H; Miller, Robert D; Kim, Ho-Cheol

    2011-05-24

    We report a facile method for creating nanoscopic oxide structures over large areas that is capable of producing high aspect ratio nanoscale structures with feature sizes below 50 nm. A variety of nanostructured oxides including TiO(2), SnO(2) and organosilicates are formed using sol-gel and nanoparticle precursors by way of molding with water-soluble polymeric templates generated from silicon masters. Sequential stacking techniques are developed that generate unique 3-dimensional nanostructures with combinatorially mixed geometries, scales, and materials. Applicable to a variety of substrates, this scalable method allows access to a broad range of new thin film morphologies for applications in devices, catalysts, and functional surface coatings. PMID:21469708

  14. The Influence of Na2O on the Solidification and Crystallization Behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Based Mold Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinxing; Wen, Guanghua; Sun, Qihao; Tang, Ping; Liu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    The reaction between [Al] and SiO2 sharply increased the Al2O3 and decreased SiO2 contents in mold flux during the continuous casting of high-Al steels. These changes converted original CaO-SiO2-based flux into CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux, promoting the crystallization and deteriorating the mold lubrication. Therefore, study on the solidification and crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux, with the applicable fluidizers, is of importance. The effect of Na2O, predominantly used as the fluidizer in mold flux, on the solidification and crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux needs to be investigated. In this study, a CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux containing 6.5 wt pct Li2O was designed; the effect of Na2O on the solidification and crystallization behavior of these mold fluxes was investigated using the single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT) and the double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT). Moreover, the slag film obtained by a heat flux simulator was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that the solid fraction of molten slag (Fs) and the crystalline fraction of solid slag (Fc) in the mold slag films decrease with increasing Na2O content from 0 to 2 wt pct. However, Fs and Fc increased when the Na2O content increased from 2 to 6 wt pct. The critical cooling rates initially decreases and then increases with increasing Na2O content. The XRD analysis results show that LiAlO2 and CaF2 were the basic crystals for all the mold fluxes. Increasing the Na2O content both inhibits the Ca2Al2SiO7 formation and promotes the production of Ca12Al14O33, indicating that the mold lubrication deteriorated because of the high melting-point phase formation of Ca2Al2SiO7 in the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux containing 6.5 wt pct Li2O, without Na2O. The strong crystallization tendency also deteriorated the mold lubrication for the mold flux with a higher Na2O content. Therefore, the addition of Na2O was less than 2 wt pct in

  15. Chalcogenide material strengthening through the lens molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Lucas, Pierre; Coleman, Garrett J.

    2016-05-01

    The demand for infrared transmitting materials has grown steadily for several decades as markets realize new applications for longer wavelength sensing and imaging. With this growth has come the demand for new and challenging material requirements that cannot be satisfied with crystalline products alone. Chalcogenide materials, with their unique physical, thermal, and optical properties, have found acceptance by designers and fabricators to meet these demands. No material is perfect in every regard, and chalcogenides are no exception. A cause for concern has been the relatively low fracture toughness and the propensity of the bulk material to fracture. This condition is amplified when traditional subtractive manufacturing processes are employed. This form of processing leaves behind micro fractures and sub surface damage, which act as propagation points for both local and catastrophic failure of the material. Precision lens molding is not a subtractive process, and as a result, micro fractures and sub surface damage are not created. This results in a stronger component than one produced by traditional methods. New processing methods have also been identified that result in an even stronger surface that is more resistant to breakage, without the need for post processing techniques that may compromise surface integrity. This paper will discuss results achieved in the process of lens molding development at Edmund Optics that result in measurably stronger chalcogenide components. Various metrics will be examined and data will be presented that quantifies component strength for different manufacturing processes.

  16. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  17. All-epitaxial, lithographically defined, current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on selective interfacial fermi-level pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Lu, D.; Deppe, D.G.

    2005-01-10

    An approach is presented to fabricate a current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser that is all-epitaxial and lithographically defined. The device uses selective Fermi level pinning to self-align the electrical injection to a mode-confining intracavity phase-shifting mesa.

  18. Poor Indoor Air Quality, Mold Exposure, and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections--Are We Placing Our Children at Risk?

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Dimos; Polyzoi, Eleoussa; Wells, John A; Koulis, Theo

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how respiratory health risks are associated with poor housing is essential to designing effective strategies to improve children's quality of life. The objective of the study described in this article was to determine the relationship between respiratory health and housing conditions. A survey was completed by 3,424 parents of children in third and fourth grade in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. An engineering audit and air samples were also taken in the homes of a subset of 715 homes. Results showed that a child's respiratory health is significantly associated with self-reported visible mold in the home and that a significant association existed between occupant-reported visible mold and tested airborne mold. Findings highlight the need for clearer standards of acceptable CFU/m3 limits for mold genera that are applicable to homes. In the absence of such guidelines, problems associated with indoor mold will continue to impact the health of residents, despite growing evidence of the adverse effects from mold exposure.

  19. Poor Indoor Air Quality, Mold Exposure, and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections--Are We Placing Our Children at Risk?

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Dimos; Polyzoi, Eleoussa; Wells, John A; Koulis, Theo

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how respiratory health risks are associated with poor housing is essential to designing effective strategies to improve children's quality of life. The objective of the study described in this article was to determine the relationship between respiratory health and housing conditions. A survey was completed by 3,424 parents of children in third and fourth grade in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. An engineering audit and air samples were also taken in the homes of a subset of 715 homes. Results showed that a child's respiratory health is significantly associated with self-reported visible mold in the home and that a significant association existed between occupant-reported visible mold and tested airborne mold. Findings highlight the need for clearer standards of acceptable CFU/m3 limits for mold genera that are applicable to homes. In the absence of such guidelines, problems associated with indoor mold will continue to impact the health of residents, despite growing evidence of the adverse effects from mold exposure. PMID:27197351

  20. Iterative learning control for synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage in step-and-scan lithographic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lan-lan; Hu, Song; Zhao, Li-xin; Ma, Ping

    2013-08-01

    Lithographic equipments are highly complex machines used to manufacture integrated circuits (ICs). To make larger ICs, a larger lens is required, which, however, is prohibitively expensive. The solution to this problem is to expose a chip not in one flash but in a scanning fashion. For step-and-scan lithographic equipment (wafer scanner), the image quality is decided by many factors, in which synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage during exposure is a key one. In this paper, the principle of reticle stage and wafer stage was analyzed through investigating the structure of scanners, firstly. While scanning, the reticle stage and wafer stage should scan simultaneously at a high speed and the speed ratio is 1:4. Secondly, an iterative learning controller (ILC) for synchronization of reticle stage and wafer stage is presented. In the controller, a master-slave structure is used, with the wafer stage acting as the master, and the reticle stage as the slave. Since the scanning process of scanner is repetitive, ILC is used to improve tracking performance. A simple design procedure is presented which allows design of the ILC system for the reticle stage and wafer stage independently. Finally, performance of the algorithm is illustrated by simulated on the virtual stages (the reticle stage and wafer stage).The results of simulation experiments and theory analyzing demonstrate that using the proposed controller better synchronization performance can be obtained for the reticle stage and wafer stage in scanner. Theory analysis and experiment shows the method is reasonable and efficient.