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Sample records for molds casting

  1. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  2. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  3. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Mold For Casting Radius-Inspection Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Thin replicas viewed on comparator without sectioning. New mold machined from piece of transparent poly(methyl methacrylate). Fits around base of post. Two slots machined into inner surface form channels for casting inspection sections. Bottom of mold fits flush against surface around bottom of post. When surface slanted, mold automatically aligns in proper orientation. Time required to inspect elliptical radii located at bottoms of series of small posts reduced from 18 hours to 3 hours.

  5. Capillarity in metal casting mold filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, Jon L.

    In metal casting processes, surface tension of the molten metal typically resists filling of the metal into the mold. The effects are greater for smaller mold cavities, and ultimately, the smallest cavities may not be filled. Surface tension forces can be overcome by applying pressure (head) to the molten metal, thus forcing metal into the cavities. However, a pressure-window will exist, too little pressure resulting in non-filled cavities and too much pressure resulting in penetration of the mold, which is itself porous. Filling-pressure windows are investigated for cylindrical-shaped mold cavities on both a theoretical and experimental basis. The lower bound of the filling pressure window is examined by treating cylindrical mold cavities as cylinders lined with packed spheres representing mold particles. The upper bound is examined by treating the mold as a 3-D array of close-packed spheres. The experimental work concerns industrial-scale vacuum investment casting of superalloy IN718 into molds containing various cylindrical mold cavities at various heights (heads). The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical modeling predictions for filling of rough (sphere-lined) cylindrical mold cavities.

  6. Gating of Permanent Molds for Aluminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-011D13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was to determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings. Equipment and procedure for real time X-Ray radiography of molten aluminum flow into permanent molds have been developed. Other studies have been conducted using water flow and behavior of liquid aluminum in sand mold using real time photography. This investigation utilizes graphite molds transparent to X-Rays making it possible to observe the flow pattern through a number of vertically oriented grating systems. These have included systems that are choked at the base of a rounded vertical sprue and vertical gating systems with a variety of different ingates into the bottom of a mold cavity. These systems have also been changed to include gating systems with vertical and horizontal gate configurations. Several conclusions can be derived from this study. A sprue-well, as designed in these experiments, does not eliminate the vena contracta. Because of the swirling at the sprue-base, the circulating metal begins to push the entering metal stream toward the open runner mitigating the intended effect of the sprue-well. Improved designs of

  7. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  8. Titanium casting: the surface reaction layer of castings obtained using ultra-low-temperature molds.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Onouchi, M; Hsu, H C; Kurotani, T; Nishiyama, M

    2001-03-01

    To examine whether the surface reaction layer of titanium castings can be reduced by lowering the mold temperature during casting, we cast titanium at three mold temperatures, including an ultra-low temperature produced by cooling the mold with liquid nitrogen, then measured the tensile strength and elongation of the castings. The titanium was cast using a centrifugal casting machine, and the molds were incinerated according to the manufacturers' instructions. Castings were then made with the molds at 200 degrees C, 600 degrees C, and an ultra-low temperature (-196 degrees C). The castability of titanium cast in the mold at the ultra-low temperature was good. The Vickers hardness near the surface layer of castings decreased as the mold temperature decreased.

  9. New methods and materials for molding and casting ice formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Richter, G. Paul

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to find improved materials and techniques for molding and casting natural or simulated ice shapes that could replace the wax and plaster method. By utilizing modern molding and casting materials and techniques, a new methodology was developed that provides excellent reproduction, low-temperature capability, and reasonable turnaround time. The resulting casts are accurate and tough.

  10. SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BACK SIDE OF FURNACE AND MOLDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BACK SIDE OF FURNACE AND MOLDING BUILDINGS SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO LOCAL POWER GRID, PRIMARILY FOR ELECTRIC FURNACES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Bessemer Foundry, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  12. View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the mold in the center-right of the photo are present immediately after the pour has been completed - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Iron Foundry, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  13. Online Measurement for Transient Mold Friction Based on the Hydraulic Oscillators of Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Yao, Man

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of the strand shell surface and mold copper plates has significant effects on the slab surface quality and casting productivity. This article focuses on developing a reliable approach to measure the transient friction force between the slab and the mold for the purpose of the investigation of lubrication and friction behavior inside a mold. This method is presented to monitor transient mold frictions for the slab continuous caster equipped with hydraulic oscillators. A mathematical model is also developed to calculate the empty working force of the no casting state, and a new algorithm, based on the particle swarm optimization, is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristic parameters of mold oscillation. The results have shown that the method has a sufficient sensitivity to variation, especially to the periodical variation of the mold friction, and it has been identified that the transient mold friction can be used as an effective index with regard to detecting mold oscillation and optimizing the casting parameters for process control. It may lay the practical foundation for the online detection of powder lubrication and the visualization of the continuous-casting mold process.

  14. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  15. Mold with improved core for metal casting operation

    DOEpatents

    Gritzner, Verne B.; Hackett, Donald W.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a mold containing an improved core for use in casting hollow, metallic articles. The core is formed of, or covered with, a layer of cellular material which possesses sufficient strength to maintain its structural integrity during casting, but will crush to alleviate the internal stresses that build up if the normal contraction during solidification and cooling is restricted.

  16. Optimization of Mold Yield in MultiCavity Sand Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Vasudev D.; Joshi, Durgesh; Ravi, B.; Narasimhan, K.

    2013-06-01

    The productivity of ductile iron foundries engaging in mass production of castings for the automobile and other engineering sectors depends on the number of cavities per mold. A denser packing of cavities, however, results in slower heat transfer from adjacent cavities, leading to delayed solidification, possible shrinkage defects, and lower mechanical properties. In this article, we propose a methodology to optimize mold yield by selecting the correct combination of the mold box size and the number of cavities based on solidification time and mold temperature. Simulation studies were carried out by modeling solid and hollow cube castings with different values of cavity-wall gap and finding the minimum value of the gap beyond which there is no change in casting solidification time. Then double-cavity molds were modeled with different values of cavity-cavity gap, and simulated to find the minimum value of gap. The simulation results were verified by melting and pouring ductile iron in green sand molds instrumented with thermocouples, and recording the temperature in mold at predetermined locations. The proposed approach can be employed to generate a technological database of minimum gaps for various combinations of part geometry, metal and process, which will be very useful to optimize the mold cavity layouts.

  17. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  18. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  19. Metal Penetration in Sand Molds for Steel Castings: Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, J.O.; Stefanescu, D.M.; Lane, A.M.; Schreiber, W.C.; Owens, M.; Piwonka, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    Case studies of samples of penetration provided by consortium members showed examples of mechanical-type penetration defects and of what appeared to be chemical penetration. Sessile drop experiments of various mold substrate materials using carbon, stainless, and Mn steels showed that Mn steel wets silica strongly, indicating that silica is not a suitable mod material for this family of alloys. Contact angles were lower for steels than for cast irons. Magnesite appeared to be the best overall mold material, although zircon flour also performed well. A simplified 1-D model was developed which predicts the diffusion rates which could cause chemical penetration. It shows that, contrary to the case in cast iron, chemical penetration is a possibility in medium and low carbon steels, as diffusion of C to the casting surface may not always occur quickly enough to protect the surface from an oxidizing reaction. The mass spectrometer gas chromatograph train was modified for accurately determining the water content of gas at the mold/metal interface. Initial gas measurements indicated that the gas generated at the interface in steel castings is 80% H2-20% CO, instead of the 50% H2- 50% CO mixture found in cast iron.

  20. Simulation of low carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization in continuous casting using a multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Choi, Joo; Park, Jun-Yong; Sohn, Il

    2014-01-01

    An inverted water-cooled multi-mold continuous casting simulator was used to investigate initial solidification of low-carbon steels and crystallization of mold flux. Embedded mold thermocouples showed characteristic temperature profiles dependent on parameters including casting speed, oscillation frequency, and stroke. Higher maximum temperatures for thermocouples at higher casting speeds, higher frequencies, and lower stroke lengths were observed. The surface of the as-cast steel strips showed oscillation marks similar to those of industrially cast slabs and higher casting speeds resulted in shallower oscillation marks. The measured pitch agreed well with the theoretical pitch suggesting the multi-mold simulator to be a cost-effective alternative to pursue fundamental studies on initial solidification in the mold. Analysis of the mold flux taken between the copper mold and solidified steel shell showed highly dendritic uni-directional crystallization occurring within the flux film suggesting that the heat transfer direction is dominantly horizontal towards the water-cooled copper mold. In addition, the solidified flux located at the upper to lower part of the mold suggested morphological differences in the size and shape of the crystalline phases indicating that crystallization ratio can increase depending upon the retention in the mold and subsequently decrease radiative heat transfer as the flux traverses down the mold.

  1. Application of statistical methods for analyzing the relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer in sand molds

    SciTech Connect

    Y. A. Owusu

    1999-03-31

    This report presents a statistical method of evaluating geometric tolerances of casting products using point cloud data generated by coordinate measuring machine (CMM) process. The focus of this report is to present a statistical-based approach to evaluate the differences in dimensional and form variations or tolerances of casting products as affected by casting gating system, molding material, casting thickness, and casting orientation at the mold-metal interface. Form parameters such as flatness, parallelism, and other geometric profiles such as angularity, casting length, and height of casting products were obtained and analyzed from CMM point cloud data. In order to relate the dimensional and form errors to the factors under consideration such as flatness and parallelism, a factorial analysis of variance and statistical test means methods were performed to identify the factors that contributed to the casting distortion at the mold-metal interface.

  2. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Subpt. WWWW, Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are..., Subpt. WWWW, Table 5 Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and... casting—CR/HS 3,4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  6. Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Boulais, Etienne; Hakobyan, Yera; Wang, Wei Li; Guan, Amy; Bathe, Mark; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We report a general strategy for designing and synthesizing inorganic nanostructures with arbitrarily prescribed three-dimensional shapes. Computationally designed DNA strands self-assemble into a stiff “nano-mold” that contains a user-specified three-dimensional cavity and encloses a nucleating gold “seed”. Under mild conditions, this seed grows into a larger cast structure that fills and thus replicates the cavity. We synthesized a variety of nanoparticles with three nanometer resolution: three distinct silver cuboids with three independently tunable dimensions, silver and gold nanoparticles with diverse cross sections, and composite structures with homo-/heterogeneous components. The designer equilateral silver triangular and spherical nanoparticles exhibited plasmonic properties consistent with electromagnetism-based simulations. Our framework is generalizable to more complex geometries and diverse inorganic materials, offering a range of applications in biosensing, photonics, and nanoelectronics. PMID:25301973

  7. Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Wei; Boulais, Etienne; Hakobyan, Yera; ...

    2014-10-09

    Here we report a general strategy for designing and synthesizing inorganic nanostructures with arbitrarily prescribed three-dimensional shapes. Computationally designed DNA strands self-assemble into a stiff “nano-mold” that contains a user-specified three-dimensional cavity and encloses a nucleating gold “seed”. Under mild conditions, this seed grows into a larger cast structure that fills and thus replicates the cavity. We synthesized a variety of nanoparticles with three nanometer resolution: three distinct silver cuboids with three independently tunable dimensions, silver and gold nanoparticles with diverse cross sections, and composite structures with homo-/heterogeneous components. The designer equilateral silver triangular and spherical nanoparticles exhibited plasmonic propertiesmore » consistent with electromagnetism-based simulations. Our framework is generalizable to more complex geometries and diverse inorganic materials, offering a range of applications in biosensing, photonics, and nanoelectronics.« less

  8. Casting inorganic structures with DNA molds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Boulais, Etienne; Hakobyan, Yera; Wang, Wei Li; Guan, Amy; Bathe, Mark; Yin, Peng

    2014-10-09

    Here we report a general strategy for designing and synthesizing inorganic nanostructures with arbitrarily prescribed three-dimensional shapes. Computationally designed DNA strands self-assemble into a stiff “nano-mold” that contains a user-specified three-dimensional cavity and encloses a nucleating gold “seed”. Under mild conditions, this seed grows into a larger cast structure that fills and thus replicates the cavity. We synthesized a variety of nanoparticles with three nanometer resolution: three distinct silver cuboids with three independently tunable dimensions, silver and gold nanoparticles with diverse cross sections, and composite structures with homo-/heterogeneous components. The designer equilateral silver triangular and spherical nanoparticles exhibited plasmonic properties consistent with electromagnetism-based simulations. Our framework is generalizable to more complex geometries and diverse inorganic materials, offering a range of applications in biosensing, photonics, and nanoelectronics.

  9. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  10. Casting defects of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in vertical centrifugal casting processes with graphite molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Limin; Xu, Daming; Li, Min; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2012-02-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental investigation are utilized to analyze the casting defects of Ti-6Al-4V alloy formed under different vertical centrifugal casting conditions in graphite molds. Mold rotating rates of 0, 110 and 210 rpm are considered in experimental process. Results show that centrifugal forces have significant effects on the quantity of both macropores and microdefects (micropores, microcracks and inclusions). The relative amount of all macro- and micro-scopic casting defects decreases from 62.4 % to 24.8 % with the increasing of the centrifugal force, and the macropore quantity in stepped casting decreases exponentially with the increase of the gravitation coefficient. The relative proportions of both micropores and microcracks decrease with the mold-rotating rate increase, but the relative proportion of inclusions increases significantly. Besides this, the mold-filling sequence is proved to be an important factor in casting quality control.

  11. Investigation of the beryllia ceramics molding process by the hot casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Sattinova, Z. K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of mathematical simulation of the ceramics molding process by the hot casting method are presented. The mathematical model describes the motion of beryllia liquid thermoplastic slurry in a form-building cavity subject to solidification. Velocity and temperature profiles providing homogeneous properties of the beryllia ceramics in the process of molding by the hot casting method are obtained.

  12. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2017-04-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  13. A Review of Mold Flux Development for the Casting of High-Al Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Lu, Boxun; Xiao, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Mold flux plays key roles during the continuous casting process of molten steel, which accounts for the quality of final slabs. With the development of advanced high strength steels (AHSS), certain amounts of Al have been added into steels that would introduce severe slag/metal interaction problems during process of continuous casting. The reaction is between Al and SiO2 that is the major component in the mold flux system. Intensive efforts have been conducted to optimize the mold flux and a CaO-Al2O3-based mold flux system has been proposed, which shows the potential to be applied for the casting process of AHSS. The latest developments for this new mold flux system were summarized with the aim to offer technical guidance for the design of new generation mold flux system for the casting of AHSS.

  14. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  15. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties.

  16. Permanent Mold Casting of JIS-AC4C Aluminum Alloy Using a Low-Temperature Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, Hiroshi; Nikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-17

    Permanent mold casting using mold temperatures below 200 deg. C was conducted to obtain a high-strength, thin-walled casting. Al-7.36 mass% Si -0.18 Cu- 0.27Mg-0.34Fe alloy JIS-AC4C was cast using a bottom pouring cast plan. The product had a rectangular tube shape (70 mm W x 68 mm D x 180 mm H) with wall thicknesses of 1, 3 and 5 mm. The effect of heat insulation at the melt path was compared when using a sand runner insert and when using a steel runner insert as well as a powder mold release agent. Fine microstructures were observed in the casting. The smaller the thickness, the higher the hardness with smaller secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). However, the hardness and the SDAS were unaffected by the mold temperature. It was proposed that the avoidance of the formation of primary {alpha} dendrite at the melt path generates a higher strength casting with adequate mold filling.

  17. 40 CFR 63.5810 - What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations at new and existing sources? 63.5810 Section... § 63.5810 What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting... (d) of this section to meet the standards for open molding or centrifugal casting operations in...

  18. Structural and compositional analysis of a casting mold sherd from ancient China

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Yunbing; Yao, Shengkun; Lang, Jianfeng; Chen, Xuexiang; Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Duan, Xiulan; Li, Nannan; Fang, Hui; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Li, Aiguo; Jiang, Huaidong

    2017-01-01

    Casting had symbolic significance and was strictly controlled in the Shang dynasty of ancient China. Vessel casting was mainly distributed around the Shang capital, Yin Ruins, which indicates a rigorous centralization of authority. Thus, for a casting mold to be excavated far from the capital region is rare. In addition to some bronze vessel molds excavated at the Buyao Village site, another key discovery of a bronze vessel mold occurred at Daxinzhuang. The Daxinzhuang site was a core area in the east of Shang state and is an important site to study the eastward expansion of the Shang. Here, combining synchrotron X-rays and other physicochemical analysis methods, nondestructive three-dimensional structure imaging and different elemental analyses were conducted on this mold sherd. Through high penetration X-ray tomography, we obtained insights on the internal structure and discovered some pores. We infer that the generation of pores inside the casting mold sherd was used to enhance air permeability during casting. Furthermore, we suppose that the decorative patterns on the surface were carved and not pasted onto it. Considering the previous compositional studies of bronze vessels, the copper and iron elements were analyzed by different methods. Unexpectedly, a larger amount of iron than of copper was detected on the surface. According to the data analysis and archaeological context, the source of iron on the casting mold sherd could be attributed to local soil contamination. A refined compositional analysis confirms that this casting mold was fabricated locally and used for bronze casting. PMID:28296963

  19. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  20. Increasing the life of molds for casting copper and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Spiridonov, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The work of the molds intended for casting copper and copper alloys in semicontinuous casters for producing flat billets is considered. It is shown that, to increase the resistance of mold plates, the inner space of the mold should have a taper shape toward the casting direction and take into account the shrinkage of the linear dimensions of the ingot during its motion in the mold. The taper shape increases the intensity and uniformity of heat removal due to close contact between the ingot and the mold inner surface. Testing of new design molds under industrial conditions demonstrates that their resistance increases by a factor of 4.0-4.5. The taper effect of the mold plates is much more pronounced in their narrow faces.

  1. Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush, Jr.; Dale T. Peters; Stephen P. Midson; Darryl J. Van Son

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the study, Application of High-Temperature Mold Materials to Die Cast Copper Motor Rotor for Improved Efficiency, was to support the Copper Development Association (CDA) in its effort to design, fabricate and demonstrate mold technologies designed to withstand the copper motor rotor die casting environment for an economically acceptable life. The anticipated result from the compiled data and tests were to: (1) identify materials suitable for die casting copper, (2) fabricate motor rotor molds and (3) supply copper rotor motors for testing in actual compressor systems. Compressor manufacturers can apply the results to assess the technical and economical viability of copper rotor motors.

  2. Development of a low cost permanent mold casting process for TiAl automotive valves

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Porter, W.J. III; Eylon, D.; Colvin, G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews progress made in the development of a low cost permanent mold casting process for TiAl automotive valves. The issues studied include mold life, mold/metal reaction, shrinkage void control, dimensional control, and post casting processes. More than 800 Ti-47Al-2Nb-1.75 Cr (at%) valves were produced by gravity, centrifugal, and pressure assisted casting methods on a laboratory scale. Microstructures, tensile, creep, and fatigue properties of as-HIP and as-heat treated valves are described. Process scale up challenges identified in this work are also discussed.

  3. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Wwww of... - Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting, and SMC Manufacturing Operations Where the Standards Are... Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Alternative Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Open Molding, Centrifugal Casting... casting—CR/HS 3 4 A vent system that moves heated air through the mold 27 lb/ton. 8. Centrifugal...

  4. Control of solidification boundary in continuous casting by asymmetric cooling and mold offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution, developed to obtain solidification-interface shapes for complex situations in which both the ingot cooling and mold geometry are asymmetric, is analyzed. The effect of mold offsett and of unequal ingot side temperatures on the interface shapes is illustrated in graphs. The results of the analysis show how the solidification interface in continuous casting can be controlled by asymmetries in both mold geometry and cooling of the ingot sides.

  5. Mold Simulator Study on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel Near the Corner of Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Peisheng; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2017-02-01

    Corner cracks are one of the most widespread surface defects of continuous casting slabs, and they are especially severe for peritectic steels and low-alloy steels. Therefore, a clear understanding of molten steel initial solidification around mold corner would be of great importance for the inhibition of corner cracks. This paper has been conducted with the aim to elucidate this understanding, by using a novel mold simulator equipped with a right-angle copper mold. The responding temperatures and heat fluxes across the mold hot-face and corner were firstly calculated through a 2D-inverse heat conduction program mathematical model, and the results suggested that the cooling ability and the fluctuation of heat fluxes around the mold corner are stronger than those for mold hot-face. With the help of power spectral density analysis and fast Fourier transformation, the four characteristic signals of heat fluxes were discussed in this paper. Next, the relation between the thickness of solidified shell and solidification time was fitted with the solidification square root law; as a result, the average solidification factor bar{K} for the hot-face shell is 2.32 mm/s1/2, and it is 2.77 mm/s1/2 for the shell near-corner. For the same oscillation marks (OMs), it appeared that the OMs positions on the shell corner are lower than those on the shell hot-face along the casting direction, because the stronger shrinkage of shell at the corner allows the overflowing steel to penetrate deeper into the larger gap between the shell corner and mold, which is demonstrated through the heat transfer analysis and metallographic examination. Finally, the interrelation between shell profile, mold oscillation, variation rate of heat flux, high-frequency heat flux and high-frequency temperature was discussed for above two cases, and the results suggested that meniscus conditions (heat transfer and melt flow) around the mold corner are more unsteady.

  6. 40 CFR 63.5810 - What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations at new and existing sources? 63.5810 Section...) through (d) of this section to meet the standards for open molding or centrifugal casting operations in... centrifugal casting, or site-specific organic HAP emissions factors discussed in § 63.5796. The...

  7. 40 CFR 63.5810 - What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations at new and existing sources? 63.5810 Section...) through (d) of this section to meet the standards for open molding or centrifugal casting operations in... centrifugal casting, or site-specific organic HAP emissions factors discussed in § 63.5796. The...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5810 - What are my options for meeting the standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for open molding and centrifugal casting operations at new and existing sources? 63.5810 Section...) through (d) of this section to meet the standards for open molding or centrifugal casting operations in... centrifugal casting, or site-specific organic HAP emissions factors discussed in § 63.5796. The...

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  10. In-depth study of mold heat transfer for the high speed continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heetae; Hwang, Jong-Yeon; Cho, Jung-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Mold heat transfer during the commercial high speed continuous casting up to 7 m/min was investigated in order to clarify the influence of various operating conditions such as casting speed, mold flux, mold thickness, thickness and height of mold coated layer and so on. A simple, but practical formula of heat flux has been derived in terms of those operating conditions by analyzing the heat flux data obtained in CEM® (Compact Endless Casting and Rolling Mill) caster based on simplified one dimensional heat transfer model. Especially, impact of mold parameters such as mold thickness, mold coated layer thickness and its height on the heat flux can be linearly expressed in the empirical formula derived. Heat flux ratio (HR), the ratio of the narrow face heat flux to the wide face one, is one of the important indicators to evaluate whether the solidified shell is evenly robust or not. Averaged HR in CEM® caster is around 0.87, which varies according to the caster specifications and operating conditions. It is suggested that the mold taper should be adjusted to maintain the HR as close to 0.87 as possible.

  11. Mold behavior and its influence on quality in the continuous casting of steel slabs: Part i. Industrial trials, mold temperature measurements, and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, R. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Walker, N.; Paterson, E. A.; Young, J. D.

    1991-12-01

    An extensive study has been conducted to elucidate mold behavior and its influence on quality during the continuous casting of slabs. The study combined industrial measurements, mathe matical modeling, and metallographic examination of cast slab samples. The industrial mea surements involved instrumenting an operating slab mold with 114 thermocouples in order to determine the axial mold wall temperature profiles for a wide range of casting conditions. A three-dimensional (3-D) heat-flow model of the mold wall was developed to characterize the heat fluxes in the mold quantitatively from the measured mold temperature data. Furthermore, heat-flow models were developed to examine steel solidification phenomena and mold flux behavior at the meniscus. Slab samples collected during the industrial trials were examined metallographically to evaluate the cast structure and defects. Owing to the length of the study, it is presented in two parts, the first of which describes the experimental techniques employed in the instrumentation of the mold together with the details of the industrial trials and mold temperature measurements. Also, the mathematical modeling technique applied to determine the axial heat-flux profiles from the measured mold temperature data is presented. It is shown that a fully 3-D model of the mold wall is needed to convert the measured temperatures to heat-flux profiles properly.

  12. Improvement of Castability and Surface Quality of Continuously Cast TWIP Slabs by Molten Mold Flux Feeding Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Wook; Yoo, Shin; Park, Min-Seok; Park, Joong-Kil; Moon, Ki-Hyeon

    2017-02-01

    An innovative continuous casting process named POCAST (POSCO's advanced CASting Technology) was developed based on molten mold flux feeding technology to improve both the productivity and the surface quality of cast slabs. In this process, molten mold flux is fed into the casting mold to enhance the thermal insulation of the meniscus and, hence, the lubrication between the solidifying steel shell and the copper mold. Enhancement of both the castability and the surface quality of high-aluminum advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) slabs is one of the most important advantages when the new process has been applied into the commercial continuous casting process. A trial cast of TWIP steel has been carried out using a 10-ton scale pilot caster and 100-ton scale and 250-ton scale commercial casters. The amount of mold flux consumption was more than 0.2 kg/m2 in the new process, which is much larger than that in the conventional powder casting. Trial TWIP castings at both the pilot and the plant caster showed stable mold performances such as mold heat transfer. Also, cast slabs showed periodic/sound oscillation marks and little defects. The successful casting of TWIP steel has been attributed to the following characteristics of POCAST: dilution of the reactant by increasing the slag pool depth, enlargement of channel for slag film infiltration at meniscus by elimination of the slag bear, and decrease of apparent viscosity of the mold slag at meniscus by increasing the slag temperature.

  13. Method of making an apertured casting. [using duplicate mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terray, A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apertured casting is made by first forming a duplicate in the shape of the finished casting, positioning refractory metal bodies such as wires in the duplicate at points corresponding to apertures or passageways in finished products, forming a ceramic coating on the duplicate, removing the duplicate material, firing the ceramic in a vacuum or inert atmosphere, vacuum casting the metal in the ceramic form, removing the ceramic form, heating the cast object in an atmospheric furnace to oxidize the refractory metal bodies and then leaching the oxidized refractory bodies from the casting with a molten caustic agent or acid solution.

  14. Effect of Mold Coating Materials and Thickness on Heat Transfer in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaiid, A.; Dargusch, M. S.; Davidson, C. J.; Tovar, S.; Loulou, T.; Rezaï-Aria, F.; Dour, G.

    2007-06-01

    In permanent mold casting or gravity die casting (GDC) of aluminum alloys, die coating at the casting-mold interface is the most important single factor controlling heat transfer and, hence, it has the greatest influence on the solidification rate and development of microstructure. This investigation studies the influence of coating thickness, coating composition, and alloy composition on the heat transfer at the casting-mold interface. Both graphite and TiO2-based coatings have been investigated. Two aluminum alloys have been investigated: Al-7Si-0.3Mg and Al-9Si-3Cu. Thermal histories throughout the die wall have been recorded by fine type-K thermocouples. From these measurements, die surface temperatures and heat flux density have been evaluated using an inverse method. Casting surface temperature was measured by infrared pyrometry, and the interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) has been determined using these combined pieces of information. While the alloy is liquid, the coating material has only a weak influence over heat flow and the thermal contact resistance seems to be governed more by coating porosity and thickness. The HTC decreases as the coating thickness increases. However, as solidification takes place and the HTC decreases, the HTC of graphite coating remains higher than that of ceramic coatings of similar thickness. After the formation of an air gap at the interface, the effect of coating material vanishes. The peak values of HTC and the heat flux density are larger for Al-7Si-0.3Mg than for Al-9Si-3Cu. Consequently, the apparent solidification time of Al-9Si-3Cu is larger than that of Al-7Si-0.3Mg and it increases with coating thickness.

  15. Novel Approach for Modeling of Nonuniform Slag Layers and Air Gap in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Kong, Lingwei; Yao, Man; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of surface defects on the continuous casting slab usually originate from nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behavior, especially during the initial solidification inside the mold. In this article, a model-coupled inverse heat transfer problem incorporating the effect of slag layers and air gap is developed to study the nonuniform distribution of liquid slag, solid slag, and air gap layers. The model considers not only the formation and evolution of slag layers and air gap but also the temperatures in the mold copper as measured by thermocouples. The simulation results from the model and the measured temperatures from experiments are shown to be in good agreement with each other. At the casting speed of 0.65 m/min, the liquid slag film disappears and transforms into solid slag entirely at about 400 mm away from meniscus, and an air gap begins to form. Until the mold exit, the maximum thickness of the solid slag layer and air gap gradually increases to 1.34 and 0.056 mm, respectively. The results illustrate that the magnitude and nonuniform distribution of the slag layers and air gap along the cross direction, correlating with heat flux between the shell and mold, eventually determine the temperature profiles of the mold hot face and slab surface. The proposed model may provide a convenient approach for analyzing nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behaviors between the mold and slab in the real casting process.

  16. Development of Metal Casting Molds By Sol-Gel Technology Using Planetary Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, L.; Sen, S.; Curreri, P.; Stefanescu, D.

    2000-01-01

    Metals extracted from planetary soils will eventually need to be casted and shaped in-situ to produce useful products. In response to this challenge, we propose to develop and demonstrate the manufacturing of a specific product using Lunar and Martian soil simulants, i.e. a mold for the casting of metal and alloy parts, which will be an indispensable tool for the survival of outposts on the Moon and Mars. Drawing from our combined knowledge of sol-gel and metal casting technologies, we set out to demonstrate the extraordinary potential of mesoporous materials such as aerogels to serve as efficient casting molds as well as fulfilling numerous other needs of an autonomous planetary outpost.

  17. Permanent mold casting of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Sahoo, M.; Lavender, C.; paul.jablonski, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review indicated that data on the effect of various casting defects, such as inclusions and porosity, on the properties of titanium alloy castings were not readily available. This information is required to reduce the cost of fabricating titanium castings for potential automotive applications. To this end, a research project was initiated to develop data on the as-cast properties of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64). Step plate castings with 3.2, 6.3, 13, and 25 mm thick steps were produced in a high-density graphite mold following melting in an induction furnace with water-cooled copper hearth. The mechanical properties were determined in the as-cast condition and were found to be close to the values reported in standards. Few casting defects such as inclusions and porosity were observed, and the loss of strength due to these defects is not significant. It is shown that titanium castings with good mechanical properties can be produced in high-density graphite molds.

  18. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  19. Mold Simulator Study of Heat Transfer Phenomenon During the Initial Solidification in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, mold simulator trials were firstly carried out to study the phenomena of the initial shell solidification of molten steel and the heat transfer across the initial shell to the infiltrated mold/shell slag film and mold. Second, a one-dimensional inverse heat transfer problem for solidification (1DITPS) was built to determine the temperature distribution and the heat transfer behavior through the solidifying shell from the measured shell thickness. Third, the mold wall temperature field was recovered by a 2DIHCP mathematical model from the measured in-mold wall temperatures. Finally, coupled with the measured slag film thickness and the calculations of 1DITPS and 2DIHCP, the thermal resistance and the thickness of liquid slag film in the vicinity of the meniscus were evaluated. The experiment results show that: the total mold/shell thermal resistance, the mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, the liquid film thermal resistance, and the solid film thermal resistance is 8.0 to 14.9 × 10-4, 2.7 to 4.8 × 10-4, 1.5 to 4.6 × 10-4, and 3.9 to 6.8 × 10-4 m2 K/W, respectively. The percentage of mold/slag interfacial thermal resistance, liquid film thermal resistance, and solid film thermal resistance over the total mold/shell thermal resistance is 27.5 to 34.4, 17.2 to 34.0, and 38.5 to 48.8 pct, respectively. The ratio of radiation heat flux is around 14.1 to 51.9 pct in the liquid slag film.

  20. Determination of the Heat Transfer Coefficient at the Metal-Mold Interface During Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, Santiago; Martorano, Marcelo A.; Heringer, Romulo; Boccalini, Mário

    2015-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient at the metal-mold interface ( h MM) has been determined for the first time during the centrifugal casting of a Fe-C alloy tube using the inverse solution method. To apply this method, a centrifugal casting experiment was carried out to measure cooling curves within the tube wall under a mold rotation speed of 900 rpm, imposing a centrifugal force 106 times as large as the gravity force (106 G). As part of the solution method, a comprehensive heat transfer model of the centrifugal casting was also developed and coupled to an optimization algorithm. Finally, the evolution of h MM with time that gives the minimum squared error between measured and calculated cooling curves was obtained. The determined h MM is approximately 870 W m-2 K-1 immediately after melt pouring, decreasing to about 50 W m-2 K-1 when the average temperature of the tube is ~973 K (700 °C), after the end of solidification. Despite the existence of a centrifugal force that could enhance the metal-mold contact, these values are lower than those generally reported for static molds with or without an insulating coating at the mold inner surface. The implemented model shows that the heat loss by radiation is dominant over that by convection at the tube inner surface, causing the formation of a solidification front that meets another front coming from the outer surface of the tube.

  1. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  2. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  3. Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions or asthma attacks in sensitive people. Molds can cause fungal infections. In addition, mold exposure may irritate your eyes, skin, nose, ...

  4. Empowerment with knowledge— toward the intelligent mold for the continuous casting of steel billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J. K.

    1993-12-01

    A never-ending challenge to the competitiveness of the steel industry is the application of knowledge on the shop floor where, finally, productivity and quality are realized. The impedi-ments to the effective implementation of knowledge are largely people related and range from the level of education of the work force to entrenched attitudes of management. The develop-ment of the continuous-casting process for the production of steel billets, upon which this lecture focuses, is but one example. Looking back over 20 years, it is clear that the billet industry, in its infancy, was in a state of confusion, operating without casting standards coupled to quality, such that individual companies had developed very different practices. Research over 2 decades has established the knowledge base for the continuous casting of quality billets and set much needed standards for the design, operation, and maintenance of casting machines. The challenge now is in knowledge transfer and implementation with the aid of expert systems. Thus, the expert system for continuous casting and the concept of the intelligent billet casting mold have evolved to transcend other forms of knowledge transfer like publications and short courses. The intelligent mold effectively transfers knowledge on line to the shop floor through the combi-nation of sensors (thermocouples and load cells), signal recognition based on years of research, mathematical models of heat flow in the solidifying shell and mold, understanding of the mech-anisms of quality problems, and the formulation of a response to a given set of casting con-ditions, all controlled by an expert system. In this lecture, the drive to develop, transfer, and implement knowledge on the continuous casting of quality billets is explored. Lessons for the future are drawn from successes, failures, and frustrations in the past.

  5. Experimental and numerical study of the effect of mold vibration on aluminum castings alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dheir, Numan

    2005-07-01

    The recent advances in scientific and engineering tools have allowed researchers to integrate more science into manufacturing, leading to improved and new innovative processes. As a result, important accomplishments have been reached in the area of designing and engineering new materials for various industrial applications. This subject is of critical significance because of the impact it could have on the manufacturing industry. In the casting industry, obtaining the desired microstructure and properties during solidification may reduce or eliminate the need for costly thermo-mechanical processing prior to secondary manufacturing processes. Several techniques have been developed to alter and control the microstructure of castings during solidification including semi-solid processing, electromagnetic stirring, electromagnetic vibration, and mechanical vibration. Although it is established that mold vibration can significantly influence the structure and properties of castings, however, most of the studies are generally qualitative, limited to a small range of conditions and no attempts have been made to simulate the effect of vibration on casting microstructure. In this work, a detailed experimental and numerical investigation is carried out to advance the utilization of mold vibration as an effective tool for controlling and modifying the casting microstructure. The effects of a wide range of vibration amplitudes and frequencies on the solidification kinetics, microstructure formation and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloys are examined. Results show strong influence of mold vibration on the resulting casting. The presence of porosity was significantly reduced as a result of mold vibration. In addition, the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties can be successfully represented by the changes in solidification characteristics. Increasing the vibration amplitude tends to reduce the lamellar spacing and change the silicon morphology to become more

  6. Control of Crystal Morphology for Mold Flux During High-Aluminum AHSS Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, Jing; SEO, Myung-Duk; SHI, Cheng-Bin; CHO, Jung-Wook; KIM, Seon-Hyo

    2016-08-01

    In the present manuscript, the efforts to control the crystal morphology are carried out aiming at improving the lubrication of lime-alumina-based mold flux for casting advanced high-strength steel with high aluminum. Jackson α factors for crystals of melt crystallization in multi-component mold fluxes are established and reasonably evaluated by applying thermodynamic databases to understand the crystal morphology control both in lime-alumina-based and lime-silica-based mold fluxes. The results show that Jackson α factor and supercooling are the most critical factors to determine the crystal morphology in a mold flux. Crystals precipitating in mold fluxes appear with different morphologies due to their different Jackson α factors and are likely to be more faceted with higher Jackson α factor. In addition, there is a critical supercooling degree for crystal morphology dendritic transition. When the supercooling over the critical value, the crystals transform from faceted shape to dendritic ones in morphology as the kinetic roughening occurs. Typically, the critical supercooling degrees for cuspidine dendritic transition in the lime-silica-based mold fluxes are evaluated to be between 0.05 and 0.06. Finally, addition of a small amount of Li2O in the mold flux can increase the Jackson α factor and decrease the supercooling for cuspidine precipitation; thus, it is favorable to enhance a faceted cuspidine crystal.

  7. Analysis of Mold Friction in a Continuous Casting Using Wavelet Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Ma; Fangyin, Wang; Cheng, Peng; Wei, Gui; Bohan, Fang

    2016-06-01

    By studying mold friction (MDF), we observed that monitoring and controlling of the friction between the strand and the mold is very important for continuous casting to improve lubrication and prevent breakout. However, existing analysis technologies of MDF do not support the continuous casting very well. In addition, we found that the wavelet entropy has multiscale and statistical properties. Informed by these observations, in this article, we use wavelet entropy to judge the lubrication state between the strand and the mold. First, we demonstrate the implementation and superiority of wavelet entropy and how it helps in efficient evaluation of the lubrication state in mold. A study of wavelet entropy of MDF, which is obtained from the abnormal continuous casting production, such as level fluctuation, submerged entry nozzle broken, and breakout, has been performed to achieve relevant conclusions. The results indicate that the information of MDF in time and frequency domains could be obtained simultaneously by the application of wavelet entropy and that the wavelet entropy has a good sensibility for the study of disorder of MDF, which could further reveal the nature of MDF.

  8. Monitoring of solidification in the continuous casting mold by temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszko, René; Příhoda, Miroslav; Čarnogurská, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Defects of continuously cast strand, such as unevenness of shell thickness or cracks as well as unstable casting parameters result in changes of strand surface temperature which affect heat flux and temperature field in the mold wall. Methods based on the principle of measurement and mathematical processing of temperatures in the mold wall are used for the purposes of diagnostics of the shell formation process, prediction of surface and subsurface quality and breakout danger, adjustment of the casting axis or condition monitoring of the oscillating mechanism. Measured values of temperatures in the wall depend on the exact position of the sensor in the wall, especially in the normal direction to the mold working surface. Ensuring the accurate and constant distance between the sensor and the mold surface is technically demanding; therefore it is necessary to correct the measured temperatures mathematically. The article describes two methods for correcting the measured temperatures, based on physical and statistical principles that have been developed and used in a real diagnostics system. Practical applications of the methods for diagnostics of strand surface quality and breakout prediction are presented.

  9. Effect of Different Molding Materials on the Thin-Walled Compacted Graphite Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Dańko, Rafał; Lelito, Janusz; Kawalec, Magdalena; Sikora, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses the effects of six mold materials used for obtaining thin-walled compacted graphite iron castings with a wall thickness of 3 mm. During this research, the following materials were analyzed: fine silica sand, coarse silica sand, cerabeads, molohite and also insulated materials in the shape of microspheres, including low-density alumina/silica ceramic sand. Granulometric and SEM observations indicate that the sand matrix used in these studies differs in terms of size, homogeneity and shape. This study shows that molds made with insulating sands (microspheres) possess both: thermal conductivity and material mold ability to absorb heat, on average to be more than five times lower compared to those of silica sand. In addition to that, the resultant peak of heat transfer coefficient at the mold/metal interface for microspheres is more than four times lower in comparison with fine silica sand. This is accompanied by a significant decrease in the cooling rate of metal in the mold cavity which promotes the development of compacted graphite in thin-walled castings as well as ferrite fractions in their microstructure.

  10. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect

    Bichler, L.; Ravindran, C.

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  11. Infiltration of Slag Film into the Grooves on a Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Wook; Jeong, Hee-Tae

    2013-02-01

    An analytical model is developed to clarify the slag film infiltration into grooves on a copper mold during the continuous casting of steel slabs. A grooved-type casting mold was applied to investigate the infiltration of slag film into the grooves of a pitch of 0.8 mm, width of 0.7 mm, and depth of 0.6 mm at the vicinity of a meniscus. The plant trial tests were carried out at a casting speed of 5.5 m min-1. The slag film captured at a commercial thin slab casting plant showed that both the overall and the liquid film thickness were decreased exponentially as the distance from the meniscus increases. In contrast, the infiltration of slag film into the grooves had been increased with increasing distance from the meniscus. A theoretic model has been derived based on the measured profile of slag film thickness to calculate the infiltration of slag film into the grooves. It successfully reproduces the empirical observation that infiltration ratio increased sharply along casting direction, about 80 pct at 50 mm and 95 pct at 150 mm below the meniscus. In the model calculation, the infiltration of slag film increases with increasing groove width and/or surface tension of the slag. The effect of groove depth is negligible when the width to depth ratio of the groove is larger than unity. It is expected that the developed model for slag film infiltration in this study will be widely utilized to optimize the design of groove dimensions in continuous casting molds.

  12. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-06-30

    Extensive progress in development of an HTC (heat transfer coefficient) Evaluator and in the preparation of the experiments at CMI and Amcast have been achieved in the last three months. The interface of the HTC Evaluator has been developed in Visual C++ for the PC platform. It provides a tool to collect and store the published data on heat transfer coefficients in a database for further analysis. It also supports the mathematical model for evaluation of heat transfer coefficients. More than 100 papers related to this project have been cited and most of them have been collected. The preparation of the experiments at CMI is almost completed. A hockey-puck mold has been selected for the experiments for squeeze casting and semi-solid casting. A direct cavity pressure measurement system was purchased from Kistler. The pressure probes and data acquisition software as well as the necessary accessories have been delivered. The instrumented mold modification has been designed and the modifications completed. At Amcast Automotive, a new wheel-like mold for low-pressure permanent mold casting was designed. The CAD file for mold fabrication has been generated. The modeling of the casting has been done. An extensive survey on the ultrasonic gap formation measurement was fulfilled. It is concluded that the ultrasonic probe is capable of measuring a gap under the authors` casting conditions. In the last three months, four project meetings has been organized and held with the industrial partners.

  13. Transient Asymmetric Flow and Bubble Transport Inside a Slab Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-04-01

    A one third scale water model experiment was conducted to observe the asymmetric flow and vortexing flow inside a slab continuous-casting mold. Dye-injection experiment was used to show the evolution of the transient flow pattern in the liquid pool without and with gas injection. The spread of the dye was not symmetric about the central plane. The flow pattern inside the mold was not stationary. The black sesames were injected into water to visualize the vortexing flow pattern on the top surface. The changes of shape and location of single vortex and two vortices with time had been observed during experiments. Plant ultrasonic testing (UT) of slabs was used to analyze the slab defects distribution, which indicated that the defects are intermittent and asymmetric. A mathematical model has been developed to analyze the time-dependent flow using the realistic geometries, which includes the submerged entry nozzle (SEN), actual mold, and part of the secondary cooling zone. The transient turbulent flow of molten steel inside the mold has been simulated using the large eddy simulation computational approach. Simulation results agree acceptably well with the water model experimentally observed and plant UT results. The oscillating motions of jet and the turbulence naturally promote the asymmetric flow even without the effects of slide gate nozzle or the existence of clogs inside the SEN. The periodic behavior of transient fluid flow in the mold is identified and characterized. The vortexing flow is resulted from asymmetric flow in the liquid pool. The vortices are located at the low-velocity side adjacent to the SEN, and the positions and sizes are different. Finally, the model is applied to investigate the influence of bubble size and casting speed on the time-dependent bubble distribution and removal fraction from the top surface inside the mold.

  14. Development of Aerogel Molds for Metal Casting Using Lunar and Martian Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years NASA has set new priorities for research and development of technologies necessary to enable long-term presence on the Moon and Mars. Among these key technologies is what is known as in situ resource utilization, which defines all conceivable usage of mineral, liquid, gaseous, or biological resources on a visited planet. In response to this challenge, we have been focusing on developing and demonstrating the manufacturing of a specific product using Lunar and Martian soil simulants (i.e., a mold for the casting of metal and alloy parts) which will be an indispensable tool for the survival of outposts on the Moon and Mars. In addition, our purpose is to demonstrate the feasibility of using mesoporous materials such as aerogels to serve as efficient casting molds for high quality components in propulsion and other aerospace applications. The first part of the project consists of producing aerogels from the in situ resources available in Martian and Lunar soil. The approach we are investigating is to use chemical processes to solubilize silicates using organic reagents at low temperatures and then use these as precursors in the formation of aerogels for the fabrication of metal casting molds. One set of experiments consists of dissolving silica sources in basic ethylene glycol solution to form silicon glycolates. When ground silica aerogel was used as source material, a clear solution of silicon glycolate was obtained and reacted to form a gel thus proving the feasibility of this approach. The application of this process to Lunar and Martian simulants did not result in the formation of a gel; further study is in progress. In the second method acidified alcohol is reacted with the simulants to form silicate esters. Preliminary results indicate the presence of silicon alkoxide in the product distillation. However, no gel has been obtained so further characterization is ongoing. In the second part of the project, the focus has been on developing a

  15. Oscillation-Mark Formation and Liquid-Slag Consumption in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Meng, Xiangning; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-12-01

    Traditional understanding on the complex multiphysics phenomenon of the meniscus in the oscillating mold for continuously cast steel, including oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption, has never considered the shape influence of the flux channel between the mold wall and the solidifying shell surface. Based on the reciprocating oscillation of mold, this study was carried out to calculate theoretically the periodic pressure and the liquid-slag layer thickness in the flux channel for the upper and the lower meniscus that possess different shapes in combination with a transient equilibrium profile of the flux channel as well as the sinusoidal and the nonsinusoidal oscillation modes of mold. The effect of flux channel shape on the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus was determined by the physical oscillation simulation by using an experimental cold model mold. The results show that the shape difference between the upper and the lower meniscus leads to the opposite direction of pressure in the flux channel. The pressure in the opposite direction plays a respective role in oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption in an oscillation cycle of mold, and thus, it makes a new mechanism for explaining the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus. The oscillation mark is initially formed by the rapid increase of positive channel pressure in the upper meniscus, and most of the liquid slag is infiltrated into the flux channel by the negative channel pressure in the lower meniscus from the end of a positive strip time to the beginning of the next positive strip time, including the negative strip time in between. Furthermore, the physical characteristics of the lubrication behavior in the meniscus are summarized, including liquid-slag infiltration, solidifying shell deformation, and the thickness change of the liquid-slag layer.

  16. Oscillation-Mark Formation and Liquid-Slag Consumption in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Meng, Xiangning; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-04-01

    Traditional understanding on the complex multiphysics phenomenon of the meniscus in the oscillating mold for continuously cast steel, including oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption, has never considered the shape influence of the flux channel between the mold wall and the solidifying shell surface. Based on the reciprocating oscillation of mold, this study was carried out to calculate theoretically the periodic pressure and the liquid-slag layer thickness in the flux channel for the upper and the lower meniscus that possess different shapes in combination with a transient equilibrium profile of the flux channel as well as the sinusoidal and the nonsinusoidal oscillation modes of mold. The effect of flux channel shape on the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus was determined by the physical oscillation simulation by using an experimental cold model mold. The results show that the shape difference between the upper and the lower meniscus leads to the opposite direction of pressure in the flux channel. The pressure in the opposite direction plays a respective role in oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption in an oscillation cycle of mold, and thus, it makes a new mechanism for explaining the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus. The oscillation mark is initially formed by the rapid increase of positive channel pressure in the upper meniscus, and most of the liquid slag is infiltrated into the flux channel by the negative channel pressure in the lower meniscus from the end of a positive strip time to the beginning of the next positive strip time, including the negative strip time in between. Furthermore, the physical characteristics of the lubrication behavior in the meniscus are summarized, including liquid-slag infiltration, solidifying shell deformation, and the thickness change of the liquid-slag layer.

  17. Numerical simulation on level fluctuation in bloom casting mold with electromagnetic stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Ni, H. W.; Li, Y.; Zhao, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    Based on a 380mm × 280mm bloom caster mold, the level fluctuation of steel-slag interface in the mold was simulated by the VOF model of commercial software Fluent. The effects of current intensity and frequency of EMS (electromagnetic stirring) on the level fluctuation in the mold were studied. The results show that whether or not with EMS, the maximum level fluctuation site of the mold occurs in the vicinity of the submerged entry nozzle. Compared with casting without EMS, molten steel flows horizontally rotatably under the action of the electromagnetic force by electromagnetic stirring, so the impact depth of molten steel decreases, then the level fluctuation slightly reduces, and the maximum level fluctuation value in the wide direction and the narrow direction of the mold, reduce from 4.24mm and 4.14mm to 4.04mm and 3.73mm respectively. With increasing intensity and frequency of current, the mold level fluctuation rises and the distribution uniformity of the level fluctuating amplitude worsens. The maximum level fluctuation enlarges by 0.18mm with raising the current intensity from 450A to 550A, but it enlarges by 0.79mm with 600A current intensity. The maximum level fluctuation enlarges by 0.15mm with raising the current frequency from 1.5Hz to 2.0Hz, but it quickly enlarges by 0.78mm with 2.5Hz current frequency. When the current strength and frequency are not more than 550A and 2.0Hz, level fluctuations are 4.00mm or less, which can meet requirements for controlling the bloom surface quality.

  18. Casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies. Technical progress report, September 29, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    First year efforts as part of a three year program to address metal casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies are described. Procedures have been developed and implemented to collect dimensional variability data from production steel castings. The influence of process variation and casting geometry variables on dimensional tolerances have been investigated. Preliminary results have shown that these factors have a significant influence on dimensional variability, although this variability is considerably less than the variability indicated in current tolerance standards. Gage repeatability and reproducibility testing must precede dimensional studies to insure that measurement system errors are acceptably small. Also initial efforts leading to the development and validation of a CAD/CAE model to predict the thermal fatigue life of permanent molds for aluminum castings are described. An appropriate thermomechanical property database for metal, mold and coating materials has been constructed. A finite element model has been developed to simulate the mold temperature distribution during repeated casting cycles. Initial validation trials have indicated the validity of the temperature distribution model developed.

  19. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  20. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, Shouwei; Cookson, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    There have been numerous developments in the current project over the last three months. The most appropriate geometries for performing the interfacial heat transfer studies have been discussed with both of our Industrial Partners. Both companies have molds which may be available for adaptation to record the thermal history during casting required for determining interfacial heat transfer coefficients. The details of what instrumentation would be the most appropriate remain to be worked out, but the instrumentation would likely include thermocoupling in the mold cavity as well as in the mold wall, as well as pressure sensors in the squeeze casting geometry molds and ultrasonic gap monitoring in the low pressure and gravity fed permanent mold geometry molds. The first advisory committee meeting was held on February 6th, and the steering committee was apprised of the objectives of the program. The capabilities of the Industrial Partners were reviewed, as well as the need for the project to make use of resources from other CMC projects. The second full Advisory Committee Meeting will be held in early May.

  1. Effects of Mold Temperature and Pouring Temperature on the Hot Tearing of Cast Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shimin; Sadayappan, Kumar; Apelian, Diran

    2016-10-01

    The effects of mold temperature and pouring temperature on hot tearing formation and contraction behavior of a modified Al-Cu alloy 206 (M206) have been studied. The experiments were conducted using a newly developed Constrained Rod Mold, which simultaneously measures the contraction force/time/temperature during solidification for the restrained casting or linear contraction/time/temperature for a relaxed casting. Three mold temperatures [473 K, 573 K, and 643 K (200 °C, 300 °C, and 370 °C)] and three pouring temperatures [superheat of 50 K, 100 K, and 150 K (50 °C, 100 °C, and 150 °C)] were studied, and alloy A356 was used as reference for comparison. The results confirm that alloy A356 has high resistance to hot tearing. Hot tearing did not occur for the three mold temperatures evaluated, whereas alloy M206 exhibited significant hot tearing for the same casting and mold temperature conditions. Hot tearing severity and linear contraction in alloy 206 decreased significantly with increasing mold temperature. Increasing pouring temperature increases hot tearing in alloy M206, but the effect is not as significant as that of mold temperature. The results and underlying mechanism of these effects are discussed in correlation with the thermomechanical properties and microstructures.

  2. Evaluation of the Inertness of Investment Casting Molds Using Both Sessile Drop and Centrifugal Casting Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Green, Nick; Withey, Paul

    2013-02-01

    The investment casting process is an economic production method for engineering components in TiAl-based alloys and offers the benefits of a near net-shaped component with a good surface finish. An investigation was undertaken to develop three new face coat systems based on yttria, but with better sintering properties. These face coat systems were mainly based on an yttria-alumina-zirconia system (Y2O3-0.5 wt pct Al2O3-0.5 wt pct ZrO2), an yttria-fluoride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct YF3), and an yttria-boride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct B2O3). After sintering, the chemical inertness of the face coat was first tested and analyzed using a sessile drop test through the metal wetting behavioral change for each face coat surface. Then, the interactions between the shell and metal were studied by centrifugal investment casting TiAl bars. Although the sintering aids in yttria can decrease the chemical inertness of the face coat, the thickness of the interaction layer in the casting was less than 10 μm; therefore, these face coats still can be possible face coat materials for investment casting TiAl alloys.

  3. Hot-tearing of multicomponent Al-Cu alloys based on casting load measurements in a constrained permanent mold

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Mirmiran, Seyed; Glaspie, Christopher; Li, Shimin; Apelian, Diran; Shyam, Amit; Haynes, James A; Rodriguez, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Hot-tearing is a major casting defect that is often difficult to characterize, especially for multicomponent Al alloys used for cylinder head castings. The susceptibility of multicomponent Al-Cu alloys to hot-tearing during permanent mold casting was investigated using a constrained permanent mold in which the load and displacement was measured. The experimental results for hot tearing susceptibility are compared with those obtained from a hot-tearing criterion based temperature range evaluated at fraction solids of 0.87 and 0.94. The Cu composition was varied from approximately 5 to 8 pct. (weight). Casting experiments were conducted without grain refining. The measured load during casting can be used to indicate the severity of hot tearing. However, when small hot-tears are present, the load variation cannot be used to detect and assess hot-tearing susceptibility.

  4. Solidification interface shape for continuous casting in an offset mold - Two analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1984-01-01

    A solution method for finding the unknown solidification interface in manufacturing slab ingots as a continuous casting is presented, which involves a product solution in the potential plane and the use of conjugate harmonic functions. It is argued that the method may be more direct for some geometries than the Cauchy boundary value method. Moreover, the usefulness of the Cauchy boundary value method is demonstrated through the example of a nonsymmetric horizontal mold where the walls are offset to support the lower ingot boundary.

  5. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Zabaras, N.J.; Samanta, D.; Tan, L.

    2005-10-30

    A design methodology will be developed with which casting mold surface topographies can be tuned to produce required surface features and micro-structural properties of Aluminum ingots. Both static and continuous casting processes will be examined with instrumented molds. Mold surface topographies, which consist of unidirectional and bi-directional groove textures, will be generated using contact and non-contact techniques to elicit a radiator-like effect at the mold-casting interface. The rate of heat extraction, the evolution of near-surface cast microstructure, and shell macro-morphology can be controlled once the proper balance between mold surface area extension and the degree of imperfect wetting at the instant solidification starts is determined. Once this control is achieved, it will be possible to minimize or even eliminate costly post-casting surface milling or scalping which is currently a major barrier to the development of new Aluminum casting processes.

  6. Designing a combined casting mold for manufacture of a gasoline centrifugal pump body using CAD/CAM-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galin, N. E.; Ogol, I. I.; Chervach, Yu B.; Dammer, V. Kh; Ru, Jia Hong

    2017-02-01

    The present paper examines designing of a combined casting mold for manufacture of a gasoline centrifugal pump body. The paper offers technological solutions for obtaining high quality castings at the testing stage of the finished mold. The paper is intended for practical use and prepared by order of JSC ‘Tomsk Electrical Engineering Plant’ using software and equipment of the department ‘Technologies of Computer-Aided Machinery Manufacturing’ of the Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) under the economic contract within state import substitution program. In preparing the paper, CAD/CAM-systems KOMPAS-3D and PowerMILL were used. In 2015, the designed casting mold was introduced into the production process at JSC ‘Tomsk Electrical Engineering Plant’.

  7. Grain refinement of permanent mold cast copper base alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadayappan, M.; Thomson, J. P.; Elboujdaini, M.; Gu, G. Ping; Sahoo, M.

    2004-04-29

    Grain refinement behavior of copper alloys cast in permanent molds was investigated. This is one of the least studied subjects in copper alloy castings. Grain refinement is not widely practiced for leaded copper alloys cast in sand molds. Aluminum bronzes and high strength yellow brasses, cast in sand and permanent molds, were usually fine grained due to the presence of more than 2% iron. Grain refinement of the most common permanent mold casting alloys, leaded yellow brass and its lead-free replacement EnviroBrass III, is not universally accepted due to the perceived problem of hard spots in finished castings and for the same reason these alloys contain very low amounts of iron. The yellow brasses and Cu-Si alloys are gaining popularity in North America due to their low lead content and amenability for permanent mold casting. These alloys are prone to hot tearing in permanent mold casting. Grain refinement is one of the solutions for reducing this problem. However, to use this technique it is necessary to understand the mechanism of grain refinement and other issues involved in the process. The following issues were studied during this three year project funded by the US Department of Energy and the copper casting industry: (1) Effect of alloying additions on the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys and their interaction with grain refiners; (2) Effect of two grain refining elements, boron and zirconium, on the grain size of four copper alloys, yellow brass, EnviroBrass II, silicon brass and silicon bronze and the duration of their effect (fading); (3) Prediction of grain refinement using cooling curve analysis and use of this method as an on-line quality control tool; (4) Hard spot formation in yellow brass and EnviroBrass due to grain refinement; (5) Corrosion resistance of the grain refined alloys; (6) Transfer the technology to permanent mold casting foundries; It was found that alloying elements such as tin and zinc do not change the grain size of Cu-Zn alloys

  8. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  9. Performance of U-Pu-Zr fuel cast into zirconium molds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.C.; Lahm, C.E. ); Tsai, H. )

    1992-10-01

    U-3Zr and U-20.5Pu-3Zr were injection cast into Zr tubes, or sheaths, rather than into quartz molds and clad in 316SS. These elements and standard-cast U-l0Zr and U-IgPu-l0Zr elements were irradiated in EBR-II to 2 at.% and removed for interim examination. Measurements of axial growth at indicate that the Zr-sheathed elements exhibited significantly less axial elongation than the standard-cast elements (1.3 to 1.8% versus 4.9 to 8.1%). Fuel material extruded through the ends of the Zr sheaths. allowing the low-Zr fuel to contact the cladding in some cases. Transverse metallographic sections reveal cracks in the Zr sheath through which fuel extruded and contacted cladding. The sheath is not a sufficient barrier between fuel and cladding to reduce FCCI. and any adverse effects due to increased FCCI will be evident as the elements attain higher burnup.

  10. Nondestructive method for chemically machining crucibles or molds from their enclosed ingots and castings

    DOEpatents

    Stout, Norman D.; Newkirk, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    An inventive method is described for chemically machining rhenium, rhenium and tungsten alloy, and group 5b and 6b crucibles or molds from included ingots and castings comprised of oxide crystals including YAG and YAG based crystals, garnets, corundum crystals, and ceramic oxides. A mixture of potassium hydroxide and 15 to 90 weight percent of potassium nitrate is prepared and maintained at a temperature above melting and below the lower of 500 degrees centigrade or the temperature of decomposition of the mixture. The enveloping metal container together with its included oxide crystal object is rotated within the heated KOH-KNO.sub.3 mixture, until the container is safely chemically machined away from the included oxide crystal object.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  12. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Turbulent Flow in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik; Vanka, Pratap; Thomas, Brian G.

    2012-11-01

    Electromagnetic Braking (EMBr) fields are applied to control the turbulent mold flow for defect reduction in continuous steel casting. The effect of EMBr depends on the path of induced electric current which is modified by presence of the highly conducting solidifying shell. The mold geometry is complex involving flow in a high-aspect ratio closed channel with bifurcated jet impinging obliquely on the side walls. The extremely transient nature and the anisotropic behavior of turbulence under the EMBr field make numerical studies challenging. We use large eddy simulations to study effects of EMBr with electrically insulating and conducting boundary conditions. Magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved using a fractional step method with second order spatial and temporal accuracy. The electric potential method is used as magnetic Reynolds number is low for liquid metal flows. The solver was first validated with measurements from scaled GaInSn model and simulations were then performed to study real casters at industrial conditions. Time averaged and transient behaviors of the flow were studied by collecting distributions of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations and vorticity. The simulations reveal that the electrical boundary conditions have a major effect on the flow structure. National Science Foundation Grant CMMI 11-30882.

  13. Effect of an Electromagnetic Brake on the Turbulent Melt Flow in a Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xincheng; Timmel, Klaus; Lucas, Dirk; Ren, Zhongmin; Eckert, Sven; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2012-08-01

    This article presents numerical and experimental investigations with respect to the fluid flow in the continuous-casting process under the influence of an external direct current (DC) magnetic field. Numerical calculations were performed by means of the software package CFX (Ansys, Inc., Canonsburg, PA) with an implemented Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-SST turbulence model. The nonisotropic nature of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence was taken into account by specific modifications of the turbulence model. The numerical results were validated by flow measurements carried out in a small-scale mockup using the eutectic alloy GaInSn. The jet flow discharging from the submerged entry nozzle was exposed to a level magnetic field spanning across the entire wide side of the mold. The comparison between our numerical calculations and the experimental results displays a good agreement; in particular, we reconstructed the peculiar phenomenon of an excitation of nonsteady, nonisotropic, large-scale flow perturbations caused by the application of the DC magnetic field. Another important result of our study is the feature that the electrical boundary conditions, namely the wall conductivity ratio, have a serious influence on the mold flow while it is exposed to an external magnetic field.

  14. Optimization of a Permanent Step Mold Design for Mg Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timelli, Giulio; Capuzzi, Stefano; Bonollo, Franco

    2015-02-01

    The design of a permanent Step mold for the evaluation of the mechanical properties of light alloys has been reviewed. An optimized Step die with a different runner and gating systems is proposed to minimize the amount of casting defects. Numerical simulations have been performed to study the filling and solidification behavior of an AM60B alloy to predict the turbulence of the melt and the microshrinkage formation. The results reveal how a correct design of the trap in the runners prevents the backwave of molten metal, which could eventually reverse out and enter the die cavity. The tapered runner in the optimized die configuration gently leads the molten metal to the ingate, avoiding turbulence and producing a balanced die cavity filling. The connection between the runner system and the die cavity by means of a fan ingate produces a laminar filling in contrast with a finger-type ingate. Solidification defects such as shrinkage-induced microporosity, numerically predicted through a dimensionless version of the Niyama criterion, are considerably reduced in the optimized permanent Step mold.

  15. Simulation of transient fluid flow in mold region during steel continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Thomas, B. G.; Sengupta, J.

    2012-07-01

    A system of models has been developed to study transient flow during continuous casting and applied to simulate an event of multiple stopper-rod movements. It includes four sub-models to incorporate different aspects in this transient event. A three-dimensional (3-D) porous-flow model of the nozzle wall calculates the rate argon gas flow into the liquid steel, and the initial mean bubble size is estimated. Transient CFD models simulate multiphase flow of steel and gas bubbles in the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) and mold and have been validated with experimental data from both nail dipping and Sub-meniscus Velocity Control (SVC) measurements. To obtain the transient inlet boundary conditions for the simulation, two semi-empirical models, a stopper-rod-position based model and a metal-level-based model, predict the liquid steel flow rate through the SEN based on recorded plant data. Finally the model system was applied to study the effects of stopper rod movements on SEN/mold flow patterns. Meniscus level fluctuations were calculated using a simple pressure method and compared well with plant measurements. Insights were gained from the simulation results to explain the cause of meniscus level fluctuations and the formation of sliver defects during stopper rod movements.

  16. Transient Simulation of Mold Heat Transfer and Solidification Phenomena of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive model of heat transfer and solidification phenomena has been developed including microstructure evolution and fluctuation macrosegregation in continuously cast steel slabs with an objective of evaluation of various mold cooling conditions. The study contains plant trials, metallographic examinations, and formulation of mathematical modeling. The plant trials involved sample collection from three slab casters in use at two different steel plants. The metallographic study combined measurements of dendrite arm spacings and macrosegregation analysis of collected samples. A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to characterize the thermal, solidification phases, microstructure evolution, interdendritic strain, and therefore, the macrosegregation distributions. Two cooling approaches were proposed in this study to evaluate the Newtonian heat transfer coefficient in various mold regions. The first approach is a direct estimation approach (DEA), whereas the second one is a coupled approach of the interfacial resistor model and direct estimation approach (CIR/DEA). The model predictions and standard analytical models as well as the previous measurements were compared to verify and to calibrate the model where good agreements were obtained. The comparison between the model predictions and the measurements of dendrite arm spacings and fluctuated carbon concentration profiles were performed to determine the model accuracy level with different cooling approaches. Good agreements were obtained by different accuracy levels with different cooling approaches. The model predictions of thermal parameters and isotherms were analyzed and discussed.

  17. O on the Crystallization Behavior of Lime-Alumina-Based Mold Flux for Casting High-Al Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Boxun; Chen, Kun; Wang, Wanlin; Jiang, Binbin

    2014-08-01

    With the development of advanced high strength steel (AHSS), a large amount of aluminum was added into steels. The reaction between aluminum in the molten steel and silica based mold flux in the continuous-casting process would tend to cause a series of problems and influence the quality of slabs. To solve the above problems caused by the slag-steel reaction, nonreactive lime-alumina-based mold flux system has been proposed. In this article, the effect of Li2O and Na2O on the crystallization behavior of the lime-alumina-silica-based mold flux has been studied by using the single hot thermocouple technology (SHTT) and double hot thermocouple technology (DHTT). The results indicated that Li2O and Na2O in the above mold flux system play different roles as they behaved in traditional lime-silica based mold flux, which would tend to inhibit general mold flux crystallization by lowering the initial crystallization temperature and increasing incubation time, especially in the high-temperature region. However, when their content exceeds a critical value, the crystallization process of mold fluxes in low temperature zone would be greatly accelerated by the new phase formation of LiAlO2 and Na x Al y Si z O4 crystals, respectively. The crystalline phases precipitated in all samples during the experiments are discussed in the article.

  18. Comparison of different Methods to model Transient Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in Continuous Casting Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schwarze, R.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of the processes in the continuous casting mold engaged many scientists once the computer-technology was able to accomplish that task. Despite that, CFD modeling of the fluid flow is still challenging. The methods allow deeper and deeper inside views into transient flow processes. Mostly two kinds of methods are applied for this purpose. URANS simulations are used for a coarse overview of the transient behavior on scales determined by the big rollers inside the mold. Besides, LES were done to study the processes on smaller scales. Unfortunately, the effort to set up a LES is orders of magnitude higher in time and space compared to URANS. Often, the flow determining processes take place in small areas inside the flow domain. Hence, scale resolving methods (SRS) came up, which resolve the turbulence in some amount in these regions, whereas they go back to URANS in the regions of less importance. It becomes more complex when dealing with magnetic fields in terms of EMBr devices. The impact of electro magnetically forces changes the flow structure remarkably. Many important effects occur, e.g. MHD turbulence, which are attributable to processes on large turbulent scales. To understand the underlying phenomena in detail, SRS allows a good inside view by resolving these processes partially. This study compares two of these methods, namely the Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) and the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES), with respect to rendition of the results known from experiments and URANS simulation. The results show, that the SAS as well as the DDES are able to deliver good results with higher mesh resolutions in important regions in the flow domain

  19. Make it clear: molds, transparent casts and lightning techniques for stereomicroscopic analysis of taphonomic modifications on bone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Camarós, Edgard; Sánchez-Hernández, Carlos; Rivals, Florent

    2016-06-20

    This paper provides detailed description of a non-destructive, low-cost, and low-time consuming technique for producing high-resolution casts for the observation of taphonomic modifications on bone surfaces. The aim of the whole process is to obtain molds that accurately replicate the original bone surface at both the macro- and microscopic levels. The high quality transparent epoxy casts produced are analyzed by light microscopy and used to produce detailed microphotographs of bone surfaces. After describing each step of the process, we present some examples of its application in the case of anthropic activity, carnivores, or other post-depositional modifications.

  20. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Numerical Investigation of Shell Formation in Thin Slab Casting of Funnel-Type Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhrushev, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Tang, Y.; Hackl, G.; Nitzl, G.

    2014-06-01

    The key issue for modeling thin slab casting (TSC) process is to consider the evolution of the solid shell including fully solidified strand and partially solidified dendritic mushy zone, which strongly interacts with the turbulent flow and in the meantime is subject to continuous deformation due to the funnel-type mold. Here an enthalpy-based mixture solidification model that considers turbulent flow [Prescott and Incropera, ASME HTD, 1994, vol. 280, pp. 59-69] is employed and further enhanced by including the motion of the solidifying and deforming solid shell. The motion of the solid phase is calculated with an incompressible rigid viscoplastic model on the basis of an assumed moving boundary velocity condition. In the first part, a 2D benchmark is simulated to mimic the solidification and motion of the solid shell. The importance of numerical treatment of the advection of latent heat in the deforming solid shell (mushy zone) is specially addressed, and some interesting phenomena of interaction between the turbulent flow and the growing mushy zone are presented. In the second part, an example of 3D TSC is presented to demonstrate the model suitability. Finally, techniques for the improvement of calculation accuracy and computation efficiency as well as experimental evaluations are also discussed.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow and Inclusions Transport in Continuous Casting Mold under Different Electromagnetic Brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to analyze transient fluid flow and inclusions transport in a slab continuous casting mold, considering the effects of electromagnetic brake (EMBr) arrangement and magnetic field strength. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated by using the large eddy simulation. The electromagnetic force is incorporated into the Navier-Stokes equation. The transport of inclusion inside the mold is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern and inclusion transport inside the mold exhibits satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. With electromagnetic brake effect, the velocities around the braking region are significantly suppressed, and the recirculating flow in the lower part drops and tends to develop a plug-like flow. The EMBr arrangement has an insignificant effect on the overall removal fraction of inclusions, especially for larger inclusions. The inclusion removal rate for the flow-control mold (FCM arrangement) reduces instead compared with no EMBr, especially for smaller inclusions.

  3. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Zabaras, N.; Tan, L.

    2005-07-12

    A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum alloys at early times is provided. The various coupling mechanisms between the solid-shell and mold deformation and heat transfer at the mold/solid-shell interface during the early stages of Aluminum solidification on molds with uneven topographies are investigated. The air-gap nucleation time, the stress evolution and the solid-shell growth pattern are examined for different mold topographies to illustrate the potential control of Aluminum cast surface morphologies during the early stages of solidification using proper design of mold topographies. The unstable shell growth pattern in the early solidification stages results mainly from the unevenness of the heat flux between the solid-shell and the mold surface. This heat flux is determined by the size of the air-gaps formed between the solidifying shell and mold surface or from the value of the contact pressure. Simulation results show that a sinusoidal mold surface with a smaller wavelength leads to nucleation of air-gaps at earlier times. In addition, the unevenness in the solid-shell growth pattern decreases faster for a smaller wavelength. Such studies can be used to tune mold surfaces for the control of cast surface morphologies.

  4. Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Miller, Arthur C., Jr.; Maxey, L. Curt; Cunningham, Joseph P.; Moreshead, William V.; Nogues, Jean-Luc R.

    1995-09-01

    Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. We use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previoulsy suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to elimiate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on nonplanar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. We will discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

  5. A New Direct-Pour In-Mold (DPI) Technology for Producing Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Castings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Hitchings; Jay R. Hitchings

    2007-07-20

    A new "Direct Pour In-Mold" (DPI) Magnesium treatment technology has been developed that can produce both Nodular and Compacted Graphite iron. The DPI technology converts the standard horizontal runner system into a vertical one, by placing a Magnesium Ferrosilicon treatment alloy and molten metal filter into a specially designed container. The DPI container is easily placed into either vertically or horizontally parted molds, and then a base metal can be poured directly into it. The metal is treated and filtered as it passes through, and then proceeds directly into a runner or casting cavity. Various sizes of containers provide all of the necessary components required to deliver a range of weights of treated and filtered metal at accurate and consistent flow rates. The DPI containers provide energy savings over competing techniques, increased mold yields, very high Magnesium recovery, zero Magnesium fume, and no post inoculation is required. By treating the metal just prior to it entering a casting cavity many other benefits and advantages are also realized.

  6. Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P.; Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R.

    1995-07-01

    Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

  7. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.

    1991-07-02

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product any be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  8. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting process

    DOEpatents

    Jenny, Mark A.; Omalete, Ogbemi O.

    1992-09-08

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  9. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-09-30

    In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

  10. Effect of Al2O3 on the Crystallization of Mold Flux for Casting High Al Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Kechao

    2015-06-01

    In order to lower the weight of automotive bodies for better fuel-efficiency and occupant safety, the demand for high Al-containing advanced high strength steel, such as transformation-induced plasticity and twinning-induced plasticity steel, is increasing. However, high aluminum content in steels would tend to significantly affect the properties of mold flux during the continuous casting process. In this paper, a kinetic study of the effect of Al2O3 content on the crystallization behavior of mold flux was conducted by using the single hot thermocouple technique and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model combined with the Arrhenius Equation. The results suggested that Al2O3 behaves as an amphoteric oxide in the crystallization process of mold flux. The precipitated phases of mold flux change from cuspidine (Ca4Si2O7F2) into nepheline (NaAlSiO4) and CaF2, and then into gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) with the increase of Al2O3 content. The kinetics study of the isothermal crystallization process indicated that the effective crystallization rate ( k) and Avrami exponent ( n) also first increased and then decreased with the increase of Al2O3 content. The values for the crystallization activation energy of mold flux with different Al2O3 contents were E R0.8A7 = 150.76 ± 17.89 kJ/mol, E R0.8A20 = 136.43 ± 6.48 kJ/mol, E R0.8A30 = 108.63 ± 12.25 kJ/mol and E R0.8A40 = 116.15 ± 8.17 kJ/mol.

  11. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes: Literature review on cast tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a literature review on cast tooling with the general focus on AISI H13 tool steel. The review includes processing of both wrought and cast H13 steel along with the accompanying microstructures. Also included is the incorporation of new rapid prototyping technologies, such as Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering, into the investment casting of tool steel. The limiting property of using wrought or cast tool steel for die casting is heat checking. Heat checking is addressed in terms of testing procedures, theories regarding the mechanism, and microstructural aspects related to the cracking.

  12. [Flow of molten metal in denture base in horizontal centrifugal casting procedure. (Part 2) Flow, inflow volume and casting time of molten metal passing through several sprues into model denture plate mold (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Okamura, H

    1978-10-01

    Two types of spruing methods were used in the casting of the denture type model pattern (thickness, 0.43 mm). Flow of molten metal in the mold was filmed by the improved system of Part 1. When three sprues were attached to the pattern vertically, molten metal passed through each sprue gate flowed being affected by the direction of gravity and revolution of casting machine, and gathered at the lower part of the mold. Next molten metal filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part. In this spruing type, molten metal turned its direction of flow several times. At the middle stage of casting, the inflow volume per unit time (inflow rate), v (mm3/10-2)s)was evaluated as v = 12.36 + 5.16A-0.16 A2 (A: total cross-sectional areas of sprues). The inflow rate increased with increase of the area of the sprues, but it saturated. When the main sprue and the subsprues were attached at the posterior border, the molten metal filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part quietly. In this spruing type, the casting mold was set facing its sprue gates downwards. The inflow rate at the middle stage of casting was evaluated as v = 21.05 + 1.79 C (C: the cross-sectional area of the main sprue). The inflow rate increased linearly with increase of the area of the main sprue.

  13. Labor reduction for mold preparation of a commercial titanium cast denture system using a heat-shock method.

    PubMed

    Harun-Urashid, Q M; Tamaki, Y; Zhang, Z; Ozawa, A; Miyazaki, T; Shimakura, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of a heat-shock method to fabricate titanium cast plates. Duplications of a maxillary model were prepared using DM under different firing schedules. Molds with patterns on the duplications were made by an outer investment (D), followed by heat shock at 850 degrees C. Duplications heat shocked at 850 degrees C after 30 min from mixing exploded within a few minutes. This explosion was successfully avoided by a drying procedure prior to the heat-shock. The molds were available for the heat shock at 850 degrees C when the duplicate models were prepared by firing either using the conventional method and the heat shock above method described. Therefore, we could reduce the preparation time from about 16 hr with the conventional method to about 10 hr at the longest with the heat-shock method. These results suggested that the heat-shock method was labor-saving for fabricating titanium cast denture plates when controlling preliminary conditions prior to use.

  14. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

  15. Influences of Basicity and Li2O on the Properties of Fluorine-Free Mold Flux for the Casting of Medium Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Yan, Xiong; Zhou, Lejun; Xie, Senlin; Huang, Daoyuan

    2016-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to study the influences of basicity and Li2O on the melting, crystallization, and heat transfer behavior of Fluorine-free mold flux designed for the casting of medium carbon steels using double hot thermocouple technology and infrared emitter technique. The results showed that with the addition of basicity, the melting and crystallization temperatures of the mold fluxes were increased, and the final heat transfer rate was reduced, as the basicity tends to promote the crystallization behavior of the designed mold fluxes. Besides, with the increase of Li2O content in the mold flux, the melting and crystallization temperature decreased, as the Li2O tends to inhibit the formation of high melting temperature crystal and lower the system melting temperature zone; meanwhile the crystallization capability of the mold flux was enhanced in the low-temperature region. Moreover, the results of EDS and XRD were confirmed that the main crystal phase in the Fluorine-free mold fluxes is calcium borate silicate (Ca11Si4B2O22). Those results obtained can provide guidelines for the design of new Fluorine-free mold flux for the casting medium carbon steels.

  16. Mold-casted non-degradable, islet macro-encapsulating hydrogel devices for restoration of normoglycemia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Rios, Peter Daniel; Zhang, Xiaomin; Luo, Xunrong; Shea, Lonnie D

    2016-11-01

    Islet transplantation is a potential cure for diabetic patients, however this procedure is not widely adopted due to the high rate of graft failure. Islet encapsulation within hydrogels is employed to provide a three-dimensional microenvironment conducive to survival of transplanted islets to extend graft function. Herein, we present a novel macroencapsulation device, composed of PEG hydrogel, that combines encapsulation with lithography techniques to generate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds. PEG solutions are mixed with islets, which are then cast into PDMS molds for subsequent crosslinking. The molds can also be employed to provide complex architectures, such as microchannels that may allow vascular ingrowth through pre-defined regions of the hydrogel. PDMS molds allowed for the formation of stable gels with encapsulation of islets, and in complex architectures. Hydrogel devices with a thickness of 600 μm containing 500 islets promoted normoglycemia within 12 days following transplantation into the epididymal fat pad, which was sustained over the two-month period of study until removal of the device. The inclusion of microchannels, which had a similar minimum distance between islets and the hydrogel surface, similarly promoted normoglycemia. A glucose challenge test indicated hydrogel devices achieved normoglycemia 90 min post-dextrose injections, similar to control mice with native pancreata. Histochemical staining revealed that transplanted islets, identified as insulin positive, were viable and isolated from host tissue at 8 weeks post-transplantation, yet devices with microchannels had tissue and vascular ingrowth within the channels. Taken together, these results demonstrate a system for creating non-degradable hydrogels with complex geometries for encapsulating islets capable of restoring normoglycemia, which may expand islet transplantation as a treatment option for diabetic patients. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2485-2495. © 2016 Wiley

  17. FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG (BMM) FROM MOBILE LADLE. EMPTY BULL LADLE IN FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Spray-formed Tooling for Injection Molding and Die Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Hugh, Kevin Matthew

    2000-06-01

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) ToolingTM is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  19. Spray-formed tooling for injection molding and die casting applications

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. McHugh; B. R. Wickham

    2000-06-26

    Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The ability of the sprayed deposit to capture features of the tool pattern eliminates costly machining operations in conventional mold making and reduces turnaround time. Moreover, rapid solidification suppresses carbide precipitation and growth, allowing many ferritic tool steels to be artificially aged, an alternative to conventional heat treatment that offers unique benefits. Material properties and microstructure transformation during heat treatment of spray-formed H13 tool steel are described.

  20. Investigation on the Effect of Mold Constraints and Cooling Rate on Residual Stress During the Sand-Casting Process of 1086 Steel by Employing a Thermomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, Amir; Davami, Parviz; Varahram, Naser; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mold constraints and cooling rate on residual stress were analyzed during the shaped casting process. For this purpose, an H-shaped sample was designed in which the contraction of its middle portion is highly restricted by the mold during the cooling process. The effects of an increasing cooling rate combined with mold constraints were analyzed by reducing the thickness of the middle portion in the second sample. A three-dimensional coupled temperature-displacement analysis was performed in finite-element code ABAQUS to simulate residual stress distribution, and then numerical results were verified by the hole-drilling strain-gauge method. It was concluded that the mold constraints have a greater effect on the values of residual stress than the cooling rate (thin section) in steel sand casting. Increasing the cooling rate would increase the amount of residual stress, only in the presence of mold constraints. It is also suggested that employing the elastic-plastic stress model for the sand mold will satisfy the experimental results and avoid exaggerated values of residual stress in simulation.

  1. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2016-12-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/h is larger than 0.4.

  2. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/ h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/ h is larger than 0.4.

  3. [Flow of molten metal in denture base in horizontal centrifugal casting procedure. (Part 1) Flow, inflow volume and casting time of molten metal passing through single aprue into disk type mold (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Okamura, H

    1976-01-01

    A pyrex glass plate was fitted at the bottom of casting ring, and disk type wax pattern (thickness. 0.43 mm) was put on the plate. Five types of sprueing were applied. Pure tin was casted using holizontal centrifugal casting machine. Flow of molten metal was filmed by the motor drive camera with the method of stroboscope. The results were summarized as follows. 1) When the sprue was attached at the center of the disk type mold vertically, moten metal flowed like a concentric circle at the early stage of casting. It was affected gradually by the direction of gravity and revolution, and it filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part. 2) When the sprue gate was attached to the side edge of the mold, and the sprue gate was placed to the forward and backward direction against the revolution direction, molten metal filled from lower part to the upper part. 3) When the sprue gate was placed against upper edge, molten metal flow was affected by the direction of gravity and revolution. When the sprue gate was placed against lower edge, molten metal filled quietry from the lower part to the upper part. 4) Inflow volume per unit time (inflow rate) was small at the early stage of casting. Inflow rate increased and became constant at the next stage. At the latter stage it became small again. 5) Inflow rate increased with the increase of area of sprue. 6) The time which was necessary to fill the volume of 1 cm (about 80% of the mold volume) became short with the increase of area of sprue. It was also influenced by the type of sprueing.

  4. The Development of CaO-SiO2-B2O3-based Fluorine-Free Mold Flux for a Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-09-01

    Designing and developing high-performance fluorine-free (F-free) mold flux has become a hot topic in steel continuous casting processes, with concerns of environment protection and energy saving. In conventional commercial mold flux, fluorine plays important roles on the properties as it works as a fluxing agent; however, it tends to cause serious environmental and health problems. In this paper, a new F-free mold flux based on the CaO-SiO2-B2O3 slag system has been introduced through summarizing previous works. The melting temperature range of F-free mold flux decreases with the addition of Na2O/Li2O and B2O3; the viscosity and heat flux decrease with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O, as well as the decrease of B2O3 contents. Also, the crystallization temperatures of F-free mold fluxes increase with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O content. The analyses of EDS and XRD show that Ca11Si4B2O22 and Ca14Mg2(SiO4)8 are the two main precipitated crystalline phases in F-free mold fluxes, and that the Ca11Si4B2O22 is a common and stable crystalline phase in the designed F-free mold fluxes system that shows the potential to replace Ca4Si2O7F2 in conventional flourine-containing mold fluxes.

  5. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  6. Improvement in Mechanical Properties of A356 Tensile Test Bars Cast in a Permanent Mold by Application of a Knife Ingate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaou; Schwam, David; Neff, David V.; Chen, Chai-Jung; Zhu, Xuejun

    2012-03-01

    As a standard test-bar permanent mold, the "Stahl" Mold has been widely used in foundries to assess the properties of cast alloys. However, inferior mechanical properties are often obtained with this mold due to shrinkage-induced microporosity in the gage section. In order to improve the mechanical properties, a design modification comprising a thin knife ingate between the feeder and test-bar cavity was evaluated in this work. The new design was studied by computer-aided simulation. Simulations predicted that the knife ingate improved the metal feeding capability and reduced the shrinkage microporosity at the gage section from 3 to 1 pct. Experimental verification work has been undertaken with aluminum alloy A356, and the results were analyzed by a statistics theory-based factorial analysis method. The new design resulted in main effects with ultimate tensile strength (UTS) improvement of 20 MPa (relative 12 pct) and elongation increment of 2 pct (relative 45 pct) for the as-cast test bars.

  7. TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD TO CONTAINMENT CHAMBER IS CONTINUOUS CASTING OPERATOR, CALVIN ANDERS. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  9. Transient Two-Phase Flow in Slide-Gate Nozzle and Mold of Continuous Steel Slab Casting with and without Double-Ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong-Mook; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-10-01

    Transient mold flow could produce undesirable surface instabilities and slag entrainments, leading to the formation of defects during continuous slab casting of steel. In this work, two Large Eddy Simulations coupled with Discrete Phase Model are run, with and without MagnetoHydroDynamic model, to gain new insights into the surface variations of molten steel-argon gas flow with anisotropic turbulence in the slide-gate nozzle and the mold, with and without double-ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking (EMBr). The model calculations are validated with plant measurements, and applied to investigate the flow variations related to the slide gate on nozzle swirl, jet wobbling, and surface flow variations by quantifying the variations of velocity, horizontal angle, and vertical angle of the transient flow. Transient flow in the slide-gate nozzle bottom is almost always swirling, alternating chaotically between clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation. The clockwise swirl, caused by stronger flow down the same side of the nozzle as the open area near the Outside Radius side of the slide-gate middle plate, produces faster jet flow and higher velocity flow across the top surface of the mold. Counter-clockwise swirl produces slower jet and surface flow, but with more variations. The double-ruler EMBr decreases the asymmetry and duration of velocity variations during nozzle swirl flipping, resulting in less flow variations in the jet and across the surface in the mold.

  10. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  11. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dense Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Momentum transfer of argon-steel flows in a slab mold were studied through an air-water physical model and particle image velocimetry measurements under the effects of nozzle design (nozzles with square ports S, square ports with bottom design U and circular ports C) and gas flow rate. The ratio of drag momentum of the gas phase over the liquid phase defines the conditions for coupled (existence of momentum transfer between the phases) and channeled flows (defined as those conditions where there is not further momentum transfer between both phases). When the ratio of superficial velocities of the gas phase over the liquid phase in the nozzle bore is less than 0.14, the flow pattern in the mold is dependent on the nozzle design and flow rate of gas (2 to 10 L/minute). Above this magnitude, the flow pattern becomes uncoupled and independent from the nozzle design and from the flow rate of gas. The ratios of drag velocities of the gas phase on the liquid phase and their superficial velocities in the nozzle bore are strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the gas phase. Nozzle U delivers the smallest sizes of bubbles and the smaller amount of bubble swarms per unit time impacting on the narrow face of the mold. It is, therefore, the most recommendable to cast ultra-low carbon steels. Practical implications derived from these results are written down in the text.

  12. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dense Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    Momentum transfer of argon-steel flows in a slab mold were studied through an air-water physical model and particle image velocimetry measurements under the effects of nozzle design (nozzles with square ports S, square ports with bottom design U and circular ports C) and gas flow rate. The ratio of drag momentum of the gas phase over the liquid phase defines the conditions for coupled (existence of momentum transfer between the phases) and channeled flows (defined as those conditions where there is not further momentum transfer between both phases). When the ratio of superficial velocities of the gas phase over the liquid phase in the nozzle bore is less than 0.14, the flow pattern in the mold is dependent on the nozzle design and flow rate of gas (2 to 10 L/minute). Above this magnitude, the flow pattern becomes uncoupled and independent from the nozzle design and from the flow rate of gas. The ratios of drag velocities of the gas phase on the liquid phase and their superficial velocities in the nozzle bore are strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the gas phase. Nozzle U delivers the smallest sizes of bubbles and the smaller amount of bubble swarms per unit time impacting on the narrow face of the mold. It is, therefore, the most recommendable to cast ultra-low carbon steels. Practical implications derived from these results are written down in the text.

  13. Relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer. Annual technical report, September 1997 - September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, K.A.; Parker, J.K.; Piwonka, T.S.; Owusu, Y.

    1998-10-22

    In the third year of this program, the final castings necessary to evaluate the effect of casting orientation and gating in silica sand lost foam were poured and measured using a CMM machine. Interfacial heat transfer and gap formation measurements continued. However, significant problems were encountered in making accurate measurements. No consistent evidence of gap formation was found in aluminum sand casting. Initial analysis yields heat transfer values below those previously reported in the literature. The program in continuing.

  14. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  15. Evaluation of Interfacial Interactions Between Ti-6Al-4V and Mold Use Ti-Added Backup Coat in Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Chai, Lianjing; Wu, Guoqing; Wang, Hong; Nan, Hai

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the chemical inertness of shell using Ti-added mullite backup coat against molten Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy was investigated. The metal/shell interfacial microstructures and compositions were characterized using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, roughness tester, and X-ray diffractometer; the hardened layer thickness was evaluated using a microhardness tester. By adding titanium powder into the mullite backup coat, the alpha case and hardened layer thickness of the Ti64 castings were largely reduced with good surface finishing. Silicon ions, from the backup coat, penetrated into the alloy and coarsened the β lath at the metal/shell interfacial area. The Ti powder in the mullite backup coat oxidized and interacted with silica during mold firing and casting, which reduced the silicon and oxygen concentrations at the metal/shell interfacial area. The oxygen penetration depth is thicker than the alpha case layer thickness, and around 0.26 wt pct, oxygen can obviously coarsen the alpha lath at the metal/shell interfacial area during investment casting.

  16. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Mold Allergy Share | Mold Allergy Overview Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Mold Allergy Overview Molds are tiny fungi whose spores float ...

  17. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  18. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-10-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  19. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Flow in a Continuous-Casting Mold under the Influence of a Transverse, Direct Current Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmel, Klaus; Eckert, Sven; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2011-02-01

    This article describes laboratory experiments aimed at investigations of flow structures and related transport processes in the continuous-casting mold under the influence of an external direct current (DC) magnetic field. The main value of cold metal laboratory experiments consists in the capabilities to obtain quantitative flow measurements with a reasonable spatial and temporal resolution. The experimental results presented here were obtained using a physical model operating with the room-temperature alloy GaInSn. According to the concept of the electromagnetic brake, the impact of a DC magnetic field on the outlet flow from the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) has been studied up to Hartmann numbers of approximately 400. The effect of the magnetic field on the flow structure turned out to be complex. The flow measurements do not manifest a general braking effect, which would be expected as an overall damping of the flow velocity and the related fluctuations all over the mold volume. Variations of the wall conductivity showed a striking impact on the resulting flow structures. The experiments provide a substantial database for the validation of respective numerical simulations.

  1. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, October 1--December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-12-31

    The first series of experiments at the CMI-Tech Center was successfully conducted on October 14 and 15 with the participation of the University of Michigan team. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the die surface temperatures (or near the surface) have a close correlation with the metal pressure profiles. Considering the difference in timing of the peak die temperatures, the high melt temperature and hotter die temperature for Inter 54 might cause a longer solidification time, and the pressure would decrease more slowly than for Inter 12. The slopes of the metal pressure profiles at the low pressure setting are almost linear. This may mean that the low metal pressure couldn`t effectively keep a pressure channel opened. In other words, as temperature decreased, the solid fraction increased and the solidified shell strengthened, and the pressure, which couldn`t overcome the resistance, would drop linearly. However, at the high pressure, there are inflection points in the pressure profiles. The inflection points are at about 8,500 psi for both the low and the high melt temperature settings. This suggests that the metal pressure was sufficient enough to overcome the resistance of the solidified shell before the inflection point was reached. A preliminary microstructure analysis shows that the dendrite arms at the location near the gate are much coarser than that at the top of the casting. The influence of intensification pressure on microstructure needs further verification and study.

  2. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE 'SQUEEZING' BOTH HALVES OF A MOLD SURROUNDING A MATCHPLATE PATTERN, DENNIS GRAY OPERATOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Surface 3D Micro Free Forms: Multifunctional Microstructured Mesoporous α-Alumina by in Situ Slip Casting Using Excimer Laser Ablated Polycarbonate Molds.

    PubMed

    Rowthu, Sriharitha; Böhlen, Karl; Bowen, Paul; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-11-11

    Ceramic surface microstructuring is a rapidly growing field with a variety of applications in tribology, wetting, biology, and so on. However, there are limitations to large-area microstructuring and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) micro free forms. Here, we present a route to obtain intricate surface structures through in situ slip casting using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) negative molds which are replicated from excimer laser ablated polycarbonate (PC) master molds. PC sheets are ablated with a nanosecond KrF (λ = 248 nm) excimer laser mask projection system to obtain micron-scale 3D surface features over a large area of up to 3 m(2). Complex surface structures that include 3D free forms such as 3D topography of Switzerland, shallow structures such as diffractive optical elements (60 nm step) and conical micropillars have been obtained. The samples are defect-free produced with thicknesses of up to 10 mm and 120 mm diameter. The drying process of the slip cast alumina slurry takes place as a one-dimensional process, through surface evaporation and water permeation through the PDMS membrane. This allows homogeneous one-dimensional shrinkage during the drying process, independent of the sample's lateral dimensions. A linear mass diffusion model has been proposed to predict and explain the drying process of these ceramic colloidal suspensions. The calculated drying time is linearly proportional to the height of the slurry and the thickness of the negatively structured PDMS and is validated by the experimental results. An experimentally observed optimum Sylgard PDMS thickness range of ∼400 μm to 1 mm has achieved the best quality microstructured green compacts. Further, the model predicts that the drying time is independent of the microstructured areas and was validated using experimental observations carried out with microstructured areas of 300 mm(2), 1200 mm(2), and 120 cm(2). Therefore, in principle, the structures can be further replicated in areas up

  4. Plastic molds reduce cost of encapsulating electric cable connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, D.

    1964-01-01

    Resin casting of the aluminum master pattern forms a plastic mold for encapsulating a cable connector. An elastomer is injected into the mold and cured. The mold is disassembled leaving an elastomeric encapsulation around the connector.

  5. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    castings. Liquid-solid slurries were cast Rheocasting ) to evaluate cast- ing properties and opportunities for enhanced mold life with a reduced temperature...pouring temperature, 600 0C mold temperature, all-metal mold. Figure 29 Schem.atic of rheocasting attachment for vacuum melting furnace. Motor and gear...33 Alumina paddle and rheocasting . Paddle cracked during itirring. Casting did not fill, probably due to poor stirring of melt. Figure 34 ZrO 2

  6. High coercivity microcrystalline Nd-rich Nd-Fe-Co-Al-B bulk magnets prepared by direct copper mold casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Hong, Y.; Fang, X. G.; Qiu, Z. G.; Zhong, X. C.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, Z. W.

    2016-06-01

    High coercivity Nd25Fe40Co20Al15-xBx (x=7-15) hard magnets were prepared by a simple process of injection casting. Different from many previous investigations on nanocomposite compositions, the magnets in this work contain hard magnetic Nd2(FeCoAl)14B, Nd-rich, and Nd1+ε(FeCo)4B4 phases. The magnetic properties, phase evolution, and microstructure of the as-cast and annealed magnets were investigated. As the boron content increased from 7 to 11 at%, the intrinsic coercivity Hcj of the as-cast magnet increased from 816 to 1140 kA/m. The magnets annealed at 750 °C have shown more regular and smaller grains than the as-cast alloys, especially for the x=11 alloy. The high intrinsic coercivities for the annealed alloys with x=8~11 result from the presence of small-sized grains in the microstructure. The highest Hcj of 1427 kA/m was obtained for the heat treated alloy with x=10. This work provides an alternative approach for preparing fully dense Nd-rich bulk hard magnets with relatively good properties.

  7. Diamond turned master molds for bulk casting of sol-gel silica diffractive optical elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1997-08-01

    This CRADA has combined the resources of a national laboratory and an innovative small company to investigate the production of diffractive lenses in silica glass, using diamond turned master molds. The method for producing these lenses combines the unique characteristics of the sol-gel silica replication process, pioneered by Geltech, with the state-of-the-art diamond turning expertise of the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT). A conventional lens focuses light by using a curved surface to refract (or bend) the incoming light so that it will form an image. These lenses are usually thick glass elements with one or both surfaces shaped into convex or concave spherical shapes. Traditionally, these lenses are produced by grinding and polishing the glass to the desired shape. Light can also be focused using the phenomenon of diffraction, rather than refraction. A lens of this type uses precision microscopic surface features to bend the light so that it forms an image. The result is a lens that is thinner and lighter than its refractive counterpart. Production of diffractive lenses requires the ability to accurately produce the precision microscopic features necessary to achieve controlled diffraction. Diffractive lenses have, for the most part, been limited to infra-red applications because the manufacturing technologies available have not enabled their use at visible wavelengths. Except in limited applications, these lenses have remained laboratory curiosities, because they must be individually produced by diamond turning infra-red optical materials. Geltech`s sol-gel silica replication process offers the opportunity to mass produce diffractive lenses in high quality silica glass. These lenses can be produced by diamond turning the necessary precision microscopic surface features into master surfaces that are replicated into intermediate molds. These molds are then used to produce a batch of diffractive lenses using the sol-gel process.

  8. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  9. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  10. Improving the Resolution of 3D-Printed Molds for Microfluidics by Iterative Casting-Shrinkage Cycles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Xie, Yanbo; Zhu, Jihong; Li, Jun; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2017-02-21

    Breaking through technical barriers and cost reduction are critical issues for the development of microfluidic devices, and both rely greatly on the innovation of fabrication techniques and use of new materials. The application of 3D printing definitely accelerated the prototyping of microfluidic chips by its versatility and functionality. However, the resolution of existing 3D printing techniques is still far below that of lithography, which makes it difficult to work on the scale of single cells and near impossible for single molecule work. In this paper, we present a facile way to increase the resolution of 3D printed microstructures to minimally 4 μm by casting-shrinkage cycles of a polyurethane (PU) polymer. A water-PU liquid mixture poured on a 3D printed template quickly solidifies replicating the structures, which then isometrically shrink to half its size after solvent evaporation, downscaling the replicated structures. By repeating the casting-shrinkage cycles, we could downscale the (sub)millimeter structures of 3D printed structures on demand, until the working limit posed by the polymer properties, which we demonstrate by fabricating a micromixer. Moreover, we can even fabricate microfluidic chips from millimeter-scale manually assembled templates, fully independent of any micromachining facilities, significantly reducing the technical barriers and costs, thus opening up the microfluidics field to low-resource areas.

  11. Organic materials for ceramic molding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramic molding processes are examined. Binders, wetting agents, lubricants, plasticizers, surface active agents, dispersants, etc., for pressing, rubber pressing, sip casting, injection casting, taping, extrusion, etc., are described, together with forming machines.

  12. Analysis on the Deflection Angle of Columnar Dendrites of Continuous Casting Steel Billets Under the Influence of Mold Electromagnetic Stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xincheng; Wang, Shengqian; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Conejo, Alberto; Liu, Xuefeng

    2016-11-01

    In the current study, the deflection angle of columnar dendrites on the cross section of steel billets under mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS) was observed. A mathematical model was developed to define the effect of M-EMS on fluid flow and then to analyze the relationship between flow velocities and deflection angle. The model was validated using experimental data that was measured with a Tesla meter on magnetic intensity. By coupling the numerical results with the experimental data, it was possible to define a relationship between the velocities of the fluid with the deflection angle of high-carbon steel. The deflection angle of high-carbon steel reached maximum values from 18 to 23 deg for a velocity from 0.35 to 0.40 m/s. The deflection angles of low-carbon steel under different EM parameters were discussed. The deflection angle of low-carbon steel was increased as the magnetic intensity, EM force, and velocity of molten steel increased.

  13. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  14. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  15. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE HUNTER 10 AND OTHER HUNTER 20 COMPRESSES BOTH MOLD HALVES OVER A DOUBLE-SIDED MATCH PLATE PATTERN. DENNIS GRAY TESTS A MOLD'S HARDNESS TO ENSURE SAND MIXTURE AND MACHINE COMPRESSIBILITY ARE CORRECT. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  16. MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, P.G.

    1963-10-01

    Molding apparatus capable of coating multiple elements each molding cycle is described. The apparatus comprises a centrally disposed reservoir penetrated by a plurality of circumferentially arranged and radially extending passageways. These passageways, in turn, communicate with passages in a separable annular member that retains selectively configured molds and mold seating arrangements. Each mold, which is readily removable from its respective seat, is adapted to retain an element therein in spaced relation to the interior of the mold by utilizing element positioning means within the mold seat and the mold so that coating material may flow about the entire outer surface of the element. (AEC)

  17. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  18. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  19. INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, GRAY IRON MOLDING MACHINE WITH MOLDER, R. L. BRANDY MOLDING A RAIL CASTING (LAWLER NO. 1337, A 16' x 35' MOLD WITH A 5' COPE AND A 4' DRAG). DRAG IS FILLED WITH SAND. - Lawler Machine & Foundry Company, Molding Area, 760 North Forty-fourth Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  1. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  2. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  3. TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES THE SAME AS THE TWO LARGER TRUFLOS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWO HUNTER 20S. EACH GONDOLA IS CONNECTED TO THE NEXT AND RIDES ON A SINGLE TRACK RAIL FROM MOLDING MACHINES THROUGH POURING AREAS CARRYING A MOLD AROUND TWICE BEFORE THE MOLD IS PUSHED OFF ONTO A VIBRATING SHAKEOUT CONVEYOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    system and ultimately fill the mold cavity to produce a casting. The fluidity of a given metal is measured with standard fluidity test molds. One...showed that the pouring temperature for large, thin-wall aluminum castings must be (1) high enough to provide sufficient fluidity for complete filling of...castings should have the following specific characteristics: good flowability , permeability, tensile strength, and compressive strength; high hot

  5. Casting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  6. Crystallization Kinetics and Mechanism of CaO-Al2O3-Based Mold Flux for Casting High-Aluminum TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-Bin; Seo, Myung-Duk; Wang, Hui; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-09-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization of the newly developed lime-alumina-based mold fluxes was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The crystallization kinetic parameters were determined by Ozawa equation, the combined Avrami-Ozawa equation, and the differential iso-conversional method of Friedman. It was found that Ozawa method failed to describe the non-isothermal crystallization behavior of the mold fluxes. The Avrami exponent determined by the combined Avrami-Ozawa equation indicates that the crystallization of cuspidine occurs through bulk nucleation and reaction-controlled three-dimensional growth, and then transforms to reaction-controlled two-dimensional growth at the crystallization later stage in lime-alumina-based mold fluxes with higher B2O3 content. For the mold fluxes with lower B2O3 content (10.8 mass pct), the crystallization of cuspidine is bulk nucleation and reaction-controlled two-dimensional growth at the crystallization primary stage followed by a diffusion-controlled two-dimensional growth process. The crystallization of CaF2 in mold flux originates from bulk nucleation and diffusion-controlled three-dimensional growth, which then transforms to two-dimensional growth. FE-SEM observations support these kinetic analysis results. The effective activation energy for cuspidine crystallization in the mold flux with higher B2O3 and Na2O contents increases as the crystallization progresses, and then decreases at the relative degree of crystallinity greater than 60 pct. The transition point of this trend approximately corresponds to the relative degree of crystallinity at which the crystallization mode of cuspidine transforms. For the mold fluxes with lower B2O3 and Na2O contents, the effective activation energy for cuspidine formation varies monotonically with the increase in the relative degree of crystallinity.

  7. Crystallization Kinetics and Mechanism of CaO-Al2O3-Based Mold Flux for Casting High-Aluminum TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-Bin; Seo, Myung-Duk; Wang, Hui; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2015-02-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization of the newly developed lime-alumina-based mold fluxes was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The crystallization kinetic parameters were determined by Ozawa equation, the combined Avrami-Ozawa equation, and the differential iso-conversional method of Friedman. It was found that Ozawa method failed to describe the non-isothermal crystallization behavior of the mold fluxes. The Avrami exponent determined by the combined Avrami-Ozawa equation indicates that the crystallization of cuspidine occurs through bulk nucleation and reaction-controlled three-dimensional growth, and then transforms to reaction-controlled two-dimensional growth at the crystallization later stage in lime-alumina-based mold fluxes with higher B2O3 content. For the mold fluxes with lower B2O3 content (10.8 mass pct), the crystallization of cuspidine is bulk nucleation and reaction-controlled two-dimensional growth at the crystallization primary stage followed by a diffusion-controlled two-dimensional growth process. The crystallization of CaF2 in mold flux originates from bulk nucleation and diffusion-controlled three-dimensional growth, which then transforms to two-dimensional growth. FE-SEM observations support these kinetic analysis results. The effective activation energy for cuspidine crystallization in the mold flux with higher B2O3 and Na2O contents increases as the crystallization progresses, and then decreases at the relative degree of crystallinity greater than 60 pct. The transition point of this trend approximately corresponds to the relative degree of crystallinity at which the crystallization mode of cuspidine transforms. For the mold fluxes with lower B2O3 and Na2O contents, the effective activation energy for cuspidine formation varies monotonically with the increase in the relative degree of crystallinity.

  8. SHAKE OUT WORKER DUMPING COOLED MOLDS ONTO THE VIBRATING CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SHAKE OUT WORKER DUMPING COOLED MOLDS ONTO THE VIBRATING CONVEYOR THAT TRANSPORTS SAND AND CASTINGS TO THE SEPARATION SCREEN. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  10. Constant permeability of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting

    SciTech Connect

    Bitoh, T.; Shibata, D.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting on the soft magnetic properties of (Fe{sub 0.75}B{sub 0.20}Si{sub 0.05}){sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass prepared by casting has been investigated. Ring-shaped bulk specimens that were prepared by B{sub 2}O{sub 3} flux melting and Cu-mold casting (fluxed specimens) show a flat hysteresis curve, indicating a good linear relationship between the magnetic induction and the applied magnetic field. Although the permeability of the fluxed specimens is lower than that of the specimens prepared by conventional Cu-mold casting by one order of magnitude, their coercivities are almost same. These results show that it is possible to develop a new soft magnetic material that exhibits constant permeability with low core loss.

  11. Biaxial casting apparatus for isolating radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Manchale, F. Jr.; Manchak, F. III.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes apparatus for isolating hazardous radioactive waste for disposal. It comprises: a bifurcated centrifugal casting mold having at least two separable mold parts, the mold being supported for rotation about a first axis; means for supporting a completed monolith in the apparatus with the mold parts removed therefrom; powered drive means for rotating the mold and the monolith about the first axis; mold removal means aligned along a second axis substantially perpendicular to the first axis for removing the separate parts of the bifurcated casting mold from a monolith while leaving the monolith supported in the apparatus for rotation about the first axis; means for injecting a charge of radiation shielding material into a pre-formed shell placed in the mold; and means for heating the interior of the shell during rotation of the mold about the first axis.

  12. Mold Charlatans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Offers a primer on toxic mold and its removal, warning against ignorant or unethical mold remediation companies and offering five considerations (checking references, considering the big picture, sampling more than the air, considering release, and considering the source) when hiring such services. (EV)

  13. MOLD POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mold pollution is the growth of molds in a building resulting in a negative impact on the use of that structure. The negative impacts generally fall into two categories: destruction of the structure itself and adverse health impacts on the building's occupants. It is estimated...

  14. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  15. Inner surface roughness of complete cast crowns made by centrifugal casting machines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, H; Raptis, C N; Asgar, K

    1981-05-01

    Six variables that could affect the surface roughness of a casting were investigated. The variables were (1) type of alloy, (2) mold temperature, (3) metal casting temperature, (4) casting machine, (5) sandblasting, and (6) location of each section. It was determined that the training portion of a complete cast crown had rougher surfaces than the leading portion. Higher mold and casting temperatures produced rougher castings, and this effect was more pronounced in the case of the base metal alloy. Sandblasting reduced the roughness, but produced scratched surfaces. Sandblasting had a more pronounced affect on the surface roughness of the base metal alloy cast either at a higher mold temperature or metal casting temperature. The morphology and the roughness profile of the original cast surface differed considerably with the type of alloy used.

  16. Method for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  17. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  18. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reduce Mold in Your Whole House: Use an electric dehumidifier to remove moisture and keep humidity in ... Find a Local Support Group Join Our Action Network Kids With Food Allergies AAFA Research Grants Health ...

  19. Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas N.; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2002-09-17

    A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

  20. Improving Metal Casting Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  1. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  2. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  3. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY SHOWING MOLD MAKING WITH PNEWMATIC JOLT SQUEEZE COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINES THAT INDIVIDUALLY MADE EITHER A COPE OR DRAG AND A SMALL WHEELED MATCHPLATE JOLT-SQUEEZE MACHINE THAT COMPRESSED AN ENTIRE MOLD AT A SINGLE TIME USING A DOUBLE-SIDED PATTERN (MATCHPLATE). ALSO SHOWN ARE RAILED PALLET CAR CONVEYORS THAT CARRIED COMPLETED MOLDS FROM MOLDING MACHINES TO POURING AREAS WHERE WORKERS USED SMALL OVERHEAD CRANE TO LIFT JACKETS AND WEIGHTS ONTO THE MOLDS TO HOLD THEM TOGETHER WHILE POURING. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Wwww of... - Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Existing Open Molding Sources, New Open Molding Sources Emitting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Centrifugal Casting and Continuous Lamination/Casting Sources that Emit Less Than 100 TPY of HAP 3... Existing Centrifugal Casting and Continuous Lamination/Casting Sources that Emit Less Than 100 TPY of HAP... lb/ton. 522 lb/ton. 7. centrifugal casting—CR/HS a. resin application with the mold closed, and...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Wwww of... - Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Existing Open Molding Sources, New Open Molding Sources Emitting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Centrifugal Casting and Continuous Lamination/Casting Sources that Emit Less Than 100 TPY of HAP 3... Existing Centrifugal Casting and Continuous Lamination/Casting Sources that Emit Less Than 100 TPY of HAP... lb/ton. 522 lb/ton. 7. centrifugal casting—CR/HS a. resin application with the mold closed, and...

  6. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Thermal stress analysis in permanent mold processing determining mold life and utilizing a combined thermomechanical finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Fackeldey, M.; Guan, J.; Helling, V.; Sahm, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Permanent mold casting offers various advantages, but its process control requires high technical skill, especially when cast iron is utilized. Thermal stresses resulting from non-uniform cooling and hindering of shrinkage frequently cause cracks, which can lead to a destruction of the permanent mold. In this paper an in-house 3-dimensional finite element model is presented, which allows an easy and comfortable analysis of the origin of thermal and residual stresses. By varying single parameters, i.e. the initial temperature as well as the mold geometry, the process may be evaluated. This leads to an optimization of the process and allows an assessment of the mold life.

  8. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  9. Mold and Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions) and irritants. Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

  10. Application of TRIZ Theory in Patternless Casting Manufacturing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Gan, Dequan; Jiang, Ping; Tian, Yumei

    The ultimate goal of Patternless Casting Manufacturing (referred to as PCM) is how to obtain the casts by casting the sand mold directly. In the previous PCM, the resin content of sand mold is much higher than that required by traditional resin sand, so the casts obtained are difficult to be sound and qualified products, which limits the application of this technique greatly. In this paper, the TRIZ algorithm is introduced to the innovation process in PCM systematically.

  11. INGOT MOLD

    DOEpatents

    Mangold, A.J. Jr.; MaHaffey, J.W.; Reese, S.L.

    1958-04-29

    An improved ingot-mold assembly is described, consisting of a body having a cavity and a recess extending through to the bottom of the body from the cavity, and the bottom of the cavity having an internal shoulder extending downward and a plug having an external shoulder. The plug extends above the shoulders and below the bottom of the body.

  12. 22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL AND TEST LAB FOR UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC. SAND CASTING TECHNICIAN, ROY BATES, TESTS THE WEIGHT OF THE SAND, DRYS IT, AND WEIGHT IT AGAINST STANDARDS TO CALCULATE THE CORRECT MOISTURE NEEDED FOR DIFFERENT MOLDS. THE SAND MIX VARY WITH THE SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CASTING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Mold filling and microhardness of 1% Fe titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideki; Komatsu, Masashi; Miller, Barbara; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Okabe, Toru

    2004-06-01

    We examined the mold filling capacity and microhardness of two industrial 1% Fe titanium alloys: Super-TIX800 (Nippon Steel Corp.) (Fe: 0.910%, O: 0.370%, N: 0.005%) and Super-TIX800N (Nippon Steel Corp.) (Fe: 0.960%, O: 0.300%, N: 0.041%). Two wedge-shaped acrylic patterns (with 30 degrees or 15 degrees angles) were prepared. Each alloy was cast in a centrifugal casting machine. Mold filling was evaluated as the missing length between the tip of the casting and the theoretical tip. Vickers hardness of the edge of the castings was also determined. For both angles tested, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in mold filling among these alloys and the control (CP Ti). The results of testing the microhardness near the cast surfaces indicated that the hardened reaction layers on these alloys were thinner at the edge compared to CP Ti.

  14. Mathematical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Minosyan, Ya.P.; Gerasimov, V.G.; Ryadno, A.A.; Solov'yev, Yu.G.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical description of centrifugal casting of long pipes in rapidly-rotating ingot molds is given. The effect of gravity force is neglected. A numerical solution is obtained for the solidification of a steel casting in a thermally insulated mold. The effect of the rate of metal pouring on the motion of the solidification interface is investigated. The disagreement with experimental data is less then 7 percent.

  15. Simulation of cracking cores when molding piston components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, Alena; Soukup, Josef

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with pistons casting made from aluminum alloy. Pistons are casting at steel mold with steel core. The casting is provided by gravity casting machine. The each machine is equipped by two metal molds, which are preheated above temperature 160 °C before use. The steel core is also preheated by flame. The metal molds and cores are heated up within the casting process. The temperature of the metal mold raise up to 200 °C and temperature of core is higher. The surface of the core is treated by nitration. The mold and core are cooled down by water during casting process. The core is overheated and its top part is finally cracked despite its intensive water-cooling. The life time cycle of the core is decreased to approximately 5 to 15 thousands casting, which is only 15 % of life time cycle of core for production of other pistons. The article presents the temperature analysis of the core.

  16. [Application to dental casting machine of the rapid heating infrared image furnace (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Etchu, Y; Noguchi, H

    1980-10-01

    The authors tried to manufacture a casting machine in dentistry by application of the infrared image furnace with a high heating speed and an easy control of a heating temperature. This machine melts an alloy in a carbon crucible set in the furnace, held in the horizontal position. Then, the furnace is turned to the vertical position to drop a melted alloy on the casting mold, and the alloy is cast in the mold by the pressure of Argon gas. The functions of trial casting machine were follows. 1. The trial casting machine was capable of heating to 1250 degrees C within one minute under 4 kW electric power. 2. The castability of the 20% Au-Pd-Ag commercial alloy cast in all casting conditions by the trial casting machine was higher than that of Thermotrol D-2 automatic centrifugal casting machine. 3. Castings of the trial casting machine showed higher tensile strength and elongation than those of the centrifugal casting machine, and the deviation of values got by the trial casting machine was small. In particular, some casting of the trial casting machine showed three times or over elongation values as compared with those of the centrifugal casting machine. 4. When casting conditions (casting temperature, casting pressure) of the trial casting machine changed, the physical properties of castings did not change so much. However, when the mold was not prevented from heating by the furnace in casting, the elongation of castings increased.

  17. The Thermal Distortion of a Funnel Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Schimmel, Ronald C.; Abbel, Gert

    2012-10-01

    This article investigates the thermal distortion of a funnel mold for continuous casting of thin slabs and explores the implications on taper and solidification of the steel shell. The three-dimensional mold temperatures are calculated using shell-mold heat flux and cooling water profiles that were calibrated with plant measurements. The thermal stresses and distorted shape of the mold are calculated with a detailed finite-element model of a symmetric fourth of the entire mold and waterbox assembly, and they are validated with plant thermocouple data and measurements of the wear of the narrow-face copper mold plates. The narrow-face mold distorts into the typical parabolic arc, and the wide face distorts into a "W" shape owing to the large variation in bolt stiffnesses. The thermal expansion of the wide face works against the applied narrow-face taper and funnel effects, so the effect of thermal distortion must be considered to accurately predict the ideal mold taper.

  18. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  19. Effect of casting methods on castability of pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J; Zhang, J Z; Okazaki, M

    1993-12-01

    Two types of patterns were tested for castability: 1) polyester mesh pattern (20mm x 22mm with 100 open squares) and 2) 20mm x 20mm wax plates 1.0 and 1.5 mm in thickness. These materials were invested using a pre-arranged commercial phosphate-bonded investment for titanium. Three different types of casting machines were selected: 1) a pressure-type casting machine with separate melting and casting chambers, 2) a pressure-type casting machine with one chamber and 3) a centrifugal-type casting machine at 3000 rpm. Pure titanium (> 99.5%) was cast into the molds at a mold temperature of 100 degrees C. The castability of mesh pattern was evaluated in terms of the number of cast segment, and the cast plate was evaluated using X-ray transparent images by a digital imaging technique. The centrifugal casting method showed the best castability among these three casting methods.

  20. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cell (WBC) casts are more common with acute kidney infections. Your provider will tell you more about your results. Risks There are no risks with this test. Alternative Names Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  1. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  2. Effect of Electromagnetic Brake on Decreasing Unbalanced Flow in Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Yuji; Furumai, Kohei

    2015-06-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of suppression of unbalanced flow in the mold under high throughput conditions in continuous casting, the effect of using an electromagnetic brake on decreasing molten steel momentum and suppressing unbalanced flow in the mold was investigated. (1) The measured value of the effect of the electromagnetic brake on decreasing molten steel momentum was consistent with the calculated value. Molten steel momentum could be reduced by more than 50% when the Stuart number was more than 3. 5. (2) Increased mold level fluctuations caused by unbalanced flow in the mold are suppressed by applying the optimum magnetic flux density with an electromagnetic brake, even under high throughput conditions.

  3. DUMPING COOLED MOLDS FROM THE SHAKE OUT RAILS ONTO A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DUMPING COOLED MOLDS FROM THE SHAKE OUT RAILS ONTO A VIBRATING CONVEYOR WHICH TRANSPORTS CASTINGS AND SAND TO A SEPARATION SCREEN WHICH SIFTS SAND ONTO BELT CONVEYORS BELOW THAT CARRY IT PAST SWITCH-ACTIVATED WATER INJECTORS TO SIMILAR SWITCH-ACTIVATED FRESH SAND ADDERS BEFORE TRANSPORTING IT TO THE SAND STORAGE BIN WHILE CASTINGS ARE EITHER MANUALLY OR SMALL CRANE LIFTED TO DEGATING AREAS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  4. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  5. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  6. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  7. Effect of Rotational Speeds on the Cast Tube During Vertical Centrifugal Casting Process on Appearance, Microstructure, and Hardness Behavior for Al-2Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Tattimani, Mahantesh S.; Rao, Shrikantha S.

    2015-04-01

    The flow of molten metal plays a crucial role in determining casting quality. During rotation of the mold, melt flow around its inner circumference determines the final configurations and properties of the cast tube. In this paper, Al-2Si alloy is cast in the vertical mold at the various rotational speeds of the mold. The uniform cylinder tube is formed at a rotational speed of 1000 rpm, while before and beyond this speed, irregular-shaped cast tube is formed. Finally, fine structured grain size with high hardness value is found in uniform cast tube compared with others.

  8. Characteristics of medium carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization using the multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ko, Eun-yi; Choi, Joo; Sohn, Il

    2014-11-01

    An oscillating multi-mold simulator with embedded thermocouples was used to study the initial solidification of medium carbon steels and crystallization characteristics of the mold flux. Casting speed variations in the simulator from 0.7 m/min to 1.4 m/min at fixed oscillation frequency and stroke resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Frequency modifications from 2.5 Hz to 5.0 Hz and stroke changes from 8.1 mm to 5.4 mm at fixed casting speeds also resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Surface profile analysis of as-cast steel strips showed characteristic oscillation marks comparable to the narrow faces of the industrial cast slabs. The apparent effect of casting variables on the temperature and surface profiles during the solidification of the medium carbon steels could be correlated to the variations in the negative strip time and subsequent changes in the extent of mold flux infiltration. Back scattered scanning electron microscope analysis of the full length of the retrieved flux film after casting showed cuspidine crystallization ratio that increased from the upper to lower portion of the flux film. This dynamic crystallization and growth of the cuspidine phase increases as the flux is sustained at high temperatures for longer periods. Additional experiments with industrial fluxes designed for soft cooling of medium carbon steel grades showed comparable infiltration thickness of the flux, but the crystallization characteristics were significantly different, which could have a significant impact on the heat transfer rate and mechanism through the flux film.

  9. Integrally Cast Low-Cost Compressor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-03

    and AE355 for discs). Figures 3 through 6 sumarize cast Custom 450 properties compared with wrought A350 and 355 and cast 17 - 4PH (a common compressor...experience with the casting of other Custom 450 alloy and 17 - 4PH alloy components. Although higher cagting and mold temperatures normally assist alloy...by regulation of air pressure. Tip deflection was related to the stress at failure locations by strain gaging techniques. 94 AOL- TABLE 17 . TENSILE

  10. Casting Freedom, 1860-1862

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…

  11. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  12. Properties of shaped castings made of modern cast VML18 and VML20 magnesium alloys manufactured by new methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. A.; Duyunova, V. A.; Uridiya, Z. P.; Trofimov, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    The methods of casting of modern magnesium alloys (corrosion-resistant Mg-Al-Zn VML18 alloy and a high-strength Mg-Zn-Zr VML20 alloy) into the temporary molds made of cold-hardening mixtures and the molds produced by 3D printing are considered. The mechanical properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, impact toughness), the corrosion properties, and the microstructure of the ingots are studied. The experimental results are used to choose the molds and the methods of casting of the parts of the control system of advanced aircrafts, which are made of modern cast magnesium alloys VML18 and VML20.

  13. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Piwonka, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    This report details results of a 30-month program to develop methods of making clean ferrous castings, i.e., castings free of inclusions and surface defects. The program was divided into 3 tasks: techniques for producing clean steel castings, electromagnetic removal of inclusions from ferrous melts, and study of causes of metal penetration in sand molds in cast iron.

  14. Floods and Mold Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mold growth may be a problem after flooding. Excess moisture in the home is cause for concern about indoor air quality primarily because it provides breeding conditions for pests, molds and other microorganisms.

  15. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  16. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  17. Mold and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuscano, Antoinette

    1998-01-01

    Mold can seriously affect the health of children with asthma or allergies. Indoor air problems related to mold can be difficult to identify, but when several students who spend time in the same classroom area show allergic symptoms, it is important to consider mold and air quality. Failure to respond promptly can have serious consequences. (SM)

  18. Interactive Mold House Tour

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Get a quick glimpse of some of the most important ways to protect your home from mold by this interactive tour of the Mold House. Room-by-room, you'll learn about common mold issues and how to address them.

  19. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  20. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  1. Effect of casting methods on accuracy of peridental restorations.

    PubMed

    Finger, W; Kota, K

    1982-06-01

    The present study has shown that the accuracy of peridental gold alloy castings depends 1) on the type of casting machine used, 2) on the diameter of the casting sprue, and 3) on the strength properties of the investment material. The dependence between the accuracy and the three factors mentioned is based on erosion of the investment mold by the inflow of the liquid casting alloy. The vacuum casting technique proved to be a more gentle casting method than centrifugal and vacuum/pressure techniques.

  2. Maritime Cast Shop Integrated Improvement Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-20

    traditional tactic of improving “one casting at a time.” The proposal included four elements integrated into a program designed to improve the upgrade...Software Tools – off the shelf technology to improve mold design  Technical Processes Assessment – deploy industry best practice technologies...source. The third party used the 3-D CAD drawings produced by the MCS and evaluated mold design using physics based solidification software. The MCS

  3. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  4. Inference of optimal speed for sound centrifugal casting of Al-12Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, Shailesh Rao; Mukunda, P. G.; Rao, Shrikantha S.; Sudhakar, K. G.

    2011-05-01

    True centrifugal casting is a standard casting technique for the manufacture of hollow, intricate and sound castings without the use of cores. The molten metal or alloy poured into the rotating mold forms a hollow casting as the centrifugal forces lift the liquid along the mold inner surface. When a mold is rotated at low and very high speeds defects are found in the final castings. Obtaining the critical speed for sound castings should not be a matter of guess or based on experience. The defects in the casting are mainly due to the behavior of the molten metal during the teeming and solidification process. Motion of molten metal at various speeds and its effect during casting are addressed in this paper. Eutectic Al-12Si alloy is taken as an experiment fluid and its performance during various rotational speeds is discussed.

  5. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings.

  6. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOEpatents

    Gunkel, Ronald W.; Podey, Larry L.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2002-11-05

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  7. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  8. The cast structure of a 7075 alloy produced by a water-cooling centrifugal casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.W. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Jong, S.H.

    1994-03-01

    A water-cooling centrifugal casting method was applied to cast the 7075 Al alloy to generate a much finer cast structure than that produced by conventional ingot casting methods. The effects of casting parameters, i.e., rotation speed, pouring temperature, water flow, and grain refiner, on casting structure were systematically studied so that the optimum casting condition and the solidification mechanism could be established. The typical cast structure along the thickness direction of a cast ring could be divided into four equiaxed zones, including the chill zone which is in contact with the mold wall. All zones have their characteristic grain size, morphology, and relative thickness, which are all dependent on the casting condition. The optimum casting condition yielding the finest structure available was found to be 3,000 rpm, 650 C, and sufficient water cooling. A uniform portion occupying 90 pct of the whole thickness and having a grain size of 17 [mu]m could be achieved under such a casting condition. When a grain refiner was added, the whole ring became further concentrated with grains of fine structure. A mechanism concerning the overall effects of rapid solidification, turbulent flow, and centrifugal force has been proposed for the present casting method and might explain the zone-structure formation and the effects of the casting parameters on microstructural features.

  9. 53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  10. Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical simulation model for the horizontal centrifugal pipe casting process was developed with the commercial simulation package Flow3D. It considers - additionally to mass, energy and momentum conservation equations and free surface tracking - the fast radial and slower horizontal movement of the mold. The iron inflow is not steady state but time dependent. Of special importance is the friction between the liquid and the mold in connection with the viscosity and turbulence of the iron. Experiments with the mold at controlled revolution speeds were carried out using a high-speed camera. From these experiments friction coefficients for the description of the interaction between mold and melt were obtained. With the simulation model, the influence of typical process parameters (e.g. melts inflow, mold movement, melt temperature, cooling media) on the wall thickness of the pipes can be studied. The comparison to results of pipes from production shows a good agreement between simulation and reality.

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwww of... - Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equations To Calculate Organic HAP Emissions Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams 1 Table 1 to Subpart... Factors for Specific Open Molding and Centrifugal Casting Process Streams ER25AU05.020 ER25AU05.021...

  16. Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  17. Guide to Molds at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., Albany, NY.

    Asserting that molds growing in schools can be harmful to children's health and learning, this guide offers information about the issue. It provides an overview of the basics, then addresses testing, types of molds, molds and health, monitoring schools for mold, mold prevention and clean-up tips for schools, and what parents should do if they…

  18. Process for Making Ceramic Mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for slip casting molds that can be more economically automated and that also exhibits greater dimensional stability is disclosed. The process involves subjecting an investment pattern, preferably made from wax, to successive cycles of wet-dipping in a slurry of colloidal, silica-based binder and dry powder-coating, or stuccoing with plaster of Paris or calcium sulfate mixtures to produce a multi-layer shell over the pattern. The invention as claimed entails applying a primary and a secondary coating to the investment pattern. At least two wet-dipping on in a primary slurry and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the primary coating, and an additional two wet-dippings and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the secondary, or back-up, coating. The primary and secondary coatings produce a multi-layered shell pattern. The multi-layered shell pattern is placed in a furnace first to cure and harden, and then to vaporize the investment pattern, leaving a detailed, high precision shell mold.

  19. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  20. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. VIEW POURING PLATFORM SHOWING MOLD POURING JACKETS AND WEIGHTS AND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW POURING PLATFORM SHOWING MOLD POURING JACKETS AND WEIGHTS AND, IN THE FOREGROUND, SAND RETURN FROM THE SHAKEOUT ACTUATING A SIMPLE LEVER SYSTEM THAT ADDED FRESH WATER TO THE SAND IN PREPARATION FOR ITS REUSE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  2. Molded elastomer provides compact ferrite-core holder, simplifies assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. R.

    1964-01-01

    A ferrite-core holder, fabricated by casting an elastomer in a simple mold, simplifies the assembly of modular matrix units for computers. Use of the device permits the core leads to be multiply threaded and soldered to terminals, without requiring intermediate terminals.

  3. Mold Allergy: Proper Humidifier Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Allergy Allergy: Overview Allergy: Allergens Mold Allergy Proper Humidifier Care Proper Humidifier Care Make ... neglected humidifier can be a major source of mold and mold spores. Learn how to keep a ...

  4. Rapid mold replication

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G. Jr.; Brown, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The desire to reduce tooling costs have driven manufacturers to investigate new manufacturing methods and materials. In the plastics injection molding industry replicating molds to meet production needs is time consuming (up to 6 months) and costly in terms of lost business. We have recently completed a feasibility study demonstrating the capability of high rate Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) in producing mold inserts in days, not months. In the current practice a graphite mandrel, in the shape of the insert`s negative image, was exposed to a jet of metal vapor atoms emanating from an electron beam heated source of an aluminum-bronze alloy. The condensation rate of the metal atoms on the mandrel was sufficient to allow the deposit to grow at over 30 {mu}m/min or 1.2 mils per minute. The vaporization process continued for approximately 14 hours after which the mandrel and deposit were removed from the EBPVD vacuum chamber. The mandrel and condensate were easily separated resulting in a fully dense aluminum-bronze mold insert about 2.5 cm or one inch thick. This mold was subsequently cleaned and drilled for water cooling passages and mounted on a fixture for operation in an actual injection molding machine. Results of the mold`s operation were extremely successful showing great promise for this technique. This paper describes the EBPVD feasibility demonstration in more detail and discusses future development work needed to bring this technique into practice.

  5. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  6. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  7. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity.

  8. Mold design with simulation for chalcogenide glass precision molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Li, Junqi; Zhang, Feng; Su, Ying; Wang, Zhongqiang

    2016-10-01

    Compare with the manufacturing of the traditional infrared material, such as signal crystal germanium, zinc sulfide, zinc selenide etc, chalcogenide infrared glass is suitable for precision molding for the low soften temperature to have large mass industry production. So the researches of precision glass molding are necessary, especially for the fast development of infrared product. The mold design is one of the key technologies of precision glass molding. In this paper, the mold processing of a sample chalcogenide glass from the technical drawing, mold design, molding to the lens are introduced. From the result of the precision molding, the technology of finite element simulation is a useful way to guiding the mold design. The molded lens by using mold process fit the design requirement.

  9. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  10. 40 CFR 464.40 - Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the zinc... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.40 Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory. The provisions of...

  11. 40 CFR 464.40 - Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability; description of the zinc... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.40 Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory. The provisions of...

  12. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  13. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  14. Glass molding process with mold lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Davey, Richard G.

    1978-06-27

    Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

  15. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  16. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  17. 92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-53. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  18. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  19. Molds in the Environment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould [PDF – 2.52 MB] . Other ...

  20. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... prevention ... more Fact Sheet: Flood Cleanup - Avoiding Indoor Air Quality Problems Flooding in a home or building can ...

  1. Breaking the Mold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Using the example of a Texas elementary school, describes how to eliminate mold and mildew from school facilities, including discovering the problem, responding quickly, reconstructing the area, and crisis planning and prevention. (EV)

  2. Newborn head molding

    MedlinePlus

    ... molding. In: Graham JM, Sanchez-Lara PA, eds. Smiths' Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Smith J. Initial evaluation. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar SU, ...

  3. Mold After a Disaster

    MedlinePlus

    ... ceiling tiles, insulation material, some clothing, leather, paper, wood, and food. Removal and cleaning are important because ... wish to disinfect, refer to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document, A Brief Guide to Mold ...

  4. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... furnace and air conditioner filters often. Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to best remove mold from the air. In the bathroom: Use an exhaust fan when you shower or take baths. Use a ...

  5. Effect of casting method on castability of titanium and dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Woldu, M; Watanabe, K; Okabe, T

    2000-09-01

    Titanium, once considered to be difficult to cast because of its relatively high melting point (1670 +/- 50 degrees C) and strong chemical affinity, can now be acceptably cast using newly developed casting apparatus. The objectives of this study were to examine the castability of commercially pure (CP) titanium using an ultra high-speed centrifugal casting machine and a pressure difference-type casting unit and to compare the castability of titanium with that of conventional dental casting alloys. To determine castability, two types of patterns were used: a mesh pattern of 22 x 24 mm cut polyether thread sieve, and a saucer pattern (24 mm diameter) perforated to create four T-shaped ends. The casting equipment significantly affected the mold filling of both patterns (p < 0.001). The castability indices obtained from both patterns of CP titanium cast in the centrifugal casting machine were significantly (p < 0.05) better than the indices of the castings produced in the pressure-difference casting unit. The radiographs of the saucer pattern cast in the centrifugal casting machine showed some pores that were fewer and smaller in size than the pores found in castings made in the pressure-difference unit. When the ultra high-speed centrifugal casting machine was used with the manufacturer's recommended mold material, the castability of titanium was similar to that of gold alloy or Ni-Cr alloy cast by conventional means.

  6. Energy Saving Melting andRevert Reduction Technology (E0SMARRT): Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimension for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Dr. Mark Samonds; Adi Sholapurwalla; Sam Scott

    2008-11-21

    The investment casting process is an expendable mold process where wax patterns of the part and rigging are molded, assembled, shelled and melted to produce a ceramic mold matching the shape of the component to be cast. Investment casting is an important manufacturing method for critical parts because of the ability to maintain dimensional shape and tolerances. However, these tolerances can be easily exceeded if the molding components do not maintain their individual shapes well. In the investment casting process there are several opportunities for the final casting shape to not maintain the intended size and shape, such as shrinkage of the wax in the injection tool, the modification of the shape during shell heating, and with the thermal shrink and distortion in the casting process. Studies have been completed to look at the casting and shell distortions through the process in earlier phases of this project. Dr. Adrian Sabau at Oak Ridge National Labs performed characterizations and validations of 17-4 PH stainless steel in primarily fused silica shell systems with good agreement between analysis results and experimental data. Further tasks provided material property measurements of wax and methodology for employing a viscoelastic definition of wax materials into software. The final set of tasks involved the implementation of the findings into the commercial casting analysis software ProCAST, owned and maintained by ESI Group. This included: o the transfer of the wax material property data from its raw form into separate temperature-dependent thermophysical and mechanical property datasets o adding this wax material property data into an easily viewable and modifiable user interface within the pre-processing application of the ProCAST suite, namely PreCAST o and validating the data and viscoelastic wax model with respect to experimental results

  7. [On deffect of cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy for dental castings (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nasu, T; Hikichi, H; Noguchi, H

    1978-01-01

    We studied about castability and microporosity of cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy for dental casting in various methods of fusion and casting. The combinations of fusion and casting were induction fusion and centrifugal casting, arc discharge fusion and argon gas pressure casting and oxy-acetylene flame fusion and centrifugal casting. The following results were obtained. 1. The amount of microposity was smaller, when only mold temperature was low, and as mold temperature and casting temperature were high, castability was better. 2. The arc discharge fusion and argon gas pressure casting was the best method about castability and microporosity in three methods. Second method was the induction fusion and centrifugal casting. 3. In the induction fusion and centrifugal casting, blowing arong gas of 1 l/min to molten metal to protect the metal from oxidization improved the castability the best, but amount of microporosity was large, so that it was needed to lower the mold temperature in this condition. 4. The oxyacetylene flame fusion and centrifugal casting was not suitable for the casting of Co-Cr alloy "Regalloy No. 3", for the alloy was made for the induction fusion casting.

  8. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  9. Technologies for Use in the Formation of a Differentiated Structure in Iron Billets Used in Glass Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    Causes for the failure of pig iron press molds that are parts of a glass mold are described. Criteria for differentiating the structure of pig iron are established. Ways of obtaining a differentiated structure of a casting product are outlined. A heat treatment regime for the billets is determined.

  10. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  11. Tundish Technology for Casting Clean Steel: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2016-08-01

    With increasing demand of high-quality clean steel, cleanliness is of paramount importance in steel production and casting. Tundish plays an important role in controlling the continuously cast steel quality as it links a batch vessel, ladle, to a continuous casting mold. Tundish is also the last vessel in which metal flows before solidifying in mold. For controlling the quality of steel, flow and temperature control of the melt are critical, and these are presented in this paper. Use of proper flux, design of flow control devices, and gas injection in tundish become important factors in casting clean steel. Recycling of hot tundish, centrifugal flow tundish, H-shaped tundish, etc. are some of the developments which were implemented to cast clean steel and these are discussed.

  12. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  13. Silica exposure in hand grinding steel castings.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Froehlich, P A; Gressel, M G; Hall, R M; Clark, N J; Bost, P; Fischbach, T

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to silica dust was studied in the grinding of castings in a steel foundry that used conventional personal sampling methods and new real-time sampling techniques developed for the identification of high-exposure tasks and tools. Approximately one-third of the personal samples exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure limit for crystalline silica, a fraction similar to that identified in other studies of casting cleaning. Of five tools used to clean the castings, the tools with the largest wheels, a 6-in. grinder and a 4-in. cutoff wheel, were shown to be the major sources of dust exposure. Existing dust control consisted of the use of downdraft grinding benches. The size of the casting precluded working at a distance close enough to the grates of the downdraft benches for efficient capture of the grinding dust. In addition, measurements of air recirculated from the downdraft benches indicated that less than one-half of the respirable particles were removed from the contaminated airstream. Previous studies have shown that silica exposures in the cleaning of castings can be reduced or eliminated through the use of mold coatings, which minimize sand burn-in on the casting surface; by application of high-velocity, low-volume exhaust hoods; and by the use of a nonsilica molding aggregate such as olivine. This study concluded that all these methods would be appropriate control options.

  14. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  15. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  16. Comparative analysis of dental enamel polyvinylsiloxane impression and polyurethane casting methods for SEM research.

    PubMed

    Galbany, Jordi; Estebaranz, Ferran; Martínez, Laura M; Romero, Alejandro; De Juan, Joaquín; Turbón, Daniel; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2006-04-01

    Dental casting is a very common procedure for making high-quality replicas of paleo-anthropological remains. Replicas are frequently used, instead of original remains, to study both fossil and extant Primate teeth in morphological and metrical analyses. Several commercial products can be used in molds. This study analyzed SEM image resolution and enamel surface feature definition of tooth molds at various magnification levels and obtained, with both Coltène and 3M low-viscosity body polyvinylsiloxane impression, materials and polyurethane casts. Results, through comparison with the original teeth, show that both the negative molds and the positive casts are highly reliable in replicating enamel surfaces. However, positive cast quality is optimal for SEM observation only till the fourth consecutive replica from the original mold, especially at high SEM magnification levels.

  17. SIDE VIEW OF PREPARATION FOR PULLING CONTINUOUSLYCAST "CAKES" FROM MOLDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SIDE VIEW OF PREPARATION FOR PULLING CONTINUOUSLY-CAST "CAKES" FROM MOLDS AT #03 STATION. WHEN THE CAKES HAVE COOLED SUFFICIENTLY, THE CASTER STATION IS MOVED ASIDE TO EXPOSE THE QUENCH TANK AND MOLDS. EACH CAKE OF THE THREE CAKES WEIGHS UP TO APPROXIMATELY 20,000 LBS THE DIMENSIONS OF BRASS CAKES RANGE UP TO 27 1\\2" WIDE X 6 3\\4" THICK X 25' LONG, CORRESPONDING MAXIMUMS FOR COPPER CAKES ARE 37 1\\2" X 5" X 24'. #01 STATION, DATING FROM THE EARLY 1960'S CASTS ONLY A SINGLE BAR (RATHER THAN THREE SIMULTANEOUSLY), THAT IS APPROXIMATELY HALF THE LENGTH OF CAKES FROM THE OTHER STATIONS (150' V. 300") AND WEIGHS UP TO 12,500 LBS. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  18. SIDE VIEW OF PREPARATION FOR PULLING CONTINUOUSLYCAST "CAKES" FROM MOLDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SIDE VIEW OF PREPARATION FOR PULLING CONTINUOUSLY-CAST "CAKES" FROM MOLDS AT #03 STATION. WHEN THE CAKES HAVE COOLED SUFFICIENTLY, THE CASTER STATION IS MOVED ASIDE TO EXPOSE THE QUENCH TANK AND MOLDS. EACH CAKE OF THE THREE CAKES WEIGHS UP TO APPROXIMATELY 20,000. THE DIMENSIONS OF BRASS CAKES RANGE UP TO 27 1\\2" WIDE X 6 3\\4" THICK X 25' LONG, CORRESPONDING MAXIMUMS FOR COPPER CAKES ARE 37 1\\2" X 5" X 24'. #01 STATION, DATING FROM THE EARLY 1960'S CASTS ONLY A SINGLE BAR (RATHER THAN THREE SIMULTANEOUSLY), THAT IS APPROXIMATELY HALF THE LENGTH OF CAKES FROM THE OTHER STATIONS (150' V. 300") AND WEIGHS UP TO 12,500 LBS. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  19. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  20. Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.; Peker, A.

    1998-08-25

    A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast. 8 figs.

  1. Molding process for imidazopyrrolone polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for producing shaped articles of imidazopyrrolone polymers comprising molding imidazopyrrolone polymer molding power under pressure and at a temperature greater than 475 C. Moderate pressures may be employed. Preferably, prior to molding, a preform is prepared by isostatic compression. The preform may be molded at a relatively low initial pressure and temperature; as the temperature is increased to a value greater than 475 C., the pressure is also increased.

  2. Creating Cast Paper Sculpture: A Simple Lesson in Papermaking and Moldmaking. AMACO[R] Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet; Gamble, David

    This lesson combines two significant art forms into one lesson. Students first learn the techniques necessary to create a relief sculpture terra cotta clay mold. Using that mold, students will experience the art of paper making and paper casting simply, safely, and economically. A brief history of the art of paper making is provided, along with…

  3. Estimation of solidification time during casting by use of a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J; Kimura, H; Ida, K

    1982-10-01

    Time-dependent temperature profiles in dental casting molds were analyzed by an unsteady heat conduction model. The thermal conductivity and initial temperature of the mold greatly affected the heat transfer in the mold. The thermal conductivities of gypsum- and phosphate-bonded investments at high temperatures were accurately measured by means of the hot wire method. From the data obtained, the solidification times of Ag, Ag alloy, and Co-Cr alloy were calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  4. A custom-made silicon mold for pressure therapy to ear keloids.

    PubMed

    Yigit, B; Yazar, M; Alyanak, A; Guven, E

    2009-11-01

    Keloids are raised reddish nodules that develop at the site of an injury. They are characterized histologically by an abundance of fibroblasts, thick collagen bundles, and ground substance. Auricular keloid formation is a known complication of ear piercing. Many types of treatments have been described for auricular keloids.Pressure therapy in combination with surgery, corticosteroid injection, or both is widely used to manage and prevent hypertrophic scarring. Many pressure devices and procedures have been developed. However, all of them are designed for the earlobe region. If a keloid grows in the posterior auricular region, none of the devices described in the literature will be effective. The authors developed a custom-made silicon ear mold that covers whole ear. With this mold, pressure can be applied homogeneously to the lobule and cartilaginous region, which the other devices described in the literature cannot affect. The preparation technique includes making the negative cast mold of the patient's ear, creating the positive cast mold from the negative cast mold, and forming the negative silicon mold from the positive cast. After all the processes, a silicon sheet has been designed according to the region needing to be pressurized. The designed silicon sheet is applied to the region, followed by placement of the silicon mold. A simple tennis head band can be used to stabilize the silicon cast. If the keloid extends to the posterior auricular region, pressurizing with clips or other devices described previously will be difficult. Application of pressure to the cartilaginous auricle needs custom-made devices. At this point, a pressure sore caused by a device applied to the ear is the most important problem. To prevent the ear from developing a pressure sore, the device should press to whole area homogeneously. For this reason, the device applied for pressure therapy to the ear must be custom made.

  5. Face Coat Materials Through Sessile Drop and Investment Casting Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Blackburn, Stuart; Withey, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Investment casting is uniquely suited to the manufacture of Ti alloys for the production of near net-shape components, reducing material waste, and machining costs. Because of the high reactivity of titanium and its based alloy, the molds which are used in the investment casting process require high chemical inertness, which results in them being very costly and non-recyclable. In order to reduce the cost of these molds, traditionally using yttria as the face coat, two alternative molds are developed in this study with face coat materials of Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2. The slurry properties and chemical inertness of the face coats were evaluated for viscosity, thermal expansion, friability, and phase development. The chemical inertness of these two molds were determined using both the sessile drop test and investment casting to identify the levels of interaction with a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2B alloy. The results illustrated that the molds using Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2 as the face coats both showed excellent sintering properties and chemical inertness when compared to the yttria face coat. They can consequently be used as two alternative face coats for the investment casting of TiAl alloys.

  6. Bioreactor-free tissue engineering: directed tissue assembly by centrifugal casting.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-02-01

    Casting is a process by which a material is introduced into a mold while it is liquid, allowed to solidify in a predefined shape inside the mold, and then removed to give a fabricated object, part or casing. Centrifugal casting could be defined as a process of molding using centrifugal forces. Although the centrifugal casting technology has a long history in metal manufacturing and in the plastics industry, only recently has this technology attracted the attention of tissue engineers. Initially, centrifugation was used to optimize cell seeding on a solid scaffold. More recently, centrifugal casting has been used to create tubular scaffolds and both tubular and flat multilayered, living tissue constructs. These newer applications were enabled by a new class of biocompatible in situ crosslinkable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix. Herein the authors summarize the state of the art of centrifugal casting technology in tissue engineering, they outline associated technological challenges, and they discuss the potential future for clinical applications.

  7. Innovative molding technologies for the fabrication of components for microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotter, Volker; Benzler, Tobias; Hanemann, Thomas; Woellmer, Heinz; Ruprecht, Robert; Hausselt, Juergen H.

    1999-03-01

    Economic success of microsystems technology requires a wide range of materials as well as the related manufacturing processes. A suitable technology for medium/large scale production is micro injection molding which actually allows the manufacturing of plastic microstructures with 20 microns minimum thickness, structural details of approximately 0.2 microns or maximum aspect ratios of more than 20. These microstructures are, for example, applied as components in micro optics, micro fluidics or minimally invasive surgery. This is demonstrated by microparts that are currently available or will be available soon. For higher economic efficiency and cost reduction, fully electrical injection modeling machines of higher accuracy have been applied. Also, micro insert injection molding reduces mounting costs. Manufacturing of metal or ceramic microparts by powder injection modeling allows large-scale production of complex shaped microstructures with a wide range of materials. Typical examples are sintered structured like stepped LIGA- gear wheels with minimal dimensions of 50 microns in different metal and ceramic materials. Micro Precision Casting originating from conventional investment casting is a suitable process for small/medium-scale production. Examples are microturbine housings made of precious metal alloys. An approach similar to rapid prototyping applies photocurable reactive resins. Photoinduced molding of low viscous resins under ambient conditions leads to significantly reduced cycle times. Additionally, rapid testing of new composite materials can be performed easily. Microcomponents molded from polymers and different composites like dyes with nonlinear optical properties and nanosized ceramic powders will be presented.

  8. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  9. Fabrication of Microfluidic Valves Using a Hydrogel Molding Method

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Yusuke; Hirama, Hirotada; Torii, Toru

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a method for fabricating a microfluidic valve made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a rapid prototyping method for microchannels through hydrogel cast molding is discussed. Currently, the valves in microchannels play an important role in various microfluidic devices. The technology to prototype microfluidic valves rapidly is actively being developed. For the rapid prototyping of PDMS microchannels, a method that uses a hydrogel as the casting mold has been recently developed. This technique can be used to prepare a three-dimensional structure through simple and uncomplicated methods. In this study, we were able to fabricate microfluidic valves easily using this rapid prototyping method that utilizes hydrogel cast molding. In addition, we confirmed that the valve displacement could be predicted within a range of constant pressures. Moreover, because microfluidic valves fabricated using this method can be directly observed from a cross-sectional direction, we anticipate that this technology will significantly contribute to clarifying fluid behavior and other phenomena in microchannels and microfluidic valves with complex structures. PMID:26300303

  10. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  11. Advanced investment cast processing for gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.; Govern, C.

    1995-12-31

    Investment casting of gamma titanium aluminide alloys has become the near-term process of choice for component manufacture. This is largely due to its near-net shape processing capabilities which allow cast gamma components to be manufactured at a lower cost when compared to wrought or powder methods. Many papers have been published discussing the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure of HIP processed samples. However, the relationship between casting parameters and resultant microstructures has not been widely discussed. An L9 DOE casting experiment was performed to examine mold preheat, furnace atmosphere, shell type and gating design parameters. It was determined that mold preheat had a very significant effect on as-cast and as-HIP processed microstructures. Mold preheats of 70 F and 750 F produced HIP Processed microstructures containing 80 to >90% equiaxed gamma grains and 2,100 F mold preheats produced structures containing 10--30% equiaxed gamma grains. The results of this experiment will be presented, including optical microstructures and microprobe analysis.

  12. Neutron radiography inspection of investment castings.

    PubMed

    Richards, W J; Barrett, J R; Springgate, M E; Shields, K C

    2004-10-01

    Investment casting, also known as the lost wax process, is a manufacturing method employed to produce near net shape metal articles. Traditionally, investment casting has been used to produce structural titanium castings for aero-engine applications with wall thickness less than 1 in (2.54 cm). Recently, airframe manufacturers have been exploring the use of titanium investment casting to replace components traditionally produced from forgings. Use of titanium investment castings for these applications reduces weight, cost, lead time, and part count. Recently, the investment casting process has been selected to produce fracture critical structural titanium airframe components. These airframe components have pushed the traditional inspection techniques to their physical limits due to cross sections on the order of 3 in (7.6 cm). To overcome these inspection limitations, a process incorporating neutron radiography (n-ray) has been developed. In this process, the facecoat of the investment casting mold material contains a cocalcined mixture of yttrium oxide and gadolinium oxide. The presence of the gadolinium oxide, allows for neutron radiographic imaging (and eventual removal and repair) of mold facecoat inclusions that remain within these thick cross sectional castings. Probability of detection (POD) studies have shown a 3 x improvement of detecting a 0.050 x 0.007 in2 (1.270 x 0.178 mm2) inclusion of this cocalcined material using n-ray techniques when compared to the POD using traditional X-ray techniques. Further, it has been shown that this n-ray compatible mold facecoat material produces titanium castings of equal metallurgical quality when compared to the traditional materials. Since investment castings can be very large and heavy, the neutron radiography facilities at the University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (UCD/MNRC) were used to develop the inspection techniques. The UCD/MNRC has very unique facilities that can handle large

  13. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... moving. The outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, ... color! These casts are lighter and stronger than plaster casts. Plaster casts are usually white and made ...

  14. Atomic layer deposition as pore diameter adjustment tool for nanoporous aluminum oxide injection molding masks.

    PubMed

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Rasilainen, Tiina; Puukilainen, Esa; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2008-05-06

    The wetting properties of polypropylene (PP) surfaces were modified by adjusting the dimensions of the surface nanostructure. The nanostructures were generated by injection molding with nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as the mold insert. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of molybdenum nitride film was used to control the pore diameters of the AAO inserts. The original 50-nm pore diameter of AAO was adjusted by depositing films of thickness 5, 10, and 15 nm on AAO. Bis(tert-butylimido)-bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum and ammonia were used as precursors in deposition. The resulting pore diameters in the nitride-coated AAO inserts were 40, 30, and 20 nm, respectively. Injection molding of PP was conducted with the coated inserts, as well as with the non-coated insert. Besides the pore diameter, the injection mold temperature was varied with temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 degrees C tested. Water contact angles of PP casts were measured and compared with theoretical contact angles calculated from Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories. The highest contact angle, 140 degrees , was observed for PP molded with the AAO mold insert with 30-nm pore diameter. The Cassie-Baxter theory showed better fit than the Wenzel theory to the experimental values. With the optimal AAO mask, the nanofeatures in the molded PP pieces were 100 nm high. In explanation of this finding, it is suggested that some sticking and stretching of the nanofeatures occurs during the molding. Increase in the mold temperature increased the contact angle.

  15. Application of Non-Arrhenius Models to the Viscosity of Mold Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-06-01

    The mold flux in continuous casting mold experiences a significant temperature gradient ranging from more than 1773 K (1500 °C) to room temperature, and the viscosity of the mold flux would therefore have a non-Arrhenius temperature dependency in such a wide temperature region. Three non-Arrhenius models, including Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT), Adam and Gibbs (AG), and Avramov (AV), were conducted to describe the relationship between the viscosity and temperature of mold flux in the temperature gradient existing in the casting mold. It found that the results predicted by the VFT and AG models are closer to the measured ones than those by the AV model and that they are much better than the Arrhenius model in characterizing the variation of viscosity of mold flux vs temperature. In addition, the VFT temperature and AG temperature can be considered to be key benchmarks in characterizing the lubrication ability of mold flux beyond the break temperature and glass transition temperature.

  16. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  17. The potential of centrifugal casting for the production of near net shape uranium parts

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.

    1993-09-01

    This report was written to provide a detailed summary of a literature survey on the near net shape casting process of centrifugal casting. Centrifugal casting is one potential casting method which could satisfy the requirements of the LANL program titled Near Net Shape Casting of Uranium for Reduced Environmental, Safety and Health Impact. In this report, centrifugal casting techniques are reviewed and an assessment of the ability to achieve the near net shape and waste minimization goals of the LANL program by using these techniques is made. Based upon the literature reviewed, it is concluded that if properly modified for operation within a vacuum, vertical or horizontal centrifugation could be used to safely cast uranium for the production of hollow, cylindrical parts. However, for the production of components of geometries other than hollow tubes, vertical centrifugation could be combined with other casting methods such as semi-permanent mold or investment casting.

  18. Casting: Pearls and pitfalls learned while caring for children’s fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Shawn; McDowell, Mitchell; Schlechter, John

    2016-01-01

    Casting is a routine procedure used for fracture care in the pediatric population. The purpose of this review is to provide pearls and pitfalls that our institution has learned from previous literature. When applying the cast, we recommend using cotton padding for the liner and fiberglass or plaster depending on how much swelling is expected. A well-molded cast must be applied in order to prevent further fracture displacement. Cast valving is a valuable technique that allows a decrease in pressure which prevents discomfort and complications like compartment syndrome. Preventing thermal injuries, skin complications, and a wet cast are other important considerations when caring for casts. Appropriate use of a cast saw, avoiding pressure spots, and properly covering the cast are ways to respectively prevent those complications. Lastly, patient education remains one of the most valuable tools in ensuring proper cast maintenance. PMID:27672566

  19. Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article

    DOEpatents

    Mangels, John A.; Dickie, Ray A.

    1985-01-01

    The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

  20. Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

    2006-02-08

    Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

  1. Expandable pattern casting research. Phase 2, Final report, October 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001--0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  2. Fabrication of Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  3. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  4. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  5. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  6. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  7. A Statistics-Based Cracking Criterion of Resin-Bonded Silica Sand for Casting Process Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Lu, Yan; Ripplinger, Keith; Detwiler, Duane; Luo, Alan A.

    2017-02-01

    Cracking of sand molds/cores can result in many casting defects such as veining. A robust cracking criterion is needed in casting process simulation for predicting/controlling such defects. A cracking probability map, relating to fracture stress and effective volume, was proposed for resin-bonded silica sand based on Weibull statistics. Three-point bending test results of sand samples were used to generate the cracking map and set up a safety line for cracking criterion. Tensile test results confirmed the accuracy of the safety line for cracking prediction. A laboratory casting experiment was designed and carried out to predict cracking of a cup mold during aluminum casting. The stress-strain behavior and the effective volume of the cup molds were calculated using a finite element analysis code ProCAST®. Furthermore, an energy dispersive spectroscopy fractographic examination of the sand samples confirmed the binder cracking in resin-bonded silica sand.

  8. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  9. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  10. Study of protective coatings for aluminum die casting molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ildiko; Rosso, Mario; Gobber, Federico Simone

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of some protective coatings on steel substrate are presented. The coatings are realized by plasma spray techniques. The substrate material used is a Cr-Mo-V based hot work tool steel, initially submitted to vacuum heat treatment to achieve homogeneous hardness. The main attention is focused on the study of wear and on the characterization of the interface between the substrate material and the coating layer, because of their key role in determining the resistance of the coating layer. Simulation of friction and wear processes is performed by pin-on-disk test and the tested samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Fundamentals of Mold Free Casting: Experimental and Computational Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Ceccio, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Researchers are developing the technology of 'Ballistic Particle Manufacturing' (BPM) in which individual drops are precisely layered onto a substrate, and the drops are deposited so as to prevent splatting. These individual drops will ultimately be combined to form a net-shape, three-dimensional object. Our understanding of controlled drop deposition as applied to BPM is far from complete. Process parameters include the size and temperature of the liquid metal drop, its impact velocity and trajectory, and the condition and temperature of the substrate. Quantitative knowledge of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer of drop deposition and solidification are necessary to fully optimize the manufacturing process and to control the material microstructure of the final part. The object of this study is to examine the dynamics of liquid metal drops as they impinge upon a solid surface and solidify under conditions consistent with BPM (i.e. conditions which produce non-splatting drops). A program of both numerical simulations and experiments will be conducted. Questions this study will address include the following: How do the deformation and solidification of the drop depend on the properties of the fluid drop and the solid substrate? How does the presence of previously deposited drops affect the impingement and solidification process? How does the impingement of the new drop affect already deposited material? How does the cooling rate and solidification of the drops influence the material microstructure?

  12. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Watkins, Thomas R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith; England, Roger

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the proposed project between Cummins and ORNL is to significantly reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create injection molds to make plastic components. Presently, the high cost of this tooling forces the design decision to make cast aluminum parts because Cummins typical production volumes are too low to allow injection molded plastic parts to be cost effective with the amortized cost of the injection molding tooling. In addition to reducing the weight of components, polymer injection molding allows the opportunity for the alternative cooling methods, via nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas cooling offers an environmentally and economically attractive cooling option, if the mold can be manufactured economically. In this project, a current injection molding design was optimized for cooling using nitrogen gas. The various components of the injection mold tooling were fabricated using the Renishaw powder bed laser additive manufacturing technology. Subsequent machining was performed on the as deposited components to form a working assembly. The injection mold is scheduled to be tested in a projection setting at a commercial vendor selected by Cummins.

  13. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  14. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  15. Three-Dimensional Molding Based on Microstereolithography Using Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Slurry for the Production of Bioceramic Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Takashi; Inada, Makoto; Maruo, Shoji

    2011-06-01

    We report on a three-dimensional (3D) molding technique of fabricating bioceramic scaffolds. In this method, ceramic slurry is cast into a 3D polymer master mold, which is fabricated via microstereolithography, by a centrifugal casting method. The polymer master mold is thermally decomposed, so that a complex 3D bioceramic scaffold can be produced. In experiments, the decomposition process of the polymer model was optimized by the master decomposition curve theory to reduce harmful cracks in a green body. As a result, we could produce not only precise lattice models but also a sophisticated porous scaffold using beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) slurry. This bioceramic 3D molding technique based on microstereolithography will be useful for tailor-made tissue engineering and regeneration medicine.

  16. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  17. Twistable mold for helicopter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. S.; Kiely, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of mold for fabrication of blades composed of sets of aerodynamic shells having same airfoil section characteristics but different distributions. Mold consists of opposing stacks of thin templates held together by long bolts. When bolts are loosened, templates can be set at different positions with respect to each other and then locked in place.

  18. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  19. Multiphysics modeling of the steel continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.

    This work develops a macroscale, multiphysics model of the continuous casting of steel. The complete model accounts for the turbulent flow and nonuniform distribution of superheat in the molten steel, the elastic-viscoplastic thermal shrinkage of the solidifying shell, the heat transfer through the shell-mold interface with variable gap size, and the thermal distortion of the mold. These models are coupled together with carefully constructed boundary conditions with the aid of reduced-order models into a single tool to investigate behavior in the mold region, for practical applications such as predicting ideal tapers for a beam-blank mold. The thermal and mechanical behaviors of the mold are explored as part of the overall modeling effort, for funnel molds and for beam-blank molds. These models include high geometric detail and reveal temperature variations on the mold-shell interface that may be responsible for cracks in the shell. Specifically, the funnel mold has a column of mold bolts in the middle of the inside-curve region of the funnel that disturbs the uniformity of the hot face temperatures, which combined with the bending effect of the mold on the shell, can lead to longitudinal facial cracks. The shoulder region of the beam-blank mold shows a local hot spot that can be reduced with additional cooling in this region. The distorted shape of the funnel mold narrow face is validated with recent inclinometer measurements from an operating caster. The calculated hot face temperatures and distorted shapes of the mold are transferred into the multiphysics model of the solidifying shell. The boundary conditions for the first iteration of the multiphysics model come from reduced-order models of the process; one such model is derived in this work for mold heat transfer. The reduced-order model relies on the physics of the solution to the one-dimensional heat-conduction equation to maintain the relationships between inputs and outputs of the model. The geometric

  20. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Karimian, Majid; Idris, M. H.; Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  1. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Sub; Mun, Jae-Chul; Kim, Tae-Won; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2014-12-01

    In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  2. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  3. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  4. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  5. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, Karl D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  6. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  7. A facile and simple high-performance polydimethylsiloxane casting based on self-polymerization dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Zhang, Lu-lu; Sun, Jian-hai; Li, Hui; Cui, Da-fu

    2014-09-01

    We present a new and facile method for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) casting by dip-coating the master molds in an aqueous solution of dopamine. A poly(dopamine) film formed by self-polymerization of dopamine is used as the surface anti-adhesion coating for PDMS de-molding. Different master molds, such as metal, silicon and PDMS replica, were used to verify the feasibility of this proposed PDMS casting method. The poly(dopamine) coatings at various fabrication conditions were studied by using surface plasmon resonance technology. We found that it is very easy to form repeated poly(dopamine) coatings with similar thicknesses and density at fairly flexible conditions of self-polymerization. The water contact angles of the PDMS master molds and the positive PDMS replicas were studied after the PDMS master molds were immersed in the dopamine coating solution for different times. The de-molding process was then measured by surface plasmon resonance technology. The surface morphology of the master molds and the PDMS replicas were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Results demonstrate that the poly(dopamine) coating exhibits a strong release property in the PDMS de-molding process and has good stickiness after PDMS de-molding a dozen times. The package performances of the PDMS replicas were detected and compared by bonding experiments. PDMS replicas after a second round of de-molding present a little higher package performance than that of the PDMS replicas with an anti-sticking agent of silane. The biochemical properties of PDMS replicas were studied through fluorescence immunoassay experiments. The PDMS replicas present similar biochemical properties to the bare PDMS. This biomimetic surface modification method of dopamine for PDMS casting has a great potential for preparing microdevices for various biological and clinical applications.

  8. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Liparoti, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; Hunag, Tsang Min; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2015-05-22

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  9. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Adrian S. Sabau

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  10. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  11. Mold Cleanup in Your Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    If you found mold in your household, you will want to clean it up. Some considerations on how you will clean it up depend on the size of the area, the contaminated materials, and any additional health concerns.

  12. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  13. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  14. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  15. Survey Of Present Lens Molding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollicove, Harvey M.

    1988-07-01

    This survey will provide an overview of glass molding technologies, with a concentration in the newest of the technologies - Precision Glass Molding (PGM). A brief description of various forms of glass molding, including an historical review of patents associated with precision molding, is given. A worldwide survey of known commercial availability and recent innovations in PGM at Kodak are presented as examples of the potential of the precision molding technology.

  16. Numerical simulation and fabrication of silicon sheet via spin casting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Kim, Hyunhui; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Lee, Jinseok; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2013-05-01

    A spin-casting process for fabricating polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is proposed, and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. A numerical study of the fluidity of molten silicon indicates that the formation of thin silicon sheets without a mold and via spin casting is feasible. The faster the rotation speed of graphite mold, the thinner the thickness of sheet. After the spread of the molten silicon to cover the graphite mold with rotation speed of above 500 rpm, the solidification has to start. Silicon sheets can be produced by using the centrifugal force under appropriate experimental conditions. The spin-cast sheet had a vertical columnar microstructure due to the normal heat extraction to the substrate, and the sheet lifetime varied from 0.1 microS to 0.3 microS measured by using the microwave photoconductance decay (MW-PCD) to confirm that the spin-cast silicon sheet is applicable to photovoltaics.

  17. Development of dental casting and porcelainizing techniques for titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, M.

    1986-01-01

    Casting of titanium metals has been difficult due to their high chemical reactivity at elevated temperatures. Thus, special melting and mold materials are needed. This study investigated molds, Ti alloys, and porcelain applications, utilizing a new dental casting machine, Castmatic. It involved argon-arc melting and subsequent argon/vacuum pressurized casting. Special refractory oxides such as yttria or Zirconia A were utilized for a face coat under phosphate bonded silica investment. Studies of Ti alloys (Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-15V, Ti-20Cu and Ti-30Pd) involved metallography, phase identification (XRD), hardness, tensile tests, and electrochemical-corrosion tests. Preliminary porcelain studies included an experimental low fusing porcelain along with commercial low fusing porcelains. The bond was evaluated by three-point bending tests and SEM/EDX observations. The yttria face coat was inert, but lacked the necessary mechanical and thermal stability. The face coat, consisting of Zirconia A and zirconium acetate binder, was stable and resulted in less mold reactivity, good internal soundness, but slightly rough surfaces. Metallographs revealed quite larger grains in the cast structure, than in the wrought forms. XRD analysis showed that quasi-equilibrium phases present.

  18. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    demonstrated the importance of proper heat treat cycles for Homogenization, and Solutionizing parameters selection and implementation. 3) Step blocks casting of Nimonic 263: Carried out casting solidification simulation analysis, NDT inspection methods evaluation, detailed test matrix for Chemical, Tensile, LCF, stress rupture, CVN impact, hardness and J1C Fracture toughness section sensitivity data and were reported. 4) Centrifugal Casting of Haynes 282, weighing 1400 lbs. with hybrid mold (half Graphite and half Chromite sand) mold assembly was cast using compressor casing production tooling. This test provided Mold cooling rates influence on centrifugally cast microstructure and mechanical properties. Graphite mold section out performs sand mold across all temperatures for 0.2% YS; %Elongation, %RA, UTS at 1400°F. Both Stress-LMP and conditional Fracture toughness plots data were in the scatter band of the wrought alloy. 5) Fundamental Studies on Cooling rates and SDAS test program. Evaluated the influence of 6 mold materials Silica, Chromite, Alumina, Silica with Indirect Chills, Zircon and Graphite on casting solidification cooling rates. Actual Casting cooling rates through Liquidus to Solidus phase transition were measured with 3 different locations based thermocouples placed in each mold. Compared with solidification simulation cooling rates and measurement of SDAS, microstructure features were reported. The test results provided engineered casting potential methods, applicable for heavy section Haynes 282 castings for optimal properties, with foundry process methods and tools. 6) Large casting of Haynes 282 Drawings and Engineering FEM models and supplemental requirements with applicable specifications were provided to suppliers for the steam turbine proto type feature valve casing casting. Molding, melting and casting pouring completed per approved Manufacturing Process Plan during 2014 Q4. The partial valve casing was successfully cast after casting methods were

  19. Rapid prototyping of biodegradable microneedle arrays by integrating CO2 laser processing and polymer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, K. T.; Chung, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    An integrated technology of CO2 laser processing and polymer molding has been demonstrated for the rapid prototyping of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microneedle arrays. Rapid and low-cost CO2 laser processing was used for the fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio microneedle master mold instead of conventional time-consuming and expensive photolithography and etching processes. It is crucial to use flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to detach PLGA. However, the direct CO2 laser-ablated PDMS could generate poor surfaces with bulges, scorches, re-solidification and shrinkage. Here, we have combined the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) ablation and two-step PDMS casting process to form a PDMS female microneedle mold to eliminate the problem of direct ablation. A self-assembled monolayer polyethylene glycol was coated to prevent stiction between the two PDMS layers during the peeling-off step in the PDMS-to-PDMS replication. Then the PLGA microneedle array was successfully released by bending the second-cast PDMS mold with flexibility and hydrophobic property. The depth of the polymer microneedles can range from hundreds of micrometers to millimeters. It is linked to the PMMA pattern profile and can be adjusted by CO2 laser power and scanning speed. The proposed integration process is maskless, simple and low-cost for rapid prototyping with a reusable mold.

  20. A Study of the Oscillation Marks' Characteristics of Continuously Cast Incoloy Alloy 825 Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of oscillation mark (OM) formation and its characteristics during the solidification of Incoloy alloy 825 in the continuous casting of blooms is investigated by plant trials and metallographic study. The experiments involved two heats with the same casting and mold conditions and sampling at different locations across the strand. The metallographic study combined macro/micro-examinations of OMs and segregation analysis of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Si by microprobe analysis. The results show that OMs have widely different characteristics, such as mark type, depth, segregation, and accompanying microstructure. Furthermore, the mark pitch can vary considerably even for the similar casting conditions, leading to different conditions for the marks' formation in relation to the mold's cyclic movement. Finally, a mechanism for the OM formation is discussed and proposed. Possible solutions for minimizing the observed defects by optimizing the mold conditions are suggested.

  1. Rapid Tooling via Investment Casting and Rapid Prototype Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this work to develop the materials processing and design technologies required to reduce the die development time for metal mold processes from 12 months to 3 months, using die casting of Al and Mg as the example process. Sandia demonstrated that investment casting, using rapid prototype patterns produced from Stereo lithography or Selective laser Sintering, was a viable alternative/supplement to the current technology of machining form wrought stock. A demonstration die insert (ejector halt) was investment cast and subsequently tested in the die casting environment. The stationary half of the die insert was machined from wrought material to benchmark the cast half. The two inserts were run in a die casting machine for 3,100 shots of aluminum and at the end of the run no visible difference could be detected between the cast and machined inserts. Inspection concluded that the cast insert performed identically to the machined insert. Both inserts had no indications of heat checking or degradation.

  2. Measurement and simulation of deformation and stresses in steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, D.; Monroe, C. A.; Beckermann, C.

    2012-07-01

    Experiments are conducted to measure displacements and forces during casting of a steel bar in a sand mold. In some experiments the bar is allowed to contract freely, while in others the bar is manually strained using embedded rods connected to a frame. Solidification and cooling of the experimental castings are simulated using a commercial code, and good agreement between measured and predicted temperatures is obtained. The deformations and stresses in the experiments are simulated using an elasto-viscoplastic finite-element model. The high temperature mechanical properties are estimated from data available in the literature. The mush is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory, where the coherency and coalescence solid fraction are taken into account. Good agreement is obtained between measured and predicted displacements and forces. The results shed considerable light on the modeling of stresses in steel casting and help in developing more accurate models for predicting hot tears and casting distortions.

  3. Casting Simulation of an Austrian Bronze Age Sword Hilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Annalisa; Mödlinger, Marianne; Piccardo, Paolo; Montesano, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Bronze Age swords with a metal hilt can be considered the peak of Bronze Age casting technologies. To reconstruct the casting techniques used more than 3000 years ago, a metal hilted sword of the Schalenknauf type from Lower Austria was studied with the aid of macroscopic analyses and simulation of mold filling and casting solidification. A three-dimensional model of the hilt was created based on optical scanner measurements performed on a hilt recently discovered during archaeological excavations. Three different configurations of the gating system were considered, two on the pommel disk and one on the knob, and the effect of its location on the formation of casting defects was investigated. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to detect internal defects, such as gas and shrinkage porosity, which were then compared with those calculated by simulation. The best match between actual and predicted hilt quality demonstrated the location of the gating system, which turned out to be on the pommel disk.

  4. Composite Materials Processing of Cast Iron and Ceramics Using Compo-Casting Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yoshihiro; Sumimoto, Haruyoshi

    The compo-casting technology of ceramics and cast iron is expected to be one of the major casting technologies that can expand the application fields of cast iron. This technique allows the heat energy of the molten metal to be utilized to produce cast iron products which are added with functions of ceramic materials. The largest problem in compo-casting technology is generation of cracks caused by thermal shock. Although this crack generation can be prevented by reducing the thermal stress by means of preheating ceramics, the necessary preheating temperature is considerably high and its precise controlling is difficult at the practical foundry working sites. In this study, we tried to numerically predict the critical preheating temperature of ceramics using the thermal stress analysis in unsteady heat transfer and the Newman's diagram, and found that the preheating of ceramics to reduce thermal stress could be substituted with placing an appropriate cast iron cover around the ceramics. Excellent results were obtained by using a method whereby a ceramic bar was covered with a flake graphite cast iron cover and fixed in a sand mold and then molten metal was poured. Then, two or three ceramics were examined at the same time under the compocasting condition. As a result, three specimens could be done at the same time by adjusting the cover space to 15mm. Moreover, irregular shape ceramics were examined under the compocasting condition. As a result, the compocasting could be done by devising the cover shape. In each condition, it was confirmed that the cover shape made from the analytical result was effective to the compocasting by doing the thermometry of the specimens.

  5. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  6. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    DOEpatents

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  7. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  8. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  9. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Large structural, thin-wall castings made of metals subject to hot tearing, and their fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article, such as a gas turbine engine mixer, is made by providing a mold structure defining a thin-walled, hollow article, and a base metal that is subject to hot tear cracking when cast in a generally equiaxed polycrystalline form, such as Rene' 108 and Mar-M247. The article is fabricated by introducing the molten base metal into the mold structure, and directionally solidifying the base metal in the mold structure to form a directionally oriented structure. The directionally oriented structure may be formed of a single grain or oriented multiple grains.

  11. Effect of MnO content on the interfacial property of mold flux and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Lejun; Yang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The interfacial property between liquid mold flux and steel has significant impact on the quality of casting slab, and this property is mainly determined by the chemical composition of mold flux and the reaction between the flux and steel. The effect of MnO content on the contact angle and interfacial tension between liquid mold flux and ultra-low carbon steel was investigated by sessile drop method in this article, and the results suggested that both the contact angle and interfacial tension decreased with the increase of MnO content in the mold flux. The increase of Si and Mn and the reduction of Al and Ti in the interaction layer were caused by the chemical reactions occurred in the vicinity of interface between mold flux and steel substrate. Besides, the thickness of the interaction layer increased from 4 μm to 7 μm, then to 9 μm, 11 μm and 15 μm when the MnO content was added from 1 wt% to 3 wt%, then to 5 wt%, 7 wt%, and 9 wt% due to the fact that MnO can simplify the polymerized structure of the melt and improve the penetrability of molten mold flux to make the interfacial reaction easier.

  12. Injection molding of engineering plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    1991-03-01

    This final report summarizes the findings of a study in injection molding of engineering plastics. Two engineering plastic resins, i.e., unmodified grades of a polyetherimide and a poly (2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether) were thoroughly characterized. The characterization included rheology, thermal properties and P-V-T behavior. The data were employed to predict various microstructural distributions including density, residual stress and birefringence distributions in compression and injection molded specimens of these two engineering plastics. The detailed microstructural distributions were also studied experimentally upon processing the two engineering plastics, employing instrumented machines and industrial practices. The experimental findings were elucidated under the light of the numerical simulation results. Overall, this study should furnish a first order understanding of the microstructure development in articles injection molded from amorphous engineering plastic resins.

  13. Flow behavior in liquid molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D.; Phelan, F.; Parnas, R.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid molding (LM) process for manufacturing polymer composites with structural properties has the potential to significantly lower fabrication costs and increase production rates. LM includes both resin transfer molding and structural reaction injection molding. To achieve this potential, however, the underlying science base must be improved to facilitate effective process optimization and implementation of on-line process control. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a major program in LM that includes materials characterization, process simulation models, on-line process monitoring and control, and the fabrication of test specimens. The results of this program are applied to real parts through cooperative projects with industry. The key feature in the effort is a comprehensive and integrated approach to the processing science aspects of LM. This paper briefly outlines the NIST program and uses several examples to illustrate the work.

  14. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  15. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  16. Experiments on stiffened conical shell structures using cast epoxy models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Davis, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a casting technique for fabricating high-quality plastic structural models, and review of results regarding the use of such specimens to parametrically study the effect of base ring stiffness on the critical buckling pressure of a ring-stiffened conical shell. The fabrication technique involves machining a metal mold to the desired configuration and vacuum-drawing the plastic material into the mold. A room-temperature curing translucent thermoset epoxy was the casting material selected. A shell of revolution computer program which employs a nonlinear axisymmetric prebuckling strain field to obtain a bifurcation buckling solution was used to guide the selection of congifurations tested. The shell experimentally exhibited asymmetric collapse behavior, and the ultimate load was considerably higher than the analytical bifurcation prediction. The asymmetric buckling mode shape, however, initially appeared at a pressure near the analysis bifurcation solution.

  17. Comparative analysis of the retention of maxillary denture base with and without border molding using zinc oxide eugenol impression paste

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simrat; Datta, Kusum; Gupta, S. K.; Suman, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of border molding on the retention of the maxillary denture base. Materials and Methods: Two special trays, one with full extensions to the periphery and one 2 mm short from the borders were made on the cast obtained from the preliminary impression. Border molding was done on the tray which was short from borders. On both trays, the final impression was made with zinc oxide eugenol impression paste. Heat cure denture bases were fabricated on the prepared casts and retention was measured using specially designed instrument. Observations and Results: Mean force with border molding (2765.0 g) was larger than mean force without border molding (1805.0 g) at P < 0.01 level. In terms of percentage, too, the mean improvement (59.4%) in force of dislodgement was statistically highly significant (i.e. P < 0.01). Clinical Significance: The results of the present study suggest that the dentures made with border molding will provide better retentive force than the dentures made without border molding. PMID:27134447

  18. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  19. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  20. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  1. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  2. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  3. Mold and Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Mold and Indoor Air Quality in Schools Mold and Moisture in Schools Webinar ... premier resource on this issue is the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools kit. Our schools-related resources ...

  4. Contamination Barrier For Contour-Molding Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Release agent prevents molding compound from adhering to or contaminating surface. Cleaning agent, Turco 4215 NCLT, forms barrier preventing silicone molding compound from sticking to surface and leaving contaminating residue. Also see MFS-29243.

  5. National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search AAAAI National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report Date: April 12, 2017 Location: San Antonio ( ... Service can automatically email you daily pollen and mold reports. Click here sign up! Return to Map ...

  6. MOLD-SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds can cause health problems like infections and allergies, destroy crops, and contaminate our food or pharmaceuticals. We can't avoid molds. Molds are essential players in the biological processes on earth, but we can now identify and quantify the molds that will be most pr...

  7. Making Internal Molds Of Long, Curved Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Mold material carried to internal weld joint and removed after impression taken. Remotely operated device makes impression mold of interior surface of tube at weld joint. Mold provides indication of extent of mismatch between members at joint. Maneuvered to weld inspected through curved tube 3 in. in diameter by 50 in. long. Readily adapted to making molds to measure depth of corrosion in boiler tubes or other pipes.

  8. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  9. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  10. Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Ruan, R.

    2001-02-22

    The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.

  11. The Mold that Almost Ate the Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Wayne; Bishop, Chuck; Byars, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    New-building mold was a bane for many home construction companies and new homeowners during the 1990s. It was not unusual to read or watch the news and see the tragedy played out in one's local community. Untold, however, is the story of the toll new-building mold can take on school systems and their principals, especially as these mold problems…

  12. Planning an Injection Mold Design Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Edward P.

    With the increased use of plastics worldwide the shortage of trained personnel in moldmaking and design for plastic injection molds is becoming critical. Local schools and community colleges should provide courses in mold design and mold making, since most workers presently learn while working under experienced designers on the job. Following this…

  13. Confined Growth of Metal Nanoparticles Within 3D DNA Origami Molds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing prescribed shaped metal nanoparticles promises emerging applications in plasmonics, energy, and disease diagnosis. The key to the shape-controllable synthesis is generating local environments encoded with prescribed geometrical information. Here, we describe a general strategy that uses 3D self-assembled DNA origami as mold to confine the casting growth of metal nanoparticle. By transferring the shape information from DNA cavities to metal nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles with prescribed shapes, dimensions, and surface binding features could be rationally designed and synthesized.

  14. Surface Replication of Molded Products with Microneedle Features in Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiumi, Kazuyasu; Takayama, Tetsuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Inou, Akinori

    Micro-molding of microneedle features was conducted using several injection-molding techniques. Injection compression molding and injection molding were performed with supercritical carbon dioxide fluid and with or without vacuum processing inside the mold cavity. Effects of process parameters on processability and surface replication of the molded parts were evaluated. The height replication ratio for microneedles was improved using injection compression molding. At a shorter compression stroke, the needle height was improved, and the influence of compression delay time was also small. Moreover, the effects of vacuum processing inside the mold cavity under the filling process were slight. The height replication ratio for microneedles showed the highest values using injection molding using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid with vacuum inside the mold cavity.

  15. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control.

  16. Is Mold the New Asbestos?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Mold and indoor air quality (IAQ) are matters of major concern to architects and their educational clients. The Environmental Protection Agency's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program offers help to districts seeking to tackle IAQ issues. Strengthening community relations is one way to be ready in case of a bad environmental or IAQ report.…

  17. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  18. Mold production for polymer optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Raab, Jonas; Speich, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The fields of application for polymer optics are huge and thus the need for polymer optics is steadily growing. Most polymer optics are produced in high numbers by injection molding. Therefore molds and dies that fulfill special requirements are needed. Polishing is usually the last process in the common process chain for production of molds for polymer optics. Usually this process step is done manually by experienced polishers. Due to the small number of skilled professionals and health problems because of the monotonous work the idea was to support or probably supersede manual polishing. Polishing using an industrial robot as movement system enables totally new possibilities in automated polishing. This work focuses on the surface generation with a newly designed polishing setup and on the code generation for the robot movement. The process starts on ground surfaces and with different tools and polishing agents surfaces that fulfill the requirements for injection molding of optics can be achieved. To achieve this the attention has to be focused not only on the process itself but also on tool path generation. A proprietary software developed in the Centre for Optical Technologies in Aalen University allows the tool path generation on almost any surface. This allows the usage of the newly developed polishing processes on different surfaces and enables an easy adaption. Details of process and software development will be presented as well as results from different polishing tests on different surfaces.

  19. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  20. ANIMAL MODELS OF MOLD ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of molds as causative agents for allergy/asthma is not new. In fact many fungal genera have been associated with allergic lung disease, but only a few fungi are well studied and even fewer fungal allergens well characterized. The complexity and variety of fungal pro...

  1. Yield improvement and defect reduction in steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Carlson

    2004-03-16

    This research project investigated yield improvement and defect reduction techniques in steel casting. Research and technology development was performed in the following three specific areas: (1) Feeding rules for high alloy steel castings; (2) Unconventional yield improvement and defect reduction techniques--(a) Riser pressurization; and (b) Filling with a tilting mold; and (3) Modeling of reoxidation inclusions during filling of steel castings. During the preparation of the proposal for this project, these areas were identified by the High Alloy Committee and Carbon and Low Alloy Committee of the Steel Founders' Society of America (SFSA) as having the highest research priority to the steel foundry industry. The research in each of the areas involved a combination of foundry experiments, modeling and simulation. Numerous SFSA member steel foundries participated in the project through casting trials and meetings. The technology resulting from this project will result in decreased scrap and rework, casting yield improvement, and higher quality steel castings produced with less iteration. This will result in considerable business benefits to steel foundries, primarily due to reduced energy and labor costs, increased capacity and productivity, reduced lead-time, and wider use and application of steel castings. As estimated using energy data provided by the DOE, the technology produced as a result of this project will result in an energy savings of 2.6 x 10{sup 12} BTU/year. This excludes the savings that were anticipated from the mold tilting research. In addition to the energy savings, and corresponding financial savings this implies, there are substantial environmental benefits as well. The results from each of the research areas listed above are summarized.

  2. Study of the Viscosity of Mold Flux Based on the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2017-02-01

    Viscosity is one of the most important properties of mold flux and affects the process of continuous casting significantly. In order to describe the variation of viscosity of mold flux accurately in a wide range of temperature occurring in the casting mold, a non-Arrhenius Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) model was adopted in this study. The results showed that the adjusted coefficient of determination (Adj. R 2) of non-Arrhenius VFT Model ranges from 0.92 to 0.96, which suggests this model could be well adapted to predict the relationship between viscosity and temperature of mold flux. The temperature at which viscosity becomes infinite, T VFT, increased with the addition of Cr2O3 and improvement of basicity, while it decreased with the addition of B2O3, as it was determined by both the degree of polymerization of the melt structure and crystallization behavior of the melt. Also, the pseudo-activation energy, E VFT, of Samples 1 to 5 was 60.1 ± 3.6, 94.7 ± 14.9, 101.7 ± 19.0, 38.0 ± 4.8, and 32.4 ± 4.0 kJ/mol, respectively; it increased with the addition of Cr2O3 and B2O3, but deceased with the increase of basicity.

  3. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic PDMS devices from reusable PDMS molds using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isiksacan, Ziya; Tahsin Guler, M.; Aydogdu, Berkan; Bilican, Ismail; Elbuken, Caglar

    2016-03-01

    The conventional fabrication methods for microfluidic devices require cleanroom processes that are costly and time-consuming. We present a novel, facile, and low-cost method for rapid fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds and devices. The method consists of three main fabrication steps: female mold (FM), male mold (MM), and chip fabrication. We use a CO2 laser cutter to pattern a thin, spin-coated PDMS layer for FM fabrication. We then obtain reusable PDMS MM from the FM using PDMS/PDMS casting. Finally, a second casting step is used to replicate PDMS devices from the MM. Demolding of one PDMS layer from another is carried out without any potentially hazardous chemical surface treatment. We have successfully demonstrated that this novel method allows fabrication of microfluidic molds and devices with precise dimensions (thickness, width, length) using a single material, PDMS, which is very common across microfluidic laboratories. The whole process, from idea to device testing, can be completed in 1.5 h in a standard laboratory.

  4. INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CAST TITANIUM CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Fonseca, Renata Garcia

    2007-01-01

    As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm). For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height) was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430°C, 515°C and 600°C. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3) for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X) and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm2). The data for each experimental condition (n=8) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05). The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD) of internal misfit were obtained for the 430°C/100%: (7.25 mm2 ±1.59) and 600°C/100% (8.8 mm2 ±2.25) groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit. PMID:19089139

  5. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  6. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  7. Assessment of Computer Simulation Software and Process Data for High Pressure Die Casting of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Hatfield, Edward C; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Kuwana, Kazunori; Viti, Valerio; Hassan, Mohamed I; Saito, Kozo

    2007-09-01

    Computer software for the numerical simulation of solidification and mold filling is an effective design tool for cast structural automotive magnesium components. A review of commercial software capabilities and their validation procedures was conducted. Aside form the software assessment, the program addressed five main areas: lubricant degradation, lubricant application, gate atomization, and heat transfer at metal mold interfaces. A test stand for lubricant application was designed. A sensor was used for the direct measurement of heat fluxes during lubricant application and casting solidification in graphite molds. Spray experiments were conducted using pure deionized water and commercial die lubricants. The results show that the sensor can be used with confidence for measuring heat fluxes under conditions specific to the die lube application. The data on heat flux was presented in forms suitable for use in HPDC simulation software. Severe jet breakup and atomization phenomena are likely to occur due to high gate velocities in HPDC. As a result of gate atomization, droplet flow affects the mold filling pattern, air entrapment, skin formation, and ensuing defects. Warm water analogue dies were designed for obtaining experimental data on mold filling phenomena. Data on break-up jet length, break-up pattern, velocities, and droplet size distribution were obtained experimentally and was used to develop correlations for jet break-up phenomena specific to die casting gate configurations.

  8. Simulation Study of Al-1Mn/Al-10Si Circular Clad Ingots Prepared by Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fu, Ying; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-02-01

    A modified direct chill casting process based on Novelis FusionTM Technology co-casting process was used recently to prepare Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots. In the current study, a comprehensive simulation model was developed to investigate the direct chill casting process for preparing the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots, and a parametric study and experimental research of the direct chill casting process was conducted to explore potential success and failure casting conditions. The simulation results revealed the bonding mechanism of the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si interface in the direct chill casting process and identified the effect of certain parameters on casting performance. The results indicated that the effect of casting speed and Al-1Mn casting temperature on the variations of the minimum solid fraction of Al-1Mn at the interface is stronger than that of cooling water flow rate in inner mold, while Al-10Si casting temperature is the weakest of the four casting parameters. The corresponding experimental results verified that Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingot with acceptable metallurgical bonding can be successfully prepared by direct chill casting process under the proper casting parameters. The thickness of diffusion zone is about 40 μm, and the fractured position in tensile test was located in the Al-1Mn alloy side which indicated the strength of the interfacial region is higher than that of Al-1Mn alloy.

  9. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  10. Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, D.M.; Lane, A.M.; Giese, S.R.; Pattabhi, R.; El-Kaddah, N.H.; Griffin, J.; Bates, C.E.; Piwonka, T.S.

    1994-10-01

    This annual report covers work performed in the first year of research on Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. During this year the causes of penetration of cast iron in sand molds were defined and a program which predicts the occurrence of penetration was written and verified in commercial foundries. Calculations were made to size a reaction chamber to remove inclusions from liquid steel using electromagnetic force and the chamber was built. Finally, significant progress was made in establishing pouring practices which avoid re-oxidation of steel during pouring application of revised pouring practices have led to reduced inclusion levels in commercially poured steel castings.

  11. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-15

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  12. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-01

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  13. Fabrication of hierarchically structured superhydrophobic PDMS surfaces by Cu and CuO casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Christopher P.; Lazarus, Nathan

    2015-10-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films decorated with hierarchically structured pillars are cast from large area copper and copper oxide negative molds. The molds are fabricated using a single patterning step and electroplating. The process of casting structured PDMS films is simpler and cheaper than alternatives based on deep reactive ion etching or laser roughening of bulk silicone. Texture imparted to the pillars from the mold walls renders the PDMS films superhydrophobic, with the contact angle/hysteresis of the most non-wetting surfaces measuring 164°/9° and 158°/10° for surfaces with and without application of a low surface energy coating. The usefulness of patterned PDMS films as a "self-cleaning" solar cell module covering is demonstrated and other applications are discussed.

  14. Hot isostatic atmospheric pressure casting H-K9L lightweight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianfeng; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Gufeng; Ni, Yin; Huang, QiTai; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    Glass lightweight mirror can be made by Hot Isostatic Atmospheric Pressure (HIAP) casting method which melting small glass chunks into a mold that made lots of hexagon-shaped pockets in the back of the mirror. Alumina-silica refractory cores which used to form honeycomb mold can withstand over 950 degree Celsius temperature. Furnace temperature rises to 950 degree Celsius after H4 H-K9L chunks loaded into mold, holds this temperature over 2 hours and then drops to room temperature slowly. HIAP casting lightweight blank can used to form 1/60 λ RMS (λ=0.6328μm) mirror and this method can use to made big diameter lightweight blank.

  15. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOEpatents

    Trudel, David R.; Meyer, Thomas N.; Kinosz, Michael J.; Arnaud, Guy; Bigler, Nicolas

    2003-06-17

    The filtering molten metal injector system includes a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and at least one molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the casting mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The molten metal injector projects into the holder furnace. The molten metal injector includes a cylinder defining a piston cavity housing a reciprocating piston for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace to the mold cavity. The cylinder and piston are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder or the piston includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity when the holder furnace contains molten metal. A conduit connects the piston cavity to the mold cavity. A molten metal filter is located in the conduit for filtering the molten metal passing through the conduit during the reciprocating movement of the piston. The molten metal intake may be a valve connected to the cylinder, a gap formed between the piston and an open end of the cylinder, an aperture defined in the sidewall of the cylinder, or a ball check valve incorporated into the piston. A second molten metal filter preferably covers the molten metal intake to the injector.

  16. Development and Demonstration of Adanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Enrique J. Lavernia

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes research results in the project Development and Demonstration of Advanced Tooling Alloys for Molds and Dies. Molds, dies and related tooling are used to manufacture most of the plastic and metal products we use every day. Conventional fabrication of molds and dies involves a multiplicity of machining, benching and heat treatment unit operations. This approach is very expensive and time consuming. Rapid Solidifcation Process (RSP) Tooling is a spray-forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The appraoch combines rapid solidifcation processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. An atomized spray of a tool-forming alloy, typically a tool steel, is deposited onto an easy-to-form tool pattern to replicate the pattern's shape and surface features. By so doing, the approach eliminates many machining operations in conventional mold making, significantly reducing cost, lead time and energy. Moreover, rapid solidification creates unique microstructural features by suppressing carbide precipitation and growth, and creating metastable phases. This can result in unique material properties following heat treatment. Spray-formed and aged tool steel dies have exhibited extended life compared to conventional dies in many forming operations such as forging, extrusion and die casting. RSP Tooling technolocy was commercialized with the formation of RSP Tooling, LLC in Solon, Oh.

  17. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1992-01-01

    The task of developing a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to accurately model the mold filling phase of a casting operation was accomplished in a systematic manner. First the state-of-the-art was determined through a literature search, a code search, and participation with casting industry personnel involved in consortium startups. From this material and inputs from industry personnel, an evaluation of the currently available codes was made. It was determined that a few of the codes already contained sophisticated CFD algorithms and further validation of one of these codes could preclude the development of a new CFD code for this purpose. With industry concurrence, ProCAST was chosen for further evaluation. Two benchmark cases were used to evaluate the code's performance using a Silicon Graphics Personal Iris system. The results of these limited evaluations (because of machine and time constraints) are presented along with discussions of possible improvements and recommendations for further evaluation.

  18. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  19. [Mold infections in lung transplants].

    PubMed

    Solé, Amparo; Ussetti, Piedad

    2014-01-01

    Invasive infections by molds, mainly Aspergillus infections, account for more than 10% of infectious complications in lung transplant recipients. These infections have a bimodal presentation: an early one, mainly invading bronchial airways, and a late one, mostly focused on lung or disseminated. The Aspergillus colonization at any time in the post-transplant period is one of the major risk factors. Late colonization, together with chronic rejection, is one of the main causes of late invasive forms. A galactomannan value of 0.5 in bronchoalveolar lavage is currently considered a predictive factor of pulmonary invasive infection. There is no universal strategy in terms of prophylaxis. Targeted prophylaxis and preemptive treatment instead of universal prophylaxis, are gaining more followers. The therapeutic drug monitoring level of azoles is highly recommended in the treatment. Monotherapy with voriconazole is the treatment of choice in invasive aspergillosis; combined antifungal therapies are only recommended in severe, disseminated, and other infections due to non-Aspergillus molds.

  20. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  1. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  2. Onychomycosis due to opportunistic molds*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Erick Obed; Arroyo-Camarena, Stefanie; Tejada-García, Diana Luz; Porras-López, Carlos Francisco; Arenas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis are caused by dermatophytes and Candida, but rarely by non- dermatophyte molds. These opportunistic agents are filamentous fungi found as soil and plant pathogens. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of opportunistic molds in onychomycosis. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 4,220 cases with onychomycosis, diagnosed in a 39-month period at the Institute of Dermatology and Skin surgery "Prof. Dr. Fernando A. Cordero C." in Guatemala City, and confirmed with a positive KOH test and culture. RESULTS: 32 cases (0.76%) of onychomycosis caused by opportunistic molds were confirmed. The most affected age group ranged from 41 to 65 years (15 patients, 46.9%) and females were more commonly affected (21 cases, 65.6%) than males. Lateral and distal subungual onychomycosis (OSD-L) was detected in 20 cases (62.5%). The microscopic examination with KOH showed filaments in 19 cases (59.4%), dermatophytoma in 9 cases (28.1%), spores in 2 cases (6.25%), and filaments and spores in 2 cases (6.25%). Etiologic agents: Aspergillus sp., 11 cases (34.4%); Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, 8 cases (25.0%); Cladosporium sp., 3 cases (9.4%); Acremonium sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Paecilomyces sp., 2 cases (6.25%); Tritirachium oryzae, 2 cases (6.25%); Fusarium sp., Phialophora sp., Rhizopus sp. and Alternaria alternate, 1 case (3.1%) each. CONCLUSIONS: We found onychomycosis by opportunistic molds in 0.76% of the cases and DLSO was present in 62.5%. The most frequent isolated etiological agents were: Aspergillus sp. and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. PMID:26131862

  3. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  4. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. J.; Smith, H. H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigated for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649 °C showed that the tensile yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and was comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  6. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  7. Study on particle distribution in A356/SiCp upward suction castings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feifan; Zhao, Haidong; Sun, Fengzhen; Zhao, Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this investigation, cylindrical A356-5%50 μm SiCp and A356-10%100 μm SiCp castings of 40 mm diameter and 350 mm height were produced by stirring preparation and vertically upward suction casting process. The SiCp fractions in the casting different sections along the filling direction were quantitatively measured. The composite slurry flow during the casting mold filling was simulated based on the Euler method while the particle flow was calculated with the Lagrangian method for predicting the SiCp distribution. The simulated distributions were compared and validated with the experiment. It has shown that as the filling distance increased, the particle fractions decreased dramatically in the A356-10%100 μm SiCp casting while varied slightly in the A356-5%50 μm SiCp casting, and that the particles were prone to be aggregated near the mold wall at the filling beginning parts whereas more particles concentrated in the centre and fewer particles were present near the wall region in the casting front.

  8. Evolution of halictine castes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  9. Cast Aluminum Bonding Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    fabricated using P?-’r;est11 bur)ld II19 te(hnll I Oly with 6 cIsL nqs. The cast a lumi num alloy used was A357 . The sur- face preparation was phosphoric acid...from a cast aluminum alloy designated A357 . The bonding surfaces of the adherends were prepared using PAA. One primer and two adhesives considered...System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 18 11 Bond Area of 350°F Adhesive System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 19 vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 A357 Chemical

  10. Nonaqueous slip casting of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductive ceramics. Ph.D. Thesis - 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigates the slip casting of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) powders using nonaqueous carrier liquids and fired ceramic molds. The parameters of the process examined here include the rheological properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) powder dispersed in various solvent/dispersant systems, the combination of nonaqueous slips with fired ceramic molds to form the superconductive ceramics, the process-property relationships using a four-factor factorial experiment, and the applicability of magnetic fields to align the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) grains during the casting process.

  11. Hot cracking during welding and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping

    Aluminum welds are susceptible to liquation cracking in the partially melted zone (PMZ). Using the multicomponent Scheil model, curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) during solidification were calculated for the PMZ and weld metals (WMs). These curves were used to predict the crack susceptibility by checking if the harmful condition of WM fS > PMZ fS exists during PMZ solidification and reduce the susceptibility by minimizing this condition. This approach was tested against full-penetration welds of alloys 7075 and 2024 and it can be used to guide the selection or development of filler metals. Liquation cracking in the PMZ in welds of Al-Si cast alloys was also investigated. The crack susceptibility was evaluated by circular-patch test, and full-penetration welds made with filler metals 1100, 4043, 4047 and 5356. Liquation cracking was significant with filler metals 1100 and 5356 but slight with filler metals 4043 and 4047. In all welds, liquation cracks were completely backfilled, instead of open as in full-penetration welds of wrought alloys 2219 and 6061. The T-fS curves showed that alloy A357 has a much higher fraction liquid for backfilling before PMZ solidification was essentially over. Hot tearing in Mg-xAl-yCa alloys was studied by constrained rod casting (CRC) in a steel mold. The hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Ca content (y) but did not change much with the Al content (x). An instrumented CRC with a steel mold was developed to detect the onset of hot tearing. The secondary phases, eutectic content, solidification path, and freezing range were examined. Hot tearing in Mg-Al-Sr alloys was also studied by CRC in a steel mold. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-1.5Sr alloys, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Al content. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-3Sr alloys, the trend was similar but not as significant. At the same Al content, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Sr

  12. Design and fabrication of cast orthopedic implants with freeform surface textures from 3-D printed ceramic shell.

    PubMed

    Curodeau, A; Sachs, E; Caldarise, S

    2000-09-01

    Three-dimensional printing is a solid freeform fabrication process, which creates parts directly from a computer model. The parts are built by repetitively spreading a layer of powder and selectively joining the powder in the layer by ink-jet printing of a binder material. 3D printing was applied to the fabrication of sub-millimeter surface textures with overhang and undercut geometries for use in orthopedic prostheses as bony ingrowth structures. 3D printing is used to fabricate ceramic molds of alumina powder and silica binder, and these molds are used to cast the bony ingrowth surfaces of Co-Cr (ASTM F75) alloy. Minimum positive feature sizes of the ceramic mold and, therefore, minimum negative feature sizes of castings were determined to be approximately 200 x 200 x 175 microm and were limited by the strength of ceramic needed to withstand handling. Minimum negative feature sizes in the ceramic mold and, therefore, minimum positive features in the casting were found to be approximately 350 x 350 x 175 microm and were determined by limitations on removal of powder from the ceramic and the pressure required to fill these small features with molten metal during casting. Textures were designed with 5 layers of distinct geometric definition, allowing for the design of overhung geometry with overall porosity ranging from 30-70%. Features as small as 350 x 350 x 200 microm were included in these designs and successfully cast.

  13. Amorphous materials molded IR lens progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, A. R., Sr.; McCord, James; Timm, Ronald; Le Blanc, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    Amorphous Materials began in 2000 a joint program with Lockheed Martin in Orlando to develop molding technology required to produce infrared lenses from chalcogenide glasses. Preliminary results were reported at this SPIE meeting by Amy Graham1 in 2003. The program ended in 2004. Since that time, AMI has concentrated on improving results from two low softening glasses, Amtir 4&5. Both glasses have been fully characterized and antireflection coatings have been developed for each. Lenses have been molded from both glasses, from Amtir 6 and from C1 Core glass. A Zygo unit is used to evaluate the results of each molded lens as a guide to improving the molding process. Expansion into a larger building has provided room for five production molding units. Molded lens sizes have ranged from 8 mm to 136 mm in diameter. Recent results will be presented

  14. Intraoperative template-molded bone flap reconstruction for patient-specific cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Marbacher, Serge; Andereggen, Lukas; Erhardt, Salome; Fathi, Ali-Reza; Fandino, Javier; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Cranioplasty is a common neurosurgical procedure. Free-hand molding of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement into complex three-dimensional shapes is often time-consuming and may result in disappointing cosmetic outcomes. Computer-assisted patient-specific implants address these disadvantages but are associated with long production times and high costs. In this study, we evaluated the clinical, radiological, and cosmetic outcomes of a time-saving and inexpensive intraoperative method to mold custom-made implants for immediate single-stage or delayed cranioplasty. Data were collected from patients in whom cranioplasty became necessary after removal of bone flaps affected by intracranial infection, tumor invasion, or trauma. A PMMA replica was cast between a negative form of the patient's own bone flap and the original bone flap with exactly the same shape, thickness, and dimensions. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed 2 months post-surgery. Patient satisfaction (Odom criteria) and cosmesis (visual analogue scale for cosmesis) were evaluated 1 to 3 years after cranioplasty. Twenty-seven patients underwent intraoperative template-molded patient-specific cranioplasty with PMMA. The indications for cranioplasty included bone flap infection (56%, n = 15), calvarian tumor resection (37%, n = 10), and defect after trauma (7%, n = 2). The mean duration of the molding procedure was 19 ± 7 min. Excellent radiological implant alignment was achieved in 94% of the cases. All (n = 23) but one patient rated the cosmetic outcome (mean 1.4 years after cranioplasty) as excellent (70%, n = 16) or good (26%, n = 6). Intraoperative cast-molded reconstructive cranioplasty is a feasible, accurate, fast, and cost-efficient technique that results in excellent cosmetic outcomes, even with large and complex skull defects.

  15. Hydrogen silsesquioxane mold coatings for improved replication of nanopatterns by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobæk, Thor Christian; Matschuk, Maria; Kafka, Jan; Pranov, Henrik J.; Larsen, Niels B.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the replication of nanosized pillars in polymer (cyclic olefin copolymer) by injection molding using nanostructured thermally cured hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) ceramic coatings on stainless steel mold inserts with mold nanostructures produced by a simple embossing process. At isothermal mold conditions, the average pillar height increases by up to 100% and a more uniform height distribution is observed compared to a traditional metal mold insert. Thermal heat transfer simulations predict that the HSQ film retards the cooling of the polymer melt during the initial stages of replication, thus allowing more time to fill the nanoscale cavities compared to standard metal molds. A monolayer of a fluorinated silane (heptadecafluorotrichlorosilane) deposited on the mold surface reduces the mold/polymer interfacial energy to support demolding of the polymer replica. The mechanical stability of thermally cured HSQ makes it a promising material for nanopattern replication on an industrial scale without the need for slow and energy intensive variotherm processes.

  16. Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 2: Development of thermo-elastic stress model

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. . Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. . Monofrax-S Plant)

    1994-06-01

    Mathematical models of heat flow and thermo-elastic stress, based on the finite-element method, have been developed and utilized to analyze the voidless,'' fused-cast, AZS, solidification process. The results of the mathematical analysis, in conjunction with information obtained in a comprehensive industrial study, presented in Part 1 of this paper, describe the mechanisms for the formation of the various crack types found in the fused-cast product. Thermal stresses are generated early in the solidification process by rapid cooling of the refractory surface as it contacts the initially cool mold and later in conjunction with the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation which occurs in the zirconia component of the AZS refractory. Applying this model, castings were made using a revised mold design. Preliminary results indicate these castings to be free of objectionable transverse cracks.

  17. Mold in My School: What Do I Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, Washington, DC.

    This publication provides information on the most important indoor mold-related health concerns and discusses how school districts can keep school facilities mold-free and avoid these problems. The document addresses when to be concerned, how molds cause health problems, symptoms caused by mold allergies, indoor molds that form toxins, who is most…

  18. Chalcogenide-mold interactions during precision glass molding (PGM) of GeAsSe glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, B.; Wachtel, P.; Musgraves, J. D.; Steinkopf, R.; Eberhardt, R.; Richardson, K.

    2013-09-01

    Five chalcogenide glasses in the GeAsSe ternary glass system were melted, fabricated into flats, and molded between planar, uncoated, binderless WC molds using a laboratory-scale precision glass molding machine. The five glasses originate at the binary arsenic triselenide (As40Se60) and are modified by replacing As with Se in 5 mol% increments, or by locking the As:Se ratio and adding Ge, also in 5 mol% increments. The glasses are separated into two groups, one for the Ge-free compositions and the other for the Ge-containing compositions. This effort analyzes the differences between the Ge-containing and the Ge-free glasses on the post-molded glass and mold surface behavior, as well as the mold lifetime. Fabrication features, such as scratch and/or dig marks were present on the glass and mold surfaces prior to the PGM process. White light interferometry analysis of the surfaces shows an overall reduction in the RMS roughness of the glass after molding, and an increase of the roughness of the molds, after 15 molding cycles. After molding, the quantity of observable defects, primarily deposits and dig marks are increased for both the glass and mold surfaces. Deposits found on the WC molds and glasses were analyzed using Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and showed no evidence of being due to material transfer between the WC molds and the glass constituents. In general the main observable difference in the analysis of the two post molded sets, despite the changes in chemistry, is the quantity of molding induced defects near the edge of the GeAsSe samples.

  19. Mold Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Matthew; Rosengart, Axel; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of exserohilum rostratum meningitis linked to epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate has brought renewed attention to mold infections of the central nervous system (CNS).1 Although uncommon, these infections are often devastating and difficult to treat. This focused review of the epidemiologic aspects, clinical characteristics, and treatment of mold infections of the CNS covers a group of common pathogens: aspergillus, fusarium, and scedosporium species, molds in the order Mucorales, and dematiaceous molds. Infections caused by these pathogen groups have distinctive epidemiologic profiles, clinical manifestations, microbiologic characteristics, and therapeutic implications, all of which clinicians should understand. PMID:25006721

  20. Mold and Human Health: a Reality Check.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Chang, Christopher; Eric Gershwin, M

    2017-03-16

    There are possibly millions of mold species on earth. The vast majority of these mold spores live in harmony with humans, rarely causing disease. The rare species that does cause disease does so by triggering allergies or asthma, or may be involved in hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or allergic fungal sinusitis. Other hypersensitivity diseases include those related to occupational or domiciliary exposures to certain mold species, as in the case of Pigeon Breeder's disease, Farmer's lung, or humidifier fever. The final proven category of fungal diseases is through infection, as in the case of onchomycosis or coccidiomycosis. These diseases can be treated using anti-fungal agents. Molds and fungi can also be particularly important in infections that occur in immunocompromised patients. Systemic candidiasis does not occur unless the individual is immunodeficient. Previous reports of "toxic mold syndrome" or "toxic black mold" have been shown to be no more than media hype and mass hysteria, partly stemming from the misinterpreted concept of the "sick building syndrome." There is no scientific evidence that exposure to visible black mold in apartments and buildings can lead to the vague and subjective symptoms of memory loss, inability to focus, fatigue, and headaches that were reported by people who erroneously believed that they were suffering from "mycotoxicosis." Similarly, a causal relationship between cases of infant pulmonary hemorrhage and exposure to "black mold" has never been proven. Finally, there is no evidence of a link between autoimmune disease and mold exposure.

  1. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  2. Cast segment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.; Studhalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation program to determine feasibility of fabricating segmented rocket engine thrust chambers using low cost, lightweight castings extends state of the art in areas of casting size and complexity, and in ability to provide thin sections and narrow, deep, cooling channels. Related developments are discussed.

  3. Higher Education's Caste System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  4. A cast orientation index.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, J R; Mahanna, G K

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a technique that allows multiple master casts to be precisely oriented to the same path of insertion and withdrawal. This technique is useful in situations where multiple fixed prosthodontic preparations require surveyed restorations and a single master cast is not available.

  5. Analysis of optical properties in injection-molded and compression-molded optical lenses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung Yen; Wang, Pei Jen

    2014-04-10

    Numerical mold-flow simulations and experimental measurements for injection-molded lenses have been investigated in form accuracy on a two-cavity mold with various process conditions. First, form profiles of the molded lenses have been measured together with the corresponding simulated mold-temperature distribution and displacement distribution of the lens in the z direction. A flow-through type layout of cooling channels has been devised for balance of mold-temperature distribution in mold cavities with various parametric distances for assessments in uniformity of temperature distribution. Finally, a compression-molding process is proposed for the post-process of birefringence relaxation as well as adequate form accuracy of lenses. In conclusion, optimization of process parameters to achieve good form accuracy in a multicavity mold with symmetric geometry but nonuniform cooling conditions is difficult. A good design of cooling channels plus optimized process conditions could provide uniform mold-temperature distribution so that molded lenses of good quality would be possible. Then, the profile deviation of lenses could be further compensated by profile geometry corrections. In conclusion, the post-compression-molding process could make birefringence-free plastic lenses with good form accuracy.

  6. Tracing the Origin of Non-ferrous Oxides in Lamination Defects on Hot-Rolled Coils: Mold Slag Entrainment vs Submerged Entry Nozzle Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengo, Sabri; Romano Triguero, Patricia; Zinngrebe, Enno; Mensonides, Fokko

    2017-02-01

    In this work, lamination defects (slivers) on hot-rolled coils of Ca-treated steel were investigated for microstructure and composition using optical and scanning electron microscopy combined with microanalysis (SEM/EDS). The goal was to identify possible origins for the observed defects which contain a complex assemblage of phases, such as different types of calcium aluminates (CA, CA2, CA6), melilite (C2AS), spinel (MA), and a newly identified phase, CNA2. Mold slag similar to that employed during the cast was absent. Analysis of the bulk composition of some of the defects indicated these to be too rich in alumina to be derived from mold slag through steel-slag redox exchange. In contrast, microstructural observation of the inner side of the submerged entry nozzles (SEN) used during casting showed deposits with compositions comparable to those of the defect material. Based on an estimation of the chemical evolution of mold slag interacting with steel, it is found that the defects are not likely to be entrained mold slag but remobilized SEN deposits, as supported by several microstructural and trace phase criteria. However, it should be noted that extensive reduction of mold slag by steel can lead to compositions rich in sodic-calcic aluminates (CNA2). Therefore, differentiation between specific locations of the defect materials within a casting system requires detailed analysis from the potential sources of origin as well as from the materials found in the defects.

  7. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat. It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.

  8. Commercial and Residential Water Damage: The Mold Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Del

    2002-01-01

    Describes the problem of toxic mold in residential and commercial property resulting from excess moisture. Includes common sources of unwanted moisture, design and construction flaws, determining the presence of mold, and advice for identifying and hiring reputable mold remediators. (PKP)

  9. Use of acrylic sheet molds for elastomeric products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Koerner, A. E.; Messineo, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Molds constructed of acrylic sheet are more easily machined than metal, are transparent to ensure complete filling during injection, and have smooth surfaces free of contamination. Technique eliminates flashing on molded parts and mold release agents.

  10. Mold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homes Partnership project. The routine sampling included measuring air quality factors such as temperature, relative humidity, air circulation, ... World Health Organization) . 2009. WHO guidelines for indoor air quality: dampness and mould. Germany: Druckpartner Moser. 4 NTP ( ...

  11. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end

  13. Transient Thermo-fluid Model of Meniscus Behavior and Slag Consumption in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonayat, A. S. M.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of the slag layer between the oscillating mold wall, the slag rim, the slag/liquid steel interface, and the solidifying steel shell, is of immense importance for the surface quality of continuous-cast steel. A computational model of the meniscus region has been developed, that includes transient heat transfer, multi-phase fluid flow, solidification of the slag, and movement of the mold during an oscillation cycle. First, the model is applied to a lab experiment done with a "mold simulator" to verify the transient temperature-field predictions. Next, the model is verified by matching with available literature and plant measurements of slag consumption. A reasonable agreement has been observed for both temperature and flow-field. The predictions show that transient temperature behavior depends on the location of the thermocouple during the oscillation relative to the meniscus. During an oscillation cycle, heat transfer variations in a laboratory frame of reference are more severe than experienced by the moving mold thermocouples, and the local heat transfer rate is increased greatly when steel overflows the meniscus. Finally, the model is applied to conduct a parametric study on the effect of casting speed, stroke, frequency, and modification ratio on slag consumption. Slag consumption per unit area increases with increase of stroke and modification ratio, and decreases with increase of casting speed while the relation with frequency is not straightforward. The match between model predictions and literature trends suggests that this methodology can be used for further investigations.

  14. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  15. Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.

  16. Immediate hip spica casting for femur fractures in pediatric patients. A review of 175 patients.

    PubMed

    Infante, A F; Albert, M C; Jennings, W B; Lehner, J T

    2000-07-01

    Immediate closed reduction and application of a well-molded hip spica cast is a safe and effective treatment option for closed, isolated femur fractures in children who weigh between 10 and 100 pounds. Between 1988 and 1996, 190 immediate hip spica casts were placed on children with isolated femoral shaft fractures who weight between 10 and 100 pounds. Fifteen patients were lost to followup leaving 175 children who were evaluated and followed up for at least 2 years after the hip spica cast was removed (range 2-10 years). The femur fractures were reduced closed and placed in a 1 1/2 hip spica cast in the emergency room with the patient under conscious sedation or in the operating room with the patient under general anesthesia. All of the children returned home within 24 hours of the procedure. All 175 femur fractures united within 8 weeks. The only complication was a refracture in a 25 pound child who fell 1 week after the cast was removed. No significant residual angular deformities were present in any of the children at last followup. None of the children required external shoe lifts, epiphysiodesis, antibiotics, irrigation and debridements, or limb lengthening procedures for leg length inequalities. The authors think that immediate closed reduction and placement of a well-molded hip spica cast is a safe and reliable treatment option for isolated, closed femur fractures in children from birth to 10 years of age who weigh less than 80 pounds.

  17. Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    This document describes how to investigate and evaluate moisture and mold problems in educational facilities, and presents the key steps for implementing a remediation plan. A checklist is provided for conducting mold remediation efforts along with a resource list of helpful organizations and governmental agencies. Appendices contain a glossary,…

  18. EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children now spend more than 90% of their time indoors. Thus, any exposure to indoor pollutants may be critical to their health. Molds are one of the most important pollutants children are exposed to indoors. Molds produce hundreds of allergens and toxins. These products ha...

  19. Dynamic Feed Control For Injection Molding

    DOEpatents

    Kazmer, David O.

    1996-09-17

    The invention provides methods and apparatus in which mold material flows through a gate into a mold cavity that defines the shape of a desired part. An adjustable valve is provided that is operable to change dynamically the effective size of the gate to control the flow of mold material through the gate. The valve is adjustable while the mold material is flowing through the gate into the mold cavity. A sensor is provided for sensing a process condition while the part is being molded. During molding, the valve is adjusted based at least in part on information from the sensor. In the preferred embodiment, the adjustable valve is controlled by a digital computer, which includes circuitry for acquiring data from the sensor, processing circuitry for computing a desired position of the valve based on the data from the sensor and a control data file containing target process conditions, and control circuitry for generating signals to control a valve driver to adjust the position of the valve. More complex embodiments include a plurality of gates, sensors, and controllable valves. Each valve is individually controllable so that process conditions corresponding to each gate can be adjusted independently. This allows for great flexibility in the control of injection molding to produce complex, high-quality parts.

  20. 21ST CENTURY MOLD ANALYSIS IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, the indoor air community has relied on mold analysis performed by either microscopic observations or the culturing of molds on various media to assess indoor air quality. These techniques were developed in the 19th century and are very laborious and time consumin...

  1. The use of IR thermography to show the mold and part temperature evolution in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bula, Karol; Różański, Leszek; Marciniak-Podsadna, Lidia; Wróbel, Dawid

    2016-12-01

    This study concerns the application of infrared camera for injection molding analysis by measuring temperatures of both injection molded parts and injection mold cavities in a function of injection cycles. The mold with two cavities, differing in thickness (1 and 3 mm), and a cold direct runner was used. Isotactic polypropylene homopolymer was utilized to produce parts. Mold temperature was set at 22°C and controlled by a water chiller. Five measuring points were determined: SP1, SP2 (placed in the 3 mm cavity), SP3, SP4 (located in the 1 mm cavity) and SP5 around an injection molding gate. Our investigations showed that the highest temperature is localized around SP2 point and the lowest at SP4. Also, it was proved that even after 62 injection molding cycles, temperatures of cavities were not stable, revealing their further increase with each cycle.

  2. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  3. Grinding technologies of small optical element molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Masahide; Urushibata, Kazunori

    2003-05-01

    The high-precision grinding technology is making contribution in every field, which is especially remarkable in the optics-related field. Lenses for digital camera and projector, which are mass-produced, for instance, are molded by the injection molding machine and glass molding-press machine. Concerning materials of high-precision molds, nickel alloy is mainly used in plastic-molding. And brittle material such as tungsten carbide and ceramic is used in glass-molding because the molding temperature is generally high. High-precision machining of nickel alloy is possible with a single-crystal diamond tool. Brittle material is ground by means of a diamond wheel, etc. Glass is being widely used for the lenses and other optical elements due to its favorable characteristics and life. As a result, needs for advancement of the high-precision grinding technology are being heightened. In grinding of small, fine and complex profiles, consideration for wheel truing and wear is a key point. Also, as many optical mold products are convex, mold profile is mainly concave. Especially, grinding of a small-aperture mold with small radius of curvature is difficult. In other words, a wheel whose diameter is larger than the radius of curvature of a mold to be ground cannot be used, and use of a small-diameter wheel is required inevitably. Influence of wheel wear and wheel diameter input errors at creation of grinding program becomes large. To eliminate such errors, a cycle of grinding, measurement and compensation grinding is normally repeated in mold machining until the target accuracy is obtained. Recently, needs for molding optical elements of small body of non-revolution such as prism and cylinder lens are on the increase, in addition to the body of revolution including lens. As one example, we introduce the compensation grinding and its results when grinding molds for an extremely small-aperture lens used for optical communication and a cylindrical lens array used for semi

  4. Recent advancements in optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianfeng; Liu, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiaqing; Wang, Xibin

    2017-02-01

    Optical microstructures are increasingly applied in several fields, such as optical systems, precision measurement, and microfluid chips. Microstructures include microgrooves, microprisms, and microlenses. This paper presents an overview of optical microstructure fabrication through glass molding and highlights the applications of optical microstructures in mold fabrication and glass molding. The glass-mold interface friction and adhesion are also discussed. Moreover, the latest advancements in glass molding technologies are detailed, including new mold materials and their fabrication methods, viscoelastic constitutive modeling of glass, and microstructure molding process, as well as ultrasonic vibrationassisted molding technology.

  5. Strong, easy-to-mold, spiral buttress thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Buttress thread with steep taper connects two molded plastic cylinders without changing wall thickness or sacrificing longitudinal strength at the juncture. Technique lends itself to conventional molding methods.

  6. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  7. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  8. Three-dimensional ceramic molding process based on microstereolithography for the production of piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruo, Shoji; Sugiyama, Kenji; Daicho, Yuya; Monri, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) molding process using a master polymer mold produced by microstereolithography has been developed for the production of piezoelectric ceramic elements. In this method, ceramic slurry is injected into a 3-D polymer mold via a centrifugal casting process. The polymer master mold is thermally decomposed so that complex 3-D piezoelectric ceramic elements can be produced. As an example of 3-D piezoelectric ceramic elements, we produced a spiral piezoelectric element that can convert multidirectional loads into a voltage. It was confirmed that a prototype of the spiral piezoelectric element could generate a voltage by applying a load in both parallel and lateral directions in relation to the helical axis. The power output of 123 pW was obtained by applying the maximum load of 2.8N at 2 Hz along the helical axis. In addition, to improve the performance of power generation, we utilized a two-step sintering process to obtain dense piezoelectric elements. As a result, we obtained a sintering body with relative density of 92.8%. Piezoelectric constant d31 of the sintered body attained to -40.0 pC/N. Furthermore we analyzed the open-circuit voltage of the spiral piezoelectric element using COMSOL multiphysics. As a result, it was found that use of patterned electrodes according to the surface potential distribution of the spiral piezoelectric element had a potential to provide high output voltage that was 20 times larger than that of uniform electrodes.

  9. Preparation of Microstructure Molds of Montmorillonite/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate Nanocomposites for Miniaturized Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Woo, Youngjae; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Man; Kang, Bong Keun; Park, Juyoung

    2015-10-01

    Environmentally friendly microstructure molds with montmorillonite (MMT) or multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) nanocomposites have been prepared for miniaturized device applications. The micropatterning of MMT/PEGDA and MWCNT/PEGDA with 0.5 to 2.0 wt% of MMTs and MWCNTs was achieved through a UV curing process with micro-patterned masks. Hexagonal dot arrays and complex patterns for microstructures of the nanocomposites were produced and characterized with an optical microscope; their thermal properties were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The TGA results showed that these nanocomposites were thermally stable up to 350 °C. Polydimethylsiloxane thin replicas with different microstructures were prepared by a casting method using the microstructured nanocomposites as molds. It is considered that these microstructure molds of the nanocomposites can be used as microchip molds to fabricate nanobio-chips and medical diagnostic chip devices.

  10. Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure.

    PubMed

    Hurraß, Julia; Heinzow, Birger; Aurbach, Ute; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bufe, Albrecht; Buzina, Walter; Cornely, Oliver A; Engelhart, Steffen; Fischer, Guido; Gabrio, Thomas; Heinz, Werner; Herr, Caroline E W; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Köberle, Martin; Lichtnecker, Herbert; Lob-Corzilius, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Mülleneisen, Norbert; Nowak, Dennis; Rabe, Uta; Raulf, Monika; Seidl, Hans Peter; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Szewszyk, Regine; Thomas, Peter; Valtanen, Kerttu; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A

    2017-04-01

    In April 2016, the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Medicine (Gesellschaft für Hygiene, Umweltmedizin und Präventivmedizin (GHUP)) together with other scientific medical societies, German and Austrian medical societies, physician unions and experts has provided an AWMF (Association of the Scientific Medical Societies) guideline 'Medical diagnostics for indoor mold exposure'. This guideline shall help physicians to advise and treat patients exposed indoors to mold. Indoor mold growth is a potential health risk, even without a quantitative and/or causal association between the occurrence of individual mold species and health effects. Apart from the allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and the mycoses caused by mold, there is only sufficient evidence for the following associations between moisture/mold damages and different health effects: Allergic respiratory diseases, asthma (manifestation, progression, exacerbation), allergic rhinitis, exogenous allergic alveolitis and respiratory tract infections/bronchitis. In comparison to other environmental allergens, the sensitizing potential of molds is estimated to be low. Recent studies show a prevalence of sensitization of 3-10% in the total population of Europe. The evidence for associations to mucous membrane irritation and atopic eczema (manifestation, progression, exacerbation) is classified as limited or suspected. Inadequate or insufficient evidence for an association is given for COPD, acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage in children, rheumatism/arthritis, sarcoidosis, and cancer. The risk of infections from indoor molds is low for healthy individuals. Only molds that are capable to form toxins can cause intoxications. The environmental and growth conditions and especially the substrate determine whether toxin formation occurs, but indoor air concentrations are always very low. In the case of indoor moisture/mold damages, everyone can be affected by odor effects and

  11. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  12. Preparation of Permanent Mold Coating Using Magnesia Powder for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guangsi; Wang, Guangtai; Yu, Haifeng; Ye, Sheng

    A kind of permanent mold coating for magnesium alloy was developed using magnesia powder and diatomite as refractory aggregate. The properties of the coating were tested and analyzed by various ingredients. The final ingredient was determined through the tests which are to find out the optimal proportion of two kinds of aggregate and the influences to coating properties by changing the proportion of binder and suspending agents. The experimental results shown that the permanent mold coating performed good properties on magnesium alloys when the optimized ratio of magnesia powder and diatomite was 6: 4, and the integrated property is very excellent when the coating was prepared with 2 percent of sodium bentonite, 0.4 percent of CMC, 7 percent of sodium hexametaphosphate, and 7 percent of sodium silicate. The excellent performance has also been proved by actual casting test.

  13. Thermal stresses in chemically hardening elastic media with application to the molding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitsky, M.; Shaffer, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    A method has been formulated for the determination of thermal stresses in materials which harden in the presence of an exothermic chemical reaction. Hardening is described by the transformation of the material from an inviscid liquid-like state into an elastic solid, where intermediate states consist of a mixture of the two, in a ratio which is determined by the degree of chemical reaction. The method is illustrated in terms of an infinite slab cast between two rigid mold surfaces. It is found that the stress component normal to the slab surfaces vanishes in the residual state, so that removal of the slab from the mold leaves the remaining residual stress unchanged. On the other hand, the residual stress component parallel to the slab surfaces does not vanish. Its distribution is described as a function of the parameters of the hardening process.

  14. The silicon mold fabrication of a kind of micro-optical resonator and coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Hui; Ohta, Takayuki; Takao, Satoru; Ito, Masafumi; Sasaki, Minoru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2007-02-01

    We present the fabrication of a kind of hexagonal and triangular cavity mold, which can cast Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) resonators and couplers. The mold is designed on (111) silicon wafer according to its crystal structure and anisotropic etching properties in the etchant of ethylene diamine, pyrocatechol, and water (EDP/EPW), forming sidewalls by six {110} crystal surfaces, which are perpendicular to the (111) plane and constitute precise hexagons and triangles. The RIE-ICP etching is used to define the depth of the triangle and hexagonal cavities, and the following EDP etching smoothes the sidewalls of cavities. Only high temperature EDP etching is proved to be able to get smooth sidewalls. Before etching, the wafer is aligned to the right crystal orientation by pre-etched marks. The etched results of different geometrical cavities are analyzed and discussed based on the crystal structure.

  15. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p < 0.05). Steam-vapor was significantly better than the alternative methods (p <0.001) with over 99% efficiency in mold spore decline from wetted carpet after 24 hr and 30 days, and over 92% efficiency after 7 days. The alternative methods exhibited lower efficiencies with a decline over time, from a maximum of 82% and 81% at 24 hr down to 60% and 43% at 30 days for detergent-hot water and high-flow, hot water extraction, respectively. The net effect of the mold management study demonstrates that while steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  16. Challenges in mold manufacturing for high precision molded diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongs, Guido; Bresseler, Bernd; Schweizer, Klaus; Bergs, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal precision glass molding of imaging optics is the key technology for mass production of precise optical elements. Especially for numerous consumer applications (e.g. digital cameras, smart phones, …), high precision glass molding is applied for the manufacturing of aspherical lenses. The usage of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can help to further reduce the number of lenses in the optical systems which will lead to a reduced weight of hand-held optical devices. But today the application of molded glass DOEs is limited due to the technological challenges in structuring the mold surfaces. Depending on the application submicrometer structures are required on the mold surface. Furthermore these structures have to be replicated very precisely to the glass lens surface. Especially the micro structuring of hard and brittle mold materials such as Tungsten Carbide is very difficult and not established. Thus a multitude of innovative approaches using diffractive optical elements cannot be realized. Aixtooling has investigated in different mold materials and different suitable machining technologies for the micro- and sub-micrometer structuring of mold surfaces. The focus of the work lays on ultra-precision grinding to generate the diffractive pattern on the mold surfaces. This paper presents the latest achievements in diffractive structuring of Tungsten Carbide mold surfaces by ultra-precision grinding.

  17. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  18. A review and update of advancements in clean cast steel technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, M.; Monroe, R.W.; Griffin, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Steel Founders' Society of America Quality Assurance Task Force identified oxide macroinclusions as a universal problem experienced by users of steel castings. SFSA along with the Department of Commerce and the Department of Energy have sponsored research directed at reducing the occurrence of macroinclusions in steel castings. The Clean Cast Steel Technology program has investigated melting practice, pouring practice, gating practice, ladle treatment, and special devices such as filtration and analog simulation of mold pouring and filling. In-plant trials have demonstrated a dramatic improvement in casting quality with submerged pouring of steel castings. Research is currently underway in optimizing foundry melting practice to reduce macroinclusions. A 30--50% reduction in macroinclusion occurrence has been observed in production castings at the foundries participating in the trials. Analog simulation and in-plant trials of pouring practices have demonstrated that poor gating practice can increase air entrainment and oxide inclusions. Ladle treatments such as calcium wire injection has been demonstrated in plant trials to significantly reduce oxide defects in steel castings. Experiments have been conducted at participating foundries to examine the benefits of filtration on casting quality. Filtration has been shown to reduce rework and scrap by 70% in some cases.

  19. Interfacial heat transfer in squeeze casting of magnesium alloy AM60 with variation of applied pressures and casting wall-thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Fang, Li; Sun, Zhizhong; Hu, Henry; Nie, Xueyuan; Tjong, Jimi

    2016-10-01

    The heat transfer coefficient at the casting-die interface is the most important factor on the solidification process. With the 75-ton hydraulic press machine and P20 steel die mold, 5-step castings of magnesium alloy AM60 with different wall-thicknesses (3, 5, 8, 12, 20 mm) were poured under various hydraulic pressures (30, 60, and 90 MPa) using an indirect squeeze casting process. Thermal histories throughout the die wall and the casting surface have been recorded by fine type-K thermocouples. The in-cavity local pressures measured by pressure transducers were explored at the casting-die interfaces of 5 steps. The casting-die interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTC) initially reached a maximum peak value followed by a gradually decline to the lower level. Similar characteristics of IHTC peak values can be observed at the applied pressures of 30, 60 and 90 MPa. With the applied pressure of 90 MPa, the peak IHTC values from steps 1 to 5 varied from 5623 to 10,649 W/m2 K. As the applied hydraulic pressure increased, the IHTC peak value of each step was increased accordingly. The wall thickness also affected IHTC peak values significantly. The peak IHTC value and heat flux increased as the step became thicker. The empirical equations relating the IHTCs to the local pressures and the solidification temperature at the casting surface were developed based on the multivariate linear and polynomial regression.

  20. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  1. Vacuum Die Casting of Silicon Sheet for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of a vacuum die-casting process for producing silicon sheet suitable for photovoltaic cells with a terrestrial efficiency greater than 12 percent and having the potential to be scaled for large quantity production is considered. The initial approach includes: (1) obtaining mechanical design parameters by using boron nitride, which has been shown to non-wetting to silicon; (2) optimizing silicon nitride material composition and coatings by sessile drop experiments; (3) testing effectiveness of fluoride salt interfacial media with a graphite mold; and (4) testing the effect of surface finish using both boron nitride and graphite. When the material and mechanical boundary conditions are established, a finalized version of the prototype assembly will be constructed and the casting variables determined.

  2. Study of Shell-Mold Thermal Resistance: Laboratory Measurements, Estimation from Compact Strip Production Plant Data, and Observation of Simulated Flux-Mold Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de la C., J. Manuel; Flores F., Tania M.; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2016-08-01

    The slag film that forms between the shell and mold in steel continuous casting is key in regulating the heat transfer between them. Generally, the mechanisms proposed are related to the phenomena associated with the formation of crystals in the solid layer of the film, such as the appearance of internal pores and surface roughness, which decrease phononic conduction through the layer and interfacial gap with the mold, respectively, and the emergence of crystals themselves, which reduce the transmissivity of infrared radiation across the layer. Due to the importance of the solid layer, this study investigates experimentally the effective thermal resistance, R T, between a hot Inconel surface and a cold Cu surface separated by an initially glassy slag disk, made from powders for casting low and medium-carbon steels, denoted as A and B, respectively. In the tests, an initially mirror-polished disk is sandwiched for 10,800 seconds while the Inconel temperature, away from the disk face, is maintained steady at a value, T c, between 973 K and 1423 K (700 °C and 1150 °C)-below the liquidus temperature of the slags. The disks have a thickness, d t, between ~0.7 and 3.2 mm. Over the range of conditions studied, mold slag B shows R T 33 pct larger than slag A, and microscopic observation of disks hints that the greater resistance arises from the larger porosity developed in B. This finding is supported by high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope observations of the evolution of the surface of slag parallelepipeds encased between Pt sheets, which reveal that during devitrification the film surface moves outward not inward, contrary with what is widely claimed. This behavior would favor contact of the slag with the mold for both kinds of powders. However, in the case of slag A, the crystalline grains growing at or near the surface pack closely together, leaving only few and small empty spaces. In slag B, crystalline grains pack loosely and many and large empty

  3. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  4. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New National Center for Environmental ... issued additional guidance, the WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality: Dampness and Mould [PDF - 2.52 MB] . Other ...

  5. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-16

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  6. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  7. Injection molded optical backplane for broadcast architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Paul; Mathai, Sagi; Sorin, Wayne V.; McLaren, Moray; Straznicky, Joseph; Panotopoulos, Georgios; Warren, David; Morris, Terry; Tan, Michael R. T.

    2012-01-01

    A low cost, blind mate, injection molded optical backplane is presented. The optical backplane is comprised of 12 channel optical broadcast buses, operating at 10Gbps/channel with six blindmate optical output ports spaced 1U apart.

  8. Antimicrobial Treatments of Indoor Mold and Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological contaminants especially mold in buildings are known to act as sources of indoor air pollution, discomfort, asthma and pulmonary disease to building occupants. Sick buildings are evidence of extremely problematic indoor air quality (IAQ), often resulting from unacceptab...

  9. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  10. Freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms by combining three-dimensional printing and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuwei; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Haili; Han, Yilin; Dong, Erbao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wendong; Cromeens, Barrett; Adler, Brent; Besner, Gail; Ray, William; Hoehne, Brad; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate surgical planning is important for improved clinical outcome and minimal complications in many surgical operations, such as a conjoined twin separation surgery. We combine 3D printing with casting and assembling to produce a solid phantom of high fidelity to help surgeons for better preparation of the conjoined twin separation surgery. 3D computer models of individual organs were reconstructed based on CT scanned data of the conjoined twins. The models were sliced, processed, and converted to an appropriate format for Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The skeletons of the phantom were printed directly by FDM using Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) material, while internal soft organs were fabricated by casting silicon materials of different compositions in FDM printed molds. The skeleton and the internal organs were then assembled with appropriate fixtures to maintain their relative positional accuracies. The assembly was placed in a FMD printed shell mold of the patient body for further casting. For clear differentiation of different internal organs, CT contrast agents of different compositions were added in the silicon cast materials. The produced phantom was scanned by CT again and compared with that of the original computer models of the conjoined twins in order to verify the structural and positional fidelity. Our preliminary experiments showed that combining 3D printing with casting is an effective way to produce solid phantoms of high fidelity for the improved surgical planning in many clinical applications.

  11. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  12. Indoor Molds and Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A Comparison of Selected Molds and House Dust Mite Induced Responses in a Mouse Model**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds are ubiquitous in the environment and exposures to molds contribute to various human diseases. Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold's role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. The molds selected for these studies are commonl...

  13. Molding apparatus. [for thermosetting plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for compression molding of thermosetting plastics compositions including interfitting hollow male and female components is reported. The components are adapted to be compressed to form a rocket nozzle in a cavity. A thermal jacket is provided exteriorly adjacent to the female component for circulating a thermal transfer fluid to effect curing of a thermosetting plastics material being molded. Each of the male and female components is provided with suitable inlets and outlets for circulating a thermal transfer fluid.

  14. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Review on micro molding of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckele, M.; Schomburg, W. K.

    2004-03-01

    Molding of micro components from thermoplastic polymers has become a routinely used industrial production process. This paper describes both the more than 30-year-old history and the present state of development and applications. Hot embossing, injection molding, reaction injection molding, injection compression molding, thermoforming, and various types of tool fabrication are introduced and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. In addition, design considerations, process limitations, and commercially available micro molding machines are presented.

  16. Mold contamination and air handling units.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen C; Palmatier, Robert N; Andriychuk, Larysa A; Martin, Jared M; Jumper, Cynthia A; Holder, Homer W; Straus, David C

    2007-07-01

    An investigation was conducted on selected locations in air handling units (AHUs) to (a) identify common mold species found on these locations, (b) determine whether some locations (and subsets) featured mold growth sites more frequently than others, (c) ascertain whether the operating condition of AHUs is related to mold contamination, and (d) provide a basis for a microbial sampling protocol for AHUs. A total of 566 tape lifts and 570 swab samples were collected from the blower wheel fan blades, insulation, cooling coil fins, and ductwork from 25 AHUs. All AHU conditions were numerically rated using a heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) survey. Results showed that Cladosporium sp. fungi were commonly recovered in terms of growth sites and deposited spores, and they were found mainly in the blower wheel fan blades, the ductwork, and the cooling coil fins. Subsections of the fan blades, insulation, and cooling coil fins showed no preferred area for mold growth sites. Other organisms such as Penicillium sp., Aspergillus sp., and Paecilomyces sp. were recovered from the cooling coil fins and insulation. Because of the widespread prevalence of Cladosporium sp., there was no relationship between mold growth and operating condition. However, the presence of different species of molds in locations other than the blower wheel blades may indicate that the AHU condition is not optimal. A suggested microbial sampling protocol including interpretations of sample results is presented.

  17. Integrated mold/surface-micromachining process

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    We detail a new monolithically integrated silicon mold/surface-micromachining process which makes possible the fabrication of stiff, high-aspect-ratio micromachined structures integrated with finely detailed, compliant structures. An important example, which we use here as our process demonstration vehicle, is that of an accelerometer with a large proof mass and compliant suspension. The proof mass is formed by etching a mold into the silicon substrate, lining the mold with oxide, filling it with mechanical polysilicon, and then planarizing back to the level of the substrate. The resulting molded structure is recessed into the substrate, forming a planar surface ideal for subsequent processing. We then add surface-micromachined springs and sense contacts. The principal advantage of this new monolithically integrated mold/surface-micromachining process is that it decouples the design of the different sections of the device: In the case of a sensitive accelerometer, it allows us to optimize independently the proof mass, which needs to be as large, stiff, and heavy as possible, and the suspension, which needs to be as delicate and compliant as possible. The fact that the high-aspect-ratio section of the device is embedded in the substrate enables the monolithic integration of high-aspect-ratio parts with surface-micromachined mechanical parts, and, in the future, also electronics. We anticipate that such an integrated mold/surface micromachining/electronics process will offer versatile high-aspect-ratio micromachined structures that can be batch-fabricated and monolithically integrated into complex microelectromechanical systems.

  18. Cast aluminum alloys containing dispersions of zircon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, A.; Surappa, M. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1983-06-01

    A process for preparing Al-alloy castings containing dispersions of zircon particles is described. Composites were prepared by stirring zircon particles (40 to 200 µm size) in commercially pure Al (99.5 pct)* and Al-11.8 pct Si melts and subsequently casting these melts in permanent molds. It was found to be necessary to alloy the above two melts with 3 pct Mg to disperse substantial amounts of zircon particles (25 to 30 pct). Further, it was possible to disperse up to 60 wt pct zircon by adding up to 5 pct Mg; however, the melts containing above 30 wt pct zircon showed insufficient fluidity for gravity diecasting and had to be pressure diecast. Microstructural studies of cast composites indicated the presence of a reaction zone at the periphery of zircon particles, and electron probe microanalysis showed concentrations of Mg and Si at the particle-matrix interface. Hardness, abrasive wear resistance, elastic modulus, 0.2 pct proof stress, and tensile strength of cast Al-3 pct Mg alloy were found to improve with the dispersions of zircon particles. Scanning electron micrographs of abraded and fractured surfaces did not show any evidence of particle pull-outs or voids at the particle matrix interface, indicating strong continuous bonding.

  19. Elimination or Minimization of Oscillation Marks: A Path To Improved Cast Surface Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Alan W. Cramb

    2007-12-17

    Oscillation marks are the most recognizable feature of continuous casting and can be related to the subsurface defects that can be found on product rolled from continuous cast slabs. The purpose of this work was to develop strategies that can be used on industrial continuous casters to reduce oscillation mark depth and, in particular, to minimize the formation of hook type defects that are prevalent on ultra low carbon grades. The major focus of the work was on developing a technique to allow heat transfer in the meniscus region of the continuous caster to be measured and the effect of mold slag chemistry and chrystallization to be documented. A new experimental technique was developed that allowed the effect of mold flux chemistry and chrystallization on the radiation heat transfer rate to be measured dynamically.

  20. Sealing micropores in thin castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersereau, G. A.; Nitzschke, G. O.; Ochs, H. L.; Sutch, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic pores in thin-walled aluminum castings are sealed by impregnation pretreatment. Technique was developed for investment castings used in hermetically sealed chassic for electronic circuitry. Excessively high leakage rates were previously measured in some chassis.

  1. In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C.; Omatete, O.O.

    1996-08-01

    Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  2. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  3. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Consortium was tasked by GE Transportation Systems (GETS) with development of the IFE, a complex ductile iron casting for a commercial loco- motive that... ductile iron foundry with this tooling, it was clear that castings with acceptable quality could not be made. These castings were on the GE...requirements. Therefore, the design specifies a thin - walled casting with complex structures and the requirements demand tight dimensional tolerances and

  4. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  5. ToxCast Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  6. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  7. Microporosity in casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-06-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. Samples from each series were sectioned longitudinally, mounted, polished and examined microscopically for evidence of microporosity.

  8. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  9. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  10. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  11. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-01-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications. PMID:27725780

  12. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  13. Feeding and Distribution of Porosity in Cast Al-Si Alloys as Function of Alloy Composition and Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Taylor, John A.; Easton, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Unmodified, Na-modified, and Sr-modified castings of Al-7 pct Si and Al-12.5 pct Si alloys were cast in molds in which it was possible to create different cooling conditions. It is shown how solidification influences the distribution of porosity at the surface and the center of the castings as a function of modification and Si content in sand- and chill-cast samples. Eutectic modification, Si content, and cooling conditions have a great impact on the distribution of porosity. Unmodified and Na-modified castings are more easily fed with porosity tending to congregate near the centerline of the casting, while Sr-modified castings solidify in a mushy manner that creates a more homogeneous distribution of porosity in the casting. The amount of porosity was highest in the Sr-modified alloys, lower in the Na-modified alloys, and lowest in the unmodified alloys. The size of the porosity-free layer and the effectiveness of the feeders were greater in the castings made with the steel chills due to the increased thermal gradients and consequent increase in the directionality of solidification.

  14. Onychomycosis Due to Nondermatophytic Molds

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Min; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there have been many studies about onychomycosis due to nondermatophytic molds (NDM), few studies about etiologic agents including NDM in onychomycosis have been reported in Korea. Objective: This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Objective This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Methods In the 10-year period from 1999~2009, we reviewed 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM. The etiologic agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. In some cases, internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis was done. NDM isolated considered pathogens when the presence of fungal elements was identified by direct microscopy observation and in follow-up cultures yielding the same fungi. Results Onychomycosis due to NDM comprised 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM, 84.7% were toenail onychomycosis and 15.3% were fingernail onychomycosis. The incidence rate was highest in the fifth decade (27.1%). The ratio of male to female patients was 1:1.6. The frequency of associated diseases, in descending order, was hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral hematoma. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (86.4%) was the most common clinical type of onychomycosis. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated etiologic agent of onychomycosis due to NDM (83.0%). Other causative agents were Scopulariopsis brevicaulis (10.2%), Acremonium spp. (3.4%), Fusarium solani (1.7%), and Chaetomium globosum (1.7%). Conclusion Because of the increase in onychomycosis due to NDM, we suggest the need of a careful mycological examination in patients with onychomycosis. PMID:22577268

  15. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  16. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  17. Injection molding simulation with variothermal mold temperature control of highly filled polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, A.; Tschiersky, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    For the installation of a fuel cell stack to convert chemical energy into electricity it is common to apply bipolar plates to separate and distribute reaction gases and cooling agents. For reducing manufacturing costs of bipolar plates a fully automated injection molding process is examined. The high performance thermoplastic matrix material, polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), defies against the chemical setting and the operation temperature up to 200 °C. To adjust also high electrical and thermal conductivity, PPS is highly filled with various carbon fillers up to an amount of 65 percentage by volume. In the first step two different structural plates (one-sided) with three different gate heights and molds are designed according to the characteristics of a bipolar plate. To cope with the approach that this plate should be producible on standard injection molding machines with variothermal mold temperature control, injection molding simulation is used. Additionally, the simulation should allow to formulate a quality prediction model, which is transferrable to bipolar plates. Obviously, the basis for a precise simulation output is an accurate description of the material properties and behavior of the highly filled compound. This, the design of the structural plate and mold and the optimization via simulation is presented, as well. The influence of the injection molding process parameters, e.g. injection time, cycle times, packing pressure, mold temperature, and melt temperature on the form filling have been simulated to determine optimal process conditions. With the aid of the simulation and the variothermal mold temperature control it was possible to reduce the required melt temperature below the decomposition temperature of PPS. Thereby, hazardous decomposition products as hydrogen sulfide are obviated. Thus, the health of the processor, the longevity of the injection molding machine as well as the material and product properties can be protected.

  18. Microstructure and fatigue characteristics of direct chill cast and electromagnetic cast 2024 Al alloy ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sug Won; Hao, Hai

    2003-07-01

    The distinct advantages of the electromagnetic casting (EMC) process consist in the presence of stirring motions in the melt, which lead to significant grain size reduction in solidified ingot. Furthermore, surface and subsurface qualities are improved due to the absence of ingot mold. However, it is impossible to achieve the aforementioned advantages in conventional direct chill casting (DCC). In order to contrast the before and after heat treatments of the microstructural and mechanical characteristics of EMC and DCC 2024 aluminium alloys, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractions (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), etc. were carried out. Compared with the DCC ingot, the EMC ingot has better mechanical properties not only in the ascast condition but also in the as-aged condition. The DSC curves show that the EMC specimens have high enthalpy, i.e., the thermal kinetic energy to form precipitates during the aging treatment process. Despite heat treatments applied to the DCC ingot, it fails to attain the same mechanical properties as the EMC ingot. Moreover, considering the expernsive scalping operation for DCC ingots, the EMC technique, which offers a lower manufacturing cost, is one of the best manufacturing methods used in obtaining the ingots of wrought aluminum alloys.

  19. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  20. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the