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Sample records for molecular basis forobligate

  1. The genome of Methylobacillus flagellatus, the molecular basis forobligate methylotrophy, and the polyphyletic origin ofmethylotrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Lapidus, Alla; Han, Cliff; Goodwin,Lynne; Saunders, Liz; Brettin, Tom; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Lucas,Susan; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2007-01-08

    Along with methane, methanol and methylated amines representimportant biogenic atmospheric constituents, thus not only methanotrophs,but also non-methanotrophic methylotrophs play a significant role inglobal carbon cycling. The complete genome of a model obligate methanoland methylamine utilizer, Methylobacillus flagellatus (strain KT) wassequenced. The genome is represented by a single circular chromosome ofapproximately 3 Mb pairs, potentially encoding a total of 2,766 proteins.Based on genome analysis as well as the results from previous genetic andmutational analyses, methylotrophy is enabled by methanol- andmethylamine dehydrogenases, the tetrahydromethanopterin-linkedformaldehyde oxidation pathway, the assimilatory and dissimilatorybranches of the ribulose monophosphate cycle, and by formatedehydrogenases. Some of the methylotrophy genes are present in more thanone (identical or non-identical) copy. The obligate dependence on singlecarbon compounds appears to be due to the incomplete tricarboxylic acidcycle, as no genes potentially encoding alpha ketoglutarate, malate orsuccinate dehydrogenases are identifiable. The genome of M. flagellatuswas compared, in terms of methylotrophy functions, to the previouslysequenced genomes of three methylotrophs: Methylobacterium extorquens(Alphaproteobacterium, 7 Mbp), Methylibium petroleophilum(Betaproteobacterium, 4 Mbp), and Methylococcus capsulatus(Gammaproteobacterium, 3.3 Mbp). Strikingly, metabolically and/orphylogenetically, methylotrophy functions in M. flagellatus were moresimilar to the ones in M. capsulatus and M. extorquens than to the onesin the more closely related M. petroleophilum, providing the firstgenomic evidence for the polyphyletic origin of methylotrophy inBetaproteobacteria.

  2. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy.

  3. A Molecular Basis of Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the molecular basis of cancer, focusing on genetics of the disease. Indicates that human cancers are initiated by oncogenes (altered versions of normal genes) and that in one case the critical alteration is a single point mutation that changes one amino acid in the protein encoded by the gene. (JN)

  4. Molecular basis for erythrocyte shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgsaeter, A.; Mikkelsen, A.

    1991-05-01

    The isolated plasma membrane of the human erythrocytes displays the same shape and shape transformations as the intact cells. It is therefore generally believed that the plasma membrane plays a dominant role in determining erythrocyte shape. The plasma membrane consists of a fluid lipid bilayer to the surface of which is attached a protein skeleton. The two halves of the lipid bilayer and the protein network (gel) are tighly coupled, but at the same time elastically deformable and can slide relative to one another in the plane of the cell membrane. The equilibrium shape of such a structure is determined by the combined mechano-chemical properties of the individual layers and equals the cell shape that for the given cell volume corresponds to the lowest total elastic free energy. The elastic free energy of the lipid bilayer is mainly associated with bending and change in surface area for each of the two lipid monolayer. For the protein membrane skeleton the elastic free energy mainly equals the sum of the local contributions due to shear deformation and surface change. When the mechano-chemical properties of each of the layers are known, calculation of the equilibrium shape is in principle just an exercise in standard continuum mechanics. The elastic properties of pure lipid monolayers have long been qualitatively fairly well known. The changes in lipid bilayer elastic properties resulting from the presence of integral membrane proteins have just recently become better understood. The detailed molecular basis for the elastic properties of the protein membrane skeleton remains unresolved despite many attempts to elucidate the problem. It is widely agreed that the elastic properties are largely accounted for by the highly elongated spectrin molecules, but whether the membrane skelton elasticity is mainly of entropic or entalphic origin is still unsettled.

  5. The Molecular Basis of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allan C.

    1985-01-01

    Discovery that mutations accumulate at steady rates over time in the genes of all lineages of plants and animals has led to new insights into evolution at the molecular and organismal levels. Discusses molecular evolution, examining deoxyribonuclei acid (DNA) sequences, morphological distances, and codon rate of change. (DH)

  6. Molecular basis of lymphokine action

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.R. ); Pierce, C.W. ); Cohen, S. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Regulation of IL2 and related genes at the mRNA level; Molecular biology of Interleukin-3; Isolation and characterization of mouse and human cDNA clones encoding IL-4 and IgA-Enhancing Factor/Esoinophil CSF (IL-5); Molecular cloning and characterization of the human gene for Interleukin-3 (IL-3); and Soluble immune response suppressor (SIRS) mediated inhibition of cell division.

  7. The Molecular Basis of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Basic architecture of embryo development appears to be under homeobox control (a short stretch of DNA). Outlines research on this genetic segment in fruit flies which led to identification of this control on the embryo's spatial organization. Indicates that molecular mechanisms underlying development may be much more universal than previously…

  8. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  9. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  10. The molecular basis of memory.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2012-08-15

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (N(A) = 6 × 10(23)). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson's disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of "synaptic plasticity" affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting.

  11. The Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (NA = 6 × 1023). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson’s disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of “synaptic plasticity” affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting. PMID:23050060

  12. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  13. The molecular basis of peanut allergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures, and discusses how modif...

  14. Molecular basis of chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is an essential physiological response for sessile plant survival and the optimization of photosynthetic ability. Simple but effective experiments on the physiological, cell biological and molecular genetic aspects have been widely used to investigate the signaling components of chloroplast photorelocation movement in Arabidopsis for the past few decades. Although recent knowledge on chloroplast photorelocation movement has led us to a deeper understanding of its physiological and molecular basis, the biochemical roles of the downstream factors remain largely unknown. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances regarding chloroplast photorelocation movement and propose that a new high-resolution approach is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  15. The molecular basis of human keratin disorders.

    PubMed

    Arin, Meral Julia

    2009-05-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that provide structural support to epithelial cells and tissues. Perturbation causes cell and tissue fragility and accounts for a large number of genetic disorders in humans. In humans, 54 functional keratin genes exist and 21 different keratin genes including hair keratins and hair follicle-specific epithelial keratins have been associated with hereditary disorders. Moreover, keratins have been implicated in more complex traits such as liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Understanding the molecular basis of keratin disorders has been the basis for improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, genetic counseling and prenatal testing for severe disorders. Besides their mechanical role, keratins have newly identified functions in apoptosis, cell growth, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. Improved understanding of the regulatory functions of keratins may offer novel approaches to overcome current treatment limitations.

  16. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  17. Molecular Basis of Actin Nucleation Factor Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Zeth, Kornelius; Pechlivanis, Markos; Samol, Annette; Pleiser, Sandra; Vonrhein, Clemens; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2011-01-01

    The distinct actin nucleation factors of the Spir and formin subgroup families cooperate in actin nucleation. The Spir/formin cooperativity has been identified to direct two essential steps in mammalian oocyte maturation, the asymmetric spindle positioning and polar body extrusion during meiosis. Understanding the nature and regulation of the Spir/Fmn cooperation is an important requirement to comprehend mammalian reproduction. Recently we dissected the structural elements of the Spir and Fmn family proteins, which physically link the two actin nucleation factors. The trans-regulatory interaction is mediated by the Spir kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) and the C-terminal formin Spir interaction motif (FSI). The interaction inhibits formin nucleation activity and enhances the Spir activity. To get insights into the molecular mechanism of the Spir/Fmn interaction, we determined the crystal structure of the KIND domain alone and in complex with the C-terminal Fmn-2 FSI peptide. Together they confirm the proposed structural homology of the KIND domain to the protein kinase fold and reveal the basis of the Spir/formin interaction. The complex structure showed a large interface with conserved and positively charged residues of the Fmn FSI peptide mediating major contacts to an acidic groove on the surface of KIND. Protein interaction studies verified the electrostatic nature of the interaction. The data presented here provide the molecular basis of the Spir/formin interaction and give a first structural view into the mechanisms of actin nucleation factor cooperativity. PMID:21705804

  18. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development.

    PubMed

    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, much genomic data and a novel body of knowledge, including the identification of microRNAs, are being increasingly accumulated for the development of laboratory testing cassettes for cerebral malaria prevention. Therefore, understanding of the underlying complex molecular basis of cerebral malaria is important for the design of strategy for cerebral malaria treatment and control.

  19. Molecular Basis of KELnull Phenotype in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Boturão-Neto, Edmir; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Kimura, Elisa Yuriko Sugano; de Oliveira, Maria do Carmo Valgueiro Costa; do Monte Barretto, Cláudia Lumack; Nunes, Mércia Maria Alves; Albuquerque, Sérgio Roberto Lopes; de Deus Santos, Marcos Daniel; Bordin, José Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background KELnull (K0) persons can produce clinically significant anti-KEL5 antibody after transfusion and/or pregnancy, requiring K0 blood transfusion when indicated. 37 K0 alleles have been reported in studies over different populations, but none in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of K0 phenotype in Brazilians. Methods We investigated three K0 samples from different Brazilian blood banks (Recife, Manaus, and Vila Velha) in women with anti-KEL5. KEL antigen typing was performed by serologic techniques, and the K0 status was confirmed by flow cytometry. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing of the KEL coding and exon-intron regions were also performed. Results RBCs of the 3 patients were phenotyped as KEL:-1,−2,−3,−4,−7. The 3 patients had the same KEL*02/02 genotype and were negative for KEL*02.03 and KEL*02.06 alleles. The Recife K0 patient was homozygous for IVS16 + 1g>a mutation (KEL*02N.31 allele). The flow cytometry with anti-KEL1, anti-KEL2, anti-KEL3, anti-KEL4, and anti-CD238 confirmed the K0 phenotype. In addition, we found the c.10423C>T mutation (KEL*02N.04 allele) in both the Manaus K0 and the Vila Velha K0 patients. Conclusion This report represents the first study of K0 molecular basis performed in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. PMID:25960716

  20. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Liver Development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Donghun; Singh Monga, Satdarshan Pal

    2015-01-01

    Liver is a prime organ responsible for synthesis, metabolism, and detoxification. The organ is endodermal in origin and its development is regulated by temporal, complex, and finely balanced cellular and molecular interactions that dictate its origin, growth, and maturation. We discuss the relevance of endoderm patterning, which truly is the first step toward mapping of domains that will give rise to specific organs. Once foregut patterning is completed, certain cells within the foregut endoderm gain competence in the form of expression of certain transcription factors that allow them to respond to certain inductive signals. Hepatic specification is then a result of such inductive signals, which often emanate from the surrounding mesenchyme. During hepatic specification bipotential hepatic stem cells or hepatoblasts become apparent and undergo expansion, which results in a visible liver primordium during the stage of hepatic morphogenesis. Hepatoblasts next differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. The expansion and differentiation is regulated by cellular and molecular interactions between hepatoblasts and mesenchymal cells including sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells, and also innate hematopoietic elements. Further maturation of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes continues during late hepatic development as a function of various growth factors. At this time, liver gains architectural novelty in the form of zonality and at cellular level acquires polarity. A comprehensive elucidation of such finely tuned developmental cues have been the basis of transdifferentiation of various types of stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells for purposes of understanding health and disease and for therapeutic applications. PMID:23720330

  1. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  2. Molecular Basis of Laminin-Integrin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are composed of three polypeptide chains, designated as α, β, and γ. The C-terminal region of laminin heterotrimers, containing coiled-coil regions, short tails, and laminin globular (LG) domains, is necessary and sufficient for binding to integrins, which are the major laminin receptor class. Laminin recognition by integrins critically requires the α chain LG domains and a glutamic acid residue of the γ chain at the third position from the C-terminus. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of the β chain contains a short amino acid sequence that modulates laminin affinity for integrins. Thus, all three of the laminin chains act cooperatively to facilitate integrin binding. Mammals possess 5 α (α1-5), 3 β (β1-3), and 3 γ (γ1-3) chains, combinations of which give rise to 16 distinct laminin isoforms. Each isoform is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific manner, exerting its functions through binding of integrins. In this review, we detail the current knowledge surrounding the molecular basis and physiological relevance of specific interactions between laminins and integrins, and describe the mechanisms underlying laminin action through integrins.

  3. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  4. The molecular basis of fertilization (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Georgadaki, Katerina; Khoury, Nikolas; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Zoumpourlis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Fertilization is the fusion of the male and female gamete. The process involves the fusion of an oocyte with a sperm, creating a single diploid cell, the zygote, from which a new individual organism will develop. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of fertilization has fascinated researchers for many years. In this review, we focus on this intriguing process at the molecular level. Several molecules have been identified to play a key role in each step of this intriguing process (the sperm attraction from the oocyte, the sperm maturation, the sperm and oocyte fusion and the two gamete pronuclei fusion leading to the zygote). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the cell-cell interactions will provide a better understanding of the causes of fertility issues due to fertilization defects. PMID:27599669

  5. Molecular basis of fracture in polystyrene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivam, M.; Klein, A.; Thomas, T.N.; Mohammadi, N.; Sperling, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the fracture of polystyrene films, a custom built dental burr grinding instrument was used. Films were made from latexes, compression molded polystyrene, and by photopolymerization. Latexes were prepared by direct miniemulsification of polystyrene using sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactant and cetyl and stearyl alcohols as co-surfactants. Grinding of various films was carried out at room temperature. GPC was used to determine the molecular weight before and after grinding. From the molecular weight reduction, the number of chain scissions per unit volume was determined. The energy required for the grinding process was also measured. The results are consistent with a model of exciting 300{+-}150 bonds (per chain fracture) to the breaking point. The most probable deformation mode, consuming maximum energy is envisaged as the scissor-like opening of the 109{degrees} -C-C-C bond angle.

  6. Molecular basis of angiosperm tree architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shoot architecture of trees greatly impacts orchard and forest management methods. Amassing greater knowledge of the molecular genetics behind tree form can benefit these industries as well as contribute to basic knowledge of plant developmental biology. This review covers basic components of ...

  7. The Molecular Basis of α-Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    The globin gene disorders including the thalassemias are among the most common human genetic diseases with more than 300,000 severely affected individuals born throughout the world every year. Because of the easy accessibility of purified, highly specialized, mature erythroid cells from peripheral blood, the hemoglobinopathies were among the first tractable human molecular diseases. From the 1970s onward, the analysis of the large repertoire of mutations underlying these conditions has elucidated many of the principles by which mutations occur and cause human genetic diseases. This work will summarize our current knowledge of the α-thalassemias, illustrating how detailed analysis of this group of diseases has contributed to our understanding of the general molecular mechanisms underlying many orphan and common diseases. PMID:23284078

  8. Molecular basis of viral and microbial pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, R.; Goebel, W.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Correlation Between Viroid Structure and Pathogenicty; Antigenicity of the Influenza Haemagglutinia Membrane Glycoprotein; Viral Glycoproteins as Determinants of Pathogenicity; Virus Genes Involved in Host Range and Pathogenicity; Molecular Heterogenetiy of Pathogenic Herpus Viruses; Recombination of Foreign (Viral) DNA with Host Genome: Studies in Vivo and in a Cell-Free system; Disorders of Cellular Neuro-Functions by Persistent Viral Infection; Pathogenic Aspects of Measles Virus-Persistent Infections in Man; Analysis of the Dual Lineage Specificity of E26 Avian Leukemia Virus; Mx Gene Control of Influenza Virus Susceptibility; Shiga and Shika-Like Toxins: A Family of Related Cytokinons; and Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenicity in Shigella Flexneri.

  9. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  10. Molecular basis of odor detection in insects.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard

    2009-07-01

    Olfactory systems are evolutionarily ancient, underlying the common requirement for all animals to sense and respond to diverse volatile chemical signals in their environment. Odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) that, in most olfactory systems, comprise large families of divergent G protein-coupled receptors. Here, I discuss our and others' recent investigations of ORs in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which have revealed insights into the distinct evolutionary origin and molecular function of insect ORs. I also describe a bioinformatics strategy that we developed to identify molecules that function with these insect-specific receptors in odor detection.

  11. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David

    2011-10-19

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  12. Molecular basis of mast cell disease.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Brenet, Fabienne; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is an incurable and sometimes fatal haematological disorder grossly described as the accumulation of abnormal mast cells in the bone marrow and other organs causing tissue and organ damage. The clinical manifestations of this disease are extremely variable; disease phenotypes range from indolent to aggressive, and often present with associated non-mast cell haematological disorders (AHNMD), mainly myeloproliferative neoplasm and myelodysplastic syndromes. Recent efforts to genetically dissect the mechanisms that define aggressive and non-aggressive mastocytosis have generated a list of recurrent somatic mutations in mastocytosis patients that are associated with and may predict the evolution towards aggressive disease phenotypes. Here we review these mutations and discuss the molecular mechanisms associated with these mutations in an effort to better understand the biology of this disease and to predict its onset and evolution, with the ultimate goal of devising new and improved treatment strategies.

  13. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review).

  14. Molecular basis of vertebrate limb patterning.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Cheryll

    2002-10-15

    Mechanisms of limb development are common to all higher vertebrates. The current understanding of how vertebrate limbs develop comes mainly from studies on chick embryos, which are classical models for experimental manipulation, and mouse embryos, which can be genetically manipulated. Work on chick and mouse embryos is often complementary and has direct implications for human limb development. Analysis has moved to the molecular level, which allows direct links to genetics. Even though genes involved in limb development have been discovered by basic scientists through different routes to that taken by clinical geneticists, many of the same genes have been identified. Thus, the fields of embryology and clinical medicine increasingly converge. The next challenge will be to go back to animal models to begin to dissect how particular gene mutations lead to specific limb phenotypes.

  15. Understanding the molecular basis of histologic grade.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, M; Sotiriou, C

    2008-01-01

    Histologic grading in breast cancer is based on the evaluation of 3 morphologic features (tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic count), is essentially describing proliferation and differentiation in breast cancer, and is considered an important prognostic factor for this disease. It has been suggested that histologic grade 1 and 3 breast tumors are 2 different diseases that may have distinct molecular origins, pathogenesis and natural history. Different single markers like Ki-67, thymidine labeling index and S phase fraction/flow cytometry have been studied as markers of proliferation, but none of them, with the possible exception of Ki-67, is currently employed routinely in clinical practice. The advent of the powerful microarray technology has enabled scientists to comprehensively study proliferation in breast cancer on a genome-wide scale. A gene expression grade index (GGI) was developed that challenges the existence and clinical relevance of an intermediate grade 2 classification. The GGI could reclassify patients with histologic grade 2 tumors into 2 groups with high versus low risks of recurrence. GGI has also been used to define 2 clinically relevant subgroups in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinomas. Finally, in the largest meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression and clinical data, 4 stable molecular subgroups of breast cancer have been identified, namely ER-/HER-, HER2+ and ER+/HER2-, which was divided into 2 subgroups (ER+/low proliferation and ER+/high proliferation). In this same meta-analysis, proliferation was shown to be the common driving force responsible for the performance of various breast cancer prognostic signatures.

  16. Molecular Basis of ABHD5 Lipolysis Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Zhang, Huamei; Mladenovic, Ljiljana; Tseng, Yan Yuan; Granneman, James G.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-beta hydrolase domain-containing 5 (ABHD5), the defective gene in human Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, is a highly conserved regulator of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipolysis that plays important roles in metabolism, tumor progression, viral replication, and skin barrier formation. The structural determinants of ABHD5 lipolysis activation, however, are unknown. We performed comparative evolutionary analysis and structural modeling of ABHD5 and ABHD4, a functionally distinct paralog that diverged from ABHD5 ~500 million years ago, to identify determinants of ABHD5 lipolysis activation. Two highly conserved ABHD5 amino acids (R299 and G328) enabled ABHD4 (ABHD4 N303R/S332G) to activate ATGL in Cos7 cells, brown adipocytes, and artificial lipid droplets. The corresponding ABHD5 mutations (ABHD5 R299N and ABHD5 G328S) selectively disrupted lipolysis without affecting ATGL lipid droplet translocation or ABHD5 interactions with perilipin proteins and ABHD5 ligands, demonstrating that ABHD5 lipase activation could be dissociated from its other functions. Structural modeling placed ABHD5 R299/G328 and R303/G332 from gain-of-function ABHD4 in close proximity on the ABHD protein surface, indicating they form part of a novel functional surface required for lipase activation. These data demonstrate distinct ABHD5 functional properties and provide new insights into the functional evolution of ABHD family members and the structural basis of lipase regulation. PMID:28211464

  17. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation.

  18. The molecular basis of bone mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Yavropoulou, M.P.; Yovos, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton has the ability to perfectly adapt to external forces of the operating environment, by altering its morphology and metabolism in order to meet different needs. This unique adaptive capacity of the skeleton creates an interesting range of biological questions concerning the perception of mechanical or other kinds of signals, the type of receptor, and the molecular pathways involved in this adaptation. Studies of the characteristics of the cellular engineering provide a host of new information that confers to osteocytes the role of the protagonist in the perception and regulation of mechanical effects on the skeleton. The identity of mechanoreceptors is manifold and concerns ion channels, integrins, cell membrane, the cytoskeleton, and other systems. A similar multiplicity characterizes the intracellular signaling. This review describes recent data concerning the outward force reception systems and intracellular transduction pathways of information transfer leading to the continuous adaptation of bone tissue. Increased appreciation of the importance of the mechanical environment in regulating and determining the effectiveness of structural adjustment of the skeleton defines new horizons for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with bone loss. PMID:27609037

  19. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  20. Property-optimized gaussian basis sets for molecular response calculations.

    PubMed

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Furche, Filipp

    2010-10-07

    With recent advances in electronic structure methods, first-principles calculations of electronic response properties, such as linear and nonlinear polarizabilities, have become possible for molecules with more than 100 atoms. Basis set incompleteness is typically the main source of error in such calculations since traditional diffuse augmented basis sets are too costly to use or suffer from near linear dependence. To address this problem, we construct the first comprehensive set of property-optimized augmented basis sets for elements H-Rn except lanthanides. The new basis sets build on the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets of split-valence to quadruple-zeta valence quality and add a small number of moderately diffuse basis functions. The exponents are determined variationally by maximization of atomic Hartree-Fock polarizabilities using analytical derivative methods. The performance of the resulting basis sets is assessed using a set of 313 molecular static Hartree-Fock polarizabilities. The mean absolute basis set errors are 3.6%, 1.1%, and 0.3% for property-optimized basis sets of split-valence, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta valence quality, respectively. Density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset polarizabilities show similar basis set convergence. We demonstrate the efficiency of our basis sets by computing static polarizabilities of icosahedral fullerenes up to C(720) using hybrid density functional theory.

  1. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B. J.; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer—Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization. PMID:25741361

  2. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B J; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer-Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization.

  3. Independent molecular basis of convergent highland adaptation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in ...

  4. The molecular basis of breast cancer pathological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing J; Lester, Susan C; Tse, Gary Mk; Factor, Rachel E; Allison, Kimberly H; Collins, Laura C; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Jensen, Kristin C; Johnson, Nicole B; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Punjabi, Rahi; Shin, Sandra J; Singh, Kamaljeet; Krings, Gregor; Eberhard, David A; Tan, Puay Hoon; Korski, Konstanty; Waldman, Frederic M; Gutman, David A; Sanders, Melinda; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Flanagan, Sydney R; Gendoo, Deena Ma; Chen, Gregory M; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Ciriello, Giovanni; Hoadley, Katherine A; Perou, Charles M; Beck, Andrew H

    2017-02-01

    The histopathological evaluation of morphological features in breast tumours provides prognostic information to guide therapy. Adjunct molecular analyses provide further diagnostic, prognostic and predictive information. However, there is limited knowledge of the molecular basis of morphological phenotypes in invasive breast cancer. This study integrated genomic, transcriptomic and protein data to provide a comprehensive molecular profiling of morphological features in breast cancer. Fifteen pathologists assessed 850 invasive breast cancer cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Morphological features were significantly associated with genomic alteration, DNA methylation subtype, PAM50 and microRNA subtypes, proliferation scores, gene expression and/or reverse-phase protein assay subtype. Marked nuclear pleomorphism, necrosis, inflammation and a high mitotic count were associated with the basal-like subtype, and had a similar molecular basis. Omics-based signatures were constructed to predict morphological features. The association of morphology transcriptome signatures with overall survival in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer was first assessed by use of the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) dataset; signatures that remained prognostic in the METABRIC multivariate analysis were further evaluated in five additional datasets. The transcriptomic signature of poorly differentiated epithelial tubules was prognostic in ER-positive breast cancer. No signature was prognostic in ER-negative breast cancer. This study provided new insights into the molecular basis of breast cancer morphological phenotypes. The integration of morphological with molecular data has the potential to refine breast cancer classification, predict response to therapy, enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology, and improve clinical management. This work is publicly accessible at www.dx.ai/tcga_breast. Copyright © 2016

  5. Unwinding the Molecular Basis of Interval and Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Patricia V.; Golombek, Diego A.; Meck, Warren H.

    2011-01-01

    Neural timing mechanisms range from the millisecond to diurnal, and possibly annual, frequencies. Two of the main processes under study are the interval timer (seconds-to-minute range) and the circadian clock. The molecular basis of these two mechanisms is the subject of intense research, as well as their possible relationship. This article summarizes data from studies investigating a possible interaction between interval and circadian timing and reviews the molecular basis of both mechanisms, including the discussion of the contribution from studies of genetically modified animal models. While there is currently no common neurochemical substrate for timing mechanisms in the brain, circadian modulation of interval timing suggests an interaction of different frequencies in cerebral temporal processes. PMID:22022309

  6. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  7. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  8. Semiclassical basis sets for the computation of molecular vibrational states.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2017-01-07

    In this paper, we extend a method recently reported [F. Revuelta et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 042921 (2013)] for the calculation of the eigenstates of classically highly chaotic systems to cases of mixed dynamics, i.e., those presenting regular and irregular motions at the same energy. The efficiency of the method, which is based on the use of a semiclassical basis set of localized wave functions, is demonstrated by applying it to the determination of the vibrational states of a realistic molecular system, namely, the LiCN molecule.

  9. The Human Glucocorticoid Receptor: Molecular Basis of Biologic Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C.; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P.; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticopid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic function. PMID:19818358

  10. The human glucocorticoid receptor: molecular basis of biologic function.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Galata, Zoi; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of the subfamily of steroid hormone receptors has enhanced our understanding of how a set of hormonally derived lipophilic ligands controls cellular and molecular functions to influence development and help achieve homeostasis. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the first member of this subfamily, is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The effector domains of the GR mediate transcriptional activation by recruiting coregulatory multi-subunit complexes that remodel chromatin, target initiation sites, and stabilize the RNA-polymerase II machinery for repeated rounds of transcription of target genes. This review summarizes the basic aspects of the structure and actions of the human (h) GR, and the molecular basis of its biologic functions.

  11. Molecular Basis for Vitamin A Uptake and Storage in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chelstowska, Sylwia; Widjaja-Adhi, Made Airanthi K.; Silvaroli, Josie A.; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to store and distribute vitamin A inside the body is the main evolutionary adaptation that allows vertebrates to maintain retinoid functions during nutritional deficiencies and to acquire new metabolic pathways enabling light-independent production of 11-cis retinoids. These processes greatly depend on enzymes that esterify vitamin A as well as associated retinoid binding proteins. Although the significance of retinyl esters for vitamin A homeostasis is well established, until recently, the molecular basis for the retinol esterification enzymatic activity was unknown. In this review, we will look at retinoid absorption through the prism of current biochemical and structural studies on vitamin A esterifying enzymes. We describe molecular adaptations that enable retinoid storage and delineate mechanisms in which mutations found in selective proteins might influence vitamin A homeostasis in affected patients. PMID:27792183

  12. Molecular Basis for Vitamin A Uptake and Storage in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chelstowska, Sylwia; Widjaja-Adhi, Made Airanthi K; Silvaroli, Josie A; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-10-26

    The ability to store and distribute vitamin A inside the body is the main evolutionary adaptation that allows vertebrates to maintain retinoid functions during nutritional deficiencies and to acquire new metabolic pathways enabling light-independent production of 11-cis retinoids. These processes greatly depend on enzymes that esterify vitamin A as well as associated retinoid binding proteins. Although the significance of retinyl esters for vitamin A homeostasis is well established, until recently, the molecular basis for the retinol esterification enzymatic activity was unknown. In this review, we will look at retinoid absorption through the prism of current biochemical and structural studies on vitamin A esterifying enzymes. We describe molecular adaptations that enable retinoid storage and delineate mechanisms in which mutations found in selective proteins might influence vitamin A homeostasis in affected patients.

  13. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  14. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Insects provide experimentally tractable and cost-effective model systems to investigate the molecular basis of animal-bacterial interactions. Recent research is revealing the central role of the insect innate immune system, especially anti-microbial peptides and reactive oxygen species, in regulating the abundance and composition of the microbiota in various insects, including Drosophila and the mosquitoes Aedes and Anopheles. Interactions between the immune system and microbiota are, however, bidirectional with evidence that members of the resident microbiota can promote immune function, conferring resistance to pathogens and parasites by both activation of immune effectors and production of toxins. Antagonistic and mutualistic interactions among bacteria have also been implicated as determinants of the microbiota composition, including exclusion of pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Some bacteria are crucial for insect nutrition, through provisioning of specific nutrients (e.g. B vitamins, essential amino acids) and modulation of the insect nutritional sensing and signaling pathways (e.g. insulin signaling) that regulate nutrient allocation, especially to lipid and other energy reserves. A key challenge for future research is to identify the molecular interaction between specific bacterial effectors and animal receptors, and to determine how these interactions translate into microbiota-dependent signaling, metabolism and immune function in the host. PMID:24735869

  15. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Angela E

    2014-11-25

    Insects provide experimentally tractable and cost-effective model systems to investigate the molecular basis of animal-bacterial interactions. Recent research is revealing the central role of the insect innate immune system, especially anti-microbial peptides and reactive oxygen species, in regulating the abundance and composition of the microbiota in various insects, including Drosophila and the mosquitoes Aedes and Anopheles. Interactions between the immune system and microbiota are, however, bidirectional with evidence that members of the resident microbiota can promote immune function, conferring resistance to pathogens and parasites by both activation of immune effectors and production of toxins. Antagonistic and mutualistic interactions among bacteria have also been implicated as determinants of the microbiota composition, including exclusion of pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Some bacteria are crucial for insect nutrition, through provisioning of specific nutrients (e.g., B vitamins, essential amino acids) and modulation of the insect nutritional sensing and signaling pathways (e.g., insulin signaling) that regulate nutrient allocation, especially to lipid and other energy reserves. A key challenge for future research is to identify the molecular interaction between specific bacterial effectors and animal receptors, as well as to determine how these interactions translate into microbiota-dependent signaling, metabolism, and immune function in the host.

  16. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide a brief

  17. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Rita; Kemp, John P; Tuppen, Helen A L; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K N; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C; Coku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-11-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as 'benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy' is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNA(Glu) mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNA(Glu) may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis.

  18. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na+/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  19. Molecular basis of NDM-1, a new antibiotic resistance determinant.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongjie; Li, Lianchun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Limin; Kong, Xiangqian; Hong, Yao; Lan, Lefu; Zheng, Mingyue; Guang-Yang, Cai; Liu, Hong; Shen, Xu; Luo, Cheng; Li, Keqin Kathy; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2011-01-01

    The New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) was first reported in 2009 in a Swedish patient. A recent study reported that Klebsiella pneumonia NDM-1 positive strain or Escherichia coli NDM-1 positive strain was highly resistant to all antibiotics tested except tigecycline and colistin. These can no longer be relied on to treat infections and therefore, NDM-1 now becomes potentially a major global health threat.In this study, we performed modeling studies to obtain its 3D structure and NDM-1/antibiotics complex. It revealed that the hydrolytic mechanisms are highly conserved. In addition, the detailed analysis indicates that the more flexible and hydrophobic loop1, together with the evolution of more positive-charged loop2 leads to NDM-1 positive strain more potent and extensive in antibiotics resistance compared with other MBLs. Furthermore, through biological experiments, we revealed the molecular basis for antibiotics catalysis of NDM-1 on the enzymatic level. We found that NDM-1 enzyme was highly potent to degrade carbapenem antibiotics, while mostly susceptible to tigecycline, which had the ability to slow down the hydrolysis velocity of meropenem by NDM-1. Meanwhile, the mutagenesis experiments, including D124A, C208A, K211A and K211E, which displayed down-regulation on meropenem catalysis, proved the accuracy of our model.At present, there are no effective antibiotics against NDM-1 positive pathogen. Our study will provide clues to investigate the molecular basis of extended antibiotics resistance of NDM-1 and then accelerate the search for new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strain in clinical studies.

  20. The molecular basis of human retinal and vitreoretinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Wolfgang; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Neidhardt, John

    2010-09-01

    During the last two to three decades, a large body of work has revealed the molecular basis of many human disorders, including retinal and vitreoretinal degenerations and dysfunctions. Although belonging to the group of orphan diseases, they affect probably more than two million people worldwide. Most excitingly, treatment of a particular form of congenital retinal degeneration is now possible. A major advantage for treatment is the unique structure and accessibility of the eye and its different components, including the vitreous and retina. Knowledge of the many different eye diseases affecting retinal structure and function (night and colour blindness, retinitis pigmentosa, cone and cone rod dystrophies, photoreceptor dysfunctions, as well as vitreoretinal traits) is critical for future therapeutic development. We have attempted to present a comprehensive picture of these disorders, including biological, clinical, genetic and molecular information. The structural organization of the review leads the reader through non-syndromic and syndromic forms of (i) rod dominated diseases, (ii) cone dominated diseases, (iii) generalized retinal degenerations and (iv) vitreoretinal disorders, caused by mutations in more than 165 genes. Clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity have an important impact on genetic testing and counselling of affected families. As phenotypes do not always correlate with the respective genotypes, it is of utmost importance that clinicians, geneticists, counsellors, diagnostic laboratories and basic researchers understand the relationships between phenotypic manifestations and specific genes, as well as mutations and pathophysiologic mechanisms. We discuss future perspectives.

  1. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation in β-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    González, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Pardo, Leonardo; Deupi, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The important and diverse biological functions of β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) have promoted the search for compounds to stimulate or inhibit their activity. In this regard, unraveling the molecular basis of ligand binding/unbinding events is essential to understand the pharmacological properties of these G protein-coupled receptors. In this study, we use the steered molecular dynamics simulation method to describe, in atomic detail, the unbinding process of two inverse agonists, which have been recently co-crystallized with β1 and β2ARs subtypes, along four different channels. Our results indicate that this type of compounds likely accesses the orthosteric binding site of βARs from the extracellular water environment. Importantly, reconstruction of forces and energies from the simulations of the dissociation process suggests, for the first time, the presence of secondary binding sites located in the extracellular loops 2 and 3 and transmembrane helix 7, where ligands are transiently retained by electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions. Comparison of the residues that form these new transient allosteric binding sites in both βARs subtypes reveals the importance of non-conserved electrostatic interactions as well as conserved aromatic contacts in the early steps of the binding process. PMID:21915263

  2. Molecular Basis of Asbestos-Induced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23347351

  3. Molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity in Tryptophan Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Marti, Marcelo A.; Estrin, Dario A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) are the only two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). While human IDO (hIDO) is able to oxidize both L and D-Trp, human TDO (hTDO) displays a major specificity towards L-Trp. In this work we aim to interrogate the molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity of hTDO. Our previous molecular dynamics simulation studies of Xanthomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) showed that an H-bond between T254 (T342 in hTDO) and the ammonium group of the substrate is present in the L-Trp-bound enzyme, but not in the D-Trp bound enzyme. The fact that this is the only notable structural alteration induced by the change in the stereo structure of the substrate prompted us to produce and characterize the T342A mutant of hTDO to evaluate the structural role of T342 in controlling the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The experimental results indicate that the mutation only slightly perturbs the global structural properties of the enzyme, but it totally abolishes the substrate stereoselectivity. Molecular Dynamics simulations of xcTDO show that T254 controls the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme by (i) modulating the H-bonding interaction between the NH3+ group and epoxide oxygen of the ferryl/indole 2,3-epoxide intermediate of the enzyme, and (ii) regulating the dynamics of two active site loops, loop250–260 and loop117–130, critical for substrate-binding. PMID:22082147

  4. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 500 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  5. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There aremore » serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide

  6. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-07-01

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious conceptual objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo a simple volume-preserving linear motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, Quantum Chemistry, and Molecular Dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model (EPnet). When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high

  7. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties.

  8. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity.

  9. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rosgen, Jorg; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-11-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins.

  10. Molecular basis of colorrectal cancer: towards an individualized management?

    PubMed

    Perea, J; Lomas, M; Hidalgo, M

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has become a highly relevant condition nowadays. In this respect, advances in the understanding of its molecular basis are key for an adequate management. From the time when the adenoma-carcinoma sequence was formulated as a carcinogenesis model to this day, when -among other things- three major carcinogenic pathways have been identified, the CRC concept has evolved from that of a single disease to the notion that each CRC is a differentiated condition in itself. The suppressor or chromosome instability pathway, the mutator or microsatellite instability pathway, and the methylator or CpG island methylation pathway allow various phenotypes to be identified within CRC. Similarly, the presence of different changes in certain genes confers several behaviors on CRC from both the prognostic and responsive standpoints to specific therapies. However, this apparent complexity does help develop the clinical management of this disease through the identification of novel, more specific therapy targets, and also markers for various behaviors within the condition, which will most likely lead us to an individualized management for these patients.

  11. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Buckler, Edward S; Hufford, Matthew B; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize.

  12. Molecular basis for the herbicide resistance of Roundup Ready crops.

    PubMed

    Funke, Todd; Han, Huijong; Healy-Fried, Martha L; Fischer, Markus; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2006-08-29

    The engineering of transgenic crops resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate has greatly improved agricultural efficiency worldwide. Glyphosate-based herbicides, such as Roundup, target the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, the functionality of which is absolutely required for the survival of plants. Roundup Ready plants carry the gene coding for a glyphosate-insensitive form of this enzyme, obtained from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4. Once incorporated into the plant genome, the gene product, CP4 EPSP synthase, confers crop resistance to glyphosate. Although widely used, the molecular basis for this glyphosate-resistance has remained obscure. We generated a synthetic gene coding for CP4 EPSP synthase and characterized the enzyme using kinetics and crystallography. The CP4 enzyme has unexpected kinetic and structural properties that render it unique among the known EPSP synthases. Glyphosate binds to the CP4 EPSP synthase in a condensed, noninhibitory conformation. Glyphosate sensitivity can be restored through a single-site mutation in the active site (Ala-100-Gly), allowing glyphosate to bind in its extended, inhibitory conformation.

  13. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity. PMID:27381510

  14. Molecular basis of AKAP specificity for PKA regulatory subunits.

    PubMed

    Gold, Matthew G; Lygren, Birgitte; Dokurno, Pawel; Hoshi, Naoto; McConnachie, George; Taskén, Kjetil; Carlson, Cathrine R; Scott, John D; Barford, David

    2006-11-03

    Localization of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) restricts the action of this broad specificity kinase. The high-resolution crystal structures of the docking and dimerization (D/D) domain of the RIIalpha regulatory subunit of PKA both in the apo state and in complex with the high-affinity anchoring peptide AKAP-IS explain the molecular basis for AKAP-regulatory subunit recognition. AKAP-IS folds into an amphipathic alpha helix that engages an essentially preformed shallow groove on the surface of the RII dimer D/D domains. Conserved AKAP aliphatic residues dominate interactions to RII at the predominantly hydrophobic interface, whereas polar residues are important in conferring R subunit isoform specificity. Using a peptide screening approach, we have developed SuperAKAP-IS, a peptide that is 10,000-fold more selective for the RII isoform relative to RI and can be used to assess the impact of PKA isoform-selective anchoring on cAMP-responsive events inside cells.

  15. Convergent evidence for the molecular basis of musical traits

    PubMed Central

    Oikkonen, Jaana; Onkamo, Päivi; Järvelä, Irma; Kanduri, Chakravarthi

    2016-01-01

    To obtain aggregate evidence for the molecular basis of musical abilities and the effects of music, we integrated gene-level data from 105 published studies across multiple species including humans, songbirds and several other animals and used a convergent evidence method to prioritize the top candidate genes. Several of the identified top candidate genes like EGR1, FOS, ARC, BDNF and DUSP1 are known to be activity-dependent immediate early genes that respond to sensory and motor stimuli in the brain. Several other top candidate genes like MAPK10, SNCA, ARHGAP24, TET2, UBE2D3, FAM13A and NUDT9 are located on chromosome 4q21-q24, on the candidate genomic region for music abilities in humans. Functional annotation analyses showed the enrichment of genes involved in functions like cognition, learning, memory, neuronal excitation and apoptosis, long-term potentiation and CDK5 signaling pathway. Interestingly, all these biological functions are known to be essential processes underlying learning and memory that are also fundamental for musical abilities including recognition and production of sound. In summary, our study prioritized top candidate genes related to musical traits. PMID:28004803

  16. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J.; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C.; Buckler, Edward S.; Hufford, Matthew B.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize. PMID:26078279

  17. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  18. Molecular Basis for Lytic Bacteriophage Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Duerkop, Breck A.; Huo, Wenwen; Bhardwaj, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human intestine harbors diverse communities of bacteria and bacteriophages. Given the specificity of phages for their bacterial hosts, there is growing interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. A significant barrier to such therapies is the rapid development of phage-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need to understand how bacteria acquire phage resistance in vivo. Here we identify novel lytic phages in municipal raw sewage that kill Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that resides in the human intestine. We show that phage infection of E. faecalis requires a predicted integral membrane protein that we have named PIPEF (for phage infection protein from E. faecalis). We find that PIPEF is conserved in E. faecalis and harbors a 160-amino-acid hypervariable region that determines phage tropism for distinct enterococcal strains. Finally, we use a gnotobiotic mouse model of in vivo phage predation to show that the sewage phages temporarily reduce E. faecalis colonization of the intestine but that E. faecalis acquires phage resistance through mutations in PIPEF. Our findings define the molecular basis for an evolutionary arms race between E. faecalis and the lytic phages that prey on them. They also suggest approaches for engineering E. faecalis phages that have altered host specificity and that can subvert phage resistance in the host bacteria. PMID:27578757

  19. The molecular basis of CO2 reception in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae Young; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A.; Carlson, John R.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 elicits a response from many insects, including mosquito vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, but the molecular basis of CO2 detection is unknown in insects or other higher eukaryotes. Here we show that Gr21a and Gr63a, members of a large family of Drosophila seven-transmembrane-domain chemoreceptor genes, are coexpressed in chemosensory neurons of both the larva and the adult. The two genes confer CO2 response when coexpressed in an in vivo expression system, the “empty neuron system.” The response is highly specific for CO2 and dependent on CO2 concentration. The response shows an equivalent dependence on the dose of Gr21a and Gr63a. None of 39 other chemosensory receptors confers a comparable response to CO2. The identification of these receptors may now allow the identification of agents that block or activate them. Such agents could affect the responses of insect pests to the humans they seek. PMID:17360684

  20. Molecular basis of human carbonic anhydrase II deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, D E; Venta, P J; Tashian, R E; Sly, W S

    1992-01-01

    Deficiency of carbonic anhydrase II (carbonate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.1) is the primary defect in the syndrome of osteopetrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and cerebral calcification. In this report we describe the molecular basis for carbonic anhydrase II deficiency in the American family in which the association of carbonic anhydrase II deficiency with this syndrome was first recognized. The three affected siblings from this family are compound heterozygotes, each having inherited two different mutations in the structural gene for carbonic anhydrase II. The paternal mutation is a splice acceptor site mutation at the 3' end of intron 5. The maternal mutation is a missense mutation in exon 3 that substitutes a tyrosine for histidine-107. We show that the mutant enzyme expressed in bacteria from the cDNA containing the His-107----Tyr mutation has detectable, though greatly reduced, activity. We suggest that residual activity of the His-107----Tyr mutant enzyme may explain the absence of mental retardation and the relatively mild phenotype of carbonic anhydrase II deficiency in affected members of this family. Images PMID:1542674

  1. Molecular Basis of Obesity: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Hélène; Meyre, David

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a global health problem that is gradually affecting each continent of the world. Obesity is a heterogeneous disorder, and the biological causes of obesity are complex. The rapid increase in obesity prevalence during the past few decades is due to major societal changes (sedentary lifestyle, over-nutrition) but who becomes obese at the individual level is determined to a great extent by genetic susceptibility. In this review, we evidence that obesity is a strongly heritable disorder, and provide an update on the molecular basis of obesity. To date, nine loci have been involved in Mendelian forms of obesity and 58 loci contribute to polygenic obesity, and rare and common structural variants have been reliably associated with obesity. Most of the obesity genes remain to be discovered, but promising technologies, methodologies and the use of “deep phenotyping” lead to optimism to chip away at the ‘missing heritability’ of obesity in the near future. In the longer term, the genetic dissection of obesity will help to characterize disease mechanisms, provide new targets for drug design, and lead to an early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of obesity. PMID:22043164

  2. Molecular Basis of Dynamic Relocalization of Dictyostelium Myosin IB*

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Preston, G. Michael; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2012-01-01

    Class I myosins have a single heavy chain comprising an N-terminal motor domain with actin-activated ATPase activity and a C-terminal globular tail with a basic region that binds to acidic phospholipids. These myosins contribute to the formation of actin-rich protrusions such as pseudopodia, but regulation of the dynamic localization to these structures is not understood. Previously, we found that Acanthamoeba myosin IC binds to acidic phospholipids in vitro through a short sequence of basic and hydrophobic amino acids, BH site, based on the charge density of the phospholipids. The tail of Dictyostelium myosin IB (DMIB) also contains a BH site. We now report that the BH site is essential for DMIB binding to the plasma membrane and describe the molecular basis of the dynamic relocalization of DMIB in live cells. Endogenous DMIB is localized uniformly on the plasma membrane of resting cells, at active protrusions and cell-cell contacts of randomly moving cells, and at the front of motile polarized cells. The BH site is required for association of DMIB with the plasma membrane at all stages where it colocalizes with phosphoinositide bisphosphate/phosphoinositide trisphosphate (PIP2/PIP3). The charge-based specificity of the BH site allows for in vivo specificity of DMIB for PIP2/PIP3 similar to the PH domain-based specificity of other class I myosins. However, DMIB-head is required for relocalization of DMIB to the front of migrating cells. Motor activity is not essential, but the actin binding site in the head is important. Thus, dynamic relocalization of DMIB is determined principally by the local PIP2/PIP3 concentration in the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:22367211

  3. Molecular basis for developmental changes in interleukin-2 gene inducibility.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Rothenberg, E V

    1993-01-01

    At least three stages in the intrathymic development of pre-T cells are demarcated by differences in the competence to express the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene as an acute response to stimulation. IL-2 inducibility appears to be acquired relatively early, prior to T-cell receptor (TcR) gene rearrangement. It is then abrogated during the stage when cells are subject to positive and negative selection, i.e., the fate determination processes that select cells for maturation or death. IL-2 inducibility finally reappears in mature classes of thymocytes that have undergone positive selection. To provide a basis for a molecular explanation of these developmental transitions, we have examined the representation in different thymocyte subsets of a set of DNA-binding proteins implicated in IL-2 gene regulation. As the DNA-binding activities of many factors are elicited only by inductive stimuli, the cells were cultured in the presence or absence of the calcium ionophore A23187 and phorbol ester. Our results separate these factors into four regulatory classes: (i) constitutive factors, such as Oct-1 and probably Sp1, that are expressed in thymocytes at all stages; (ii) inducible factors, such as NF-kappa B and complexes binding to the region of a CD28 response element, that can be activated in all thymocytes, including those cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) that can undergo selection; (iii) inducible factors, such as NF-AT and AP-1, that can be activated in mature (CD4+ CD8- TcRhigh) and immature (CD4- CD8- TcR-) thymocytes alike but not in the transitional stages when the cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) are subject to selection; and (iv) a factor containing CREB, which can be activated in thymocytes of all developmental stages by culture but does not require specific induction. These results verify that inducible transcription factors are targets of intrathymic developmental change. They also identify NF-AT and AP-1 as factors that are particularly sensitive to the mechanism altering

  4. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  5. Training Program in the Molecular Basis of Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    growth, differentiation and molecular genetics. During the reporting period, research by the six students supported by the Iraining program resulted...physicians studying different aspects of breast cancer and cancer therapy, as well as fundamental mechanisms of cell growth, differentiation and molecular...an in vitro culture system preadipocyte cells will differentiate into adipocytes in response to a specific hormonal stimuli. This terminal

  6. Cellular and molecular basis of decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Nilay; Zimmer, Manuel; Domingos, Ana I

    2014-10-01

    People think they are in control of their own decisions: what to eat or drink, whom to marry or pick a fight with, where to live, what to buy. Behavioural economists and neurophysiologists have long studied decision-making behaviours. However, these behaviours have only recently been studied through the light of molecular genetics. Here, we review recent research in mice, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, that analyses the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying decision-making. These studies interrogate decision-making about food, sexual behaviour, aggression or foraging strategies, and add molecular and cell biology understanding onto the consilience of brain and decision.

  7. Cellular and molecular basis of decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Nilay; Zimmer, Manuel; Domingos, Ana I

    2014-01-01

    People think they are in control of their own decisions: what to eat or drink, whom to marry or pick a fight with, where to live, what to buy. Behavioural economists and neurophysiologists have long studied decision-making behaviours. However, these behaviours have only recently been studied through the light of molecular genetics. Here, we review recent research in mice, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, that analyses the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying decision-making. These studies interrogate decision-making about food, sexual behaviour, aggression or foraging strategies, and add molecular and cell biology understanding onto the consilience of brain and decision. PMID:25239948

  8. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  9. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  10. Determining the Molecular and Genetic Basis for Diabetes in Navy Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-12

    3. DATES COVERED (From Jul 2012-Sep 2013 To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determining the molecular and genetic basis for diabetes in Navy bottlenose...thereby reduces hepatic glucose production. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gluconeogenesis, CREB ZF, Fasting, Diabetes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a...Number: N000141210617 Award Title: Determining the molecular and genetic basis for diabetes in Navy bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncates

  11. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this stud...

  12. Molecular basis of fungicide resistance in Cercospora beticola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS), caused by the fungus Cercospora beticola, is the most important foliar disease of sugarbeet. Control measures include the application of sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) and quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides. Understanding the molecular mechanism of fungici...

  13. [A molecular basis of the plague vaccine development].

    PubMed

    Dentovskaia, S V; Kopylov, P Kh; Ivanov, S A; Ageev, S A; Anisimov, A P

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the Yersinia pestis pathogenicity and peculiarities of maturation of specific immunity to plague are reviewed. The history and modern state of the plague vaccine development are described. Special attention is focused on the prospects in the area of the plague vaccine development. The possible approaches to improvement of vaccine preparations are discussed.

  14. Training Program in the Molecular Basis of Breast Cancer Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Faff semester, 1995 the Molecular Medicine Ph.D. Program at all levels was 26, which includes 12 women, and 3 minorities (1 black, 2 Hispanic ...nonconsensus estrogen response element in the proximal region of the promoter which may play a role in the hormonal regulation of this gene . We have...is to determine the cis-acting sequences responsible for the regulation of the human estrogen receptor gene . Deletion and site-directed mutagenesis

  15. Molecular basis of telomere dysfunction in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarek, Grzegorz; Marzec, Paulina; Margalef, Pol; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins required for telomere structure, replication, repair and length maintenance are associated with several debilitating human genetic disorders. These complex telomere biology disorders (TBDs) give rise to critically short telomeres that affect the homeostasis of multiple organs. Furthermore, genome instability is often a hallmark of telomere syndromes, which are associated with increased cancer risk. Here, we summarize the molecular causes and cellular consequences of disease-causing mutations associated with telomere dysfunction.

  16. Energetic basis for the molecular-scale organization of bone.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jinhui; Battle, Keith C; Pan, Haihua; Salter, E Alan; Chien, Yung-Ching; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; De Yoreo, James J

    2015-01-13

    The remarkable properties of bone derive from a highly organized arrangement of coaligned nanometer-scale apatite platelets within a fibrillar collagen matrix. The origin of this arrangement is poorly understood and the crystal structures of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the nonmineralized collagen fibrils alone do not provide an explanation. Moreover, little is known about collagen-apatite interaction energies, which should strongly influence both the molecular-scale organization and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. We investigated collagen-mineral interactions by combining dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements of binding energies with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binding and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of collagen adsorption on single crystals of calcium phosphate for four mineral phases of potential importance in bone formation. In all cases, we observe a strong preferential orientation of collagen binding, but comparison between the observed orientations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of native tissues shows that only calcium-deficient apatite (CDAP) provides an interface with collagen that is consistent with both. MD simulations predict preferred collagen orientations that agree with observations, and results from both MD and DFS reveal large values for the binding energy due to multiple binding sites. These findings reconcile apparent contradictions inherent in a hydroxyapatite or carbonated apatite (CAP) model of bone mineral and provide an energetic rationale for the molecular-scale organization of bone.

  17. Morphological, Molecular, and Hormonal Basis of Limb Regeneration across Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Das, Sunetra

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration is a developmental process that allows an organism to re-grow a lost body part. Historically, the most studied aspect of limb regeneration across Pancrustacea is its morphological basis and its dependence on successful molting. Although there are distinct morphological differences in regeneration processes between insects and crustaceans, in both groups the phenomenon is initiated via formation of a blastema, followed by proliferation, dedifferentiation, and redifferentiation of blastemal cells to generate a functional limb. In recent years, with the availability of sequence data and tools to manipulate gene expression, the emphasis of this field has shifted toward the genetic basis of limb regeneration. Among insects this focus is on genes that are known to be required during the development of legs in embryos. RNA interference-mediated functional studies conducted during regeneration of imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster, and nymphal legs of Gryllus bimaculatus reveal that several conserved pathways and transcription factors (Wingless, Decapentaplegic, Hedgehog, Dachshund) are required for successful regeneration. In contrast to studies on the regeneration of insects' limbs, work on crustaceans has focused on the hormonal basis of the re-growth of limbs. Regeneration in decapods, like Uca pugilator and Gecarcinus lateralis, occurs in discrete phases of growth in tandem with the stages of the molt cycle. Recent studies have shown that ecdysteroid hormone signaling is necessary for blastemal proliferation. Although the current research emphases of limb regeneration in insect and crustacean are fairly distinct, the results generated by functional studies of a wide array of regeneration genes will be beneficial for generating testable regeneration models.

  18. The molecular basis of susceptibility to infection in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo; Tellez-Avila, Felix I; Uribe, Misael

    2007-01-01

    There is much clinical evidence of a relationship between infectious disease and chronic liver disease. The consequences of this adverse association have been described and advances in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious disease have had an important effect on the management of patients with chronic liver disease. The association between infectious disease and chronic liver disease involves altered cytokine production, cellular immunity, and vascular response. However, there is little information on the mechanisms underlying these phenomena. In this report, we review the mechanistic basis of this common association.

  19. Molecular basis of phenotypic variation in patients with argininemia.

    PubMed

    Uchino, T; Snyderman, S E; Lambert, M; Qureshi, I A; Shapira, S K; Sansaricq, C; Smit, L M; Jakobs, C; Matsuda, I

    1995-09-01

    Argininemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the liver-type arginase enzyme. Clinical manifestations include progressive spastic diplegia and mental retardation. While the quality of life can severely deteriorate in most such patients, some do show remarkable improvement in neurological symptoms while on controlled diets. We examined the thesis that differences in clinical responses to dietary treatment are based on molecular heterogeneity in mutant arginase alleles. Genomic DNAs from 11 patients with argininemia were examined using the polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and sequencing. Nine mutations representing 21/22 mutant alleles were identified in 11 patients with argininemia, and four of these mutations were expressed in vitro to determine the severity of enzymatic defects. We found that these mutations accounted for 64% of the mutant alleles in our patients. Based on findings in vitro expression tests, the mutations can be considered either severe or moderate. Patients with at least one moderate mutant allele responded well to dietary treatment; concentrations of plasma arginine were controlled within 300 microM. In contrast, patients with two severely mutated alleles did not respond to dietary treatment and plasma arginine was over 400 microM. Argininemia is heterogeneous at the molecular level. The degree of clinical improvement during dietary treatment is reflected in the concentration of arginine in plasma, as a measure of metabolic control. Plasma arginine levels during treatment is reflected in the concentration of arginine in plasma, as a measure of metabolic control. Plasma arginine levels during treatment correlated with types of molecular defects in the arginase genes.

  20. Molecular Basis of Klotho: From Gene to Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Klotho (KL) gene, which was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene, has generated tremendous interest and has advanced understanding of the aging process. In mice, the overexpression of the KL gene extends the life span, whereas mutations to the KL gene shorten the life span. The human KL gene encodes the α-Klotho protein, which is a multifunctional protein that regulates the metabolism of phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D. α-Klotho also may function as a hormone, although the α-Klotho receptor(s) has not been found. Point mutations of the KL gene in humans are associated with hypertension and kidney disease, which suggests that α-Klotho may be essential to the maintenance of normal renal function. Three α-Klotho protein types with potentially different functions have been identified: a full-length transmembrane α-Klotho, a truncated soluble α-Klotho, and a secreted α-Klotho. Recent evidence suggests that α-Klotho suppresses the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways, inhibits oxidative stress, and regulates phosphatase and calcium absorption. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological properties of the KL gene. Specifically, this review focuses on the structure of the KL gene and the factors that regulate KL gene transcription, the key sites in the regulation of α-Klotho enzyme activity, the α-Klotho signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie α-Klotho function. This current understanding of the molecular biology of the α-Klotho protein may offer new insights into its function and role in aging. PMID:25695404

  1. The molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance in Italian children.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, R; Scarano, M I; Esposito, G; Chiandetti, L; Izzo, P; Salvatore, F

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the molecular defects of the aldolase B gene in five unrelated patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance. The techniques used were DNA amplification, direct sequencing and allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization. The most frequent substitutions found in the hereditary fructose intolerance alleles analysed were the A174D and the A149P mutations, which account for 50% and 30% of the alleles, respectively. In two unrelated families, we found a rare mutation, the MD delta 4 previously described only in one British family, which may be an important cause of the disease in Italy.

  2. The molecular basis of ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene profoundly influences plants at nearly every stage of growth and development. In the past ten years, the use of a genetic approach, based on the triple response phenotype, has been a powerful tool for investigating the molecular events that underlie these effects. Several fundamental elements of the pathway have been described: a receptor with homology to bacterial two-component histidine kinases (ETR1), elements of a MAP kinase cascade (CTR1) and a putative transcription factor (EIN3). Taken together, these elements can be assembled into a simple, linear model for ethylene signalling that accounts for most of the well-characterized ethylene mediated responses.

  3. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Gerard; Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%-6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms.

  4. The molecular basis for the high photosensitivity of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Robert S H; Colmenares, Leticia U

    2003-12-09

    Based on structural information derived from the F NMR data of labeled rhodopsins, rhodopsin crystal structure, and excited-state properties of model polyenes, we propose a molecular mechanism that accounts specifically for the causes of the well-known enhanced photoreactivity of rhodopsin (increased rates and quantum yield of isomerization). It involves the key features of close proximity of C-187 to H-12 and chromophore bond lengthening upon light absorption. The resultant "sudden punch" to H-12 triggers dual processes of decay of the Franck-Condon-excited rhodopsin, a productive directed photoisomerization and a nonproductive decay returning to the ground state as two separate molecular pathways [based on real-time fluorescence results of Chosrowjan, H., Mataga, N., Shibata, Y., Tachibanaki, S., Kandori, H., Shichida, Y., Okada, T. & Kouyama, T. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 9706-9707]. The two processes are controlled by the local protein structure: an empty space provided by the intradiscal loop connecting transmembrane helices 4 and 5 and a protein wall composed of amino acid units in transmembrane 3. Suggestions, involving retinal analogs and rhodopsin mutants, to improve the unusually high photosensitivity of rhodopsin are proposed.

  5. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): from molecular basis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sponzilli, Ivonne; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-04-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases (PID) comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that affect distinct components of the innate and adaptive immune system, such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, complement proteins, natural killer cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of disorders characterized by increased susceptibility to severe infections and early death. The diagnosis of SCID is supported by the demonstration of low absolute lymphocyte count and T cell lymphopenia (variably associated with numerical defects of B and NK cells). In the last two decades, advances in the characterization of the molecular pathophysiology of SCID, have permitted the development of novel diagnostic assays based on analysis of the expression of the disease-associated proteins and mutation analysis. More recently, pilot newborn screening programs for the identification of infants with SCID have been initiated in the United States. Prompt and aggressive treatment of infections, antimicrobial prophylaxis (in particular against Pneumocystis jiroveci) and regular administration of immunoglobulins are essential to reduce the risk of early death. However, survival ultimately depends on reconstitution of immune function, that is usually achieved by means of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy have also been used successfully is selected forms of SCID. Here we review the molecular and cellular pathophysiology and the mainstay of treatment of SCID.

  6. Molecular basis for optical clearing of collagenous tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M.; Hwang, Wonmuk; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2010-09-01

    Molecular interactions of optical clearing agents were investigated using a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and optical spectroscopy. For a series of sugar alcohols with low to high optical clearing potential, Raman spectroscopy and integrating sphere measurements were used to quantitatively characterize tissue water loss and reduction in light scattering following agent exposures. The rate of tissue water loss was found to correlate with agent optical clearing potential, but equivalent tissue optical clearing was measured in native and fixed tissue in vitro, given long-enough exposure times to the polyol series. MD simulations showed that the rate of tissue optical clearing correlated with the preferential formation of hydrogen bond bridges between agent and collagen. Hydrogen bond bridge formation disrupts the collagen hydration layer and facilitates replacement by a chemical agent to homogenize tissue refractive index. However, the reduction in tissue light scattering did not correlate with the agent index of refraction. Our results suggest that a necessary property of optical clearing agents is hyperosmolarity to tissue, but that the most effective agents with the highest rates of optical clearing are a subset with the highest collagen solubilities.

  7. Molecular basis of outer kinetochore assembly on CENP-T

    PubMed Central

    Huis in 't Veld, Pim J; Jeganathan, Sadasivam; Petrovic, Arsen; Singh, Priyanka; John, Juliane; Krenn, Veronica; Weissmann, Florian; Bange, Tanja; Musacchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Stable kinetochore-microtubule attachment is essential for cell division. It requires recruitment of outer kinetochore microtubule binders by centromere proteins C and T (CENP-C and CENP-T). To study the molecular requirements of kinetochore formation, we reconstituted the binding of the MIS12 and NDC80 outer kinetochore subcomplexes to CENP-C and CENP-T. Whereas CENP-C recruits a single MIS12:NDC80 complex, we show here that CENP-T binds one MIS12:NDC80 and two NDC80 complexes upon phosphorylation by the mitotic CDK1:Cyclin B complex at three distinct CENP-T sites. Visualization of reconstituted complexes by electron microscopy supports this model. Binding of CENP-C and CENP-T to MIS12 is competitive, and therefore CENP-C and CENP-T act in parallel to recruit two MIS12 and up to four NDC80 complexes. Our observations provide a molecular explanation for the stoichiometry of kinetochore components and its cell cycle regulation, and highlight how outer kinetochore modules bridge distances of well over 100 nm. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21007.001 PMID:28012276

  8. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation.

  9. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Nripesh; Levy, Shawn E.; Stodieck, Louis; Jones, Angela; Shrestha, Shristi; Klaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity—all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport. PMID:27806055

  10. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  11. Molecular basis of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: an update.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Wieslaw H; Koczorowski, Ryszard

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular events underlying hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) caused by mutations of the genes encoding proteins of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-related signaling pathway have been presented. These proteins are involved in signal transduction from ectoderm to mesenchyme during development of the fetus and are indispensable for the differentiation of ectoderm-derived structures such as eccrine sweat glands, teeth, hair, skin, and/or nails. Novel data were reviewed and discussed on the structure and functions of the components of TNFα-related signaling pathway, the consequences of mutations of the genes encoding these proteins, and the prospect for further investigations, which might elucidate the origin of HED.

  12. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rösgen, Jörg; Bolen, D. Wayne; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins. PMID:17693466

  13. The prevalence and molecular basis of hemoglobinopathies in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Carnley, Benedict P; Prior, John F; Gilbert, Anne; Lim, Erna; Devenish, Robyn; Sing, Heng; Sarin, Eng; Guhadasan, Rathi; Sullivan, Sheena G; Wise, Cheryl A; Bittles, Alan H; Chan, Kaimin; Wong, Man-Sim; Chan, Vivian; Erber, Wendy N

    2006-01-01

    Blood counts, hemoglobin (Hb) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and DNA analyses were performed on 260 children, aged 5 months to 16 years, at Siem Reap to assess the prevalence of thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies in regional Cambodia. Hemoglobinopathies were present in 134 children (51.5%) with 20 abnormal genotypes identified. alpha-Thalassemia (thal) (35.4%) was the most prevalent disorder and the -alpha3.7 gene deletion was the most common alpha-globin gene abnormality. The - -SEA deletion and nondeletional forms of alpha-thal, Hb Constant Spring [Hb CS, alpha142, Term-->Gln, TAA-->CAA (alpha2)], Hb Paksé [alpha142, Term-->Tyr, TAA-->TAT (alpha2)] and triplicated alpha genes, were also present but at low frequencies. Hb E [beta26(B8)Glu-->Lys, GAG-->AAG] (28.8%) was the most common beta-globin gene abnormality, whilst beta-thal was only detected in two children (0.8% of cases). Although hemoglobinopathies were common, the majority of abnormalities detected (heterozygous -alpha3.7 and Hb E) were not clinically significant. On the basis of these findings, and with the majority of abnormalities being mild, it seems improbable that thalassemia represents a major health burden in this region of Cambodia.

  14. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of ‘excretory–secretory’ products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in

  15. Molecular basis of cystic fibrosis in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Petreska, L; Koceva, S; Plaseska, D; Chernick, M; Gordova-Muratovska, A; Fustic, S; Nestorov, R; Efremov, G D

    1998-09-01

    Eighty-three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and their families, belonging to various ethnic groups living in the Republic of Macedonia were studied for molecular defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and for the associated extragenic marker loci XV-2c and KM19. The DNA methodology used included characterization of CFTR mutations in 19 exons (and flanking sequences) of the gene and analysis of distribution of the XV-2c/KM19 haplotypes among normal (N) and CF chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by dot blot hybridization, restriction digestion, single-strand conformational polymorphism, constant denaturing gel electrophoresis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. We identified 58.4% (97/166) of the CF chromosomes. Nine different CFTR gene mutations, including three novel ones, were found. Eight known and one new CFTR intragene polymorphisms were also characterized. The haplotype analysis of the XV-2c/TaqI and KM19/PstI polymorphic loci have shown that haplotype C is the most frequently found haplotype among the non-deltaF508 CF chromosomes from Macedonia (36.5%). The results demonstrate the broad heterogeneity of CF origin in this part of the Balkan Peninsula.

  16. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Outer Membrane Permeability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria characteristically are surrounded by an additional membrane layer, the outer membrane. Although outer membrane components often play important roles in the interaction of symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria with their host organisms, the major role of this membrane must usually be to serve as a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of noxious compounds and at the same time to allow the influx of nutrient molecules. This review summarizes the development in the field since our previous review (H. Nikaido and M. Vaara, Microbiol. Rev. 49:1-32, 1985) was published. With the discovery of protein channels, structural knowledge enables us to understand in molecular detail how porins, specific channels, TonB-linked receptors, and other proteins function. We are now beginning to see how the export of large proteins occurs across the outer membrane. With our knowledge of the lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid asymmetric bilayer of the outer membrane, we are finally beginning to understand how this bilayer can retard the entry of lipophilic compounds, owing to our increasing knowledge about the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide from diverse organisms and the way in which lipopolysaccharide structure is modified by environmental conditions. PMID:14665678

  17. The molecular basis of the non-thyroidal illness syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Emmely M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2015-06-01

    The 'sick euthyroid syndrome' or 'non-thyroidal illness syndrome' (NTIS) occurs in a large proportion of hospitalized patients and comprises a variety of alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis that are observed during illness. One of the hallmarks of NTIS is decreased thyroid hormone (TH) serum concentrations, often viewed as an adaptive mechanism to save energy. Downregulation of hypophysiotropic TRH neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and of TSH production in the pituitary gland points to disturbed negative feedback regulation during illness. In addition to these alterations in the central component of the HPT axis, changes in TH metabolism occur in a variety of TH target tissues during NTIS, dependent on the timing, nature and severity of the illness. Cytokines, released during illness, are known to affect a variety of genes involved in TH metabolism and are therefore considered a major determinant of NTIS. The availability of in vivo and in vitro models for NTIS has elucidated part of the mechanisms involved in the sometimes paradoxical changes in the HPT axis and TH responsive tissues. However, the pathogenesis of NTIS is still incompletely understood. This review focusses on the molecular mechanisms involved in the tissue changes in TH metabolism and discusses the gaps that still require further research.

  18. Cellular and Molecular Basis for Stress-Induced Depression

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Wei, Jing; Qin, Luye; Kim, Yong; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric diseases, such as anxiety and depression. Dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been linked to the cognitive and emotional deficits induced by stress. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular determinants in mPFC for stress-associated mental disorders. Here we show that chronic restraint stress induces the selective loss of p11 (also known as annexin II light chain, S100A10), a multifunctional protein binding to 5-HT receptors, in layer II/III neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrL), as well as depression-like behaviors, both of which are reversed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the tricyclic class of antidepressant (TCA) agents. In layer II/III of the PrL, p11 is highly concentrated in dopamine D2 receptor-expressing (D2+) glutamatergic neurons. Viral expression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons alleviates the depression-like behaviors exhibited by genetically manipulated mice with D2+ neuron-specific or global deletion of p11. In stressed animals, overexpression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons rescues depression-like behaviors by restoring glutamatergic transmission. Our results have identified p11 as a key molecule in a specific cell type that regulates stress-induced depression, which provides a framework for the development of new strategies to treat stress-associated mental illnesses. PMID:27457815

  19. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and maltose binding protein (MBP) captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of the non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone. PMID:27501151

  20. [Molecular basis of obesity-related hepatic steatosis].

    PubMed

    Buqué, X; Aspichueta, P; Ochoa, B

    2008-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a chronic inflammation liver condition that is currently highly relevant because of its strong association with increasingly incident diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus. The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss the best part of current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in hepatic steatosis development, the condition s initial stage, and on progression to steatohepatitis. Special attention has been paid to clinical and experimental obesity-related fatty liver. In the latter, the fa/fa rat is assessed, which constitutes an animal model for obesity with phenotype features similar to human obesity, including insulin resistance and dyslipemia. Hepatic steatosis is a complex, mainly metabolic condition where apparently non-compatible metabolic processes concur, in addition to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased expression of survival genes. Extrahepatic signals underlie the disorder, such as those arising from peripheral insulin resistance associated with an increase in adipose mass and systemic free fatty acids, together with intrahepatic signals leading to derangement of liver glycostatic and lipidostatic functions, as well as to greater vulnerability to other aggressions.

  1. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  2. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K(+) channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K(+) channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa 3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa 1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv 7.1), KCNH2 (Kv 11.1), KCNH5 (Kv 10.2), KCNT1 (KCa 4.1), KCNT2 (KCa 4.2), and KCNK5 (K 2P 5.1). We will give an overview of K(+) channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K(+) channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K(+) channels may be of importance.

  3. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  4. The molecular basis of galactosemia - Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-09-10

    Galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism, was first described in the 1900s by von Ruess. The subsequent 100years has seen considerable progress in understanding the underlying genetics and biochemistry of this condition. Initial studies concentrated on increasing the understanding of the clinical manifestations of the disease. However, Leloir's discovery of the pathway of galactose catabolism in the 1940s and 1950s enabled other scientists, notably Kalckar, to link the disease to a specific enzymatic step in the pathway. Kalckar's work established that defects in galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) were responsible for the majority of cases of galactosemia. However, over the next three decades it became clear that there were two other forms of galactosemia: type II resulting from deficiencies in galactokinase (GALK1) and type III where the affected enzyme is UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). From the 1970s, molecular biology approaches were applied to galactosemia. The chromosomal locations and DNA sequences of the three genes were determined. These studies enabled modern biochemical studies. Structures of the proteins have been determined and biochemical studies have shown that enzymatic impairment often results from misfolding and consequent protein instability. Cellular and model organism studies have demonstrated that reduced GALT or GALE activity results in increased oxidative stress. Thus, after a century of progress, it is possible to conceive of improved therapies including drugs to manipulate the pathway to reduce potentially toxic intermediates, antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress of cells or use of "pharmacological chaperones" to stabilise the affected proteins.

  5. Molecular and cellular basis of cannabinoid and opioid interactions.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Daniela; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-06-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids have been shown to possess several similar pharmacological effects, including analgesia and stimulation of brain circuitry that are believed to underlie drug addiction and reward. In recent years, these phenomena have supported the possible existence of functional links in the mechanisms of action of both types of drugs. The present review addresses the recent advances in the study of biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying opioid and cannabinoid interaction. Several hypothesis have been formulated to explain this cross-modulation including the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids and interaction at the level of receptor and/or their signal transduction mechanisms. Moreover it is important to consider that the nature of cannabinoid and opioid interaction might differ in the brain circuits mediating reward and in those mediating other pharmacological properties, such as antinociception. While in vitro studies point to the presence of interaction at various steps along the signal transduction pathway, studies in intact animals are frequently contradictory pending on the used species and the adopted protocol. The presence of reciprocal alteration in receptor density and efficiency as well as the modification in opioid/cannabinoid endogenous systems often do not reflect the behavioral results. Further studies are needed since a better knowledge of the opioid-cannabinoid interaction may lead to exciting therapeutic possibilities.

  6. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  7. The molecular basis of ultrasonic absorption by proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews significant advances in understanding the basis for the magnitude of ultrasonic absorption in proteins and related biological materials. Carstensen and Schwan's accurate and extensive measurements on blood and hemoglobin solutions provided the initial experimental data; these were augmented by data from measurements on aqueous solutions of gelatin, bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, various polypeptides, and amino acids. The initial frequency range of 1-10 MHz was expanded to 0.035-1000 MHz; temperature and pH dependences of absorption were studied. Theoretical approaches included consideration of the relative motion of blood cells in plasma, perturbation of water structure around macromolecules, solvation of charged entities, proton-transfer reactions, and helix-coil transitions. Proton-transfer reactions between amino and carboxylic groups and water proved to be largely responsible for the observed peaks in pH dependence of absorption coefficient; the peaks occurred in the basic and acidic regions corresponding to the pKs for titration of these groups. Such reactions could not account for the magnitude of absorption at physiological pH because only histidine titrated in this range. Extensive analysis, using relaxation theory, and measurements have shown that the proton transfer reaction between the imidazole group of histidine and hydrogen phosphate ion (in solution) provides sufficient volume change for significant ultrasonic absorption at physiological pH. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment was found with the peptide bacitracin in phosphate buffer solutions. By generalizing these results to the case of a protein, Slutsky wt al estimated maximum values of frequency-dependent absorption coefficients for typical tissue and found them to be correct to order of magnitude.

  8. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  9. The cellular and molecular basis of cnidarian neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Fabian; Layden, Michael; Manuel, Michaël

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenesis initiates during early development and it continues through later developmental stages and in adult animals to enable expansion, remodeling, and homeostasis of the nervous system. The generation of nerve cells has been analyzed in detail in few bilaterian model organisms, leaving open many questions about the evolution of this process. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians occupy an informative phylogenetic position to address the early evolution of cellular and molecular aspects of neurogenesis and to understand common principles of neural development. Here we review studies in several cnidarian model systems that have revealed significant similarities and interesting differences compared to neurogenesis in bilaterian species, and between different cnidarian taxa. Cnidarian neurogenesis is currently best understood in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, where it includes epithelial neural progenitor cells that express transcription factors of the soxB and atonal families. Notch signaling regulates the number of these neural progenitor cells, achaete-scute and dmrt genes are required for their further development and Wnt and BMP signaling appear to be involved in the patterning of the nervous system. In contrast to many vertebrates and Drosophila, cnidarians have a high capacity to generate neurons throughout their lifetime and during regeneration. Utilizing this feature of cnidarian biology will likely allow gaining new insights into the similarities and differences of embryonic and regenerative neurogenesis. The use of different cnidarian model systems and their expanding experimental toolkits will thus continue to provide a better understanding of evolutionary and developmental aspects of nervous system formation. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e257. doi: 10.1002/wdev.257 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Molecular basis for Duarte and Los Angeles variant galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, S.D.; Lai, K.; Dembure, P.P.

    1997-02-01

    Human erythrocytes that are homozygous for the Duarte enzyme variant of galactosemia (D/D) have a characteristic isoform on isoelectric focusing and 50% reduction in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) enzyme activity. The Duarte biochemical phenotype has a molecular genotype of N314D/N314D. The characteristic Duarte isoform is also associated with a variant called the {open_quotes}Los Angeles (LA) phenotype,{close_quotes} which has increased GALT enzyme activity. We evaluated GALT enzyme activity and screened the GALT genes of 145 patients with one or more N314D-containing alleles. We found seven with the LA biochemical phenotype, and all had a 1721C{r_arrow}T transition in exon 7 in cis with the N314D missense mutation. The 1721C{r_arrow}T transition is a neutral polymorphism for leucine at amino acid 218 (L218L). In pedigree analyses, this 1721C{r_arrow}T transition segregated with the LA phenotype of increased GALT activity in three different biochemical phenotypes (LA/N, LA/G, and LA/D). To determine the mechanism for increased activity of the LA variant, we compared GALT mRNA, protein abundance, and enzyme thermal stability in lymphoblast cell lines of D and LA phenotypes with comparable genotypes. GALT protein abundance was increased in LA compared to D alleles, but mRNA was similar among all genotypes. We conclude that the codon change N314D in cis with the base-pair transition 1721C{r_arrow}T produces the LA variant of galactosemia and that this nucleotide change increases GALT activity by increasing GALT protein abundance without increasing transcription or decreasing thermal lability. A favorable codon bias for the mutated codon with consequently increased translation rates is postulated as the mechanism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  12. Molecular basis of ALS and FTD: implications for translational studies.

    PubMed

    Liščić, Rajka M

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative disorders, related by signs of deteriorating motor and cognitive functions, and short survival. The cause is unknown and no effective treatment currently exists. For ALS, there is only a drug Riluzole and a promising substance arimoclomol. The overlap between ALS and FTD occurs at clinical, genetic, and pathological levels. The majority of ALS cases are sporadic (SALS) and a subset of patients has an inherited form of the disease, familial ALS (FALS), with a common SOD1 mutation, also present in SALS. A few of the mutant genes identified in FALS have also been found in SALS. Recently, hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 gene were found to comprise the largest fraction of ALS- and FTD-causing mutations known to date. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), encoded by the TARDBP gene, has been identified as the pathological protein of FALS, SALS and, less frequently, FTD. The less frequent TDP-43 pathology in other forms of familial FTD has been linked to a range of mutations in GRN, FUS/TLS, rarely VCP, and other genes. TDP-43 and FUS/TLS have striking structural and functional similarities, most likely implicating altered RNA processing as a major event in ALS pathogenesis. The clinical overlap of the symptoms of FTD and ALS is complemented by overlapping neuropathology, with intracellular inclusions composed of microtubule-associated protein tau, TDP-43 and less frequently FUS, or unknown ubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, new therapeutic approaches continue to emerge, by targeting SOD1, TDP-43 or GRN proteins. This review addresses new advances that are being made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of both diseases, which may eventually translate into new treatment options.

  13. A molecular basis for retinoic acid-induced axial truncation.

    PubMed

    Iulianella, A; Beckett, B; Petkovich, M; Lohnes, D

    1999-01-01

    Dietary deprivation and gene disruption studies clearly demonstrate that biologically active retinoids, such as retinoic acid (RA), are essential for numerous developmental programs. Similar ontogenic processes are also affected by retinoic acid excess, suggesting that the effects of retinoid administration reflect normal retinoid-dependent events. In the mouse, exogenous retinoic acid can induce both anterior (anencephaly, exencephaly) and posterior (spina bifida) neural tube defects depending on the developmental stage of treatment. Retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) mediates these effects on the caudal neural tube at 8.5 days postcoitum, as RARgamma-/- mice are completely resistant to spina bifida induced by retinoic acid at this stage. We therefore used this null mouse as a model to examine the molecular nature of retinoid-induced caudal neural tube defects by using a panel of informative markers and comparing their expression between retinoic acid-treated wild-type and RARgamma-/- embryos. Our findings indicate that treatment of wild-type embryos led to a rapid and significant decrease in the caudal expression of all mesodermal markers examined (e.g., brachyury, wnt-3a, cdx-4), whereas somite, neuroepithelial, notochord, floorplate, and hindgut markers were unaffected. RARgamma-/- mutants exhibited normal expression patterns for all markers examined, consistent with the notion that mesodermal defects underlie the etiology of retinoid-induced spina bifida. We also found that posterior somitic, but not caudal presomitic, embryonic tissues contained detectable bioactive retinoids, an observation which correlated with the ability of caudal explants to rapidly clear exogenous RA. Interestingly, transcripts encoding mP450RAI, a cytochrome P450, the product of which is believed to catabolize retinoic acid, were abundant in the retinoid-poor region of the caudal embryo. mP450RAI was rapidly induced by retinoic acid treatment in vivo, consistent with previous

  14. The molecular basis of resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Somoskovi, Akos; Parsons, Linda M; Salfinger, Max

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged worldwide. In many countries and regions, these resistant strains constitute a serious threat to the efficacy of tuberculosis control programs. An important element in gaining control of this epidemic is developing an understanding of the molecular basis of resistance to the most important antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide. On the basis of this information, more exacting laboratory testing, and ultimately more appropriate and timely treatment regimens, can be developed. PMID:11686881

  15. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function.

    PubMed

    Bao, Gang; Kamm, Roger D; Thomas, Wendy; Hwang, Wonmuk; Fletcher, Daniel A; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Zhu, Cheng; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-03-02

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress transmission, mechanosensing and mechanotransduction in living cells. In particular, single-molecule biomechanics studies of proteins and DNA, and mechanochemical coupling in biomolecular motors have demonstrated the critical importance of molecular mechanics as a new frontier in bioengineering and life sciences. To stimulate a more systematic study of the basic issues in molecular biomechanics, and attract a broader range of researchers to enter this emerging field, here we discuss its significance and relevance, describe the important issues to be addressed and the most critical questions to be answered, summarize both experimental and theoretical/computational challenges, and identify some short-term and long-term goals for the field. The needs to train young researchers in molecular biomechanics with a broader knowledge base, and to bridge and integrate molecular, subcellular and cellular level studies of biomechanics are articulated.

  16. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Gang; Kamm, Roger D.; Thomas, Wendy; Hwang, Wonmuk; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Zhu, Cheng; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress transmission, mechanosensing and mechanotransduction in living cells. In particular, single-molecule biomechanics studies of proteins and DNA, and mechanochemical coupling in biomolecular motors have demonstrated the critical importance of molecular mechanics as a new frontier in bioengineering and life sciences. To stimulate a more systematic study of the basic issues in molecular biomechanics, and attract a broader range of researchers to enter this emerging field, here we discuss its significance and relevance, describe the important issues to be addressed and the most critical questions to be answered, summarize both experimental and theoretical/computational challenges, and identify some short-term and long-term goals for the field. The needs to train young researchers in molecular biomechanics with a broader knowledge base, and to bridge and integrate molecular, subcellular and cellular level studies of biomechanics are articulated. PMID:20700472

  17. Molecular basis of the delayed rectifier current I(ks)in heart.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, J; Abriel, H; Kass, R S

    2001-05-01

    J. Kurokawa, H. Abriel and R. S. Kass. Molecular Basis of the Delayed Rectifier Current I(Ks)in Heart. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology (2001) 33, 873-882. Electrical activity underlies the control of the frequency, strength, and duration of contraction of the heart. During the cardiac cycle, a regular rhythmic pattern must be established in time-dependent changes in ionic conductances in order to ensure events that underlie normal cardiac function. This pattern must be tightly regulated by sympathetic nervous activity to ensure a physiologically relevant relationship between diastolic filling and ejection times with variable heart rate. The duration of the ventricular action potential is controlled in part by a slowly activated potassium channel current, I(Ks). The molecular identity of the subunits that comprise the channels conducting this current is important, not only for understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control electrical activity in healthy individuals, but also for understanding the molecular basis of at least one inherited human disease, LQTS-1. This brief review summarizes key points of information regarding the molecular determinants of the activity of these channels, their relationship to human disease, and what is known, and yet to be discovered, about the molecular determinants of the regulation of this channel by sympathetic nervous activity.

  18. The complex genetic and molecular basis of a model quantitative trait.

    PubMed

    Linder, Robert A; Seidl, Fabian; Ha, Kimberly; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative traits are often influenced by many loci with small effects. Identifying most of these loci and resolving them to specific genes or genetic variants is challenging. Yet, achieving such a detailed understanding of quantitative traits is important, as it can improve our knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis of heritable phenotypic variation. In this study, we use a genetic mapping strategy that involves recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection to obtain new insights into an ecologically, industrially, and medically relevant quantitative trait-tolerance of oxidative stress, as measured based on resistance to hydrogen peroxide. We examine the genetic basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance in three related yeast crosses and detect 64 distinct genomic loci that likely influence the trait. By precisely resolving or cloning a number of these loci, we demonstrate that a broad spectrum of cellular processes contribute to hydrogen peroxide resistance, including DNA repair, scavenging of reactive oxygen species, stress-induced MAPK signaling, translation, and water transport. Consistent with the complex genetic and molecular basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance, we show two examples where multiple distinct causal genetic variants underlie what appears to be a single locus. Our results improve understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of a highly complex, model quantitative trait.

  19. [Study on effective substance basis and molecular mechanism of Qigui Tongfeng tablet using network pharmacology method].

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhi-peng; Zhang, Xin-zhuang; Ding, Yue; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Qigui Tongfeng tablet (QLTFT) is a traditional Chinese medicine with good effect for treating gout. Here, network pharmacology method and molecular similarity analysis were utilized to study the effective substance basis and molecular mechanism of the QLTFT on the gout. The similarity to the medicinal compounds is reflected in the Tanimoto coefficient that gives the structural similarity of two compounds. Operationally, similar modifiers were described as pairs of concepts with a similarity score of 0. 500. The results of the molecular similarity analysis suggested that the flavonoids in QLTFT could be new leads for gout. Furthermore, complex biological systems may be represented and analyzed as computable networks. Two important properties of a network were degree and betweenness. Nodes with high degree or high betweenness may play important roles in the overall composition of a network. And the results of network analysis showed that dongbeinine, verticinone-N-oxide, verticine N-oxide, peimine, peiminine, isobaimonidine, dongbeirine, peimisine and simi-arenol which with high degree acted on xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, an arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, tyrosine-protein kinase and etc. Inhibition of these targets can prevent the formation of uric acid, reduce inflammation by uric acid and regulate the body's immune response. Thus, these compounds may be the main effective substance basis. The research results not only reveals its molecular mechanism, but also provide a theoretical basis for the quality control of drugs and clinical application.

  20. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-08

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors.

  1. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O’Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth’s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:25731976

  2. Multiple-Timestep ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Using an Atomic Basis Set Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Steele, Ryan P

    2015-12-17

    This work describes an approach to accelerate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by exploiting the inherent timescale separation between contributions from different atom-centered Gaussian basis sets. Several MD steps are propagated with a cost-efficient, low-level basis set, after which a dynamical correction accounts for large basis set relaxation effects in a time-reversible fashion. This multiple-timestep scheme is shown to generate valid MD trajectories, on the basis of rigorous testing for water clusters, the methanol dimer, an alanine polypeptide, protonated hydrazine, and the oxidized water dimer. This new approach generates observables that are consistent with those of target basis set trajectories, including MD-based vibrational spectra. This protocol is shown to be valid for Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory approaches. Recommended pairings include 6-31G as a low-level basis set for 6-31G** or 6-311G**, as well as cc-pVDZ as the subset for accurate dynamics with aug-cc-pVTZ. Demonstrated cost savings include factors of 2.6-7.3 on the systems tested and are expected to remain valid across system sizes.

  3. Fundamental Studies in the Molecular Basis of Laser Induced Retinal Damage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-31

    N-retinylidene Schiff bases (NRB) and N-retinylidene protonated Schiff bases (NRBH). The direct method was unable to detect any differences in the...RESOLUTIOM TESI CHAWI NATIONAL BUR[A4 OF STANOARDS 1%,3-A AD__ _ _ _ _ FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IN THE MOLECULAR BASIS OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL DAMAGE ANNUAL... based on this guiding framework ....................... 8 III. Superresolution Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy ............. 12 REFERENCES

  4. Molecular basis of HHQ biosynthesis: molecular dynamics simulations, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PQS (PseudomonasQuinolone Signal) and its precursor HHQ are signal molecules of the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system. They explicate their role in mammalian pathogenicity by binding to the receptor PqsR that induces virulence factor production and biofilm formation. The enzyme PqsD catalyses the biosynthesis of HHQ. Results Enzyme kinetic analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor experiments were used to determine mechanism and substrate order of the biosynthesis. Comparative analysis led to the identification of domains involved in functionality of PqsD. A kinetic cycle was set up and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular bases of the kinetics of PqsD. Trajectory analysis, pocket volume measurements, binding energy estimations and decompositions ensured insights into the binding mode of the substrates anthraniloyl-CoA and β-ketodecanoic acid. Conclusions Enzyme kinetics and SPR experiments hint at a ping-pong mechanism for PqsD with ACoA as first substrate. Trajectory analysis of different PqsD complexes evidenced ligand-dependent induced-fit motions affecting the modified ACoA funnel access to the exposure of a secondary channel. A tunnel-network is formed in which Ser317 plays an important role by binding to both substrates. Mutagenesis experiments resulting in the inactive S317F mutant confirmed the importance of this residue. Two binding modes for β-ketodecanoic acid were identified with distinct catalytic mechanism preferences. PMID:23916145

  5. Human chromosomal bands: nested structure, high-definition map and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Maria; Clay, Oliver; Federico, Concetta; Saccone, Salvatore; Auletta, Fabio; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report investigations on the nested structure, the high-definition mapping, and the molecular basis of the classical Giemsa and Reverse bands in human chromosomes. We found the rules according to which the approximately 3,200 isochores of the human genome are assembled in high (850-band) resolution bands, and the latter in low (400-band) resolution bands, so forming the nested mosaic structure of chromosomes. Moreover, we identified the borders of both sets of chromosomal bands at the DNA sequence level on the basis of our recent map of isochores, which represent the highest-resolution, ultimate bands. Indeed, beyond the 100-kb resolution of the isochore map, the guanine and cytosine (GC) profile of DNA becomes turbulent owing to the contribution of specific sequences such as exons, introns, interspersed repeats, CpG islands, etc. The isochore-based level of definition (100 kb) of chromosomal bands is much higher than the cytogenetic definition level (2-3 Mb). The major conclusions of this work concern the high degree of order found in the structure of chromosomal bands, their mapping at a high definition, and the solution of the long-standing problem of the molecular basis of chromosomal bands, as these could be defined on the basis of compositional DNA properties alone.

  6. Molecular characterization of antibodies bearing Id-460. II. Molecular basis for Id-460 expression

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Id-460+ immunoglobulins can be induced in vivo by immunization with dinitrophenyl (DNP) or P. pneumotropica and form two nonoverlapping groups of antibodies with respect to antigen binding specificity. In this study, using Id-460+ antibodies of differing antigen binding specificities, we compared on the molecular genetic level the five gene segment combinations (VH, DH, JH, VL, and JL) that encode the variable regions of these idiotype-positive immunoglobulins. The Id-460 determinant appears to be a conformational or combinatorial determinant encoded by VH460 and VK1 crosshybridizing genes. DH, JH, and JK gene segments appear to have no measurable effect upon expression of Id-460. Finally, antigen binding specificity does not appear to simply localize to any particular gene segment but may in part be the result of somatic mutation and/or VDJH junctional sequences, whose length correlates roughly with antigen binding specificity. PMID:3932578

  7. Catechin inhibition of influenza neuraminidase and its molecular basis with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Downard, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis for the antiviral inhibitory properties of three catechins epigallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate and catechin-5-gallate derived from green tea was assessed in terms of their ability to interact with influenza neuraminidase. This was investigated using a molecular based MALDI mass spectrometry approach in conjunction with companion inhibition assays employing confocal microscopy. Together with computational molecular docking, all three catechins were found to bind to influenza neuraminidase in the vicinity of a structurally conserved cavity adjacent to residue 430 that has been suggested to be a secondary sialic acid binding site. In doing so, they were effective inhibitors of the enzyme preventing the release of progeny viruses from host cells at inhibitor concentrations (IC50 values) of between 100 and 173 μM. Importantly, their different binding profiles avoid the limitations of existing neuraminidase inhibitors manifested by the evolution of antiviral resistance strains.

  8. Molecular basis of inherited skin-blistering disorders, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Monique; Has, Cristina; Tunggal, Lucy; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2006-10-13

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and associated skin-fragility syndromes are a group of inherited skin diseases characterised by trauma-induced blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. Mutations in at least 14 distinct genes encoding molecular components of the epidermis or the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) can cause blistering skin diseases that differ by clinical presentation and severity of the symptoms. Despite great advances in discerning the genetic basis of this group of diseases, the molecular pathways leading to symptoms are not yet fully understood. Unravelling these pathways by molecular analysis of the structure and in vitro assessment of functional properties of the human proteins involved, combined with genetic models in lower organisms, should pave the way for specific cures for inherited skin fragility.

  9. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  10. The Molecular Basis of Evolution and Disease: A Cold War Alliance.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Díaz, Edna

    2017-03-28

    This paper extends previous arguments against the assumption that the study of variation at the molecular level was instigated with a view to solving an internal conflict between the balance and classical schools of population genetics. It does so by focusing on the intersection of basic research in protein chemistry and the molecular approach to disease with the enactment of global health campaigns during the Cold War period. The paper connects advances in research on protein structure and function as reflected in Christian Anfinsen´s The molecular basis of evolution, with a political reading of Emilé Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling's identification of molecular disease and evolution. Beyond atomic fallout, these advances constituted a rationale for the promotion of genetic surveys of human populations in the Third World, in connection with international health programs. Light is shed not only on the experimental roots of the molecular challenge but on the broader geopolitical context where the rising role of biomedicine and public health (particularly the malaria eradication campaigns) had an impact on evolutionary biology.

  11. A unified model for the molecular basis of Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a pathway that removes lesions distorting the DNA helix. The molecular basis of the rare diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne Syndrome (CS) are explained based on the defects happening in 2 NER branches: Global-Genome Repair and Transcription-Coupled Repair, respectively. Nevertheless, both afflictions sporadically occur together, giving rise to XP/CS; however, the molecular basis of XP/CS is not understood very well. Many efforts have been made to clarify why mutations in only 4 NER genes, namely XPB, XPD, XPF and XPG, are the basis of this disease. Effort has also been made to unravel why mutations within these genes lead to XP, XP/CS, or other pathologies. We have recently contributed to the disclosure of this puzzle by characterizing Rad3/XPD mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells. Based on our, and others', observations, we propose a model compatible with all XP/CS cases and the current bibliography.

  12. A unified model for the molecular basis of Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a pathway that removes lesions distorting the DNA helix. The molecular basis of the rare diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne Syndrome (CS) are explained based on the defects happening in 2 NER branches: Global-Genome Repair and Transcription-Coupled Repair, respectively. Nevertheless, both afflictions sporadically occur together, giving rise to XP/CS; however, the molecular basis of XP/CS is not understood very well. Many efforts have been made to clarify why mutations in only 4 NER genes, namely XPB, XPD, XPF and XPG, are the basis of this disease. Effort has also been made to unravel why mutations within these genes lead to XP, XP/CS, or other pathologies. We have recently contributed to the disclosure of this puzzle by characterizing Rad3/XPD mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells. Based on our, and others', observations, we propose a model compatible with all XP/CS cases and the current bibliography. PMID:26460500

  13. Molecular Basis for Bcl-2 Homology 3 Domain Recognition in the Bcl-2 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Moroy, Gautier; Martin, Elyette; Dejaegere, Annick; Stote, Roland H.

    2009-01-01

    The proteins of the Bcl-2 family are important regulators of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. These proteins regulate this fundamental biological process via the formation of heterodimers involving both pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Disruption of the balance between anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins is the cause of numerous pathologies. Bcl-xl, an anti-apoptotic protein of this family, is known to form heterodimers with multiple pro-apoptotic proteins, such as Bad, Bim, Bak, and Bid. To elucidate the molecular basis of this recognition process, we used molecular dynamics simulations coupled with the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area approach to identify the amino acids that make significant energetic contributions to the binding free energy of four complexes formed between Bcl-xl and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology 3 peptides. A fifth protein-peptide complex composed of another anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-w, in complex with the peptide from Bim was also studied. The results identified amino acids of both the anti-apoptotic proteins as well as the Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domains of the pro-apoptotic proteins that make strong, recurrent interactions in the protein complexes. The calculations show that the two anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-xl and Bcl-w, share a similar recognition mechanism. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis for the promiscuous nature of this molecular recognition process by members of the Bcl-2 protein family. These amino acids could be targeted in the design of new mimetics that serve as scaffolds for new antitumoral molecules. PMID:19293158

  14. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. IV. Calculation of static electrical response properties

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E.; Dunning, T.H. Jr. )

    1994-02-15

    An accurate description of the electrical properties of atoms and molecules is critical for quantitative predictions of the nonlinear properties of molecules and of long-range atomic and molecular interactions between both neutral and charged species. We report a systematic study of the basis sets required to obtain accurate correlated values for the static dipole ([alpha][sub 1]), quadrupole ([alpha][sub 2]), and octopole ([alpha][sub 3]) polarizabilities and the hyperpolarizability ([gamma]) of the rare gas atoms He, Ne, and Ar. Several methods of correlation treatment were examined, including various orders of Moller--Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP3, MP4), coupled-cluster theory with and without perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD, CCSD(T)], and singles and doubles configuration interaction (CISD). All of the basis sets considered here were constructed by adding even-tempered sets of diffuse functions to the correlation consistent basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. With multiply-augmented sets we find that the electrical properties of the rare gas atoms converge smoothly to values that are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data and/or previously computed results. As a further test of the basis sets presented here, the dipole polarizabilities of the F[sup [minus

  15. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity: A genome-wide ssociation study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Isen, Joshua D.; Malone, Stephen M.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity (EDA) was analyzed using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large population-representative sample of twins and parents (N = 4,424) in relation to various EDA indices. Biometric analyses suggested that approximately 50% or more of variance in all EDA indices was heritable. The combined effect of all SNPs together accounted for a significant amount of variance in each index, affirming their polygenic basis and heritability. However, none of the SNPs were genome-wide significant for any EDA index. Previously reported SNP associations with disorders such as substance dependence or schizophrenia, which have been linked to EDA abnormalities, were not significant; nor were associations between EDA and genes in specific neurotransmitter systems. These results suggest that EDA is influenced by multiple genes rather than by polymorphisms with large effects. PMID:25387706

  16. Polyatomic molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations with Gaussian basis sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical methods have been used successfully in atomic Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations for many years. Some DHF calculations using numerical methods have been done on diatomic molecules, but while these serve a useful purpose for calibration, the computational effort in extending this approach to polyatomic molecules is prohibitive. An alternative more in line with traditional quantum chemistry is to use an analytical basis set expansion of the wave function. This approach fell into disrepute in the early 1980's due to problems with variational collapse and intruder states, but has recently been put on firm theoretical foundations. In particular, the problems of variational collapse are well understood, and prescriptions for avoiding the most serious failures have been developed. Consequently, it is now possible to develop reliable molecular programs using basis set methods. This paper describes such a program and reports results of test calculations to demonstrate the convergence and stability of the method.

  17. The molecular basis of metabolic cycles and their relationship to circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Jane

    2016-12-06

    Metabolic cycles result from the partitioning of oxidative and reductive metabolism into rhythmic phases of gene expression and oscillating post-translational protein modifications. Relatively little is known about how these switches in gene expression are controlled, although recent studies have suggested that transcription itself may play a central role. This review explores the molecular basis of the metabolic and gene-expression oscillations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as how they relate to other biological time-keeping mechanisms, such as circadian rhythms.

  18. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  19. [Molecular ecological basis of high-yielding formation of rice and its application].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenxiong; Liang, Kangjing; Guo, Yuchun; He, Huaqin; Wang, Jingyuan; Liang, Yiyuan; Chen, Fangyu

    2003-12-01

    This paper introduced the developmental genetics and its molecular ecological basis of high yielding formation of rice in the past decade, and analyzed the advantage and the shortage of comparative physiological approach traditionally used in the research work on crop cultivation. It was emphasized to actively introduce the research contents and its methodology from relative disciplines to deeply understand the scientific issue, and suggested that the key to realize stable and high yielding of rice was to develop a rational cultivation system based on the properties of genetic effects on the traits in different developmental stages by controlling and regulating the traits governed by dominant effect genes and additive effect genes x environment in same direction, which was considered as the main characteristics and the technological innovation of modern crop genetic ecological cultivation science. Finally, the development trend of crop cultivation science shifting to molecular crop cultivation science was predicted and discussed.

  20. Molecular Signaling Network Motifs Provide a Mechanistic Basis for Cellular Threshold Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Conolly, Rory B.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, there is a move toward using in vitro toxicity testing to assess human health risk due to chemical exposure. As with in vivo toxicity testing, an important question for in vitro results is whether there are thresholds for adverse cellular responses. Empirical evaluations may show consistency with thresholds, but the main evidence has to come from mechanistic considerations. Objectives: Cellular response behaviors depend on the molecular pathway and circuitry in the cell and the manner in which chemicals perturb these circuits. Understanding circuit structures that are inherently capable of resisting small perturbations and producing threshold responses is an important step towards mechanistically interpreting in vitro testing data. Methods: Here we have examined dose–response characteristics for several biochemical network motifs. These network motifs are basic building blocks of molecular circuits underpinning a variety of cellular functions, including adaptation, homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. For each motif, we present biological examples and models to illustrate how thresholds arise from specific network structures. Discussion and Conclusion: Integral feedback, feedforward, and transcritical bifurcation motifs can generate thresholds. Other motifs (e.g., proportional feedback and ultrasensitivity)produce responses where the slope in the low-dose region is small and stays close to the baseline. Feedforward control may lead to nonmonotonic or hormetic responses. We conclude that network motifs provide a basis for understanding thresholds for cellular responses. Computational pathway modeling of these motifs and their combinations occurring in molecular signaling networks will be a key element in new risk assessment approaches based on in vitro cellular assays. Citation: Zhang Q, Bhattacharya S, Conolly RB, Clewell HJ III, Kaminski NE, Andersen ME. 2014. Molecular signaling network motifs provide a

  1. Molecular basis of Rh blood group system in the Malaysian population

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Rozi Hanisa; Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Hassan, Afifah; Ayob, Yasmin; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rh molecular studies have been previously mainly conducted in Caucasians and African population. There is a limited data on the molecular basis for Rh genotypes among Asians. Aims: This study aims to characterize the Rh genes and frequency of the various RH genotypes among blood donors in National Blood Centre (NBC), Kuala Lumpur. Materials and Methods: A total of 1014 blood samples were obtained from blood donors from four different ethnic groups (360 Malays, 434 Chinese, 164 Indians and 56 others). Serological and molecular analysis of all 1014 blood samples were performed. An automated deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing analysis was performed. Results: Rh phenotypes and RH genotypes showed heterogeneity and significant association with ethnicities. Discrepancies in allele D, C/c and E/e between phenotypes and genotypes results were observed. Discrepancy results in allele D showed significant association with the ethnic groups of the blood donors in NBC. There were multiple novel mutations (23) and published mutations (5) found in this study. Significant associations between discrepancy results and mutations were found in allele D and C/c. Conclusion: Performing RH molecular analysis in Malaysian population provided the basic database for the distribution of Rh genotypes of donors from major ethnic groups in Malaysia. PMID:25722573

  2. Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

  3. Molecular basis of the light-driven switching of the photochromic fluorescent protein Padron.

    PubMed

    Brakemann, Tanja; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Groenhof, Gerrit; Stiel, Andre C; Trowitzsch, Simon; Eggeling, Christian; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hell, Stefan W; Wahl, Markus C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-05-07

    Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins can be repeatedly photoswitched between a fluorescent and a nonfluorescent state by irradiation with the light of two different wavelengths. The molecular basis of the switching process remains a controversial topic. Padron0.9 is a reversibly switchable fluorescent protein with "positive" switching characteristics, exhibiting excellent spectroscopic properties. Its chromophore is formed by the amino acids Cys-Tyr-Gly. We obtained high resolution x-ray structures of Padron0.9 in both the fluorescent and the nonfluorescent states and used the structural information for molecular dynamics simulations. We found that in Padron0.9 the chromophore undergoes a cis-trans isomerization upon photoswitching. The molecular dynamics simulations clarified the protonation states of the amino acid residues within the chromophore pocket that influence the protonation state of the chromophore. We conclude that a light driven cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore appears to be the fundamental switching mechanism in all photochromic fluorescent proteins known to date. Distinct absorption cross-sections for the switching wavelengths in the fluorescent and the nonfluorescent state are not essential for efficient photochromism in fluorescent proteins, although they may facilitate the switching process.

  4. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D; Convertino, Marino; De Vivo, Marco

    2016-06-20

    The design of multitarget-directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget-directed ligand named ARN2508 (2-[3-fluoro-4-[3-(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2-arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti-inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX.

  5. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  6. Molecular Basis for Adaptation of Oysters to Stressful Marine Intertidal Environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofan; Li, Li; Meng, Jie; Qi, Haigang; Qu, Tao; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Oysters that occupy estuarine and intertidal habitats have well-developed stress tolerance mechanisms to tolerate harsh and dynamically changing environments. In this review, we summarize common pathways and genomic features in oyster that are responsive to environmental stressors such as temperature, salinity, hypoxia, air exposure, pathogens, and anthropogenic pollutions. We first introduce the key genes involved in several pathways, which constitute the molecular basis for adaptation to stress. We use genome analysis to highlight the strong cellular homeostasis system, a unique adaptive characteristic of oysters. Next, we provide a global view of features of the oyster genome that contribute to stress adaptation, including oyster-specific gene expansion, highly inducible expression, and functional divergence. Finally, we review the consequences of interactions between oysters and the environment from ecological and evolutionary perspectives by discussing mass mortality and adaptive divergence among populations and related species of the genus Crassostrea. We conclude with prospects for future study.

  7. Molecular basis of early stages of Clostridium difficile infection: germination and colonization.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) occur when antibiotic therapy disrupts the gastrointestinal flora, favoring infected C. difficile spores to germinate, outgrow, colonize and produce toxins. During CDI, C. difficile vegetative cells initiate the process of sporulation allowing a fraction of the spores to remain adhered to the intestinal surfaces. These spores, which are unaffected by antibiotic therapy commonly used for CDIs, then germinate, outgrow and recolonize the host's GI tract causing relapse of CDI. Consequently, the germination and colonization processes can be considered as the earliest and most essential steps for the development as well as relapse of CDI. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the molecular basis involved in C. difficile spore germination and colonization.

  8. Molecular Basis for Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and Their Drug Actions by Extracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Juan; Jiang, Jason Y.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2017-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) associated with the slow phase of the glutamatergic signaling pathway in neurons of the central nervous system have gained importance as drug targets for chronic neurodegenerative diseases. While extracellular Ca2+ was reported to exhibit direct activation and modulation via an allosteric site, the identification of those binding sites was challenged by weak binding. Herein, we review the discovery of extracellular Ca2+ in regulation of mGluRs, summarize the recent developments in probing Ca2+ binding and its co-regulation of the receptor based on structural and biochemical analysis, and discuss the molecular basis for Ca2+ to regulate various classes of drug action as well as its importance as an allosteric modulator in mGluRs. PMID:28335551

  9. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed.

  10. Molecular basis for premature senescence induced by surfactants in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Yoshimi; Miki, Kensuke; Yonekura, Ryuzo; Kudo, Ikuru; Fujii, Michihiko; Ayusawa, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Sublethal doses of surfactants as exemplified by NP-40 clearly induce premature senescence in normal human cells. To understand molecular basis for this phenomenon, we tried to suppress it with use of various inhibitors. An inhibitor of p38 of the MAPK family almost completely suppressed growth arrest and morphological changes induced by surfactants; however, other inhibitors tested had no effect. Oleic acid, a weak inducer of premature senescence, was found to suppress the effect of NP-40. Fluorescein-labeled oleic acid rapidly bound to the cell surface, and this binding was clearly blocked by pre-treatment with surfactants, suggesting that surfactants and oleic acid compete for binding to the cell surface. Moderate concentrations of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, also suppressed the senescent features induced by NP-40. These results suggest that surfactants activate p38 signaling pathway by binding to the cell surface, and induce cellular senescence.

  11. Molecular basis for oncohistone H3 recognition by SETD2 methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Lu, Chao; Li, Guo-Min; Allis, C. David; Li, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency point mutations of genes encoding histones have been identified recently as novel drivers in a number of tumors. Specifically, the H3K36M/I mutations were shown to be oncogenic in chondroblastomas and undifferentiated sarcomas by inhibiting H3K36 methyltransferases, including SETD2. Here we report the crystal structures of the SETD2 catalytic domain bound to H3K36M or H3K36I peptides with SAH (S-adenosylhomocysteine). In the complex structure, the catalytic domain adopts an open conformation, with the K36M/I peptide snuggly positioned in a newly formed substrate channel. Our structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis underying oncohistone recognition by and inhibition of SETD2. PMID:27474439

  12. Toward understanding the molecular basis of atherosclerosis with genetics and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Rollins, Jarod; Paigen, Beverly; Wang, Xiaosong

    2007-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is a very complex disease involving both genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interactions. In the general population, genetic polymorphisms of many genes in the pathways of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and thrombogenesis are likely responsible for the wide range of susceptibilities to myocardial infarction, the most deadly consequence of atherosclerosis. To identify these polymorphisms, genetic linkage studies have been carried out in both humans and mouse models. Approximately 40 quantitative trait loci for atherosclerotic disease have been found in humans, and approximately 30 in mice. Recently, genome-wide association studies have been used to identify atherosclerosis-susceptibility polymorphisms. Although finding new atherosclerosis genes through these approaches remains challenging, the pace of finding these polymorphisms is accelerating due to the rapidly improving bioinformatics resources and biotechnologies. The results from these efforts will not only reveal the molecular basis of, but will facilitate finding drug targets and individualized medicine for, atherosclerotic disease. PMID:17767904

  13. Genetic and Molecular Basis of Quantitative Trait Loci of Arthritis in Rat: Genes and Polymorphisms1

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qing; Jiao, Yan; Hasty, Karen A.; Stuart, John M.; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Kang, Andrew H.; Gu, Weikuan

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which is affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. To understand the genetic and molecular basis of RA, a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate experimental autoimmune arthritis have been identified using various rat models for RA. However, identifying the particular responsible genes within these QTL remains a major challenge. Using currently available genome data and gene annotation information, we systematically examined RA-associated genes and polymorphisms within and outside QTL over the whole rat genome. By the whole genome analysis of genes and polymorphisms, we found that there are significantly more RA-associated genes in QTL regions as contrasted with non-QTL regions. Further experimental studies are necessary to determine whether these known RA-associated genes or polymorphisms are genetic components causing the QTL effect. PMID:18606636

  14. [Epidemics of conjunctivitis caused by avian influenza virus and molecular basis for its ocular tropism].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Jin, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused several outbreaks in humans, leading to disasters to human beings. The outbreak of H7N9 avian influenza in China in 2003 re-attracted our close attention to this disease. More and more evidences demonstrated that eye is one of invasion portals of AIV, leading to conjunctivitis. The current studies showed that only subtypes H7 and H5 could cause severe systemic infections. Abundant distribution of α-2, 3 siliac acid receptor in conjunctiva and cornea as well as specific activiation of NF-κB signal transduction pathway by subtype H7 virus may contribute to the ocular tropism of the virus. These studies suggest that avian influenza conjunctivitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis during influenza epidemic seasons, and eyes should be well protected for disease control personnel when handling avian influenza epidemics. This review focused on AIV conjunctivitis and the molecular basis of ocular tropism.

  15. The myosin mesa and a possible unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    No matter how many times one explores the structure of the myosin molecule, there is always something new to discover. Here, I describe the myosin mesa, a structural feature of the motor domain that has the characteristics of a binding domain for another protein, possibly myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C). Interestingly, many well-known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutations lie along this surface and may affect the putative interactions proposed here. A potential unifying hypothesis for the molecular basis of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is discussed here. It involves increased power output of the cardiac muscle as a result of HCM mutations causing the release of inhibition by myosin binding protein C. PMID:25619247

  16. Molecular basis of in-vivo biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial biofilms are involved in a multitude of serious chronic infections. In recent years, modeling biofilm infection in vitro led to the identification of microbial determinants governing biofilm development. However, we lack information as to whether biofilm formation mechanisms identified in vitro have relevance for biofilm-associated infection. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation using staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to illustrate key points, as their biofilm development process is well-studied. We will focus on in-vivo findings such as obtained in animal infection models, and critically evaluate in-vivo relevance of in-vitro findings. Although results on the role of quorum-sensing in biofilm formation have been conflicting, we now argue that integration of in-vitro and in-vivo studies allows a differentiated view of this mechanism as it relates to biofilm infection. PMID:23261595

  17. Immunological and molecular basis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Radwan, Basil M; Nandipati, Kalyana C; Hunter, William J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is rising worldwide with the increasing incidence of obesity, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. NASH is currently one of the most common indications of liver transplantation in the United States. The immune system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH. The metabolic changes, associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, induce immunological responses resulting in NAFLD and further aggravation of the metabolic derangement in a feed-forward loop. Genetic and endocrine factors modulate the immunological and metabolic responses and determine the pathophysiological features of NAFLD. Histologically, NAFLD is a spectrum that ranges from simple hepatic steatosis to severe steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of the disease. This article is a critical evaluation of our current knowledge of the immunological and molecular basis of the disease.

  18. Structure of the thermolabile mutant aldolase B, A149P: molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Malay, Ali D; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2005-03-18

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially lethal inborn error in metabolism caused by mutations in the aldolase B gene, which is critical for gluconeogenesis and fructose metabolism. The most common mutation, which accounts for 53% of HFI alleles identified worldwide, results in substitution of Pro for Ala at position 149. Structural and functional investigations of human aldolase B with the A149P substitution (AP-aldolase) have shown that the mutation leads to losses in thermal stability, quaternary structure, and activity. X-ray crystallography is used to reveal the structural basis of these perturbations. Crystals of AP-aldolase are grown at two temperatures (4 degrees C and 18 degrees C), and the structure solved to 3.0 angstroms resolution, using the wild-type structure as the phasing model. The structures reveal that the single residue substitution, A149P, causes molecular disorder around the site of mutation (residues 148-159), which is propagated to three adjacent beta-strand and loop regions (residues 110-129, 189-199, 235-242). Disorder in the 110-129-loop region, which comprises one subunit-subunit interface, provides an explanation for the disrupted quaternary structure and thermal instability. Greater structural perturbation, particularly at a Glu189-Arg148 salt bridge in the active-site architecture, is observed in the structure determined at 18 degrees C, which could explain the temperature-dependent loss in activity. The disorder revealed in these structures is far greater than that predicted by homology modeling and underscores the difficulties in predicting perturbations of protein structure and function by homology modeling alone. The AP-aldolase structure reveals the molecular basis of a hereditary disease and represents one of only a few structures known for mutant proteins at the root of the thousands of other inherited disorders.

  19. Convergent Partially Augmented Basis Sets for Post-Hartree-Fock Calculations of Molecular Properties and Reaction Barrier Heights.

    PubMed

    Papajak, Ewa; Truhlar, Donald G

    2011-01-11

    We present sets of convergent, partially augmented basis set levels corresponding to subsets of the augmented "aug-cc-pV(n+d)Z" basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. We show that for many molecular properties a basis set fully augmented with diffuse functions is computationally expensive and almost always unnecessary. On the other hand, unaugmented cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets are insufficient for many properties that require diffuse functions. Therefore, we propose using intermediate basis sets. We developed an efficient strategy for partial augmentation, and in this article, we test it and validate it. Sequentially deleting diffuse basis functions from the "aug" basis sets yields the "jul", "jun", "may", "apr", etc. basis sets. Tests of these basis sets for Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) show the advantages of using these partially augmented basis sets and allow us to recommend which basis sets offer the best accuracy for a given number of basis functions for calculations on large systems. Similar truncations in the diffuse space can be performed for the aug-cc-pVxZ, aug-cc-pCVxZ, etc. basis sets.

  20. Convergent Partially Augmented Basis Sets for Post-Hartree-Fock Calculations of Molecular Properties and Reaction Barrier Heights

    SciTech Connect

    Papajak, Ewa; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2011-01-11

    We present sets of convergent, partially augmented basis set levels corresponding to subsets of the augmented “aug-cc-pV(n+d)Z” basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. We show that for many molecular properties a basis set fully augmented with diffuse functions is computationally expensive and almost always unnecessary. On the other hand, unaugmented cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets are insufficient for many properties that require diffuse functions. Therefore, we propose using intermediate basis sets. We developed an efficient strategy for partial augmentation, and in this article, we test it and validate it. Sequentially deleting diffuse basis functions from the “aug” basis sets yields the “jul”, “jun”, “may”, “apr”, etc. basis sets. Tests of these basis sets for Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) show the advantages of using these partially augmented basis sets and allow us to recommend which basis sets offer the best accuracy for a given number of basis functions for calculations on large systems. Similar truncations in the diffuse space can be performed for the aug-cc-pVxZ, aug-cc-pCVxZ, etc. basis sets.

  1. Molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Sadamoto, Hisayo; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    In insects, dopamine modulates various aspects of behavior such as learning and memory, arousal and locomotion, and is also a precursor of melanin. To elucidate the molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer, we identified genes involved in dopamine biosynthesis, signal transduction, and dopamine re-uptake in the cricket. Complementary DNA of two isoforms of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which convert tyrosine into L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, was isolated from the cricket brain cDNA library. In addition, four dopamine receptor genes (Dop1, Dop2, Dop3, and DopEcR) and a high-affinity dopamine transporter gene were identified. The two TH isoforms contained isoform-specific regions in the regulatory ACT domain and showed differential expression patterns in different tissues. In addition, the dopamine receptor genes had a receptor subtype-specific distribution: the Dop1, Dop2, and DopEcR genes were broadly expressed in various tissues at differential expression levels, and the Dop3 gene was restrictedly expressed in neuronal tissues and the testicles. Our findings provide a fundamental basis for understanding the dopaminergic regulation of diverse physiological processes in the cricket.

  2. A conserved molecular basis for photoperiod adaptation in two temperate legumes.

    PubMed

    Weller, James L; Liew, Lim Chee; Hecht, Valérie F G; Rajandran, Vinodan; Laurie, Rebecca E; Ridge, Stephen; Wenden, Bénédicte; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Jaminon, Odile; Blassiau, Christelle; Dalmais, Marion; Rameau, Catherine; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Macknight, Richard C; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle

    2012-12-18

    Legumes were among the first plant species to be domesticated, and accompanied cereals in expansion of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent into diverse environments across the Mediterranean basin, Europe, Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. Although several recent studies have outlined the molecular basis for domestication and eco-geographic adaptation in the two main cereals from this region, wheat and barley, similar questions remain largely unexplored in their legume counterparts. Here we identify two major loci controlling differences in photoperiod response between wild and domesticated pea, and show that one of these, high response to photoperiod (HR), is an ortholog of early flowering 3 (ELF3), a gene involved in circadian clock function. We found that a significant proportion of flowering time variation in global pea germplasm is controlled by HR, with a single, widespread functional variant conferring altered circadian rhythms and the reduced photoperiod response associated with the spring habit. We also present evidence that ELF3 has a similar role in lentil, another major legume crop, with a distinct functional variant contributing to reduced photoperiod response in cultivars widely deployed in short-season environments. Our results identify the factor likely to have permitted the successful prehistoric expansion of legume cultivation to Northern Europe, and define a conserved genetic basis for major adaptive changes in flowering phenology and growth habit in an important crop group.

  3. A conserved molecular basis for photoperiod adaptation in two temperate legumes

    PubMed Central

    Weller, James L.; Liew, Lim Chee; Hecht, Valérie F. G.; Rajandran, Vinodan; Laurie, Rebecca E.; Ridge, Stephen; Wenden, Bénédicte; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K.; Jaminon, Odile; Blassiau, Christelle; Dalmais, Marion; Rameau, Catherine; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Macknight, Richard C.; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Legumes were among the first plant species to be domesticated, and accompanied cereals in expansion of agriculture from the Fertile Crescent into diverse environments across the Mediterranean basin, Europe, Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. Although several recent studies have outlined the molecular basis for domestication and eco-geographic adaptation in the two main cereals from this region, wheat and barley, similar questions remain largely unexplored in their legume counterparts. Here we identify two major loci controlling differences in photoperiod response between wild and domesticated pea, and show that one of these, HIGH RESPONSE TO PHOTOPERIOD (HR), is an ortholog of EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3), a gene involved in circadian clock function. We found that a significant proportion of flowering time variation in global pea germplasm is controlled by HR, with a single, widespread functional variant conferring altered circadian rhythms and the reduced photoperiod response associated with the spring habit. We also present evidence that ELF3 has a similar role in lentil, another major legume crop, with a distinct functional variant contributing to reduced photoperiod response in cultivars widely deployed in short-season environments. Our results identify the factor likely to have permitted the successful prehistoric expansion of legume cultivation to Northern Europe, and define a conserved genetic basis for major adaptive changes in flowering phenology and growth habit in an important crop group. PMID:23213200

  4. Molecular Basis of Differential B-Pentamer Stability of Shiga Toxins 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Conrady, Deborah G.; Flagler, Michael J.; Friedmann, David R.; Vander Wielen, Bradley D.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Weiss, Alison A.; Herr, Andrew B.

    2012-06-27

    Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 is a major cause of food poisoning that can result in severe diarrhea and, in some cases, renal failure. The pathogenesis of E. coli O157:H7 is in large part due to the production of Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB{sub 5} toxin that consists of a ribosomal RNA-cleaving A-subunit surrounded by a pentamer of receptor-binding B subunits. There are two major isoforms, Stx1 and Stx2, which differ dramatically in potency despite having 57% sequence identity. Animal studies and epidemiological studies show Stx2 is associated with more severe disease. Although the molecular basis of this difference is unknown, data suggest it is associated with the B-subunit. Mass spectrometry studies have suggested differential B-pentamer stability between Stx1 and Stx2. We have examined the relative stability of the B-pentamers in solution. Analytical ultracentrifugation using purified B-subunits demonstrates that Stx2B, the more deadly isoform, shows decreased pentamer stability compared to Stx1B (EC{sub 50} = 2.3 {micro}M vs. EC{sub 50} = 0.043 {micro}M for Stx1B). X-ray crystal structures of Stx1B and Stx2B identified a glutamine in Stx2 (versus leucine in Stx1) within the otherwise strongly hydrophobic interface between B-subunits. Interchanging these residues switches the stability phenotype of the B-pentamers of Stx1 and Stx2, as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. These studies demonstrate a profound difference in stability of the B-pentamers in Stx1 and Stx2, illustrate the mechanistic basis for this differential stability, and provide novel reagents to test the basis for differential pathogenicity of these toxins.

  5. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  6. Molecular basis of human transcobalamin II deficiency in an affected family

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Seetharam, S.; Seetharam, B.

    1994-09-01

    Transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease leading to cobalamin (Cbl, Vitamin B{sub 12}) deficiency. Patients with this disorder fail to absorb and transport Cbl across cellular membranes and develop Cbl deficiency, symptoms of which include failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, impaired immunodefence and neurological disorders. The molecular basis for this disease is not known. By means of Southern blotting and sequence analysis of TC II, cDNA amplified from fibroblasts of an affected child and his parents, we have identified two mutant TC II alleles. The maternally derived allele had a gross deletion, while the paternally derived allele had a 4-nucleotide ({sup 1023}TCTG) deletion which caused a reading frame shift and generation of a premature termination codon, 146 nucleotides downstream from the deletion. Both these deletions caused markedly reduced levels of TC II mRNA and protein. In addition, these two deletions were unique to this family and were not detected in four other unrelated TC II deficient patients who also exhibited the same (TC II protein/mRNA deficiency) phenotypes. Based on this study we suggest, (1) that the molecular defect in the most common form of human TC II deficiency (lack of immunoprecipitable plasma TC II) is heterogeneous and (2) these mutations cause TC II mRNA and protein deficiency leading to defective plasma transport of Cbl and the development of Cbl deficiency.

  7. Molecular basis for epitope recognition by non-neutralizing anti-gp41 antibody F240.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Tolbert, William D; Orlandi, Chiara; Richard, Jonathan; Ding, Shilei; Chen, Xishan; Bonsor, Daniel A; Sundberg, Eric J; Lu, Wuyuan; Ray, Krishanu; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-11-09

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by non-neutralizing antibodies (nnAbs) specific to the HIV envelope (Env) glycoproteins present at the surface of virus sensitized or infected cells plays a role in the effective adaptive immune response to HIV. Here, we explore the molecular basis for the epitope at the disulfide loop region (DLR) of the principal immunodominant domain of gp41, recognized by the well-known nnAb F240. Our structural studies reveal details of the F240-gp41 interface and describe a structure of DLR that is distinct from known conformations of this region studied in the context of either CD4-unliganded Env trimer or the gp41 peptide in the unbound state. These data coupled with binding and functional analyses indicate that F240 recognizes non-trimeric Env forms which are significantly overexpressed on intact virions but poorly represented at surfaces of cells infected with infectious molecular clones and endogenously-infected CD4 T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Furthermore, although we detect ADCC activities of F240 against cells spinoculated with intact virions, our data suggest that these activities result from F240 recognition of gp41 stumps or misfolded Env variants present on virions rather than its ability to recognize functional gp41 transition structures emerging on trimeric Env post CD4 receptor engagement.

  8. "Zwitterionic Proton Sponge" Hydrogen Bonding Investigations on the Basis of Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J

    2015-06-22

    1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)-4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene has been investigated on the basis of static DFT computations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed in the gas phase and in the solid state. The studied "zwitterionic proton sponge" possesses two, short intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H···O and N-H···N) classified as Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds (LBHBs); therefore, the system studied is strongly anharmonic. In addition, the compound exists as a "zwitterion" in solution and in the solid state, thus the intramolecular hydrogen bonds belong to the class of charge-assisted interactions. The applied quantum-chemical methods enabled investigations of metric and spectroscopic parameters of the molecule. The time-evolution investigations of the H-bonding showed a strong delocalization of the bridge protons and their high mobility, reflected in the low barriers on the free energy surfaces. Frequent proton transfer phenomena were noticed. The power spectra of atomic velocity were computed to analyze the vibrational features associated with O-H and N-H stretching. A broad absorption was indicated for both hydrogen bridges. For the first time, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics results are reported for the compound, and they indicate a broad, shallow but not barrierless, potential well for each of the bridge protons.

  9. Molecular Basis for the Dual Function of Eps8 on Actin Dynamics: Bundling and Capping

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Larnele; Disanza, Andrea; Liu, HongJun; Perlade, Emilie; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Maiolica, Alessio; Confalonieri, Stefano; Le Clainche, Christophe; Offenhauser, Nina; Block, Jennifer; Rottner, Klemens; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Carlier, Marie-France; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Scita, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Actin capping and cross-linking proteins regulate the dynamics and architectures of different cellular protrusions. Eps8 is the founding member of a unique family of capping proteins capable of side-binding and bundling actin filaments. However, the structural basis through which Eps8 exerts these functions remains elusive. Here, we combined biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches with electron microscopy and image analysis to dissect the molecular mechanism responsible for the distinct activities of Eps8. We propose that bundling activity of Eps8 is mainly mediated by a compact four helix bundle, which is contacting three actin subunits along the filament. The capping activity is mainly mediated by a amphipathic helix that binds within the hydrophobic pocket at the barbed ends of actin blocking further addition of actin monomers. Single-point mutagenesis validated these modes of binding, permitting us to dissect Eps8 capping from bundling activity in vitro. We further showed that the capping and bundling activities of Eps8 can be fully dissected in vivo, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the identified Eps8 structural/functional modules. Eps8 controls actin-based motility through its capping activity, while, as a bundler, is essential for proper intestinal morphogenesis of developing Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:20532239

  10. Molecular basis for epitope recognition by non-neutralizing anti-gp41 antibody F240

    PubMed Central

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Tolbert, William D.; Orlandi, Chiara; Richard, Jonathan; Ding, Shilei; Chen, Xishan; Bonsor, Daniel A.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Lu, Wuyuan; Ray, Krishanu; Finzi, Andrés; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by non-neutralizing antibodies (nnAbs) specific to the HIV envelope (Env) glycoproteins present at the surface of virus sensitized or infected cells plays a role in the effective adaptive immune response to HIV. Here, we explore the molecular basis for the epitope at the disulfide loop region (DLR) of the principal immunodominant domain of gp41, recognized by the well-known nnAb F240. Our structural studies reveal details of the F240-gp41 interface and describe a structure of DLR that is distinct from known conformations of this region studied in the context of either CD4-unliganded Env trimer or the gp41 peptide in the unbound state. These data coupled with binding and functional analyses indicate that F240 recognizes non-trimeric Env forms which are significantly overexpressed on intact virions but poorly represented at surfaces of cells infected with infectious molecular clones and endogenously-infected CD4 T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Furthermore, although we detect ADCC activities of F240 against cells spinoculated with intact virions, our data suggest that these activities result from F240 recognition of gp41 stumps or misfolded Env variants present on virions rather than its ability to recognize functional gp41 transition structures emerging on trimeric Env post CD4 receptor engagement. PMID:27827447

  11. Molecular Basis of Hydroperoxide Specificity in Peroxiredoxins: The Case of AhpE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zeida, Ari; Reyes, Aníbal M; Lichtig, Pablo; Hugo, Martín; Vazquez, Diego S; Santos, Javier; González Flecha, F Luis; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Trujillo, Madia

    2015-12-15

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a ubiquitous family of Cys-dependent peroxidases that play essential roles in reducing hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and organic hydroperoxides in almost all organisms. Members of the Prx subfamilies show differential oxidizing substrate specificities that await explanations at a molecular level. Among them, alkyl hydroperoxide reductases E (AhpE) is a novel subfamily comprising Mycobacterium tuberculosis AhpE and AhpE-like proteins expressed in some bacteria and archaea. We previously reported that MtAhpE reacts ∼10(4) times faster with an arachidonic acid derived hydroperoxide than with hydrogen peroxide, and suggested that this surprisingly high reactivity was related to the presence of a hydrophobic groove at the dimer interface evidenced in the crystallography structure of the enzyme. In this contribution we experimentally confirmed the existence of an exposed hydrophobic patch in MtAhpE. We found that fatty acid hydroperoxide reduction by the enzyme showed positive activation entropy that importantly contributed to catalysis. Computational dynamics indicated that interactions of fatty acid-derived hydroperoxides with the enzyme properly accommodated them inside the active site and modifies enzyme's dynamics. The computed reaction free energy profile obtained via QM/MM simulations is consistent with a greater reactivity in comparison with hydrogen peroxide. This study represents new insights on the understanding of the molecular basis that determines oxidizing substrate selectivity in the peroxiredoxin family, which has not been investigated at an atomic level so far.

  12. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  13. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  14. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S K; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  15. Molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of protein A-immunoglobulin G1 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex.

  16. Molecular Basis of β-Thalassemia Intermedia in Erbil Province of Iraqi Kurdistan.

    PubMed

    Shamoon, Rawand P; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Cappellini, Maria D; Di Pierro, Elena; Brancaleoni, Valentina; Granata, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) is a clinical term describing a range of clinical phenotypes that are intermediate in severity between the carrier state and β-thalassemia major (β-TM). To characterize the molecular basis of β-TI in Erbil Province, Northern Iraq, 83 unrelated patients were investigated. Detection of β-globin gene mutations was carried out by reverse hybridization assay and direct gene sequencing. All patients were screened for the XmnI polymorphism by direct sequencing of HBG2 ((G)γ promoter gene). Detection of α-globin gene deletions and triplication was carried out using the reverse hybridization assay. Four main molecular patterns were identified in association with the β-TI phenotype, namely: β(+)/β(+) (38.5%), β(+)/β(0) (21.6%), β(0)/β(0) (31.3%), and β(0)/wild type (8.4%). IVS-I-6 (T > C) was the most frequently encountered mutation (55 alleles, 34.6%), followed by IVS-II-1 (G > A) and codon 8 (-AA); furthermore, we report for the first time from Iraq two β(+) mutations, -87 (C > G) and 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) +22 (G > A). The XmnI polymorphism was detected in 47.0% of patients, mainly in association with the β(0)/β(0) genotype. The α-globin gene deletions were encountered in four cases, including one case with (- -(FIL)) double gene deletion, a report that is the first from our country. The α-globin gene triplication was detected in five of the seven heterozygous β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients. Similar to other Mediterranean countries, inheritance of mild β-globin mutations was the main molecular pattern underlying β-TI in our patients followed by the ameliorating effect of the XmnI polymorphism.

  17. Molecular basis of the core regulatory network in ABA responses: sensing, signaling and transport.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Taishi; Nakashima, Kazuo; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kuromori, Takashi; Tanokura, Masaru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2010-11-01

    ABA is a major phytohormone that regulates a broad range of plant traits and is especially important for adaptation to environmental conditions. Our understanding of the molecular basis of ABA responses in plants improved dramatically in 2009 and 2010, banner years for ABA research. There are three major components; PYR/PYL/ RCAR (an ABA receptor), type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C; a negative regulator) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2; a positive regulator), and they offer a double negative regulatory system, [PYR/PYL/RCAR-| PP2C-| SnRK2]. In the absence of ABA, PP2C inactivates SnRK2 by direct dephosphorylation. In response to environmental or developmental cues, ABA promotes the interaction of PYR/PYL/RCAR and PP2C, resulting in PP2C inhibition and SnRK2 activation. This signaling complex can work in both the nucleus and cytosol, as it has been shown that SnRK2 phosphorylates basic-domain leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors or membrane proteins. Several structural analyses of PYR/PYL/RCAR have provided the mechanistic basis for this 'core signaling' model, by elucidating the mechanism of ABA binding of receptors, or the 'gate-latch-lock' mechanism of interaction with PP2C in inhibiting activity. On the other hand, intercellular ABA transport had remained a major issue, as had intracellular ABA signaling. Recently, two plasma membrane-type ABC transporters were identified and shed light on the influx/efflux system of ABA, resolving how ABA is transported from cell to cell in plants. Our knowledge of ABA responses in plants has been greatly expanded from intracellular signaling to intercellular transport of ABA.

  18. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  19. Molecular basis for effects of carcinogenic heavy metals on inducible gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J W; Kaltreider, R C; Bajenova, O V; Ihnat, M A; McCaffrey, J; Turpie, B W; Rowell, E E; Oh, J; Nemeth, M J; Pesce, C A; Lariviere, J P

    1998-01-01

    Certain forms of the heavy metals arsenic and chromium are considered human carcinogens, although they are believed to act through very different mechanisms. Chromium(VI) is believed to act as a classic and mutagenic agent, and DNA/chromatin appears to be the principal target for its effects. In contrast, arsenic(III) is considered nongenotoxic, but is able to target specific cellular proteins, principally through sulfhydryl interactions. We had previously shown that various genotoxic chemical carcinogens, including chromium (VI), preferentially altered expression of several inducible genes but had little or no effect on constitutive gene expression. We were therefore interested in whether these carcinogenic heavy metals might target specific but distinct sites within cells, leading to alterations in gene expression that might contribute to the carcinogenic process. Arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) each significantly altered both basal and hormone-inducible expression of a model inducible gene, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), at nonovertly toxic doses in the chick embryo in vivo and rat hepatoma H411E cells in culture. We have recently developed two parallel cell culture approaches for examining the molecular basis for these effects. First, we are examining the effects of heavy metals on expression and activation of specific transcription factors known to be involved in regulation of susceptible inducible genes, and have recently observed significant but different effects of arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) on nuclear transcription factor binding. Second, we have developed cell lines with stably integrated PEPCK promoter-luciferase reporter gene constructs to examine effects of heavy metals on promoter function, and have also recently seen profound effects induced by both chromium(VI) and arsenic(III) in this system. These model systems should enable us to be able to identify the critical cis (DNA) and trans (protein) cellular targets of heavy metal exposure

  20. Molecular Basis of S100A1 Activation at Saturating and Subsaturating Calcium Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Caitlin E.; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The S100A1 protein mediates a wide variety of physiological processes through its binding of calcium (Ca2+) and endogenous target proteins. S100A1 presents two Ca2+-binding domains: a high-affinity “canonical” EF (cEF) hand and a low-affinity “pseudo” EF (pEF) hand. Accumulating evidence suggests that both Ca2+-binding sites must be saturated to stabilize an open state conducive to peptide recognition, yet the pEF hand’s low affinity limits Ca2+ binding at normal physiological concentrations. To understand the molecular basis of Ca2+ binding and open-state stabilization, we performed 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations of S100A1 in the apo/holo (Ca2+-free/bound) states and a half-saturated state, for which only the cEF sites are Ca2+-bound. Our simulations indicate that the pattern of oxygen coordination about Ca2+ in the cEF relative to the pEF site contributes to the former’s higher affinity, whereas Ca2+ binding strongly reshapes the protein’s conformational dynamics by disrupting β-sheet coupling between EF hands. Moreover, modeling of the half-saturated configuration suggests that the open state is unstable and reverts toward a closed state in the absence of the pEF Ca2+ ion. These findings indicate that Ca2+ binding at the cEF site alone is insufficient to stabilize opening; thus, posttranslational modification of the protein may be required for target peptide binding at subsaturating intracellular Ca2+ levels. PMID:26958883

  1. The molecular basis of defective lens development in the Iberian mole

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F David; Jiménez, Rafael; Collinson, J Martin

    2008-01-01

    Background Fossorial mammals face natural selection pressures that differ from those acting on surface dwelling animals, and these may lead to reduced visual system development. We have studied eye development in a species of true mole, the Iberian mole Talpa occidentalis, and present the molecular basis of abnormal lens development. This is the first embryological developmental study of the eyes of any fossorial mammal at the molecular level. Results Lens fibre differentiation is not completed in the Iberian mole. Although eye development starts normally (similar to other model species), defects are seen after closure of the lens vesicle. PAX6 is not down-regulated in developing lens fibre nuclei, as it is in other species, and there is ectopic expression of FOXE3, a putative downstream effector of PAX6, in some, but not all lens fibres. FOXE3-positive lens fibres continue to proliferate within the posterior compartment of the embryonic lens, but unlike in the mouse, no proliferation was detected anywhere in the postnatal mole lens. The undifferentiated status of the anterior epithelial cells was compromised, and most of them undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, β-crystallin and PROX1 expression patterns are abnormal and our data suggest that genes encoding β-crystallins are not directly regulated by PAX6, c-MAF and PROX1 in the Iberian mole, as they are in other model vertebrates. Conclusion In other model vertebrates, genetic pathways controlling lens development robustly compartmentalise the lens into a simple, undifferentiated, proliferative anterior epithelium, and quiescent, anuclear, terminally differentiated posterior lens fibres. These pathways are not as robust in the mole, and lead to loss of the anterior epithelial phenotype and only partial differentiation of the lens fibres, which continue to express 'epithelial' genes. Paradigms of genetic regulatory networks developed in other vertebrates appear not to hold true for the Iberian mole. PMID:18939978

  2. Molecular basis of substrate recognition and specificity revealed in family 12 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Felipe; Prates, Erica T; Gonçalves, Thiago A; Rubio, Marcelo V; Zubieta, Mariane P; Squina, Fabio M; Skaf, Munir S; Damásio, André R L

    2016-12-01

    Fungal GH12 enzymes are classified as xyloglucanases when they specifically target xyloglucans, or promiscuous endoglucanases when they exhibit catalytic activity against xyloglucan and β-glucan chains. Several structural and functional studies involving GH12 enzymes tried to explain the main patterns of xyloglucan activity, but what really determines xyloglucanase specificity remains elusive. Here, three fungal GH12 enzymes from Aspergillus clavatus (AclaXegA), A. zonatus (AspzoGH12), and A. terreus (AtEglD) were studied to unveil the molecular basis for substrate specificity. Using functional assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that three main regions are responsible for substrate selectivity: (i) the YSG group in loop 1; (ii) the SST group in loop 2; and (iii) loop A3-B3 and neighboring residues. Functional assays and sequence alignment showed that while AclaXegA is specific to xyloglucan, AtEglD cleaves β-glucan, and xyloglucan. However, AspzoGH12 was also shown to be promiscuous contrarily to a sequence alignment-based prediction. We find that residues Y111 and R93 in AtEglD harbor the substrate in an adequate orientation for hydrolysis in the catalytic cleft entrance and that residues Y19 in AclaXegA and Y30 in AspzoGH12 partially compensate the absence of the YSG segment, typically found in promiscuous enzymes. The results point out the multiple structural factors underlying the substrate specificity of GH12 enzymes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2577-2586. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Hall, Kathryn T; Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Fujita, Matthew K; Ruggiero, Robert P; Degner, Jack F; Daza, Juan M; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J; Castoe, Jill M; Fox, Samuel E; Poole, Alex W; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A; Hoffmann, Federico G; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N; Chang, Belinda S W; Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K; Mackessy, Stephen P; Bronikowski, Anne M; Bronikowsi, Anne M; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C; Secor, Stephen M; Pollock, David D

    2013-12-17

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome.

  4. The molecular and cellular basis of taste coding in the legs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ling, Frederick; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A; Kwon, Jae Young; Carlson, John R

    2014-05-21

    To understand the principles of taste coding, it is necessary to understand the functional organization of the taste organs. Although the labellum of the Drosophila melanogaster head has been described in detail, the tarsal segments of the legs, which collectively contain more taste sensilla than the labellum, have received much less attention. We performed a systematic anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the tarsal sensilla of Drosophila. We construct an anatomical map of all five tarsal segments of each female leg. The taste sensilla of the female foreleg are systematically tested with a panel of 40 diverse compounds, yielding a response matrix of ∼500 sensillum-tastant combinations. Six types of sensilla are characterized. One type was tuned remarkably broadly: it responded to 19 of 27 bitter compounds tested, as well as sugars; another type responded to neither. The midleg is similar but distinct from the foreleg. The response specificities of the tarsal sensilla differ from those of the labellum, as do n-dimensional taste spaces constructed for each organ, enhancing the capacity of the fly to encode and respond to gustatory information. We examined the expression patterns of all 68 gustatory receptors (Grs). A total of 28 Gr-GAL4 drivers are expressed in the legs. We constructed a receptor-to-sensillum map of the legs and a receptor-to-neuron map. Fourteen Gr-GAL4 drivers are expressed uniquely in the bitter-sensing neuron of the sensillum that is tuned exceptionally broadly. Integration of the molecular and physiological maps provides insight into the underlying basis of taste coding.

  5. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Hall, Kathryn T.; Card, Daren C.; Schield, Drew R.; Fujita, Matthew K.; Ruggiero, Robert P.; Degner, Jack F.; Daza, Juan M.; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J.; Castoe, Jill M.; Fox, Samuel E.; Poole, Alex W.; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W.; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N.; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Vonk, Freek J.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Richardson, Michael K.; Mackessy, Stephen P.; Bronikowski, Anne M.; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C.; Secor, Stephen M.; Pollock, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome. PMID:24297902

  6. The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Taste Coding in the Legs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Frederick; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A.; Kwon, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    To understand the principles of taste coding, it is necessary to understand the functional organization of the taste organs. Although the labellum of the Drosophila melanogaster head has been described in detail, the tarsal segments of the legs, which collectively contain more taste sensilla than the labellum, have received much less attention. We performed a systematic anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the tarsal sensilla of Drosophila. We construct an anatomical map of all five tarsal segments of each female leg. The taste sensilla of the female foreleg are systematically tested with a panel of 40 diverse compounds, yielding a response matrix of ∼500 sensillum–tastant combinations. Six types of sensilla are characterized. One type was tuned remarkably broadly: it responded to 19 of 27 bitter compounds tested, as well as sugars; another type responded to neither. The midleg is similar but distinct from the foreleg. The response specificities of the tarsal sensilla differ from those of the labellum, as do n-dimensional taste spaces constructed for each organ, enhancing the capacity of the fly to encode and respond to gustatory information. We examined the expression patterns of all 68 gustatory receptors (Grs). A total of 28 Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed in the legs. We constructed a receptor-to-sensillum map of the legs and a receptor-to-neuron map. Fourteen Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed uniquely in the bitter-sensing neuron of the sensillum that is tuned exceptionally broadly. Integration of the molecular and physiological maps provides insight into the underlying basis of taste coding. PMID:24849350

  7. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with “emotive” neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the “neutrix.” Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding (“flavoring”) cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  8. Molecular basis of reovirus virulence: Role of the S1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Howard L.; Drayna, Dennis; Averill, Damon R.; Fields, Bernard N.

    1977-01-01

    A genetic approach has been used to define the molecular basis for the different patterns of virulence and central nervous system cell tropism exhibited by reovirus types 1 and 3. Intracerebral inoculation of reovirus type 3 into newborn mice causes a necrotizing encephalitis (without ependymal damage) that is uniformly fatal. Animal inoculated with reovirus type 1 generally survive and may develop epedymal cell damage (without neuronal necrosis) and hydrocephalus. Using recombinant clones derived from crosses between reovirus types 1 and 3, we have been able to determine that the S1 genome segment is responsible for the differing cell tropism of reovirus serotypes and is the major determinant of neurovirulence. The type 1 S1 genome segment is responsible for ependymal damage with subsequent hydrocephalus; the type 3 S1 genome segment is responsible for neuronal necrosis and neurovirulence. We postulate that these differences are due to the specific interaction of the σ1 outer capsid polypeptide (the protein coded for by the S1 genome segment) with receptors on the surface of either ependymal cells or neuronal cells. Images PMID:271999

  9. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  10. Molecular Basis of Substrate Recognition and Degradation by Human Presequence Protease

    PubMed Central

    King, John V.; Liang, Wenguang G.; Scherpelz, Kathryn P.; Schilling, Alexander B.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human Presequence Protease (hPreP) is an M16 metalloprotease localized in mitochondria. There, hPreP facilitates proteostasis by utilizing a ∼13,300Å3 catalytic chamber to degrade a diverse array of potentially toxic peptides, including mitochondrial presequences and amyloid-β (Aβ), the latter of which contributes to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Here we report crystal structures for hPreP alone and in complex with Aβ, which show that hPreP uses size-exclusion and charge complementation for substrate recognition. These structures also reveal hPreP-specific features that permit a diverse array of peptides, with distinct distributions of charged and hydrophobic residues, to be specifically captured, cleaved, and their amyloidogenic features destroyed. SAXS analysis demonstrates that hPreP in solution exists in dynamic equilibrium between closed and open states, with the former being preferred. Furthermore, Aβ binding induces the closed state and hPreP dimerization. Together, these data reveal the molecular basis for flexible yet specific substrate recognition and degradation by hPreP. PMID:24931469

  11. Molecular basis for the inhibition of Drosophila eye development by Antennapedia

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, Serge; Prince, Frédéric; Jaeger, Johannes; Kloter, Urs; Flister, Susanne; Benassayag, Corinne; Cribbs, David; Gehring, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Hox genes encoding homeodomain transcriptional regulators are known to specify the body plan of multicellular organisms and are able to induce body plan transformations when misexpressed. These findings led to the hypothesis that duplication events and misexpression of Hox genes during evolution have been necessary for generating the observed morphological diversity found in metazoans. It is known that overexpressing Antennapedia (Antp) in the head induces antenna-to-leg as well as head-to-thorax transformation and eye reduction. At present, little is known about the exact molecular mechanism causing these phenotypes. The aim of this study is to understand the basis of inhibition of eye development. We demonstrate that Antp represses the activity of the eye regulatory cascade. By ectopic expression, we show that Antp antagonizes the activity of the eye selector gene eyeless. Using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that this inhibitory mechanism involves direct protein–protein interactions between the DNA-binding domains of EY and ANTP, resulting in mutual inhibition. PMID:11179224

  12. Molecular basis for the inhibition of Drosophila eye development by Antennapedia.

    PubMed

    Plaza, S; Prince, F; Jaeger, J; Kloter, U; Flister, S; Benassayag, C; Cribbs, D; Gehring, W J

    2001-02-15

    Hox genes encoding homeodomain transcriptional regulators are known to specify the body plan of multicellular organisms and are able to induce body plan transformations when misexpressed. These findings led to the hypothesis that duplication events and misexpression of Hox genes during evolution have been necessary for generating the observed morphological diversity found in metazoans. It is known that overexpressing Antennapedia (Antp) in the head induces antenna-to-leg as well as head-to-thorax transformation and eye reduction. At present, little is known about the exact molecular mechanism causing these phenotypes. The aim of this study is to understand the basis of inhibition of eye development. We demonstrate that Antp represses the activity of the eye regulatory cascade. By ectopic expression, we show that Antp antagonizes the activity of the eye selector gene eyeless. Using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that this inhibitory mechanism involves direct protein-protein interactions between the DNA-binding domains of EY and ANTP, resulting in mutual inhibition.

  13. Deciphering the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, Vanessa; Assaf-Casals, Iman; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Fan, Xiaorong; Avila, Concepción; Miller, Anthony; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    Ammonium is the predominant form of inorganic nitrogen in the soil of coniferous forests. Despite the ecological and economic importance of conifers, the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in this group of gymnosperms is largely unknown. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of members of the AMT gene family in Pinus pinaster: PpAMT1.1, PpAMT1.2 and PpAMT1.3 (subfamily 1) and PpAMT2.1 and PpAMT2.3 (subfamily 2). Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that in conifers, all members of the AMT1 subfamily evolved from a common ancestor that is evolutionarily related to the ancient PpAMT1.2 gene. Individual AMT genes are developmentally and nutritionally regulated, and their transcripts are specifically distributed in different organs. PpAMT1.3 was predominantly expressed in the roots, particularly during N starvation and mycorrhizal interaction, whereas PpAMT2.3 was preferentially expressed in lateral roots. Immunolocalization studies of roots with varied nitrogen availability revealed that PpAMT1 and PpAMT2 proteins play complementary roles in the uptake of external ammonium. Heterologous expression in yeast and Xenopus oocytes revealed that the AMT genes encode functional transporters with different kinetics and with different capacities for ammonium transport. Our results provide new insights on how nitrogen is acquired and transported in conifers.

  14. Molecular basis of the functional distinction between Cln1 and Cln2 cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Quilis, Inma; Igual, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cln1 and Cln2 are very similar but not identical cyclins. In this work, we tried to describe the molecular basis of the functional distinction between Cln1 and Cln2. We constructed chimeric cyclins containing different fragments of Cln1 and Cln2 and performed several functional analysis that make it possible to distinguish between Cln1 or Cln2. We identified that region between amino acids 225 and 299 of Cln2 is not only necessary but also sufficient to confer Cln2 specific functionality compared with Cln1. We also studied Cln1 and Cln2 subcellular localization identifying additional differences between them. Both cyclins are distributed between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but Cln1 shows stronger nuclear accumulation. Nuclear import of both cyclins is mediated by the classical nuclear import pathway and by sequences in the N-terminal end of the proteins. For Cln2, but not for Cln1, a nuclear export mechanism mediated by karyopherin Msn5 has been identified. Strikingly, Cln2 export depends on a Msn5-dependent NES between amino acids 225 and 299. In fact, the introduction of this region confers to Cln1 an export mechanism dependent on Msn5; importantly, this causes the gain of Cln2-specific cytosolic functions and the impairment of nuclear function. In short, a region from Cln2 controlling an Msn5-dependent nuclear export mechanism confers a specific functionality to Cln2 compared with Cln1. PMID:22889732

  15. Assessing the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance during dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol from biomass is considered a promising alternative to reliance on diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, providing a sustainable option for fuels production in an environmentally compatible manner. The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels through a biological route usually suffers from the intrinsic recalcitrance of biomass owing to the complicated structure of plant cell walls. Currently, a pretreatment step that can effectively reduce biomass recalcitrance is generally required to make the polysaccharide fractions locked in the intricacy of plant cell walls to become more accessible and amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments are attractive and among the most promising pretreatment technologies that enhance sugar release performance. This review highlights our recent understanding on molecular structure basis for recalcitrance, with emphasis on structural transformation of major biomass biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) related to the reduction of recalcitrance during dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatments. The effects of these two pretreatments on biomass porosity as well as its contribution on reduced recalcitrance are also discussed. PMID:23356640

  16. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  17. Molecular basis for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

      Methotrexate (MTX) is a derivative of folic acid (folate) and commonly used as an anchor drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of MTX entirely depends on the function of specific transporters that belong to the two major superfamilies, solute carrier transporters and ATP-binding cassette transporters. Several transporters have been identified as being able to mediate the transport of MTX, and suggested to be involved in the disposition in the body and in the regulation of intracellular metabolism in target cells, together with several enzymes involved in folate metabolism. Thus, drug-drug interactions through the transporters and their genetic polymorphisms may alter the PK and PD of MTX, resulting in an interpatient variability of efficacy. This review summarizes the PK and PD of MTX, particularly in relation to RA therapy and focuses on the roles of transporters involved in PK and PD with the aim of facilitating an understanding of the molecular basis of the mechanism of MTX action to achieve its effective use in RA therapy.

  18. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  19. Cellular and molecular basis of von Willebrand disease: studies on blood outgrowth endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Starke, Richard D; Paschalaki, Koralia E; Dyer, Clare E F; Harrison-Lavoie, Kimberly J; Cutler, Jacqueline A; McKinnon, Thomas A J; Millar, Carolyn M; Cutler, Daniel F; Laffan, Mike A; Randi, Anna M

    2013-04-04

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a heterogeneous bleeding disorder caused by decrease or dysfunction of von Willebrand factor (VWF). A wide range of mutations in the VWF gene have been characterized; however, their cellular consequences are still poorly understood. Here we have used a recently developed approach to study the molecular and cellular basis of VWD. We isolated blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) from peripheral blood of 4 type 1 VWD and 4 type 2 VWD patients and 9 healthy controls. We confirmed the endothelial lineage of BOECs, then measured VWF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels (before and after stimulation) and VWF multimers. Decreased mRNA levels were predictive of plasma VWF levels in type 1 VWD, confirming a defect in VWF synthesis. However, BOECs from this group of patients also showed defects in processing, storage, and/or secretion of VWF. Levels of VWF mRNA and protein were normal in BOECs from 3 type 2 VWD patients, supporting the dysfunctional VWF model. However, 1 type 2M patient showed decreased VWF synthesis and storage, indicating a complex cellular defect. These results demonstrate for the first time that isolation of endothelial cells from VWD patients provides novel insight into cellular mechanisms of the disease.

  20. The molecular basis for ANE syndrome revealed by the large ribosomal subunit processome interactome

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Kathleen L; Teramoto, Takamasa; Zhang, Jun; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Baserga, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    ANE syndrome is a ribosomopathy caused by a mutation in an RNA recognition motif of RBM28, a nucleolar protein conserved to yeast (Nop4). While patients with ANE syndrome have fewer mature ribosomes, it is unclear how this mutation disrupts ribosome assembly. Here we use yeast as a model system and show that the mutation confers growth and pre-rRNA processing defects. Recently, we found that Nop4 is a hub protein in the nucleolar large subunit (LSU) processome interactome. Here we demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation disrupts Nop4’s hub function by abrogating several of Nop4’s protein-protein interactions. Circular dichroism and NMR demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation in RRM3 of human RBM28 disrupts domain folding. We conclude that the ANE syndrome mutation generates defective protein folding which abrogates protein-protein interactions and causes faulty pre-LSU rRNA processing, thus revealing one aspect of the molecular basis of this human disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16381.001 PMID:27077951

  1. Molecular Basis for the Unique Deubiquitinating Activity of the NF-κB Inhibitor A20

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Chung, J; Lamothe, B; Rajashankar, K; Lu, M; Lo, Y; Lam, A; Darnay, B; Wu, H

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) activation in tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and Toll-like receptor pathways requires Lys63-linked nondegradative polyubiquitination. A20 is a specific feedback inhibitor of NF-?B activation in these pathways that possesses dual ubiquitin-editing functions. While the N-terminal domain of A20 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) for Lys63-linked polyubiquitinated signaling mediators such as TRAF6 and RIP, its C-terminal domain is a ubiquitin ligase (E3) for Lys48-linked degradative polyubiquitination of the same substrates. To elucidate the molecular basis for the DUB activity of A20, we determined its crystal structure and performed a series of biochemical and cell biological studies. The structure reveals the potential catalytic mechanism of A20, which may be significantly different from papain-like cysteine proteases. Ubiquitin can be docked onto a conserved A20 surface; this interaction exhibits charge complementarity and no steric clash. Surprisingly, A20 does not have specificity for Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Instead, it effectively removes Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains from TRAF6 without dissembling the chains themselves. Our studies suggest that A20 does not act as a general DUB but has the specificity for particular polyubiquitinated substrates to assure its fidelity in regulating NF-?B activation in the tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and Toll-like receptor pathways.

  2. A Dynamic molecular basis for malfunction in disease mutants of p97/VCP

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Anne K; Kay, Lewis E

    2016-01-01

    p97/VCP is an essential, abundant AAA+ ATPase that is conserved throughout eukaryotes, with central functions in diverse processes ranging from protein degradation to DNA damage repair and membrane fusion. p97 has been implicated in the etiology of degenerative diseases and in cancer. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy we reveal how disease-causing mutations in p97 deregulate dynamics of the N-terminal domain that binds adaptor proteins involved in controlling p97 function. Our results provide a molecular basis for understanding how malfunction occurs whereby mutations shift the ADP-bound form of the enzyme towards an ATP-like state in a manner that correlates with disease severity. This deregulation interferes with the two-pronged binding of an adaptor that affects p97 function in lysosomal degradation of substrates. Subtle structural changes propagate from mutation sites to regions distal in space, defining allosteric networks that facilitate inter-domain communication, with potential implications for modulation of enzyme activity by drug molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20143.001 PMID:27828775

  3. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  4. Molecular basis of floral petaloidy: insights from androecia of Canna indica

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qian; Liu, Huanfang; Almeida, Ana M. R.; Kuang, Yanfeng; Zou, Pu; Liao, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Floral organs that take on the characteristics of petals can occur in all whorls of the monocot order Zingiberales. In Canna indica, the most ornamental or ‘petaloid’ parts of the flowers are of androecial origin and are considered staminodes. However, the precise nature of these petaloid organs is yet to be determined. In order to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of androecial identity, a molecular investigation of B- and C-class genes was carried out. Two MADS-box genes GLOBOSA (GLO) and AGAMOUS (AG) were isolated from young inflorescences of C. indica by 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (3′-RACE PCR). Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analyses show that CiGLO and CiAG belong to the B- and C-class MADS-box gene family, respectively. CiAG is expressed in petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. CiGLO is expressed in petals, petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. Expression patterns in mature tissues of CiGLO and CiAG suggest that petaloid staminodes and the labellum are of androecial identity, in agreement with their position within the flower and with described Arabidopsis thaliana expression patterns. Although B- and C-class genes are important components of androecial determination, their expression patterns are not sufficient to explain the distinct morphology observed in staminodes and the fertile stamen in C. indica. PMID:24876297

  5. Molecular Basis of Cardioprotective Effect of Antioxidant Vitamins in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Feliú, Felipe; Hasson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Major advances in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and myocardial infarction, using cardiologic interventions, such as thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PCA) have improved the clinical outcome of patients. Nevertheless, as a consequence of these procedures, the ischemic zone is reperfused, giving rise to a lethal reperfusion event accompanied by increased production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress). These reactive species attack biomolecules such as lipids, DNA, and proteins enhancing the previously established tissue damage, as well as triggering cell death pathways. Studies on animal models of AMI suggest that lethal reperfusion accounts for up to 50% of the final size of a myocardial infarct, a part of the damage likely to be prevented. Although a number of strategies have been aimed at to ameliorate lethal reperfusion injury, up to date the beneficial effects in clinical settings have been disappointing. The use of antioxidant vitamins could be a suitable strategy with this purpose. In this review, we propose a systematic approach to the molecular basis of the cardioprotective effect of antioxidant vitamins in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury that could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity against this oxidative tissue damage. PMID:23936799

  6. Molecular basis of differences among statins and a comparison with antioxidant vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston

    2006-12-04

    Although all statin drugs lower levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, molecular differences among statins affect their metabolism, solubility, and intramembrane localization, which in turn is likely to influence their efficacy and safety. In addition, these properties may have a differential impact on the pleiotropic effects of statins, including their ability to improve endothelial function and to affect proliferation and apoptosis in vascular tissues. Many pleiotropic effects of statins appear to be due to inhibition of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins and/or restoration of nitric oxide bioavailability, and atorvastatin metabolites may also directly protect vascular tissues from oxidative damage. The possibility of cardiovascular benefits from antioxidant effects of atorvastatin metabolites contrasts with the lack of benefits seen in most studies of antioxidant vitamins. This article reviews some of the differences in pleiotropic effects of statins and assesses the contribution of their solubility and membrane localization as the possible basis for these differences. In addition, the possibility that statin benefits on stroke reflect pleiotropic effects is reviewed. Finally, possible reasons for differences between the effects of atorvastatin metabolites and antioxidant vitamins are considered.

  7. The molecular basis of β-lactamase production in Gram-negative bacteria from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Yezli, Saber; Shibl, Atef M; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-02-01

    Resistance to β-lactams among Gram-negative bacteria is a worldwide issue. Increased prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers and the dissemination of carbapenem-resistance genes are particularly concerning. ESBL-producing strains are common in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, particularly among the Enterobacteriaceae, and carbapenem resistance is on the increase, especially among the non-fermenters. β-lactamase production is a major mechanism of resistance to these agents and although β-lactamase-producing strains have been documented in the Kingdom, relatively few reports characterized the molecular basis of this production. Nevertheless, available data suggest that CTX-M (CTX-M-15 in particular) is the predominant ESBL in the Enterobacteriaceae, with SHV also being prevalent in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Carbapenem resistance in the latter is mainly due to OXA-48 and NDM-1. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, VEB-like enzymes are the most common ESBLs, and VIM is the prevalent metallo-β-lactamase. OXA-10 extended-spectrum enzymes are also frequent. PER and GES ESBLs have been reported in Acinetobacter baumannii, and oxacillinases (OXA-23 in particular) are the dominant carbapanamases in this species.

  8. A Hybrid approach to molecular continuum processes combiningGaussian basis functions and the discrete variable representation

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, Thomas N.; Horner, Daniel A.; Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy,C. William

    2005-08-29

    Gaussian basis functions, routinely employed in molecular electronic structure calculations, can be combined with numerical grid-based functions in a discrete variable representation to provide an efficient method for computing molecular continuum wave functions. This approach, combined with exterior complex scaling, obviates the need for slowly convergent single-center expansions, and allows one to study a variety of electron-molecule collision problems. The method is illustrated by computation of various bound and continuum properties of H2+.

  9. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  10. The molecular basis of oligomeric organization of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Liste, María José Varela; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors, including the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, can form homo-oligomers. However, the basis of these interactions and the overall organizational structure of such oligomers are poorly understood. Combinations of site-directed mutagenesis and homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies that assessed interactions between receptor protomers at the surface of transfected cells indicated important contributions of regions of transmembrane domains I, IV, V, VI, and VII as well as intracellular helix VIII to the overall organization. Molecular modeling studies based on both these results and an X-ray structure of the inactive state of the M3 receptor bound by the antagonist/inverse agonist tiotropium were then employed. The results could be accommodated fully by models in which a proportion of the cell surface M3 receptor population is a tetramer with rhombic, but not linear, orientation. This is consistent with previous studies based on spectrally resolved, multiphoton fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Modeling studies furthermore suggest an important role for molecules of cholesterol at the dimer + dimer interface of the tetramer, which is consistent with the presence of cholesterol at key locations in many G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures. Mutants that displayed disrupted quaternary organization were often poorly expressed and showed immature N-glycosylation. Sustained treatment of cells expressing such mutants with the muscarinic receptor inverse agonist atropine increased cellular levels and restored both cell surface delivery and quaternary organization to many of the mutants. These observations suggest that organization as a tetramer may occur before plasma membrane delivery and may be a key step in cellular quality control assessment.

  11. New insights concerning the molecular basis for defective glucoregulation in soluble adenylyl cyclase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Holz, George G; Leech, Colin A; Chepurny, Oleg G

    2014-12-01

    Recently published findings indicate that a knockout (KO) of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, also known as AC-10) gene expression in mice leads to defective glucoregulation that is characterized by reduced pancreatic insulin secretion and reduced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. Summarized here are current concepts regarding the molecular basis for this phenotype, with special emphasis on the potential role of sAC as a determinant of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Highlighted is new evidence that in pancreatic beta cells, oxidative glucose metabolism stimulates mitochondrial CO₂production that in turn generates bicarbonate ion (HCO(3)(-)). Since HCO(3)(-) binds to and directly stimulates the activity of sAC, we propose that glucose-stimulated cAMP production in beta cells is mediated not simply by transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (TMACs), but also by sAC. Based on evidence that sAC is expressed in mitochondria, there exists the possibility that beta-cell glucose metabolism is linked to mitochondrial cAMP production with consequent facilitation of oxidative phosphorylation. Since sAC is also expressed in the cytoplasm, sAC catalyzed cAMP production may activate cAMP sensors such as PKA and Epac2 to control ion channel function, intracellular Ca²⁺ handling, and Ca²⁺-dependent exocytosis. Thus, we propose that the existence of sAC in beta cells provides a new and unexpected explanation for previously reported actions of glucose metabolism to stimulate cAMP production. It seems possible that alterations of sAC activity might be of importance when evaluating new strategies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), or when evaluating why glucose metabolism fails to stimulate insulin secretion in patients diagnosed with T2DM. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease.

  12. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  13. Molecular basis of nonclassical steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency detected by neonatal mass screening in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tajima, T; Fujieda, K; Nakae, J; Toyoura, T; Shimozawa, K; Kusuda, S; Goji, K; Nagashima, T; Cutler, G B

    1997-07-01

    Since 1989, neonatal mass screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) has been performed in Japan, and the frequency of the classical form of 21-hydroxylase deficiency was found to be nearly identical to that in other countries. However, it has not yet been determined whether our mass screening program can detect the nonclassical (NC) form. From 1991 to 1994, about 4,500,000 infants underwent CAH mass screening in Japan. During this period, we identified by screening 2 siblings and 2 unrelated patients who had mild elevation of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels at 5 days of age, but who revealed no symptoms of CAH. They were diagnosed as having probable NC steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. To clarify the molecular basis of NC CAH detectable by neonatal screening in Japan, the steroid 21-hydroxylase (CYP21) genes from these cases were analyzed. The 2 siblings (patients 1 and 2) had I172N and R356W mutations in 1 allele and in the other allele had local gene conversion, including the P30L mutation in exon 1. Patient 3, who was unrelated, had gene conversion encoding the same P30L mutation in 1 allele and in the other allele had an intron 2 mutation (668-12 A-->G), causing aberrant ribonucleic acid splicing, and the R356W mutation. Patient 4, also a compound heterozygote, had the R356W and 707del8 mutations. The estimated rate of detection of the NC form by mass screening (1:1,100,000) seemed low compare to the established detection rate for the classical form (1:18,000). As all of our 4 patients were compound heterozygotes with at least 1 allele bearing 1 or more mutations associated with classic CAH, it may be difficult to detect NC cases carrying only NC-associated alleles using our current neonatal mass screening methods.

  14. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  15. Molecular basis of hERG potassium channel blockade by the class Ic antiarrhythmic flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    The class Ic antiarrhythmic drug flecainide inhibits KCNH2-encoded “hERG” potassium channels at clinically relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of this action. Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37 °C. Wild-type (WT) IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.49 μM and this was not significantly altered by reversing the direction of K+ flux or raising external [K+]. The use of charged and uncharged flecainide analogues showed that the charged form of the drug accesses the channel from the cell interior to produce block. Promotion of WT IhERG inactivation slowed recovery from inhibition, whilst the N588K and S631A attenuated-inactivation mutants exhibited IC50 values 4–5 fold that of WT IhERG. The use of pore-helix/selectivity filter (T623A, S624A V625A) and S6 helix (G648A, Y652A, F656A) mutations showed < 10-fold shifts in IC50 for all but V625A and F656A, which respectively exhibited IC50s 27-fold and 142-fold their WT controls. Docking simulations using a MthK-based homology model suggested an allosteric effect of V625A, since in low energy conformations flecainide lay too low in the pore to interact directly with that residue. On the other hand, the molecule could readily form π–π stacking interactions with aromatic residues and particularly with F656. We conclude that flecainide accesses the hERG channel from the cell interior on channel gating, binding low in the inner cavity, with the S6 F656 residue acting as a principal binding determinant. PMID:26159617

  16. Molecular basis of a shattering resistance boosting global dissemination of soybean

    PubMed Central

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Masaya; Hirose, Aya; Inaba, Hiroki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Katayama, Takeshi; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2014-01-01

    Pod dehiscence (shattering) is essential for the propagation of wild plant species bearing seeds in pods but is a major cause of yield loss in legume and crucifer crops. Although natural genetic variation in pod dehiscence has been, and will be, useful for plant breeding, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of shattering resistance in crops. Therefore, we performed map-based cloning to unveil a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling pod dehiscence in soybean. Fine mapping and complementation testing revealed that the QTL encodes a dirigent-like protein, designated as Pdh1. The gene for the shattering-resistant genotype, pdh1, was defective, having a premature stop codon. The functional gene, Pdh1, was highly expressed in the lignin-rich inner sclerenchyma of pod walls, especially at the stage of initiation in lignin deposition. Comparisons of near-isogenic lines indicated that Pdh1 promotes pod dehiscence by increasing the torsion of dried pod walls, which serves as a driving force for pod dehiscence under low humidity. A survey of soybean germplasm revealed that pdh1 was frequently detected in landraces from semiarid regions and has been extensively used for breeding in North America, the world’s leading soybean producer. These findings point to a new mechanism for pod dehiscence involving the dirigent protein family and suggest that pdh1 has played a crucial role in the global expansion of soybean cultivation. Furthermore, the orthologs of pdh1, or genes with the same role, will possibly be useful for crop improvement. PMID:25468966

  17. Molecular basis of organ-specific selection of viral variants during chronic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Hahn, C S; Somasundaram, T; Villarete, L; Matloubian, M; Strauss, J H

    1991-01-01

    Viral variants of different phenotypes are present in the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of carrier mice infected at birth with the Armstrong strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The CNS isolates are similar to the parental virus and cause acute infections in adult mice, whereas the lymphoid isolates cause chronic infections associated with suppressed T-cell responses. In this study, we provide a molecular basis for this organ-specific selection and identify a single amino acid change in the viral glycoprotein that correlates with the tissue specific selection and the persistent and immunosuppressive phenotype of the variants. This phenylalanine (F)-to-leucine (L) change at position 260 of the viral glycoprotein was seen in the vast majority (43 of 47) of the lymphoid isolates, and variants with L at this residue were selected in spleens of persistently infected mice. In striking contrast, isolates with the parental sequence (F at residue 260) predominated (48 of 59 isolates) in the CNS of the same carrier mice. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of the major structural genes of several independently derived (from different mice) spleen isolates showed that these variants were greater than 99.8% identical to the parental virus. In fact, the only common change among these spleen isolates was the F----L mutation at residue 260 of the glycoprotein. These results show that an RNA virus can exhibit minimal genetic drift during chronic infection in its natural host, and yet a single or few mutations can result in the organ-specific selection of variants that are markedly different from the parental virus. Images PMID:2072451

  18. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Hobbs, Kevin H; Thuma, Jeffrey B

    2008-10-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vertebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca(++) binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved.

  19. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  20. Molecular models of the Mojave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) venom metalloproteinases reveal a structural basis for differences in hemorrhagic activities.

    PubMed

    Dagda, Ruben K; Gasanov, Sardar E; Zhang, Boris; Welch, William; Rael, Eppie D

    2014-03-01

    Rattlesnake venom can differ in composition and in metalloproteinase-associated activities. The molecular basis for this intra-species variation in Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mojave rattlesnake) remains an enigma. To understand the molecular basis for intra-species variation of metalloproteinase-associated activities, we modeled the three-dimensional structures of four metalloproteinases based on the amino acid sequence of four variations of the proteinase domain of the C. s. scutulatus metalloproteinase gene (GP1, GP2, GP3, and GP4). For comparative purposes, we modeled the atrolysin metalloproteinases of C. atrox as well. All molecular models shared the same topology. While the atrolysin metalloproteinase molecular models contained highly conserved substrate binding sites, the Mojave rattlesnake metalloproteinases showed higher structural divergence when superimposed onto each other. The highest structural divergence among the four C. s. scutulatus molecular models was located at the northern cleft wall and the S'1-pocket of the substrate binding site, molecular regions that modulate substrate selectivity. Molecular dynamics and field potential maps for each C. s. scutulatus metalloproteinase model demonstrated that the non-hemorrhagic metalloproteinases (GP2 and GP3) contain highly basic molecular and field potential surfaces while the hemorrhagic metalloproteinases GP1 and atrolysin C showed extensive acidic field potential maps and shallow but less dynamic active site pockets. Hence, differences in the spatial arrangement of the northern cleft wall, the S'1-pocket, and the physico-chemical environment surrounding the catalytic site contribute to differences in metalloproteinase activities in the Mojave rattlesnake. Our results provide a structural basis for variation of metalloproteinase-associated activities in the rattlesnake venom of the Mojave rattlesnake.

  1. 'From past to future' - deciphering the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease through the pages of the Journal of Neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cappai, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The Journal of Neurochemistry has made significant contributions to unraveling the molecular basis for Alzheimer's disease during its 60-year history. To mark its 60th anniversary, this review describes the association between the journal and Alzheimer's disease research - from the early years when Alzheimer's disease was a minor topic in the journal through to the molecular era in the mid-1980s. This coincided with a number of the highly cited Alzheimer's disease studies which described fundamental aspects of the neurochemistry of Alzheimer's disease and encompassed the themes of oxidative stress and post-translational modifications, cholinergic system, tau, purification of Aβ, defining the Aβ toxic species, mechanism of amyloid precursor protein processing, and the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. The Journal of Neurochemistry has made significant contributions toward unraveling the molecular, cellular and pathological basis of Alzheimer's disease through its 60 years. This article is part of the 60th Anniversary special issue.

  2. Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: An Integration to Teach Drug Structure-Activity Relationship and the Molecular Basis of Drug Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Ivone; Borges, Aurea D. L.; Bernardes, Lilian S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry and the protein data bank (PDB) to understand and predict the chemical and molecular basis involved in the drug-receptor interactions is discussed. A geometrical and chemical overview of the great structural similarity in the substrate and inhibitor is provided.

  3. Tyrosinase and ocular diseases: some novel thoughts on the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism type 1.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kunal; Chaki, Moumita; Sengupta, Mainak

    2007-07-01

    Tyrosinase (TYR) is a multifunctional copper-containing glycoenzyme (approximately 80 kDa), which plays a key role in the rate-limiting steps of the melanin biosynthetic pathway. This membrane-bound protein, possibly evolved by the fusion of two different copper-binding proteins, is mainly expressed in epidermal, ocular and follicular melanocytes. In the melanocytes, TYR functions as an integrated unit with other TYR-related proteins (TYRP1, TYRP2), lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) and melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptors; thus forming a melanogenic complex. Mutations in the TYR gene (TYR, 11q14-21, MIM 606933) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1, MIM 203100), a developmental disorder having an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. In addition, TYR can act as a modifier locus for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) and it also contributes significantly in the eye developmental process. Expression of TYR during neuroblast division helps in later pathfinding by retinal ganglion cells from retina to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. However, mutation screening of TYR is complicated by the presence of a pseudogene-TYR like segment (TYRL, 11p11.2, MIM 191270), sharing approximately 98% sequence identity with the 3' region of TYR. Thus, in absence of a full-proof strategy, any nucleotide variants identified in the 3' region of TYR could actually be present in TYRL. Interestingly, despite extensive search, the second TYR mutation in 15% of the OCA1 cases remains unidentified. Several possible locations of these "uncharacterized mutations" (UCMs) have been speculated so far. Based on the structure of TYR gene, its sequence context and some experimental evidences, we propose two additional possibilities, which on further investigations might shed light on the molecular basis of UCMs in TYR of OCA1 patients; (i) partial deletion of the exons 4 and 5 region of TYR that is homologous with TYRL and (ii) variations in the polymorphic GA complex

  4. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Rowan M.; Caplan, David; Fadda, Elisa; Pomès, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  5. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    expression of Flo11-dependent phenotypes, including flocculation. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of this strain-specific phenotypic variability. Our data indicate that strain-specific differences in the level of flocculation result from significant sequence differences in the FLO11 alleles and do not depend on quantitative differences in FLO11 expression or on surface hydrophobicity. We further have shown that beads coated with amino-terminal domain peptide bind preferentially to homologous cells. These data show that variability in the structure of the Flo11 adhesion domain may thus be an important determinant of membership in microbial communities and hence may drive selection and evolution. PMID:27547826

  6. General contraction of Gaussian basis sets. II - Atomic natural orbitals and the calculation of atomic and molecular properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almlof, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A recently proposed scheme for using natural orbitals from atomic configuration interaction wave functions as a basis set for linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) calculations is extended for the calculation of molecular properties. For one-electron properties like multipole moments, which are determined largely by the outermost regions of the molecular wave function, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the basis in these regions. This is most easily done by uncontracting the outermost Gaussian primitives, and/or by adding diffuse primitives. A similar approach can be employed for the calculation of polarizabilities. Properties which are not dominated by the long-range part of the wave function, such as spectroscopic constants or electric field gradients at the nucleus, can generally be treated satisfactorily with the original atomic natural orbital sets.

  7. General contraction of Gaussian basis sets. Part 2: Atomic natural orbitals and the calculation of atomic and molecular properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    A recently proposed scheme for using natural orbitals from atomic configuration interaction (CI) wave functions as a basis set for linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) calculations is extended for the calculation of molecular properties. For one-electron properties like multipole moments, which are determined largely by the outermost regions of the molecular wave function, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the basis in these regions. This is most easily done by uncontracting the outmost Gaussian primitives, and/or by adding diffuse primitives. A similar approach can be employed for the calculation of polarizabilities. Properties which are not dominated by the long-range part of the wave function, such as spectroscopic constants or electric field gradients at the nucleus, can generally be treated satisfactorily with the original atomic natural orbital (ANO) sets.

  8. Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atomic and molecular calculations obtained from the generator coordinate method with polynomial discretization.

    PubMed

    Celeste, Ricardo; Maringolo, Milena P; Comar, Moacyr; Viana, Rommel B; Guimarães, Amanda R; Haiduke, Roberto L A; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2015-10-01

    Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atoms from H to Ba were obtained by means of the generator coordinate Hartree-Fock (GCHF) method based on a polynomial expansion to discretize the Griffin-Wheeler-Hartree-Fock equations (GWHF). The discretization of the GWHF equations in this procedure is based on a mesh of points not equally distributed in contrast with the original GCHF method. The results of atomic Hartree-Fock energies demonstrate the capability of these polynomial expansions in designing compact and accurate basis sets to be used in molecular calculations and the maximum error found when compared to numerical values is only 0.788 mHartree for indium. Some test calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for N2, F2, CO, NO, HF, and HCN show that total energies within 1.0 to 2.4 mHartree compared to the cc-pV5Z basis sets are attained with our contracted bases with a much smaller number of polarization functions (2p1d and 2d1f for hydrogen and heavier atoms, respectively). Other molecular calculations performed here are also in very good accordance with experimental and cc-pV5Z results. The most important point to be mentioned here is that our generator coordinate basis sets required only a tiny fraction of the computational time when compared to B3LYP/cc-pV5Z calculations.

  9. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; de Jong, Govardus A. H.; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L.; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  10. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  11. (Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Studies on the molecular mechanisms by which Escherichia Coli and Micrococcus luteus repair pyrimidine dimers induced in their DNA by ultraviolet light are reported. The studies involve the isolation and enzymatic activity of the ucr system. The specific roles of ucr A and ucr B proteins are sought. In addition the expression of the ucr genes in mammalian cells is addressed. 35 refs. (DT)

  12. 27ps DFT Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a-maltose: A Reduced Basis Set Study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DFT molecular dynamics simulations are time intensive when carried out on carbohydrates such as alpha-maltose, requiring up to three or more weeks on a fast 16-processor computer to obtain just 5ps of constant energy dynamics. In a recent publication [1] forces for dynamics were generated from B3LY...

  13. Molecular basis for the broad substrate selectivity of a peptide prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Pierce, Elizabeth; Roe, Daniel; Morita, Maho; McIntosh, John A; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cheatham, Thomas E; Schmidt, Eric W; Nair, Satish K

    2016-12-06

    The cyanobactin prenyltransferases catalyze a series of known or unprecedented reactions on millions of different substrates, with no easily observable recognition motif and exquisite regioselectivity. Here we define the basis of broad substrate tolerance for the otherwise uncharacterized TruF family. We determined the structures of the Tyr-prenylating enzyme PagF, in complex with an isoprenoid donor analog and a panel of linear and macrocyclic peptide substrates. Unexpectedly, the structures reveal a truncated barrel fold, wherein binding of large peptide substrates is necessary to complete a solvent-exposed hydrophobic pocket to form the catalytically competent active site. Kinetic, mutational, chemical, and computational analyses revealed the structural basis of selectivity, showing a small motif within peptide substrates that is sufficient for recognition by the enzyme. Attaching this 2-residue motif to two random peptides results in their isoprenylation by PagF, demonstrating utility as a general biocatalytic platform for modifications on any peptide substrate.

  14. Chemometric Analysis of Some Biologically Active Groups of Drugs on the Basis Chromatographic and Molecular Modeling Data.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Baczek, Tomasz; Bucinski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different groups of drugs such as 12 analgesic drugs, 11 cardiovascular system drugs and 36 "other" compounds, respectively, were analyzed with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) methods. All chemometric analysis were based on the chromatographic parameters (logk and logk(w)) determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and also by molecular modeling descriptors calculated using various computer programs (HyperChem, Dragon, and the VCCLAB). The clustering of compounds were obtained by CA (using various algorithm as e.g. Ward method or unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages as well as Euclidean or Manhattan distance), and allowed to build dendrograms linked drugs with similar physicochemical and pharmacological properties were discussed. Moreover, the analysis performed for analyzed groups of compounds with the use of FA or PCA methods indicated that almost all information reached in input chromatographic parameters as well as in molecular modeling descriptors can be explained by first two factors. Additionally, all analyzed drugs were clustered according to their chemical structure and pharmacological activity. Summarized, the performed classification analysis of studied drugs was focused on similarities and differences in methods being used for chemometric analysis as well as focused abilities to drugs classification (clustering) according to their molecular structures and pharmacological activity performed on the basis of chromatographic experimental and molecular modeling data. Thus, the most important application of statistically important molecular descriptors taken from QSRR models to classification analysis allow detailed biological (pharmacological) classification of analyzed drugs.

  15. Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-06-27

    Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of

  16. The hallmarks of premalignant conditions: a molecular basis for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bríd M; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M

    2016-02-01

    The hallmarks of premalignant lesions were first described in the 1970s, a time when relatively little was known about the molecular underpinnings of cancer. Yet it was clear there must be opportunities to intervene early in carcinogenesis. A vast array of molecular information has since been uncovered, with much of this stemming from studies of existing cancer or cancer models. Here, examples of how an understanding of cancer biology has informed cancer prevention studies are highlighted and emerging areas that may have implications for the field of cancer prevention research are described. A note of caution accompanies these examples, in that while there are similarities, there are also fundamental differences between the biology of premalignant lesions or premalignant conditions and invasive cancer. These differences must be kept in mind, and indeed leveraged, when exploring potential cancer prevention measures.

  17. The hallmarks of premalignant conditions: a molecular basis for cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bríd M.; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of premalignant lesions were first described in the 1970s, a time when relatively little was known about the molecular underpinnings of cancer. Yet it was clear there must be opportunities to intervene early in carcinogenesis. A vast array of molecular information has since been uncovered, with much of this stemming from studies of existing cancer or cancer models. Here, examples of how an understanding of cancer biology has informed cancer prevention studies are highlighted and emerging areas that may have implications for the field of cancer prevention research are described. A note of caution accompanies these examples, in that while there are similarities, there are also fundamental differences between the biology of premalignant lesions or premalignant conditions and invasive cancer. These differences must be kept in mind, and indeed leveraged, when exploring potential cancer prevention measures. PMID:26970122

  18. Disentangling the molecular genetic basis of personality: from monoamines to neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The present review/perspectives article provides a short overview of our current understanding of the molecular genetics of personality. In the first part, the most important gene candidates such as COMT or SLC6A4 gene are presented. Since several seminal review studies have recently been published on different facets of molecular genetics and personality/emotionality, we focus the second half of the present article on new relevant research directions. This includes a stronger focus on animal research based testing of candidate genes (e.g. neuropeptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin) and the use of á priori genotyping to increase statistical power. Moreover, we stress the importance of integrating cross-cultural data in future research designs and of inclusion of epigenetic measures in neuroscientifically oriented personality research. Finally, the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales are introduced as a new promising tool for biologically oriented psychology/psychiatry research.

  19. Fundamental Studies in the Molecular Basis of Laser Induced Retinal Damage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-15

    Among these new emerging lensless techniques is the method of molecular exciton microscopy (MEM) in which energy transfer is used between a crystal of...finally to lensless light microscopy with the potential to place in the hands of cell biologists a microscope with a variety of magnifications from a few...resolution lensless light microscopy . In summary, although these exciting developments in our laboratory have not yet yielded fruit for the ocular

  20. Molecular basis for benzimidazole resistance from a novel β-tubulin binding site model.

    PubMed

    Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Castillo, Rafael; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián; Medina-Franco, José L; Hernández-Campos, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Benzimidazole-2-carbamate derivatives (BzCs) are the most commonly used antiparasitic drugs for the treatment of protozoan and helminthic infections. BzCs inhibit the microtubule polymerization mechanism through binding selectively to the β-tubulin subunit in which mutations have been identified that lead to drug resistance. Currently, the lack of crystallographic structures of β-tubulin in parasites has limited the study of the binding site and the analysis of the resistance to BzCs. Recently, our research group has proposed a model to explain the interaction between the BzCs and a binding site in the β-tubulin. Herein, we report the homology models of two susceptible (Haemonchus contortus and Giardia intestinalis) parasites and one unsusceptible (Entamoeba histolytica) generated using the structure of the mammal Ovis aries, considered as a low susceptible organism, as a template. Additionally, the mechanism by which the principal single point mutations Phe167Tyr, Glu198Ala and Phe200Tyr could lead to resistance to BzCs is analyzed. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out in order to evaluate the models and the ligand-protein complexes' behaviors. This study represents a first attempt towards understanding, at the molecular level, the structural composition of β-tubulin in all organisms, also suggesting possible resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, these results support the importance of benzimidazole derivative optimization in order to design more potent and selective (less toxic) molecules for the treatment of parasitic diseases.

  1. Molecular Basis of the Mechanical Hierarchy in Myomesin Dimers for Sarcomere Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Senbo; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Myomesin is one of the most important structural molecules constructing the M-band in the force-generating unit of striated muscle, and a critical structural maintainer of the sarcomere. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we here dissect the mechanical properties of the structurally known building blocks of myomesin, namely α-helices, immunglobulin (Ig) domains, and the dimer interface at myomesin’s 13th Ig domain, covering the mechanically important C-terminal part of the molecule. We find the interdomain α-helices to be stabilized by the hydrophobic interface formed between the N-terminal half of these helices and adjacent Ig domains, and, interestingly, to show a rapid unfolding and refolding equilibrium especially under low axial forces up to ∼15 pN. These results support and yield atomic details for the notion of recent atomic-force microscopy experiments, namely, that the unique helices inserted between Ig domains in myomesin function as elastomers and force buffers. Our results also explain how the C-terminal dimer of two myomesin molecules is mechanically outperforming the helices and Ig domains in myomesin and elsewhere, explaining former experimental findings. This study provides a fresh view onto how myomesin integrates elastic helices, rigid immunoglobulin domains, and an extraordinarily resistant dimer into a molecular structure, to feature a mechanical hierarchy that represents a firm and yet extensible molecular anchor to guard the stability of the sarcomere. PMID:25140432

  2. Molecular basis of cooperativity in pH-triggered supramolecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Tian; Wang, Chensu; Lin, Zhiqiang; Huang, Gang; Sumer, Baran D.; Gao, Jinming

    2016-10-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly offers a powerful strategy to produce high-performance, stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. However, lack of molecular understanding of stimulated responses frequently hampers our ability to rationally design nanomaterials with sharp responses. Here we elucidated the molecular pathway of pH-triggered supramolecular self-assembly of a series of ultra-pH sensitive (UPS) block copolymers. Hydrophobic micellization drove divergent proton distribution in either highly protonated unimer or neutral micelle states along the majority of the titration coordinate unlike conventional small molecular or polymeric bases. This all-or-nothing two-state solution is a hallmark of positive cooperativity. Integrated modelling and experimental validation yielded a Hill coefficient of 51 in pH cooperativity for a representative UPS block copolymer, by far the largest reported in the literature. These data suggest hydrophobic micellization and resulting positive cooperativity offer a versatile strategy to convert responsive nanomaterials into binary on/off switchable systems for chemical and biological sensing, as demonstrated in an additional anion sensing model.

  3. Molecular basis of cooperativity in pH-triggered supramolecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Tian; Wang, Chensu; Lin, Zhiqiang; Huang, Gang; Sumer, Baran D.; Gao, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly offers a powerful strategy to produce high-performance, stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. However, lack of molecular understanding of stimulated responses frequently hampers our ability to rationally design nanomaterials with sharp responses. Here we elucidated the molecular pathway of pH-triggered supramolecular self-assembly of a series of ultra-pH sensitive (UPS) block copolymers. Hydrophobic micellization drove divergent proton distribution in either highly protonated unimer or neutral micelle states along the majority of the titration coordinate unlike conventional small molecular or polymeric bases. This all-or-nothing two-state solution is a hallmark of positive cooperativity. Integrated modelling and experimental validation yielded a Hill coefficient of 51 in pH cooperativity for a representative UPS block copolymer, by far the largest reported in the literature. These data suggest hydrophobic micellization and resulting positive cooperativity offer a versatile strategy to convert responsive nanomaterials into binary on/off switchable systems for chemical and biological sensing, as demonstrated in an additional anion sensing model. PMID:27786266

  4. Molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance: mutations and polymorphisms in the human aldolase B gene.

    PubMed

    Tolan, D R

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human aldolase B gene that result in hereditary fructose intolerance have been characterized extensively. Although the majority of subjects have been from northern Europe, subjects from other geographical regions and ethnic groups have been identified. At present 21 mutations have been reported; 15 of these are single base substitutions, resulting in nine amino acid replacements, four nonsense codons, and two putative splicing defects. Two large deletions, two four-base deletions, a single-base deletion, and a seven-base deletion/one-base insertion have been found. This last mutation leads to a defect in splicing and it is likely that one of the small deletions does as well. Regions of the enzyme where mutations have been observed recurrently are encoded by exons 5 and 9. Indeed, the three most common mutations are found in these exons. Two of these prevalent HFI mutations arose from a common ancestor and spread throughout the population by genetic drift. This finding was based on linkage to two sequence polymorphisms, which are among very few informative polymorphic markers that have been identified within the aldolase B gene. Because of the prevalence of a few HFI alleles, and the recent advances in molecular methods for identifying and screening for mutation, the diagnosis of HFI by molecular screening methods should become routine. These molecular diagnostic methods will be extremely beneficial for this often difficult to diagnose and sometimes fatal disease.

  5. Insight into the molecular basis of Schistosoma haematobium-induced bladder cancer through urine proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Carina; Cunha, Maria Cláudia; Santos, Júlio Henrique; da Costa, José M Correia; Brindley, Paul J; Lopes, Carlos; Amado, Francisco; Ferreira, Rita; Vitorino, Rui; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2016-08-01

    Infection due to Schistosoma haematobium is carcinogenic. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying urogenital schistosomiasis (UGS)-induced carcinogenesis have not been well defined. Conceptually, early molecular detection of this phenomenon, through non-invasive procedures, seems feasible and is desirable. Previous analysis of urine collected during UGS suggests that estrogen metabolites, including depurinating adducts, may be useful for this purpose. Here, a new direction was pursued: the identification of molecular pathways and potential biomarkers in S. haematobium-induced bladder cancer by analyzing the proteome profiling of urine samples from UGS patients. GeLC-MS/MS followed by protein-protein interaction analysis indicated oxidative stress and immune defense systems responsible for microbicide activity are the most representative clusters in UGS patients. Proteins involved in immunity, negative regulation of endopeptidase activity, and inflammation were more prevalent in UGS patients with bladder cancer, whereas proteins with roles in renal system process, sensory perception, and gas and oxygen transport were more abundant in subjects with urothelial carcinoma not associated with UGS. These findings highlighted a Th2-type immune response induced by S. haematobium, which seems to be further modulated by tumorigenesis, resulting in high-grade bladder cancer characterized by an inflammatory response and complement activation alternative pathway. These findings established a starting point for the development of multimarker strategies for the early detection of UGS-induced bladder cancer.

  6. Review and update on the molecular basis of Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are uncommon pathologies and one of the most harmful causes of childhood and adult blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe kind of these diseases accounting for approximately 5% of the whole retinal dystrophies and 20% of the children that study on blind schools. Clinical ophthalmologic findings including severe vision loss, nystagmus and ERG abnormalities should be suspected through the first year of life in this group of patients. Phenotypic variability is found when LCA patients have a full ophthalmologic examination. However, a correct diagnosis may be carried out; the determination of ophthalmologic clues as light sensibility, night blindness, fundus pigmentation, among other, join with electroretinographics findings, optical coherence tomography, and new technologies as molecular gene testing may help to reach to a precise diagnosis. Several retinal clinical features in LCA may suggest a genetic or gene particular defect; thus genetic-molecular tools could directly corroborate the clinical diagnosis. Currently, approximately 20 genes have been associated to LCA. In this review, historical perspective, clinical ophthalmological findings, new molecular-genetics technologies, possible phenotype-genotypes correlations, and gene therapy for some LCA genes are described. PMID:25685757

  7. Exploring the molecular basis of RNA recognition by the dimeric RNA-binding protein via molecular simulation methods.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shan; Zhang, Da-Wei; Xu, Lei; Wan, Hua; Hou, Ting-Jun; Kong, Ren

    2016-11-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) is critical for axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, and regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. Recently, different states of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) of RBPMS, one in its free form and another in complex with CAC-containing RNA, were determined by X-ray crystallography. In this article, the free RRM domain, its wild type complex and 2 mutant complex systems are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Through comparison of free RRM domain and complex systems, it's found that the RNA binding facilitates stabilizing the RNA-binding interface of RRM domain, especially the C-terminal loop. Although both R38Q and T103A/K104A mutations reduce the binding affinity of RRM domain and RNA, the underlining mechanisms are different. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) methods were used to explore the dynamical and recognition mechanisms of RRM domain and RNA. R38Q mutation is positioned on the homodimerization interface and mainly induces the large fluctuations of RRM domains. This mutation does not directly act on the RNA-binding interface, but some interfacial hydrogen bonds are weakened. In contrast, T103A/K104A mutations are located on the RNA-binding interface of RRM domain. These mutations obviously break most of high occupancy hydrogen bonds in the RNA-binding interface. Meanwhile, the key interfacial residues lose their favorable energy contributions upon RNA binding. The ranking of calculated binding energies in 3 complex systems is well consistent with that of experimental binding affinities. These results will be helpful in understanding the RNA recognition mechanisms of RRM domain.

  8. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions.

  9. Molecular basis for the differential quinolone susceptibility of mycobacterial DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rupesh; Madhumathi, Bhavani Shankar; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils in the genomes of eubacteria. Fluoroquinolones (FQs), successful as drugs clinically, target the enzyme to trap the gyrase-DNA complex, leading to the accumulation of double-strand breaks in the genome. Mycobacteria are less susceptible to commonly used FQs. However, an 8-methoxy-substituted FQ, moxifloxacin (MFX), is a potent antimycobacterial, and a higher susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to MFX has been demonstrated. Although several models explain the mechanism of FQ action and gyrase-DNA-FQ interaction, the basis for the differential susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to various FQs is not understood. We have addressed the basis of the differential susceptibility of the gyrase and revisited the mode of action of FQs. We demonstrate that FQs bind both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrases in the absence of DNA and that the addition of DNA enhances the drug binding. The FQs bind primarily to the GyrA subunit of mycobacterial gyrase, while in E. coli holoenzyme is the target. The binding of MFX to GyrA of M. tuberculosis correlates with its effectiveness as a better inhibitor of the enzyme and its efficacy in cell killing.

  10. Deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition: crystal structures of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding transcription regulator QacR.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Brennan, Richard G

    2003-03-01

    Multidrug transporters and their transcriptional regulators are key components of bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR). How these multidrug binding proteins can recognize such chemically disparate compounds represents a fascinating question from a structural standpoint and an important question in future drug development efforts. The Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding regulator, QacR, is soluble and recognizes an especially wide range of structurally dissimilar compounds, properties making it an ideal model system for deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition. Recent structures of QacR have afforded the first view of any MDR protein bound to multiple drugs, revealing key structural features of multidrug recognition, including a multisite binding pocket.

  11. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions.

  12. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats. PMID:26813022

  13. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-27

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats.

  14. Molecular basis for multiple sulfatase deficiency and mechanism for formylglycine generation of the human formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Preusser-Kunze, Andrea; Schmidt, Bernhard; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; von Figura, Kurt; Ficner, Ralf; Rudolph, Markus Georg

    2005-05-20

    Sulfatases are enzymes essential for degradation and remodeling of sulfate esters. Formylglycine (FGly), the key catalytic residue in the active site, is unique to sulfatases. In higher eukaryotes, FGly is generated from a cysteine precursor by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE). Inactivity of FGE results in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a fatal autosomal recessive syndrome. Based on the crystal structure, we report that FGE is a single-domain monomer with a surprising paucity of secondary structure and adopts a unique fold. The effect of all 18 missense mutations found in MSD patients is explained by the FGE structure, providing a molecular basis of MSD. The catalytic mechanism of FGly generation was elucidated by six high-resolution structures of FGE in different redox environments. The structures allow formulation of a novel oxygenase mechanism whereby FGE utilizes molecular oxygen to generate FGly via a cysteine sulfenic acid intermediate.

  15. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  16. Molecular Basis of Tubulin Transport Within the Cilium by IFT74 and IFT81

    PubMed Central

    Bhogaraju, Sagar; Cajanek, Lukas; Fort, Cécile; Blisnick, Thierry; Weber, Kristina; Taschner, Michael; Mizuno, Naoko; Lamla, Stefan; Bastin, Philippe; Nigg, Erich A.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors such as tubulin from the cytoplasm to the ciliary tip is involved in the construction of the cilium, a hairlike organelle found on most eukaryotic cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of IFT are poorly understood. Here, we found that the two core IFT proteins IFT74 and IFT81 form a tubulin-binding module and mapped the interaction to a calponin homology domain of IFT81 and a highly basic domain in IFT74. Knockdown of IFT81 and rescue experiments with point mutants showed that tubulin binding by IFT81 was required for ciliogenesis in human cells. PMID:23990561

  17. Molecular basis for the Cu2+ binding-induced destabilization of beta2-microglobulin revealed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Yan, Lisa; Singh, Deepak; Cieplak, Piotr

    2006-06-01

    According to experimental data, binding of the Cu(2+) ions destabilizes the native state of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). The partial unfolding of the protein was generally considered an early step toward fibril formation in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Recent NMR studies have suggested that the destabilization of the protein might be achieved through increased flexibility upon Cu(2+) binding. However, the molecular mechanism of destabilization due to Cu(2+), its role in amyloid formation, and the relative contributions of different potential copper-binding sites remain unclear. To elucidate the effect of ion ligation at atomic detail, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on apo- and Cu(2+)-beta2m systems in explicit aqueous solutions, with varying numbers of bound ions. Simulations at elevated temperatures (360 K) provide detailed pictures for the process of Cu(2+)-binding-induced destabilization of the native structure at the nanosecond timescale, which are in agreement with experiments. Conformational transitions toward partially unfolded states were observed in protein solutions containing bound copper ions at His-31 and His-51, which is marked by an increase in the protein vibrational entropy, with TDeltaS(vibr) ranging from 30 to 69 kcal/mol. The binding of Cu(2+) perturbs the secondary structure and the hydrogen bonding pattern disrupts the native hydrophobic contacts in the neighboring segments, which include the beta-strand D2 and part of the beta-strand E, B, and C and results in greater exposure of the D-E loop and the B-C loop to the water environment. Analysis of the MD trajectories suggests that the changes in the hydrophobic environment near the copper-binding sites lower the barrier of conformational transition and stabilize the more disordered conformation. The results also indicate that the binding of Cu(2+) at His-13 has little effect on the conformational stability, whereas the copper-binding site His-31, and to a lesser

  18. Molecular structure, IR spectra, and chemical reactivity of cisplatin and transplatin: DFT studies, basis set effect and solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Qingzhu; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Tengfei; Yuan, Haoliang; Lin, Jianguo; Luo, Shineng

    2015-01-01

    Three different density functional theory (DFT) methods were employed to study the molecular structures of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (TDDP). The basis set effect on the structure was also investigated. By comparing the optimized structures with the experimental data, a relatively more accurate method was chosen for further study of the IR spectra and other properties as well as the solvent effect. Nineteen characteristic vibrational bands of the title compounds were assigned and compared with available experimental data. The number of characteristic peaks for the asymmetric stretching and deformation vibrations of N-H can serve as a judgment for the isomer between CDDP and TDDP. Significant solvent effect was observed on the molecular structures and IR spectra. The reduced density gradient analysis was performed to study the intramolecular interactions of CDDP and TDDP, and the nature of changes in the structures caused by the solvent was illustrated. Several descriptors determined from the energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) were applied to describe the chemical reactivity of the title compounds. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) surfaces showed that the amino groups were the most favorable sites that nucleophilic reagents tend to attack, and CDDP was easier to be attacked by nucleophilic reagents than TDDP.

  19. The Molecular Basis of Individual Differences in Phenylthiocarbamide and Propylthiouracil Bitterness Perception

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Breslin, Paul A. S.; Kuhn, Christina; Reed, Danielle R.; Tharp, Christopher D.; Slack, Jay P.; Kim, Un-Kyung; Drayna, Dennis; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Summary Individual differences in perception are ubiquitous within the chemical senses: taste, smell, and chemical somesthesis [1–4]. A hypothesis of this fact states that polymorphisms in human sensory receptor genes could alter perception by coding for functionally distinct receptor types [1, 5–8]. We have previously reported evidence that sequence variants in a presumptive bitter receptor gene (hTAS2R38) correlate with differences in bitterness recognition of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) [9–11]. Here, we map individual psychogenomic pathways for bitter taste by testing people with a variety of psychophysical tasks and linking their individual perceptions of the compounds PTC and propylthiouracil (PROP) to the in vitro responses of their TAS2R38 receptor variants. Functional expression studies demonstrate that five different haplotypes from the hTAS2R38 gene code for operatively distinct receptors. The responses of the three haplotypes we also tested in vivo correlate strongly with individuals’ psychophysical bitter sensitivities to a family of compounds. These data provide a direct molecular link between heritable variability in bitter taste perception to functional variations of a single G protein coupled receptor that responds to compounds such as PTC and PROP that contain the N-C═S moiety. The molecular mechanisms of perceived bitterness variability have therapeutic implications, such as helping patients to consume beneficial bitter-tasting compounds—for example, pharmaceuticals and selected phytochemicals. PMID:15723792

  20. Molecular basis of RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT) activation by RAM.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Dhaval; Petit, Alain-Pierre; Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Jansen, Chimed; Fletcher, Dan A; Peggie, Mark; Weidlich, Simone; Scullion, Paul; Pisliakov, Andrei V; Cowling, Victoria H

    2016-12-01

    Maturation and translation of mRNA in eukaryotes requires the addition of the 7-methylguanosine cap. In vertebrates, the cap methyltransferase, RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT), has an activating subunit, RNMT-Activating Miniprotein (RAM). Here we report the first crystal structure of the human RNMT in complex with the activation domain of RAM. A relatively unstructured and negatively charged RAM binds to a positively charged surface groove on RNMT, distal to the active site. This results in stabilisation of a RNMT lobe structure which co-evolved with RAM and is required for RAM binding. Structure-guided mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that RAM stabilises the structure and positioning of the RNMT lobe and the adjacent α-helix hinge, resulting in optimal positioning of helix A which contacts substrates in the active site. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we observe that RAM increases the recruitment of the methyl donor, AdoMet (S-adenosyl methionine), to RNMT. Thus we report the mechanism by which RAM allosterically activates RNMT, allowing it to function as a molecular rheostat for mRNA cap methylation.

  1. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Arthur H; de Sousa, Marcelo V

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  2. Mass Spectrometry-based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, Arthur; de Sousa, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enable the identification and quantification of thousand of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  3. Molecular basis of non-self recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Tsuda, Ryoko

    2002-09-19

    The self/non-self discrimination by innate immunity through simple ligands universally expressed both on pathogens and hosts, such as monosaccharides and acetyl group, depends on the density or clustering patterns of the ligands. The specific recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins with a propeller-like fold or a propeller-like oligomeric arrangement is reinforced by the short distance between the individual binding sites that interact with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). There is virtually no conformational change in the main or side chains of tachylectins upon binding with the ligands. This low structural flexibility of the propeller structures must be very important for specific interaction with PAMPs. Mammalian lectins, such as mannose-binding lectin and ficolins, trigger complement activation through the lectin pathway in the form of opsonins. However, tachylectins have no effector collagenous domains and no lectin-associated serine proteases found in the mammalian lectins. Furthermore, no complement-like proteins have been found in horseshoe crabs, except for alpha(2)-macroglobulin. The mystery of the molecular mechanism of the scavenging pathway of pathogens in horseshoe crabs remains to be solved.

  4. The molecular basis of individual differences in phenylthiocarbamide and propylthiouracil bitterness perception.

    PubMed

    Bufe, Bernd; Breslin, Paul A S; Kuhn, Christina; Reed, Danielle R; Tharp, Christopher D; Slack, Jay P; Kim, Un-Kyung; Drayna, Dennis; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2005-02-22

    Individual differences in perception are ubiquitous within the chemical senses: taste, smell, and chemical somesthesis . A hypothesis of this fact states that polymorphisms in human sensory receptor genes could alter perception by coding for functionally distinct receptor types . We have previously reported evidence that sequence variants in a presumptive bitter receptor gene (hTAS2R38) correlate with differences in bitterness recognition of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) . Here, we map individual psychogenomic pathways for bitter taste by testing people with a variety of psychophysical tasks and linking their individual perceptions of the compounds PTC and propylthiouracil (PROP) to the in vitro responses of their TAS2R38 receptor variants. Functional expression studies demonstrate that five different haplotypes from the hTAS2R38 gene code for operatively distinct receptors. The responses of the three haplotypes we also tested in vivo correlate strongly with individuals' psychophysical bitter sensitivities to a family of compounds. These data provide a direct molecular link between heritable variability in bitter taste perception to functional variations of a single G protein coupled receptor that responds to compounds such as PTC and PROP that contain the N-C=S moiety. The molecular mechanisms of perceived bitterness variability have therapeutic implications, such as helping patients to consume beneficial bitter-tasting compounds-for example, pharmaceuticals and selected phytochemicals.

  5. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles.

  6. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles. PMID:25741476

  7. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W

    2016-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants.

  8. Structure of soybean [beta]-cyanoalanine synthase and the molecular basis for cyanide detoxification in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hankuil; Juergens, Matthew; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-09-07

    Plants produce cyanide (CN{sup -}) during ethylene biosynthesis in the mitochondria and require {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) for CN{sup -} detoxification. Recent studies show that CAS is a member of the {beta}-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) family, which also includes the Cys biosynthesis enzyme O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), but how the BSAS evolved distinct metabolic functions is not understood. Here we show that soybean (Glycine max) CAS and OASS form {alpha}-aminoacrylate reaction intermediates from Cys and O-acetylserine, respectively. To understand the molecular evolution of CAS and OASS in the BSAS enzyme family, the crystal structures of Gm-CAS and the Gm-CAS K95A mutant with a linked pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-Cys molecule in the active site were determined. These structures establish a common fold for the plant BSAS family and reveal a substrate-induced conformational change that encloses the active site for catalysis. Comparison of CAS and OASS identified residues that covary in the PLP binding site. The Gm-OASS T81M, S181M, and T185S mutants altered the ratio of OASS:CAS activity but did not convert substrate preference to that of a CAS. Generation of a triple mutant Gm-OASS successfully switched reaction chemistry to that of a CAS. This study provides new molecular insight into the evolution of diverse enzyme functions across the BSAS family in plants.

  9. A Molecular Basis for Bifidobacterial Enrichment in the Infant Gastrointestinal Tract123

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Barile, Daniela; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commonly used as probiotics in dairy foods. Select bifidobacterial species are also early colonizers of the breast-fed infant colon; however, the mechanism for this enrichment is unclear. We previously showed that Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a prototypical bifidobacterial species that can readily utilize human milk oligosaccharides as the sole carbon source. MS-based glycoprofiling has revealed that numerous B. infantis strains preferentially consume small mass oligosaccharides, abundant in human milks. Genome sequencing revealed that B. infantis possesses a bias toward genes required to use mammalian-derived carbohydrates. Many of these genomic features encode enzymes that are active on milk oligosaccharides including a novel 40-kb region dedicated to oligosaccharide utilization. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the encoded glycosidases and transport proteins has further resolved the mechanism by which B. infantis selectively imports and catabolizes milk oligosaccharides. Expression studies indicate that many of these key functions are only induced during growth on milk oligosaccharides and not expressed during growth on other prebiotics. Analysis of numerous B. infantis isolates has confirmed that these genomic features are common among the B. infantis subspecies and likely constitute a competitive colonization strategy used by these unique bifidobacteria. By detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms responsible, these studies provide a conceptual framework for bifidobacterial persistence and host interaction in the infant gastrointestinal tract mediated in part through consumption of human milk oligosaccharides. PMID:22585920

  10. The molecular basis of the organization of repetitive DNA-containing constitutive heterochromatin in mammals.

    PubMed

    Nishibuchi, Gohei; Déjardin, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Constitutive heterochromatin is composed mainly of repetitive elements and represents the typical inert chromatin structure in eukaryotic cells. Approximately half of the mammalian genome is made of repeat sequences, such as satellite DNA, telomeric DNA, and transposable elements. As essential genes are not present in these regions, most of these repeat sequences were considered as junk DNA in the past. However, it is now clear that these regions are essential for chromosome stability and the silencing of neighboring genes. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that histone methylation at H3K9 and its recognition by heterochromatin protein 1 represent the fundamental mechanism by which heterochromatin forms. Although this molecular mechanism is highly conserved from yeast to human cells, its detailed epigenetic regulation is more complex and dynamic for each distinct constitutive heterochromatin structure in higher eukaryotes. It can also vary according to the developmental stage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the epigenetic regulation of eukaryote genomes, but non-unique reads are usually discarded during standard ChIP-seq data alignment to reference genome databases. Therefore, specific methods to obtain global epigenetic information concerning repetitive elements are needed. In this review, we focus on such approaches and we summarize the latest molecular models for distinct constitutive heterochromatin types in mammals.

  11. Identifying the molecular basis of functions in the transcriptome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Whitney, T J; Gardner, D G; Mott, M L; Brandon, M

    2010-03-09

    The unusual life cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum, in which an extra-cellular stressor such as starvation induces the development of a multicellular fruiting body consisting of stalk cells and spores from a culture of identical amoebae, provides an excellent model for investigating the molecular control of differentiation and the transition from single- to multi-cellular life, a key transition in development. We utilized serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a molecular method that is unbiased by dependence on previously identified genes, to obtain a transcriptome from a high-density culture of amoebae, in order to examine the transition to multi-cellular development. The SAGE method provides relative expression levels, which allows us to rank order the expressed genes. We found that a large number of ribosomal proteins were expressed at high levels, while various components of the proteosome were expressed at low levels. The only identifiable transmembrane signaling system components expressed in amoebae are related to quorum sensing, and their expression levels were relatively low. The most highly expressed gene in the amoeba transcriptome, dutA untranslated RNA, is a molecule with unknown function that may serve as an inhibitor of translation. These results suggest that high-density amoebae have not initiated development, and they also suggest a mechanism by which the transition into the development program is controlled.

  12. Molecular basis of RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT) activation by RAM

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Dhaval; Petit, Alain-Pierre; Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A.; Jansen, Chimed; Fletcher, Dan A.; Peggie, Mark; Weidlich, Simone; Scullion, Paul; Pisliakov, Andrei V.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2016-01-01

    Maturation and translation of mRNA in eukaryotes requires the addition of the 7-methylguanosine cap. In vertebrates, the cap methyltransferase, RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT), has an activating subunit, RNMT-Activating Miniprotein (RAM). Here we report the first crystal structure of the human RNMT in complex with the activation domain of RAM. A relatively unstructured and negatively charged RAM binds to a positively charged surface groove on RNMT, distal to the active site. This results in stabilisation of a RNMT lobe structure which co-evolved with RAM and is required for RAM binding. Structure-guided mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that RAM stabilises the structure and positioning of the RNMT lobe and the adjacent α-helix hinge, resulting in optimal positioning of helix A which contacts substrates in the active site. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we observe that RAM increases the recruitment of the methyl donor, AdoMet (S-adenosyl methionine), to RNMT. Thus we report the mechanism by which RAM allosterically activates RNMT, allowing it to function as a molecular rheostat for mRNA cap methylation. PMID:27422871

  13. Comparison of molecular fingerprint methods on the basis of biological profile data.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Andreas; Kogej, Thierry; Tyrchan, Christian; Engkvist, Ola

    2009-02-01

    In this study we evaluated a set of molecular fingerprint methods with respect to their capability to reproduce similarities in the biological activity space. The evaluation presented in this paper is therefore different from many other fingerprint studies, in which the enrichment of active compounds binding to the same target as selected query structures was studied. Conversely, our data set was extracted from the BioPrint database, which contains uniformly derived biological activity profiles of mainly marketed drugs for a range of biological assays relevant for the pharmaceutical industry. We compared calculated molecular fingerprint similarity values between all compound pairs of the data set with the corresponding similarities in the biological activity space and additionally analyzed agreements of generated clusterings. A closer analysis of the compound pairs with a high biological activity similarity revealed that fingerprint methods such as CHEMGPS or TRUST4, which describe global features of a molecule such as physicochemical properties and pharmacophore patterns, might be better suited to describe similarity of biological activity profiles than purely structural fingerprint methods. It is therefore suggested that the usage of these fingerprint methods could increase the probability of finding molecules with a similar biological activity profile but yet a different chemical structure.

  14. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  15. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Arthur H.; de Sousa, Marcelo V.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis. PMID:27790611

  16. Molecular basis for the autonomous promotion of cell proliferation by angiogenin

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Trish T.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2017-01-01

    Canonical growth factors act indirectly via receptor-mediated signal transduction pathways. Here, we report on an autonomous pathway in which a growth factor is internalized, has its localization regulated by phosphorylation, and ultimately uses intrinsic catalytic activity to effect epigenetic change. Angiogenin (ANG), a secreted vertebrate ribonuclease, is known to promote cell proliferation, leading to neovascularization as well as neuroprotection in mammals. Upon entering cells, ANG encounters the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor protein, which binds with femtomolar affinity. We find that protein kinase C and cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylate ANG, enabling ANG to evade its inhibitor and enter the nucleus. After migrating to the nucleolus, ANG cleaves promoter-associated RNA, which prevents the recruitment of the nucleolar remodeling complex to the ribosomal DNA promoter. The ensuing derepression of rDNA transcription promotes cell proliferation. The biochemical basis for this unprecedented mechanism of signal transduction suggests new modalities for the treatment of cancers and neurological disorders. PMID:27915233

  17. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Thomas H.; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1–Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:26494786

  18. Structural and Molecular Basis for Ebola Virus Neutralization by Protective Human Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Misasi, John; Gilman, Morgan S.A.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Gui, Miao; Cagigi, Alberto; Mulangu, Sabue; Corti, Davide; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Cunningham, James; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean Jacques; Baxa, Ulrich; Graham, Barney S.; Xiang, Ye; Sullivan, Nancy J.; McLellan, Jason S.

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus causes hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate and for which there is no approved therapy. Two human monoclonal antibodies, mAb100 and mAb114, in combination protect non-human primates against all signs of Ebola virus disease, including viremia. Here, we demonstrate that mAb100 recognizes the base of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) trimer, occludes access to the cathepsin-cleavage loop, and prevents the proteolytic cleavage of GP that is required for virus entry. We show that mAb114 interacts with the glycan cap and inner chalice of GP, remains associated following proteolytic removal of the glycan cap, and inhibits binding of cleaved GP to its receptor. These results define the basis of neutralization for two protective antibodies and may facilitate development of therapies and vaccines. PMID:26917592

  19. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. )

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The Molecular Basis of Toxins’ Interactions with Intracellular Signaling via Discrete Portals

    PubMed Central

    Lahiani, Adi; Yavin, Ephraim; Lazarovici, Philip

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which microbial, plant or animal-secreted toxins exert their action provides the most important element for assessment of human health risks and opens new insights into therapies addressing a plethora of pathologies, ranging from neurological disorders to cancer, using toxinomimetic agents. Recently, molecular and cellular biology dissecting tools have provided a wealth of information on the action of these diverse toxins, yet, an integrated framework to explain their selective toxicity is still lacking. In this review, specific examples of different toxins are emphasized to illustrate the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity at different biochemical, molecular and cellular- levels with particular consideration for the nervous system. The target of primary action has been highlighted and operationally classified into 13 sub-categories. Selected examples of toxins were assigned to each target category, denominated as portal, and the modulation of the different portal’s signaling was featured. The first portal encompasses the plasma membrane lipid domains, which give rise to pores when challenged for example with pardaxin, a fish toxin, or is subject to degradation when enzymes of lipid metabolism such as phospholipases A2 (PLA2) or phospholipase C (PLC) act upon it. Several major portals consist of ion channels, pumps, transporters and ligand gated ionotropic receptors which many toxins act on, disturbing the intracellular ion homeostasis. Another group of portals consists of G-protein-coupled and tyrosine kinase receptors that, upon interaction with discrete toxins, alter second messengers towards pathological levels. Lastly, subcellular organelles such as mitochondria, nucleus, protein- and RNA-synthesis machineries, cytoskeletal networks and exocytic vesicles are also portals targeted and deregulated by other diverse group of toxins. A fundamental concept can be drawn from these seemingly different toxins with

  1. The Molecular Basis of Toxins' Interactions with Intracellular Signaling via Discrete Portals.

    PubMed

    Lahiani, Adi; Yavin, Ephraim; Lazarovici, Philip

    2017-03-16

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which microbial, plant or animal-secreted toxins exert their action provides the most important element for assessment of human health risks and opens new insights into therapies addressing a plethora of pathologies, ranging from neurological disorders to cancer, using toxinomimetic agents. Recently, molecular and cellular biology dissecting tools have provided a wealth of information on the action of these diverse toxins, yet, an integrated framework to explain their selective toxicity is still lacking. In this review, specific examples of different toxins are emphasized to illustrate the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity at different biochemical, molecular and cellular- levels with particular consideration for the nervous system. The target of primary action has been highlighted and operationally classified into 13 sub-categories. Selected examples of toxins were assigned to each target category, denominated as portal, and the modulation of the different portal's signaling was featured. The first portal encompasses the plasma membrane lipid domains, which give rise to pores when challenged for example with pardaxin, a fish toxin, or is subject to degradation when enzymes of lipid metabolism such as phospholipases A₂ (PLA₂) or phospholipase C (PLC) act upon it. Several major portals consist of ion channels, pumps, transporters and ligand gated ionotropic receptors which many toxins act on, disturbing the intracellular ion homeostasis. Another group of portals consists of G-protein-coupled and tyrosine kinase receptors that, upon interaction with discrete toxins, alter second messengers towards pathological levels. Lastly, subcellular organelles such as mitochondria, nucleus, protein- and RNA-synthesis machineries, cytoskeletal networks and exocytic vesicles are also portals targeted and deregulated by other diverse group of toxins. A fundamental concept can be drawn from these seemingly different toxins with

  2. Molecular basis for the polymerization of octopus lens S-crystallin.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H C; Lin, T L; Chang, G G

    2000-01-01

    S-Crystallin from octopus lens has a tertiary structure similar to sigma-class glutathione transferase (GST). However, after isolation from the lenses, S-crystallin was found to aggregate more easily than sigma-GST. In vitro experiments showed that the lens S-crystallin can be polymerized and finally denatured at increasing concentration of urea or guanidinium chloride (GdmCl). In the intermediate concentrations of urea or GdmCl, the polymerized form of S-crystallin is aggregated, as manifested by the increase in light scattering and precipitation of the protein. There is a delay time for the initiation of polymerization. Both the delay time and rate of polymerization depend on the protein concentration. The native protein showed a maximum fluorescence emission spectrum at 341 nm. The GdmCl-denatured protein exhibited two fluorescence maxima at 310 nm and 358 nm, respectively, whereas the urea-denatured protein showed a fluorescence peak at 358 nm with a small peak at 310 nm. The fluorescence intensity was quenched. Monomers, dimers, trimers, and polymers of the native protein were observed by negative-stain electron microscopic analysis. The aggregated form, however, showed irregular structure. The aggregate was solubilized in high concentrations of urea or GdmCl. The redissolved denatured protein showed an identical fluorescence spectrum to the protein solution that was directly denatured with high concentrations of urea or GdmCl. The denatured protein was readily refolded to its native state by diluting with buffer solution. The fluorescence spectrum of the renatured protein solution was similar to that of the native form. The phase diagrams for the S-crystallin in urea and GdmCl were constructed. Both salt concentration and pH value of the solution affect the polymerization rate, suggesting the participation of ionic interactions in the polymerization. Comparison of the molecular models of the S-crystallin and sigma-GST suggests that an extra ion-pair between

  3. Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion to Geochemical Surfaces: Computer Simulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adhesion to Goethite

    PubMed Central

    Shroll, Robert M.; Straatsma, T. P.

    2003-01-01

    The adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the goethite mineral is investigated using classical molecular simulation. A fragment model for goethite has been integrated into a fully atomistic membrane model. Properties for the resulting system are evaluated for a 1.5-ns simulation in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The response of the membrane to the presence of the mineral is investigated. Radial distribution functions are used to present an average picture of the hydrogen bonding. Orientational vectors, assigned to the saccharide groups, reveal the extent of the mineral's perturbations on the membrane. Significant structural changes were observed for the outermost saccharide groups, several of which rotate to form hydrogen bonds with the mineral surface. The structure of the inner core, and the corresponding integrity of the membrane, is maintained. The mineral surface dehydrates slightly in the presence of the membrane as saccharide hydroxyl groups compete with water molecules for hydrogen-bonding sites on its surface. PMID:12609878

  4. Molecular basis for the mechanism of action of an anti-TACE antibody

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Cook, Kimberly; Xu, Linda; Cheng, Li; Damschroder, Melissa; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) have potential as therapeutics for various diseases. Many small molecule inhibitors, however, exhibit poor specificity profiles because they target the highly conserved catalytic cleft of TACE. We report for the first time the molecular interaction of a highly specific anti-TACE antagonistic antibody (MEDI3622). We characterized the binding of MEDI3622 using mutagenesis, as well as structural modeling and docking approaches. We show that MEDI3622 recognizes a unique surface loop of sIVa-sIVb β-hairpin on TACE M-domain, but does not interact with the conserved catalytic cleft or its nearby regions. The exquisite specificity of MEDI3622 is mediated by this distinct structural feature on the TACE M-domain. These findings may aid the design of antibody therapies against TACE. PMID:27610476

  5. The molecular basis for carcinogenesis in metaplastic columnar-lined esophagus.

    PubMed

    Souza, R F; Meltzer, S J

    1997-09-01

    A wide variety of biologic events and mechanisms appear to have roles in the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus-associated neoplastic lesions. Figure 5 is a schematic depiction of these events. This is known as an infernogram (named after Dante's Inferno) (S. Kern, unpublished presentations, 1996). Events at the bottom rings of the inferno are high-frequency mutations; nearer to the top of the inferno are the less common events. The next several years promise many further discoveries of not only high-frequency and low-frequency events, but also their application. Some of the molecular alterations already studied show promise as markers for early cancer detection or prognostication. Eventually, applications of these discoveries should yield new and more effective means of preventing and treating the deadly complications of this troublesome premalignant condition.

  6. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure in Rodents As a Promising Model for the Study of ADHD Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E.; Padilla-Velarde, Edgar; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A physiological parallelism, or even a causal effect relationship, can be deducted from the analysis of the main characteristics of the “Alcohol Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders” (ARND), derived from prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), and the behavioral performance in the Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These two clinically distinct disease entities, exhibits many common features. They affect neurological shared pathways, and also related neurotransmitter systems. We briefly review here these parallelisms, with their common and uncommon characteristics, and with an emphasis in the subjacent molecular mechanisms of the behavioral manifestations, that lead us to propose that PAE in rats can be considered as a suitable model for the study of ADHD. PMID:28018163

  7. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Dheeraj S.; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K.; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored. PMID:26736022

  8. Signaling required for blood vessel maintenance: molecular basis and pathological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to vascular formation increases, vessel maintenance including stabilization of new vessels and prevention of vessel regression began to be considered as an active process that requires specific cellular signaling. While signaling pathways such as VEGF, FGF, and angiopoietin-Tie2 are important for endothelial cell survival and junction stabilization, PDGF and TGF-β signaling modify mural cell (vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes) functions, thus they fortify vessel integrity. Breakdown of these signaling systems results in pathological hyperpermeability and/or genetic vascular abnormalities such as vascular malformations, ultimately progressing to hemorrhage and edema. Hence, blood vessel maintenance is fundamental to controlling vascular homeostasis and tissue functions. This paper discusses signaling pathways essential for vascular maintenance and clinical conditions caused by deterioration of vessel integrity.

  9. Molecular basis for specificity of the Met1-linked polyubiquitin signal.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul R

    2016-12-15

    The post-translational modification of proteins provides a rapid and versatile system for regulating all signalling pathways. Protein ubiquitination is one such type of post-translational modification involved in controlling numerous cellular processes. The unique ability of ubiquitin to form polyubiquitin chains creates a highly complex code responsible for different subsequent signalling outcomes. Specialised enzymes ('writers') generate the ubiquitin code, whereas other enzymes ('erasers') disassemble it. Importantly, the ubiquitin code is deciphered by different ubiquitin-binding proteins ('readers') functioning to elicit particular cellular responses. Ten years ago, the methionine1 (Met1)-linked (linear) polyubiquitin code was first identified and the intervening years have witnessed a seismic shift in our understanding of Met1-linked polyubiquitin in cellular processes, particularly inflammatory signalling. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of specificity determination within Met1-linked polyubiquitin signalling.

  10. Molecular basis for specificity of the Met1-linked polyubiquitin signal

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins provides a rapid and versatile system for regulating all signalling pathways. Protein ubiquitination is one such type of post-translational modification involved in controlling numerous cellular processes. The unique ability of ubiquitin to form polyubiquitin chains creates a highly complex code responsible for different subsequent signalling outcomes. Specialised enzymes (‘writers’) generate the ubiquitin code, whereas other enzymes (‘erasers’) disassemble it. Importantly, the ubiquitin code is deciphered by different ubiquitin-binding proteins (‘readers’) functioning to elicit particular cellular responses. Ten years ago, the methionine1 (Met1)-linked (linear) polyubiquitin code was first identified and the intervening years have witnessed a seismic shift in our understanding of Met1-linked polyubiquitin in cellular processes, particularly inflammatory signalling. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of specificity determination within Met1-linked polyubiquitin signalling. PMID:27913667

  11. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Savage, Michael D; Cerro, Ramon L

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations-particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  12. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  13. Sex-biased cellular signaling: molecular basis for sex differences in neuropsychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Rita J; Bangasser, Debra A

    2016-12-01

    The recognition that there are fundamental biological sex differences that extend beyond those that define sexual behavior and reproductive function has inspired the drive toward inclusion of both sexes in research design. This is supported by an underlying clinical rationale that studying both sexes is necessary to elucidate pathophysiology and develop treatments for the entire population. However, at a more basic level, sex differences, like genetic differences, can be exploited to better understand biology. Here, we discuss how sex differences at the molecular level of cell signaling and protein trafficking are amplified to create a state of vulnerability that under the right conditions can result in symptoms of neuropsychiatry disease. Although this dialogue focuses on the specific example of corticotropin-releasing factor, the potential for analogous sex differences in signaling and/or trafficking of receptors for other neuromodulators has broad biological and therapeutic implications.

  14. Sex-biased cellular signaling: molecular basis for sex differences in neuropsychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Rita J.; Bangasser, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that there are fundamental biological sex differences that extend beyond those that define sexual behavior and reproductive function has inspired the drive toward inclusion of both sexes in research design. This is supported by an underlying clinical rationale that studying both sexes is necessary to elucidate pathophysiology and develop treatments for the entire population. However, at a more basic level, sex differences, like genetic differences, can be exploited to better understand biology. Here, we discuss how sex differences at the molecular level of cell signaling and protein trafficking are amplified to create a state of vulnerability that under the right conditions can result in symptoms of neuropsychiatry disease. Although this dialogue focuses on the specific example of corticotropin-releasing factor, the potential for analogous sex differences in signaling and/or trafficking of receptors for other neuromodulators has broad biological and therapeutic implications. PMID:28179810

  15. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored.

  16. Molecular basis of pathogenesis, prognosis and therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2008-02-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is caused by the abnormal accumulation of non-functional B-cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow. However, the precise aetiology and mechanism of the disease are unclear. Recently, progress has been made in the identification of both the genetic deficiencies and environmental factors that may underlie CLL. This has provided some clues to the nature of the disease, but no definitive cures. Although treatment has increased remission time, at present the disease is not curable by conventional therapy. Further studies of the pathogenesis of CLL are needed, as are the development of suitable cell lines and animal models in which to study it. This review summarises the most recent progress in CLL with emphasis on molecular events and possible implications in therapy.

  17. Molecular basis for protection of ribosomal protein L4 from cellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Ferdinand M.; Hoelz, André

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the nuclear import of ∼80 nascent ribosomal proteins and the elimination of excess amounts by the cellular degradation machinery. Assembly chaperones recognize nascent unassembled ribosomal proteins and transport them together with karyopherins to their nuclear destination. We report the crystal structure of ribosomal protein L4 (RpL4) bound to its dedicated assembly chaperone of L4 (Acl4), revealing extensive interactions sequestering 70 exposed residues of the extended RpL4 loop. The observed molecular recognition fundamentally differs from canonical promiscuous chaperone–substrate interactions. We demonstrate that the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension harbours overlapping binding sites for Acl4 and the nuclear transport factor Kap104, facilitating its continuous protection from the cellular degradation machinery. Thus, Acl4 serves a dual function to facilitate nuclear import and simultaneously protect unassembled RpL4 from the cellular degradation machinery. PMID:28148929

  18. Molecular basis of coupled protein and electron transfer dynamics of cytochrome c in biomimetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Martín, Diego F; DeBiase, Pablo M; Hildebrandt, Peter; Martí, Marcelo A; Murgida, Daniel H

    2010-04-28

    Direct electron transfer (ET) of redox proteins immobilized on biomimetic or biocompatible electrodes represents an active field of fundamental and applied research. In this context, several groups have reported for a variety of proteins unexpected distance dependencies of the ET rate, whose origin remains largely speculative and controversial, but appears to be a quite general phenomenon. Here we have employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron pathway analyses to study the ET properties of cytochrome c (Cyt) electrostatically immobilized on Au coated by carboxyl-terminated alkylthiols. The MD simulations and concomitant binding energy calculations allow identification of preferred binding configurations of the oxidized and reduced Cyt which are established via different lysine residues and, thus, correspond to different orientations and dipole moments. Calculations of the electronic coupling matrices for the various Cyt/self-assembled monolayer (SAM) complexes indicate that the thermodynamically preferred protein orientations do not coincide with the orientations of optimum coupling. These findings demonstrate that the ET of the immobilized Cyt is controlled by an interplay between protein dynamics and tunneling probabilities. Protein dynamics exerts two level of tuning on the electronic coupling via reorientation (coarse) and low amplitude thermal fluctuations (fine). Upon operating the Au support as an electrode, electric-field-dependent alignment of the protein dipole moment becomes an additional determinant for the protein dynamics and thus for the overall ET rate. The present results provide a consistent molecular description of previous (spectro)electrochemical data and allow conclusions concerning the coupling of protein dynamics and ET of Cyt in physiological complexes.

  19. Molecular basis of voltage-dependent potassium currents in porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Diane E; Mitchell, Kathy E; Li, Yan; Finley, Melissa R; Freeman, Lisa C

    2002-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular bases for K(+) current diversity in porcine granulosa cells (GC). Two delayed rectifier K(+) currents with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties were recorded from porcine GC by using whole-cell patch clamp: 1) a slowly activating, noninactivating current (I(Ks)) antagonized by clofilium, 293B, L-735,821, and L-768,673; and 2) an ultrarapidly activating, slowly inactivating current (I(Kur)) antagonized completely by clofilium and 4-aminopyridine and partially by tetraethylammonium, charybdotoxin, dendrotoxin, and kaliotoxin. The molecular identity of the K(+) channel genes underlying I(Ks) and I(Kur) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting to detect K(+) channel transcripts and proteins. We found that GC could express multiple voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel subunits, including KCNQ1, KCNE1, Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kvbeta1.3, and Kvbeta2. Coimmunoprecipitation was used to establish the hetero-oligomeric nature of granulosa cell Kv channels. KCNE1 and KCNQ1 were coassociated in GC, and their expression coincided with the expression of I(Ks). Extensive coassociation of the various Kv alpha- and beta-subunits was also documented, suggesting that the diverse electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of I(Kur) currents may reflect variation in the composition and stoichiometry of the channel assemblies, as well as differences in post-translational modification of contributing Kv channel subunits. Our findings provide an essential background for experimental definition of granulosa K(+) channel function(s). It will be critical to define the functional roles of specific GC K(+) channels, because these proteins may represent either novel targets for assisted reproduction or potential sites of drug toxicity.

  20. Characterization and molecular basis of heterogeneity of the African swine fever virus envelope protein p54.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, F; Alcaraz, C; Eiras, A; Yáñez, R J; Rodriguez, J M; Alonso, C; Rodriguez, J F; Escribano, J M

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that the propagation of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in cell culture generates viral subpopulations differing in protein p54 (C. Alcaraz, A. Brun, F. Ruiz-Gonzalvo, and J. M. Escribano, Virus Res. 23:173-182, 1992). A recombinant bacteriophage expressing a 328-bp fragment of the p54 gene was selected in a lambda phage expression library of ASFV genomic fragments by immunoscreening with antibodies against p54 protein. The sequence of this recombinant phage allowed the location of the p54 gene in the EcoRI E fragment of the ASFV genome. Nucleotide sequence obtained from this fragment revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 183 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 19,861. This protein contains a transmembrane domain and a Gly-Gly-X motif, a recognition sequence for protein processing of several ASFV structural proteins. In addition, two direct tandem repetitions were also found within this open reading frame. Further characterization of the transcription and gene product revealed that the p54 gene is translated from a late mRNA and the protein is incorporated to the external membrane of the virus particle. A comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the p54 gene carried by two virulent ASFV strains (E70 and E75) with that obtained from virus Ba71V showed 100% similarity. However, when p54 genes from viral clones generated by cell culture passage and coding for p54 proteins with different electrophoretic mobility were sequenced, they showed changes in the number of copies of a 12-nucleotide sequence repeat. These changes produce alterations in the number of copies of the amino acid sequence Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala present in p54, resulting in stepwise modifications in the molecular weight of the protein. These duplications and deletions of a tandem repeat sequence array within a protein coding region constitute a novel mechanism of genetic diversification in ASFV. Images PMID:7933107

  1. Molecular Time-Course and the Metabolic Basis of Entry into Dauer in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Pan-Young; Kwon, Min-Seok; Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Paik, Young-Ki

    2009-01-01

    When Caenorhabditis elegans senses dauer pheromone (daumone), signaling inadequate growth conditions, it enters the dauer state, which is capable of long-term survival. However, the molecular pathway of dauer entry in C. elegans has remained elusive. To systematically monitor changes in gene expression in dauer paths, we used a DNA microarray containing 22,625 gene probes corresponding to 22,150 unique genes from C. elegans. We employed two different paths: direct exposure to daumone (Path 1) and normal growth media plus liquid culture (Path 2). Our data reveal that entry into dauer is accomplished through the multi-step process, which appears to be compartmentalized in time and according to metabolic flux. That is, a time-course of dauer entry in Path 1 shows that dauer larvae formation begins at post-embryonic stage S4 (48 h) and is complete at S6 (72 h). Our results also suggest the presence of a unique adaptive metabolic control mechanism that requires both stage-specific expression of specific genes and tight regulation of different modes of fuel metabolite utilization to sustain the energy balance in the context of prolonged survival under adverse growth conditions. It is apparent that worms entering dauer stage may rely heavily on carbohydrate-based energy reserves, whereas dauer larvae utilize fat or glyoxylate cycle-based energy sources. We created a comprehensive web-based dauer metabolic database for C. elegans (www.DauerDB.org) that makes it possible to search any gene and compare its relative expression at a specific stage, or evaluate overall patterns of gene expression in both paths. This database can be accessed by the research community and could be widely applicable to other related nematodes as a molecular atlas. PMID:19129915

  2. Establishing a reference group for distal 18q-: Clinical description and molecular basis

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Jannine D.; Hasi, Minire; Soileau, Bridgette; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Sebold, Courtney; O’Donnell, Louise; Perry, Brian; Stratton, Robert F.; Hale, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Although constitutional chromosome abnormalities have been recognized since the 1960s, clinical characterization and development of treatment options have been hampered by their obvious genetic complexity and relative rarity. Additionally, deletions of 18q are particularly heterogeneous, with no two people having the same breakpoints. We identified sixteen individuals with deletions that, despite unique breakpoints, encompass the same set of genes within a 17.6 Mb region. This group represents the most genotypically similar group yet identified with distal 18q deletions. As the deletion is of average size when compared with other 18q deletions, this group can serve as a reference point for the clinical and molecular description of this condition. We performed a thorough medical record review as well as a series of clinical evaluations on 14 of the 16 individuals. Common functional findings included developmental delays, hypotonia, growth hormone deficiency, and hearing loss. Structural anomalies included foot anomalies, ear canal atresia/stenosis, and hypospadias. The majority of individuals performed within the low normal range of cognitive ability but had more serious deficits in adaptive abilities. Of interest, the hemizygous region contains 38 known genes, 26 of which are sufficiently understood to tentatively determine dosage sensitivity. Published data suggest that 20 are unlikely to cause an abnormal phenotype in the hemizygous state and five are likely to be dosage sensitive: TNX3, NETO1, ZNF407, TSHZ1, and NFATC. A sixth gene, ATP9B, may be conditionally dosage sensitive. Not all distal 18q- phenotypes can be attributed to these six genes; however, this is an important advance in the molecular characterization of 18q deletions. PMID:24092497

  3. Molecular Basis of Acute Cystitis Reveals Susceptibility Genes and Immunotherapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cafaro, Caterina; Nadeem, Aftab; Butler, Daniel S. C.; Rydström, Gustav; Filenko, Nina A.; Wullt, Björn; Miethke, Thomas; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Tissue damage is usually regarded as a necessary price to pay for successful elimination of pathogens by the innate immune defense. Yet, it is possible to distinguish protective from destructive effects of innate immune activation and selectively attenuate molecular nodes that create pathology. Here, we identify acute cystitis as an Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-driven, hyper-inflammatory condition of the infected urinary bladder and IL-1 receptor blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy. Disease severity was controlled by the mechanism of IL-1β processing and mice with intact inflammasome function developed a moderate, self-limiting form of cystitis. The most severe form of acute cystitis was detected in mice lacking the inflammasome constituents ASC or NLRP-3. IL-1β processing was hyperactive in these mice, due to a new, non-canonical mechanism involving the matrix metalloproteinase 7- (MMP-7). ASC and NLRP-3 served as transcriptional repressors of MMP7 and as a result, Mmp7 was markedly overexpressed in the bladder epithelium of Asc-/- and Nlrp3-/- mice. The resulting IL-1β hyper-activation loop included a large number of IL-1β-dependent pro-inflammatory genes and the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra inhibited their expression and rescued susceptible Asc-/- mice from bladder pathology. An MMP inhibitor had a similar therapeutic effect. Finally, elevated levels of IL-1β and MMP-7 were detected in patients with acute cystitis, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets. The results reproduce important aspects of human acute cystitis in the murine model and provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acute cystitis, one of the most common infections in man. Trial Registration The clinical studies were approved by the Human Ethics Committee at Lund University (approval numbers LU106-02, LU236-99 and Clinical Trial Registration RTP-A2003, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, www

  4. Molecular basis for the role of Staphylococcus aureus penicillin binding protein 4 in antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Navratna, Vikas; Nadig, Savitha; Sood, Varun; Prasad, K; Arakere, Gayathri; Gopal, B

    2010-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated proteins that catalyze the final step of murein biosynthesis. These proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in a few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity. Both transpeptidase and carboxypeptidase activities of PBPs occur at the D-Ala-D-Ala terminus of a murein precursor containing a disaccharide pentapeptide comprising N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala. Beta-lactam antibiotics inhibit these enzymes by competing with the pentapeptide precursor for binding to the active site of the enzyme. Here we describe the crystal structure, biochemical characteristics, and expression profile of PBP4, a low-molecular-mass PBP from Staphylococcus aureus strain COL. The crystal structures of PBP4-antibiotic complexes reported here were determined by molecular replacement, using the atomic coordinates deposited by the New York Structural Genomics Consortium. While the pbp4 gene is not essential for the viability of S. aureus, the knockout phenotype of this gene is characterized by a marked reduction in cross-linked muropeptide and increased vancomycin resistance. Unlike other PBPs, we note that expression of PBP4 was not substantially altered under different experimental conditions, nor did it change across representative hospital- or community-associated strains of S. aureus that were examined. In vitro data on purified recombinant S. aureus PBP4 suggest that it is a beta-lactamase and is not trapped as an acyl intermediate with beta-lactam antibiotics. Put together, the expression analysis and biochemical features of PBP4 provide a framework for understanding the function of this protein in S. aureus and its role in antimicrobial resistance.

  5. Molecular Basis for the Neutralization of Tumor Necrosis Factor α by Certolizumab Pegol in the Treatment of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Un; Shin, Woori; Son, Ji Young; Yoo, Ki-Young; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against TNFα, including infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol, are widely used for the treatment of the inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Recently, the crystal structures of TNFα, in complex with the Fab fragments of infliximab and adalimumab, have revealed the molecular mechanisms of these antibody drugs. Here, we report the crystal structure of TNFα in complex with the Fab fragment of certolizumab pegol to clarify the precise antigen-antibody interactions and the structural basis for the neutralization of TNFα by this therapeutic antibody. The structural analysis and the mutagenesis study revealed that the epitope is limited to a single protomer of the TNFα trimer. Additionally, the DE loop and the GH loop of TNFα play critical roles in the interaction with certolizumab, suggesting that this drug exerts its effects by partially occupying the receptor binding site of TNFα. In addition, a conformational change of the DE loop was induced by certolizumab binding, thereby interrupting the TNFα-receptor interaction. A comprehensive comparison of the interactions of TNFα blockers with TNFα revealed the epitope diversity on the surface of TNFα, providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of TNFα blockers. The accumulation of these structural studies can provide a basis for the improvement of therapeutic antibodies against TNFα. PMID:28124979

  6. Molecular basis of the binding of YAP transcriptional regulator to the ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Bhat, Vikas; Mikles, David C; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-06-01

    The newly discovered transactivation function of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is believed to be mediated by virtue of the ability of its proteolytically-cleaved intracellular domain (ICD) to physically associate with YAP2 transcriptional regulator. In an effort to unearth the molecular basis of YAP2-ErbB4 interaction, we have conducted a detailed biophysical analysis of the binding of WW domains of YAP2 to PPXY motifs located within the ICD of ErbB4. Our data show that the WW1 domain of YAP2 binds to PPXY motifs within the ICD in a differential manner and that this behavior is by and large replicated by the WW2 domain. Remarkably, while both WW domains absolutely require the integrity of the PPXY consensus sequence, non-consensus residues within and flanking this motif do not appear to be critical for binding. In spite of this shared mode of binding, the WW domains of YAP2 display distinct conformational dynamics in complex with PPXY motifs derived from ErbB4. Collectively, our study lends new insights into the molecular basis of a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of cellular processes.

  7. Molecular Basis for the Neutralization of Tumor Necrosis Factor α by Certolizumab Pegol in the Treatment of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Un; Shin, Woori; Son, Ji Young; Yoo, Ki-Young; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2017-01-23

    Monoclonal antibodies against TNFα, including infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol, are widely used for the treatment of the inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Recently, the crystal structures of TNFα, in complex with the Fab fragments of infliximab and adalimumab, have revealed the molecular mechanisms of these antibody drugs. Here, we report the crystal structure of TNFα in complex with the Fab fragment of certolizumab pegol to clarify the precise antigen-antibody interactions and the structural basis for the neutralization of TNFα by this therapeutic antibody. The structural analysis and the mutagenesis study revealed that the epitope is limited to a single protomer of the TNFα trimer. Additionally, the DE loop and the GH loop of TNFα play critical roles in the interaction with certolizumab, suggesting that this drug exerts its effects by partially occupying the receptor binding site of TNFα. In addition, a conformational change of the DE loop was induced by certolizumab binding, thereby interrupting the TNFα-receptor interaction. A comprehensive comparison of the interactions of TNFα blockers with TNFα revealed the epitope diversity on the surface of TNFα, providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of TNFα blockers. The accumulation of these structural studies can provide a basis for the improvement of therapeutic antibodies against TNFα.

  8. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products.

  9. Mechanical and molecular basis for the symmetrical division of the fission yeast nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Božič, Bojan; Svetina, Saša

    2015-06-28

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout mitosis and undergoes a series of symmetrical morphological changes when the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), embedded in the nuclear envelope, are pushed apart by elongating spindle microtubules. These symmetrical membrane shape transformations do not correspond to the shape behavior of an analogous system based on lipid vesicles. Here we report that the symmetry of the dividing fission yeast nucleus is ensured by SPB-chromosome attachments, as loss of kinetochore clustering in the vicinity of SPBs results in the formation of abnormal asymmetric shapes with long membrane tethers. We integrated these findings in a biophysical model, which explains the symmetry of the nuclear shapes on the basis of forces exerted by chromosomes clustered at SPBs on the extending nuclear envelope. Based on this analysis we conclude that the fission yeast nuclear envelope exhibits the same mechanical properties as simple lipid vesicles, but interactions with other cellular components, such as chromosomes, influence the nuclear shape during mitosis, allowing the formation of otherwise energetically unfavorable symmetrical dumbbell structures upon spindle elongation. The model allows us to explain the appearance of abnormal asymmetric shapes in fission yeast mutants with mis-segregated chromosomes as well as with altered nuclear membrane composition.

  10. Regulation of malic enzyme expression and the molecular basis for a cytosolic malic enzyme null mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate the basis for the MOD-1 null mutation, a {lambda}gt 11 cDNA library was constructed using mRNA from the livers of induced MOD-1 null mice as a template. A recombinant phage with a 2kb insert was isolated by screening with wild type malic enzyme cDNA probes. The subcloned insert exhibited an atypical (non-wild type) restriction pattern and was subjected to sequence analysis. MOD-1 null malic enzyme cDNA contains an internal, tandemly-duplicated sequence that corresponds to nucleotides 1027-1548 in the coding region of wild type murine malic enzyme cDNA. An open reading frame is retained throughout the duplicated sequences. The discovery of a 522 nucleotide, in-frame duplication accounts for the increased size of MOD-1 null malic enzyme mRNAs. Western immunoblot analysis disclosed that MOD-1 null liver cytosol contains an 82 kDa protein that is recognized by anti malic enzyme antibodies. Under stringent conditions, an anti-sense {sup 32}P-oligonucleotide that spans the abnormal junction between the reiterated sequences hybridized with the 2.5 and 3.6 kb MOD-1 null malic enzyme mRNAs, but failed to form stable complexes with wild type malic enzyme mRNAs.

  11. Molecular basis for the reproductive division of labour in a lower termite

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Tobias; Rehli, Michael; Korb, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Background Polyphenism, the expression of different phenotypes with the same genetic background, is well known for social insects. The substantial physiological and morphological differences among the castes generally are the result of differential gene expression. In lower termites, workers are developmentally flexible to become neotenic replacement reproductives via a single moult after the death of the founding reproductives. Thus, both castes (neotenics and workers) are expected to differ mainly in the expression of genes linked to reproductive division of labour, which constitutes the fundamental basis of insect societies. Results Representational difference analysis of cDNAs was used to study differential gene expression between neotenics and workers in the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus (Kalotermitidae). We identified and, at least partially cloned five novel genes that were highly expressed in female neotenics. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of all five genes in different castes (neotenics, founding reproductives, winged sexuals and workers of both sexes) confirmed the differential expression patterns. In addition, the relative expression of these genes was determined in three body parts of female neotenics (head, thorax, and abdomen) using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion The identified genes could be involved in the control and regulation of reproductive division of labour. Interestingly, this study revealed an expression pattern partly similar to social Hymenoptera indicating both common and species-specific regulatory mechanisms in hemimetabolous and holometabolous social insects. PMID:17598892

  12. The molecular basis of viral oncolysis: usurpation of the Ras signaling pathway by reovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Strong, J E; Coffey, M C; Tang, D; Sabinin, P; Lee, P W

    1998-01-01

    NIH-3T3 cells, which are resistant to reovirus infection, became susceptible when transformed with activated Sos or Ras. Restriction of reovirus proliferation in untransformed NIH-3T3 cells was not at the level of viral gene transcription, but rather at the level of viral protein synthesis. An analysis of cell lysates revealed that a 65 kDa protein was phosphorylated in untransformed NIH-3T3 cells, but only after infection with reovirus. This protein was not phosphorylated in infected or uninfected transformed cells. The 65 kDa protein was determined to be the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), whose phosphorylation leads to translation inhibition. Inhibition of PKR phosphorylation by 2-aminopurine, or deletion of the Pkr gene, led to drastic enhancement of reovirus protein synthesis in untransformed cells. The emerging picture is one in which early viral transcripts trigger PKR phosphorylation in untransformed cells, which in turn leads to inhibition of translation of viral genes; this phosphorylation event is blocked by an element(s) in the Ras pathway in the transformed cells, allowing viral protein synthesis to ensue. The usurpation of the Ras signaling pathway therefore constitutes the basis of reovirus oncolysis. PMID:9628872

  13. Molecular And Structural Basis of Cytokine Receptor Pleiotropy in the Interleukin-4/13 System

    SciTech Connect

    LaPorte, S.L.; Juo, Z.S.; Vaclavikova, J.; Colf, L.A.; Qi, X.; Heller, N.M.; Keegan, A.D.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-20

    Interleukin-4 and Interleukin-13 are cytokines critical to the development of T cell-mediated humoral immune responses, which are associated with allergy and asthma, and exert their actions through three different combinations of shared receptors. Here we present the crystal structures of the complete set of type I (IL-4R{alpha}/{gamma}{sub c}/IL-4) and type II (IL-4R/IL-13R{alpha}1/IL-4, IL-4R{alpha}/IL-13R{alpha}1/IL-13) ternary signaling complexes. The type I complex reveals a structural basis for {gamma}{sub c}'s ability to recognize six different {gamma}{sub c}-cytokines. The two type II complexes utilize an unusual top-mounted Ig-like domain on IL-13R{alpha}1 for a novel mode of cytokine engagement that contributes to a reversal in the IL-4 versus IL-13 ternary complex assembly sequences, which are mediated through substantially different recognition chemistries. We also show that the type II receptor heterodimer signals with different potencies in response to IL-4 versus IL-13 and suggest that the extracellular cytokine-receptor interactions are modulating intracellular membrane-proximal signaling events.

  14. Molecular basis of MAPK-activated protein kinase 2:p38 assembly

    PubMed Central

    White, Andre; Pargellis, Christopher A.; Studts, Joey M.; Werneburg, Brian G.; Farmer, Bennett T.

    2007-01-01

    p38 MAPK and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) are key components of signaling pathways leading to many cellular responses, notably the proinflammatory cytokine production. The physical association of p38α isoform and MK2 is believed to be physiologically important for this signaling. We report the 2.7-Å resolution crystal structure of the unphosphorylated complex between p38α and MK2. These protein kinases bind “head-to-head,” present their respective active sites on approximately the same side of the heterodimer, and form extensive intermolecular interactions. Among these interactions, the MK2 Ile-366–Ala-390, which includes the bipartite nuclear localization signal, binds to the p38α-docking region. This binding supports the involvement of noncatalytic regions to the tight binding of the MK2:p38α binary assembly. The MK2 residues 345–365, containing the nuclear export signal, block access to the p38α active site. Some regulatory phosphorylation regions of both protein kinases engage in multiple interactions with one another in this complex. This structure gives new insights into the regulation of the protein kinases p38α and MK2, aids in the better understanding of their known cellular and biochemical studies, and provides a basis for understanding other regulatory protein–protein interactions involving signal transduction proteins. PMID:17395714

  15. Molecular basis of proton block of L-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen ions are important regulators of ion flux through voltage- gated Ca2+ channels but their site of action has been controversial. To identify molecular determinants of proton block of L-type Ca2+ channels, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and unitary current recordings from wild-type (WT) and mutant L-type Ca2+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. WT channels in 150 mM K+ displayed two conductance states, deprotonated (140 pS) and protonated (45 pS), as found previously in native L-type Ca2+ channels. Proton block was altered in a unique fashion by mutation of each of the four P-region glutamates (EI-EIV) that form the locus of high affinity Ca2+ interaction. Glu(E)-->Gln(Q) substitution in either repeats I or III abolished the high-conductance state, as if the titration site had become permanently protonated. While the EIQ mutant displayed only an approximately 40 pS conductance, the EIIIQ mutant showed the approximately 40 pS conductance plus additional pH-sensitive transitions to an even lower conductance level. The EIVQ mutant exhibited the same deprotonated and protonated conductance states as WT, but with an accelerated rate of deprotonation. The EIIQ mutant was unusual in exhibiting three conductance states (approximately 145, 102, 50 pS, respectively). Occupancy of the low conductance state increased with external acidification, albeit much higher proton concentration was required than for WT. In contrast, the equilibrium between medium and high conductance levels was apparently pH-insensitive. We concluded that the protonation site in L-type Ca2+ channels lies within the pore and is formed by a combination of conserved P-region glutamates in repeats I, II, and III, acting in concert. EIV lies to the cytoplasmic side of the site but exerts an additional stabilizing influence on protonation, most likely via electrostatic interaction. These findings are likely to hold for all voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and provide a simple molecular explanation

  16. Molecular basis for agonist selectivity and activation of the orphan BRS-3-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nieves; Hocart, Simon J.; Portal-Nuñez, Sergio; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Zudaire, Enrique; Coy, David H.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3(BRS-3), a G protein-coupled orphan receptor, shares 51% identity with the mammalian bombesin(Bn) receptor for gastrin-releasing peptide(GRPR). There is increasing interest in BRS-3 because it is important in energy metabolism, glucose control,motility and tumor-growth. BRS-3 has low affinity for all Bn-related peptides, however, recently synthetic high-affinity agonists[D-Tyr6/D-Phe6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6–14) were described, but they are nonselective for BRS-3 over other Bn-receptors. Based on these peptides, three BRS-3 selective-ligands were developed: peptide#2,[D-Tyr6(R)-Apa11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn(6–14); peptide#3,[D-Tyr6,(R)-Apa11,4Cl-Phe13,Nle14]Bn(6–14); peptide #4,Ac-Phe-Trp-Ala-His(tBzl)-Nip-Gly-Arg-NH2. Their molecular determinants of selectivity/high affinity for BRS-3 are unknown. To address this we used a chimeric/site-mutagenesis approach. Substitution of extracellular domain2(EC2) of BRS-3 by the comparable GRPR domain decreased 26-,4,0-fold affinity for peptides#4,3,2. Substitution of EC3 decreased affinity 4-,11-,0-fold affinity for peptides#2,3,4. Ten point mutations in the EC2 and adjacent transmembrane regions (TM2) 2 and 3 of BRS-3 were made. His107(EC2-BRS-3) for lysine(H107K)(EC2-GRPR), decreased affinity(25-,0-fold) for peptide#4,1; however it could not be activated by either peptide. Its combination with Val101(TM2),Gly112(EC2),Arg127(TM3) resulted in complete loss-of-affinity of peptide#4. Receptor-modeling showed that each of these residues face inward and are within 4Å of the binding-pocket. These results demonstrate [Val101,His107,Gly112,Arg127] in the EC2/adjacent upper TMs of BRS-3 are critical for the high BRS3-selectivity of peptide#4. His107 in EC2 is essential for BRS-3 activation, suggesting amino-aromatic ligand/receptor interactions with peptide#4 are critical for both binding/ activation. Furthermore, these result demonstrate that even though these three BRS-3 selective agonists were developed

  17. Alternative basis functions for L sup 2 calculations on the molecular continuum. I. The basic prototype integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Fortunelli, A.; Carravetta, V. )

    1992-04-01

    Alternative square-integrable ({ital L}{sup 2}) basis functions, the oscillating Hermite Gaussian functions (OHGF's), are proposed for describing the continuum orbitals in {ital L}{sup 2} calculations on molecules. Each function is the product of a Hermite Gaussian function (HGF), which gives the proper dumping and angular factor, and a radial trigonometric function, cos({ital kr}), which describes the oscillating asymptotic behavior of a continuum orbital. Analytic expressions for the one- and two-electron integrals involving {ital s}-type OHGF's and many-center {ital s}-type HGF's are derived and their numerical implementation is discussed in detail. The present proposal of adopting a mixed basis set of OHGF's and many-center HGF's for the {ital L}{sup 2} description of bound and continuum molecular states is compared with the other types of basis functions currently employed. With respect to these, it requires a greater computational effort in the integral evaluation, but it also allows an accurate description of the electronic continuum in general polyatomic systems.

  18. Molecular basis of a novel renal amyloidosis due to N184K gelsolin variant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonì, Francesco; Milani, Mario; Porcari, Riccardo; Barbiroli, Alberto; Ricagno, Stefano; De Rosa, Matteo

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in gelsolin are responsible for a systemic amyloidosis first described in 1969. Until recently, the disease was associated with two substitutions of the same residue, leading to the loss of the calcium binding site. Novel interest arose in 2014 when the N184K variant of the protein was identified as the etiological agent of a novel kidney-localized amyloidosis. Here we provide a first rationale for N184K pathogenicity. We show that the mutation induces a destabilization of gelsolin second domain, without compromising its calcium binding capacity. X-ray data combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the primary source of the destabilization is a loss of connectivity in proximity of the metal. Such rearrangement of the H-bond network does not have a major impact on the overall fold of the domain, nevertheless, it increases the flexibility of a stretch of the protein, which is consequently processed by furin protease. Overall our data suggest that the N184K variant is subjected to the same aberrant proteolytic events responsible for the formation of amyloidogenic fragments in the previously characterized mutants. At the same time our data suggest that a broader number of mutations, unrelated to the metal binding site, can lead to a pathogenic phenotype.

  19. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  20. Molecular basis of xeroderma pigmentosum group C DNA recognition by engineered meganucleases.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pilar; Prieto, Jesús; Muñoz, Inés G; Alibés, Andreu; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Cabaniols, Jean-Pierre; Daboussi, Fayza; Arnould, Sylvain; Perez, Christophe; Duchateau, Philippe; Pâques, Frédéric; Blanco, Francisco J; Montoya, Guillermo

    2008-11-06

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a monogenic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultraviolet light. The cells of xeroderma pigmentosum patients are defective in nucleotide excision repair, limiting their capacity to eliminate ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, and resulting in a strong predisposition to develop skin cancers. The use of rare cutting DNA endonucleases-such as homing endonucleases, also known as meganucleases-constitutes one possible strategy for repairing DNA lesions. Homing endonucleases have emerged as highly specific molecular scalpels that recognize and cleave DNA sites, promoting efficient homologous gene targeting through double-strand-break-induced homologous recombination. Here we describe two engineered heterodimeric derivatives of the homing endonuclease I-CreI, produced by a semi-rational approach. These two molecules-Amel3-Amel4 and Ini3-Ini4-cleave DNA from the human XPC gene (xeroderma pigmentosum group C), in vitro and in vivo. Crystal structures of the I-CreI variants complexed with intact and cleaved XPC target DNA suggest that the mechanism of DNA recognition and cleavage by the engineered homing endonucleases is similar to that of the wild-type I-CreI. Furthermore, these derivatives induced high levels of specific gene targeting in mammalian cells while displaying no obvious genotoxicity. Thus, homing endonucleases can be designed to recognize and cleave the DNA sequences of specific genes, opening up new possibilities for genome engineering and gene therapy in xeroderma pigmentosum patients whose illness can be treated ex vivo.

  1. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  2. Mechanistic basis for the recognition of a misfolded protein by the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Oroz, Javier; Kim, Jin Hae; Chang, Bliss J; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2017-02-20

    The critical toxic species in over 40 human diseases are misfolded proteins. Their interaction with molecular chaperones such as Hsp90, which preferentially interacts with metastable proteins, is essential for the blocking of disease progression. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the misfolded cytotoxic monomer of the amyloidogenic human protein transthyretin, which is characterized by the release of the C-terminal β-strand and perturbations of the A-B loop. The misfolded transthyretin monomer, but not the wild-type protein, binds to human Hsp90. In the bound state, the Hsp90 dimer predominantly populates an open conformation, and transthyretin retains its globular structure. The interaction surface for the transthyretin monomer comprises the N-terminal and middle domains of Hsp90 and overlaps with that of the Alzheimer's-disease-related protein tau. Taken together, the data suggest that Hsp90 uses a mechanism for the recognition of aggregation-prone proteins that is largely distinct from those of other Hsp90 clients.

  3. Molecular basis of a novel renal amyloidosis due to N184K gelsolin variant

    PubMed Central

    Bonì, Francesco; Milani, Mario; Porcari, Riccardo; Barbiroli, Alberto; Ricagno, Stefano; de Rosa, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in gelsolin are responsible for a systemic amyloidosis first described in 1969. Until recently, the disease was associated with two substitutions of the same residue, leading to the loss of the calcium binding site. Novel interest arose in 2014 when the N184K variant of the protein was identified as the etiological agent of a novel kidney-localized amyloidosis. Here we provide a first rationale for N184K pathogenicity. We show that the mutation induces a destabilization of gelsolin second domain, without compromising its calcium binding capacity. X-ray data combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the primary source of the destabilization is a loss of connectivity in proximity of the metal. Such rearrangement of the H-bond network does not have a major impact on the overall fold of the domain, nevertheless, it increases the flexibility of a stretch of the protein, which is consequently processed by furin protease. Overall our data suggest that the N184K variant is subjected to the same aberrant proteolytic events responsible for the formation of amyloidogenic fragments in the previously characterized mutants. At the same time our data suggest that a broader number of mutations, unrelated to the metal binding site, can lead to a pathogenic phenotype. PMID:27633054

  4. The Molecular Basis for Control of ETEC Enterotoxin Expression in Response to Environment and Host

    PubMed Central

    Haycocks, James R. J.; Sharma, Prateek; Stringer, Anne M.; Wade, Joseph T.; Grainger, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause severe diarrhoea in humans and neonatal farm animals. Annually, 380,000 human deaths, and multi-million dollar losses in the farming industry, can be attributed to ETEC infections. Illness results from the action of enterotoxins, which disrupt signalling pathways that manage water and electrolyte homeostasis in the mammalian gut. The resulting fluid loss is treated by oral rehydration. Hence, aqueous solutions of glucose and salt are ingested by the patient. Given the central role of enterotoxins in disease, we have characterised the regulatory trigger that controls toxin production. We show that, at the molecular level, the trigger is comprised of two gene regulatory proteins, CRP and H-NS. Strikingly, this renders toxin expression sensitive to both conditions encountered on host cell attachment and the components of oral rehydration therapy. For example, enterotoxin expression is induced by salt in an H-NS dependent manner. Furthermore, depending on the toxin gene, expression is activated or repressed by glucose. The precise sensitivity of the regulatory trigger to glucose differs because of variations in the regulatory setup for each toxin encoding gene. PMID:25569153

  5. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence.

  6. Molecular-basis of single-walled carbon nanotube recognition by single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Daniel; Mittal, Jeetain; Jagota, Anand

    2012-03-14

    Hybrids of biological molecules and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) have proven useful for SWCNT sorting and are enabling several biomedical applications in sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. In the DNA-SWCNT system, certain short (10-20mer) sequences of single-stranded DNA recognize specific SWCNT, allowing the latter to be sorted from a chirality diverse mixture. (1) However, little is known about the DNA secondary structures that underlie their recognition of SWCNTs. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) of multiple strands on a single SWCNT, we report that DNA forms ordered structures on SWCNTs that are strongly DNA sequence and SWCNT dependent. DNA sequence (TAT)(4) on its recognition partner, the (6,5) SWCNT, (1) forms an ordered right-handed helically wrapped barrel, stabilized by intrastrand, self-stitching hydrogen bonds and interstrand hydrogen bonding. The same sequence on the larger diameter (8,7)-SWCNT forms a different and less-stable structure, demonstrating SWCNT selectivity. In contrast, homopolymer (T)(12), with weaker tendency for intrastrand hydrogen bonding, forms a distinctly left-handed wrap on the (6,5)-SWCNT, demonstrating DNA sequence specificity. Experimental measurements show that (TAT)(4) selectively disperses smaller diameter SWCNTs more efficiently than (T)(12), establishing a relationship between recognition motifs and binding strength. The developing understanding of DNA secondary structure on nanomaterials can shed light on a number of issues involving hybrids of nanomaterials and biological molecules, including nanomedicine, health-effects of nanomaterials, and nanomaterial processing.

  7. [Molecular basis of one-way serological reaction between SINV and XJ-160 virus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-hua; Fu, Shi-hong; Yang, Yi-liang; Zhu, Wu-yang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guo-dong

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of one-way serological reaction between XJ-160 virus and SINV by recombinant viruses which exchanged the glycoprotein genes individually or simultaneously. Three recombinant viruses were obtained based on the whole-length infectious cDNA clone of XJ-160 virus. The infectivity and pathogenesis to BHK-21 cells and animals were studied and the gene which controlled this one-way serological reaction phenomenon was searched by MCPENT. The results showed that the E2 glycoprotein was the main factor which influenced the growth rate, plaque morphology and pathogenicity of BHK-21 cells and suckling mice. The results of MCPENT showed that the E2 glycoprotein of SINV played a major role in this one-way serological reaction phenomenon. Our study identified the SINE2 gene was the determined gene for one way serological reaction between XJ-160 virus and SINV, and this research laid the foundation for further analysis of the genomic structure and function of SINV.

  8. Cellular and molecular basis for the regulation of inflammation by TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Yu; Mori, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been shown to play an essential role in the suppression of inflammation, yet recent studies have revealed the positive roles of TGF-β in inflammatory responses. For example, TGF-β induces Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells (iTregs) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2), while in the presence of IL-6, it induces pathogenic IL-17 producing Th17 cells. TGF-β inhibits the proliferation of immune cells as well as cytokine production via Foxp3-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Little is known about molecular mechanisms involved in immune suppression via TGF-β; however, Smad2/3 have been shown to play essential roles in Foxp3 induction as well as in IL-2 and IFN-γ suppression, whereas Th17 differentiation is promoted via the Smad-independent pathway. Interaction between TGF-β and other cytokine signaling is important in establishing the balance of immunity and tolerance. PMID:20410014

  9. Scarless integumentary wound healing in the mammalian fetus: molecular basis and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Kathju, Sandeep; Gallo, Phillip H; Satish, Latha

    2012-09-01

    Adult mammals respond to injury of their skin/integument by forming scar tissue. Scar is useful in rapidly sealing an injured area, but can also lead to significant morbidity. Mammals in fetal life retain the ability to heal integumentary wounds regeneratively, without scar. The critical molecular mechanisms governing this remarkable phenomenon have been a subject of great interest, in the hopes that these could be dissected and recapitulated in the healing adult wound, with the goal of inducing scarless healing in injured patients. Multiple lines of investigation spanning decades have implicated a number of factors in distinguishing scarless from fibrotic wound healing, including most prominently transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10, among others. Therapeutic interventions to try to mitigate scarring in adult wounds have been developed out of these studies, and have reached the level of clinical trials in humans, although as yet no FDA-approved treatment exists. More recent expressomic studies have revealed many more genes that are differentially expressed in scarlessly healing fetal wounds compared with adult, and microRNAs have also been identified as participating in the fetal wound healing response. These represent an even greater range of potential therapeutics (or targets for therapy) to translate the promise of scarless fetal wound healing to the injured adult patient.

  10. Defending against pathogens – immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  11. Molecular basis of Kar9-Bim1 complex function during mating and spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Manatschal, Cristina; Farcas, Ana-Maria; Degen, Miriam Steiner; Bayer, Mathias; Kumar, Anil; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer, Rudolf; Barral, Yves; Steinmetz, Michel O.

    2016-01-01

    The Kar9 pathway promotes nuclear fusion during mating and spindle alignment during metaphase in budding yeast. How Kar9 supports the different outcome of these two divergent processes is an open question. Here, we show that three sites in the C-terminal disordered domain of Kar9 mediate tight Kar9 interaction with the C-terminal dimerization domain of Bim1 (EB1 orthologue). Site1 and Site2 contain SxIP motifs; however, Site3 defines a novel type of EB1-binding site. Whereas Site2 and Site3 mediate Kar9 recruitment to microtubule tips, nuclear movement, and karyogamy, only Site2 functions in spindle positioning during metaphase. Site1 in turn plays an inhibitory role during mating. Additionally, the Kar9-Bim1 complex is involved in microtubule-independent activities during mating. Together, our data reveal how multiple and partially redundant EB1-binding sites provide a microtubule-associated protein with the means to modulate its biochemical properties to promote different molecular processes during cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27682587

  12. A molecular and neuronal basis for amino acid sensing in the Drosophila larva

    PubMed Central

    Croset, Vincent; Schleyer, Michael; Arguello, J. Roman; Gerber, Bertram; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important nutrients for animals, reflected in conserved internal pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates for monitoring cellular levels of these compounds. In mammals, sensory cells and metabotropic glutamate receptor-related taste receptors that detect environmental sources of amino acids in food are also well-characterised. By contrast, it is unclear how insects perceive this class of molecules through peripheral chemosensory mechanisms. Here we investigate amino acid sensing in Drosophila melanogaster larvae, which feed ravenously to support their rapid growth. We show that larvae display diverse behaviours (attraction, aversion, neutral) towards different amino acids, which depend upon stimulus concentration. Some of these behaviours require IR76b, a member of the variant ionotropic glutamate receptor repertoire of invertebrate chemoreceptors. IR76b is broadly expressed in larval taste neurons, suggesting a role as a co-receptor. We identify a subpopulation of these neurons that displays physiological activation by some, but not all, amino acids, and which mediate suppression of feeding by high concentrations of at least a subset of these compounds. Our data reveal the first elements of a sophisticated neuronal and molecular substrate by which these animals detect and behave towards external sources of amino acids. PMID:27982028

  13. Molecular basis for disruption of E-cadherin adhesion by botulinum neurotoxin A complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangkook; Zhong, Xiaofen; Gu, Shenyan; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Dorner, Martin B.; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-01-01

    How botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cross the host intestinal epithelial barrier in foodborne botulism is poorly understood. Here, we present the crystal structure of a clostridial hemagglutinin (HA) complex of serotype BoNT/A bound to the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin at 2.4 Ångströms. The HA complex recognizes E-cadherin with high specificity involving extensive intermolecular interactions and also binds to carbohydrates on the cell surface. Binding of HA complex sequesters E-cadherin in the monomeric state thereby compromising the E-cadherin-mediated intercellular barrier and facilitating paracellular absorption of BoNT/A. We reconstituted the complete 14-subunit BoNT/A complex using recombinantly-produced components and demonstrated that abolishing either E-cadherin- or carbohydrate-binding of HA complex drastically reduces oral toxicity of BoNT/A complex in vivo. Together, these studies establish the molecular mechanism of how HAs contribute to the oral toxicity of BoNT/A. PMID:24948737

  14. The Molecular Basis of Ligand Interaction at Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120)*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain fatty acid receptor FFA4 (previously GPR120) is receiving substantial interest as a novel target for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disease. This study examines for the first time the detailed mode of binding of both long-chain fatty acid and synthetic agonist ligands at FFA4 by integrating molecular modeling, receptor mutagenesis, and ligand structure-activity relationship approaches in an iterative format. In doing so, residues required for binding of fatty acid and synthetic agonists to FFA4 have been identified. This has allowed for the refinement of a well validated model of the mode of ligand-FFA4 interaction that will be invaluable in the identification of novel ligands and the future development of this receptor as a therapeutic target. The model reliably predicted the effects of substituent variations on agonist potency, and it was also able to predict the qualitative effect of binding site mutations in the majority of cases. PMID:24860101

  15. Molecular basis of ornithine aminotransferase deficiency in B-6-responsive and -nonresponsive forms of gyrate atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, V.; McClatchey, A.I.; Ramesh, N.; Benoit, L.A.; Berson, E.L.; Shih, V.E.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-06-01

    Gyrate atrophy (GA), a recessive eye disease involving progressive loss of vision due to chorioretinal degeneration, is associated with a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine aminotransferase with consequent hyperornithinemia. Genetic heterogeneity of GA has been suggested by the demonstration that administration of pyridoxine to increase the level of pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor of OATase, reduces hyperornithinemia in a subset of patients. The authors have cloned and sequences cDNAs for OATase from two GA patients, one responsive and one nonresponsive to pyridoxine treatment. The respective cDNAs contained different single missense mutations, which were sufficient to eliminate OATase activity when each cDNA was tested in a eukaryotic expression system. However, like the enzyme in fibroblasts from the pyridoxine-responsive patient, OATase encoded by the corresponding cDNA from this individual showed a significant increase in activity when assayed in the presence of an increased pyridoxal phosphate concentration. These data firmly establish that both pyridoxine responsive and nonresponsive forms of GA result from mutations in the OATase structural gene. Moreover, they provide a molecular characterization of the primary lesion in a pyridoxine-responsive genetic disorder.

  16. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  17. A molecular basis underlying differences in the toxicity of botulinum serotypes A and E

    PubMed Central

    Bajohrs, Mark; Rickman, Colin; Binz, Thomas; Davletov, Bazbek

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) block neurotransmitter release through their specific proteolysis of the proteins responsible for vesicle exocytosis. Paradoxically, two serotypes of BoNTs, A and E, cleave the same molecule, synaptosome-associated protein with relative molecular mass 25K (SNAP-25), and yet they cause synaptic blockade with very different properties. Here we compared the action of BoNTs A and E on the plasma membrane fusion machinery composed of syntaxin and SNAP-25. We now show that the BoNT/A-cleaved SNAP-25 maintains its association with two syntaxin isoforms in vitro, which is mirrored by retention of SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane in vivo. In contrast, BoNT/E severely compromises the ability of SNAP-25 to bind the plasma membrane syntaxin isoforms, leading to dissociation of SNAP-25. The distinct properties of botulinum intoxication, therefore, can result from the ability of shortened SNAP-25 to maintain its association with syntaxins—in the case of BoNT/A poisoning resulting in unproductive syntaxin/SNAP-25 complexes that impede vesicle exocytosis. PMID:15486565

  18. A molecular and neuronal basis for amino acid sensing in the Drosophila larva.

    PubMed

    Croset, Vincent; Schleyer, Michael; Arguello, J Roman; Gerber, Bertram; Benton, Richard

    2016-12-16

    Amino acids are important nutrients for animals, reflected in conserved internal pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates for monitoring cellular levels of these compounds. In mammals, sensory cells and metabotropic glutamate receptor-related taste receptors that detect environmental sources of amino acids in food are also well-characterised. By contrast, it is unclear how insects perceive this class of molecules through peripheral chemosensory mechanisms. Here we investigate amino acid sensing in Drosophila melanogaster larvae, which feed ravenously to support their rapid growth. We show that larvae display diverse behaviours (attraction, aversion, neutral) towards different amino acids, which depend upon stimulus concentration. Some of these behaviours require IR76b, a member of the variant ionotropic glutamate receptor repertoire of invertebrate chemoreceptors. IR76b is broadly expressed in larval taste neurons, suggesting a role as a co-receptor. We identify a subpopulation of these neurons that displays physiological activation by some, but not all, amino acids, and which mediate suppression of feeding by high concentrations of at least a subset of these compounds. Our data reveal the first elements of a sophisticated neuronal and molecular substrate by which these animals detect and behave towards external sources of amino acids.

  19. Molecular Basis of Renal Adaptation in a Murine Model of Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jordan L.; Wilhide, Michael E.; Ingraham, Susan E.; Hains, David S.; McHugh, Kirk M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy is a common cause of chronic kidney disease and a leading indication for renal transplant in children. The cellular and molecular responses of the kidney to congenital obstruction are incompletely characterized. In this study, we evaluated global transcription in kidneys with graded hydronephrosis in the megabladder (mgb−/−) mouse to better understand the pathophysiology of congenital obstructive nephropathy. Three primary pathways associated with kidney remodeling/repair were induced in mgb−/− kidneys independent of the degree of hydronephrosis. These pathways included retinoid signaling, steroid hormone metabolism, and renal response to injury. Urothelial proliferation and the expression of genes with roles in the integrity and maintenance of the renal urothelium were selectively increased in mgb−/− kidneys. Ngal/Lcn2, a marker of acute kidney injury, was elevated in 36% of kidneys with higher grades of hydronephrosis. Evaluation of Ngalhigh versus Ngallow kidneys identified the expression of several novel candidate markers of renal injury. This study indicates that the development of progressive hydronephrosis in mgb−/− mice results in renal adaptation that includes significant changes in the morphology and potential functionality of the renal urothelium. These observations will permit the development of novel biomarkers and therapeutic approaches to progressive renal injury in the context of congenital obstruction. PMID:24023768

  20. Molecular basis of renal adaptation in a murine model of congenital obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Brian; Carpenter, Ashley R; Allen, Jordan L; Wilhide, Michael E; Ingraham, Susan E; Hains, David S; McHugh, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy is a common cause of chronic kidney disease and a leading indication for renal transplant in children. The cellular and molecular responses of the kidney to congenital obstruction are incompletely characterized. In this study, we evaluated global transcription in kidneys with graded hydronephrosis in the megabladder (mgb (-/-)) mouse to better understand the pathophysiology of congenital obstructive nephropathy. Three primary pathways associated with kidney remodeling/repair were induced in mgb (-/-) kidneys independent of the degree of hydronephrosis. These pathways included retinoid signaling, steroid hormone metabolism, and renal response to injury. Urothelial proliferation and the expression of genes with roles in the integrity and maintenance of the renal urothelium were selectively increased in mgb (-/-) kidneys. Ngal/Lcn2, a marker of acute kidney injury, was elevated in 36% of kidneys with higher grades of hydronephrosis. Evaluation of Ngal(high) versus Ngal(low) kidneys identified the expression of several novel candidate markers of renal injury. This study indicates that the development of progressive hydronephrosis in mgb (-/-) mice results in renal adaptation that includes significant changes in the morphology and potential functionality of the renal urothelium. These observations will permit the development of novel biomarkers and therapeutic approaches to progressive renal injury in the context of congenital obstruction.

  1. Molecular basis of active copper resistance mechanisms in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bondarczuk, Kinga; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-12-01

    Copper is a metallic element that is crucial for cell metabolism; however, in extended concentrations, it is toxic for all living organisms. The dual nature of copper has forced organisms, including bacteria, to keep a tight hold on cellular copper content. This challenge has led to the evolution of complex mechanisms that on one hand enable them to deliver the essential element and on the other to protect cells against its toxicity. Such mechanisms have been found in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In bacteria a number of different systems such as extra- and intracellular sequestration, enzymatic detoxification, and metal removal from the cell enabling them to survive in the presence of high concentration of copper have been identified. Gram-negative bacteria, due to their additional compartment, need to deal with both cytoplasmic and periplasmic copper. Therefore, these bacteria have evolved intricate and precisely regulated systems which interact with each other. In this review the active mechanisms of copper resistance at their molecular level are discussed.

  2. Diseases of the tooth: the genetic and molecular basis of inherited anomalies affecting the dentition.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    In humans, inherited variation in the number, size, and shape of teeth within the dentitions are relatively common, while rarer defects of hard tissue formation, including amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, and problems associated with tooth eruption are also seen. In many cases, these anomalies occur in isolation, but they can also present as a feature of numerous well-characterized developmental syndromes. Complex reiterative signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme is a feature of normal tooth development in the embryo, occurring from early patterning through morphogenesis, hard tissue formation and during root development. Significant events also occur during postnatal development of the dentition, including hard tissue maturation and tooth eruption. In the last decade, advances in human and mouse genetics have meant that in many cases candidate genes have been identified for these anomalies. These genes have provided a useful platform for developmental biologists, allowing them to begin elucidating how these signals interact to generate a functional dentition and understand the mechanisms underlying many of the anomalies that are seen in human populations. In this article, we review current concepts relating to the developmental biology of tooth number, size, and shape, formation of the dental hard tissues and eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. We will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in both health and disease.

  3. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cattò, Cristina; Dell’Orto, Silvia; Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Vitali, Alberto; Marzano, Valeria; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and screened against Escherichia coli to understand the structural requirements necessary for biofilm inhibition at sub-lethal concentrations. Considerations concerning the relationship between structure and anti-biofilm activity revealed that i) the para-sulfoxy ester group is not needed to exploit the anti-biofilm activity of the molecule, it is the cinnamic acid scaffold that is responsible for anti-biofilm performance; ii) the anti-biofilm activity of ZA derivatives depends on the presence of a carboxylate anion and, consequently, on its hydrogen-donating ability; iii) the conjugated aromatic system is instrumental to the anti-biofilm activities of ZA and its analogues. Using a protein pull-down approach, combined with mass spectrometry, the herein-defined active structure of ZA was matrix-immobilized, and was proved to interact with the E. coli NADH:quinone reductase, WrbA, suggesting a possible role of this protein in the biofilm formation process. PMID:26132116

  4. The dopaminergic basis of human behaviors: a review of molecular imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, Alice; Mehta, Mitul A; Montgomery, Andrew J; Lappin, Julia M; Howes, Oliver D; Reeves, Suzanne J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Grasby, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review describes human molecular imaging studies which have investigated alterations in extracellular DA levels during performance of behavioral tasks. Whilst heterogeneity in experimental methods limits meta-analysis, we describe the advantages and limitations of different methodological approaches. Interpretation of experimental results may be limited by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes, head movement and choice of control conditions. We revisit our original study of striatal DA release during video-game playing (Koepp et al., 1998) to illustrate the potentially confounding influences of head movement and alterations in rCBF. Changes in [11C]raclopride binding may be detected in extrastriatal as well as striatal brain regions – however we review evidence which suggests that extrastriatal changes may not be clearly interpreted in terms of DA release. Whilst several investigations have detected increases in striatal extracellular DA concentrations during task components such as motor learning and execution, reward-related processes, stress and cognitive performance, the presence of potentially biasing factors should be carefully considered (and, where possible, accounted for) when designing and interpreting future studies. PMID:19481108

  5. Molecular basis for endothelial lumen formation and tubulogenesis during vasculogenesis and angiogenic sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Koh, Wonshill

    2013-01-01

    Many studies reveal a fundamental role for extracellular matrix-mediated signaling through integrins and Rho GTPases as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the molecular control of vascular tube morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins that controls these vascular morphogenic events. These findings reveal a signaling interdependence between Cdc42 and MT1-MMP to control the 3D matrix-specific process of EC tubulogenesis. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically-generated vascular guidance tunnels in 3D matrices that are utilized to remodel EC-lined tubes through EC motility and could facilitate processes such as flow-induced remodeling and arteriovenous EC sorting and differentiation. Within vascular guidance tunnels, key dynamic interactions occur between endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes to affect vessel remodeling, diameter, and vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a fundamental process necessary for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. Thus, the EC lumen and tube formation mechanism coordinates the concomitant establishment of a network of vascular tubes within tunnel spaces to allow for flow responsiveness, EC-mural cell interactions, and vascular extracellular matrix assembly to control the development of the functional microcirculation. PMID:21482411

  6. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  7. Molecular basis and quantitative assessment of TRF1 and TRF2 protein interactions with TIN2 and Apollo peptides.

    PubMed

    Kalathiya, Umesh; Padariya, Monikaben; Baginski, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Shelterin is a six-protein complex (TRF1, TRF2, POT1, RAP1, TIN2, and TPP1) that also functions in smaller subsets in regulation and protection of human telomeres. Two closely related proteins, TRF1 and TRF2, make high-affinity contact directly with double-stranded telomeric DNA and serve as a molecular platform. Protein TIN2 binds to TRF1 and TRF2 dimer-forming domains, whereas Apollo makes interaction only with TRF2. To elucidate the molecular basis of these interactions, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of TRF1TRFH-TIN2TBM and TRF2TRFH-TIN2TBM/ApolloTBM complexes and of the isolated proteins. MD enabled a structural and dynamical comparison of protein-peptide complexes including H-bond interactions and interfacial residues that may regulate TRF protein binding to the given peptides, especially focusing on interactions described in crystallographic data. Residues with a selective function in both TRF1TRFH and TRF2TRFH and forming a stable hydrogen bond network with TIN2TBM or ApolloTBM peptides were traced. Our study revealed that TIN2TBM forms a well-defined binding mode with TRF1TRFH as compared to TRF2TRFH, and that the binding pocket of TIN2TBM is deeper for TRF2TRFH protein than ApolloTBM. The MD data provide a basis for the reinterpretation of mutational data obtained in crystallographic work for the TRF proteins. Together, the previously determined X-ray structure and our MD provide a detailed view of the TRF-peptide binding mode and the structure of TRF1/2 binding pockets. Particular TRF-peptide interactions are very specific for the formation of each protein-peptide complex, identifying TRF proteins as potential targets for the design of inhibitors/drugs modulating telomere machinery for anticancer therapy.

  8. The Molecular Basis of Drug Resistance against Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Keith P.; Ali, Akbar; Aydin, Cihan; Soumana, Djade; Özen, Ayşegül; Deveau, Laura M.; Silver, Casey; Cao, Hong; Newton, Alicia; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Huang, Wei; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of chronic liver diseases, including cirrhosis, liver failure, and liver cancer. Available antiviral therapies cause severe side effects and are effective only for a subset of patients, though treatment outcomes have recently been improved by the combination therapy now including boceprevir and telaprevir, which inhibit the viral NS3/4A protease. Despite extensive efforts to develop more potent next-generation protease inhibitors, however, the long-term efficacy of this drug class is challenged by the rapid emergence of resistance. Single-site mutations at protease residues R155, A156 and D168 confer resistance to nearly all inhibitors in clinical development. Thus, developing the next-generation of drugs that retain activity against a broader spectrum of resistant viral variants requires a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of drug resistance. In this study, 16 high-resolution crystal structures of four representative protease inhibitors – telaprevir, danoprevir, vaniprevir and MK-5172 – in complex with the wild-type protease and three major drug-resistant variants R155K, A156T and D168A, reveal unique molecular underpinnings of resistance to each drug. The drugs exhibit differential susceptibilities to these protease variants in both enzymatic and antiviral assays. Telaprevir, danoprevir and vaniprevir interact directly with sites that confer resistance upon mutation, while MK-5172 interacts in a unique conformation with the catalytic triad. This novel mode of MK-5172 binding explains its retained potency against two multi-drug-resistant variants, R155K and D168A. These findings define the molecular basis of HCV N3/4A protease inhibitor resistance and provide potential strategies for designing robust therapies against this rapidly evolving virus. PMID:22910833

  9. Phylogeny and Molecular Identification of Vibrios on the Basis of Multilocus Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, F. L.; Gevers, D.; Thompson, C. C.; Dawyndt, P.; Naser, S.; Hoste, B.; Munn, C. B.; Swings, J.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the usefulness of rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequences for the identification of vibrios. We sequenced fragments of these loci from a collection of 208 representative strains, including 192 well-documented Vibrionaceae strains and 16 presumptive Vibrio isolates associated with coral bleaching. In order to determine the intraspecies variation among the three loci, we included several representative strains per species. The phylogenetic trees constructed with the different genetic loci were roughly in agreement with former polyphasic taxonomic studies, including the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny of vibrios. The families Vibrionaceae, Photobacteriaceae, Enterovibrionaceae, and Salinivibrionaceae were all differentiated on the basis of each genetic locus. Each species clearly formed separated clusters with at least 98, 94, and 94% rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequence similarity, respectively. The genus Vibrio was heterogeneous and polyphyletic, with Vibrio fischeri, V. logei, and V. wodanis grouping closer to the Photobacterium genus. V. halioticoli-, V. harveyi-, V. splendidus-, and V. tubiashii-related species formed groups within the genus Vibrio. Overall, the three genetic loci were more discriminatory among species than were 16S rRNA sequences. In some cases, e.g., within the V. splendidus and V. tubiashii group, rpoA gene sequences were slightly less discriminatory than recA and pyrH sequences. In these cases, the combination of several loci will yield the most robust identification. We can conclude that strains of the same species will have at least 98, 94, and 94% rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequence similarity, respectively. PMID:16151093

  10. Genetics of Migraine: Insights into the Molecular Basis of Migraine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-01

    Migraine is a complex, debilitating neurovascular disorder, typically characterized by recurring, incapacitating attacks of severe headache often accompanied by nausea and neurological disturbances. It has a strong genetic basis demonstrated by rare migraine disorders caused by mutations in single genes (monogenic), as well as familial clustering of common migraine which is associated with polymorphisms in many genes (polygenic). Hemiplegic migraine is a dominantly inherited, severe form of migraine with associated motor weakness. Family studies have found that mutations in three different ion channels genes, CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A can be causal. Functional studies of these mutations has shown that they can result in defective regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain, which lowers the threshold for cortical spreading depression, a wave of cortical depolarization thought to be involved in headache initiation mechanisms. Other putative genes for monogenic migraine include KCKN18, PRRT2, and CSNK1D, which can also be involved with other disorders. There are a number of primarily vascular disorders caused by mutations in single genes, which are often accompanied by migraine symptoms. Mutations in NOTCH3 causes cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a hereditary cerebrovascular disease that leads to ischemic strokes and dementia, but in which migraine is often present, sometimes long before the onset of other symptoms. Mutations in the TREX1 and COL4A1 also cause vascular disorders, but often feature migraine. With respect to common polygenic migraine, genome-wide association studies have now identified single nucleotide polymorphisms at 38 loci significantly associated with migraine risk. Functions assigned to the genes in proximity to these loci suggest that both neuronal and vascular pathways also contribute to the pathophysiology of common

  11. Molecular Basis of the Defective Heat Stress Response in Mycobacterium leprae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Diana L.; Pittman, Tana L.; Deshotel, Mike; Oby-Robinson, Sandra; Smith, Issar; Husson, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, a major human pathogen, grows poorly at 37°C. The basis for its inability to survive at elevated temperatures was investigated. We determined that M. leprae lacks a protective heat shock response as a result of the lack of transcriptional induction of the alternative sigma factor genes sigE and sigB and the major heat shock operons, HSP70 and HSP60, even though heat shock promoters and regulatory circuits for these genes appear to be intact. M. leprae sigE was found to be capable of complementing the defective heat shock response of mycobacterial sigE knockout mutants only in the presence of a functional mycobacterial sigH, which orchestrates the mycobacterial heat shock response. Since the sigH of M. leprae is a pseudogene, these data support the conclusion that a key aspect of the defective heat shock response in M. leprae is the absence of a functional sigH. In addition, 68% of the genes induced during heat shock in M. tuberculosis were shown to be either absent from the M. leprae genome or were present as pseudogenes. Among these is the hsp/acr2 gene, whose product is essential for M. tuberculosis survival during heat shock. Taken together, these results suggest that the reduced ability of M. leprae to survive at elevated temperatures results from the lack of a functional transcriptional response to heat shock and the absence of a full repertoire of heat stress response genes, including sigH. PMID:17933896

  12. Molecular basis of the differential sensitivity of nematode and mammalian muscle to the anthelmintic agent levamisole.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Bartos, Mariana; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2004-08-27

    Levamisole is an anthelmintic agent that exerts its therapeutic effect by acting as a full agonist of the nicotinic receptor (AChR) of nematode muscle. Its action at the mammalian muscle AChR has not been elucidated to date despite its wide use as an anthelmintic in humans and cattle. By single channel and macroscopic current recordings, we investigated the interaction of levamisole with the mammalian muscle AChR. Levamisole activates mammalian AChRs. However, single channel openings are briefer than those activated by acetylcholine (ACh) and do not appear in clusters at high concentrations. The peak current induced by levamisole is about 3% that activated by ACh. Thus, the anthelmintic acts as a weak agonist of the mammalian AChR. Levamisole also produces open channel blockade of the AChR. The apparent affinity for block (190 microm at -70 mV) is similar to that of the nematode AChR, suggesting that differences in channel activation kinetics govern the different sensitivity of nematode and mammalian muscle to anthelmintics. To identify the structural basis of this different sensitivity, we performed mutagenesis targeting residues in the alpha subunit that differ between vertebrates and nematodes. The replacement of the conserved alphaGly-153 with the homologous glutamic acid of nematode AChR significantly increases the efficacy of levamisole to activate channels. Channel activity takes place in clusters having two different kinetic modes. The kinetics of the high open probability mode are almost identical when the agonist is ACh or levamisole. It is concluded that alphaGly-153 is involved in the low efficacy of levamisole to activate mammalian muscle AChRs.

  13. Molecular basis of P450 OleTJE: an investigation of substrate binding mechanism and major pathways.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Liu, Lin; Guo, Li Zhong; Yao, Xiao Jun; Yang, Jian Ming

    2017-03-25

    Cytochrome P450 OleTJE has attracted much attention for its ability to catalyze the decarboxylation of long chain fatty acids to generate alkenes, which are not only biofuel molecule, but also can be used broadly for making lubricants, polymers and detergents. In this study, the molecular basis of the binding mechanism of P450 OleTJE for arachidic acid, myristic acid, and caprylic acid was investigated by utilizing conventional molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations. Moreover, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations were performed to uncover the most probable access/egress channels for different fatty acids. The predicted binding free energy shows an order of arachidic acid < myristic acid < caprylic acid. Key residues interacting with three substrates and residues specifically binding to one of them were identified. The RAMD results suggest the most likely channel for arachidic acid, myristic acid, and caprylic acid are 2e/2b, 2a and 2f/2a, respectively. It is suggested that the reaction is easier to carry out in myristic acid bound system than those in arachidic acid and caprylic acid bound system based on the distance of Hβ atom of substrate relative to P450 OleTJE Compound I states. This study provided novel insight to understand the substrate preference mechanism of P450 OleTJE and valuable information for rational enzyme design for short chain fatty acid decarboxylation.

  14. Reptilian heart development and the molecular basis of cardiac chamber evolution.

    PubMed

    Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Mori, Alessandro D; Kaynak, Bogac L; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Sukonnik, Tatyana; Georges, Romain O; Latham, Stephany; Beck, Laurel; Beck, Laural; Henkelman, R Mark; Black, Brian L; Olson, Eric N; Wade, Juli; Takeuchi, Jun K; Nemer, Mona; Gilbert, Scott F; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2009-09-03

    The emergence of terrestrial life witnessed the need for more sophisticated circulatory systems. This has evolved in birds, mammals and crocodilians into complete septation of the heart into left and right sides, allowing separate pulmonary and systemic circulatory systems, a key requirement for the evolution of endothermy. However, the evolution of the amniote heart is poorly understood. Reptilian hearts have been the subject of debate in the context of the evolution of cardiac septation: do they possess a single ventricular chamber or two incompletely septated ventricles? Here we examine heart development in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans (a chelonian), and the green anole, Anolis carolinensis (a squamate), focusing on gene expression in the developing ventricles. Both reptiles initially form a ventricular chamber that homogenously expresses the T-box transcription factor gene Tbx5. In contrast, in birds and mammals, Tbx5 is restricted to left ventricle precursors. In later stages, Tbx5 expression in the turtle (but not anole) heart is gradually restricted to a distinct left ventricle, forming a left-right gradient. This suggests that Tbx5 expression was refined during evolution to pattern the ventricles. In support of this hypothesis, we show that loss of Tbx5 in the mouse ventricle results in a single chamber lacking distinct identity, indicating a requirement for Tbx5 in septation. Importantly, misexpression of Tbx5 throughout the developing myocardium to mimic the reptilian expression pattern also results in a single mispatterned ventricular chamber lacking septation. Thus ventricular septation is established by a steep and correctly positioned Tbx5 gradient. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the evolution of the amniote ventricle, and support the concept that altered expression of developmental regulators is a key mechanism of vertebrate evolution.

  15. Microbes on building materials--evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lopandic, Ksenija; Spangl, Bernhard; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Voitl, Christian; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-11-15

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials - common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials.

  16. Behavioural pharmacology and its contribution to the molecular basis of memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, I; McGaugh, J L

    2000-11-01

    Recent findings have significantly advanced our understanding the mechanisms of memory formation. Most of these advances stemmed from behavioural pharmacology research involving, particularly, the localized infusion of drugs with specific molecular actions into specific brain regions. This approach has revealed brain structures involved in different memory types and the main neurotransmitter systems and sequence of metabolic cascades that participate in memory consolidation. Biochemical studies and, in several cases, studies of genetically manipulated animals, in which receptors or enzymes affected by the various drugs were absent or overexpressed, have complemented the pharmacological research. Although most studies have concentrated on the involvement of the hippocampus, many have also investigated the entorhinal cortex, other regions of the cortex, and the amygdala. Behavioural pharmacology has been of crucial importance in establishing the major neurohumoral and hormonal systems involved in the modulation of memory formation. These systems act on specific steps of memory formation in the hippocampus and in the entorhinal, parietal, and cingulate cortex. A specialized system mediated by the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, and involving several neuromodulatory systems, is activated by emotional arousal and serves to regulate memory formation in other brain regions. The core mechanisms involved in the formation of explicit (declarative) memory are in many respects similar to those of long-term potentiation (LTP), particularly in the hippocampus. However, there are also important differences between memory formation and LTP. Memory formation involves numerous modulatory influences, the co-participation of various brain regions other than the hippocampus, and some properties that are specific to memory and absent in LTP (i.e. flexibility of response). We discuss the implications of these similarities and differences for understanding the neural bases of memory.

  17. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Miller, Cassandra L.; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Zou, Juan; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT) domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR's cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs) in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics. PMID:27746744

  18. Molecular Basis of Regulating High Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels by S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng-Hua; Bavencoffe, Alexis; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-12-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, such as vasoregulation and neurotransmission, and has a complex role in the regulation of pain transduction and synaptic transmission. We have shown previously that NO inhibits high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels in primary sensory neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this inhibitory action remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of S-nitrosylation in the NO regulation of high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) rapidly reduced N-type currents when Cav2.2 was coexpressed with the Cavβ1 or Cavβ3 subunits in HEK293 cells. In contrast, SNAP only slightly inhibited P/Q-type and L-type currents reconstituted with various Cavβ subunits. SNAP caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent N-type channel activation, but it had no effect on Cav2.2 protein levels on the membrane surface. The inhibitory effect of SNAP on N-type currents was blocked by the sulfhydryl-specific modifying reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium. Furthermore, the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation were much more abundant in Cav2.2 than in Cav1.2 and Cav2.1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Cys-805, Cys-930, and Cys-1045 in the II-III intracellular loop, Cys-1835 and Cys-2145 in the C terminus of Cav2.2, and Cys-346 in the Cavβ3 subunit were nitrosylation sites mediating NO sensitivity of N-type channels. Our findings demonstrate that the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation in cytoplasmically accessible sites are critically involved in post-translational regulation of N-type Ca(2+) channels by NO. S-Nitrosylation mediates the feedback regulation of N-type channels by NO.

  19. The molecular basis of melanism and mimicry in a swallowtail butterfly.

    PubMed

    Koch, P B; Behnecke, B; ffrench-Constant, R H

    2000-05-18

    Melanism in Lepidoptera, either industrial or in mimicry, is one of the most commonly cited examples of natural selection [1] [2]. Despite extensive studies of the frequency and maintenance of melanic genes in insect populations [1] [2], there has been little work on the underlying molecular mechanisms. Nowhere is butterfly melanism more striking than in the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) of North America [3] [4] [5]. In this species, females can be either yellow (wild type) or black (melanic). The melanic form is a Batesian mimic of the distasteful Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor), which is also black in overall color. Melanism in P. glaucus is controlled by a single Y-linked (female) black gene [6]. Melanic females, therefore, always have melanic daughters. Black melanin replaces the background yellow in melanic females. Here, we show that the key enzyme involved is N-beta-alanyl-dopamine-synthase (BAS), which shunts dopamine from the melanin pathway into the production of the yellow color pigment papiliochrome and also provides products for cuticle sclerotization. In melanic females, this enzyme is suppressed, leading to abnormal melanization of a formerly yellow area, and wing scale maturation is also delayed in the same area. This raises the possibility that either reduced BAS activity itself is preventing scale sclerotization (maturation) or, in contrast, that the delay in scale maturation precludes expression of BAS at the correct stage. Together, these data show how changes in expression of a single gene product could result in multiple wing color phenotypes. The implications for the genetic control of mimicry in other Lepidoptera are discussed.

  20. The molecular basis of phosphate discrimination in arsenate-rich environments.

    PubMed

    Elias, Mikael; Wellner, Alon; Goldin-Azulay, Korina; Chabriere, Eric; Vorholt, Julia A; Erb, Tobias J; Tawfik, Dan S

    2012-11-01

    Arsenate and phosphate are abundant on Earth and have striking similarities: nearly identical pK(a) values, similarly charged oxygen atoms, and thermochemical radii that differ by only 4% (ref. 3). Phosphate is indispensable and arsenate is toxic, but this extensive similarity raises the question whether arsenate may substitute for phosphate in certain niches. However, whether it is used or excluded, discriminating phosphate from arsenate is a paramount challenge. Enzymes that utilize phosphate, for example, have the same binding mode and kinetic parameters as arsenate, and the latter's presence therefore decouples metabolism. Can proteins discriminate between these two anions, and how would they do so? In particular, cellular phosphate uptake systems face a challenge in arsenate-rich environments. Here we describe a molecular mechanism for this process. We examined the periplasmic phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) of the ABC-type transport system that mediates phosphate uptake into bacterial cells, including two PBPs from the arsenate-rich Mono Lake Halomonas strain GFAJ-1. All PBPs tested are capable of discriminating phosphate over arsenate at least 500-fold. The exception is one of the PBPs of GFAJ-1 that shows roughly 4,500-fold discrimination and its gene is highly expressed under phosphate-limiting conditions. Sub-ångström-resolution structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens PBP with both arsenate and phosphate show a unique mode of binding that mediates discrimination. An extensive network of dipole-anion interactions, and of repulsive interactions, results in the 4% larger arsenate distorting a unique low-barrier hydrogen bond. These features enable the phosphate transport system to bind phosphate selectively over arsenate (at least 10(3) excess) even in highly arsenate-rich environments.

  1. Revised molecular basis of the promiscuous carboxylic acid perhydrolase activity in serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2012-06-25

    Several serine hydrolases catalyze a promiscuous reaction: perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to form peroxycarboxylic acids. The working hypothesis is that perhydrolases are more selective than esterases for hydrogen peroxide over water. In this study, we tested this hypothesis, and focused on L29P-PFE (Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase), which catalyzes perhydrolysis of acetic acid 43-fold faster than wild-type PFE. This hypothesis predicts that L29P-PFE should be approximately 43-fold more selective for hydrogen peroxide than wild-type PFE, but experiments show that L29P-PFE is less selective. The ratio of hydrolysis to perhydrolysis of methyl acetate at different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide fit a kinetic model for nucleophile selectivity. L29P-PFE (β(0)=170  M(-1)) is approximately half as selective for hydrogen peroxide over water than wild-type PFE (β(0)=330  M(-1)), which contradicts the working hypothesis. An alternative hypothesis is that carboxylic acid perhydrolases increase perhydrolysis by forming the acyl-enzyme intermediate faster. Consistent with this hypothesis, the rate of acetyl-enzyme formation, measured by (18)O-water exchange into acetic acid, was 25-fold faster with L29P-PFE than with wild-type PFE, which is similar to the 43-fold faster perhydrolysis with L29P-PFE. Molecular modeling of the first tetrahedral intermediate (T(d)1) suggests that a closer carbonyl group found in perhydrolases accepts a hydrogen bond from the leaving group water. This revised understanding can help design more efficient enzymes for perhydrolysis and shows how subtle changes can create new, unnatural functions in enzymes.

  2. Molecular basis for competitive solvation of the Burkholderia cepacia lipase by sorbitol and urea.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ivan P; Martínez, Leandro

    2016-08-21

    Increasing the stability of proteins is important for their application in industrial processes. In the intracellular environment many small molecules, called osmolytes, contribute to protein stabilization under physical or chemical stress. Understanding the nature of the interactions of these osmolytes with proteins can help the design of solvents and mutations to increase protein stability in extracellular media. One of the most common stabilizing osmolyes is sorbitol and one of the most common chemical denaturants is urea. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a detailed picture of the solvation of the Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) in the presence of the protecting osmolyte sorbitol and of the urea denaturant. We show that both sorbitol and urea compete with water for interactions with the protein surface. Overall, sorbitol promotes the organization of water in the first solvation shell and displaces water from the second solvation shell, while urea causes opposite effects. These effects are, however, highly heterogeneous among residue types. For instance, the depletion of water from the first protein solvation shell by urea can be traced down essentially to the side chain of negatively charged residues. The organization of water in the first solvation shell promoted by sorbitol occurs at polar (but not charged) residues, where the urea effect is minor. By contrast, sorbitol depletes water from the second solvation shell of polar residues, while urea promotes water organization at the same distances. The interactions of urea with negatively charged residues are insensitive to the presence of sorbitol. This osmolyte removes water and urea particularly from the second solvation shell of polar and non-polar residues. In summary, we provide a comprehensive description of the diversity of protein-solvent interactions, which can guide further investigations on the stability of proteins in non-conventional media, and assist solvent and

  3. Molecular basis for designing selective modulators of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P

    2001-08-01

    Retinoic acid receptors are ligand-regulated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which comprises 49 members in the human genome. all-trans retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) are each encoded by three distinct genes and several isoforms arise from alternative splicing and the use of different promoters. While RXRs are promiscuous dimerization partners of several other nuclear receptors, RARs are active, in-vivo, when associated to RXRs. Retinoids are therefore regulators of multiple physiological processes, from embryogenesis to metabolism. Different combinations of RXR:RAR heterodimers occur as a function of their tissue-specific expression and their activity is mostly conditioned by the activation status of RAR. These heterodimers are defined as non permissive heterodimers, in opposition to permissive dimers whose transcriptional activity may be modulated through RXR and its dimerization partner. The transcriptional activity of these dimers also relies on their ability to recruit nuclear coactivators and corepressors, which function as multi proteic complexes harboring several enzymatic activities (acetylases, kinases). The structure of the ligand bound to the RAR moiety of the dimer, as well as the nature of the DNA sequence to which dimers are bound, dictate the relative affinity of dimers for coactivators and thus its overall transcriptional activity. RARs are also able to repress the activity of unrelated transcription factors such as AP1 and NF-kappa-B, and therefore have potent anti proliferative and anti inflammatory properties. This review summarizes our current view of molecular mechanisms governing these various activities and emphasizes the need for a detailed understanding of how retinoids may dictate transactivating and transrepressive properties of RARs and RXRs, which may be considered as highly valuable therapeutic targets in many diseases such as cancer, skin hyperproliferation and

  4. Molecular basis of skeletal muscle plasticity--from gene to form and function.

    PubMed

    Flück, M; Hoppeler, H

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle shows an enormous plasticity to adapt to stimuli such as contractile activity (endurance exercise, electrical stimulation, denervation), loading conditions (resistance training, microgravity), substrate supply (nutritional interventions) or environmental factors (hypoxia). The presented data show that adaptive structural events occur in both muscle fibres (myofibrils, mitochondria) and associated structures (motoneurons and capillaries). Functional adaptations appear to involve alterations in regulatory mechanisms (neuronal, endocrine and intracellular signalling), contractile properties and metabolic capacities. With the appropriate molecular techniques it has been demonstrated over the past 10 years that rapid changes in skeletal muscle mRNA expression occur with exercise in human and rodent species. Recently, gene expression profiling analysis has demonstrated that transcriptional adaptations in skeletal muscle due to changes in loading involve a broad range of genes and that mRNA changes often run parallel for genes in the same functional categories. These changes can be matched to the structural/functional adaptations known to occur with corresponding stimuli. Several signalling pathways involving cytoplasmic protein kinases and nuclear-encoded transcription factors are recognized as potential master regulators that transduce physiological stress into transcriptional adaptations of batteries of metabolic and contractile genes. Nuclear reprogramming is recognized as an important event in muscle plasticity and may be related to the adaptations in the myosin type, protein turnover, and the cytoplasma-to-myonucleus ratio. The accessibility of muscle tissue to biopsies in conjunction with the advent of high-throughput gene expression analysis technology points to skeletal muscle plasticity as a particularly useful paradigm for studying gene regulatory phenomena in humans.

  5. Structural basis of type 2A von Willebrand disease investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Interlandi, Gianluca; Ling, Minhua; Tu, An Yue; Chung, Dominic W; Thomas, Wendy E

    2012-01-01

    The hemostatic function of von Willebrand factor is downregulated by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13, which cleaves at a unique site normally buried in the A2 domain. Exposure of the proteolytic site is induced in the wild-type by shear stress as von Willebrand factor circulates in blood. Mutations in the A2 domain, which increase its susceptibility to cleavage, cause type 2A von Willebrand disease. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the A2 domain unfolds under tensile force progressively through a series of steps. The simulation results also indicated that three type 2A mutations in the C-terminal half of the A2 domain, L1657I, I1628T and E1638K, destabilize the native state fold of the protein. Furthermore, all three type 2A mutations lowered in silico the tensile force necessary to undock the C-terminal helix α6 from the rest of the A2 domain, the first event in the unfolding pathway. The mutations F1520A, I1651A and A1661G were also predicted by simulations to destabilize the A2 domain and facilitate exposure of the cleavage site. Recombinant A2 domain proteins were expressed and cleavage assays were performed with the wild-type and single-point mutants. All three type 2A and two of the three predicted mutations exhibited increased rate of cleavage by ADAMTS13. These results confirm that destabilization of the helix α6 in the A2 domain facilitates exposure of the cleavage site and increases the rate of cleavage by ADAMTS13.

  6. Molecular basis of a novel adaptation to hypoxic-hypercapnia in a strictly fossorial mole

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated blood O2 affinity enhances survival at low O2 pressures, and is perhaps the best known and most broadly accepted evolutionary adjustment of terrestrial vertebrates to environmental hypoxia. This phenotype arises by increasing the intrinsic O2 affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) molecule, by decreasing the intracellular concentration of allosteric effectors (e.g., 2,3-diphosphoglycerate; DPG), or by suppressing the sensitivity of Hb to these physiological cofactors. Results Here we report that strictly fossorial eastern moles (Scalopus aquaticus) have evolved a low O2 affinity, DPG-insensitive Hb - contrary to expectations for a mammalian species that is adapted to the chronic hypoxia and hypercapnia of subterranean burrow systems. Molecular modelling indicates that this functional shift is principally attributable to a single charge altering amino acid substitution in the β-type δ-globin chain (δ136Gly→Glu) of this species that perturbs electrostatic interactions between the dimer subunits via formation of an intra-chain salt-bridge with δ82Lys. However, this replacement also abolishes key binding sites for the red blood cell effectors Cl-, lactate and DPG (the latter of which is virtually absent from the red cells of this species) at δ82Lys, thereby markedly reducing competition for carbamate formation (CO2 binding) at the δ-chain N-termini. Conclusions We propose this Hb phenotype illustrates a novel mechanism for adaptively elevating the CO2 carrying capacity of eastern mole blood during burst tunnelling activities associated with subterranean habitation. PMID:20637064

  7. Molecular basis of substrate-induced permeation by an amino acid antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Ratera, Mercè; Paladino, Antonella; Bartoccioni, Paola; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Valencia, Eva; Portella, Guillem; Bial, Susanna; Zorzano, Antonio; Fita, Ignacio; Orozco, Modesto; Carpena, Xavier; Vázquez-Ibar, José Luis; Palacín, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Transporters of the amino acid, polyamine and organocation (APC) superfamily play essential roles in cell redox balance, cancer, and aminoacidurias. The bacterial L-arginine/agmatine antiporter, AdiC, is the main APC structural paradigm and shares the “5 + 5 inverted repeat” fold found in other families like the Na+-coupled neurotransmitter transporters. The available AdiC crystal structures capture two states of its transport cycle: the open-to-out apo and the outward-facing Arg+-bound occluded. However, the role of Arg+ during the transition between these two states remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure at 3.0 Å resolution of an Arg+-bound AdiC mutant (N101A) in the open-to-out conformation, completing the picture of the major conformational states during the transport cycle of the 5 + 5 inverted repeat fold-transporters. The N101A structure is an intermediate state between the previous known AdiC conformations. The Arg+-guanidinium group in the current structure presents high mobility and delocalization, hampering substrate occlusion and resulting in a low translocation rate. Further analysis supports that proper coordination of this group with residues Asn101 and Trp293 is required to transit to the occluded state, providing the first clues on the molecular mechanism of substrate-induced fit in a 5 + 5 inverted repeat fold-transporter. The pseudosymmetry found between repeats in AdiC, and in all fold-related transporters, restraints the conformational changes, in particular the transmembrane helices rearrangements, which occur during the transport cycle. In AdiC these movements take place away from the dimer interface, explaining the independent functioning of each subunit. PMID:21368142

  8. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide in a remarkable reaction that requires manganese and dioxygen. Previous studies have shown that replacing an active-site loop segment Ser161-Glu162-Asn163-Ser164 in the N-terminal domain of OxDC with the cognate residues Asp161-Ala162-Ser-163-Asn164 of an evolutionarily related, Mn-dependent oxalate oxidase gives a chimeric variant (DASN) that exhibits significantly increased oxidase activity. The mechanistic basis for this change in activity has now been investigated using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope effect (IE) measurements. Quantitative analysis of the reaction stoichiometry as a function of oxalate concentration, as determined by MIMS, suggests that the increased oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant is associated with only a small fraction of the enzyme molecules in solution. In addition, IE measurements show that C–C bond cleavage in the DASN OxDC variant proceeds via the same mechanism as in the wild-type enzyme, even though the Glu162 side chain is absent. Thus, replacement of the loop residues does not modulate the chemistry of the enzyme-bound Mn(II) ion. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the observed oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant arises from an increased level of access of the solvent to the active site during catalysis, implying that the functional role of Glu162 is to control loop conformation. A 2.6 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between oxalate and the Co(II)-substituted ΔE162 OxDC variant, in which Glu162 has been deleted from the active site loop, reveals the likely mode by which the substrate coordinates the catalytically active Mn ion prior to C–C bond cleavage. The “end-on” conformation of oxalate observed in the structure is consistent with the previously published V/K IE data and provides an empty coordination site for the dioxygen ligand that is thought to

  9. The molecular basis for the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of curcumin and its metabolites in relation to cancer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F; Broekgaarden, Mans; Michel, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the oncopharmacological properties of curcumin at the molecular level. First, the interactions between curcumin and its molecular targets are addressed on the basis of curcumin's distinct chemical properties, which include H-bond donating and accepting capacity of the β-dicarbonyl moiety and the phenylic hydroxyl groups, H-bond accepting capacity of the methoxy ethers, multivalent metal and nonmetal cation binding properties, high partition coefficient, rotamerization around multiple C-C bonds, and the ability to act as a Michael acceptor. Next, the in vitro chemical stability of curcumin is elaborated in the context of its susceptibility to photochemical and chemical modification and degradation (e.g., alkaline hydrolysis). Specific modification and degradatory pathways are provided, which mainly entail radical-based intermediates, and the in vitro catabolites are identified. The implications of curcumin's (photo)chemical instability are addressed in light of pharmaceutical curcumin preparations, the use of curcumin analogues, and implementation of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of curcumin and its most important degradation products are detailed in light of curcumin's poor bioavailability. Particular emphasis is placed on xenobiotic phase I and II metabolism as well as excretion of curcumin in the intestines (first pass), the liver (second pass), and other organs in addition to the pharmacokinetics of curcumin metabolites and their systemic clearance. Lastly, a summary is provided of the clinical pharmacodynamics of curcumin followed by a detailed account of curcumin's direct molecular targets, whereby the phenotypical/biological changes induced in cancer cells upon completion of the curcumin-triggered signaling cascade(s) are addressed in the framework of the hallmarks of cancer. The direct molecular targets include the ErbB family of receptors, protein kinase C, enzymes involved in prostaglandin

  10. Myocardial contractility in the echo lab: molecular, cellular and pathophysiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Bombardini, Tonino

    2005-01-01

    In the standard accepted concept, contractility is the intrinsic ability of heart muscle to generate force and to shorten, independently of changes in the preload or afterload with fixed heart rates. At molecular level the crux of the contractile process lies in the changing concentrations of Ca2+ ions in the myocardial cytosol. Ca2+ ions enter through the calcium channel that opens in response to the wave of depolarization that travels along the sarcolemma. These Ca2+ ions "trigger" the release of more calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and thereby initiate a contraction-relaxation cycle. In the past, several attempts were made to transfer the pure physiological concept of contractility, expressed in the isolated myocardial fiber by the maximal velocity of contraction of unloaded muscle fiber (Vmax), to the in vivo beating heart. Suga and Sagawa achieved this aim by measuring pressure/volume loops in the intact heart: during a positive inotropic intervention, the pressure volume loop reflects a smaller end-systolic volume and a higher end-systolic pressure, so that the slope of the pressure volume relationship moves upward and to the left. The pressure volume relationship is the most reliable index for assessing myocardial contractility in the intact circulation and is almost insensitive to changes in preload and after load. This is widely used in animal studies and occasionally clinically. The limit of the pressure volume relationship is that it fails to take into account the frequency-dependent regulation of contractility: the frequency-dependent control of transmembrane Ca2+ entry via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels provides cardiac cells with a highly sophisticated short-term system for the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. An increased stimulation rate increases the force of contraction: the explanation is repetitive Ca2+ entry with each depolarization and, hence, an accumulation of cytosolic calcium. As the heart fails, there is a change in

  11. Molecular basis for manganese sequestration by calprotectin and roles in the innate immune response to invading bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Damo, Steven M; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Sugitani, Norie; Holt, Marilyn E; Rathi, Subodh; Murphy, Wesley J; Zhang, Yaofang; Betz, Christine; Hench, Laura; Fritz, Günter; Skaar, Eric P; Chazin, Walter J

    2013-03-05

    The S100A8/S100A9 heterodimer calprotectin (CP) functions in the host response to pathogens through a mechanism termed "nutritional immunity." CP binds Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) with high affinity and starves bacteria of these essential nutrients. Combining biophysical, structural, and microbiological analysis, we identified the molecular basis of Mn(2+) sequestration. The asymmetry of the CP heterodimer creates a single Mn(2+)-binding site from six histidine residues, which distinguishes CP from all other Mn(2+)-binding proteins. Analysis of CP mutants with altered metal-binding properties revealed that, despite both Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) being essential metals, maximal growth inhibition of multiple bacterial pathogens requires Mn(2+) sequestration. These data establish the importance of Mn(2+) sequestration in defense against infection, explain the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of CP relative to other S100 proteins, and clarify the impact of metal depletion on the innate immune response to infection.

  12. Identification of the molecular basis of inhibitor selectivity between the human and streptococcal type I methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Arya, Tarun; Reddi, Ravikumar; Kishor, Chandan; Ganji, Roopa Jones; Bhukya, Supriya; Gumpena, Rajesh; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-03-12

    The methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) family is responsible for the cleavage of the initiator methionine from newly synthesized proteins. Currently, there are no small molecule inhibitors that show selectivity toward the bacterial MetAPs compared to the human enzyme. In our current study, we have screened 20 α-aminophosphonate derivatives and identified a molecule (compound 15) that selectively inhibits the S. pneumonia MetAP in low micromolar range but not the human enzyme. Further bioinformatics, biochemical, and structural analyses suggested that phenylalanine (F309) in the human enzyme and methionine (M205) in the S. pneumonia MetAP at the analogous position render them with different susceptibilities against the identified inhibitor. X-ray crystal structures of various inhibitors in complex with wild type and F309M enzyme further established the molecular basis for the inhibitor selectivity.

  13. Molecular basis of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor studied with carboxyl-terminal photolabile probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J; Dong, Maoqing

    2009-12-04

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is a member of Family B G protein-coupled receptors and represents an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino-terminal domain of this receptor and that of several close family members, understanding of the molecular basis of natural ligand GLP1 binding to its intact receptor remains limited. The goal of this study was to explore spatial approximations between specific receptor residues within the carboxyl terminus of GLP1 and its receptor as normally docked. Therefore, we developed and characterized two high affinity, full-agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites for covalent attachment in positions 24 and 35. Both probes labeled the receptor specifically and saturably. Subsequent peptide mapping using chemical and proteinase cleavages of purified wild-type and mutant GLP1 receptor identified that the Arg(131)-Lys(136) segment at the juxtamembrane region of the receptor amino terminus contained the site of labeling for the position 24 probe, and the specific receptor residue labeled by this probe was identified as Glu(133) by radiochemical sequencing. Similarly, nearby residue Glu(125) within the same region of the receptor amino-terminal domain was identified as the site of labeling by the position 35 probe. These data represent the first direct demonstration of spatial approximation between GLP1 and its intact receptor as docked, providing two important constraints for the modeling of this interaction. This should expand our understanding of the molecular basis of natural agonist ligand binding to the GLP1 receptor and may be relevant to other family members.

  14. Defining the Molecular Basis for the First Potent and Selective Orthosteric Agonists of the FFA2 Free Fatty Acid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Anna Mette; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Murdoch, Hannah; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ward, Richard J.; Marquez, Rudi; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    FFA2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that responds to short chain fatty acids and has generated interest as a therapeutic target for metabolic and inflammatory conditions. However, definition of its functions has been slowed by a dearth of selective ligands that can distinguish it from the closely related FFA3. At present, the only selective ligands described for FFA2 suffer from poor potency, altered signaling due to allosteric modes of action, or a lack of function at non-human orthologs of the receptor. To address the need for novel selective ligands, we synthesized two compounds potentially having FFA2 activity and examined the molecular basis of their function. These compounds were confirmed to be potent and selective orthosteric FFA2 agonists. A combination of ligand structure-activity relationship, pharmacological analysis, homology modeling, species ortholog comparisons, and mutagenesis studies were then employed to define the molecular basis of selectivity and function of these ligands. From this, we identified key residues within both extracellular loop 2 and the transmembrane domain regions of FFA2 critical for ligand function. One of these ligands was active with reasonable potency at rodent orthologs of FFA2 and demonstrated the role of FFA2 in inhibition of lipolysis and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in murine-derived 3T3-L1 and STC-1 cell lines, respectively. Together, these findings describe the first potent and selective FFA2 orthosteric agonists and demonstrate key aspects of ligand interaction within the binding site of FFA2 that will be invaluable in future ligand development at this receptor. PMID:23589301

  15. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1–infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor–NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7. Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1–infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. PMID:28115366

  16. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated.

  17. Analysis of the basis set superposition error in molecular dynamics of hydrogen-bonded liquids: Application to methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Houteghem, Marc; Verstraelen, Toon; Ghysels, An; Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    An efficient protocol is presented to compensate for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) in DFT molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using localized Gaussian basis sets. We propose a classical correction term that can be added a posteriori to account for BSSE. It is tested to what extension this term will improve radial distribution functions (RDFs). The proposed term is pairwise between certain atoms in different molecules and was calibrated by fitting reference BSSE data points computed with the counterpoise method. It is verified that the proposed exponential decaying functional form of the model is valid. This work focuses on hydrogen-bonded liquids, i.e., methanol, and more specific on the intermolecular hydrogen bond, but in principle the method is generally applicable on any type of interaction where BSSE is significant. We evaluated the relative importance of the Grimme-dispersion versus BSSE and found that they are of the same order of magnitude, but with an opposite sign. Upon introduction of the correction, the relevant RDFs, obtained from MD, have amplitudes equal to experiment.

  18. Molecular basis of chronic stress-induced hippocampal lateral asymmetry in rats and impact on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Spasojevic, N; Jovanovic, P; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2013-12-01

    Neurochemical lateralization has been demonstrated in the rat brain suggesting that such lateralization might contribute to behavior. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine neurochemical asymmetry in the hippocampus, molecular basis of neurochemical lateralization and its impact on spatial learning and memory. Changes in noradrenaline content, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were studied in the right and left hippocampus of naive control and chronically isolated rats, by applying TaqMan RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Hippocampal-based spatial learning and memory were evaluated using the Barnes maze. In control rats an asymmetrical right-left distribution of noradrenaline content and gene expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzyme was found. Chronic psychosocial stress further emphasized asymmetry. Isolation stress reduced noradrenaline content only in the right hippocampus. No changes were observed in gene expression and protein levels of TH in the right hippocampus, whereas expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzyme was elevated in the left hippocampus. Reduced noradrenaline content in the right hippocampus did not cause impairment in spatial learning and memory. Our findings suggest that chronic psychosocial stress reduces noradrenaline stores in the right hippocampus which may be caused by molecular asymmetry, but it does not affect spatial learning and memory.

  19. Novel methods for the molecular discrimination of Fasciola spp. on the basis of nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Shoriki, Takuya; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Suganuma, Keisuke; Naito, Ikunori; Hayashi, Kei; Nakao, Minoru; Aita, Junya; Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Inoue, Noboru; Murakami, Kenji; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Fasciolosis is an economically important disease of livestock caused by Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes. The aspermic Fasciola flukes have been discriminated morphologically from the two other species by the absence of sperm in their seminal vesicles. To date, the molecular discrimination of F. hepatica and F. gigantica has relied on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region. However, ITS1 genotypes of aspermic Fasciola flukes cannot be clearly differentiated from those of F. hepatica and F. gigantica. Therefore, more precise and robust methods are required to discriminate Fasciola spp. In this study, we developed PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiplex PCR methods to discriminate F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes on the basis of the nuclear protein-coding genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and DNA polymerase delta, which are single locus genes in most eukaryotes. All aspermic Fasciola flukes used in this study had mixed fragment pattern of F. hepatica and F. gigantica for both of these genes, suggesting that the flukes are descended through hybridization between the two species. These molecular methods will facilitate the identification of F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes, and will also prove useful in etiological studies of fasciolosis.

  20. The route to MBxNyCz molecular wheels: II. Results using accurate functionals and basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güthler, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandey, R.; Boustani, I.

    2014-04-01

    Applying ab initio quantum chemical methods, molecular wheels composed of metal and light atoms were investigated. High quality basis sets 6-31G*, TZPV, and cc-pVTZ as well as exchange and non-local correlation functionals B3LYP, BP86 and B3P86 were used. The ground-state energy and structures of cyclic planar and pyramidal clusters TiBn (for n = 3-10) were computed. In addition, the relative stability and electronic structures of molecular wheels TiBxNyCz (for x, y, z = 0-10) and MBnC10-n (for n = 2 to 5 and M = Sc to Zn) were determined. This paper sustains a follow-up study to the previous one of Boustani and Pandey [Solid State Sci. 14 (2012) 1591], in which the calculations were carried out at the HF-SCF/STO3G/6-31G level of theory to determine the initial stability and properties. The results show that there is a competition between the 2D planar and the 3D pyramidal TiBn clusters (for n = 3-8). Different isomers of TiB10 clusters were also studied and a structural transition of 3D-isomer into 2D-wheel is presented. Substitution boron in TiB10 by carbon or/and nitrogen atoms enhances the stability and leads toward the most stable wheel TiB3C7. Furthermore, the computations show that Sc, Ti and V at the center of the molecular wheels are energetically favored over other transition metal atoms of the first row.

  1. Computational Modelling of Dapsone Interaction With Dihydropteroate Synthase in Mycobacterium leprae; Insights Into Molecular Basis of Dapsone Resistance in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya V, Sundeep; Das, Madhusmita; Bhat, Pritesh; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2015-10-01

    The molecular basis for determination of resistance to anti-leprosy drugs is the presence of point mutations within the genes of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) that encode active drug targets. The downstream structural and functional implications of these point mutations on drug targets were scarcely studied. In this study, we utilized computational tools to develop native and mutant protein models for 5 point mutations at codon positions 53 and 55 in 6-hydroxymethyl-7, 8-dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) of M. leprae, an active target for dapsone encoded by folp1 gene, that confer resistance to dapsone. Molecular docking was performed to identify variations in dapsone interaction with mutant DHPS in terms of hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and energy changes. Schrodinger Suite 2014-3 was used to build homology models and in performing molecular docking. An increase in volume of the binding cavities of mutant structures was noted when compared to native form indicating a weakening in interaction (60.7 Å(3) in native vs. 233.6 Å(3) in Thr53Ala, 659.9 Å(3) in Thr53Ile, 400 Å(3) for Thr53Val, 385 Å(3) for Pro55Arg, and 210 Å(3) for Pro55Leu). This was also reflected by changes in hydrogen bonds and decrease in hydrophobic interactions in the mutant models. The total binding energy (ΔG) decreased significantly in mutant forms when compared to the native form (-51.92 Kcal/mol for native vs. -35.64, -35.24, -46.47, -47.69, and -41.36 Kcal/mol for mutations Thr53Ala, Thr53Ile, Thr53Val, Pro55Arg, and Pro55Leu, respectively. In brief, this analysis provided structural and mechanistic insights to the degree of dapsone resistance contributed by each of these DHPS mutants in leprosy.

  2. Molecular Basis of Adhesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-22

    Calchera, A. R.; Patterson, J. E. Journal of Physical Chemistry C 2011, 115, 11550. (5) Curtis, A. D.; Asplund , M. C.; Patterson, J. E. J. Phys. Chem...Calchera, A. R.; Asplund , M. C.; Patterson, J. E. Journal of Physical Chemistry C 2012, in revision following review. (8) Curtis, A. D., Brigham Young

  3. Dynamical properties of liquid water from ab initio molecular dynamics performed in the complete basis set limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Seung; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2007-04-01

    Dynamical properties of liquid water were studied using Car-Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)] ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations within the Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory employing the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange-correlation functional for the electronic structure. The KS orbitals were expanded in a discrete variable representation basis set, wherein the complete basis set limit can be easily reached and which, therefore, provides complete convergence of ionic forces. In order to minimize possible nonergodic behavior of the simulated water system in a constant energy (NVE) ensemble, a long equilibration run (30ps) preceded a 60ps long production run. The temperature drift during the entire 60ps trajectory was found to be minimal. The diffusion coefficient [0.055Å2/ps] obtained from the present work for 32 D2O molecules is a factor of 4 smaller than the most up to date experimental value, but significantly larger than those of other recent AIMD studies. Adjusting the experimental result so as to match the finite-sized system used in the present study brings the comparison between theory and experiment to within a factor of 3. More importantly, the system is not observed to become "glassy" as has been reported in previous AIMD studies. The computed infrared spectrum is in good agreement with experimental data, especially in the low frequency regime where the translational and librational motions of water are manifested. The long simulation length also made it possible to perform detailed studies of hydrogen bond dynamics. The relaxation dynamics of hydrogen bonds observed in the present AIMD simulation is slower than those of popular force fields, such as the TIP4P potential, but comparable to that of the TIP5P potential.

  4. Synaptotoxic amyloid-β oligomers: a molecular basis for the cause, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Klein, William L

    2013-01-01

    The oligomer hypothesis for Alzheimer's disease (AD)was introduced in 1998. It was based on evidence that oligomers could exist free of amyloid fibrils, that fibril-free oligomer solutions rapidly inhibited long term potentiation, and that oligomers ultimately caused a highly selective nerve cell death. Fibrils no longer were the only toxins made by amyloid-β (Aβ), and likely not the most important ones. Oligomers provided a new basis for instigating AD. Since introduction of the hypothesis, more than 1,500 articles on oligomers have been published. Articles for this review were selected for contributions to oligomer theory at three different levels. The first set demonstrated new aspects of oligomer pathobiology in cell models, showing that exposure of neurons to oligomers is sufficient to cause key features of AD neuropathology. The second set confirmed the relationship between oligomers and salient AD neuropathology in animal models, consistent with other in vivo studies that overall have substantiated cell-based discoveries. The third set developed strategies for therapeutic targeting of oligomers, introducing both small molecule and antibody-based approaches. These and related findings from many groups have helped establish oligomers as central to the mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Comprising a ligand-based attack on specific synapses, the action of toxic oligomers gives a molecular basis to account for key features of AD neuropathology and to explain why early disease targets memory. Although there still is no effective treatment for AD, insights over the past five years raise hopes that new approaches targeting Aβ oligomers could finally bring disease-modifying therapeutics.

  5. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  6. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

    PubMed

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  7. Molecular basis for variable expression of merozoite surface antigen gp45 among American isolates of Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Fisher, T G; McElwain, T F; Palmer, G H

    2001-06-01

    Immunization with the merozoite surface glycoprotein gp45 induces protection against challenge using the homologous Babesia bigemina strain. However, gp45 B-cell epitopes are highly polymorphic among B. bigemina strains isolated from different geographical locations within North and South America. The molecular basis for this polymorphism was investigated using the JG-29 biological clone of a Mexico strain of B. bigemina and comparison with the Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Texcoco strains. The molecular size and antibody reactivity of gp45 expressed by the JG-29 clone were identical to those of the parental Mexico strain. gp45 cDNA and the genomic locus encompassing gp45 were cloned and sequenced from JG-29. The locus sequence and Southern blot data were consistent with a single gp45 copy in the JG-29 genome. The JG-29 cDNA expressed the full-length protein recognized by the gp45-specific monoclonal antibody 14/1.3.2. The genomes of the Puerto Rico and St. Croix strains of B. bigemina were shown to lack a closely related gp45-like gene by PCR using multiple primer sets and by Southern blots using both full-length and region-specific gp45 probes. This genomic difference was confirmed using unpassaged isolates from a 1999 disease outbreak in Puerto Rico. In contrast, the Texcoco strain retains a gp45 gene, encoding an open reading frame identical to that of JG-29. However, the Texcoco gp45 gene is not transcribed. These two mechanisms, lack of a closely related gp45-like gene and failure to transcribe gp45, result in generation of antigenic polymorphism among B. bigemina strains, and the latter mechanism is unique compared to prior mechanisms of antigenic polymorphism identified in babesial parasites.

  8. Structural Basis for Cooperative Binding of Azoles to CYP2E1 as Interpreted through Guided Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph W.; Hartman, Jessica H.; Perry, Martin D.; Miller, Grover P.

    2015-01-01

    CYP2E1 metabolizes a wide array of small, hydrophobic molecules, resulting in their detoxification or activation into carcinogens through Michaelis-Menten as well as cooperative mechanisms. Nevertheless, the molecular determinants for CYP2E1 specificity and metabolic efficiency toward these compounds are still unknown. Herein, we employed computational docking studies coupled to Molecular Dynamics simulations to provide a critical perspective for understanding a structural basis for cooperativity observed for an array of azoles from our previous binding and catalytic studies (Hartman, JH et al (2014) Biochem Pharmacol 87, 523-33). The resulting 28 CYP2E1 complexes in this study revealed a common passageway for azoles that included a hydrophobic steric barrier causing a pause in movement toward the active site. The entrance to the active site acted like a second sieve to restrict access to the inner chamber. Collectively, these interactions impacted the final orientation of azoles reaching the active site and hence could explain differences in their biochemical properties observed in our previous studies, such as the consequences of methylation at position 5 of the azole ring. The association of a second azole demonstrated significant differences in interactions stabilizing the bound complex than observed for the first binding event. Intermolecular interactions occurred between the two azoles as well as CYP2E1 residue side chains and backbone and involved both hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds. The relative importance of these interactions depended on the structure of the respective azoles indicating the absence of specific defining criteria for binding unlike the well-characterized dominant role of hydrophobicity in active site binding. Consequently, the structure activity relationships described here and elsewhere are necessary to more accurately identify factors impacting the observation and significance of cooperativity in CYP2E1 binding and catalysis

  9. Hidden variability of floral homeotic B genes in Solanaceae provides a molecular basis for the evolution of novel functions.

    PubMed

    Geuten, Koen; Irish, Vivian

    2010-08-01

    B-class MADS box genes specify petal and stamen identities in several core eudicot species. Members of the Solanaceae possess duplicate copies of these genes, allowing for diversification of function. To examine the changing roles of such duplicate orthologs, we assessed the functions of B-class genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference approaches. Loss of function of individual duplicates can have distinct phenotypes, yet complete loss of B-class gene function results in extreme homeotic transformations of petal and stamen identities. We also show that these duplicate gene products have qualitatively different protein-protein interaction capabilities and different regulatory roles. Thus, compensatory changes in B-class MADS box gene duplicate function have occurred in the Solanaceae, in that individual gene roles are distinct, but their combined functions are equivalent. Furthermore, we show that species-specific differences in the stamen regulatory network are associated with differences in the expression of the microRNA miR169. Whereas there is considerable plasticity in individual B-class MADS box transcription factor function, there is overall conservation in the roles of the multimeric MADS box B-class protein complexes, providing robustness in the specification of petal and stamen identities. Such hidden variability in gene function as we observe for individual B-class genes can provide a molecular basis for the evolution of regulatory functions that result in novel morphologies.

  10. Hot topics in DNA repair: the molecular basis for different disease states caused by mutations in TFIIH and XPG.

    PubMed

    Schärer, Orlando D

    2008-02-01

    Alterations in genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) are associated with three genetic disorders, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The transcription and repair factor TFIIH is a central component of NER and mutations of its subunits are associated with all three diseases. A recent report provides a molecular basis for how mutations in the NER endonuclease XPG that affect the interaction of TFIIH might give rise to CS features. In cells of XP-G patients with a combined XP and CS phenotype, XPG fails to associate with TFIIH and as a consequence the CAK subunit dissociates from core TFIIH. A simplified, but general model of how various assembly and disassembly states of TFIIH can be invoked to explain different disease states is discussed. Accordingly, defects in specific enzymatic functions typically result in XP, dissociation of the CAK subunit from TFIIH is associated with XP/CS and a more generalized destabilization of TFIIH gives rise to TTD. While this classification provides a useful framework to understand how alterations in TFIIH correlate with disease states, it does not universally apply and relevant exception and alternative explanations are discussed.

  11. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels.

  12. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  13. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  14. The challenges for molecular nutrition research 3: comparative nutrigenomics research as a basis for entering the systems level

    PubMed Central

    Drevon, Christian A.; Klein, Ulla I.; Kleemann, Robert; van Ommen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Human nutrition and metabolism may serve as the paradigm for the complex interplay of the genome with its environment. The concept of nutrigenomics now enables science with new tools and comprehensive analytical techniques to investigate this interaction at all levels of the complexity of the organism. Moreover, nutrigenomics seeks to better define the homeostatic control mechanisms, identify the de-regulation in the early phases of diet-related diseases, and attempts to assess to what extent an individual‘s sensitizing genotype contributes to the overall health or disease state. In a comparative approach nutrigenomics uses biological systems of increasing complexity from yeast to mammalian models to define the general rules of metabolic and genetic mechanisms in adaptations to the nutritional environment. Powerful information technology, bioinformatics and knowledge management tools as well as new mathematical and computational approaches now make it possible to study these molecular mechanisms at the cellular, organ and whole organism level and take it on to modeling the processes in a “systems biology” approach. This review summarizes some of the concepts of a comparative approach to nutrigenomics research, identifies current lacks and proposes a concerted scientific effort to create the basis for nutritional systems biology. PMID:18830658

  15. Fungicide-Driven Evolution and Molecular Basis of Multidrug Resistance in Field Populations of the Grey Mould Fungus Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Mosbach, Andreas; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Fillinger, Sabine; Mernke, Dennis; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Leroux, Pierre; De Waard, Maarten A.; Hahn, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification resulting in reduced drug binding. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) caused by increased efflux activity is common in human pathogenic microbes, but rarely described for plant pathogens. Annual monitoring for fungicide resistance in field isolates from fungicide-treated vineyards in France and Germany revealed a rapidly increasing appearance of B. cinerea field populations with three distinct MDR phenotypes. All MDR strains showed increased fungicide efflux activity and overexpression of efflux transporter genes. Similar to clinical MDR isolates of Candida yeasts that are due to transcription factor mutations, all MDR1 strains were shown to harbor activating mutations in a transcription factor (Mrr1) that controls the gene encoding ABC transporter AtrB. MDR2 strains had undergone a unique rearrangement in the promoter region of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2, induced by insertion of a retrotransposon-derived sequence. MDR2 strains carrying the same rearranged mfsM2 allele have probably migrated from French to German wine-growing regions. The roles of atrB, mrr1 and mfsM2 were proven by the phenotypes of knock-out and overexpression mutants. As confirmed by sexual crosses, combinations of mrr1 and mfsM2 mutations lead to MDR3 strains with higher broad-spectrum resistance. An MDR3 strain was shown in field experiments to be selected against sensitive strains by fungicide treatments. Our data document for the first time the rising prevalence, spread and molecular basis of MDR populations in a major plant pathogen in agricultural environments. These populations will increase the risk of grey mould rot and hamper the effectiveness of current strategies for

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Portunus trituberculatus in Response to Salinity Stress Provides Insights into the Molecular Basis of Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jianjian; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yu; Gao, Baoquan; Chen, Ping; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, which is naturally distributed in the coastal waters of Asia-Pacific countries, is an important farmed species in China. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic factors that influence not only the distribution and abundance of crustaceans, it is also an important factor for artificial propagation of the crab. To better understand the interaction between salinity stress and osmoregulation, we performed a transcriptome analysis in the gills of Portunus trituberculatus challenged with salinity stress, using the Illumina Deep Sequencing technology. Results We obtained 27,696,835, 28,268,353 and 33,901,271 qualified Illumina read pairs from low salinity challenged (LC), non-challenged (NC), and high salinity challenged (HC) Portunus trituberculatus cDNA libraries, respectively. The overall de novo assembly of cDNA sequence data generated 94,511 unigenes, with an average length of 644 bp. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 1,705 genes differentially expressed in salinity stress compared to the controls, including 615 and 1,516 unigenes in NC vs LC and NC vs HC respectively. GO functional enrichment analysis results showed some differentially expressed genes were involved in crucial processes related to osmoregulation, such as ion transport processes, amino acid metabolism and synthesis processes, proteolysis process and chitin metabolic process. Conclusion This work represents the first report of the utilization of the next generation sequencing techniques for transcriptome analysis in Portunus trituberculatus and provides valuable information on salinity adaptation mechanism. Results reveal a substantial number of genes modified by salinity stress and a few important salinity acclimation pathways, which will serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular basis of osmoregulation in Portunus trituberculatus. In addition, the most comprehensive sequences of transcripts reported in this study

  17. Adaptive local basis set for Kohn-Sham density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework II: Force, vibration, and molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaigong; Lin, Lin; Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, we have proposed the adaptive local basis set for electronic structure calculations based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory in a pseudopotential framework. The adaptive local basis set is efficient and systematically improvable for total energy calculations. In this paper, we present the calculation of atomic forces, which can be used for a range of applications such as geometry optimization and molecular dynamics simulation. We demonstrate that, under mild assumptions, the computation of atomic forces can scale nearly linearly with the number of atoms in the system using the adaptive local basis set. We quantify the accuracy of the Hellmann-Feynman forces for a range of physical systems, benchmarked against converged planewave calculations, and find that the adaptive local basis set is efficient for both force and energy calculations, requiring at most a few tens of basis functions per atom to attain accuracies required in practice. Since the adaptive local basis set has implicit dependence on atomic positions, Pulay forces are in general nonzero. However, we find that the Pulay force is numerically small and systematically decreasing with increasing basis completeness, so that the Hellmann-Feynman force is sufficient for basis sizes of a few tens of basis functions per atom. We verify the accuracy of the computed forces in static calculations of quasi-1D and 3D disordered Si systems, vibration calculation of a quasi-1D Si system, and molecular dynamics calculations of H2 and liquid Al-Si alloy systems, where we show systematic convergence to benchmark planewave results and results from the literature.

  18. Molecular basis of IgE-recognition of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Suphioglu, C; Blaher, B; Rolland, J M; McCluskey, J; Schäppi, G; Kenrick, J; Singh, M B; Knox, R B

    1998-04-01

    Grass pollen, especially of rye-grass (Lolium perenne). represents an important cause of type I allergy. Identification of IgE-binding (allergenic) epitopes of major grass pollen allergens is essential for understanding the molecular basis of interaction between allergens and human IgE antibodies and therefore facilitates the devising of safer and more effective diagnostic and immunotherapy reagents. The aim of this study was to identify the allergenic epitopes of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen, immunodissect these epitopes further so that the amino acid residues critical for antibody binding can be determined and investigate the conservation and nature of these epitopes within the context of the natural grass pollen allergens. Peptides, 12-13 amino acid residues long and overlapping each other by 4 amino acid residues, based on the entire deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region of Lol p 5, were synthesised and assayed for IgE-binding. Two strong IgE-binding epitopes (Lol p 5 (49-60) and (265-276), referred to as peptides 7 and 34, respectively) were identified. These epitopes were further resolved by truncated peptides and amino acid replacement studies and the amino acid residues critical for IgE-binding determined (Lol p 5 (49-60) residue Lys57 and (265-276) residue Lys275). Sequences of these epitopes were conserved in related allergens and may form the conserved allergenic domains responsible for the cross-reactivity observed between pollen allergens of taxonomically related grasses. Furthermore, due to its strong IgE-reactivity, synthetic peptide Lol p 5 (265-276) was used to affinity-purify specific IgE antibodies which recognised proteins of other clinically important grass pollens. further indicating presence of allergenic cross-reactivity at the level of allergenic epitope. Moreover, Lol p 5 (265 276) demonstrated a strong capacity to inhibit IgE-binding to natural rye-grass pollen proteins highlighting the antibody accessibility

  19. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-14

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H-X, 49 X-Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ∼4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0.0019 (D

  20. Al- and Cu-doped BaSi2 films on Si(111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy and evaluation of depth profiles of Al and Cu atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmal Khan, M.; Takeishi, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Saito, T.; Suemasu, T.

    The main objective of the present work is to evaluate and compare the depth profiles of Al and Cu atoms in in-situ doped BaSi2. Furthermore, it is also desired to investigate and compare the carrier concentration of Al-doped as well as Cu-doped BaSi2 films and qualify as a potential dopant-candidate for more efficient solar cells of BaSi2. During the experiment, reactive deposition epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy were used to develop the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), were used to determine the structure, depth profile and composition of the already grown films. The electrical properties were characterized by Hall measurement using the van der Pauw method. In case of Al-doped BaSi2 films, it was not encouraging result due to diffusion and segregation of Al in both the surface and BaSi2/ Si interface regions. On the other hand, those phenomena were not observed for Cu-doped BaS2 films. Heavily Cu-doped BaSi2 showed n+ conductivity, differently from our prediction.

  1. Molecular basis of structural makeup of hulless barley in relation to rumen degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Damiran, D; Yu, P

    2011-10-01

    To date, no study has been done of molecular structures in relation to nutrient degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to (1) reveal molecular structures of hulless barley affected by structural alteration using molecular spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) as a novel approach, and (2) quantify structure features on a molecular basis in relation to digestive kinetics and nutritive value in the rumen and intestine in cattle. The modeled feeds in this study were 4 types of hulless barley (HB) cultivars modified in starch traits: (a) normal starch cultivar, (b) zero-amylose waxy, (c) waxy, and (d) high-amylose. The molecular structural features were determined using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (ca. 4,000-800 cm(-1)) of the electromagnetic spectrum. The items assessed included infrared intensity attributed to protein amide I (ca. 1,715-1,575 cm(-1)), amide II (ca. 1,575-1,490 cm(-1)), α-helix (ca. 1,648-1,660 cm(-1)), β-sheet (ca. 1,625-1,640 cm(-1)), and their ratio, β-glucan (ca. 1,445-1,400 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO; ca. 1,188-820 cm(-1)) and their 3 major peaks, structural carbohydrates (ca. 1,277-1,190 cm(-1)), and ratios of amide I to II and amide I to CHO. The results show that (1) the zero-amylose waxy was the greatest in amide I and II peak areas, as well as in the ratio of protein amide I to CHO among HB; (2) α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio differed among HB: the high-amylose was the greatest, the zero-amylose waxy and waxy were the intermediate, and the normal starch was the lowest; (3) HB were similar in β-glucan and CHO molecular structural makeup; (4) altered starch HB cultivars were similar to each other, but were different from the normal starch cultivar in protein molecular makeup; and (5) the rate and extent of rumen degradation of starch and protein were highly related to the molecular structural

  2. Periodic local Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory method applied to molecular crystals: study of solid NH3 and CO2 using extended basis sets.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Usvyat, Denis; Schütz, Martin; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2010-04-07

    We have calculated the equilibrium geometry, formation energy, and bulk modulus of two molecular bulk crystals, NH(3) and CO(2), at the periodic post-Hartree-Fock correlated level. The dependence of the results on the basis set has been analyzed, by employing basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ quality. In the calculations, we used the periodic local Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (LMP2), implemented in the CRYSCOR program. Multipolar expansion techniques, as well as density fitting, are employed in this code to reduce the number of and to factorize the required electron repulsion integrals; as a consequence of that, the computational cost for the correlation part of the calculations is comparable to that of the Hartree-Fock. Auxiliary calculations performed on molecular dimers are also reported to verify the accuracy of the LMP2 approach and of the basis sets used. Furthermore, the effect of spin-component scaling has been investigated for the two crystals. One intention of the present paper is also to lay out and specify the computational setup, which is generally applicable for accurate CRYSCOR calculations on molecular crystals.

  3. Structural changes on a molecular basis of canola meal by conditioning temperature and time during pelleting process in relation to physiochemical (energy and protein) properties relevant to ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuewei; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) To investigate the effects of conditioning temperature (70, 80, 90°C), time (30, 60 sec), and interaction (temperature × time) during the pelleting process on internal protein molecular structure changes of the co-products; (2) To identify differences in protein molecular structures among pellets that were processed under different conditions, and between unprocessed mash and pellets; 3) To quantify protein molecular structure changes in relation to predicted energy and protein utilization in dairy cows. The final goal of this program was to show how processing conditions changed internal feed structure on a molecular basis and how molecular structure changes induced by feed processing affected feed milk value in dairy cows. The hypothesis in this study was that processing-induced protein inherent structure changes affected energy and protein availability in dairy cattle and the sensitivity and response of protein internal structure to the different pelleting process conditions could be detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy. The protein molecular structures, amides I and II, amide I to II ratios, α-helix structure, β-sheet structure, and α to β structure ratios, were determined using the advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). The energy values were determined using NRC2001 summary approach in terms of total digestible nutrients, metabolizable and net energy for lactation. The protein and carbohydrate subfactions that are related to rumen degradation characteristics and rumen undegraded protein supply were determined using updated CNCPS system. The experiment design was a RCBD and the treatment design was a 3x2 factorial design. The results showed that pelleting induced changes in protein molecular structure. The sensitivity and response of protein inherent structure to the pelleting depended on the conditioning temperature and time. The protein molecular structure changes were correlated (P < 0

  4. Structural changes on a molecular basis of canola meal by conditioning temperature and time during pelleting process in relation to physiochemical (energy and protein) properties relevant to ruminants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuewei; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) To investigate the effects of conditioning temperature (70, 80, 90°C), time (30, 60 sec), and interaction (temperature × time) during the pelleting process on internal protein molecular structure changes of the co-products; (2) To identify differences in protein molecular structures among pellets that were processed under different conditions, and between unprocessed mash and pellets; 3) To quantify protein molecular structure changes in relation to predicted energy and protein utilization in dairy cows. The final goal of this program was to show how processing conditions changed internal feed structure on a molecular basis and how molecular structure changes induced by feed processing affected feed milk value in dairy cows. The hypothesis in this study was that processing-induced protein inherent structure changes affected energy and protein availability in dairy cattle and the sensitivity and response of protein internal structure to the different pelleting process conditions could be detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy. The protein molecular structures, amides I and II, amide I to II ratios, α-helix structure, β-sheet structure, and α to β structure ratios, were determined using the advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). The energy values were determined using NRC2001 summary approach in terms of total digestible nutrients, metabolizable and net energy for lactation. The protein and carbohydrate subfactions that are related to rumen degradation characteristics and rumen undegraded protein supply were determined using updated CNCPS system. The experiment design was a RCBD and the treatment design was a 3x2 factorial design. The results showed that pelleting induced changes in protein molecular structure. The sensitivity and response of protein inherent structure to the pelleting depended on the conditioning temperature and time. The protein molecular structure changes were correlated (P < 0

  5. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, February-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1981-09-01

    Laser-spectroscopy experiments have focused on cones in the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. Choice of this system was based on the desire to correlate molecular data with the extensive data being collected on this system by Dr. Zwick in his studies on laser hazards at LAIR. Thus, a detailed collaborative effort was initiated on this system during the past year. The experiments resulted in important information that opens new avenues to explore fundamental molecular mechanisms of retinal damage with laser irradiation. Results of these experiments are summarized in the following sections: I. Elucidation of the role of oil droplets in the absorption of light by the turtle retina; II. A Selective Probe of Membrane Potentials in Turtle Cone Cells; III. Angstrom Resolution Light Microscopy of Photoreceptor Cells; IV. Identification and Selective Staining of Other Important Molecular Components of Photoreceptor Cells.

  6. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  7. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1982-09-01

    This research led to new insights in the fundamental mechanisms involved in laser induced retinal damage and some of the fundamental work on these mechanisms lead to new and exciting avenues in the development of rapidly adjustable molecular light filters with important new possibilities for pulsed-laser eye protection. This report summarizes the significant progress of the past year: (1) Development and Fundamental Mechanism of a Rapidly Adjustable Molecular Filter for Pulsed Laser Eye Protection - this research direction resulted from our investigations on cones of the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. (2) The Optical Density of Turtle Oil Droplet Solutions - it is important both from a practical and fundamental point of view to determine the optical density of turtle oil-droplet suspensions. In view of the high optical densities in this system, tunable-laser resonance Raman spectroscopy, which is the only technique that has been able to provide high-resolution data, is the only technique that is potentially able to obtain the information. (3) Laser-Induced Molecular Alterations in Turtle Retina. (4) Light Driven Enzymatic Reactions in Photoreceptors. (5) Molecular Cytology of Rod Outer Segments.

  8. The Molecular and Biochemical Basis for Varietal Variation in Sesquiterpene Content in Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Rinds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A combined chemical, biochemical and molecular study was conducted to understand the differential accumulation of volatile sesquiterpenes in melon fruits. Sesquiterpenes were present mainly in the rinds of climacteric varieties, and a great diversity in their composition was found among varieties. S...

  9. Molecular analysis of lungworms from European bison (Bison bonasus) on the basis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M

    2014-03-01

    Dictyocaulosis (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea) is a widespread parasitosis of the European bison (Bison bonasus) inhabiting Bialowieza Primeval Forest. Bearing in mind the current coexistence of bison with wild cervids, and with domestic ruminants in the 19th and 20th century, the need arose for molecular identification of lungworm species. Molecular analysis was done on adult lungworms that were obtained from the respiratory track of four free-roaming bison euthanized as a part of the population health control program. As the result of the study four identical small subunit-ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the lungworms were obtained and deposited in GenBank as sequence, 1708 bp long (GenBank KC771250). Comparative analysis of the SSU rRNA sequences revealed the European bison to be a host for the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus.

  10. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of antisaccade eye tracking error rate: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Malone, Stephen M.; Donnelly, Jennifer M.; Hammer, Micah A.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Antisaccade deficits reflect abnormalities in executive function linked to various disorders including schizophrenia, externalizing psychopathology, and neurological conditions. We examined the genetic bases of antisaccade error in a sample of community-based twins and parents (N = 4,469). Biometric models showed that about half of the variance in the antisaccade response was due to genetic factors and half due to nonshared environmental factors. Molecular genetic analyses supported these results, showing that the heritability accounted for by common molecular genetic variants approximated biometric estimates. Genome-wide analyses revealed several SNPs as well as two genes—B3GNT7 and NCL—on Chromosome 2 associated with antisaccade error. SNPs and genes hypothesized to be associated with antisaccade error based on prior work, although generating some suggestive findings for MIR137, GRM8, and CACNG2, could not be confirmed. PMID:25387707

  11. Molecular basis for fibrinogen Dusart (A alpha 554 Arg-->Cys) and its association with abnormal fibrin polymerization and thrombophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, J; Haverkate, F; Grimbergen, J; Lord, S T; Mosesson, M W; DiOrio, J P; Siebenlist, K S; Legrand, C; Soria, J; Soria, C

    1993-01-01

    The molecular defect in the abnormal fibrinogen Dusart (Paris V) that is associated with thrombophilia was determined by sequence analysis of genomic DNA that had been amplified using the polymerase chain reaction. The propositus was heterozygous for a single base change (C-->T) in the A alpha-chain gene, resulting in the amino acid substitution A alpha 554 Arg-->Cys. Restriction analysis of the amplified DNA derived from the family members showed that his father and his two sons were also heterozygous. Electron microscopic studies on fibrin formed from purified fibrinogen Dusart demonstrated fibers that were much thinner than in normal fibrin. In contrast to the previously observed defective binding of plasminogen, the binding of thrombospondin to immobilized fibrinogen Dusart was similar to that of normal fibrinogen. Immunoblot analysis of plasma fibrinogen demonstrated that a substantial part of the fibrinogen Dusart molecules were disulfide-linked to albumin. The plasma of the affected family members also contained fibrinogen-albumin complexes. Furthermore, small amounts of high molecular weight complexes containing fibrinogen were detected in all the heterozygous individuals. These data indicate that the molecular abnormality in fibrinogen Dusart (A alpha 554 Arg-->Cys) results in defective lateral association of the fibrin fibers and disulfide-linked complex formation with albumin, and is associated with a family history of recurrent thrombosis in the affected individuals. Images PMID:8473507

  12. New insights into heat induced structural changes of pectin methylesterase on fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, Oana Viorela; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Botez, Elisabeta

    2014-07-01

    Heat-induced structural changes of Aspergillus oryzae pectin methylesterase (PME) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling, whereas the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed at two pH value (4.5 and 7.0). At both pH values, the phase diagrams were linear, indicating the presence of two molecular species induced by thermal treatment. A red shift of 7 nm was observed at neutral pH by increasing temperature up to 60 °C, followed by a blue shift of 4 nm at 70 °C, suggesting significant conformational rearrangements. The quenching experiments using acrylamide and iodide demonstrate a more flexible conformation of enzyme with increasing temperature, especially at neutral pH. The experimental results were complemented with atomic level observations on PME model behavior after performing molecular dynamics simulations at different temperatures. The inactivation kinetics of PME in buffer solutions was fitted using a first-order kinetics model, resulting in activation energy of 241.4 ± 7.51 kJ mol-1.

  13. Calculation of wave-functions with frozen orbitals in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. II. Application of the local basis equation.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, György G

    2013-04-05

    The application of the local basis equation (Ferenczy and Adams, J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134108) in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and quantum mechanics/quantum mechanics (QM/QM) methods is investigated. This equation is suitable to derive local basis nonorthogonal orbitals that minimize the energy of the system and it exhibits good convergence properties in a self-consistent field solution. These features make the equation appropriate to be used in mixed QM/MM and QM/QM methods to optimize orbitals in the field of frozen localized orbitals connecting the subsystems. Calculations performed for several properties in divers systems show that the method is robust with various choices of the frozen orbitals and frontier atom properties. With appropriate basis set assignment, it gives results equivalent with those of a related approach [G. G. Ferenczy previous paper in this issue] using the Huzinaga equation. Thus, the local basis equation can be used in mixed QM/MM methods with small size quantum subsystems to calculate properties in good agreement with reference Hartree-Fock-Roothaan results. It is shown that bond charges are not necessary when the local basis equation is applied, although they are required for the self-consistent field solution of the Huzinaga equation based method. Conversely, the deformation of the wave-function near to the boundary is observed without bond charges and this has a significant effect on deprotonation energies but a less pronounced effect when the total charge of the system is conserved. The local basis equation can also be used to define a two layer quantum system with nonorthogonal localized orbitals surrounding the central delocalized quantum subsystem.

  14. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First‐Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree–Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double‐zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6‐31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean‐field methods. PMID:27308221

  15. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  16. Exercise and Prognosis on the Basis of Clinicopathologic and Molecular Features in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: The LACE and Pathways Studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Kwan, Marilyn L; Weltzien, Erin; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Sternfeld, Barbara; Sweeney, Carol; Bernard, Philip S; Castillo, Adrienne; Habel, Laurel A; Kroenke, Candyce H; Langholz, Bryan M; Queensberry, Charles P; Dang, Chau; Weigelt, Britta; Kushi, Lawrence H; Caan, Bette J

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether the impact of postdiagnosis exercise on breast cancer outcomes in women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer differs on the basis of tumor clinicopathologic and molecular features. Using a prospective design, 6,211 patients with early-stage breast cancer from two large population-based cohort studies were studied. Age-adjusted and multivariable Cox regression models were performed to determine the relationship between exercise exposure (total MET-hours/week) and recurrence and breast cancer-related death for: (i) all patients ("unselected" cohort), and on the basis of (ii) classic clinicopathologic features, (iii) clinical subtypes, (iv) PAM50-based molecular intrinsic subtypes, and (v) individual PAM50 target genes. After a median follow-up of 7.2 years, in the unselected cohort (n = 6,211) increasing exercise exposure was not associated with a reduction in the risk of recurrence (adjusted Ptrend = 0.60) or breast cancer-related death (adjusted Ptrend = 0.39). On the basis of clinicopathologic features, an exercise-associated reduction in breast cancer-related death was apparent for tumors <2 cm [HR, 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.72], well/moderately differentiated tumors (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.91), and ER-positive tumors (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.53-0.97). Stratification by clinical subtype indicated that the ER(+)/PR(+)/HER2(-)/low-grade clinical subtype was preferentially responsive to exercise (recurrence: adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45-0.88; breast cancer-related death: adjusted HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.86). The impact of exercise on cancer outcomes appears to differ as a function of pathologic and molecular features in early-stage breast cancer. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5415-22. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Structure of Soybean β-Cyanoalanine Synthase and the Molecular Basis for Cyanide Detoxification in Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hankuil; Juergens, Matthew; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce cyanide (CN−) during ethylene biosynthesis in the mitochondria and require β-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) for CN− detoxification. Recent studies show that CAS is a member of the β-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) family, which also includes the Cys biosynthesis enzyme O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), but how the BSAS evolved distinct metabolic functions is not understood. Here we show that soybean (Glycine max) CAS and OASS form α-aminoacrylate reaction intermediates from Cys and O-acetylserine, respectively. To understand the molecular evolution of CAS and OASS in the BSAS enzyme family, the crystal structures of Gm-CAS and the Gm-CAS K95A mutant with a linked pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-Cys molecule in the active site were determined. These structures establish a common fold for the plant BSAS family and reveal a substrate-induced conformational change that encloses the active site for catalysis. Comparison of CAS and OASS identified residues that covary in the PLP binding site. The Gm-OASS T81M, S181M, and T185S mutants altered the ratio of OASS:CAS activity but did not convert substrate preference to that of a CAS. Generation of a triple mutant Gm-OASS successfully switched reaction chemistry to that of a CAS. This study provides new molecular insight into the evolution of diverse enzyme functions across the BSAS family in plants. PMID:22739827

  18. Exploring the molecular basis of age-related disease comorbidities using a multi-omics graphical model

    PubMed Central

    Zierer, Jonas; Pallister, Tess; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Krumsiek, Jan; Bell, Jordana T.; Lauc, Gordan; Spector, Tim D; Menni, Cristina; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Although association studies have unveiled numerous correlations of biochemical markers with age and age-related diseases, we still lack an understanding of their mutual dependencies. To find molecular pathways that underlie age-related diseases as well as their comorbidities, we integrated aging markers from four different high-throughput omics datasets, namely epigenomics, transcriptomics, glycomics and metabolomics, with a comprehensive set of disease phenotypes from 510 participants of the TwinsUK cohort. We used graphical random forests to assess conditional dependencies between omics markers and phenotypes while eliminating mediated associations. Applying this novel approach for multi-omics data integration yields a model consisting of seven modules that represent distinct aspects of aging. These modules are connected by hubs that potentially trigger comorbidities of age-related diseases. As an example, we identified urate as one of these key players mediating the comorbidity of renal disease with body composition and obesity. Body composition variables are in turn associated with inflammatory IgG markers, mediated by the expression of the hormone oxytocin. Thus, oxytocin potentially contributes to the development of chronic low-grade inflammation, which often accompanies obesity. Our multi-omics graphical model demonstrates the interconnectivity of age-related diseases and highlights molecular markers of the aging process that might drive disease comorbidities. PMID:27886242

  19. Molecular basis for DNA double-strand break annealing and primer extension by an NHEJ DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Brissett, Nigel C; Martin, Maria J; Bartlett, Edward J; Bianchi, Julie; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J

    2013-11-27

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5'-3' direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3' overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3' overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3' ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks.

  20. Out of the Mouths of Plants: The Molecular Basis of the Evolution and Diversity of Stomatal Development[W

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Kylee M.; Rychel, Amanda L.; Torii, Keiko U.

    2010-01-01

    Stomata are microscopic valves on the plant epidermis that played a critical role in the evolution of land plants. Studies in the model dicot Arabidopsis thaliana have identified key transcription factors and signaling pathways controlling stomatal patterning and differentiation. Three paralogous Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix proteins, SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and FAMA, mediate sequential steps of cell-state transitions together with their heterodimeric partners SCREAM (SCRM) and SCRM2. Cell–cell signaling components, including putative ligands, putative receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, orient asymmetric cell divisions and prevent overproduction and clustering of stomata. The recent availability of genome sequence and reverse genetics tools for model monocots and basal land plants allows for the examination of the conservation of genes important in stomatal patterning and differentiation. Studies in grasses have revealed that divergence of SPCH-MUTE-FAMA predates the evolutionary split of monocots and dicots and that these proteins show conserved and novel roles in stomatal differentiation. By contrast, specific asymmetric cell divisions in Arabidopsis and grasses require unique molecular components. Molecular phylogenetic analysis implies potential conservation of signaling pathways and prototypical functions of the transcription factors specifying stomatal differentiation. PMID:20179138

  1. Molecular basis for thermoprotection in Bemisia: structural differences between whitefly ketose reductase and other medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, G R; Smith, C A; Hendrix, D L; Salvucci, M E

    1999-02-01

    The silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii, Bellows and Perring) accumulates sorbitol as a thermoprotectant in response to elevated temperature. Sorbitol synthesis in this insect is catalyzed by an unconventional ketose reductase (KR) that uses NADPH to reduce fructose. A cDNA encoding the NADPH-KR from adult B. argentifolii was cloned and sequenced to determine the primary structure of this enzyme. The cDNA encoded a protein of 352 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.2 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA shared 60% identity with sheep NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). Residues in SDH involved in substrate binding were conserved in the whitefly NADPH-KR. An important structural difference between the whitefly NADPH-KR and NAD(+)-SDHs occurred in the nucleotide-binding site. The Asp residue that coordinates the adenosyl ribose hydroxyls in NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases (including NAD(+)-SDH), was replaced by an Ala in the whitefly NADPH-KR. The whitefly NADPH-KR also contained two neutral to Arg substitutions within four residues of the Asp to Ala substitution. Molecular modeling indicated that addition of the Arg residues and loss of the Asp decreased the electric potential of the adenosine ribose-binding pocket, creating an environment favorable for NADPH-binding. Because of the ability to use NADPH, the whitefly NADPH-KR synthesizes sorbitol under physiological conditions, unlike NAD(+)-SDHs, which function in sorbitol catabolism.

  2. Crystal Structures of Glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 Reveal the Molecular Basis for Glycosylation and Deglycosylation of (Iso)flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Modolo, Luzia V.; Li, Lenong; Pan, Haiyun; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2010-09-21

    The glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 from Medicago truncatula catalyzes the glycosylation of various (iso)flavonoids such as the flavonols kaempferol and myricetin, the isoflavone formononetin, and the anthocyanidins pelargonidin and cyanidin. It also catalyzes a reverse reaction to remove the sugar moiety from glycosides. The structures of UGT78G1 bound with uridine diphosphate or with both uridine diphosphate and myricetin were determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, revealing detailed interactions between the enzyme and substrates/products and suggesting a distinct binding mode for the acceptor/product. Comparative structural analysis and mutagenesis identify glutamate 192 as a key amino acid for the reverse reaction. This information provides a basis for enzyme engineering to manipulate substrate specificity and to design effective biocatalysts with glycosylation and/or deglycosylation activity.

  3. Songbird: a unique animal model for studying the molecular basis of disorders of vocal development and communication.

    PubMed

    Mori, Chihiro; Wada, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Like humans, songbirds are one of the few animal groups that learn vocalization. Vocal learning requires coordination of auditory input and vocal output using auditory feedback to guide one's own vocalizations during a specific developmental stage known as the critical period. Songbirds are good animal models for understand the neural basis of vocal learning, a complex form of imitation, because they have many parallels to humans with regard to the features of vocal behavior and neural circuits dedicated to vocal learning. In this review, we will summarize the behavioral, neural, and genetic traits of birdsong. We will also discuss how studies of birdsong can help us understand how the development of neural circuits for vocal learning and production is driven by sensory input (auditory information) and motor output (vocalization).

  4. Molecular basis of processing-induced changes in protein structure in relation to intestinal digestion in yellow and green type pea (Pisum sativum L.): A molecular spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Warkentin, Tom; Niu, Zhiyuan; Khan, Nazir A; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-12-05

    The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify the protein inherent molecular structural features of green cotyledon (CDC Striker) and yellow cotyledon (CDC Meadow) pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds using molecular spectroscopic technique (FT/IR-ATR); (2) measure the denaturation of protein molecular makeup in the two types of pea during dry roasting (120°C for 60 min), autoclaving (120°C for 60 min) or microwaving (for 5 min); and (3) correlate the heat-induced changes in protein molecular makeup to the corresponding changes in protein digestibility determined using modified three-step in vitro procedure. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had higher (P<0.05) ratios of amide I to II peak height (1.698 vs. 1.805) and area (1.843 vs. 2.017). A significant correlation was observed between the amide I and II peak height (r=0.48) and peak area (r=-0.42) ratio with protein content. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had lower (P<0.05) α-helix:β-sheet ratio (1.015 vs. 0.926), indicating varietal difference in protein secondary structure makeup. All processing applications increased α-helix:β-sheet ratio, with the largest (P<0.05) increase being observed with roasting and microwaving. The heat-induced changes in α-helix:β-sheet ratio was strongly correlated to intestinal digestibility of protein within the green (r=-0. 86) and yellow (r=0.81) pea-types. However, across the pea types the correlation was not significant. Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses on the entire spectral data from the amide region (ca. 1727-1480 cm(-1)) were able to visualize and discriminate the structural difference between pea varieties and processing treatments. This study shows that the molecular spectroscopy can be used as a rapid tool to screen the protein value of raw and heat-treated peas.

  5. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-09-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  6. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  7. Molecular basis for TANK recognition by TRAF1 revealed by the crystal structure of TRAF1/TANK complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Min; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Son, Young-Jin; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun Ho

    2017-02-02

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) is a multifunctional adaptor protein involved in important processes of cellular signaling, including innate immunity and apoptosis. TRAF family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK) has been identified as a competitive intracellular inhibitor of TRAF2 function. Although TRAF recognition by various receptors has been studied extensively in the field of TRAF-mediated biology, molecular and functional details of TANK recognition and interaction with TRAF1 have not been studied. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the TRAF1/TANK peptide complex. Quantitative interaction experiments showed that TANK peptide interacts with both TRAF1 and TRAF2 with similar affinity in a micromolar range. Our structural study also reveals that TANK binds TRAF1 using a minor minimal consensus motif for TRAF binding, Px(Q/E)xT.

  8. Simulation and modeling of synuclein-based 'protofibril' structures: as a means of understanding the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigelny, I. F.; Sharikov, Y.; Miller, M. A.; Masliah, E.

    2008-07-01

    The protein α-synuclein (aS) is a 140 amino acid cytosolic protein of unknown function expressed abundantly in neurons and is associated with both environmentally induced and inherited forms of Parkinson's disease, the neurological disorder caused by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Here we demonstrate that aS aggregation leads to protofibril formation that accompanies aS binding to membranes. The specific surfaces of aS that bind to membranes are likely developed during the folding maturation process, where the 3D combinations of amino acids that are bound to these surfaces are very specific. Using molecular modeling and simulation technique, we elucidate the folding pathway of aS into protofibril structures and its configurations that bind to membranes. These membrane-binding surfaces can be targeted with pharmaceutical intervention for dissolution.

  9. The 1.9 Astroms Structure of Human α-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase: The Molecular Basis of Schindler and Kanzaki Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Garman, S

    2009-01-01

    ?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (?-NAGAL; E.C. 3.2.1.49) is a lysosomal exoglycosidase that cleaves terminal ?-N-acetylgalactosamine residues from glycopeptides and glycolipids. In humans, a deficiency of ?-NAGAL activity results in the lysosomal storage disorders Schindler disease and Kanzaki disease. To better understand the molecular defects in the diseases, we determined the crystal structure of human ?-NAGAL after expressing wild-type and glycosylation-deficient glycoproteins in recombinant insect cell expression systems. We measured the enzymatic parameters of our purified wild-type and mutant enzymes, establishing their enzymatic equivalence. To investigate the binding specificity and catalytic mechanism of the human ?-NAGAL enzyme, we determined three crystallographic complexes with different catalytic products bound in the active site of the enzyme. To better understand how individual defects in the ?-NAGAL glycoprotein lead to Schindler disease, we analyzed the effect of disease-causing mutations on the three-dimensional structure.

  10. Molecular Basis of Filtering Carbapenems by Porins from β-Lactam-resistant Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Harsha; Scorciapino, Mariano A.; Moynié, Lucile; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Naismith, James H.; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins known as porins are the major pathway by which hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Single point mutations in porins can decrease the permeability of an antibiotic, either by reduction of channel size or modification of electrostatics in the channel, and thereby confer clinical resistance. Here, we investigate four mutant OmpC proteins from four different clinical isolates of Escherichia coli obtained sequentially from a single patient during a course of antimicrobial chemotherapy. OmpC porin from the first isolate (OmpC20) undergoes three consecutive and additive substitutions giving rise to OmpC26, OmpC28, and finally OmpC33. The permeability of two zwitterionic carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, measured using liposome permeation assays and single channel electrophysiology differs significantly between OmpC20 and OmpC33. Molecular dynamic simulations show that the antibiotics must pass through the constriction zone of porins with a specific orientation, where the antibiotic dipole is aligned along the electric field inside the porin. We identify that changes in the vector of the electric field in the mutated porin, OmpC33, create an additional barrier by “trapping” the antibiotic in an unfavorable orientation in the constriction zone that suffers steric hindrance for the reorientation needed for its onward translocation. Identification and understanding the underlying molecular details of such a barrier to translocation will aid in the design of new antibiotics with improved permeation properties in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26645688

  11. The Structure of Interleukin-23 Reveals in the Molecular Basis of P40 Subunit Sharing With Interleukin-12

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Interleukin-23 is a recently identified member of the IL-12 family of heterodimeric cytokines that modulate subpopulations of T helper cells, and both IL-12 and IL-23 are attractive targets for therapy of autoimmune diseases. IL-23 is a binary complex of a four-helix bundle cytokine (p19) and a soluble class I cytokine receptor p40. IL-12 and IL-23 share p40 as an {alpha}-receptor subunit, yet show only 15% sequence homology between their four-helix cytokines p19 and p35, respectively, and signal through different combinations of shared receptors. In order to elucidate the structural basis of p40 sharing, we have determined a 2.3{angstrom} crystal structure of IL-23 for comparison to the previously determined structure of IL-12. The docking mode of p19 to p40 is altered compared to p35, deviating by a 'tilt' and 'roll' that results in an altered footprint of p40 on the A and D helices of the respective cytokines. Binding of p19 to p40 is mediated primarily by an Arginine residue on helix D of p19 that forms an extensive charge and hydrogen-bonding network with residues at the base of the pocket on p40. This 'Arginine pocket' is lined with an inner shell of hydrophobic interactions that are ringed by an outer shell of polar interactions. Comparative analysis indicates that the IL-23 and IL-12 complexes 'mimic' the network of interactions constituting the central Arginine pocket despite p19 and p35 having limited sequence homology. The majority of the structural epitopes in the two complexes are composed of unique p19 and p35 pair-wise contacts with common residues on p40. Thus, while the critical hotspot is maintained in the two complexes, the majority of the interfaces are structurally distinct and, therefore, provide a basis for the therapeutic targeting of IL-12 versus IL-23 heterodimer formation despite their use of a common receptor subunit.

  12. Curvy-steps approach to constraint-free extended-Lagrangian ab initio molecular dynamics, using atom-centered basis functions: convergence toward Born-Oppenheimer trajectories.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-12-15

    A dynamical extension of the "curvy-steps" approach to linear-scaling self-consistent field calculations is presented, which yields an extended-Lagrangian formulation of ab initio molecular dynamics. An exponential parametrization of the one-electron density matrix, expressed in terms of atom-centered Gaussian basis functions, facilitates propagation along the manifold of density matrices in a geometrically correct fashion that automatically enforces idempotency constraints. The extended Lagrangian itself is constraint free, thus neither density matrix purification nor expensive, iterative solution for Lagrange multipliers is required. Propagation is highly efficient, and time steps compare favorably to those used in Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The behavior of the method, especially with regard to the maintenance of adiabatic decoupling of nuclei and electrons, is examined for a sequence of diatomic molecules, and comparison is made to trajectories propagated on the converged Born-Oppenheimer surface. Certain claims to the contrary notwithstanding, our results demonstrate that vibrational frequencies may depend on the value of the fictitious mass parameter, even in an atom-centered basis. Light-atom stretching frequencies can be significantly redshifted, even when the nuclear and electronic energy scales are well separated. With a sufficiently small fictitious mass and a short time step, accurate frequencies can be obtained; we characterize appropriate values of these parameters for a wide range of vibrational frequencies.

  13. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.

    1984-09-01

    Advances made in the work for the Ocular Hazards Program at the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR) are described. The research has seen the first application of femtosecond lasers to the visual system; it is giving new insights into how these ultimate laser sources interact with biological tissue in general and with the visual system in particular. The authors have discovered that simple anions can activate visual photoreceptors in the dark; among these anionic activators is the dental agent fluoride. Research has continued into identifying selectively and spatially the image of various elements in photoreceptors and adjacent tissue. The authors were able to extend our preparation procedures to view the elemental composition of such components as melanin granules. The sensitive and selective spatial images should play important roles in extending understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage. The staining procedures developed can be applied to study laser-damaged retina. Data were obtained demonstrating rapid mechanical motions in vertebrate photoreceptors. Such rapid mechanical motions which parallel electrophysiological responses in the cell may lie at the very basis of photoreceptor function. Laser-damage mechanisms should now be reevaluated in terms of this new data. The effect of laser light on these newly discovered mechanical motions will surely lead to new and improved understanding of low-level laser ocular hazards.

  14. The molecular basis of ABA-independent inhibition of PP2Cs by a subclass of PYL proteins.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qi; Yin, Ping; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Li; Yan, Chuangye; Lin, Zhaohu; Wu, Jim Zhen; Wang, Jiawei; Yan, S Frank; Yan, Nieng

    2011-06-10

    PYR1/PYL/RCAR proteins (PYLs) are confirmed abscisic acid (ABA) receptors, which inhibit protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) upon binding to ABA. Arabidopsis thaliana has 14 PYLs, yet their functional distinction remains unclear. Here, we report systematic biochemical characterization of PYLs. A subclass of PYLs, represented by PYL10, inhibited PP2C in the absence of any ligand. Crystal structures of PYL10, both in the free form and in the HAB1 (PP2C)-bound state, revealed the structural basis for its constitutive activity. Structural-guided biochemical analyses revealed that ABA-independent inhibition of PP2C requires the PYLs to exist in a monomeric state. In addition, the residues guarding the entrance to the ligand-binding pocket of these PYLs should be bulky and hydrophobic. Based on these principles, we were able to generate monomeric PYL2 variants that gained constitutive inhibitory effect on PP2Cs. These findings provide an important framework for understanding the complex regulation of ABA signaling by PYL proteins.

  15. Human apo-SRP72 and SRP68/72 complex structures reveal the molecular basis of protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yina; Zhang, Qi; Lang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Dong, Xiaofei; Chen, Zhenhang; Tian, Wenli; Tang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Tong, Yufeng; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2017-03-20

    The co-translational targeting or insertion of secretory and membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a key biological process mediated by the signal recognition particle (SRP). In eukaryotes, the SRP68-SRP72 (SRP68/72) heterodimer plays an essential role in protein translocation. However, structural information on the two largest SRP proteins, SRP68 and SRP72, is limited, especially regarding their interaction. Herein, we report the first crystal structures of human apo-SRP72 and the SRP68/72 complex at 2.91Å and 1.7Å resolution, respectively. The SRP68-binding domain of SRP72 contains four atypical tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) and a flexible C-terminal cap. Apo-SRP72 exists mainly as dimers in solution. To bind to SRP68, the SRP72 homodimer disassociates, and the indispensable C-terminal cap undergoes a pronounced conformational change to assist formation of the SRP68/72 heterodimer. A 23-residue polypeptide of SRP68 is sufficient for tight binding to SRP72 through its unusually hydrophobic and extended surface. Structural, biophysical, and mutagenesis analyses revealed that cancer-associated mutations disrupt the SRP68-SRP72 interaction and their co-localization with ER in mammalian cells. The results highlight the essential role of the SRP68-SRP72 interaction in SRP-mediated protein translocation and provide a structural basis for disease diagnosis, pathophysiology, and drug design.

  16. The molecular basis for selective assembly of the UBAP1-containing endosome-specific ESCRT-I complex.

    PubMed

    Wunderley, Lydia; Brownhill, Kim; Stefani, Flavia; Tabernero, Lydia; Woodman, Philip

    2014-02-01

    ESCRT-I is essential for the multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of ubiquitylated cargo such as epidermal growth factor receptor, as well as for several cellular functions, such as cell division and retroviral budding. ESCRT-I has four subunits; TSG101, VPS28, VPS37 and MVB12. There are several members of VPS37 and MVB12 families in mammalian cells, and their differential incorporation into ESCRT-I could provide function-specific variants of the complex. However, it remains unclear whether these different forms of VPS37 and MVB12 combine randomly or generate selective pairings within ESCRT-I, and what the mechanistic basis for such pairing would be. Here, we show that the incorporation of two MVB12 members, UBAP1 and MVB12A, into ESCRT-I is highly selective with respect to their VPS37 partners. We map the region mediating selective assembly of UBAP1-VPS37A to the core ESCRT-I-binding domain of VPS37A. In contrast, selective integration of UBAP1 requires both the minimal ESCRT-I-binding region and a neighbouring predicted helix. The biochemical specificity in ESCRT-I assembly is matched by functional specialisation as siRNA-mediated depletion of UBAP1, but not MVB12A and MVB12B, disrupts ubiquitin-dependent sorting at the MVB.

  17. Probing the molecular basis of substrate specificity, stereospecificity, and catalysis in the class II pyruvate aldolase, BphI.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Carere, Jason; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2011-05-03

    BphI, a pyruvate-specific class II aldolase found in the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) degradation pathway, catalyzes the reversible C-C bond cleavage of (4S)-hydroxy-2-oxoacids to form pyruvate and an aldehyde. Mutations were introduced into bphI to probe the contribution of active site residues to substrate recognition and catalysis. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme that has similar specificities for acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde, the L87A variant exhibited a 40-fold preference for propionaldehyde over acetaldehyde. The specificity constant of the L89A variant in the aldol addition reaction using pentaldehyde is increased ∼50-fold, making it more catalytically efficient for pentaldehyde utilization compared to the wild-type utilization of the natural substrate, acetaldehyde. Replacement of Tyr-290 with phenylalanine or serine resulted in a loss of stereochemical control as the variants were able to utilize substrates with both R and S configurations at C4 with similar kinetic parameters. Aldol cleavage and pyruvate α-proton exchange activity were undetectable in the R16A variant, supporting the role of Arg-16 in stabilizing a pyruvate enolate intermediate. The pH dependence of the enzyme is consistent with a single deprotonation by a catalytic base with pK(a) values of approximately 7. In H20A and H20S variants, pH profiles show the dependence of enzyme activity on hydroxide concentration. On the basis of these results, a catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  18. Molecular Basis for Failure of “Atypical” C1 Domain of Vav1 to Bind Diacylglycerol/Phorbol Ester*

    PubMed Central

    Geczy, Tamas; Peach, Megan L.; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Sigano, Dina M.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Valle, Christopher J.; Selezneva, Julia; Woo, Wonhee; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E.; Garfield, Susan H.; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Marquez, Victor E.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains, the recognition motif of the second messenger diacylglycerol and of the phorbol esters, are classified as typical (ligand-responsive) or atypical (not ligand-responsive). The C1 domain of Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, plays a critical role in regulation of Vav activity through stabilization of the Dbl homology domain, which is responsible for exchange activity of Vav. Although the C1 domain of Vav1 is classified as atypical, it retains a binding pocket geometry homologous to that of the typical C1 domains of PKCs. This study clarifies the basis for its failure to bind ligands. Substituting Vav1-specific residues into the C1b domain of PKCδ, we identified five crucial residues (Glu9, Glu10, Thr11, Thr24, and Tyr26) along the rim of the binding cleft that weaken binding potency in a cumulative fashion. Reciprocally, replacing these incompatible residues in the Vav1 C1 domain with the corresponding residues from PKCδ C1b (δC1b) conferred high potency for phorbol ester binding. Computer modeling predicts that these unique residues in Vav1 increase the hydrophilicity of the rim of the binding pocket, impairing membrane association and thereby preventing formation of the ternary C1-ligand-membrane binding complex. The initial design of diacylglycerol-lactones to exploit these Vav1 unique residues showed enhanced selectivity for C1 domains incorporating these residues, suggesting a strategy for the development of ligands targeting Vav1. PMID:22351766

  19. Alternative basis functions for L sup 2 calculations on the molecular continuum. II. Integrals with higher-order functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fortunelli, A.; Carravetta, V. )

    1992-04-01

    By differentiation of the expressions for the basic {ital s}-type integrals previously presented, analytic expressions are here derived for integrals, relevant for quantum-chemistry calculations, involving oscillating Hermite Gaussian functions (OHGF's) and many-center Hermite Gaussian functions (HGF's) of any order. The OHGF is the product of a HGF and a radial trigonometric factor cos({ital kr}), and has been proposed for describing the continuum orbitals in {ital L}{sup 2} calculations on molecules. The resulting expressions are compact and particularly suitable for numerical implementation on a computer, while the increase in the computational effort of the integral evaluation with respect to the {ital s}-type functions is estimated to be of the same order as that found in the standard case of simple Gaussian functions. Applications of the OHGF basis to the calculation of continuum states are presented and compared to the exact results for test cases: the hydrogen atom and the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecule, in order to discuss advantages and limitations of the proposed approach.

  20. Molecular Dynamic Simulation to Explore the Molecular Basis of Btk-PH Domain Interaction with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dan; Jiang, Junfeng; Liang, Zhongjie; Sun, Maomin; Luo, Cheng; Shen, Bairong

    2013-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase contains a pleckstrin homology domain, and it specifically binds inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5)P4), which is involved in the maturation of B cells. In this paper, we studied 12 systems including the wild type and 11 mutants, K12R, S14F, K19E, R28C/H, E41K, L11P, F25S, Y40N, and K12R-R28C/H, to investigate any change in the ligand binding site of each mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the method of molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area have been applied to the twelve systems, and reasonable mutant structures and their binding free energies have been obtained as criteria in the final classification. As a result, five structures, K12R, K19E, R28C/H, and E41K mutants, were classified as “functional mutations,” whereas L11P, S14F, F25S, and Y40N were grouped into “folding mutations.” This rigorous study of the binding affinity of each of the mutants and their classification provides some new insights into the biological function of the Btk-PH domain and related mutation-causing diseases. PMID:24307874

  1. Molecular basis of the mechanism of thiol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution: challenging the SN2 paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Zeida, Ari; Babbush, Ryan; Lebrero, Mariano C. González; Trujillo, Madia; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Darío A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation of cellular thiol containing compounds, such as glutathione and protein Cys residues, is considered to play an important role in many biological processes. Among possible oxidants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is known to be produced in many cell types as a response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and could work as an intracellular messenger. This reaction has been reported to proceed through a SN2 mechanism, but despite its importance, the reaction is not completely understood at the atomic level. In this work we elucidate the reaction mechanism of thiol oxidation by H2O2 for a model methanethiolate system using state of the art hybrid quantum-classical (QM-MM) molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the solvent plays a key role in positioning the reactants, that there is a significant charge redistribution in the first stages of the reaction, and that there is a hydrogen transfer process between H2O2 oxygen atoms that occurs after reaching the transition state. These observations contradict the SN2 mechanism hypothesis for this reaction. Specifically, our results indicate that the reaction is driven by a tendency of the slightly charged peroxidatic oxygen to become even more negative in the product via an electrophilic attack on the negative sulfur atom. This is inconsistent with the SN2 mechanism, which predicts a protonated sulfenic acid and hydroxyl anion as stable intermediates. These intermediates are not found. Instead, the reaction proceeds directly to unprotonated sulfenic acid and water. PMID:22303921

  2. Molecular genetics of meningiomas: a systematic review of the current literature and potential basis for future treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Zada, Gabriel; Mosich, Gina M; Chen, Thomas C; Giannotta, Steven L; Wang, Kai; Mack, William J

    2011-05-01

    Although a majority of meningiomas are benign neoplasms, those occurring at the cranial base may be challenging tumors to treat because of extensive tissue invasion, an inability to achieve gross-total microscopic resection, and local tumor recurrence and/or progression. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic abnormalities associated with meningioma tumorigenesis, growth, and invasion may provide novel targets for grading assessments and individualizing molecular therapies for skull base meningiomas. The authors performed a review of the current literature to identify genes that have been associated with the formation and/or progression of meningiomas. Mutations in the NF2 gene have been most commonly implicated in the formation of the majority of meningiomas. Inactivation of other tumor suppressor genes, including DAL-1 and various tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, upregulation of several oncogenes including c-sis and STAT3, and signaling dysregulation of pathways such as the Wnt pathway, have each been found to play important, and perhaps, complementary roles in meningioma development, progression, and recurrence. Identification of these genetic factors using genome-wide association studies and high-throughput genomics may provide data for future individualized treatment strategies.

  3. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  4. Two exon-skipping mutations as the molecular basis of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (4-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed Central

    Chambliss, K L; Hinson, D D; Trettel, F; Malaspina, P; Novelletto, A; Jakobs, C; Gibson, K M

    1998-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a rare metabolic disorder of 4-aminobutyric acid degradation, has been identified in approximately 150 patients. Affected individuals accumulate large quantities of 4-hydroxybutyric acid, a compound with a wide range of neuropharmacological activities, in physiological fluids. As a first step in beginning an investigation of the molecular genetics of SSADH deficiency, we have utilized SSADH cDNA and genomic sequences to identify two point mutations in the SSADH genes derived from four patients. These mutations, identified by standard methods of reverse transcription, PCR, dideoxy-chain termination, and cycle sequencing, alter highly conserved sequences at intron/exon boundaries and prevent the RNA-splicing apparatus from properly recognizing the normal splice junction. Each family segregated a mutation in a different splice site, resulting in exon skipping and, in one case, a frameshift and premature termination and, in the other case, an in-frame deletion in the resulting protein. Family members, including parents and siblings of these patients, were shown to be heterozygotes for the splicing abnormality, providing additional evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance. Our results provide the first evidence that 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria, resulting from SSADH deficiency, is the result of genetic defects in the human SSADH gene. PMID:9683595

  5. Molecular basis of fatty acid selectivity in the zDHHC family of S-acyltransferases revealed by click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Jennifer; Munro, Kevin R.; Davidson, Stuart C.; Riviere, Matthieu; Wojno, Justyna; Smith, Terry K.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.; Chamberlain, Luke H.

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification, catalyzed by the zinc finger DHHC domain containing (zDHHC) enzyme family. S-acylated proteins can be modified by different fatty acids; however, very little is known about how zDHHC enzymes contribute to acyl chain heterogeneity. Here, we used fatty acid-azide/alkyne labeling of mammalian cells, showing their transformation into acyl-CoAs and subsequent click chemistry-based detection, to demonstrate that zDHHC enzymes have marked differences in their fatty acid selectivity. This difference in selectivity was apparent even for highly related enzymes, such as zDHHC3 and zDHHC7, which displayed a marked difference in their ability to use C18:0 acyl-CoA as a substrate. Furthermore, we identified isoleucine-182 in transmembrane domain 3 of zDHHC3 as a key determinant in limiting the use of longer chain acyl-CoAs by this enzyme. This study uncovered differences in the fatty acid selectivity profiles of cellular zDHHC enzymes and mapped molecular determinants governing this selectivity. PMID:28167757

  6. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis uncovers the molecular basis underlying early flowering and apetalous characteristic in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kunjiang; Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Feng; Chen, Song; Peng, Qi; Li, Hongge; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Maolong; Chu, Pu; Zhang, Jiefu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-01-01

    Floral transition and petal onset, as two main aspects of flower development, are crucial to rapeseed evolutionary success and yield formation. Currently, very little is known regarding the genetic architecture that regulates flowering time and petal morphogenesis in Brassica napus. In the present study, a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis was performed with an absolutely apetalous and early flowering line, APL01, and a normally petalled line, PL01, using high-throughput RNA sequencing. In total, 13,205 differential expressed genes were detected, of which 6111 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 7094 genes were significantly up-regulated in the young inflorescences of APL01 compared with PL01. The expression levels of a vast number of genes involved in protein biosynthesis were altered in response to the early flowering and apetalous character. Based on the putative rapeseed flowering genes, an early flowering network, mainly comprised of vernalization and photoperiod pathways, was built. Additionally, 36 putative upstream genes possibly governing the apetalous character of line APL01 were identified, and six genes potentially regulating petal origination were obtained by combining with three petal-related quantitative trait loci. These findings will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying floral transition and petal initiation in B. napus. PMID:27460760

  7. Molecular basis of multiple resistance to ACCase- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in Alopecurus japonicus from China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yaling; Liu, Weitang; Guo, Wenlei; Li, Lingxu; Yuan, Guohui; Du, Long; Wang, Jinxin

    2016-01-01

    Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant Alopecurus japonicus has become a recurring problem in winter wheat fields in eastern China. Growers have resorted to using mesosulfuron-methyl, an acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicide, to control this weed. A single A. japonicus population (AH-15) resistant to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl was found in Anhui Province, China. The results of whole-plant dose-response experiments showed that AH-15 has evolved high-level resistance to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (95.96-fold) and mesosulfuron-methyl (39.87-fold). It was shown via molecular analysis that resistance to both fenoxaprop-P-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl was due to an amino acid substitution of Ile1781 to Leu in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) and a substitution of Trp 574 to Leu in ALS, respectively. Whole-plant bioassays indicated that the AH-15 population was resistant to the ACCase herbicides clodinafop-propargyl, clethodim, sethoxydim and pinoxaden as well as the ALS herbicides pyroxsulam, flucarbazone-Na and imazethapyr, but susceptible to the ACCase herbicide haloxyfop-R-methyl. This work reports for the first time that A. japonicus has developed resistance to ACCase- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides due to target site mutations in the ACCase and ALS genes.

  8. Molecular basis for hair loss in mice carrying a novel nonsense mutation (Hrrh-R ) in the hairless gene (Hr).

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Sundberg, J P; Das, S; Carpenter, D; Cain, K T; Michaud, E J; Voy, B H

    2010-01-01

    Animal models carrying mutations in the hairless (Hr) gene provide a rich resource for study of hair follicle biology. A spontaneous mouse mutant with a phenotype strikingly similar to rhino mutants of Hr arose spontaneously in the mouse facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sequence analysis of Hr in these mutants uncovered a nonsense mutation in exon 12, designated as Hr(rh-R) (rhino, Oak Ridge). The mutation led to significant reduction in Hr mRNA levels, predicted to be due to nonsense-mediated decay. Histological analysis indicated dilated hair follicle infundibula at 14 days of age that rapidly became filled with cornified material. Microarray analyses revealed that expression levels of many genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal regeneration, and wound healing were significantly upregulated before morphological detection of the phenotype, suggesting their role in onset of the Hr(rh-R) phenotype. Identification of this new Hr allele and the underlying molecular alterations allows further understanding of the role of Hr in hair follicle biology.

  9. Investigating the molecular genetic basis of heterosis for internode expansion in maize by microRNA transcriptomic deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Ding, Dong; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Xue, Yadong; Li, Weihua; Fu, Zhiyuan; Li, Haochuan; Tang, Jihua

    2015-05-01

    Heterosis has been used widely in the breeding of maize and other crops and plays an important role in increasing yield, improving quality, and enhancing stress resistance, but its molecular mechanism is far from clear. To determine whether microRNA (miRNA)-dependent gene regulation is responsible for heterosis of elongating internodes below the ear and ear height in maize, a deep-sequencing strategy was applied to the elite hybrid Xundan20, which is currently cultivated widely in China, and its two parents. RNA was extracted from the eighth internode because it shows clear internode length heterosis. A total of 99 conserved maize miRNAs were detected in both the hybrid and parental lines. Most of these miRNAs were expressed nonadditively in the hybrid compared with its parental lines. These results indicated that miRNAs might participate in heterosis during internode expansion in maize and exert an influence on ear and plant height via the repression of their target genes. In total, eight novel miRNAs belonging to four miRNA families were predicted in the expanding internode. Global repression of miRNAs in the hybrid, which might result in enhanced gene expression, might be one reason why the hybrid shows longer internodes and taller seedlings compared with its parental lines.

  10. The molecular basis of ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 deamidation by the bacterial effector protein Cif.

    PubMed

    Crow, Allister; Hughes, Richard K; Taieb, Frédéric; Oswald, Eric; Banfield, Mark J

    2012-07-03

    The cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are a family of translocated effector proteins, found in diverse pathogenic bacteria, that interfere with the host cell cycle by catalyzing the deamidation of a specific glutamine residue (Gln40) in NEDD8 and the related protein ubiquitin. This modification prevents recycling of neddylated cullin-RING ligases, leading to stabilization of various cullin-RING ligase targets, and also prevents polyubiquitin chain formation. Here, we report the crystal structures of two Cif/NEDD8 complexes, revealing a conserved molecular interface that defines enzyme/substrate recognition. Mutation of residues forming the interface suggests that shape complementarity, rather than specific individual interactions, is a critical feature for complex formation. We show that Cifs from diverse bacteria bind NEDD8 in vitro and conclude that they will all interact with their substrates in the same way. The "occluding loop" in Cif gates access to Gln40 by forcing a conformational change in the C terminus of NEDD8. We used native PAGE to follow the activity of Cif from the human pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and selected variants, and the position of Gln40 in the active site has allowed us to propose a catalytic mechanism for these enzymes.

  11. Understanding the molecular basis of plant growth promotional effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on rice through protein profiling

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KH-1 was found to exhibit plant growth promotional activity in rice under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. But the mechanism underlying such promotional activity of P. fluorescens is not yet understood clearly. In this study, efforts were made to elucidate the molecular responses of rice plants to P. fluorescens treatment through protein profiling. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis strategy was adopted to identify the PGPR responsive proteins and the differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Results Priming of P. fluorescens, 23 different proteins found to be differentially expressed in rice leaf sheaths and MS analysis revealed the differential expression of some important proteins namely putative p23 co-chaperone, Thioredoxin h- rice, Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large chain precursor, Nucleotide diPhosphate kinase, Proteosome sub unit protein and putative glutathione S-transferase protein. Conclusion Functional analyses of the differential proteins were reported to be directly or indirectly involved in growth promotion in plants. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of PGPR strain KH-1 in rice plant growth promotion. PMID:20034395

  12. The Risk of Some Veterinary Antimicrobial Agents on Public Health Associated with Antimicrobial Resistance and their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Sander, Pascal; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Yulian; Cheng, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data, and risk assessment results of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in humans. From the selected examples, it was apparent from reviewing the published scientific literature that the ban on use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., avoparcin, fluoroquinolone, tetracyclines) did not change drug resistance patterns and did not mitigate the intended goal of minimizing antimicrobial resistance. The use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., virginiamycin, macrolides, and cephalosporins) in food animals may have an impact on the antimicrobial resistance in humans, but it was largely depended on the pattern of drug usage in different geographical regions. The epidemiological characteristics of resistant bacteria were closely related to molecular mechanisms involved in the development, fitness, and transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27803693

  13. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate–aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  14. Molecular basis for the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis: An experimental study in the Sprague-dawley rat model

    PubMed Central

    Omu, Alexander E.; Al-Azemi, Majedah K.; Al-Maghrebi, May; Mathew, Chacko T.; Omu, Florence E.; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Anim, Jehoram T.; Oriowo, Mabayoje A.; Memon, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. Materials and Methods: Three groups of eight adult male SD rats were maintained for 4 weeks on a normal diet as control, zinc deficient diet and zinc deficient diet with zinc supplementation of 28 mg zinc/kg body weight respectively. Using standard techniques, the following parameters were compared between the three groups of experimental animals at the end of 4 weeks: (a) Serum zinc, magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), selenium (Se) and cadmium (Cd), (b) serum sex hormones, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), (c) interleukin-4 (IL-4), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 expression in the testes, (d) assessment of apoptosis of testicular cells using electron microscopy and (e) testicular volume and histology using the orchidometer and Johnsen score, respectively. Results: The zinc deficient group showed a reduction of testicular volume, serum concentrations of Zn, Cu, Se, Mg, SOD, GPX, IL-4, Bcl-2 and testosterone (P < 0.05), as well as increased levels of serum Cd, MDA and tissue TNF-α, Bax, caspase-3 and apoptosis of the germ cells (P < 0.05) compared with control and zinc supplementation groups. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency is associated with impaired spermatogenesis because of reduced testosterone production, increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. These findings suggest that zinc has a role in male reproduction. PMID:25624578

  15. Targeted Disruption of Orchestration between Stroma and Tumor Cells in Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Li, Lei; Li, Zhaoshen; Xie, Keping

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with a prominent desmoplastic reaction as the defining hallmark of the disease. The past several decades have seen dramatic progress in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including the identification of precursor lesions, sequential transformation from normal pancreas to invasive pancreatic cancer and corresponding signature genetic even