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Sample records for molecular basis forobligate

  1. The genome of Methylobacillus flagellatus, the molecular basis forobligate methylotrophy, and the polyphyletic origin ofmethylotrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Lapidus, Alla; Han, Cliff; Goodwin,Lynne; Saunders, Liz; Brettin, Tom; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Lucas,Susan; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2007-01-08

    Along with methane, methanol and methylated amines representimportant biogenic atmospheric constituents, thus not only methanotrophs,but also non-methanotrophic methylotrophs play a significant role inglobal carbon cycling. The complete genome of a model obligate methanoland methylamine utilizer, Methylobacillus flagellatus (strain KT) wassequenced. The genome is represented by a single circular chromosome ofapproximately 3 Mb pairs, potentially encoding a total of 2,766 proteins.Based on genome analysis as well as the results from previous genetic andmutational analyses, methylotrophy is enabled by methanol- andmethylamine dehydrogenases, the tetrahydromethanopterin-linkedformaldehyde oxidation pathway, the assimilatory and dissimilatorybranches of the ribulose monophosphate cycle, and by formatedehydrogenases. Some of the methylotrophy genes are present in more thanone (identical or non-identical) copy. The obligate dependence on singlecarbon compounds appears to be due to the incomplete tricarboxylic acidcycle, as no genes potentially encoding alpha ketoglutarate, malate orsuccinate dehydrogenases are identifiable. The genome of M. flagellatuswas compared, in terms of methylotrophy functions, to the previouslysequenced genomes of three methylotrophs: Methylobacterium extorquens(Alphaproteobacterium, 7 Mbp), Methylibium petroleophilum(Betaproteobacterium, 4 Mbp), and Methylococcus capsulatus(Gammaproteobacterium, 3.3 Mbp). Strikingly, metabolically and/orphylogenetically, methylotrophy functions in M. flagellatus were moresimilar to the ones in M. capsulatus and M. extorquens than to the onesin the more closely related M. petroleophilum, providing the firstgenomic evidence for the polyphyletic origin of methylotrophy inBetaproteobacteria.

  2. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy.

  3. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy. PMID:25307570

  4. A Molecular Basis of Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the molecular basis of cancer, focusing on genetics of the disease. Indicates that human cancers are initiated by oncogenes (altered versions of normal genes) and that in one case the critical alteration is a single point mutation that changes one amino acid in the protein encoded by the gene. (JN)

  5. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  6. The Molecular Basis of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allan C.

    1985-01-01

    Discovery that mutations accumulate at steady rates over time in the genes of all lineages of plants and animals has led to new insights into evolution at the molecular and organismal levels. Discusses molecular evolution, examining deoxyribonuclei acid (DNA) sequences, morphological distances, and codon rate of change. (DH)

  7. The Molecular Basis of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Basic architecture of embryo development appears to be under homeobox control (a short stretch of DNA). Outlines research on this genetic segment in fruit flies which led to identification of this control on the embryo's spatial organization. Indicates that molecular mechanisms underlying development may be much more universal than previously…

  8. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  9. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  10. The molecular basis of cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Ivell, Richard; Hartung, Stefan

    2003-04-01

    Cryptorchidism is the commonest malady to affect newborn male infants. Until recently, the molecular aetiology of this syndrome was unclear. Cryptorchidism may be part of a broader testicular dysgenesis syndrome, wherein a disturbance in steroid hormone metabolism, possibly through a perturbed hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis could be involved. Disturbance may be genetic, or extrinsic through endocrine disruptors. Recently, the role of insulin-like factor-3 (INSL3; alternatively called relaxin-like factor) has been highlighted through the cryptorchid phenotype of mice where genes for either INSL3 or its receptor have been ablated. INSL3 is produced by Leydig cells of the fetal testis and acts upon the gubernacular ligament to retain the gonad in the inguinal region, from which it later passes into the scrotum. INSL3 expression in fetal testis is inhibited by maternal exposure to estrogens. Although to date no mutations have been found in the human INSL3 gene responsible for cryptorchidism, one causative mutation in the INSL3 receptor (LGR8 or GREAT) has been reported. Studies on developmental transcription factors, such as Hoxa-10 in mice, suggest that other specific molecular cascades could also lead to a cryptorchid phenotype. Considering its frequency in newborn children, and the severity of the untreated condition (infertility and often testicular cancer) these new findings should generate new information on possible causes and treatments.

  11. The Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (NA = 6 × 1023). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson’s disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of “synaptic plasticity” affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting. PMID:23050060

  12. The molecular basis of memory.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2012-08-15

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (N(A) = 6 × 10(23)). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson's disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of "synaptic plasticity" affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting. PMID:23050060

  13. The molecular basis of memory.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2012-08-15

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (N(A) = 6 × 10(23)). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson's disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of "synaptic plasticity" affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting.

  14. Molecular basis of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F

    2001-05-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. Forms of CMT2 map to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3p (CMT2B), chromosome 7p (CMT2D), and to chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset, demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathologic features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosomes 8q, 10q, and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies

  15. The molecular basis of peanut allergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures, and discusses how modif...

  16. The molecular basis for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jethro; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted therapy for glioblastoma has arrived, but results have been modest thus far. This review highlights the challenges inherent to treating glioblastoma with targeted therapy and delves into the complex signaling networks that form the molecular basis of novel therapies. Past failures, current challenges, and future possibilities are discussed in the context of the classic "oncogenic" signaling network, as well as the "nononcogenic" stress response network.

  17. Molecular basis of thalassemia in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidli, Aisha; Hamodat, Mowafak; Fawzi, Zainab; Abu-Laban, Mohamed; Gerard, Nathalie; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal

    2007-01-01

    There is a paucity of information on the molecular basis of beta-thalassemia (thal) in Qatar, a country in the southern part of the Arabian Gulf. To decipher the molecular spectrum of beta- thalassemic alleles present in Qatar, we studied 31 clinically recognized patients, including three with sickle cell disease and beta-thal, and an additional six cases referred for unexplained microcytic anemia. We found 12 different beta-thalassemic alleles and two yet to be defined alleles, mutations likely occurring elsewhere than in the beta-globin gene per se. This is quite striking, given the small size of the study population, and highlights not only the ethnic diversity, but also the necessity of further investigating the thalassemic spectrum. PMID:17486492

  18. The molecular basis of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Maleki, Soheila J; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-05-01

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures and discusses how modifications both enzymatic and non-enzymatic affect digestion, innate immune recognition, and IgE interactions. The allergen structures help explain cross-reactivity among allergens from different sources, which is useful in improving patient diagnostics. Surprisingly, it was recently noted that similar short peptide sequences among unrelated peanut allergens could also be a source of cross-reactivity. The molecular features of peanut allergens continue to inform predictions and provide new research directions in the study of allergic disease. PMID:24633613

  19. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  20. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  1. Molecular Basis of KELnull Phenotype in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Boturão-Neto, Edmir; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Kimura, Elisa Yuriko Sugano; de Oliveira, Maria do Carmo Valgueiro Costa; do Monte Barretto, Cláudia Lumack; Nunes, Mércia Maria Alves; Albuquerque, Sérgio Roberto Lopes; de Deus Santos, Marcos Daniel; Bordin, José Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background KELnull (K0) persons can produce clinically significant anti-KEL5 antibody after transfusion and/or pregnancy, requiring K0 blood transfusion when indicated. 37 K0 alleles have been reported in studies over different populations, but none in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of K0 phenotype in Brazilians. Methods We investigated three K0 samples from different Brazilian blood banks (Recife, Manaus, and Vila Velha) in women with anti-KEL5. KEL antigen typing was performed by serologic techniques, and the K0 status was confirmed by flow cytometry. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing of the KEL coding and exon-intron regions were also performed. Results RBCs of the 3 patients were phenotyped as KEL:-1,−2,−3,−4,−7. The 3 patients had the same KEL*02/02 genotype and were negative for KEL*02.03 and KEL*02.06 alleles. The Recife K0 patient was homozygous for IVS16 + 1g>a mutation (KEL*02N.31 allele). The flow cytometry with anti-KEL1, anti-KEL2, anti-KEL3, anti-KEL4, and anti-CD238 confirmed the K0 phenotype. In addition, we found the c.10423C>T mutation (KEL*02N.04 allele) in both the Manaus K0 and the Vila Velha K0 patients. Conclusion This report represents the first study of K0 molecular basis performed in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. PMID:25960716

  2. Molecular basis of environmentally induced birth defects.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Richard H; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Eudy, James D; Rosenquist, Thomas H

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of the developing conceptus to selected environmental agents can lead to deleterious and often times lethal birth defects. These malformations result in serious emotional and financial consequences to families and societies worldwide. As we continue to progress technologically, we face challenges from the introduction of new pharmacological agents and chemical compounds into the environment. This results in a concomitant need to more fully understand the relationship between in utero exposure to environmental teratogens and the risk of congenital malformations. The goal of this review is to provide a current perspective of the major concepts related to the molecular basis of environmentally induced birth defects. Starting with a discussion of commonly occurring birth defects, we consider important fundamental facets of embryonic development, teratology, and gene-environment interactions. The review then summarizes our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in selected birth defects following exposure to pharmacological compounds, including thalidomide, retinoids, and valproic acid. Understanding these signaling pathways may lead to the development of safer pharmaceutical compounds and a reduction in the number of infants born with preventable birth defects.

  3. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Liver Development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Donghun; Singh Monga, Satdarshan Pal

    2015-01-01

    Liver is a prime organ responsible for synthesis, metabolism, and detoxification. The organ is endodermal in origin and its development is regulated by temporal, complex, and finely balanced cellular and molecular interactions that dictate its origin, growth, and maturation. We discuss the relevance of endoderm patterning, which truly is the first step toward mapping of domains that will give rise to specific organs. Once foregut patterning is completed, certain cells within the foregut endoderm gain competence in the form of expression of certain transcription factors that allow them to respond to certain inductive signals. Hepatic specification is then a result of such inductive signals, which often emanate from the surrounding mesenchyme. During hepatic specification bipotential hepatic stem cells or hepatoblasts become apparent and undergo expansion, which results in a visible liver primordium during the stage of hepatic morphogenesis. Hepatoblasts next differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. The expansion and differentiation is regulated by cellular and molecular interactions between hepatoblasts and mesenchymal cells including sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells, and also innate hematopoietic elements. Further maturation of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes continues during late hepatic development as a function of various growth factors. At this time, liver gains architectural novelty in the form of zonality and at cellular level acquires polarity. A comprehensive elucidation of such finely tuned developmental cues have been the basis of transdifferentiation of various types of stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells for purposes of understanding health and disease and for therapeutic applications. PMID:23720330

  4. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  5. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  6. The molecular basis of fertilization (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Georgadaki, Katerina; Khoury, Nikolas; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Zoumpourlis, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Fertilization is the fusion of the male and female gamete. The process involves the fusion of an oocyte with a sperm, creating a single diploid cell, the zygote, from which a new individual organism will develop. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of fertilization has fascinated researchers for many years. In this review, we focus on this intriguing process at the molecular level. Several molecules have been identified to play a key role in each step of this intriguing process (the sperm attraction from the oocyte, the sperm maturation, the sperm and oocyte fusion and the two gamete pronuclei fusion leading to the zygote). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the cell-cell interactions will provide a better understanding of the causes of fertility issues due to fertilization defects. PMID:27599669

  7. Molecular basis of fracture in polystyrene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivam, M.; Klein, A.; Thomas, T.N.; Mohammadi, N.; Sperling, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the fracture of polystyrene films, a custom built dental burr grinding instrument was used. Films were made from latexes, compression molded polystyrene, and by photopolymerization. Latexes were prepared by direct miniemulsification of polystyrene using sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactant and cetyl and stearyl alcohols as co-surfactants. Grinding of various films was carried out at room temperature. GPC was used to determine the molecular weight before and after grinding. From the molecular weight reduction, the number of chain scissions per unit volume was determined. The energy required for the grinding process was also measured. The results are consistent with a model of exciting 300{+-}150 bonds (per chain fracture) to the breaking point. The most probable deformation mode, consuming maximum energy is envisaged as the scissor-like opening of the 109{degrees} -C-C-C bond angle.

  8. The molecular basis of fertilization (Review).

    PubMed

    Georgadaki, Katerina; Khoury, Nikolas; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Zoumpourlis, Vasilis

    2016-10-01

    Fertilization is the fusion of the male and female gamete. The process involves the fusion of an oocyte with a sperm, creating a single diploid cell, the zygote, from which a new individual organism will develop. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of fertilization has fascinated researchers for many years. In this review, we focus on this intriguing process at the molecular level. Several molecules have been identified to play a key role in each step of this intriguing process (the sperm attraction from the oocyte, the sperm maturation, the sperm and oocyte fusion and the two gamete pronuclei fusion leading to the zygote). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the cell‑cell interactions will provide a better understanding of the causes of fertility issues due to fertilization defects. PMID:27599669

  9. Molecular basis of angiosperm tree architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shoot architecture of trees greatly impacts orchard and forest management methods. Amassing greater knowledge of the molecular genetics behind tree form can benefit these industries as well as contribute to basic knowledge of plant developmental biology. This review covers basic components of ...

  10. The Molecular Basis of Erythrocyte Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgsaeter, Arnljot; Stokke, Bjorn T.; Mikkelsen, Arne; Branton, Daniel

    1986-12-01

    Recent discoveries about the molecular organization and physical properties of the mammalian erythrocyte membrane and its associated structural proteins can now be used to explain, and may eventually be used to predict, the shape of the erythrocyte. Such explanations are possible because the relatively few structural proteins of the erythrocyte are regularly distributed over the entire cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane and because the well-understood topological associations of these proteins seem to be stable in comparison with the time required for the cell to change shape. These simplifications make the erythrocyte the first nonmuscle cell for which it will be possible to extend our knowledge of molecular interactions to the next hierarchical level of organization that deals with shape and shape transformations.

  11. Molecular basis of viral and microbial pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, R.; Goebel, W.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Correlation Between Viroid Structure and Pathogenicty; Antigenicity of the Influenza Haemagglutinia Membrane Glycoprotein; Viral Glycoproteins as Determinants of Pathogenicity; Virus Genes Involved in Host Range and Pathogenicity; Molecular Heterogenetiy of Pathogenic Herpus Viruses; Recombination of Foreign (Viral) DNA with Host Genome: Studies in Vivo and in a Cell-Free system; Disorders of Cellular Neuro-Functions by Persistent Viral Infection; Pathogenic Aspects of Measles Virus-Persistent Infections in Man; Analysis of the Dual Lineage Specificity of E26 Avian Leukemia Virus; Mx Gene Control of Influenza Virus Susceptibility; Shiga and Shika-Like Toxins: A Family of Related Cytokinons; and Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenicity in Shigella Flexneri.

  12. The molecular basis of chemical toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, J D

    1985-01-01

    Studies of structure-activity relationships and molecular mechanisms of action are fundamental to our understanding of the harmful effects of chemicals on the environment and their more direct effects on human health. It is important to identify factors that determine toxicological effects of foreign chemicals in biological systems and to assess our knowledge about chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Several fundamental mechanisms underlying toxic action are described, and the importance of studying receptor-substrate interactions is stressed. The Ah receptor is cited as an example of a protein-small molecule interaction associated with extreme acute toxicity in laboratory animals. It is recognized that reliable attempts at predictive toxicology across compound classes through structural and theoretical chemistry approaches must be based on sound knowledge about mechanisms of action at the molecular level. Such studies also contribute to the knowledge base in biomedical and physical sciences. PMID:2998750

  13. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  14. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David

    2011-10-19

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  15. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957337

  16. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review).

  17. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation.

  18. The molecular basis of bone mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, M P; Yovos, J G

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton has the ability to perfectly adapt to external forces of the operating environment, by altering its morphology and metabolism in order to meet different needs. This unique adaptive capacity of the skeleton creates an interesting range of biological questions concerning the perception of mechanical or other kinds of signals, the type of receptor, and the molecular pathways involved in this adaptation. Studies of the characteristics of the cellular engineering provide a host of new information that confers to osteocytes the role of the protagonist in the perception and regulation of mechanical effects on the skeleton. The identity of mechanoreceptors is manifold and concerns ion channels, integrins, cell membrane, the cytoskeleton, and other systems. A similar multiplicity characterizes the intracellular signaling. This review describes recent data concerning the outward force reception systems and intracellular transduction pathways of information transfer leading to the continuous adaptation of bone tissue. Increased appreciation of the importance of the mechanical environment in regulating and determining the effectiveness of structural adjustment of the skeleton defines new horizons for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with bone loss. PMID:27609037

  19. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation. PMID:8224607

  20. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Property-optimized Gaussian basis sets for molecular response calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Furche, Filipp

    2010-10-01

    With recent advances in electronic structure methods, first-principles calculations of electronic response properties, such as linear and nonlinear polarizabilities, have become possible for molecules with more than 100 atoms. Basis set incompleteness is typically the main source of error in such calculations since traditional diffuse augmented basis sets are too costly to use or suffer from near linear dependence. To address this problem, we construct the first comprehensive set of property-optimized augmented basis sets for elements H-Rn except lanthanides. The new basis sets build on the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets of split-valence to quadruple-zeta valence quality and add a small number of moderately diffuse basis functions. The exponents are determined variationally by maximization of atomic Hartree-Fock polarizabilities using analytical derivative methods. The performance of the resulting basis sets is assessed using a set of 313 molecular static Hartree-Fock polarizabilities. The mean absolute basis set errors are 3.6%, 1.1%, and 0.3% for property-optimized basis sets of split-valence, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta valence quality, respectively. Density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset polarizabilities show similar basis set convergence. We demonstrate the efficiency of our basis sets by computing static polarizabilities of icosahedral fullerenes up to C720 using hybrid density functional theory.

  2. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B J; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer-Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization.

  3. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B. J.; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer—Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization. PMID:25741361

  4. [Genetic mechanism and molecular basis of apomixis in plant].

    PubMed

    Ma, San-Mei; Wang, Yong-Fei; Ye, Xiu-Lin; Zhao, Nan-Xian; Liang, Cheng-Ye

    2002-03-01

    Apomixis allows the establishment of genetically stable seed propagating clones of crops, which can perpetuate themselves across countless sporophytic generations. This asexual mode of reproduction, which naturally occurs in some angiosperms,may prove to be an unrivalled tool to improve crop yields. The current state of knowledge on the molecular and genetic basis of apomixis is reviewed.

  5. Unwinding the Molecular Basis of Interval and Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Patricia V.; Golombek, Diego A.; Meck, Warren H.

    2011-01-01

    Neural timing mechanisms range from the millisecond to diurnal, and possibly annual, frequencies. Two of the main processes under study are the interval timer (seconds-to-minute range) and the circadian clock. The molecular basis of these two mechanisms is the subject of intense research, as well as their possible relationship. This article summarizes data from studies investigating a possible interaction between interval and circadian timing and reviews the molecular basis of both mechanisms, including the discussion of the contribution from studies of genetically modified animal models. While there is currently no common neurochemical substrate for timing mechanisms in the brain, circadian modulation of interval timing suggests an interaction of different frequencies in cerebral temporal processes. PMID:22022309

  6. Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity. PMID:26038515

  7. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  8. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  9. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kiran; Shilpasree, A S; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-05-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  10. [Candidiasis: molecular basis of parasitic adaptation of opportunistic pathogenic protists].

    PubMed

    Poulain, D

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is a versatile organism living as a commensal of the gastro-intestinal tract and having the ability to invade host tissues and to initiate serious diseases under the appropriate environmental conditions. The molecular basis for adherence, invasion, interactions with specific and non-specific immune factors have been studied in parallel to structural characteristics of the yeast. The main parasitologic features are closely linked to phenotypic variations. In this respect, mannoproteins are strongly involved in the cell wall variations. The study of the oligomannosidic repertoire represents one of the essential steps for the understanding of host-parasite relationships.

  11. Molecular basis of metronidazole resistance in pathogenic bacteria and protozoa.

    PubMed

    Land, Kirkwood M.; Johnson, Patricia J.

    1999-10-01

    The molecular basis of metronidazole resistance has been examined in anaerobic bacteria, such as Bacteroides, Clostridium, and Helicobacter, and anaerobic parasitic protists such as Giardia, Entamoeba, and trichomonads. A variety of enzymatic and cellular alterations have been shown to correlate with metronidazole susceptibility in these pathogens; however, a common theme has been revealed. Resistant cells are typically deficient in drug activation. The frequent correlation between metronidazole resistance and ineffective drug activation suggests that drug resistance is the result of modification of proteins involved in drug activation. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  12. The molecular basis of social behavior: models, methods and advances.

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Adria C; Benton, Richard; Keller, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular and neural basis of complex social behaviors such as communal living, division of labor and warfare requires model organisms that exhibit these multi-faceted behavioral phenotypes. Social insects, such as ants, bees, wasps and termites, are attractive models to address this problem, with rich ecological and ethological foundations. However, their atypical systems of reproduction have hindered application of classical genetic approaches. In this review, we discuss how recent advances in social insect genomics, transcriptomics, and functional manipulations have enhanced our ability to observe and perturb gene expression, physiology and behavior in these species. Such developments begin to provide an integrated view of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of complex social behavior. PMID:22995551

  13. Molecular basis for chromatin binding and regulation of MLL5.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Zhao, Wei; Rothbart, Scott B; Tong, Qiong; Parkhurst, Susan M; Strahl, Brian D; Deng, Lih-Wen; Groudine, Mark; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2013-07-01

    The human mixed-lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein mediates hematopoietic cell homeostasis, cell cycle, and survival; however, the molecular basis underlying MLL5 activities remains unknown. Here, we show that MLL5 is recruited to gene-rich euchromatic regions via the interaction of its plant homeodomain finger with the histone mark H3K4me3. The 1.48-Å resolution crystal structure of MLL5 plant homeodomain in complex with the H3K4me3 peptide reveals a noncanonical binding mechanism, whereby K4me3 is recognized through a single aromatic residue and an aspartate. The binding induces a unique His-Asp swapping rearrangement mediated by a C-terminal α-helix. Phosphorylation of H3T3 and H3T6 abrogates the association with H3K4me3 in vitro and in vivo, releasing MLL5 from chromatin in mitosis. This regulatory switch is conserved in the Drosophila ortholog of MLL5, UpSET, and suggests the developmental control for targeting of H3K4me3. Together, our findings provide first insights into the molecular basis for the recruitment, exclusion, and regulation of MLL5 at chromatin. PMID:23798402

  14. Molecular basis for chromatin binding and regulation of MLL5

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muzaffar; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Zhao, Wei; Rothbart, Scott B.; Tong, Qiong; Parkhurst, Susan M.; Strahl, Brian D.; Deng, Lih-Wen; Groudine, Mark; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2013-01-01

    The human mixed-lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein mediates hematopoietic cell homeostasis, cell cycle, and survival; however, the molecular basis underlying MLL5 activities remains unknown. Here, we show that MLL5 is recruited to gene-rich euchromatic regions via the interaction of its plant homeodomain finger with the histone mark H3K4me3. The 1.48-Å resolution crystal structure of MLL5 plant homeodomain in complex with the H3K4me3 peptide reveals a noncanonical binding mechanism, whereby K4me3 is recognized through a single aromatic residue and an aspartate. The binding induces a unique His–Asp swapping rearrangement mediated by a C-terminal α-helix. Phosphorylation of H3T3 and H3T6 abrogates the association with H3K4me3 in vitro and in vivo, releasing MLL5 from chromatin in mitosis. This regulatory switch is conserved in the Drosophila ortholog of MLL5, UpSET, and suggests the developmental control for targeting of H3K4me3. Together, our findings provide first insights into the molecular basis for the recruitment, exclusion, and regulation of MLL5 at chromatin. PMID:23798402

  15. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    PubMed

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel.

  16. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  17. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Insects provide experimentally tractable and cost-effective model systems to investigate the molecular basis of animal-bacterial interactions. Recent research is revealing the central role of the insect innate immune system, especially anti-microbial peptides and reactive oxygen species, in regulating the abundance and composition of the microbiota in various insects, including Drosophila and the mosquitoes Aedes and Anopheles. Interactions between the immune system and microbiota are, however, bidirectional with evidence that members of the resident microbiota can promote immune function, conferring resistance to pathogens and parasites by both activation of immune effectors and production of toxins. Antagonistic and mutualistic interactions among bacteria have also been implicated as determinants of the microbiota composition, including exclusion of pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Some bacteria are crucial for insect nutrition, through provisioning of specific nutrients (e.g. B vitamins, essential amino acids) and modulation of the insect nutritional sensing and signaling pathways (e.g. insulin signaling) that regulate nutrient allocation, especially to lipid and other energy reserves. A key challenge for future research is to identify the molecular interaction between specific bacterial effectors and animal receptors, and to determine how these interactions translate into microbiota-dependent signaling, metabolism and immune function in the host. PMID:24735869

  18. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Angela E

    2014-11-25

    Insects provide experimentally tractable and cost-effective model systems to investigate the molecular basis of animal-bacterial interactions. Recent research is revealing the central role of the insect innate immune system, especially anti-microbial peptides and reactive oxygen species, in regulating the abundance and composition of the microbiota in various insects, including Drosophila and the mosquitoes Aedes and Anopheles. Interactions between the immune system and microbiota are, however, bidirectional with evidence that members of the resident microbiota can promote immune function, conferring resistance to pathogens and parasites by both activation of immune effectors and production of toxins. Antagonistic and mutualistic interactions among bacteria have also been implicated as determinants of the microbiota composition, including exclusion of pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Some bacteria are crucial for insect nutrition, through provisioning of specific nutrients (e.g., B vitamins, essential amino acids) and modulation of the insect nutritional sensing and signaling pathways (e.g., insulin signaling) that regulate nutrient allocation, especially to lipid and other energy reserves. A key challenge for future research is to identify the molecular interaction between specific bacterial effectors and animal receptors, as well as to determine how these interactions translate into microbiota-dependent signaling, metabolism, and immune function in the host.

  19. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide a brief

  20. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na(+)/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials.

  1. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na+/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  2. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na(+)/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  3. The molecular basis of human retinal and vitreoretinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Wolfgang; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Neidhardt, John

    2010-09-01

    During the last two to three decades, a large body of work has revealed the molecular basis of many human disorders, including retinal and vitreoretinal degenerations and dysfunctions. Although belonging to the group of orphan diseases, they affect probably more than two million people worldwide. Most excitingly, treatment of a particular form of congenital retinal degeneration is now possible. A major advantage for treatment is the unique structure and accessibility of the eye and its different components, including the vitreous and retina. Knowledge of the many different eye diseases affecting retinal structure and function (night and colour blindness, retinitis pigmentosa, cone and cone rod dystrophies, photoreceptor dysfunctions, as well as vitreoretinal traits) is critical for future therapeutic development. We have attempted to present a comprehensive picture of these disorders, including biological, clinical, genetic and molecular information. The structural organization of the review leads the reader through non-syndromic and syndromic forms of (i) rod dominated diseases, (ii) cone dominated diseases, (iii) generalized retinal degenerations and (iv) vitreoretinal disorders, caused by mutations in more than 165 genes. Clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity have an important impact on genetic testing and counselling of affected families. As phenotypes do not always correlate with the respective genotypes, it is of utmost importance that clinicians, geneticists, counsellors, diagnostic laboratories and basic researchers understand the relationships between phenotypic manifestations and specific genes, as well as mutations and pathophysiologic mechanisms. We discuss future perspectives. PMID:20362068

  4. Molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W

    2013-01-24

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23347351

  5. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function.

  6. Molecular Basis of Chemokine CXCL5-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Nagarajan, Balaji; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-09-23

    Chemokines, a large family of highly versatile small soluble proteins, play crucial roles in defining innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating the trafficking of leukocytes, and also play a key role in various aspects of human physiology. Chemokines share the characteristic feature of reversibly existing as monomers and dimers, and their functional response is intimately coupled to interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis or molecular mechanisms underlying CXCL5-GAG interactions. To address this missing knowledge, we characterized the interaction of a panel of heparin oligosaccharides to CXCL5 using solution NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and molecular dynamics simulations. NMR studies indicated that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG binding ligand and that lysine residues from the N-loop, 40s turn, β3 strand, and C-terminal helix mediate binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated a stoichiometry of two oligosaccharides per CXCL5 dimer. NMR-based structural models reveal that these residues form a contiguous surface within a monomer and, interestingly, that the GAG-binding domain overlaps with the receptor-binding domain, indicating that a GAG-bound chemokine cannot activate the receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the roles of the individual lysines are not equivalent and that helical lysines play a more prominent role in determining binding geometry and affinity. Further, binding interactions and GAG geometry in CXCL5 are novel and distinctly different compared with the related chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8. We conclude that a finely tuned balance between the GAG-bound dimer and free soluble monomer regulates CXCL5-mediated receptor signaling and function. PMID:27471273

  7. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 500 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  8. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-07-01

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious conceptual objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo a simple volume-preserving linear motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, Quantum Chemistry, and Molecular Dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model (EPnet). When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high

  9. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There aremore » serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide

  10. [Molecular basis of stress-evoked psychiatric disturbances].

    PubMed

    Beszczyńska, Beata

    2007-11-20

    Stress, defined as coping with environmental challenges, involves the activation of the neuronal and neurohormonal systems. Central monoaminergic (noradrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic) neural networks, limbic structures, the sympathoadrenal system, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the immune system are considered the most important stress pathways. Their activation determines stress reactivity and pathological consequences on exposure to situations of distress. Both trauma and long-term stress can cause alterations in the activities of neuroanatomical structures and neural networks within the central nervous system. These neurohormonal changes are associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a disturbance thought to be one of the most serious psychiatric illnesses. PTSD may develop in individuals after exposure to a traumatic event (war, violence, accident) and is manifested by various symptoms, such as re-experiencing, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, impaired memory of the event, sleep disorders, nightmares, panic attacks, and depression. In this review the neurohormonal changes associated with experiencing stress are presented to highlight the molecular and hormonal basis of PTSD.

  11. Molecular Basis for Lytic Bacteriophage Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Duerkop, Breck A.; Huo, Wenwen; Bhardwaj, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human intestine harbors diverse communities of bacteria and bacteriophages. Given the specificity of phages for their bacterial hosts, there is growing interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. A significant barrier to such therapies is the rapid development of phage-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need to understand how bacteria acquire phage resistance in vivo. Here we identify novel lytic phages in municipal raw sewage that kill Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that resides in the human intestine. We show that phage infection of E. faecalis requires a predicted integral membrane protein that we have named PIPEF (for phage infection protein from E. faecalis). We find that PIPEF is conserved in E. faecalis and harbors a 160-amino-acid hypervariable region that determines phage tropism for distinct enterococcal strains. Finally, we use a gnotobiotic mouse model of in vivo phage predation to show that the sewage phages temporarily reduce E. faecalis colonization of the intestine but that E. faecalis acquires phage resistance through mutations in PIPEF. Our findings define the molecular basis for an evolutionary arms race between E. faecalis and the lytic phages that prey on them. They also suggest approaches for engineering E. faecalis phages that have altered host specificity and that can subvert phage resistance in the host bacteria. PMID:27578757

  12. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rosgen, Jorg; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-11-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins.

  13. Molecular Basis for Chiral Selection in RNA Aminoacylation

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The chiral-selective aminoacylation of an RNA minihelix is a potential progenitor to modern tRNA-based protein synthesis using l-amino acids. This article describes the molecular basis for this chiral selection. The extended double helical form of an RNA minihelix with a CCA triplet (acceptor of an amino acid), an aminoacyl phosphate donor nucleotide (mimic of aminoacyl-AMP), and a bridging nucleotide facilitates chiral-selective aminoacylation. Energetically, the reaction is characterized by a downhill reaction wherein an amino acid migrates from a high-energy acyl phosphate linkage to a lower-energy carboxyl ester linkage. The reaction occurs under the restriction that the nucleophilic attack of O, from 3′-OH in the terminal CCA, to C, from C=O in the acyl phosphate linkage, must occur at a Bürgi-Dunitz angle, which is defined as the O–C=O angle of approximately 105°. The extended double helical form results in a steric hindrance at the side chain of the amino acid leading to chiral preference combined with cation coordinations in the amino acid and the phosphate oxygen. Such a system could have developed into the protein biosynthetic system with an exclusively chiral component (l-amino acids) via (proto) ribosomes. PMID:21845109

  14. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Buckler, Edward S; Hufford, Matthew B; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize.

  15. Molecular Basis of Obesity: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Hélène; Meyre, David

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a global health problem that is gradually affecting each continent of the world. Obesity is a heterogeneous disorder, and the biological causes of obesity are complex. The rapid increase in obesity prevalence during the past few decades is due to major societal changes (sedentary lifestyle, over-nutrition) but who becomes obese at the individual level is determined to a great extent by genetic susceptibility. In this review, we evidence that obesity is a strongly heritable disorder, and provide an update on the molecular basis of obesity. To date, nine loci have been involved in Mendelian forms of obesity and 58 loci contribute to polygenic obesity, and rare and common structural variants have been reliably associated with obesity. Most of the obesity genes remain to be discovered, but promising technologies, methodologies and the use of “deep phenotyping” lead to optimism to chip away at the ‘missing heritability’ of obesity in the near future. In the longer term, the genetic dissection of obesity will help to characterize disease mechanisms, provide new targets for drug design, and lead to an early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of obesity. PMID:22043164

  16. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity.

  17. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity. PMID:27381510

  18. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J.; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C.; Buckler, Edward S.; Hufford, Matthew B.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize. PMID:26078279

  19. Molecular Photoionization Calculations Using the Complex Basis Function Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chin-Hui

    The complex basis function method (CBF) using both real and complex basis functions has been applied to the calculation of photoionization cross sections. The CBF method requires less computational resources than rigorous full-scattering methods and is effective for the evaluation of shape-resonance features. Neither the number of electrons in the system nor the molecular geometry is restricted. Moreover, the cross section obtained by the CBF method satisfies a variational principle and provides a practical diagnostic tool for the calculation of cross sections. The photoionization cross sections of H _sp{2}{+}, H _2, N_2, CO _2, and SF_6 have been computed using the CBF method. The computed partial cross sections for linear molecules agreed fairly well with other theoretical and experimental values. Particularly encouraging is the nearly perfect agreement of the CBF results with the results by rigorous full-scattering methods in the regions of sharp resonance features such as the K-shell ionization of N_2 and the 4sigma_{rm g} --> ksigma_ {rm u} transition of CO _2. The effect of averaging over all vibrational modes on the ionization cross sections for the 4 sigma_{rm g} orbital in CO_2 has also been studied for the first time. The resonance peak in the totally vibrationally averaged cross sections was reduced by 20%, but still represents a feature which has not yet been detected experimentally. The photoionization of SF_6 valence shells, 1t_{1rm g} , 5t_{1rm u}, 1t_{2rm u}, 3e _{rm g}, 1t_ {2rm g}, 4t_{1 rm u}, and 5a_{1 rm g}, has also been studied for the continuum symmetries a_{1rm g }, t_{1rm u} , e_{rm g}, and t_{2rm g}. The CBF results of SF_6 are numerically stable and essentially approach the static-exchange limit. These static-exchange partial cross sections, however, do not compare well with the experimental measurements. The discrepancy may be attributed to the physical approximations made in the theoretical model and to the quality of the ground -state

  20. Molecular basis of protein S deficiency in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Jian, Xiao-Rong; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Guo, Tao; Wang, Hua-Fang; Lu, Xuan; Wang, Qing-Yun; Hu, Yu

    2013-10-01

    Protein S (ProS) is a physiological inhibitor of coagulation with an important function in the down-regulation of thrombin generation. ProS deficiency is a major risk factor for venous thrombosis. This study enrolled 40 ProS-deficient probands to investigate the molecular basis of hereditary ProS deficiency in Chinese patients. A mutation analysis was performed by resequencing the PROS1 gene. Large deletions were identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. A total of 20 different mutations, including 15 novel mutations, were identified in 21 of the 40 index probands. Small mutations were detected in 18 (45.0%) probands, and large deletions were found in 3 (7.5%) probands, leaving 19 (47.5%) patients without causative variants. To evaluate the functional consequences of 2 novel missense variants, ex vivo thrombin-generation assays, bioinformatics tools, and in vitro expression studies were employed. The p.Asn365Lys ProS variant was found to have moderately impaired secretion and reduced activated protein C cofactor activity. In contrast, the p.Pro410His mutant appeared to have severely impaired secretion but full anticoagulant activity. This study is the largest investigation of ProS deficiency in China and the first investigation of the influence of Type I ProS missense mutations on the global level of coagulation function. The p.K196E mutation, which is common in the neighboring Japanese population, was not found in our Chinese population, and null mutations were common in our Chinese population but not common in Japan. Further genetic analysis is warranted to understand the causes of ProS deficiency in patients without a genetic explanation. PMID:23813890

  1. Molecular basis for developmental changes in interleukin-2 gene inducibility.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Rothenberg, E V

    1993-01-01

    At least three stages in the intrathymic development of pre-T cells are demarcated by differences in the competence to express the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene as an acute response to stimulation. IL-2 inducibility appears to be acquired relatively early, prior to T-cell receptor (TcR) gene rearrangement. It is then abrogated during the stage when cells are subject to positive and negative selection, i.e., the fate determination processes that select cells for maturation or death. IL-2 inducibility finally reappears in mature classes of thymocytes that have undergone positive selection. To provide a basis for a molecular explanation of these developmental transitions, we have examined the representation in different thymocyte subsets of a set of DNA-binding proteins implicated in IL-2 gene regulation. As the DNA-binding activities of many factors are elicited only by inductive stimuli, the cells were cultured in the presence or absence of the calcium ionophore A23187 and phorbol ester. Our results separate these factors into four regulatory classes: (i) constitutive factors, such as Oct-1 and probably Sp1, that are expressed in thymocytes at all stages; (ii) inducible factors, such as NF-kappa B and complexes binding to the region of a CD28 response element, that can be activated in all thymocytes, including those cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) that can undergo selection; (iii) inducible factors, such as NF-AT and AP-1, that can be activated in mature (CD4+ CD8- TcRhigh) and immature (CD4- CD8- TcR-) thymocytes alike but not in the transitional stages when the cells (CD4+ CD8+ TcRlow) are subject to selection; and (iv) a factor containing CREB, which can be activated in thymocytes of all developmental stages by culture but does not require specific induction. These results verify that inducible transcription factors are targets of intrathymic developmental change. They also identify NF-AT and AP-1 as factors that are particularly sensitive to the mechanism altering

  2. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  3. Basis set effects on frontier molecular orbital energies and energy gaps: a comparative study between plane waves and localized basis functions in molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Matus, Myrna H; Garza, Jorge; Galván, Marcelo

    2004-06-01

    In order to study the Kohn-Sham frontier molecular orbital energies in the complete basis limit, a comparative study between localized functions and plane waves, obtained with the local density approximation exchange-correlation functional is made. The analyzed systems are ethylene and butadiene, since they are theoretical and experimentally well characterized. The localized basis sets used are those developed by Dunning. For the plane-waves method, the pseudopotential approximation is employed. The results obtained by the localized basis sets suggest that it is possible to get an estimation of the orbital energies in the limit of the complete basis set, when the basis set size is large. It is shown that the frontier molecular orbital energies and the energy gaps obtained with plane waves are similar to those obtained with a large localized basis set, when the size of the supercell and the plane-wave expansion have been appropriately calibrated.

  4. Emerging insights into the molecular and cellular basis of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Gavin P.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Wykosky, Jill; Genovese, Giannicola; Quayle, Steven N.; Dunn, Ian F.; Agarwalla, Pankaj K.; Chheda, Milan G.; Campos, Benito; Wang, Alan; Brennan, Cameron; Ligon, Keith L.; Furnari, Frank; Cavenee, Webster K.; Depinho, Ronald A.; Chin, Lynda; Hahn, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is both the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor. Extensive multiplatform genomic characterization has provided a higher-resolution picture of the molecular alterations underlying this disease. These studies provide the emerging view that “glioblastoma” represents several histologically similar yet molecularly heterogeneous diseases, which influences taxonomic classification systems, prognosis, and therapeutic decisions. PMID:22508724

  5. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  6. Cardiac Hypertrophy: An Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Schmack, Bastian; Farag, Mina; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wahlers, Thorsten; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is an ominous escalation of hemodynamically stressful conditions such as hypertension and valve disease. The pathophysiology of hypertrophy is complex and multifactorial, as it touches on several cellular and molecular systems. Understanding the molecular background of cardiac hypertrophy is essential in order to protect the myocardium from pathological remodeling, or slow down the destined progression to heart failure. In this review we highlight the most important molecular aspects of cardiac hypertrophic growth in light of the currently available published research data. PMID:27450399

  7. Cellular and molecular basis of decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Nilay; Zimmer, Manuel; Domingos, Ana I

    2014-01-01

    People think they are in control of their own decisions: what to eat or drink, whom to marry or pick a fight with, where to live, what to buy. Behavioural economists and neurophysiologists have long studied decision-making behaviours. However, these behaviours have only recently been studied through the light of molecular genetics. Here, we review recent research in mice, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, that analyses the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying decision-making. These studies interrogate decision-making about food, sexual behaviour, aggression or foraging strategies, and add molecular and cell biology understanding onto the consilience of brain and decision. PMID:25239948

  8. Increased molecular damage and heterogeneity as the basis of aging.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2008-03-01

    Aging at the molecular level is characterized by the progressive accumulation of molecular damage. The sources of damage act randomly through environmental and metabolically generated free radicals, through spontaneous errors in biochemical reactions, and through nutritional components. However, damage to a macromolecule may depend on its structure, localization and interactions with other macromolecules. Damage to the maintenance and repair pathways comprising homeodynamic machinery leads to age-related failure of homeodynamics, increased molecular heterogeneity, altered cellular functioning, reduced stress tolerance, diseases and ultimate death. Novel approaches for testing and developing effective means of intervention, prevention and modulation of aging involve means to minimize the occurrence and accumulation of molecular damage. Mild stress-induced hormesis by physical, biological and nutritional methods, including hormetins, represents a promising strategy for achieving healthy aging and for preventing age-related diseases.

  9. The molecular basis of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Storb, U

    1996-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation amplifies the variable region repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. Recent experimental evidence has thrown light on various molecular models of somatic hypermutation. A link between somatic hypermutation and transcription coupled DNA repair is shaping up.

  10. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this stud...

  11. [A molecular basis of the plague vaccine development].

    PubMed

    Dentovskaia, S V; Kopylov, P Kh; Ivanov, S A; Ageev, S A; Anisimov, A P

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the Yersinia pestis pathogenicity and peculiarities of maturation of specific immunity to plague are reviewed. The history and modern state of the plague vaccine development are described. Special attention is focused on the prospects in the area of the plague vaccine development. The possible approaches to improvement of vaccine preparations are discussed.

  12. Molecular basis of fungicide resistance in Cercospora beticola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS), caused by the fungus Cercospora beticola, is the most important foliar disease of sugarbeet. Control measures include the application of sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) and quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides. Understanding the molecular mechanism of fungici...

  13. Treasure of the Past VIII: Molecular Basis of Flame Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by inorganic chemical additives in fire retardancy and flame inhibition is considered. Particular attention is given to the molecular level aspects of commercially important systems containing compounds of antimony, halogens, and phosphorus. The flame inhibiting function of metal containing additives is also discussed. PMID:27500045

  14. Molecular basis of telomere dysfunction in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarek, Grzegorz; Marzec, Paulina; Margalef, Pol; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins required for telomere structure, replication, repair and length maintenance are associated with several debilitating human genetic disorders. These complex telomere biology disorders (TBDs) give rise to critically short telomeres that affect the homeostasis of multiple organs. Furthermore, genome instability is often a hallmark of telomere syndromes, which are associated with increased cancer risk. Here, we summarize the molecular causes and cellular consequences of disease-causing mutations associated with telomere dysfunction.

  15. Molecular Basis of Allosteric Transitions: GroEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horovitz, Amnon

    Chaperonins such as GroEL from Escherichia coli are molecular machines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. Here, we describe some of the various functional (allosteric) states of GroEL, the pathways by which they inter-convert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions.

  16. Energetic basis for the molecular-scale organization of bone

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jinhui; Battle, Keith C.; Pan, Haihua; Salter, E. Alan; Chien, Yung-Ching; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; De Yoreo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable properties of bone derive from a highly organized arrangement of coaligned nanometer-scale apatite platelets within a fibrillar collagen matrix. The origin of this arrangement is poorly understood and the crystal structures of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the nonmineralized collagen fibrils alone do not provide an explanation. Moreover, little is known about collagen–apatite interaction energies, which should strongly influence both the molecular-scale organization and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. We investigated collagen–mineral interactions by combining dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements of binding energies with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binding and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of collagen adsorption on single crystals of calcium phosphate for four mineral phases of potential importance in bone formation. In all cases, we observe a strong preferential orientation of collagen binding, but comparison between the observed orientations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of native tissues shows that only calcium-deficient apatite (CDAP) provides an interface with collagen that is consistent with both. MD simulations predict preferred collagen orientations that agree with observations, and results from both MD and DFS reveal large values for the binding energy due to multiple binding sites. These findings reconcile apparent contradictions inherent in a hydroxyapatite or carbonated apatite (CAP) model of bone mineral and provide an energetic rationale for the molecular-scale organization of bone. PMID:25540415

  17. Energetic basis for the molecular-scale organization of bone.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jinhui; Battle, Keith C; Pan, Haihua; Salter, E Alan; Chien, Yung-Ching; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; De Yoreo, James J

    2015-01-13

    The remarkable properties of bone derive from a highly organized arrangement of coaligned nanometer-scale apatite platelets within a fibrillar collagen matrix. The origin of this arrangement is poorly understood and the crystal structures of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the nonmineralized collagen fibrils alone do not provide an explanation. Moreover, little is known about collagen-apatite interaction energies, which should strongly influence both the molecular-scale organization and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. We investigated collagen-mineral interactions by combining dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements of binding energies with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binding and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of collagen adsorption on single crystals of calcium phosphate for four mineral phases of potential importance in bone formation. In all cases, we observe a strong preferential orientation of collagen binding, but comparison between the observed orientations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of native tissues shows that only calcium-deficient apatite (CDAP) provides an interface with collagen that is consistent with both. MD simulations predict preferred collagen orientations that agree with observations, and results from both MD and DFS reveal large values for the binding energy due to multiple binding sites. These findings reconcile apparent contradictions inherent in a hydroxyapatite or carbonated apatite (CAP) model of bone mineral and provide an energetic rationale for the molecular-scale organization of bone.

  18. Molecular Basis of Klotho: From Gene to Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Klotho (KL) gene, which was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene, has generated tremendous interest and has advanced understanding of the aging process. In mice, the overexpression of the KL gene extends the life span, whereas mutations to the KL gene shorten the life span. The human KL gene encodes the α-Klotho protein, which is a multifunctional protein that regulates the metabolism of phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D. α-Klotho also may function as a hormone, although the α-Klotho receptor(s) has not been found. Point mutations of the KL gene in humans are associated with hypertension and kidney disease, which suggests that α-Klotho may be essential to the maintenance of normal renal function. Three α-Klotho protein types with potentially different functions have been identified: a full-length transmembrane α-Klotho, a truncated soluble α-Klotho, and a secreted α-Klotho. Recent evidence suggests that α-Klotho suppresses the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways, inhibits oxidative stress, and regulates phosphatase and calcium absorption. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological properties of the KL gene. Specifically, this review focuses on the structure of the KL gene and the factors that regulate KL gene transcription, the key sites in the regulation of α-Klotho enzyme activity, the α-Klotho signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie α-Klotho function. This current understanding of the molecular biology of the α-Klotho protein may offer new insights into its function and role in aging. PMID:25695404

  19. Molecular basis of phenotypic variation in patients with argininemia.

    PubMed

    Uchino, T; Snyderman, S E; Lambert, M; Qureshi, I A; Shapira, S K; Sansaricq, C; Smit, L M; Jakobs, C; Matsuda, I

    1995-09-01

    Argininemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in the liver-type arginase enzyme. Clinical manifestations include progressive spastic diplegia and mental retardation. While the quality of life can severely deteriorate in most such patients, some do show remarkable improvement in neurological symptoms while on controlled diets. We examined the thesis that differences in clinical responses to dietary treatment are based on molecular heterogeneity in mutant arginase alleles. Genomic DNAs from 11 patients with argininemia were examined using the polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and sequencing. Nine mutations representing 21/22 mutant alleles were identified in 11 patients with argininemia, and four of these mutations were expressed in vitro to determine the severity of enzymatic defects. We found that these mutations accounted for 64% of the mutant alleles in our patients. Based on findings in vitro expression tests, the mutations can be considered either severe or moderate. Patients with at least one moderate mutant allele responded well to dietary treatment; concentrations of plasma arginine were controlled within 300 microM. In contrast, patients with two severely mutated alleles did not respond to dietary treatment and plasma arginine was over 400 microM. Argininemia is heterogeneous at the molecular level. The degree of clinical improvement during dietary treatment is reflected in the concentration of arginine in plasma, as a measure of metabolic control. Plasma arginine levels during treatment is reflected in the concentration of arginine in plasma, as a measure of metabolic control. Plasma arginine levels during treatment correlated with types of molecular defects in the arginase genes.

  20. The molecular basis of ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene profoundly influences plants at nearly every stage of growth and development. In the past ten years, the use of a genetic approach, based on the triple response phenotype, has been a powerful tool for investigating the molecular events that underlie these effects. Several fundamental elements of the pathway have been described: a receptor with homology to bacterial two-component histidine kinases (ETR1), elements of a MAP kinase cascade (CTR1) and a putative transcription factor (EIN3). Taken together, these elements can be assembled into a simple, linear model for ethylene signalling that accounts for most of the well-characterized ethylene mediated responses.

  1. Biological and molecular basis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, J; Yang, X; Hu, Y F; Bove, B A; Huang, Y; Silva, I D; Tahin, Q; Wu, Y; Higgy, N; Zekri, A; Russo, I H

    1998-09-01

    Human breast cancer remains the most common malignancy in the American women. The ultimate cure of this disease relies on a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of this disease. The neoplastic transformation of HBEC in vitro represents a successful model for obtaining knowledge on the molecular and biological alterations that may contribute to the tumorigenic mechanisms. We have presented here a current understanding of chemically transformed HBEC in the following aspects: 1. Factors affecting the transformation of HBEC such as genetic predisposition and differentiation status and prior immortalization; 2. New targets for studying the mechanism of cell immortalization such as alterations in telomerase activity and differential expression of cell cycle dependent genes as well as others recently isolated through differential cloning such as H-ferritin, and a calcium binding protein; 3. Epigenetic and genetic mechanisms underlying cell transformation; 4. The association of microsatellite instability in specific loci on chromosomes 11, 13, and 16 with the progression of cell transformation; and 5. The application of microcell mediated chromosome transfer technique as an approach to testing the functional role of specific genes whose dysregulation or loss of function may contribute to the ultimate cell transformation. Further efforts in this cell system will be directed to determine the roles of identified molecular changes as well as the mapping/cloning of tumor suppressor or senescence genes such as those that may reside on chromosomes 11 or 17. PMID:9727085

  2. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): from molecular basis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sponzilli, Ivonne; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-04-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases (PID) comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that affect distinct components of the innate and adaptive immune system, such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, complement proteins, natural killer cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of disorders characterized by increased susceptibility to severe infections and early death. The diagnosis of SCID is supported by the demonstration of low absolute lymphocyte count and T cell lymphopenia (variably associated with numerical defects of B and NK cells). In the last two decades, advances in the characterization of the molecular pathophysiology of SCID, have permitted the development of novel diagnostic assays based on analysis of the expression of the disease-associated proteins and mutation analysis. More recently, pilot newborn screening programs for the identification of infants with SCID have been initiated in the United States. Prompt and aggressive treatment of infections, antimicrobial prophylaxis (in particular against Pneumocystis jiroveci) and regular administration of immunoglobulins are essential to reduce the risk of early death. However, survival ultimately depends on reconstitution of immune function, that is usually achieved by means of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy have also been used successfully is selected forms of SCID. Here we review the molecular and cellular pathophysiology and the mainstay of treatment of SCID.

  3. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  4. Molecular genetic basis of pod corn (Tunicate maize)

    PubMed Central

    Wingen, Luzie U.; Münster, Thomas; Faigl, Wolfram; Deleu, Wim; Sommer, Hans; Saedler, Heinz; Theißen, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Pod corn is a classic morphological mutant of maize in which the mature kernels of the cob are covered by glumes, in contrast to generally grown maize varieties in which kernels are naked. Pod corn, known since pre-Columbian times, is the result of a dominant gain-of-function mutation at the Tunicate (Tu) locus. Some classic articles of 20th century maize genetics reported that the mutant Tu locus is complex, but molecular details remained elusive. Here, we show that pod corn is caused by a cis-regulatory mutation and duplication of the ZMM19 MADS-box gene. Although the WT locus contains a single-copy gene that is expressed in vegetative organs only, mutation and duplication of ZMM19 in Tu lead to ectopic expression of the gene in the inflorescences, thus conferring vegetative traits to reproductive organs. PMID:22517751

  5. The molecular basis of mechanisms underlying polarization vision

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nicholas W.; Porter, Megan L.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of polarization sensitivity (PS) have long remained elusive. For rhabdomeric photoreceptors, questions remain over the high levels of PS measured experimentally. In ciliary photoreceptors, and specifically cones, little direct evidence supports any type of mechanism. In order to promote a greater interest in these fundamental aspects of polarization vision, we examined a varied collection of studies linking membrane biochemistry, protein–protein interactions, molecular ordering and membrane phase behaviour. While initially these studies may seem unrelated to polarization vision, a common narrative emerges. A surprising amount of evidence exists demonstrating the importance of protein–protein interactions in both rhabdomeric and ciliary photoreceptors, indicating the possible long-range ordering of the opsin protein for increased PS. Moreover, we extend this direction by considering how such protein paracrystalline organization arises in all cell types from controlled membrane phase behaviour and propose a universal pathway for PS to occur in both rhabdomeric and cone photoreceptors. PMID:21282166

  6. Progeroid syndromes: probing the molecular basis of aging?

    PubMed Central

    Kipling, D; Faragher, R G

    1997-01-01

    A valid method of studying age related degenerative pathologies is to study human genetic diseases that appear to accelerate many, though not necessarily all, features of the aging process. Such diseases are described as progeroid syndromes because of their possible relevance to many aspects of aging and age related disease. This article describes the recent progress made at the cellular and molecular levels in understanding the pathogenesis of one of the best characterised of these disorders, Werner's syndrome. These observations are related to some of the less well characterised progeroid syndromes within the context of the cell senescence hypothesis of aging, a theory formulated to explain the aging of regenerative tissue in normal individuals. Images PMID:9497912

  7. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Guoyuan; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Wang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Tengfei; Yang, Jinlong; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Rongrong; Pan, Zishu; Shao, Huabin; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this study, we generated chimeric viruses by exchanging viral genes between the thermostable TS09-C strain and thermolabile LaSota strain using reverse genetics technology. Evaluations of these chimeric NDVs demonstrated that the thermostability of NDV was dependent on the origin of HN protein. Chimeras bearing the HN protein derived from thermostable virus exhibited a thermostable phenotype, and vice versa. Both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities of viruses bearing the TS09-C HN protein were more thermostable than those containing LaSota HN protein. Furthermore, the newly developed thermostable virus rLS-T-HN, encoding the TS09-C HN protein in LaSota backbone, induced significantly higher antibody response than the TS09-C virus, and conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge. Taken together, the data suggest that the HN protein of NDV is a crucial determinant of thermostability, and the HN gene from a thermostable NDV could be engineered into a thermolabile NDV vaccine strain for developing novel thermostable NDV vaccine. PMID:26935738

  8. Structural Basis for Molecular Recognition at Serotonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Edward X.; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai; Bai, Fang; Yang, Huaiyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Hualiang; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Xu, H. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist anti-migraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared to the accompanying structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs. PMID:23519210

  9. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of ‘excretory–secretory’ products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in

  10. The molecular basis of the non-thyroidal illness syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Emmely M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2015-06-01

    The 'sick euthyroid syndrome' or 'non-thyroidal illness syndrome' (NTIS) occurs in a large proportion of hospitalized patients and comprises a variety of alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis that are observed during illness. One of the hallmarks of NTIS is decreased thyroid hormone (TH) serum concentrations, often viewed as an adaptive mechanism to save energy. Downregulation of hypophysiotropic TRH neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and of TSH production in the pituitary gland points to disturbed negative feedback regulation during illness. In addition to these alterations in the central component of the HPT axis, changes in TH metabolism occur in a variety of TH target tissues during NTIS, dependent on the timing, nature and severity of the illness. Cytokines, released during illness, are known to affect a variety of genes involved in TH metabolism and are therefore considered a major determinant of NTIS. The availability of in vivo and in vitro models for NTIS has elucidated part of the mechanisms involved in the sometimes paradoxical changes in the HPT axis and TH responsive tissues. However, the pathogenesis of NTIS is still incompletely understood. This review focusses on the molecular mechanisms involved in the tissue changes in TH metabolism and discusses the gaps that still require further research. PMID:25972358

  11. Uniqueness of thermodynamic projector and kinetic basis of molecular individualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2004-05-01

    Three results are presented: First, we solve the problem of persistence of dissipation for reduction of kinetic models. Kinetic equations with thermodynamic Lyapunov functions are studied. Uniqueness of the thermodynamic projector is proven: There exists only one projector which transforms any vector field equipped with the given Lyapunov function into a vector field with the same Lyapunov function for a given anzatz manifold which is not tangent to the Lyapunov function levels. Second, we use the thermodynamic projector for developing the short memory approximation and coarse-graining for general nonlinear dynamic systems. We prove that in this approximation the entropy production increases. ( The theorem about entropy overproduction.) In example, we apply the thermodynamic projector to derive the equations of reduced kinetics for the Fokker-Planck equation. A new class of closures is developed, the kinetic multipeak polyhedra. Distributions of this type are expected in kinetic models with multidimensional instability as universally as the Gaussian distribution appears for stable systems. The number of possible relatively stable states of a nonequilibrium system grows as 2 m, and the number of macroscopic parameters is in order mn, where n is the dimension of configuration space, and m is the number of independent unstable directions in this space. The elaborated class of closures and equations pretends to describe the effects of “molecular individualism”. This is the third result.

  12. Emerging molecular basis of hematogenous metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liang-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is commonly observed in gastric cancer (GC), but hematogenous metastasis is more likely responsible for the cancer-related mortality. Since Stephen Paget first introduced the “seed and soil hypothesis” a century ago, growing evidence recognizes that numerous essential secreted factors and signaling pathway effectors participate in the pre-metastatic niche formation and distant organ metastasis. The cross-talk between GC cells and surrounding microenvironment may consist of a series of interrelated steps, including epithelial mesenchymal transition, intravasation into blood vessels, circulating tumor cell translocation, and secondary organ metastasis. Secreted factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases and cancer-derived extracellular vesicles, especially exosomes, are essential in formation of premetastatic niche. Circulating tumor cells and microRNAs represent as ‘‘metastatic intermediates’’ between primary tumors and sites of dissemination. Many biomarkers have been identified as novel metastatic markers and prognostic effectors. In addition, molecular therapy has been designed to target biomarkers such as growth factors (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, VEGF) and chemokines, although they have not clearly proven to be effective in inhibiting GC metastasis in clinical trials. In this review, we will systematically discuss the emerging molecules and their microenvironment in hematogenous metastasis of GC, which may help us to find new therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26937132

  13. The Molecular Basis of Folate Salvage in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sora, J. Enrique; Ochong, Edwin; Beveridge, Susan; Johnson, David; Nzila, Alexis; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Stocks, Paul A.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Bray, Patrick G.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrofolates are essential cofactors for DNA synthesis and methionine metabolism. Malaria parasites are capable both of synthesizing tetrahydrofolates and precursors de novo and of salvaging them from the environment. The biosynthetic route has been studied in some detail over decades, whereas the molecular mechanisms that underpin the salvage pathway lag behind. Here we identify two functional folate transporters (named PfFT1 and PfFT2) and delineate unexpected substrate preferences of the folate salvage pathway in Plasmodium falciparum. Both proteins are localized in the plasma membrane and internal membranes of the parasite intra-erythrocytic stages. Transport substrates include folic acid, folinic acid, the folate precursor p-amino benzoic acid (pABA), and the human folate catabolite pABAGn. Intriguingly, the major circulating plasma folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, was a poor substrate for transport via PfFT2 and was not transported by PfFT1. Transport of all folates studied was inhibited by probenecid and methotrexate. Growth rescue in Escherichia coli and antifolate antagonism experiments in P. falciparum indicate that functional salvage of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is detectable but trivial. In fact pABA was the only effective salvage substrate at normal physiological levels. Because pABA is neither synthesized nor required by the human host, pABA metabolism may offer opportunities for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:21998306

  14. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  15. The molecular basis of the non-thyroidal illness syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Emmely M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2015-06-01

    The 'sick euthyroid syndrome' or 'non-thyroidal illness syndrome' (NTIS) occurs in a large proportion of hospitalized patients and comprises a variety of alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis that are observed during illness. One of the hallmarks of NTIS is decreased thyroid hormone (TH) serum concentrations, often viewed as an adaptive mechanism to save energy. Downregulation of hypophysiotropic TRH neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and of TSH production in the pituitary gland points to disturbed negative feedback regulation during illness. In addition to these alterations in the central component of the HPT axis, changes in TH metabolism occur in a variety of TH target tissues during NTIS, dependent on the timing, nature and severity of the illness. Cytokines, released during illness, are known to affect a variety of genes involved in TH metabolism and are therefore considered a major determinant of NTIS. The availability of in vivo and in vitro models for NTIS has elucidated part of the mechanisms involved in the sometimes paradoxical changes in the HPT axis and TH responsive tissues. However, the pathogenesis of NTIS is still incompletely understood. This review focusses on the molecular mechanisms involved in the tissue changes in TH metabolism and discusses the gaps that still require further research.

  16. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Outer Membrane Permeability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria characteristically are surrounded by an additional membrane layer, the outer membrane. Although outer membrane components often play important roles in the interaction of symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria with their host organisms, the major role of this membrane must usually be to serve as a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of noxious compounds and at the same time to allow the influx of nutrient molecules. This review summarizes the development in the field since our previous review (H. Nikaido and M. Vaara, Microbiol. Rev. 49:1-32, 1985) was published. With the discovery of protein channels, structural knowledge enables us to understand in molecular detail how porins, specific channels, TonB-linked receptors, and other proteins function. We are now beginning to see how the export of large proteins occurs across the outer membrane. With our knowledge of the lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid asymmetric bilayer of the outer membrane, we are finally beginning to understand how this bilayer can retard the entry of lipophilic compounds, owing to our increasing knowledge about the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide from diverse organisms and the way in which lipopolysaccharide structure is modified by environmental conditions. PMID:14665678

  17. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  18. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  19. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  20. Molecular basis of thrombomodulin activation of slow thrombin

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, T.E.; LI, W.; HUNTINGTON, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Coagulation is a highly regulated process where the ability to prevent blood loss after injury is balanced against the maintenance of blood fluidity. Thrombin is at the center of this balancing act. It is the critical enzyme for producing and stabilizing a clot, but when complexed with thrombomodulin (TM) it is converted to a powerful anticoagulant. Another cofactor that may play a role in determining thrombin function is the monovalent cation Na+. Its apparent affinity suggests that half of the thrombin generated is in a Na+-free ‘slow’ state and half is in a Na+-coordinated ‘fast’ state. While slow thrombin is a poor procoagulant enzyme, when complexed to TM it is an effective anticoagulant. Methods To better understand this molecular transformation we solved a 2.4 Å structure of thrombin complexed with EGF domains 4–6 of TM in the absence of Na+ and other cofactors or inhibitors. Results We find that TM binds as previously observed, and that the thrombin component resembles structures of the fast form. The Na+ binding loop is observed in a conformation identical to the Na+-bound form, with conserved water molecules compensating for the missing ion. Using the fluorescent probe p-aminobenzamidine we show that activation of slow thrombin by TM principally involves the opening of the primary specificity pocket. Conclusions These data show that TM binding alters the conformation of thrombin in a similar manner as Na+ coordination, resulting in an ordering of the Na+ binding loop and an opening of the adjacent S1 pocket. We conclude that other, more subtle subsite changes are unlikely to influence thrombin specificity toward macromolecular substrates. PMID:19656282

  1. Molecular basis of chill resistance adaptations in poikilothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Scott A L; Manso, Bruno; Cossins, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Chill and freeze represent very different components of low temperature stress. Whilst the principal mechanisms of tissue damage and of acquired protection from freeze-induced effects are reasonably well established, those for chill damage and protection are not. Non-freeze cold exposure (i.e. chill) can lead to serious disruption to normal life processes, including disruption to energy metabolism, loss of membrane perm-selectivity and collapse of ion gradients, as well as loss of neuromuscular coordination. If the primary lesions are not relieved then the progressive functional debilitation can lead to death. Thus, identifying the underpinning molecular lesions can point to the means of building resistance to subsequent chill exposures. Researchers have focused on four specific lesions: (i) failure of neuromuscular coordination, (ii) perturbation of bio-membrane structure and adaptations due to altered lipid composition, (iii) protein unfolding, which might be mitigated by the induced expression of compatible osmolytes acting as 'chemical chaperones', (iv) or the induced expression of protein chaperones along with the suppression of general protein synthesis. Progress in all these potential mechanisms has been ongoing but not substantial, due in part to an over-reliance on straightforward correlative approaches. Also, few studies have intervened by adoption of single gene ablation, which provides much more direct and compelling evidence for the role of specific genes, and thus processes, in adaptive phenotypes. Another difficulty is the existence of multiple mechanisms, which often act together, thus resulting in compensatory responses to gene manipulations, which may potentially mask disruptive effects on the chill tolerance phenotype. Consequently, there is little direct evidence of the underpinning regulatory mechanisms leading to induced resistance to chill injury. Here, we review recent advances mainly in lower vertebrates and in arthropods, but increasingly

  2. Molecular basis of essential fructosuria: molecular cloning and mutational analysis of human ketohexokinase (fructokinase).

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T; Brady, N; Donaldson, I A; Steinmann, B

    1994-09-01

    Essential fructosuria is one of the oldest known inborn errors of metabolism. It is a benign condition which is believed to result from deficiency of hepatic fructokinase (ketohexokinase, KHK, E.C.2.7.1.3). This enzyme catalyses the first step of metabolism of dietary fructose, conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate. Despite the early recognition of this disorder, the primary structure of human KHK and the molecular basis of essential fructosuria have not been previously defined. In this report, the isolation and sequencing of full-length cDNA clones encoding human ketohexokinase are described. Alternative mRNA species and alternative KHK isozymes are produced by alternative polyadenylation and splicing of the KHK gene. The KHK proteins show a high level of sequence conservation relative to rat KHK. Direct evidence that mutation of the KHK structural gene is the cause of essential fructosuria was also obtained. In a well-characterized family, in which three of eight siblings have fructosuria, all affected individuals are compound heterozygotes for two mutations Gly40Arg and Ala43Thr. Both mutations result from G-->A transitions, and each alters the same conserved region of the KHK protein. Neither mutation was seen in a sample of 52 unrelated control individuals. An additional conservative amino acid change (Val49IIe) was present on the KHK allele bearing Ala43Thr.

  3. Permutationally invariant polynomial basis for molecular energy surface fitting via monomial symmetrization.

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.; Bowman, J. M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Emory Univ.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a procedure to develop a fitting basis for molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) that is invariant with respect to permutation of like atoms. The method is based on a straightforward symmetrization of a primitive monomial basis and illustrated for several classes of molecules. A numerically efficient method to evaluate the resulting expression for the PES is also described. The fitting basis is used to obtain a new PES for H{sub 3}O{sup +} based on roughly 62000 ab initio energies.

  4. The complex genetic and molecular basis of a model quantitative trait

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Robert A.; Seidl, Fabian; Ha, Kimberly; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative traits are often influenced by many loci with small effects. Identifying most of these loci and resolving them to specific genes or genetic variants is challenging. Yet, achieving such a detailed understanding of quantitative traits is important, as it can improve our knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis of heritable phenotypic variation. In this study, we use a genetic mapping strategy that involves recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection to obtain new insights into an ecologically, industrially, and medically relevant quantitative trait—tolerance of oxidative stress, as measured based on resistance to hydrogen peroxide. We examine the genetic basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance in three related yeast crosses and detect 64 distinct genomic loci that likely influence the trait. By precisely resolving or cloning a number of these loci, we demonstrate that a broad spectrum of cellular processes contribute to hydrogen peroxide resistance, including DNA repair, scavenging of reactive oxygen species, stress-induced MAPK signaling, translation, and water transport. Consistent with the complex genetic and molecular basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance, we show two examples where multiple distinct causal genetic variants underlie what appears to be a single locus. Our results improve understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of a highly complex, model quantitative trait. PMID:26510497

  5. [Study on effective substance basis and molecular mechanism of Qigui Tongfeng tablet using network pharmacology method].

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhi-peng; Zhang, Xin-zhuang; Ding, Yue; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Qigui Tongfeng tablet (QLTFT) is a traditional Chinese medicine with good effect for treating gout. Here, network pharmacology method and molecular similarity analysis were utilized to study the effective substance basis and molecular mechanism of the QLTFT on the gout. The similarity to the medicinal compounds is reflected in the Tanimoto coefficient that gives the structural similarity of two compounds. Operationally, similar modifiers were described as pairs of concepts with a similarity score of 0. 500. The results of the molecular similarity analysis suggested that the flavonoids in QLTFT could be new leads for gout. Furthermore, complex biological systems may be represented and analyzed as computable networks. Two important properties of a network were degree and betweenness. Nodes with high degree or high betweenness may play important roles in the overall composition of a network. And the results of network analysis showed that dongbeinine, verticinone-N-oxide, verticine N-oxide, peimine, peiminine, isobaimonidine, dongbeirine, peimisine and simi-arenol which with high degree acted on xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, an arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, tyrosine-protein kinase and etc. Inhibition of these targets can prevent the formation of uric acid, reduce inflammation by uric acid and regulate the body's immune response. Thus, these compounds may be the main effective substance basis. The research results not only reveals its molecular mechanism, but also provide a theoretical basis for the quality control of drugs and clinical application.

  6. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. PMID:26209732

  7. Molecular basis of HHQ biosynthesis: molecular dynamics simulations, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PQS (PseudomonasQuinolone Signal) and its precursor HHQ are signal molecules of the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system. They explicate their role in mammalian pathogenicity by binding to the receptor PqsR that induces virulence factor production and biofilm formation. The enzyme PqsD catalyses the biosynthesis of HHQ. Results Enzyme kinetic analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor experiments were used to determine mechanism and substrate order of the biosynthesis. Comparative analysis led to the identification of domains involved in functionality of PqsD. A kinetic cycle was set up and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular bases of the kinetics of PqsD. Trajectory analysis, pocket volume measurements, binding energy estimations and decompositions ensured insights into the binding mode of the substrates anthraniloyl-CoA and β-ketodecanoic acid. Conclusions Enzyme kinetics and SPR experiments hint at a ping-pong mechanism for PqsD with ACoA as first substrate. Trajectory analysis of different PqsD complexes evidenced ligand-dependent induced-fit motions affecting the modified ACoA funnel access to the exposure of a secondary channel. A tunnel-network is formed in which Ser317 plays an important role by binding to both substrates. Mutagenesis experiments resulting in the inactive S317F mutant confirmed the importance of this residue. Two binding modes for β-ketodecanoic acid were identified with distinct catalytic mechanism preferences. PMID:23916145

  8. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-01

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors.

  9. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  10. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-01

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors. PMID:11853675

  11. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  12. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O’Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth’s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:25731976

  13. Multiple-Timestep ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Using an Atomic Basis Set Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Steele, Ryan P

    2015-12-17

    This work describes an approach to accelerate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by exploiting the inherent timescale separation between contributions from different atom-centered Gaussian basis sets. Several MD steps are propagated with a cost-efficient, low-level basis set, after which a dynamical correction accounts for large basis set relaxation effects in a time-reversible fashion. This multiple-timestep scheme is shown to generate valid MD trajectories, on the basis of rigorous testing for water clusters, the methanol dimer, an alanine polypeptide, protonated hydrazine, and the oxidized water dimer. This new approach generates observables that are consistent with those of target basis set trajectories, including MD-based vibrational spectra. This protocol is shown to be valid for Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory approaches. Recommended pairings include 6-31G as a low-level basis set for 6-31G** or 6-311G**, as well as cc-pVDZ as the subset for accurate dynamics with aug-cc-pVTZ. Demonstrated cost savings include factors of 2.6-7.3 on the systems tested and are expected to remain valid across system sizes.

  14. Connecting the eye to the brain: the molecular basis of ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Oster, S F; Sretavan, D W

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, a great deal has been learnt about the molecular basis through which specific neural pathways in the visual system are established during embryonic development. This review provides a framework for understanding the principles of retinal ganglion cell axon guidance, and introduces some of the families of axon guidance molecules involved. In addition, the potential relevance of retinal axon guidance to human visual developmental disorders, and to retinal axon regeneration, is discussed. PMID:12714414

  15. Vibrational molecular quantum computing: basis set independence and theoretical realization of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Carmen M; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2004-12-22

    The phase of quantum gates is one key issue for the implementation of quantum algorithms. In this paper we first investigate the phase evolution of global molecular quantum gates, which are realized by optimally shaped femtosecond laser pulses. The specific laser fields are calculated using the multitarget optimal control algorithm, our modification of the optimal control theory relevant for application in quantum computing. As qubit system we use vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules, here the two IR-active modes of acetylene. Exemplarily, we present our results for a Pi gate, which shows a strong dependence on the phase, leading to a significant decrease in quantum yield. To correct for this unwanted behavior we include pressure on the quantum phase in our multitarget approach. In addition the accuracy of these phase corrected global quantum gates is enhanced. Furthermore we could show that in our molecular approach phase corrected quantum gates and basis set independence are directly linked. Basis set independence is also another property highly required for the performance of quantum algorithms. By realizing the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm in our two qubit molecular model system, we demonstrate the good performance of our phase corrected and basis set independent quantum gates.

  16. [Occurrence characteristics and molecular genetic basis of pod shattering in soybean].

    PubMed

    Dezhi, Han; Yulong, Ren; Yong, Guo; Hongrui, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Wencheng, Lu; Lijuan, Qiu

    2015-06-01

    Pod shattering is a natural property of wild soybean (Glycine soja) for propagation and also a major cause of yield loss in cultivated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr). Thus, studies on occurrence characteristics and molecular genetic basis of pod shattering in soybean can provide insights into both molecular mechanisms and potential application in legume crop improvement. In this review, we summarize the occurrence features and phenotypic identification methods of pod shattering based on analysis of the cellular microstructure of shattering-resistant soybean pod. We also introduced the identification and breeding of shattering-resistant germplasms, the progress of molecular genetic studies on shattering-resistant phenotype in soybean as well as perspectives on future studies of pod-shattering trait and application in crop improvement.

  17. Charcot-marie-tooth disease and related neuropathies: molecular basis for distinction and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D

    1999-11-01

    Great advances have been made in understanding the molecular basis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies, namely Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and congenital hypomyelination (CH). The number of newly uncovered mutations and identified genetic loci is rapidly increasing, and, as a consequence, the classification of these disorders is becoming more complicated. Molecular genetics, animal models, and transfected cell studies are shedding light on function and dysfunction of proteins involved in hereditary myelinopathies-peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), myelin protein zero (PO), connexin 32 (Cx32), and early growth response 2 (EGR2). Gene dosage effect, loss of function, gain of toxic function, and dominant negative effect are possible mechanisms whereby different gene mutations may exert their detrimental action on peripheral nerves. A tentative rational approach to clinical and molecular diagnosis based on genotype-phenotype correlation analysis is described. PMID:10514227

  18. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  19. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity: A genome-wide ssociation study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Isen, Joshua D.; Malone, Stephen M.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity (EDA) was analyzed using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large population-representative sample of twins and parents (N = 4,424) in relation to various EDA indices. Biometric analyses suggested that approximately 50% or more of variance in all EDA indices was heritable. The combined effect of all SNPs together accounted for a significant amount of variance in each index, affirming their polygenic basis and heritability. However, none of the SNPs were genome-wide significant for any EDA index. Previously reported SNP associations with disorders such as substance dependence or schizophrenia, which have been linked to EDA abnormalities, were not significant; nor were associations between EDA and genes in specific neurotransmitter systems. These results suggest that EDA is influenced by multiple genes rather than by polymorphisms with large effects. PMID:25387706

  20. Revisiting the supernumerary: the epidemiological and molecular basis of extra teeth.

    PubMed

    Fleming, P S; Xavier, G M; DiBiase, A T; Cobourne, M T

    2010-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are a common clinical and radiographic finding and may produce occlusal and dental problems. The aetiological basis of extra teeth is poorly understood in human populations; however, the mouse provides a useful model system to investigate the complex genetics of tooth development. This article describes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of supernumerary teeth. We have reviewed biological evidence that provides insight into why supernumerary tooth formation may occur. Indeed, many of the molecular signalling pathways known to be involved in normal development of the tooth germ can also give rise to additional teeth if inappropriately regulated. These include components of the Hedgehog, FGF, Wnt, TNF and BMP families, which provide a useful resource of candidate genes that may potentially play a role in human supernumerary tooth formation. PMID:20057458

  1. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a new model system for studying the molecular basis of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2011-05-20

    The genome of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has both plant-like and animal-like genes. It is of interest to know which types of clock genes this alga has. Recent forward and reverse genetic studies have revealed that its clock has both plant-like and algal clock components. In addition, since C. reinhardtii is a useful model organism also called "green yeast", the identification of clock genes will make C. reinhardtii a powerful model for studying the molecular basis of the eukaryotic circadian clock. In this review, we describe our forward genetic approach in C. reinhardtii and discuss some recent findings about its circadian clock.

  2. Construction of the Fock Matrix on a Grid-Based Molecular Orbital Basis Using GPGPUs.

    PubMed

    Losilla, Sergio A; Watson, Mark A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Sundholm, Dage

    2015-05-12

    We present a GPGPU implementation of the construction of the Fock matrix in the molecular orbital basis using the fully numerical, grid-based bubbles representation. For a test set of molecules containing up to 90 electrons, the total Hartree-Fock energies obtained from reference GTO-based calculations are reproduced within 10(-4) Eh to 10(-8) Eh for most of the molecules studied. Despite the very large number of arithmetic operations involved, the high performance obtained made the calculations possible on a single Nvidia Tesla K40 GPGPU card.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  4. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016.

  5. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation from the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Pan, Albert C; Dror, Ron O; Mocking, Tamara; Liu, Rongfang; Heitman, Laura H; Shaw, David E; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-01

    How drugs dissociate from their targets is largely unknown. We investigated the molecular basis of this process in the adenosine A2Areceptor (A2AR), a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Through kinetic radioligand binding experiments, we characterized mutant receptors selected based on molecular dynamic simulations of the antagonist ZM241385 dissociating from the A2AR. We discovered mutations that dramatically altered the ligand's dissociation rate despite only marginally influencing its binding affinity, demonstrating that even receptor features with little contribution to affinity may prove critical to the dissociation process. Our results also suggest that ZM241385 follows a multistep dissociation pathway, consecutively interacting with distinct receptor regions, a mechanism that may also be common to many other GPCRs.

  6. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016. PMID:27604155

  7. Molecular Basis for the Influence of Muscle Length on Myocardial Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Arvind; Sonnenblick, Edmund; Gulati, Jagdish

    1988-04-01

    According to Starling's law of the heart, the force of contraction during the ejection of blood is a function of the end-diastolic volume. To seek the molecular explanation of this effect, a study was made of the effects of length on Ca2+ sensitivity during tension development by isolated demembranated cardiac muscle in which the cardiac form of troponin C was substituted with skeletal troponin C. The results of troponin C exchange were compared at sarcomere lengths of 1.9 and 2.4 micrometers. Enhancement of the myocardial performance at the stretched length was greatly suppressed with the skeletal troponin C compared with the cardiac troponin C. Thus the troponin C subunit of the troponin complex that regulates the activation of actin filaments has intrinsic molecular properties that influence the length-induced autoregulation of myocardial performance and may be a basis for Starling's law of the heart.

  8. Electrical heart disease: Genetic and molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias in normal structural hearts.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Gollob, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    Purely electrical heart diseases, defined by the absence of any structural cardiac defects, are responsible for a large number of sudden, unexpected deaths in otherwise healthy, young individuals. These conditions include the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and the short QT syndrome. Collectively, these conditions have been referred to as channelopathies. Ion channels provide the molecular basis for cardiac electrical activity. These channels have specific ion selectivity and are responsible for the precise and timely regulation of the passage of charged ions across the cell membrane in myocytes, and the summation of their activity in cardiac muscle defines the surface electrocardiogram. Impairment in the flow of these ions in heart cells may mean the difference between a normal, prosperous life and the tragedy of a sudden, unexpected death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The present paper reviews the current clinical and molecular understanding of the electrical diseases of the heart associated with sudden cardiac death.

  9. Molecular basis for antagonistic activity of anifrolumab, an anti-interferon-α receptor 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2015-01-01

    Anifrolumab (anifrolumab) is an antagonist human monoclonal antibody that targets interferon α receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Anifrolumab has been developed to treat autoimmune diseases and is currently in clinical trials. To decipher the molecular basis of its mechanism of action, we engaged in multiple epitope mapping approaches to determine how it interacts with IFNAR1 and antagonizes the receptor. We identified the epitope of anifrolumab using enzymatic fragmentation, phage-peptide library panning and mutagenesis approaches. Our studies revealed that anifrolumab recognizes the SD3 subdomain of IFNAR1 with the critical residue R(279). Further, we solved the crystal structure of anifrolumab Fab to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Guided by our epitope mapping studies, we then used in silico protein docking of the anifrolumab Fab crystal structure to IFNAR1 and characterized the corresponding mode of binding. We find that anifrolumab sterically inhibits the binding of IFN ligands to IFNAR1, thus blocking the formation of the ternary IFN/IFNAR1/IFNAR2 signaling complex. This report provides the molecular basis for the mechanism of action of anifrolumab and may provide insights toward designing antibody therapies against IFNAR1.

  10. Many-body calculations of molecular electric polarizabilities in asymptotically complete basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monten, Ruben; Hajgató, Balázs; Deleuze, Michael S.

    2011-10-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities of Ne, CO, N2, F2, HF, H2O, HCN, and C2H2 (acetylene) have been determined close to the Full-CI limit along with an asymptotically complete basis set (CBS), according to the principles of a Focal Point Analysis. For this purpose the results of Finite Field calculations up to the level of Coupled Cluster theory including Single, Double, Triple, Quadruple and perturbative Pentuple excitations [CCSDTQ(P)] were used, in conjunction with suited extrapolations of energies obtained using augmented and doubly-augmented Dunning's correlation consistent polarized valence basis sets of improving quality. The polarizability characteristics of C2H4 (ethylene) and C2H6 (ethane) have been determined on the same grounds at the CCSDTQ level in the CBS limit. Comparison is made with results obtained using lower levels in electronic correlation, or taking into account the relaxation of the molecular structure due to an adiabatic polarization process. Vibrational corrections to electronic polarizabilities have been empirically estimated according to Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical simulations employing Density Functional Theory. Confrontation with experiment ultimately indicates relative accuracies of the order of 1 to 2%.

  11. Molecular Basis for Phosphorylation-dependent SUMO Recognition by the DNA Repair Protein RAP80.

    PubMed

    Anamika; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2016-02-26

    Recognition and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSB) involves the targeted recruitment of BRCA tumor suppressors to damage foci through binding of both ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like modifier SUMO. RAP80 is a component of the BRCA1 A complex, and plays a key role in the recruitment process through the binding of Lys(63)-linked poly-Ub chains by tandem Ub interacting motifs (UIM). RAP80 also contains a SUMO interacting motif (SIM) just upstream of the tandem UIMs that has been shown to specifically bind the SUMO-2 isoform. The RAP80 tandem UIMs and SIM function collectively for optimal recruitment of BRCA1 to DSBs, although the molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the RAP80 SIM binds SUMO-2, and that both specificity and affinity are enhanced through phosphorylation of the canonical CK2 site within the SIM. The affinity increase results from an enhancement of electrostatic interactions between the phosphoserines of RAP80 and the SIM recognition module within SUMO-2. The NMR structure of the SUMO-2·phospho-RAP80 complex reveals that the molecular basis for SUMO-2 specificity is due to isoform-specific sequence differences in electrostatic SIM recognition modules.

  12. Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

  13. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D.; Convertino, Marino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The design of multitarget‐directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget‐directed ligand named ARN2508 (2‐[3‐fluoro‐4‐[3‐(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2‐arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti‐inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX. PMID:26593700

  14. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  15. Molecular basis for activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Boguth, Cassandra A.; Singh, Puja; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) selectively recognize and are allosterically regulated by activated GPCRs, but the molecular basis for this interaction is not understood. Herein, we report crystal structures of GRK6 in which regions known to be critical for receptor phosphorylation have coalesced to stabilize the kinase domain in a closed state and to form a likely receptor docking site. The crux of this docking site is an extended N-terminal helix that bridges the large and small lobes of the kinase domain and lies adjacent to a basic surface of the protein proposed to bind anionic phospholipids. Mutation of exposed, hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix selectively inhibits receptor, but not peptide phosphorylation, suggesting that these residues interact directly with GPCRs. Our structural and biochemical results thus provide an explanation for how receptor recognition, phospholipid binding, and kinase activation are intimately coupled in GRKs.

  16. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed.

  17. Molecular basis of cellular localization of poly C binding protein 1 in neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Andrea M.; Flock, Kelly E.; Loh, Horace H.; Ko, Jane L. . E-mail: kojane@shu.edu

    2006-11-03

    Poly C binding protein 1 (PCBP) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of neuronal mu-opioid receptor gene. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of PCBP cellular/nuclear localization in neuronal cells using EGFP fusion protein. PCBP, containing three KH domains and a variable domain, distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus with a preferential nuclear expression. Domain-deletional analyses suggested the requirement of variable and KH3 domains for strong PCBP nuclear expression. Within the nucleus, a low nucleolar PCBP expression was observed, and PCBP variable domain contributed to this restricted nucleolar expression. Furthermore, the punctate nuclear pattern of PCBP was correlated to its single-stranded (ss) DNA binding ability, with both requiring cooperativity of at least three sequential domains. Collectively, certain PCBP domains thus govern its nuclear distribution and transcriptional regulatory activity in the nucleus of neurons, whereas the low nucleolar expression implicates the disengagement of PCBP in the ribosomal RNA synthesis.

  18. The influence of the molecular basis of resistance on insecticide discovery

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of invention and development of new insecticides and the impact of current research in resistance mechanisms on that process. The topic is introduced in the context of (i) the critical need to develop new insect-control agents to ensure a continued supply of high-quality food and fibre; (ii) how resistance development will continue to influence the potential to ensure the supply of these essentials; and (iii) why new insect-control technology is welcomed by growers. The main section of the paper describes a generic agrochemical invention process and discusses the impact that an understanding of the molecular basis of resistance will have on the various stages of this process, using specific examples to illustrate these points. By focusing on insecticide invention, this paper provides a context in which other information more specific to insecticide resistance from this issue can be understood.

  19. Molecular basis of natural variation and environmental control of trichome patterning.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2014-01-01

    Trichomes are differentiated epidermal cells on above ground organs of nearly all land plants. They play important protective roles as structural defenses upon biotic attacks such as herbivory, oviposition and fungal infections, and against abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, freezing, excess of light, and UV radiation. The pattern and density of trichomes is highly variable within natural population suggesting tradeoffs between traits positively affecting fitness such as resistance and the costs of trichome production. The spatial distribution of trichomes is regulated through a combination of endogenous developmental programs and external signals. This review summarizes the current understanding on the molecular basis of the natural variation and the role of phytohormones and environmental stimuli on trichome patterning. PMID:25071803

  20. Molecular basis of in-vivo biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial biofilms are involved in a multitude of serious chronic infections. In recent years, modeling biofilm infection in vitro led to the identification of microbial determinants governing biofilm development. However, we lack information as to whether biofilm formation mechanisms identified in vitro have relevance for biofilm-associated infection. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation using staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to illustrate key points, as their biofilm development process is well-studied. We will focus on in-vivo findings such as obtained in animal infection models, and critically evaluate in-vivo relevance of in-vitro findings. Although results on the role of quorum-sensing in biofilm formation have been conflicting, we now argue that integration of in-vitro and in-vivo studies allows a differentiated view of this mechanism as it relates to biofilm infection. PMID:23261595

  1. The E-state as the basis for molecular structure space definition and structure similarity

    PubMed

    Hall; Kier

    2000-05-01

    The electrotopological state (E-state) is presented as a representation of molecular structure useful for definition of a space for chemical structures. This E-state representation provides the basis for chemical database management. The E-state formalism is presented along with its extension to the atom-type E-state. An approach to database organization, using polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) as examples, reveals the descriptive power of the E-state paradigm. A well-organized chemical database, as described here, may be searched to find structures similar to a target structure with the expectation that such structures may exhibit properties similar to the target. Searches using the atom-type E-state indices are demonstrated with two example drug molecules.

  2. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, SJ; Caputo, M; Tulloh, RM

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed. PMID:26516182

  3. ["Gating-Spring" model and molecular basis of mechanotransduction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The sense of mechanical stimuli (e.g. force or deformation) in the environment underlies several important physiological processes, for example the perception of sound, touch, pain and acceleration. The key step in mechanosensation is to convert the extracellular mechanical stimuli into cellular electrical or chemical signals. This process is termed as mechanotransduction. Based on mechanical and electrophysiological measurements, "Gating-Spring" theory was proposed as a general model to describe the cell biological mechanism of mechanotransduction. However, despite efforts made in several model organisms, the molecular basis of the "Gating-Spring" model remains elusive. In recent years, several key progresses have been made using the mechanoreceptors of Drosophila melanogaster as the models. This article introduces the "Gating-Spring" theory and reviews the recent research progresses on the fly mechanotransduction.

  4. The Molecular and Structural Basis of HBV-resistance to Nucleos(t)ide Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Goyal, Milky; Wu, Catherine H.; Wu, George Y.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a worldwide health problem. Chronic hepatitis B can lead to fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Management of the latter two conditions often requires liver transplantation. Treatment with conventional interferon or pegylated interferon alpha can clear the virus, but the rates are very low. The likelihood, however, of viral resistance to interferon is minimal. The main problems with this therapy are the frequency and severity of side effects. In contrast, nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have significantly lower side effects, but require long term treatment as sustained virological response rates are extremely low. However, long term treatment with NAs increases the risk for the development of anti-viral drug resistance. Only by understanding the molecular basis of resistance and using agents with multiple sites of action can drugs be designed to optimally prevent the occurrence of HBV antiviral resistance. PMID:26357626

  5. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed. PMID:26516182

  6. Molecular basis of natural variation and environmental control of trichome patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2014-01-01

    Trichomes are differentiated epidermal cells on above ground organs of nearly all land plants. They play important protective roles as structural defenses upon biotic attacks such as herbivory, oviposition and fungal infections, and against abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, freezing, excess of light, and UV radiation. The pattern and density of trichomes is highly variable within natural population suggesting tradeoffs between traits positively affecting fitness such as resistance and the costs of trichome production. The spatial distribution of trichomes is regulated through a combination of endogenous developmental programs and external signals. This review summarizes the current understanding on the molecular basis of the natural variation and the role of phytohormones and environmental stimuli on trichome patterning. PMID:25071803

  7. Molecular basis for oncohistone H3 recognition by SETD2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Lu, Chao; Li, Guo-Min; Allis, C David; Li, Haitao

    2016-07-15

    High-frequency point mutations of genes encoding histones have been identified recently as novel drivers in a number of tumors. Specifically, the H3K36M/I mutations were shown to be oncogenic in chondroblastomas and undifferentiated sarcomas by inhibiting H3K36 methyltransferases, including SETD2. Here we report the crystal structures of the SETD2 catalytic domain bound to H3K36M or H3K36I peptides with SAH (S-adenosylhomocysteine). In the complex structure, the catalytic domain adopts an open conformation, with the K36M/I peptide snuggly positioned in a newly formed substrate channel. Our structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis underying oncohistone recognition by and inhibition of SETD2. PMID:27474439

  8. A common molecular basis for exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid potentiation of glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wu, Xiongwu; Li, Fuying; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Lovinger, David M; Zhang, Li

    2012-04-11

    Both exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids can allosterically modulate glycine receptors (GlyRs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of cannabinoid-GlyR interactions. Here we report that sustained incubation with the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) substantially increased the amplitude of glycine-activated current in both rat cultured spinal neurons and in HEK-293 cells expressing human α1, rat α2 and α3 GlyRs. While the α1 and α3 subunits were highly sensitive to AEA-induced potentiation, the α2 subunit was relatively insensitive to AEA. Switching a serine at 296 and 307 in the TM3 (transmembrane domain 3) of the α1 and α3 subunits with an alanine (A) at the equivalent position in the α2 subunit converted the α1/α3 AEA-sensitive receptors to sensitivity resembling that of α2. The S296 residue is also critical for exogenous cannabinoid-induced potentiation of I(Gly). The magnitude of AEA potentiation decreased with removal of either the hydroxyl or oxygen groups on AEA. While desoxy-AEA was significantly less efficacious in potentiating I(Gly), desoxy-AEA inhibited potentiation produced by both Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, and AEA. Similarly, didesoxy-THC, a modified THC with removal of both hydroxyl/oxygen groups, did not affect I(Gly) when applied alone but inhibited the potentiation of I(Gly) induced by AEA and THC. These findings suggest that exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids potentiate GlyRs via a hydrogen bonding-like interaction. Such a specific interaction likely stems from a common molecular basis involving the S296 residue in the TM3 of the α1 and α3 subunits. PMID:22496565

  9. [Molecular genetic basis for para-Bombay phenotypes in two cases].

    PubMed

    He, Yang-Ming; Xu, Xian-Guo; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Yan, Li-Xing

    2007-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the molecular genetics basis for para-Bombay phenotype. The para-Bombay phenotype of two probands was identified by routine serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase gene (FUT1 and FUT2) in the probands was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplified fragments were directly sequenced, meanwhile the mutations of FUT1 were also identified by TOPO TA cloning sequence method. The results indicated that two heterozygous mutations were detected by directly sequencing in two probands: AG deletion at position 547 - 552 and C to T mutation at position 658. Two different mutations were confirmed to be true compound heterozygotes with each mutation on a separate homologous chromosome by TOPO TA cloning sequence method. AG deletion at position 547 - 552 caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. C658T mutation resulted in Arg-->Cys at amino acid position 220. It is suggested that the FUT1 mutation of two probands are compound heterozygous mutation with different chromosomes, which are named h1h3 and may be the genetics basis of para-Bombay phenotype.

  10. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol Mannoside Biosynthesis and Regulation in Mycobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Marcelo E.; Korduláková, Jana; Alzari, Pedro M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs) are unique glycolipids found in abundant quantities in the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope of all Mycobacterium species. They are based on a phosphatidyl-myo-inositol lipid anchor carrying one to six mannose residues and up to four acyl chains. PIMs are considered not only essential structural components of the cell envelope but also the structural basis of the lipoglycans (lipomannan and lipoarabinomannan), all important molecules implicated in host-pathogen interactions in the course of tuberculosis and leprosy. Although the chemical structure of PIMs is now well established, knowledge of the enzymes and sequential events leading to their biosynthesis and regulation is still incomplete. Recent advances in the identification of key proteins involved in PIM biogenesis and the determination of the three-dimensional structures of the essential phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase PimA and the lipoprotein LpqW have led to important insights into the molecular basis of this pathway. PMID:20801880

  11. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence. PMID:27072710

  12. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence.

  13. Molecular Basis of Differential B-Pentamer Stability of Shiga Toxins 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Conrady, Deborah G.; Flagler, Michael J.; Friedmann, David R.; Vander Wielen, Bradley D.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Weiss, Alison A.; Herr, Andrew B.

    2012-06-27

    Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 is a major cause of food poisoning that can result in severe diarrhea and, in some cases, renal failure. The pathogenesis of E. coli O157:H7 is in large part due to the production of Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB{sub 5} toxin that consists of a ribosomal RNA-cleaving A-subunit surrounded by a pentamer of receptor-binding B subunits. There are two major isoforms, Stx1 and Stx2, which differ dramatically in potency despite having 57% sequence identity. Animal studies and epidemiological studies show Stx2 is associated with more severe disease. Although the molecular basis of this difference is unknown, data suggest it is associated with the B-subunit. Mass spectrometry studies have suggested differential B-pentamer stability between Stx1 and Stx2. We have examined the relative stability of the B-pentamers in solution. Analytical ultracentrifugation using purified B-subunits demonstrates that Stx2B, the more deadly isoform, shows decreased pentamer stability compared to Stx1B (EC{sub 50} = 2.3 {micro}M vs. EC{sub 50} = 0.043 {micro}M for Stx1B). X-ray crystal structures of Stx1B and Stx2B identified a glutamine in Stx2 (versus leucine in Stx1) within the otherwise strongly hydrophobic interface between B-subunits. Interchanging these residues switches the stability phenotype of the B-pentamers of Stx1 and Stx2, as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. These studies demonstrate a profound difference in stability of the B-pentamers in Stx1 and Stx2, illustrate the mechanistic basis for this differential stability, and provide novel reagents to test the basis for differential pathogenicity of these toxins.

  14. Strategies to determine the molecular basis of chemical communication by trematodes.

    PubMed

    Hayunga, E G; Sumner, M P

    1986-08-01

    The identification of pheromones and chemicals that may inhibit or stimulate growth and reproduction necessarily leads to the consideration of biochemical methods to isolate and characterize these molecules. Analysis ofSchistosoma mansoni surface antigens by direct radioiodination, metabolic labeling with tritiated and(14)C-tagged hexose precursors, affinity chromatography, isoelectric focusing, hydrophobic chromatography, and competitive inhibition is presented to illustrate methods of immunochemical analysis and antigen purification. Technical problems that may arise when investigating parasite molecular biology are described. Evidence of diminished fecundity of female worms in acutely infected mice supports the theory of a "crowding effect" in murine schistosomiasis and suggests the possibility that worm secretions or metabolites may function as chemical messages to inhibit oviposition. There is also evidence that the immune response of mice to an isolated surface antigen from adult worms results in the attenuation of hepatic granulomata of challenge infections. Several hypotheses are proposed to elucidate the molecular basis for chemical communication between trematodes and analytical approaches to test these hypotheses are outlined.

  15. Molecular structural basis for polymorphism in Alzheimer's β-amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Paravastu, Anant K.; Leapman, Richard D.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe a full structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (Aβ1–40), based on numerous constraints from solid state NMR and electron microscopy. This model applies specifically to fibrils with a periodically twisted morphology, with twist period equal to 120 ± 20 nm (defined as the distance between apparent minima in fibril width in negatively stained transmission electron microscope images). The structure has threefold symmetry about the fibril growth axis, implied by mass-per-length data and the observation of a single set of 13C NMR signals. Comparison with a previously reported model for Aβ1–40 fibrils with a qualitatively different, striated ribbon morphology reveals the molecular basis for polymorphism. At the molecular level, the 2 Aβ1–40 fibril morphologies differ in overall symmetry (twofold vs. threefold), the conformation of non-β-strand segments, and certain quaternary contacts. Both morphologies contain in-register parallel β-sheets, constructed from nearly the same β-strand segments. Because twisted and striated ribbon morphologies are also observed for amyloid fibrils formed by other polypeptides, such as the amylin peptide associated with type 2 diabetes, these structural variations may have general implications. PMID:19015532

  16. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lawrence K; Ginsburg, Michael A; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-08-19

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation. PMID:20676082

  17. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  18. Molecular basis of photoprotection and control of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Andrew A; Liu, Zhenfeng; Broess, Koen; van Oort, Bart; van Amerongen, Herbert; Wang, Chao; Horton, Peter; Robert, Bruno; Chang, Wenrui; Ruban, Alexander

    2005-07-01

    In order to maximize their use of light energy in photosynthesis, plants have molecules that act as light-harvesting antennae, which collect light quanta and deliver them to the reaction centres, where energy conversion into a chemical form takes place. The functioning of the antenna responds to the extreme changes in the intensity of sunlight encountered in nature. In shade, light is efficiently harvested in photosynthesis. However, in full sunlight, much of the energy absorbed is not needed and there are vitally important switches to specific antenna states, which safely dissipate the excess energy as heat. This is essential for plant survival, because it provides protection against the potential photo-damage of the photosynthetic membrane. But whereas the features that establish high photosynthetic efficiency have been highlighted, almost nothing is known about the molecular nature of the dissipative states. Recently, the atomic structure of the major plant light-harvesting antenna protein, LHCII, has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Here we demonstrate that this is the structure of a dissipative state of LHCII. We present a spectroscopic analysis of this crystal form, and identify the specific changes in configuration of its pigment population that give LHCII the intrinsic capability to regulate energy flow. This provides a molecular basis for understanding the control of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

  19. Molecular basis for the transformation defects in mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Notani, N K; Setlow, J K; Joshi, V R; Allison, D P

    1972-06-01

    To determine the molecular basis of transformation defects in Haemophilus influenzae, the fate of genetically marked, (32)P-labeled, heavy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was examined in three mutant strains (rec(1) (-), rec(2) (-), and KB6) and in wild type having (3)H-labeled DNA and a second genetic marker. Transforming cells upon lysis with digitonin followed by low-speed centrifugation are separable into the supernatant fraction, containing mainly the unintegrated donor DNA, and the pellet, containing most of the resident DNA along with integrated donor DNA. Electron micrographs of digitonin-treated cells also indicate that the resident DNA is trapped inside a cellular structure but that cytoplasmic elements such as ribosomes are extensively released. DNA synthesis in digitonin-treated cells is immediately blocked, as is any further integration of donor DNA into the resident genome. Isopycnic and sedimentation analysis of supernatant fluids and pellets revealed that in strains rec(2) (-) and KB6 there is little or no association between donor and resident DNA, and thus there is negligible transfer of donor DNA genetic information. In these strains, the donor DNA is not broken into pieces of lower molecular weight as it is in strain rec(1) (-) and in the wild type, both of which show association between donor and recipient DNA. In strain rec(1) (-), although some donor DNA atoms become covalently linked to resident DNA, the incorporated material does not have the donor DNA transforming activity. PMID:4537421

  20. The molecular basis of autosomal recessive diseases among the Arabs and Druze in Israel.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, Joël

    2010-11-01

    The Israeli population mainly includes Jews, Muslim and Christian Arabs, and Druze In the last decade, data on genetic diseases present in the population have been systematically collected and are available online in the Israeli national genetic database ( http://www.goldenhelix.org/server/israeli ). In the non-Jewish population, up to 1 July 2010, the database included molecular data on six diseases relatively frequent in the whole population: thalassemia, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cystic fibrosis, deafness, phenylketonuria and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, as well as data on 195 autosomal recessive diseases among Muslim Israeli Arabs, 11 among the Christian Arabs and 31 among Druze. A single mutation was characterized in 149 out of the 238 rare disorders for which the molecular basis was known. In many diseases, mutation had never been observed in any other population and was present in one family only suggesting that it occurred as a de novo event. In other diseases, the mutation was present in more than one community or even in other populations such as Bedouins from the Arab peninsula or Christians from Lebanon. In the 89 other disorders, more than one mutation was characterized either in the same gene or in more than one gene. While it is probable that most of these cases represent random events in some cases such as Bardet Biedl among the Bedouins, the reason may be a selective advantage to the heterozygotes.

  1. "Zwitterionic Proton Sponge" Hydrogen Bonding Investigations on the Basis of Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J

    2015-06-22

    1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)-4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene has been investigated on the basis of static DFT computations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed in the gas phase and in the solid state. The studied "zwitterionic proton sponge" possesses two, short intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H···O and N-H···N) classified as Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds (LBHBs); therefore, the system studied is strongly anharmonic. In addition, the compound exists as a "zwitterion" in solution and in the solid state, thus the intramolecular hydrogen bonds belong to the class of charge-assisted interactions. The applied quantum-chemical methods enabled investigations of metric and spectroscopic parameters of the molecule. The time-evolution investigations of the H-bonding showed a strong delocalization of the bridge protons and their high mobility, reflected in the low barriers on the free energy surfaces. Frequent proton transfer phenomena were noticed. The power spectra of atomic velocity were computed to analyze the vibrational features associated with O-H and N-H stretching. A broad absorption was indicated for both hydrogen bridges. For the first time, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics results are reported for the compound, and they indicate a broad, shallow but not barrierless, potential well for each of the bridge protons. PMID:25965324

  2. [Study on the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype].

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Shao, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Xian-Guo; Hu, Qing-Fa; Wu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Fu, Qi-Hua; Yan, Li-Xing

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype, the red blood cell phenotype of the proband was characterized by standard serological techniques. Exon 6 and 7 of ABO gene, the entire coding region of FUT1 gene and FUT2 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA of the proband respectively. The PCR products were purified by agarose gels and directly sequenced. The PCR-SSP and genescan were performed to confirm the mutations detected by sequencing. The results showed that the proband ABO genotype was A(102)A(102). Two heterozygous mutations of FUT1 gene, an A to G transition at position 682 and AG deletion at position 547-552 were detected in the proband. A682G could cause transition of Met-->Val at amino acid position 228, AG deletion at position 547-552 caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. The FUT2 genotype was heterozygous for a functional allele Se(357) and a weakly functional allele Se(357), 385 (T/T homozygous at position 357 and A/T heterozygous at 385 position). It is concluded that the compound heterozygous mutation--a novel A682G missense mutation and a 547-552 del AG is the molecular mechanism of this para-Bombay phenotype.

  3. Molecular basis of human transcobalamin II deficiency in an affected family

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Seetharam, S.; Seetharam, B.

    1994-09-01

    Transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease leading to cobalamin (Cbl, Vitamin B{sub 12}) deficiency. Patients with this disorder fail to absorb and transport Cbl across cellular membranes and develop Cbl deficiency, symptoms of which include failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, impaired immunodefence and neurological disorders. The molecular basis for this disease is not known. By means of Southern blotting and sequence analysis of TC II, cDNA amplified from fibroblasts of an affected child and his parents, we have identified two mutant TC II alleles. The maternally derived allele had a gross deletion, while the paternally derived allele had a 4-nucleotide ({sup 1023}TCTG) deletion which caused a reading frame shift and generation of a premature termination codon, 146 nucleotides downstream from the deletion. Both these deletions caused markedly reduced levels of TC II mRNA and protein. In addition, these two deletions were unique to this family and were not detected in four other unrelated TC II deficient patients who also exhibited the same (TC II protein/mRNA deficiency) phenotypes. Based on this study we suggest, (1) that the molecular defect in the most common form of human TC II deficiency (lack of immunoprecipitable plasma TC II) is heterogeneous and (2) these mutations cause TC II mRNA and protein deficiency leading to defective plasma transport of Cbl and the development of Cbl deficiency.

  4. Actin reorganization as the molecular basis for the regulation of apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; George, S P; Srinivasan, K; Patnaik, S; Khurana, S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is a rapidly renewing tissue in which apoptosis represents part of the overall homeostatic process. Regulation of apoptosis in the GI epithelium is complex with a precise relationship between cell position and apoptosis. Apoptosis occurs spontaneously and in response to radiation and cytotoxic drugs at the base of the crypts. By contrast, the villus epithelial cells are extremely resistant to apoptosis. The molecular mechanism underlying this loss of function of villus epithelial cells to undergo apoptosis shortly after their exit from the crypt is unknown. In this study we demonstrate for the first time, that deletion of two homologous actin-binding proteins, villin and gelsolin renders villus epithelial cells extremely sensitive to apoptosis. Ultrastructural analysis of the villin-gelsolin−/− double-knockout mice shows an abnormal accumulation of damaged mitochondria demonstrating that villin and gelsolin function on an early step in the apoptotic signaling at the level of the mitochondria. A characterization of functional and ligand-binding mutants demonstrate that regulated changes in actin dynamics determined by the actin severing activities of villin and gelsolin are required to maintain cellular homeostasis. Our study provides a molecular basis for the regulation of apoptosis in the GI epithelium and identifies cell biological mechanisms that couple changes in actin dynamics to apoptotic cell death. PMID:22421965

  5. Insights into the molecular basis of piezophilic adaptation: Extraction of piezophilic signatures.

    PubMed

    Nath, Abhigyan; Subbiah, Karthikeyan

    2016-02-01

    Piezophiles are the organisms which can successfully survive at extreme pressure conditions. However, the molecular basis of piezophilic adaptation is still poorly understood. Analysis of the protein sequence adjustments that had taken place during evolution can help to reveal the sequence adaptation parameters responsible for protein functional and structural adaptation at such high pressure conditions. In this current work we have used SVM classifier for filtering strong instances and generated human interpretable rules from these strong instances by using the PART algorithm. These generated rules were analyzed for getting insights into the molecular signature patterns present in the piezophilic proteins. The experiments were performed on three different temperature ranges piezophilic groups, namely psychrophilic-piezophilic, mesophilic-piezophilic, and thermophilic-piezophilic for the detailed comparative study. The best classification results were obtained as we move up the temperature range from psychrophilic-piezophilic to thermophilic-piezophilic. Based on the physicochemical classification of amino acids and using feature ranking algorithms, hydrophilic and polar amino acid groups have higher discriminative ability for psychrophilic-piezophilic and mesophilic-piezophilic groups along with hydrophobic and nonpolar amino acids for the thermophilic-piezophilic groups. We also observed an overrepresentation of polar, hydrophilic and small amino acid groups in the discriminatory rules of all the three temperature range piezophiles along with aliphatic, nonpolar and hydrophobic groups in the mesophilic-piezophilic and thermophilic-piezophilic groups.

  6. Uncovering the differential molecular basis of adaptive diversity in three Echinochloa leaf transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Nah, Gyoungju; Im, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Won; Park, Hae-Rim; Yook, Min-Jung; Yang, Tae-Jin; Fischer, Albert J; Kim, Do-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Echinochloa is a major weed that grows almost everywhere in farmed land. This high prevalence results from its high adaptability to various water conditions, including upland and paddy fields, and its ability to grow in a wide range of climates, ranging from tropical to temperate regions. Three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions (EC-SNU1, EC-SNU2, and EC-SNU3) collected in Korea have shown diversity in their responses to flooding, with EC-SNU1 exhibiting the greatest growth among three accessions. In the search for molecular components underlying adaptive diversity among the three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions, we performed de novo assembly of leaf transcriptomes and investigated the pattern of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Although the overall composition of the three leaf transcriptomes was well-conserved, the gene expression patterns of particular gene ontology (GO) categories were notably different among the three accessions. Under non-submergence growing conditions, five protein categories (serine/threonine kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase, signaling-related, glycoprotein, and glycosidase) were significantly (FDR, q < 0.05) enriched in up-regulated DEGs from EC-SNU1. These up-regulated DEGs include major components of signal transduction pathways, such as receptor-like kinase (RLK) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) genes, as well as previously known abiotic stress-responsive genes. Our results therefore suggest that diversified gene expression regulation of upstream signaling components conferred the molecular basis of adaptive diversity in Echinochloa crus-galli.

  7. Molecular Basis of Hydroperoxide Specificity in Peroxiredoxins: The Case of AhpE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zeida, Ari; Reyes, Aníbal M; Lichtig, Pablo; Hugo, Martín; Vazquez, Diego S; Santos, Javier; González Flecha, F Luis; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Trujillo, Madia

    2015-12-15

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a ubiquitous family of Cys-dependent peroxidases that play essential roles in reducing hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and organic hydroperoxides in almost all organisms. Members of the Prx subfamilies show differential oxidizing substrate specificities that await explanations at a molecular level. Among them, alkyl hydroperoxide reductases E (AhpE) is a novel subfamily comprising Mycobacterium tuberculosis AhpE and AhpE-like proteins expressed in some bacteria and archaea. We previously reported that MtAhpE reacts ∼10(4) times faster with an arachidonic acid derived hydroperoxide than with hydrogen peroxide, and suggested that this surprisingly high reactivity was related to the presence of a hydrophobic groove at the dimer interface evidenced in the crystallography structure of the enzyme. In this contribution we experimentally confirmed the existence of an exposed hydrophobic patch in MtAhpE. We found that fatty acid hydroperoxide reduction by the enzyme showed positive activation entropy that importantly contributed to catalysis. Computational dynamics indicated that interactions of fatty acid-derived hydroperoxides with the enzyme properly accommodated them inside the active site and modifies enzyme's dynamics. The computed reaction free energy profile obtained via QM/MM simulations is consistent with a greater reactivity in comparison with hydrogen peroxide. This study represents new insights on the understanding of the molecular basis that determines oxidizing substrate selectivity in the peroxiredoxin family, which has not been investigated at an atomic level so far.

  8. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  9. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  10. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S K; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  11. Molecular genetic basis of antimicrobial agent resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: 1998 update.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Musser, J M

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of resistance to antituberculous agents has advanced rapidly since we reviewed this topic 3 years ago. Virtually all isolates resistant to rifampin and related rifamycins have a mutation that alters the sequence of a 27-amino-acid region of the beta subunit of ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase. Resistance to isoniazid (INH) is more complex. Many resistant organisms have mutations in the katG gene encoding catalase-peroxidase that result in altered enzyme structure. These structural changes apparently result in decreased conversion of INH to a biologically active form. Some INH-resistant organisms also have mutations in the inhA locus or a recently characterized gene (kasA) encoding a beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase. Streptomycin resistance is due mainly to mutations in the 16S rRNA gene or the rpsL gene encoding ribosomal protein S12. Resistance to pyrazinamide in the great majority of organisms is caused by mutations in the gene (pncA) encoding pyrazinamidase that result in diminished enzyme activity. Ethambutol resistance in approximately 60% of organisms is due to amino acid replacements at position 306 of an arabinosyltransferase encoded by the embB gene. Amino acid changes in the A subunit of deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase cause fluoroquinolone resistance in most organisms. Kanamycin resistance is due to nucleotide substitutions in the rrs gene encoding 16S rRNA. Multidrug resistant strains arise by sequential accumulation of resistance mutations for individual drugs. Limited evidence exists indicating that some drug resistant strains with mutations that severely alter catalase-peroxidase activity are less virulent in animal models. A diverse array of strategies is available to assist in rapid detection of drug resistance-associated gene mutations. Although remarkable advances have been made, much remains to be learned about the molecular genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is

  12. Molecular and Structural Basis of Inner Core Lipopolysaccharide Alterations in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Lindner, Buko; Kobylak, Natalia; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) often carries nonstoichiometric substitutions in lipid A and in the inner core. In this work, the molecular basis of inner core alterations and their physiological significance are addressed. A new inner core modification of LPS is described, which arises due to the addition of glucuronic acid on the third heptose with a concomitant loss of phosphate on the second heptose. This was shown by chemical and structural analyses. Furthermore, the gene whose product is responsible for the addition of this sugar was identified in all Escherichia coli core types and in Salmonella and was designated waaH. Its deduced amino acid sequence exhibits homology to glycosyltransferase family 2. The transcription of the waaH gene is positively regulated by the PhoB/R two-component system in a growth phase-dependent manner, which is coordinated with the transcription of the ugd gene explaining the genetic basis of this modification. Glucuronic acid modification was observed in E. coli B, K12, R2, and R4 core types and in Salmonella. We also show that the phosphoethanolamine (P-EtN) addition on heptose I in E. coli K12 requires the product of the ORF yijP, a new gene designated as eptC. Incorporation of P-EtN is also positively regulated by PhoB/R, although it can occur at a basal level without a requirement for any regulatory inducible systems. This P-EtN modification is essential for resistance to a variety of factors, which destabilize the outer membrane like the addition of SDS or challenge to sublethal concentrations of Zn2+. PMID:23372159

  13. Molecular Basis of Glycosaminoglycan Heparin Binding to the Chemokine CXCL1 Dimer*

    PubMed Central

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Joseph, Prem Raj B.; Sawant, Kirti V.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-bound and soluble chemokine gradients in the vasculature and extracellular matrix mediate neutrophil recruitment to the site of microbial infection and sterile injury in the host tissue. However, the molecular principles by which chemokine-GAG interactions orchestrate these gradients are poorly understood. This, in part, can be directly attributed to the complex interrelationship between the chemokine monomer-dimer equilibrium and binding geometry and affinities that are also intimately linked to GAG length. To address some of this missing knowledge, we have characterized the structural basis of heparin binding to the murine CXCL1 dimer. CXCL1 is a neutrophil-activating chemokine and exists as both monomers and dimers (Kd = 36 μm). To avoid interference from monomer-GAG interactions, we designed a trapped dimer (dCXCL1) by introducing a disulfide bridge across the dimer interface. We characterized the binding of GAG heparin octasaccharide to dCXCL1 using solution NMR spectroscopy. Our studies show that octasaccharide binds orthogonally to the interhelical axis and spans the dimer interface and that heparin binding enhances the structural integrity of the C-terminal helical residues and stability of the dimer. We generated a quadruple mutant (H20A/K22A/K62A/K66A) on the basis of the binding data and observed that this mutant failed to bind heparin octasaccharide, validating our structural model. We propose that the stability enhancement of dimers upon GAG binding regulates in vivo neutrophil trafficking by increasing the lifetime of “active” chemokines, and that this structural knowledge could be exploited for designing inhibitors that disrupt chemokine-GAG interactions and neutrophil homing to the target tissue. PMID:23864653

  14. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  15. Molecular basis for H blood group deficiency in Bombay (Oh) and para-Bombay individuals.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R J; Ernst, L K; Larsen, R D; Bryant, J G; Robinson, J S; Lowe, J B

    1994-06-21

    The penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the human ABO blood group oligosaccharide antigens is catalyzed by alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase(s) (GDP-L-fucose: beta-D-galactoside 2-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.69), whose expression is determined by the H and Secretor (SE) blood group loci (also known as FUT1 and FUT2, respectively). These enzymes construct Fuc alpha 1-->2Gal beta-linkages, known as H determinants, which are essential precursors to the A and B antigens. Erythrocytes from individuals with the rare Bombay and para-Bombay blood group phenotypes are deficient in H determinants, and thus A and B determinants, as a consequence of apparent homozygosity for null alleles at the H locus. We report a molecular analysis of a human alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase gene, thought to correspond to the H blood group locus, in a Bombay pedigree and a para-Bombay pedigree. We find inactivating point mutations in the coding regions of both alleles of this gene in each H-deficient individual. These results define the molecular basis for H blood group antigen deficiency in Bombay and para-Bombay phenotypes, provide compelling evidence that this gene represents the human H blood group locus, and strongly support a hypothesis that the H and SE loci represent distinct alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase genes. Candidate sequences for the human SE locus are identified by low-stringency Southern blot hybridization analyses, using a probe derived from the H alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase gene.

  16. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Hall, Kathryn T; Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Fujita, Matthew K; Ruggiero, Robert P; Degner, Jack F; Daza, Juan M; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J; Castoe, Jill M; Fox, Samuel E; Poole, Alex W; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A; Hoffmann, Federico G; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N; Chang, Belinda S W; Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K; Mackessy, Stephen P; Bronikowski, Anne M; Bronikowsi, Anne M; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C; Secor, Stephen M; Pollock, David D

    2013-12-17

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome. PMID:24297902

  17. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Hall, Kathryn T; Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Fujita, Matthew K; Ruggiero, Robert P; Degner, Jack F; Daza, Juan M; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J; Castoe, Jill M; Fox, Samuel E; Poole, Alex W; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A; Hoffmann, Federico G; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N; Chang, Belinda S W; Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K; Mackessy, Stephen P; Bronikowski, Anne M; Bronikowsi, Anne M; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C; Secor, Stephen M; Pollock, David D

    2013-12-17

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome.

  18. Multiple-site replacement analogs of glucagon. A molecular basis for antagonist design.

    PubMed

    Unson, C G; Wu, C R; Fitzpatrick, K J; Merrifield, R B

    1994-04-29

    Extensive structure activity analysis has allowed us to identify specific residues in the glucagon sequence that are responsible for either receptor recognition or signal transduction. For instance, we have demonstrated that aspartic acid 9 and histidine 1 are essential for activation, and that an ionic interaction between the negative carboxylate and the protonated imidazole may contribute to the activation reaction at the molecular level. In the absence of the carboxylic group at position 9, aspartic 21 or aspartic 15 might furnish distal electrostatic effects to maintain partial agonism. Further investigation established that each of the 4 serine residues in the hormone play distinct roles. Serine 8 provides an important determinant of binding. Whereas neither serines 2, 11, nor 16 are required for receptor recognition. We have shown that serine 16 is essential for signal transduction and thus have identified it to be the third residue in glucagon to participate in a putative catalytic triad together with aspartic 9 and histidine 1, in the transduction of the glucagon response. In this work, we utilized insights into the functional significance of particular residues in the peptide appropriated from our structure-function assignments, as the basis of a molecular approach for the design of active-site directed antagonists of glucagon. The importance as well as the accuracy of our findings are confirmed by the synthesis of a series of improved glucagon antagonists based on replacements at positions 1, 9, 11, 16, and 21. The inhibition index, (I/A)50, of our best antagonist des-His1-[Nle9-Ala11-Ala16]glucagon amide, has been improved 10-fold over the previous best glucagon inhibitor. PMID:8175663

  19. Genetic and Molecular Basis of QTL of Diabetes in Mouse: Genes and Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Jiao, Yan; Xiong, Qing; Wang, Cong-Yi; Gerling, Ivan; Gu, Weikuan

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study has been conducted of all available reports in PubMed and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) to examine the genetic and molecular basis of quantitative genetic loci (QTL) of diabetes with the main focus on genes and polymorphisms. The major question is, What can the QTL tell us? Specifically, we want to know whether those genome regions differ from other regions in terms of genes relevant to diabetes. Which genes are within those QTL regions, and, among them, which genes have already been linked to diabetes? whether more polymorphisms have been associated with diabetes in the QTL regions than in the non-QTL regions. Our search revealed a total of 9038 genes from 26 type 1 diabetes QTL, which cover 667,096,006 bp of the mouse genomic sequence. On one hand, a large number of candidate genes are in each of these QTL; on the other hand, we found that some obvious candidate genes of QTL have not yet been investigated. Thus, the comprehensive search of candidate genes for known QTL may provide unexpected benefit for identifying QTL genes for diabetes. PMID:19471607

  20. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  1. Leukemia-Associated Mutations in Nucleophosmin Alter Recognition by CRM1: Molecular Basis of Aberrant Transport

    PubMed Central

    Arregi, Igor; Falces, Jorge; Olazabal-Herrero, Anne; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Taneva, Stefka G.; Rodríguez, José A.; Urbaneja, María A.; Bañuelos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, normally enriched in nucleoli, that performs several activities related to cell growth. NPM mutations are characteristic of a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where mutant NPM seems to play an oncogenic role. AML-associated NPM mutants exhibit altered subcellular traffic, being aberrantly located in the cytoplasm of leukoblasts. Exacerbated export of AML variants of NPM is mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1, and due, in part, to a mutationally acquired novel nuclear export signal (NES). To gain insight on the molecular basis of NPM transport in physiological and pathological conditions, we have evaluated the export efficiency of NPM in cells, and present new data indicating that, in normal conditions, wild type NPM is weakly exported by CRM1. On the other hand, we have found that AML-associated NPM mutants efficiently form complexes with CRM1HA (a mutant CRM1 with higher affinity for NESs), and we have quantitatively analyzed CRM1HA interaction with the NES motifs of these mutants, using fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We have observed that the affinity of CRM1HA for these NESs is similar, which may help to explain the transport properties of the mutants. We also describe NPM recognition by the import machinery. Our combined cellular and biophysical studies shed further light on the determinants of NPM traffic, and how it is dramatically altered by AML-related mutations. PMID:26091065

  2. The Molecular Basis of Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency: Mosaicism correlates with prolonged survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Yang, Hong; De Braganca, Kevin C.; Lu, Jiesheng; Yu Shih, Ling; Briones, Paz; De Vivo, Darryl C.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency (OMIM, 266150) is a rare autosomal recessive disease. The revised PC gene structure described in this report consists of 20 coding exons and four non-coding exons at the 5’-untranslated region (5’-UTR). The gene codes for three transcripts due to alternative splicing: variant 1 (NM_000920.3), variant 2 (NM_022172.2) and variant 3 (BC011617.2). PC deficiency is manifested by three clinical phenotypes - an infantile form (Type A), a neonatal form (Type B), and a benign form (Type C). We report the molecular basis for eight cases (one Type A, five Type B and two Type C) of PC deficiency. Eight novel complex mutations were identified representing different combinations of missense mutations, deletions, a splice site substitution and a nonsense mutation. The classical phenotypes (A, B and C) correlated poorly with clinical outcomes. Mosaicism was found in five cases (one Type A, three Type B and one Type C) and four of these cases had prolonged survival. Death in the fifth case resulted from unrelated medical complications. The discrepancy between the current findings and the existing classification system should be addressed to accommodate these new observations. PMID:18676167

  3. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with "emotive" neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the "neutrix." Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding ("flavoring") cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology.

  4. Molecular basis of aflatoxin-induced mutagenesis—role of the aflatoxin B1-formamidopyrimidine adduct

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Li, Liang; Makarova, Alena V.; Burgers, Peter M.; Stone, Michael P.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a known carcinogen associated with early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is thought to contribute to over half a million new HCCs per year. Although some of the fundamental risk factors are established, the molecular basis of AFB1-induced mutagenesis in primate cells has not been rigorously investigated. To gain insights into genome instability that is produced as a result of replicating DNAs containing AFB1 adducts, site-specific mutagenesis assays were used to establish the mutagenic potential of the persistent ring-opened AFB1 adduct, AFB1-formamidopyrimidine (AFB1-FAPY). This lesion was highly mutagenic, yielding replication error frequencies of 97%, with the predominant base substitution being a G to T transversion. This transversion is consistent with previous mutational data derived from aflatoxin-associated HCCs. In vitro translesion synthesis assays demonstrated that polymerase (pol) ζ was the most likely candidate polymerase that is responsible for the G to T mutations induced by this adduct. PMID:24398669

  5. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with "emotive" neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the "neutrix." Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding ("flavoring") cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  6. Molecular basis of adaptive convergence in experimental populations of RNA viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, José M; Elena, Santiago F; Moya, Andrés

    2002-01-01

    Characterizing the molecular basis of adaptation is one of the most important goals in modern evolutionary genetics. Here, we report a full-genome sequence analysis of 21 independent populations of vesicular stomatitis ribovirus evolved on the same cell type but under different demographic regimes. Each demographic regime differed in the effective viral population size. Evolutionary convergences are widespread both at synonymous and nonsynonymous replacements as well as in an intergenic region. We also found evidence for epistasis among sites of the same and different loci. We explain convergences as the consequence of four factors: (1) environmental homogeneity that supposes an identical challenge for each population, (2) structural constraints within the genome, (3) epistatic interactions among sites that create the observed pattern of covariation, and (4) the phenomenon of clonal interference among competing genotypes carrying different beneficial mutations. Using these convergences, we have been able to estimate the fitness contribution of the identified mutations and epistatic groups. Keeping in mind statistical uncertainties, these estimates suggest that along with several beneficial mutations of major effect, many other mutations got fixed as part of a group of epistatic mutations. PMID:12399369

  7. Structure of a Chaperone-Usher Pilus Reveals the Molecular Basis of Rod Uncoiling

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Redzej, Adam; Dodson, Karen; Ukleja, Marta; Frenz, Brandon; Rodrigues, Catarina; Hultgren, Scott J.; DiMaio, Frank; Egelman, Edward H.; Waksman, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Types 1 and P pili are prototypical bacterial cell-surface appendages playing essential roles in mediating adhesion of bacteria to the urinary tract. These pili, assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway, are polymers of pilus subunits assembling into two parts: a thin, short tip fibrillum at the top, mounted on a long pilus rod. The rod adopts a helical quaternary structure and is thought to play essential roles: its formation may drive pilus extrusion by preventing backsliding of the nascent growing pilus within the secretion pore; the rod also has striking spring-like properties, being able to uncoil and recoil depending on the intensity of shear forces generated by urine flow. Here, we present an atomic model of the P pilus generated from a 3.8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction. This structure provides the molecular basis for the rod’s remarkable mechanical properties and illuminates its role in pilus secretion. PMID:26724865

  8. The structure of human GALNS reveals the molecular basis for mucopolysaccharidosis IV A

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Colón, Yadilette; Schutsky, Emily K.; Kita, Adriana Z.; Garman, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes catalyze the breakdown of macromolecules in the cell. In humans, loss of activity of a lysosomal enzyme leads to an inherited metabolic defect known as a lysosomal storage disorder. The human lysosomal enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS, also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase and GalN6S; E.C. 3.1.6.4) is deficient in patients with the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (also known as MPS IV A and Morquio A). Here we report the three-dimensional structure of human GALNS, determined by x-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a catalytic gem diol nucleophile derived from modification of a cysteine side chain. The active site of GALNS is a large, positively charged trench suitable for binding polyanionic substrates such as keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. Enzymatic assays on the insect cell-expressed human GALNS indicate activity against synthetic substrates and inhibition by both substrate and product. Mapping 120 MPS IV A missense mutations onto the structure reveals that a majority of mutations affect the hydrophobic core of the structure, indicating that most MPS IV A cases result from misfolding of GALNS. Comparison of the structure of GALNS to paralogous sulfatases shows a wide variety of active site geometries in the family, but strict conservation of the catalytic machinery. Overall, the structure and the known mutations establish the molecular basis for MPS IV A and for the larger MPS family of diseases. PMID:22940367

  9. Molecular basis for the lack of enantioselectivity of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, C.; Chaloin, L.; Lallemand, P.; Roy, B.; Périgaud, C.; Barman, T.; Varga, A.; Vas, M.; Lionne, C.; Arold, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    Non-natural l-nucleoside analogues are increasingly used as therapeutic agents to treat cancer and viral infections. To be active, l-nucleosides need to be phosphorylated to their respective triphosphate metabolites. This stepwise phosphorylation relies on human enzymes capable of processing l-nucleoside enantiomers. We used crystallographic analysis to reveal the molecular basis for the low enantioselectivity and the broad specificity of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK), an enzyme responsible for the last step of phosphorylation of many nucleotide derivatives. Based on structures of hPGK in the absence of nucleotides, and bound to l and d forms of MgADP and MgCDP, we show that a non-specific hydrophobic clamp to the nucleotide base, as well as a water-filled cavity behind it, allows high flexibility in the interaction between PGK and the bases. This, combined with the dispensability of hydrogen bonds to the sugar moiety, and ionic interactions with the phosphate groups, results in the positioning of different nucleotides so to expose their diphosphate group in a position competent for catalysis. Since the third phosphorylation step is often rate limiting, our results are expected to alleviate in silico tailoring of l-type prodrugs to assure their efficient metabolic processing. PMID:18463139

  10. Molecular basis and expression of the LWa/LWb blood group polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hermand, P; Gane, P; Mattei, M G; Sistonen, P; Cartron, J P; Bailly, P

    1995-08-15

    The Landsteiner-Wiener (LW) blood group antigens reside on a 42-kD erythrocyte membrane glycoprotein that has recently been cloned. Here, we found that the molecular basis for the LWa/LWb polymorphism is determined by a single base pair mutation (A308G) that correlates with a Pvu II restriction site and results in a Gln70Arg amino acid substitution. COS-7 cells transfected with LWa or LWb cDNAs reacted with human anti-LWa and anti-LWb sera, respectively, as well as with a murine monoclonal anti-LWab antibody, as shown by flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, a 42-kD protein was immunoprecipitated from the transfected cells with the monoclonal anti-LWab antibody. These findings indicate that LWa and LWb are alleles of the LW blood group locus as defined also by a monoclonal anti-LWab of nonhuman origin. In addition, the LW locus has been assigned to chromosome 19p13.3 by in situ hybridization. Study by Southern blot analysis indicated also that the LW locus is composed of a single gene that was not grossly rearranged in rare LW(a-b-) and Rhnull individuals deficient for LW antigens. In addition, Pvu II restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis indicated that these variants were all homozygous for a phenotypically silent LWa allele. PMID:7632968

  11. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  12. Meshless reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compactly supported radial basis function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Guanglei; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Shang, Wenting; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising tool in the study of cancer, drug discovery, and disease diagnosis, enabling noninvasive and quantitative imaging of the biodistribution of fluorophores in deep tissues via image reconstruction techniques. Conventional reconstruction methods based on the finite-element method (FEM) have achieved acceptable stability and efficiency. However, some inherent shortcomings in FEM meshes, such as time consumption in mesh generation and a large discretization error, limit further biomedical application. In this paper, we propose a meshless method for reconstruction of FMT (MM-FMT) using compactly supported radial basis functions (CSRBFs). With CSRBFs, the image domain can be accurately expressed by continuous CSRBFs, avoiding the discretization error to a certain degree. After direct collocation with CSRBFs, the conventional optimization techniques, including Tikhonov, L1-norm iteration shrinkage (L1-IS), and sparsity adaptive matching pursuit, were adopted to solve the meshless reconstruction. To evaluate the performance of the proposed MM-FMT, we performed numerical heterogeneous mouse experiments and in vivo bead-implanted mouse experiments. The results suggest that the proposed MM-FMT method can reduce the position error of the reconstruction result to smaller than 0.4 mm for the double-source case, which is a significant improvement for FMT.

  13. Comparative genome analysis reveals the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuxiang; Tang, Hongzhi; Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter is one of the most prevalent genera of nicotine-degrading bacteria; however, studies of nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter species remain at the plasmid level (plasmid pAO1). Here, we report the bioinformatic analysis of a nicotine-degrading Arthrobacter aurescens M2012083, and show that the moeB and mogA genes that are essential for nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter are absent from plasmid pAO1. Homologues of all the nicotine degradation-related genes of plasmid pAO1 were found to be located on a 68,622-bp DNA segment (nic segment-1) in the M2012083 genome, showing 98.1% nucleotide acid sequence identity to the 69,252-bp nic segment of plasmid pAO1. However, the rest sequence of plasmid pAO1 other than the nic segment shows no significant similarity to the genome sequence of strain M2012083. Taken together, our data suggest that the nicotine degradation-related genes of strain M2012083 are located on the chromosome or a plasmid other than pAO1. Based on the genomic sequence comparison of strain M2012083 and six other Arthrobacter strains, we have identified 17 σ70 transcription factors reported to be involved in stress responses and 109 genes involved in environmental adaptability of strain M2012083. These results reveal the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter species. PMID:25721465

  14. Deciphering the molecular basis for nucleotide selection by the West Nile virus RNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Despins, Simon; Issur, Moheshwarnath; Bougie, Isabelle; Bisaillon, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The West Nile virus RNA helicase uses the energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleotides to separate complementary strands of RNA. Although this enzyme has a preference for ATP, the bias towards this purine nucleotide cannot be explained on the basis of specific protein–ATP interactions. Moreover, the enzyme does not harbor the characteristic Q-motif found in other helicases that regulates binding to ATP. In the present study, we used structural homology modeling to generate a model of the West Nile virus RNA helicase active site that provides instructive findings on the interaction between specific amino acids and the ATP substrate. In addition, we evaluated both the phosphohydrolysis and the inhibitory potential of a collection of 30 synthetic purine analogs. A structure-guided alanine scan of 16 different amino acids was also performed to clarify the contacts that are made between the enzyme and ATP. Our study provides a molecular rationale for the bias of the enzyme for ATP by highlighting the specific functional groups on ATP that are important for binding. Moreover, we identified three new essential amino acids (Arg-185, Arg-202 and Asn-417) that are critical for phosphohydrolysis. Finally, we provide evidence that a region located upstream of motif I, which we termed the nucleotide specificity region, plays a functional role in nucleotide selection which is reminiscent to the role exerted by the Q-motif found in other helicases. PMID:20421212

  15. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity.

  16. Meshless reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compactly supported radial basis function.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Guanglei; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Shang, Wenting; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising tool in the study of cancer, drug discovery, and disease diagnosis, enabling noninvasive and quantitative imaging of the biodistribution of fluorophores in deep tissues via image reconstruction techniques. Conventional reconstruction methods based on the finite-element method (FEM) have achieved acceptable stability and efficiency. However, some inherent shortcomings in FEM meshes, such as time consumption in mesh generation and a large discretization error, limit further biomedical application. In this paper, we propose a meshless method for reconstruction of FMT (MM-FMT) using compactly supported radial basis functions (CSRBFs). With CSRBFs, the image domain can be accurately expressed by continuous CSRBFs, avoiding the discretization error to a certain degree. After direct collocation with CSRBFs, the conventional optimization techniques, including Tikhonov, L1-norm iteration shrinkage (L1-IS), and sparsity adaptive matching pursuit, were adopted to solve the meshless reconstruction. To evaluate the performance of the proposed MM-FMT, we performed numerical heterogeneous mouse experiments and in vivo bead-implanted mouse experiments. The results suggest that the proposed MM-FMT method can reduce the position error of the reconstruction result to smaller than 0.4 mm for the double-source case, which is a significant improvement for FMT. PMID:26451513

  17. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  18. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with “emotive” neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the “neutrix.” Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding (“flavoring”) cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  19. Genomic Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis for Capsule Loss in the Group B Streptococcus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B. Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl trasferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  20. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  1. Molecular basis of floral petaloidy: insights from androecia of Canna indica

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qian; Liu, Huanfang; Almeida, Ana M. R.; Kuang, Yanfeng; Zou, Pu; Liao, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Floral organs that take on the characteristics of petals can occur in all whorls of the monocot order Zingiberales. In Canna indica, the most ornamental or ‘petaloid’ parts of the flowers are of androecial origin and are considered staminodes. However, the precise nature of these petaloid organs is yet to be determined. In order to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of androecial identity, a molecular investigation of B- and C-class genes was carried out. Two MADS-box genes GLOBOSA (GLO) and AGAMOUS (AG) were isolated from young inflorescences of C. indica by 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (3′-RACE PCR). Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analyses show that CiGLO and CiAG belong to the B- and C-class MADS-box gene family, respectively. CiAG is expressed in petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. CiGLO is expressed in petals, petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. Expression patterns in mature tissues of CiGLO and CiAG suggest that petaloid staminodes and the labellum are of androecial identity, in agreement with their position within the flower and with described Arabidopsis thaliana expression patterns. Although B- and C-class genes are important components of androecial determination, their expression patterns are not sufficient to explain the distinct morphology observed in staminodes and the fertile stamen in C. indica. PMID:24876297

  2. The molecular basis for ANE syndrome revealed by the large ribosomal subunit processome interactome

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Kathleen L; Teramoto, Takamasa; Zhang, Jun; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Baserga, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    ANE syndrome is a ribosomopathy caused by a mutation in an RNA recognition motif of RBM28, a nucleolar protein conserved to yeast (Nop4). While patients with ANE syndrome have fewer mature ribosomes, it is unclear how this mutation disrupts ribosome assembly. Here we use yeast as a model system and show that the mutation confers growth and pre-rRNA processing defects. Recently, we found that Nop4 is a hub protein in the nucleolar large subunit (LSU) processome interactome. Here we demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation disrupts Nop4’s hub function by abrogating several of Nop4’s protein-protein interactions. Circular dichroism and NMR demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation in RRM3 of human RBM28 disrupts domain folding. We conclude that the ANE syndrome mutation generates defective protein folding which abrogates protein-protein interactions and causes faulty pre-LSU rRNA processing, thus revealing one aspect of the molecular basis of this human disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16381.001 PMID:27077951

  3. Molecular basis for specific recognition of bacterial ligands by NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Kofoed, Eric M; Daugherty, Matthew D; Malik, Harmit S; Vance, Russell E

    2014-04-10

    NLR (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]- and leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing) proteins mediate innate immune sensing of pathogens in mammals and plants. How NLRs detect their cognate stimuli remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed ligand recognition by NLR apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) inflammasomes. Mice express multiple highly related NAIP paralogs that recognize distinct bacterial proteins. We analyzed a panel of 43 chimeric NAIPs, allowing us to map the NAIP domain responsible for specific ligand detection. Surprisingly, ligand specificity was mediated not by the LRR domain, but by an internal region encompassing several NBD-associated α-helical domains. Interestingly, we find that the ligand specificity domain has evolved under positive selection in both rodents and primates. We further show that ligand binding is required for the subsequent co-oligomerization of NAIPs with the downstream signaling adaptor NLR family, CARD-containing 4 (NLRC4). These data provide a molecular basis for how NLRs detect ligands and assemble into inflammasomes. PMID:24657167

  4. Huntington's disease: Molecular basis of pathology and status of current therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a frequent and incurable hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that impairs motor and cognitive functions. Mutations in huntingtin (HTT) protein, which is essential for neuronal development, lead to the development of HD. An increase in the number of CAG repeats within the HTT gene, which lead to an expansion of polyglutamine tract in the resulting mutated HTT protein, which is toxic, is the causative factor of HD. Although the molecular basis of HD is known, there is no known cure for this disease other than symptomatic relief treatment approaches. The toxicity of mutHTT appears to be more detrimental to striatal medium spiny neurons, which degenerate in this disease. Therapeutic strategies addressing a reduction in the mutHTT content at the transcriptional level using zinc finger proteins and at the translational level with RNA interference and antisense oligonucleotides or promoting the proteosomal degradation of mutHTT are being studied extensively in preclinical models and also to a limited extent in clinical trials. The post-translational modification of mutHTT is another possibility that is currently being investigated for drug development. In addition to the pharmacological approaches, several lines of evidence suggested the potential therapeutic use of stem cell therapy, in particular using the patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, to replace the lost striatal neurons. The multi-pronged clinical investigations currently underway may identify therapies and potentially improve the quality of life for the HD patients in future. PMID:27698679

  5. Molecular basis of human body odour formation: insights deduced from corynebacterial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Barzantny, H; Brune, I; Tauch, A

    2012-02-01

    During the past few decades, there has been an increased interest in the essential role of commensal skin bacteria in human body odour formation. It is now generally accepted that skin bacteria cause body odour by biotransformation of sweat components secreted in the human axillae. Especially, aerobic corynebacteria have been shown to contribute strongly to axillary malodour, whereas other human skin residents seem to have little influence. Analysis of odoriferous sweat components has shown that the major odour-causing substances in human sweat include steroid derivatives, short volatile branched-chain fatty acids and sulphanylalkanols. In this mini-review, we describe the molecular basis of the four most extensively studied routes of human body odour formation, while focusing on the underlying enzymatic processes. Considering the previously reported role of β-oxidation in odour formation, we analysed the genetic repertoire of eight Corynebacterium species concerning fatty acid metabolism. We particularly focused on the metabolic abilities of the lipophilic axillary isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411.

  6. Huntington's disease: Molecular basis of pathology and status of current therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a frequent and incurable hereditary neurodegenerative disorder that impairs motor and cognitive functions. Mutations in huntingtin (HTT) protein, which is essential for neuronal development, lead to the development of HD. An increase in the number of CAG repeats within the HTT gene, which lead to an expansion of polyglutamine tract in the resulting mutated HTT protein, which is toxic, is the causative factor of HD. Although the molecular basis of HD is known, there is no known cure for this disease other than symptomatic relief treatment approaches. The toxicity of mutHTT appears to be more detrimental to striatal medium spiny neurons, which degenerate in this disease. Therapeutic strategies addressing a reduction in the mutHTT content at the transcriptional level using zinc finger proteins and at the translational level with RNA interference and antisense oligonucleotides or promoting the proteosomal degradation of mutHTT are being studied extensively in preclinical models and also to a limited extent in clinical trials. The post-translational modification of mutHTT is another possibility that is currently being investigated for drug development. In addition to the pharmacological approaches, several lines of evidence suggested the potential therapeutic use of stem cell therapy, in particular using the patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, to replace the lost striatal neurons. The multi-pronged clinical investigations currently underway may identify therapies and potentially improve the quality of life for the HD patients in future.

  7. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  8. Molecular basis of cyclin-CDK-CKI regulation by reversible binding of an inositol pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sam; Huang, Kexin; Quiocho, Florante A; O’Shea, Erin K

    2008-01-01

    When Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are starved of inorganic phosphate, the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin–cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) is inactivated by the Pho81 CDK inhibitor (CKI). The regulation of Pho80-Pho85 is distinct from previously characterized mechanisms of CDK regulation: the Pho81 CKI is constitutively associated with Pho80-Pho85, and a small-molecule ligand, inositol heptakisphosphate (IP7), is required for kinase inactivation. We investigated the molecular basis of the IP7- and Pho81-dependent Pho80-Pho85 inactivation using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, enzyme kinetics and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that IP7 interacts noncovalently with Pho80-Pho85-Pho81 and induces additional interactions between Pho81 and Pho80-Pho85 that prevent substrates from accessing the kinase active site. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to Pho81, we define regions of Pho81 responsible for constitutive Pho80-Pho85 binding and IP7-regulated interaction and inhibition. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms of cyclin-CDK regulation and of the biochemical mechanisms of IP7 action. PMID:18059263

  9. Deciphering the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, Vanessa; Assaf-Casals, Iman; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Fan, Xiaorong; Avila, Concepción; Miller, Anthony; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    Ammonium is the predominant form of inorganic nitrogen in the soil of coniferous forests. Despite the ecological and economic importance of conifers, the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in this group of gymnosperms is largely unknown. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of members of the AMT gene family in Pinus pinaster: PpAMT1.1, PpAMT1.2 and PpAMT1.3 (subfamily 1) and PpAMT2.1 and PpAMT2.3 (subfamily 2). Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that in conifers, all members of the AMT1 subfamily evolved from a common ancestor that is evolutionarily related to the ancient PpAMT1.2 gene. Individual AMT genes are developmentally and nutritionally regulated, and their transcripts are specifically distributed in different organs. PpAMT1.3 was predominantly expressed in the roots, particularly during N starvation and mycorrhizal interaction, whereas PpAMT2.3 was preferentially expressed in lateral roots. Immunolocalization studies of roots with varied nitrogen availability revealed that PpAMT1 and PpAMT2 proteins play complementary roles in the uptake of external ammonium. Heterologous expression in yeast and Xenopus oocytes revealed that the AMT genes encode functional transporters with different kinetics and with different capacities for ammonium transport. Our results provide new insights on how nitrogen is acquired and transported in conifers.

  10. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  11. Apicoplast isoprenoid precursor synthesis and the molecular basis of fosmidomycin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sethu C.; Brooks, Carrie F.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Strurm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Anglin, Justin L.; Song, Yongcheng; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexa are important pathogens that include the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Apicomplexan parasites contain a relict chloroplast, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is indispensable and an attractive drug target. The apicoplast is home to a 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DOXP) pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. This pathway is believed to be the most conserved function of the apicoplast, and fosmidomycin, a specific inhibitor of the pathway, is an effective antimalarial. Surprisingly, fosmidomycin has no effect on most other apicomplexans. Using Toxoplasma gondii, we establish that the pathway is essential in parasites that are highly fosmidomycin resistant. We define the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility, experimentally testing various host and parasite contributions in T. gondii and Plasmodium. We demonstrate that in T. gondii the parasite plasma membrane is a critical barrier to drug uptake. In strong support of this hypothesis, we engineer de novo drug-sensitive T. gondii parasites by heterologous expression of a bacterial transporter protein. Mice infected with these transgenic parasites can now be cured from a lethal challenge with fosmidomycin. We propose that the varied extent of metabolite exchange between host and parasite is a crucial determinator of drug susceptibility and a predictor of future resistance. PMID:21690250

  12. Basis of a humeomics science: chemical fractionation and molecular characterization of humic biosuprastructures.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2011-04-11

    We propose a mild stepwise fractionation of molecular components of a humic acid (HA) suprastructure and their structural identification by advanced analytical methods. This procedure may be the basis of a "Humeomics" approach to characterize natural humic molecules and clarify their relations with ecosystems functions. Sequential fractionation included: (1) organic solvent extraction, (2) transesterification with boron trifluoride in methanol (BF(3)-CH(3)OH), (3) methanolic alkaline hydrolysis (KOH-CH(3)OH), and (4) cleavage of ether and glycosidic bonds with HI. Structural identification of initial and final material, separated organo-soluble and hydrosoluble fractions, and subfractions was conducted by GC-MS, HPSEC-ESI-MS (high-resolution, Orbitrap), and solid- and liquid-state NMR. GC-MS revealed in organosoluble unbound fractions the presence of both saturated and unsaturated, linear and branched, alkanoic, hydroxyalkanoic and alkandioic acids, n-alkanes, and n-alkanols. These components decreased progressively in fractions obtained after weak and strong ester cleavage. Unsubstituted alkanoic acids with variable chain length were ubiquitously detected in all fractions, thereby suggesting their fundamental function in the architecture of humic suprastructures. An important role in differentiating supramolecular associations should also be attributed to substituted alkanoic acids that were detected in variable amounts in different fractions. The content of aromatic acids and steroids was only noticed in the latter fractions. HPSEC-ESI-MS of initial and final solid fractions showed similar compounds, as indicated by GC-MS, whereas the hydrosoluble fraction after transesterification revealed fewer of these compounds but noticeable nitrogen-containing acids. A large amount of "cyclic" acids were identified by MS empirical formula in initial HA, and, to a lesser extent, in the final fractionation residue as well as in the hydrosoluble fraction. The predominant alkyl

  13. Basis of a humeomics science: chemical fractionation and molecular characterization of humic biosuprastructures.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2011-04-11

    We propose a mild stepwise fractionation of molecular components of a humic acid (HA) suprastructure and their structural identification by advanced analytical methods. This procedure may be the basis of a "Humeomics" approach to characterize natural humic molecules and clarify their relations with ecosystems functions. Sequential fractionation included: (1) organic solvent extraction, (2) transesterification with boron trifluoride in methanol (BF(3)-CH(3)OH), (3) methanolic alkaline hydrolysis (KOH-CH(3)OH), and (4) cleavage of ether and glycosidic bonds with HI. Structural identification of initial and final material, separated organo-soluble and hydrosoluble fractions, and subfractions was conducted by GC-MS, HPSEC-ESI-MS (high-resolution, Orbitrap), and solid- and liquid-state NMR. GC-MS revealed in organosoluble unbound fractions the presence of both saturated and unsaturated, linear and branched, alkanoic, hydroxyalkanoic and alkandioic acids, n-alkanes, and n-alkanols. These components decreased progressively in fractions obtained after weak and strong ester cleavage. Unsubstituted alkanoic acids with variable chain length were ubiquitously detected in all fractions, thereby suggesting their fundamental function in the architecture of humic suprastructures. An important role in differentiating supramolecular associations should also be attributed to substituted alkanoic acids that were detected in variable amounts in different fractions. The content of aromatic acids and steroids was only noticed in the latter fractions. HPSEC-ESI-MS of initial and final solid fractions showed similar compounds, as indicated by GC-MS, whereas the hydrosoluble fraction after transesterification revealed fewer of these compounds but noticeable nitrogen-containing acids. A large amount of "cyclic" acids were identified by MS empirical formula in initial HA, and, to a lesser extent, in the final fractionation residue as well as in the hydrosoluble fraction. The predominant alkyl

  14. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  15. Molecular basis of antigenic polymorphism of EspA filaments: development of a peptide display technology.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valérie F; Shaw, Robert; Knutton, Stuart; Frankel, Gad

    2005-07-01

    Like many Gram-negative pathogens, enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) use a macromolecular type III secretion system (TTSS) to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The membrane-associated needle complex (NC) of the TTSS, which shows broad similarity to the flagellar basal body, is conserved amongst bacterial pathogens. However, the extracellular part of the TTSS of EPEC and EHEC is unique, in that it has a hollow, approximately 12 nm in diameter, filamentous extension to the NC. EspA filaments are homo-polymers made of the translocator protein EspA. The three-dimensional structure of EspA filaments is comparable to that of flagella; the helical symmetry and packing of the subunits forming both filamentous structures are very similar. Like flagella, EspA filaments show antigenic polymorphism as EspA from different EPEC and EHEC clones show no immunological cross-reactivity. In this study, we determined the molecular basis of the antigenic polymorphism of EspA filaments and identified a surface-exposed hypervariable domain that contains the immunodominant EspA epitope. By exchanging the hypervariable domains of EspA(EPEC) and EspA(EHEC) we swapped the antigenic specificity of the EspA filaments. As for the flagellin D3 domain, which is known to tolerate insertions of natural and artificial amino acid sequences, we have inserted short peptides into the surface-exposed, hypervariable domain of EspA. We demonstrated that the inserted peptides are presented on the surface of the recombinant EspA filaments forming a new immunodominant epitope. Accordingly, EspA filaments have a potential to be developed into a novel epitope display system. PMID:15921692

  16. Molecular basis and drug sensitivity of the delayed rectifier (IKr) in the fish heart.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fishes are increasingly used as models for human cardiac diseases, creating a need for a better understanding of the molecular basis of fish cardiac ion currents. To this end we cloned KCNH6 channel of the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) that produces the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), the main repolarising current of the fish heart. KCNH6 (ccErg2) was the main isoform of the Kv11 potassium channel family with relative transcript levels of 98.9% and 99.6% in crucian carp atrium and ventricle, respectively. KCNH2 (ccErg1), an orthologue to human cardiac Erg (Herg) channel, was only slightly expressed in the crucian carp heart. The native atrial IKr and the cloned ccErg2 were inhibited by similar concentrations of verapamil, terfenadine and KB-R7943 (P>0.05), while the atrial IKr was about an order of magnitude more sensitive to E-4031 than ccErg2 (P<0.05) suggesting that some accessory β-subunits may be involved. Sensitivity of the crucian carp atrial IKr to E-4031, terfenadine and KB-R7943 was similar to what has been reported for the Herg channel. In contrast, the sensitivity of the crucian carp IKr to verapamil was approximately 30 times higher than the previously reported values for the Herg current. In conclusion, the cardiac IKr is produced by non-orthologous gene products in fish (Erg2) and mammalian hearts (Erg1) and some marked differences exist in drug sensitivity between fish and mammalian Erg1/2 which need to be taken into account when using fish heart as a model for human heart. PMID:26215639

  17. Molecular basis of hERG potassium channel blockade by the class Ic antiarrhythmic flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    The class Ic antiarrhythmic drug flecainide inhibits KCNH2-encoded “hERG” potassium channels at clinically relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of this action. Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37 °C. Wild-type (WT) IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.49 μM and this was not significantly altered by reversing the direction of K+ flux or raising external [K+]. The use of charged and uncharged flecainide analogues showed that the charged form of the drug accesses the channel from the cell interior to produce block. Promotion of WT IhERG inactivation slowed recovery from inhibition, whilst the N588K and S631A attenuated-inactivation mutants exhibited IC50 values 4–5 fold that of WT IhERG. The use of pore-helix/selectivity filter (T623A, S624A V625A) and S6 helix (G648A, Y652A, F656A) mutations showed < 10-fold shifts in IC50 for all but V625A and F656A, which respectively exhibited IC50s 27-fold and 142-fold their WT controls. Docking simulations using a MthK-based homology model suggested an allosteric effect of V625A, since in low energy conformations flecainide lay too low in the pore to interact directly with that residue. On the other hand, the molecule could readily form π–π stacking interactions with aromatic residues and particularly with F656. We conclude that flecainide accesses the hERG channel from the cell interior on channel gating, binding low in the inner cavity, with the S6 F656 residue acting as a principal binding determinant. PMID:26159617

  18. Molecular Basis of 9G4 B Cell Autoreactivity in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher; Chida, Asiya Seema; Adlowitz, Diana; Silver, Lin; Fox, Erin; Jenks, Scott A.; Palmer, Elise; Wang, Youliang; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Li, Quan-Zhen; Mohan, Chandra; Cummings, Richard; Tipton, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    9G4+ IgG Abs expand in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a disease-specific fashion and react with different lupus Ags including B cell Ags and apoptotic cells. Their shared use of VH4-34 represents a unique system to understand the molecular basis of lupus autoreactivity. In this study, a large panel of recombinant 9G4+ mAbs from single naive and memory cells was generated and tested against B cells, apoptotic cells, and other Ags. Mutagenesis eliminated the framework-1 hydrophobic patch (HP) responsible for the 9G4 idiotype. The expression of the HP in unselected VH4-34 cells was assessed by deep sequencing. We found that 9G4 Abs recognize several Ags following two distinct structural patterns. B cell binding is dependent on the HP, whereas anti-nuclear Abs, apoptotic cells, and dsDNA binding are HP independent and correlate with positively charged H chain third CDR. The majority of mutated VH4-34 memory cells retain the HP, thereby suggesting selection by Ags that require this germline structure. Our findings show that the germline-encoded HP is compulsory for the anti–B cell reactivity largely associated with 9G4 Abs in SLE but is not required for reactivity against apoptotic cells, dsDNA, chromatin, anti-nuclear Abs, or cardiolipin. Given that the lupus memory compartment contains a majority of HP+ VH4-34 cells but decreased B cell reactivity, additional HP-dependent Ags must participate in the selection of this compartment. This study represents the first analysis, to our knowledge, of VH-restricted autoreactive B cells specifically expanded in SLE and provides the foundation to understand the antigenic forces at play in this disease. PMID:24108696

  19. Structure of human procathepsin L reveals the molecular basis of inhibition by the prosegment.

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, R; Grochulski, P; Sivaraman, J; Ménard, R; Mort, J S; Cygler, M

    1996-01-01

    Cathepsin L is a member of the papain superfamily of cysteine proteases and, like many other proteases, it is synthesized as an inactive proenzyme. Its prosegment shows little homology to that of procathepsin B, whose structure, the first for a cysteine protease proenzyme, has been determined recently. We report here the 3-D structure of a mutant of human procathepsin L determined at 2.2 A resolution, describe the mode of binding employed by the prosegment and discuss the molecular basis for other possible roles of the prosegment. The N-terminal part of the prosegment is globular and contains three alpha-helices with a small hydrophobic core built around aromatic side chains. This domain packs against a loop on the enzyme's surface, with the aromatic side chain from the prosegment being located in the center of this loop and providing a large contact area. The C-terminal portion of the prosegment assumes an extended conformation and follows along the substrate binding cleft toward the N-terminus of the mature enzyme. The direction of the prosegment in the substrate binding cleft is opposite to that of substrates. The previously described role of the prosegment in the interactions with membranes is supported by the structure of its N-terminal domain. The fold of the prosegment and the mechanism by which it inhibits the enzymatic activity of procathepsin L is similar to that observed in procathepsin B despite differences in length and sequence, suggesting that this mode of inhibition is common to all enzymes from the papain superfamily. Images PMID:8896443

  20. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  1. Molecular basis of two novel mutations found in type I methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Felipe R; Phillips, John D; Nussenzveig, Roberto; Lingam, Bindu; Koul, Parvaiz A; Schrier, Stanley L; Prchal, Josef T

    2011-04-15

    Congenital methemoglobinemia due to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs sporadically worldwide, although endemic clusters of this disorder have been identified in certain ethnic groups. It is present as two distinct phenotypes, type I and type II. Type I methemoglobinemia is characterized by CYB5R3 enzyme deficiency restricted to erythrocytes and is associated with benign cyanosis. The less frequent type II methemoglobinemia is associated with generalized CYB5R3 deficiency affecting all cells and is lethal in early infancy. Here we describe the molecular basis of type I methemoglobinemia due to CYB5R3 deficiency in four patients from three distinct ethnic backgrounds, Asian Indian, Mexican and Greek. The CYB5R3 gene of three probands with type I methemoglobinemia and their relatives were sequenced revealing several putative causative mutations; in one subject multiple mutations were present. Two novel mutations, S54R and F157C, were identified and the previously described A179T, V253M mutations were also identified. All these point mutations mapped to the NADH binding domain and or the FAD binding domain. Each has the potential to sterically hinder cofactor binding causing instability of the CYB5R3 protein. Wild-type CYB5R3, as well as two of these novel mutations, S54R and F157C, was amplified, cloned, and purified recombinant peptide obtained. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of these proteins show that the above mutations lead to decreased thermal stability. PMID:21349748

  2. The molecular basis for Mucosal-Associated Invariant T cell recognition of MR1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Dulberger, Charles L.; Crooks, James E.; Parks, Chelsea D.; Luoma, Adrienne M.; McFedries, Amanda; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Saghatelian, Alan; Adams, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an evolutionarily conserved αβ T-cell lineage that express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) restricted to the MHC related-1 (MR1) protein. MAIT cells are dependent upon MR1 expression and exposure to microbes for their development and stimulation, yet these cells can exhibit microbial-independent stimulation when responding to MR1 from different species. We have used this microbial-independent, cross-species reactivity of MAIT cells to define the molecular basis of MAIT-TCR/MR1 engagement and present here a 2.85 Å complex structure of a human MAIT-TCR bound to bovine MR1. The MR1 binding groove is similar in backbone structure to classical peptide-presenting MHC class I molecules (MHCp), yet is partially occluded by large aromatic residues that form cavities suitable for small ligand presentation. The docking of the MAIT-TCR on MR1 is perpendicular to the MR1 surface and straddles the MR1 α1 and α2 helices, similar to classical αβ TCR engagement of MHCp. However, the MAIT-TCR contacts are dominated by the α-chain, focused on the MR1 α2 helix. TCR β-chain contacts are mostly through the variable CDR3β loop that is positioned proximal to the CDR3α loop directly over the MR1 open groove. The elucidation of the MAIT TCR/MR1 complex structure explains how the semi-invariant MAIT-TCR engages the nonpolymorphic MR1 protein, and sheds light onto ligand discrimination by this cell type. Importantly, this structure also provides a critical link in our understanding of the evolution of αβ T-cell recognition of MHC and MHC-like ligands. PMID:23613577

  3. Molecular basis of a shattering resistance boosting global dissemination of soybean.

    PubMed

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Masaya; Hirose, Aya; Inaba, Hiroki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Katayama, Takeshi; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2014-12-16

    Pod dehiscence (shattering) is essential for the propagation of wild plant species bearing seeds in pods but is a major cause of yield loss in legume and crucifer crops. Although natural genetic variation in pod dehiscence has been, and will be, useful for plant breeding, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of shattering resistance in crops. Therefore, we performed map-based cloning to unveil a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling pod dehiscence in soybean. Fine mapping and complementation testing revealed that the QTL encodes a dirigent-like protein, designated as Pdh1. The gene for the shattering-resistant genotype, pdh1, was defective, having a premature stop codon. The functional gene, Pdh1, was highly expressed in the lignin-rich inner sclerenchyma of pod walls, especially at the stage of initiation in lignin deposition. Comparisons of near-isogenic lines indicated that Pdh1 promotes pod dehiscence by increasing the torsion of dried pod walls, which serves as a driving force for pod dehiscence under low humidity. A survey of soybean germplasm revealed that pdh1 was frequently detected in landraces from semiarid regions and has been extensively used for breeding in North America, the world's leading soybean producer. These findings point to a new mechanism for pod dehiscence involving the dirigent protein family and suggest that pdh1 has played a crucial role in the global expansion of soybean cultivation. Furthermore, the orthologs of pdh1, or genes with the same role, will possibly be useful for crop improvement. PMID:25468966

  4. Dissecting the molecular basis of the contribution of source strength to high fructan accumulation in wheat.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang-Ping; Drenth, Janneke; Glassop, Donna; Kooiker, Maarten; McIntyre, C Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Fructans represent the major component of water soluble carbohydrates (WSCs) in the maturing stem of temperate cereals and are an important temporary carbon reserve for grain filling. To investigate the importance of source carbon availability in fructan accumulation and its molecular basis, we performed comparative analyses of WSC components and the expression profiles of genes involved in major carbohydrate metabolism and photosynthesis in the flag leaves of recombinant inbred lines from wheat cultivars Seri M82 and Babax (SB lines). High sucrose levels in the mature flag leaf (source organ) were found to be positively associated with WSC and fructan concentrations in both the leaf and stem of SB lines in several field trials. Analysis of Affymetrix expression array data revealed that high leaf sucrose lines grown in abiotic-stress-prone environments had high expression levels of a number of genes in the leaf involved in the sucrose synthetic pathway and photosynthesis, such as Calvin cycle genes, antioxidant genes involved in chloroplast H(2)O(2) removal and genes involved in energy dissipation. The expression of the majority of genes involved in fructan and starch synthetic pathways were positively correlated with sucrose levels in the leaves of SB lines. The high level of leaf fructans in high leaf sucrose lines is likely attributed to the elevated expression levels of fructan synthetic enzymes, as the mRNA levels of three fructosyltransferase families were consistently correlated with leaf sucrose levels among SB lines. These data suggest that high source strength is one of the important genetic factors determining high levels of WSC in wheat.

  5. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  6. Molecular basis of a shattering resistance boosting global dissemination of soybean

    PubMed Central

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Masaya; Hirose, Aya; Inaba, Hiroki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Katayama, Takeshi; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2014-01-01

    Pod dehiscence (shattering) is essential for the propagation of wild plant species bearing seeds in pods but is a major cause of yield loss in legume and crucifer crops. Although natural genetic variation in pod dehiscence has been, and will be, useful for plant breeding, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of shattering resistance in crops. Therefore, we performed map-based cloning to unveil a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling pod dehiscence in soybean. Fine mapping and complementation testing revealed that the QTL encodes a dirigent-like protein, designated as Pdh1. The gene for the shattering-resistant genotype, pdh1, was defective, having a premature stop codon. The functional gene, Pdh1, was highly expressed in the lignin-rich inner sclerenchyma of pod walls, especially at the stage of initiation in lignin deposition. Comparisons of near-isogenic lines indicated that Pdh1 promotes pod dehiscence by increasing the torsion of dried pod walls, which serves as a driving force for pod dehiscence under low humidity. A survey of soybean germplasm revealed that pdh1 was frequently detected in landraces from semiarid regions and has been extensively used for breeding in North America, the world’s leading soybean producer. These findings point to a new mechanism for pod dehiscence involving the dirigent protein family and suggest that pdh1 has played a crucial role in the global expansion of soybean cultivation. Furthermore, the orthologs of pdh1, or genes with the same role, will possibly be useful for crop improvement. PMID:25468966

  7. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  8. Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: An Integration to Teach Drug Structure-Activity Relationship and the Molecular Basis of Drug Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Ivone; Borges, Aurea D. L.; Bernardes, Lilian S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry and the protein data bank (PDB) to understand and predict the chemical and molecular basis involved in the drug-receptor interactions is discussed. A geometrical and chemical overview of the great structural similarity in the substrate and inhibitor is provided.

  9. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    expression of Flo11-dependent phenotypes, including flocculation. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of this strain-specific phenotypic variability. Our data indicate that strain-specific differences in the level of flocculation result from significant sequence differences in the FLO11 alleles and do not depend on quantitative differences in FLO11 expression or on surface hydrophobicity. We further have shown that beads coated with amino-terminal domain peptide bind preferentially to homologous cells. These data show that variability in the structure of the Flo11 adhesion domain may thus be an important determinant of membership in microbial communities and hence may drive selection and evolution. PMID:27547826

  10. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Flo11-dependent phenotypes, including flocculation. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of this strain-specific phenotypic variability. Our data indicate that strain-specific differences in the level of flocculation result from significant sequence differences in the FLO11 alleles and do not depend on quantitative differences in FLO11 expression or on surface hydrophobicity. We further have shown that beads coated with amino-terminal domain peptide bind preferentially to homologous cells. These data show that variability in the structure of the Flo11 adhesion domain may thus be an important determinant of membership in microbial communities and hence may drive selection and evolution. PMID:27547826

  11. Molecular Basis of the Waxy Endosperm Starch Phenotype in Broomcorn Millet (Panicum miliaceum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harriet V.; Denyer, Kay; Packman, Len C.; Jones, Martin K.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Waxy varieties of the tetraploid cereal broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) have endosperm starch granules lacking detectable amylose. This study investigated the basis of this phenotype using molecular and biochemical methods. Iodine staining of starch granules in 72 plants from 38 landrace accessions found 58 nonwaxy and 14 waxy phenotype plants. All waxy types were in plants from Chinese and Korean accessions, a distribution similar to that of the waxy phenotype in other cereals. Granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) protein was present in the endosperm of both nonwaxy and waxy individuals, but waxy types had little or no granule-bound starch synthase activity compared with the wild types. Sequencing of the GBSSI (Waxy) gene showed that this gene is present in two different forms (L and S) in P. miliaceum, which probably represent homeologues derived from two distinct diploid ancestors. Protein products of both these forms are present in starch granules. We identified three polymorphisms in the exon sequence coding for mature GBSSI peptides. A 15-bp deletion has occurred in the S type GBSSI, resulting in the loss of five amino acids from glucosyl transferase domain 1 (GTD1). The second GBSSI type (L) shows two sequence polymorphisms. One is the insertion of an adenine residue that causes a reading frameshift, and the second causes a cysteine–tyrosine amino acid polymorphism. These mutations appear to have occurred in parallel from the ancestral allele, resulting in three GBSSI-L alleles in total. Five of the six possible genotype combinations of the S and L alleles were observed. The deletion in the GBSSI-S gene causes loss of protein activity, and there was 100% correspondence between this deletion and the waxy phenotype. The frameshift mutation in the L gene results in the loss of L-type protein from starch granules. The L isoform with the tyrosine residue is present in starch granules but is nonfunctional. This loss of function may result from the

  12. General contraction of Gaussian basis sets. Part 2: Atomic natural orbitals and the calculation of atomic and molecular properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    A recently proposed scheme for using natural orbitals from atomic configuration interaction (CI) wave functions as a basis set for linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) calculations is extended for the calculation of molecular properties. For one-electron properties like multipole moments, which are determined largely by the outermost regions of the molecular wave function, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the basis in these regions. This is most easily done by uncontracting the outmost Gaussian primitives, and/or by adding diffuse primitives. A similar approach can be employed for the calculation of polarizabilities. Properties which are not dominated by the long-range part of the wave function, such as spectroscopic constants or electric field gradients at the nucleus, can generally be treated satisfactorily with the original atomic natural orbital (ANO) sets.

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Nonsteroidal Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Antagonists: Molecular Basis of FXR Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Si, Pei; Wang, Lei; Xu, Yong; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Jin; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Weihua; Chen, Lili; Li, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol, lipid, and glucose metabolism. Recently, several studies on the molecular basis of FXR antagonism have been reported. However, none of these studies employs an FXR antagonist with nonsteroidal scaffold. On the basis of our previously reported FXR antagonist with a trisubstituted isoxazole scaffold, a novel nonsteroidal FXR ligand was designed and used as a lead for structural modification. In total, 39 new trisubstituted isoxazole derivatives were designed and synthesized, which led to pharmacological profiles ranging from agonist to antagonist toward FXR. Notably, compound 5s (4'-[(3-{[3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-thienyl)isoxazol-4-yl]methoxy}-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid), containing a thienyl-substituted isoxazole ring, displayed the best antagonistic activity against FXR with good cellular potency (IC50 =12.2 ± 0.2 μM). Eventually, this compound was used as a probe in a molecular dynamics simulation assay. Our results allowed us to propose an essential molecular basis for FXR antagonism, which is consistent with a previously reported antagonistic mechanism; furthermore, E467 on H12 was found to be a hot-spot residue and may be important for the future design of nonsteroidal antagonists of FXR.

  14. Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atomic and molecular calculations obtained from the generator coordinate method with polynomial discretization.

    PubMed

    Celeste, Ricardo; Maringolo, Milena P; Comar, Moacyr; Viana, Rommel B; Guimarães, Amanda R; Haiduke, Roberto L A; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2015-10-01

    Accurate Gaussian basis sets for atoms from H to Ba were obtained by means of the generator coordinate Hartree-Fock (GCHF) method based on a polynomial expansion to discretize the Griffin-Wheeler-Hartree-Fock equations (GWHF). The discretization of the GWHF equations in this procedure is based on a mesh of points not equally distributed in contrast with the original GCHF method. The results of atomic Hartree-Fock energies demonstrate the capability of these polynomial expansions in designing compact and accurate basis sets to be used in molecular calculations and the maximum error found when compared to numerical values is only 0.788 mHartree for indium. Some test calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for N2, F2, CO, NO, HF, and HCN show that total energies within 1.0 to 2.4 mHartree compared to the cc-pV5Z basis sets are attained with our contracted bases with a much smaller number of polarization functions (2p1d and 2d1f for hydrogen and heavier atoms, respectively). Other molecular calculations performed here are also in very good accordance with experimental and cc-pV5Z results. The most important point to be mentioned here is that our generator coordinate basis sets required only a tiny fraction of the computational time when compared to B3LYP/cc-pV5Z calculations.

  15. Discriminating the molecular basis of hepatotoxicity using the large-scale characteristic molecular signatures of toxicants by expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Ryu, So Yeon; Noh, Ji Heon; Lee, Min-Jae; Jang, Ja-Jun; Ryu, Jae Chun; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hongjian; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sug Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2008-07-30

    Predicting the potential human health risk posed by chemical stressors has long been a major challenge for toxicologists, and the use of microarrays to measure responses to toxicologically relevant genes, and to identify selective, sensitive biomarkers of toxicity is a major application of predictive and discovery toxicology. To investigate this possibility, we investigated whether carcinogens (at doses known to induce liver tumors in chronic exposure bioassays) deregulate characteristic sets of genes in mice. Male C3H/He mice were dosed with two hepatocarcinogens (vinyl chloride (VC, 50-25 mg/kg), aldrin (AD, 0.8-0.4 mg/kg)), or two non-hepatocarcinogens (copper sulfate (CS, 150-60 mg/kg), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T, 150-60 mg/kg)). Large-scale molecular changes elicited by these four hepatotoxicants in liver tissues were analyzed using DNA microarray. Three days after administration, no significant phenotypic changes were induced by these four different hepatotoxicants in terms of histological examination or blood biochemical assay. However, unsupervised hierarchical analysis of gene expressional changes induced by hepatotoxicants resulted in two major gene subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., a carcinogen (VN, AD) and non-carcinogen group (CS, 2,4,5-T), and also revealed that distinct molecular signatures exist. These signatures were founded on well-defined functional gene categories and may differentiate genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Venn diagram analysis allowed us to identify carcinogen and non-carcinogen-associated molecular signatures. Using statistical methods, we analyzed outlier genes for four different classes (genotoxic-, non-genotoxic-carcinogen, genotoxic-, non-genotoxic non-carcinogen) in terms of their potential to predict different modes-of-action. In conclusion, the identification of large-scale molecular changes in different hepatocarcinogen exposure models revealed that different types of hepatotoxicants are

  16. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H J; de Jong, Govardus A H; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A; Baumert, Joseph L; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  17. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; de Jong, Govardus A. H.; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L.; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  18. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  19. Molecular Dipole Moments within the Incremental Scheme Using the Domain-Specific Basis-Set Approach.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Benjamin; Coriani, Sonia; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-07-12

    We present the first implementation of the fully automated incremental scheme for CCSD unrelaxed dipole moments using the domain-specific basis-set approach. Truncation parameters are varied, and the accuracy of the method is statistically analyzed for a test set of 20 molecules. The local approximations introduce small errors at second order and negligible ones at third order. For a third-order incremental CCSD expansion with a CC2 error correction, a cc-pVDZ/SV domain-specific basis set (tmain = 3.5 Bohr), and the truncation parameter f = 30 Bohr, we obtain a mean error of 0.00 mau (-0.20 mau) and a standard deviation of 1.95 mau (2.17 mau) for the total dipole moments (Cartesian components of the dipole vectors). By analyzing incremental CCSD energies, we demonstrate that the MP2 and CC2 error correction schemes are an exclusive correction for the domain-specific basis-set error. Our implementation of the incremental scheme provides fully automated computations of highly accurate dipole moments at reduced computational cost and is fully parallelized in terms of the calculation of the increments. Therefore, one can utilize the incremental scheme, on the same hardware, to extend the basis set in comparison to standard CCSD and thus obtain a better total accuracy. PMID:27300371

  20. 27ps DFT Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a-maltose: A Reduced Basis Set Study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DFT molecular dynamics simulations are time intensive when carried out on carbohydrates such as alpha-maltose, requiring up to three or more weeks on a fast 16-processor computer to obtain just 5ps of constant energy dynamics. In a recent publication [1] forces for dynamics were generated from B3LY...

  1. Chemometric Analysis of Some Biologically Active Groups of Drugs on the Basis Chromatographic and Molecular Modeling Data.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Baczek, Tomasz; Bucinski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different groups of drugs such as 12 analgesic drugs, 11 cardiovascular system drugs and 36 "other" compounds, respectively, were analyzed with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) methods. All chemometric analysis were based on the chromatographic parameters (logk and logk(w)) determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and also by molecular modeling descriptors calculated using various computer programs (HyperChem, Dragon, and the VCCLAB). The clustering of compounds were obtained by CA (using various algorithm as e.g. Ward method or unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages as well as Euclidean or Manhattan distance), and allowed to build dendrograms linked drugs with similar physicochemical and pharmacological properties were discussed. Moreover, the analysis performed for analyzed groups of compounds with the use of FA or PCA methods indicated that almost all information reached in input chromatographic parameters as well as in molecular modeling descriptors can be explained by first two factors. Additionally, all analyzed drugs were clustered according to their chemical structure and pharmacological activity. Summarized, the performed classification analysis of studied drugs was focused on similarities and differences in methods being used for chemometric analysis as well as focused abilities to drugs classification (clustering) according to their molecular structures and pharmacological activity performed on the basis of chromatographic experimental and molecular modeling data. Thus, the most important application of statistically important molecular descriptors taken from QSRR models to classification analysis allow detailed biological (pharmacological) classification of analyzed drugs.

  2. Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-06-27

    Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of

  3. Evidence on the Molecular Basis of the Ac/ac Adaptive Cyanogenesis Polymorphism in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.)

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Hsu, Shih-Chung; Small, Linda L.

    2008-01-01

    White clover is polymorphic for cyanogenesis, with both cyanogenic and acyanogenic plants occurring in nature. This chemical defense polymorphism is one of the longest-studied and best-documented examples of an adaptive polymorphism in plants. It is controlled by two independently segregating genes: Ac/ac controls the presence/absence of cyanogenic glucosides; and Li/li controls the presence/absence of their hydrolyzing enzyme, linamarase. Whereas Li is well characterized at the molecular level, Ac has remained unidentified. Here we report evidence that Ac corresponds to a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 of the CYP79D protein subfamily (CYP79D15), and we describe the apparent molecular basis of the Ac/ac polymorphism. CYP79D orthologs catalyze the first step in cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis in other cyanogenic plant species. In white clover, Southern hybridizations indicate that CYP79D15 occurs as a single-copy gene in cyanogenic plants but is absent from the genomes of ac plants. Gene-expression analyses by RT–PCR corroborate this finding. This apparent molecular basis of the Ac/ac polymorphism parallels our previous findings for the Li/li polymorphism, which also arises through the presence/absence of a single-copy gene. The nature of these polymorphisms may reflect white clover's evolutionary origin as an allotetraploid derived from cyanogenic and acyanogenic diploid progenitors. PMID:18458107

  4. The hallmarks of premalignant conditions: a molecular basis for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bríd M; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M

    2016-02-01

    The hallmarks of premalignant lesions were first described in the 1970s, a time when relatively little was known about the molecular underpinnings of cancer. Yet it was clear there must be opportunities to intervene early in carcinogenesis. A vast array of molecular information has since been uncovered, with much of this stemming from studies of existing cancer or cancer models. Here, examples of how an understanding of cancer biology has informed cancer prevention studies are highlighted and emerging areas that may have implications for the field of cancer prevention research are described. A note of caution accompanies these examples, in that while there are similarities, there are also fundamental differences between the biology of premalignant lesions or premalignant conditions and invasive cancer. These differences must be kept in mind, and indeed leveraged, when exploring potential cancer prevention measures. PMID:26970122

  5. Disentangling the molecular genetic basis of personality: from monoamines to neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The present review/perspectives article provides a short overview of our current understanding of the molecular genetics of personality. In the first part, the most important gene candidates such as COMT or SLC6A4 gene are presented. Since several seminal review studies have recently been published on different facets of molecular genetics and personality/emotionality, we focus the second half of the present article on new relevant research directions. This includes a stronger focus on animal research based testing of candidate genes (e.g. neuropeptides such as oxytocin and vasopressin) and the use of á priori genotyping to increase statistical power. Moreover, we stress the importance of integrating cross-cultural data in future research designs and of inclusion of epigenetic measures in neuroscientifically oriented personality research. Finally, the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales are introduced as a new promising tool for biologically oriented psychology/psychiatry research.

  6. Temperature sensing by thermal TRP channels: thermodynamic basis and molecular insights.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qin

    2014-01-01

    All organisms need to sense temperature in order to survive and adapt. But how they detect and perceive temperature remains poorly understood. Recent discoveries of thermal Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels have shed light on the problem and unravel molecular entities for temperature detection and transduction in mammals. Thermal TRP channels belong to the large family of transient receptor potential channels. They are directly activated by heat or cold in physiologically relevant temperature ranges, and the activation is exquisitely sensitive to temperature changes. Thermodynamically, this strong temperature dependence of thermal channels occurs due to large enthalpy and entropy changes associated with channel opening. Thus understanding how the channel proteins obtain their exceptionally large energetics is central toward determining functional mechanisms of thermal TRP channels. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive review on critical issues and challenges facing the problem, with emphases on underlying biophysical and molecular mechanisms.

  7. Genetic, molecular and physiological basis of variation in Drosophila gut immunocompetence

    PubMed Central

    Bou Sleiman, Maroun S.; Osman, Dani; Massouras, Andreas; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Gut immunocompetence involves immune, stress and regenerative processes. To investigate the determinants underlying inter-individual variation in gut immunocompetence, we perform enteric infection of 140 Drosophila lines with the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila and observe extensive variation in survival. Using genome-wide association analysis, we identify several novel immune modulators. Transcriptional profiling further shows that the intestinal molecular state differs between resistant and susceptible lines, already before infection, with one transcriptional module involving genes linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism contributing to this difference. This genetic and molecular variation is physiologically manifested in lower ROS activity, lower susceptibility to ROS-inducing agent, faster pathogen clearance and higher stem cell activity in resistant versus susceptible lines. This study provides novel insights into the determinants underlying population-level variability in gut immunocompetence, revealing how relatively minor, but systematic genetic and transcriptional variation can mediate overt physiological differences that determine enteric infection susceptibility. PMID:26213329

  8. Molecular basis for histone acetyltransferase regulation by binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) that regulates chromatin dynamics and function. Dysregulation of acetylation or acetyltransferase activity has been correlated with several human diseases. Many, if not all histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are regulated in part through tethered domains, association with binding partners or post-translational modification, including predominantly acetylation. This review focuses on what is currently understood at the molecular level of HAT regulation as it occurs via binding partners, associated domains, and autoacetylation. PMID:26555232

  9. Review and update on the molecular basis of Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are uncommon pathologies and one of the most harmful causes of childhood and adult blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe kind of these diseases accounting for approximately 5% of the whole retinal dystrophies and 20% of the children that study on blind schools. Clinical ophthalmologic findings including severe vision loss, nystagmus and ERG abnormalities should be suspected through the first year of life in this group of patients. Phenotypic variability is found when LCA patients have a full ophthalmologic examination. However, a correct diagnosis may be carried out; the determination of ophthalmologic clues as light sensibility, night blindness, fundus pigmentation, among other, join with electroretinographics findings, optical coherence tomography, and new technologies as molecular gene testing may help to reach to a precise diagnosis. Several retinal clinical features in LCA may suggest a genetic or gene particular defect; thus genetic-molecular tools could directly corroborate the clinical diagnosis. Currently, approximately 20 genes have been associated to LCA. In this review, historical perspective, clinical ophthalmological findings, new molecular-genetics technologies, possible phenotype-genotypes correlations, and gene therapy for some LCA genes are described. PMID:25685757

  10. Molecular basis of sodium butyrate-dependent proapoptotic activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pajak, B; Orzechowski, A; Gajkowska, B

    2007-01-01

    This review outlines the molecular events that accompany the antitumor action of sodium butyrate (NaBt). Butyrate, a low-molecular weight four-carbon chain volatile fatty acid (VFA) has been previously shown to withdraw cells from cell cycle or to promote cell differentiation, and finally to induce programmed cell death. Recent advances in molecular biology indicate, that this product of large bowel microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, might evoke the above-mentioned effects by indirect action on genes. NaBt was shown to inhibit histone deacetylase activity, allowing DNA binding of several transcription factors. Higher genomic activity leads to the higher expression of proapoptotic genes, higher level of their protein products and elevated sensitivity to death ligand-induced apoptosis. Cancer cells might be arrested in G1 phase of cell cycle in a p21-dependent manner. Proapoptotic activity of NaBt includes higher expression of membrane death receptors (DR4/5), higher level and activation of Smad3 protein in TGF-beta-dependent apoptotic pathway, lower level of antiapoptotic proteins (cFLIP, XIAP) and activation ofproapoptotic tBid protein. Thus, both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways are stimulated to ampify the apoptotic signals. These effects are specific for tumor but not for regular cells. Unique properties of NaBt make this agent a promising metabolic inhibitor to retard tumorigenesis to suppress tumor growth.

  11. Review and update on the molecular basis of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-16

    Inherited retinal diseases are uncommon pathologies and one of the most harmful causes of childhood and adult blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe kind of these diseases accounting for approximately 5% of the whole retinal dystrophies and 20% of the children that study on blind schools. Clinical ophthalmologic findings including severe vision loss, nystagmus and ERG abnormalities should be suspected through the first year of life in this group of patients. Phenotypic variability is found when LCA patients have a full ophthalmologic examination. However, a correct diagnosis may be carried out; the determination of ophthalmologic clues as light sensibility, night blindness, fundus pigmentation, among other, join with electroretinographics findings, optical coherence tomography, and new technologies as molecular gene testing may help to reach to a precise diagnosis. Several retinal clinical features in LCA may suggest a genetic or gene particular defect; thus genetic-molecular tools could directly corroborate the clinical diagnosis. Currently, approximately 20 genes have been associated to LCA. In this review, historical perspective, clinical ophthalmological findings, new molecular-genetics technologies, possible phenotype-genotypes correlations, and gene therapy for some LCA genes are described. PMID:25685757

  12. Identifying the molecular basis of host-parasite coevolution: merging models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, Mark F; Jenkins, Christina E; Nuismer, Scott L

    2014-07-01

    Mathematical models of the coevolutionary process have uncovered consequences of host-parasite interactions that go well beyond the traditional realm of the Red Queen, potentially explaining several important evolutionary transitions. However, these models also demonstrate that the specific consequences of coevolution are sensitive to the structure of the infection matrix, which is embedded in models to describe the likelihood of infection in encounters between specific host and parasite genotypes. Traditional cross-infection approaches to estimating infection matrices might be unreliable because evolutionary dynamics and experimental sampling lead to missing genotypes. Consequently, our goal is to identify the likely structure of infection matrices by synthesizing molecular mechanisms of host immune defense and parasite counterdefense with coevolutionary models. This synthesis reveals that the molecular mechanisms of immune reactions, although complex and diverse, conform to two basic models commonly used within coevolutionary theory: matching infection and targeted recognition. Our synthesis also overturns conventional wisdom, revealing that the general models are not taxonomically restricted but are applicable to plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Finally, our synthesis identifies several important areas for future research that should improve the explanatory power of coevolutionary models. The most important among these include empirical studies to identify the molecular hotspots of genotypic specificity and theoretical studies examining the consequences of matrices that more accurately represent multistep infection processes and quantitative defenses.

  13. Targeted metagenomics unveils the molecular basis for adaptive evolution of enzymes to their environment

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have a wonderful ability to adapt rapidly to new or altered environmental conditions. Enzymes are the basis of metabolism in all living organisms and, therefore, enzyme adaptation plays a crucial role in the adaptation of microorganisms. Comparisons of homology and parallel beneficial mutations in an enzyme family provide valuable hints of how an enzyme adapted to an ecological system; consequently, a series of enzyme collections is required to investigate enzyme evolution. Targeted metagenomics is a promising tool for the construction of enzyme pools and for studying the adaptive evolution of enzymes. This perspective article presents a summary of targeted metagenomic approaches useful for this purpose. PMID:26441940

  14. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channel Function and Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Human cardiomyocytes express 3 distinct types of delayed rectifier potassium channels. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels conduct the rapidly activating current IKr; KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels conduct the slowly activating current IKs; and Kv1.5 channels conduct an ultrarapid activating current IKur. Here the authors provide a general overview of the mechanistic and structural basis of ion selectivity, gating, and pharmacology of the 3 types of cardiac delayed rectifier potassium ion channels. Most blockers bind to S6 residues that line the central cavity of the channel, whereas activators interact with the channel at 4 symmetric binding sites outside the cavity. PMID:27261821

  15. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions.

  16. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions. PMID:27434607

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of water at constant pressure using converged basis sets and empirical dispersion corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhonghua; Zhang, Yanli; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2012-07-01

    It is generally believed that studies of liquid water using the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory require dispersion corrections in order to obtain reasonably accurate structural and dynamical properties. Here, we report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of water in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble using a converged discrete variable representation basis set and an empirical dispersion correction due to Grimme [J. Comp. Chem. 27, 1787 (2006)], 10.1002/jcc.20495. At 300 K and an applied pressure of 1 bar, the density obtained without dispersion corrections is approximately 0.92 g/cm3 while that obtained with dispersion corrections is 1.07 g/cm3, indicating that the empirical dispersion correction overestimates the density by almost as much as it is underestimated without the correction for this converged basis. Radial distribution functions exhibit a loss of structure in the second solvation shell. Comparison of our results with other studies using the same empirical correction suggests the cause of the discrepancy: the Grimme dispersion correction is parameterized for use with a particular basis set; this parameterization is sensitive to this choice and, therefore, is not transferable to other basis sets.

  18. Molecular basis for specificity in the druggable kinome: sequence-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianping; Zhang, Xi

    2007-01-01

    Motivation Rational design of kinase inhibitors remains a challenge partly because there is no clear delineation of the molecular features that direct the pharmacological impact towards clinically relevant targets. Standard factors governing ligand affinity, such as potential for intermolecular hydrophobic interactions or for intermolecular hydrogen bonding do not provide good markers to assess cross reactivity. Thus, a core question in the informatics of drug design is what type of molecular similarity among targets promotes promiscuity and what type of molecular difference governs specificity. This work answers the question for a sizable screened sample of the human pharmacokinome including targets with unreported structure. Results We show that drug design aimed at promoting pairwise interactions between ligand and kinase target actually fosters promiscuity because of the high conservation of the partner groups on or around the ATP-binding site of the kinase. Alternatively, we focus on a structural marker that may be reliably determined from sequence and measures dehydration propensities mostly localized on the loopy regions of kinases. Based on this marker, we construct a sequence-based kinase classifier that enables the accurate prediction of pharmacological differences. Our indicator is a micro-environmental descriptor that quantifies the propensity for water exclusion around preformed polar pairs. The results suggest that targeting polar dehydration patterns heralds a new generation of drugs that enable a tighter control of specificity than designs aimed at promoting ligand–kinase pairwise interactions. Availability The predictor of polar hot spots for dehydration propensity, or solvent-accessible hydrogen bonds in soluble proteins, named YAPView, may be freely downloaded from the University of Chicago website http://protlib.uchicago.edu/dloads.html PMID:17255140

  19. Investigation into the molecular and thermodynamic basis of protein interactions in multimodal chromatography using functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Parimal, Siddharth; Lopez, Maria M; McCallum, Scott A; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-11-11

    Although multimodal chromatography offers significant potential for bioseparations, there is a lack of molecular level understanding of the nature of protein binding in these systems. In this study a nanoparticle system is employed that can simulate a chromatographic resin surface while also being amenable to isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and solution NMR. ITC and NMR titration experiments are carried out with (15)N-labeled ubiquitin to investigate the interactions of ubiquitin with nanoparticles functionalized with two industrially important multimodal ligands. The ITC results suggest that binding to both multimodal ligand surfaces is entropically driven over a range of temperatures and that this is due primarily to the release of surface bound waters. In order to reveal structural details of the interaction process, binding-induced chemical shift changes obtained from the NMR experiments are employed to obtain dissociation constants of individual amino acid residues on the protein surface. The residue level information obtained from NMR is then used to identify a preferred binding face on ubiquitin for interaction to both multimodal ligand surfaces. In addition, electrostatic potential and spatial aggregation propensity maps are used to determine important protein surface property data that are shown to correlate well with the molecular level information obtained from NMR. Importantly, the data demonstrate that the cluster of interacting residues on the protein surface act co-operatively to give rise to multimodal binding affinities several orders of magnitude greater than those obtained previously for interactions with free solution ligands. The use of NMR and ITC to study protein interactions with functionalized nanoparticles offers a new tool for obtaining important molecular and thermodynamic insights into protein affinity in multimodal chromatographic systems. PMID:25310519

  20. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  1. Molecular Basis of Tubulin Transport Within the Cilium by IFT74 and IFT81

    PubMed Central

    Bhogaraju, Sagar; Cajanek, Lukas; Fort, Cécile; Blisnick, Thierry; Weber, Kristina; Taschner, Michael; Mizuno, Naoko; Lamla, Stefan; Bastin, Philippe; Nigg, Erich A.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors such as tubulin from the cytoplasm to the ciliary tip is involved in the construction of the cilium, a hairlike organelle found on most eukaryotic cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of IFT are poorly understood. Here, we found that the two core IFT proteins IFT74 and IFT81 form a tubulin-binding module and mapped the interaction to a calponin homology domain of IFT81 and a highly basic domain in IFT74. Knockdown of IFT81 and rescue experiments with point mutants showed that tubulin binding by IFT81 was required for ciliogenesis in human cells. PMID:23990561

  2. Recent advances in understanding the molecular basis of group B Streptococcus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Maisey, Heather C.; Doran, Kelly S.; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus commonly colonises healthy adults without symptoms, yet under certain circumstances displays the ability to invade host tissues, evade immune detection and cause serious invasive disease. Consequently, Group B Streptococcus remains a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. Here we review recent information on the bacterial factors and mechanisms that direct host–pathogen interactions involved in the pathogenesis of Group B Streptococcus infection. New research on host signalling and inflammatory responses to Group B Streptococcus infection is summarised. An understanding of the complex interplay between Group B Streptococcus and host provides valuable insight into pathogen evolution and highlights molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:18803886

  3. All-electron double zeta basis sets for the lanthanides: Application in atomic and molecular property calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, F. E.; Martins, L. S. C.; Franco, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Segmented all-electron basis sets of valence double zeta quality plus polarization functions (DZP) for the elements from Ce to Lu are generated to be used with the non-relativistic and Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) Hamiltonians. At the B3LYP level, the DZP-DKH atomic ionization energies and equilibrium bond lengths and atomization energies of the lanthanide trifluorides are evaluated and compared with benchmark theoretical and experimental data reported in the literature. In general, this compact size set shows to have a regular, efficient, and reliable performance. It can be particularly useful in molecular property calculations that require explicit treatment of the core electrons.

  4. In vitro CAPE inhibitory activity towards human AKR1C3 and the molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiyun; Zhao, Yining; Zheng, Xuehua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Yunyun; Li, Qing; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-06-25

    AKR1C3 is a critical enzyme for producing testosterone and 5α-DHT in the human body. Inhibiting AKR1C3 is a potential target for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). To find AKR1C3 inhibitors with a new molecular skeleton and binding mode, we analyzed the in vitro inhibitory activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and eight other phenolic acid analogues towards AKR1C3 and six other human AKR1 enzymes. We analyzed CAPE and octyl gallate interactions with AKR1C3 using X-ray crystallography, which provided a molecular basis for understanding the phenolic acid inhibitory activity and selectivity towards human AKR1s. PMID:27163852

  5. Molecular mechanisms of nematode-nematophagous microbe interactions: basis for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zou, Chenggang; Xu, Jianping; Ji, Xinglai; Niu, Xuemei; Yang, Jinkui; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause significant damage to a broad range of vegetables and agricultural crops throughout the world. As the natural enemies of nematodes, nematophagous microorganisms offer a promising approach to control the nematode pests. Some of these microorganisms produce traps to capture and kill the worms from the outside. Others act as internal parasites to produce toxins and virulence factors to kill the nematodes from within. Understanding the molecular basis of microbe-nematode interactions provides crucial insights for developing effective biological control agents against plant-parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between nematodes and nematophagous microorganisms, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which nematophagous microorganisms infect nematodes and on the nematode defense against pathogenic attacks. We conclude by discussing several key areas for future research and development, including potential approaches to apply our recent understandings to develop effective biocontrol strategies.

  6. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats. PMID:26813022

  7. The molecular basis of neurosensory cell formation in ear development: a blueprint for hair cell and sensory neuron regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Beisel, Kirk W.; Hansen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Summary The inner ear of mammals uses neurosensory cells derived from the embryonic ear for mechanoelectric transduction of vestibular and auditory stimuli (the hair cells) and conducts this information to the brain via sensory neurons. As with most other neurons of mammals, lost hair cells and sensory neurons are not spontaneously replaced and result instead in age-dependent progressive hearing loss. We review the molecular basis of neurosensory development in the mouse ear to provide a blueprint for possible enhancement of therapeutically useful transformation of stem cells into lost neurosensory cells. We identify several readily available adult sources of stem cells that express, like the ectoderm-derived ear, genes known to be essential for ear development. Use of these stem cells combined with molecular insights into neurosensory cell specification and proliferation regulation of the ear, might allow for neurosensory regeneration of mammalian ears in the near future. PMID:17120192

  8. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats. PMID:26813022

  9. Surface-confined heterometallic triads on the basis of terpyridyl complexes and design of molecular logic gates.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Singh, Vikram; Jeyachandran, Yekkoni Lakshmanan; Zharnikov, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Surface-confined heterometallic molecular triads (SURHMTs) were fabricated on SiOx-based solid substrates using optically rich and redox-active Fe-, Os-, and Ru-based terpyridyl complexes as metalloligands and Cu(2+) ions as linkers. Optical and electrochemical studies reveal efficient electronic intramolecular communication in these assemblies. The UV-vis spectra of the triads exhibit a superposition of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands of individual complexes, providing a significant enlargement of the optical window, useful for application. Similarly, cyclic voltammograms of SURHMT layers show a variety of redox peaks corresponding to individual complexes as well as multi-redox states at a low potential. Interaction of a representative SURHMT assembly with redox-active NOBF4 was investigated and used as a basis for configuring molecular logic gates. PMID:25853640

  10. Molecular mechanisms of nematode-nematophagous microbe interactions: basis for biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zou, Chenggang; Xu, Jianping; Ji, Xinglai; Niu, Xuemei; Yang, Jinkui; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause significant damage to a broad range of vegetables and agricultural crops throughout the world. As the natural enemies of nematodes, nematophagous microorganisms offer a promising approach to control the nematode pests. Some of these microorganisms produce traps to capture and kill the worms from the outside. Others act as internal parasites to produce toxins and virulence factors to kill the nematodes from within. Understanding the molecular basis of microbe-nematode interactions provides crucial insights for developing effective biological control agents against plant-parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between nematodes and nematophagous microorganisms, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which nematophagous microorganisms infect nematodes and on the nematode defense against pathogenic attacks. We conclude by discussing several key areas for future research and development, including potential approaches to apply our recent understandings to develop effective biocontrol strategies. PMID:25938277

  11. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  12. Exploring the Molecular Basis of Qo bc1 Complex Inhibitors Activity to Find Novel Antimalarials Hits.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta P; Gut, Jiri; Rodrigues, Tiago; Ribeiro, Maria H L; Lopes, Francisca; Rosenthal, Philip J; Moreira, Rui; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome bc1 complex is a crucial element in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being indispensable for the survival of several species of Plasmodia that cause malaria and, therefore, it is a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We report a molecular docking study building on the most recently obtained X-ray structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bc1 complex (PDB code: 3CX5) using several reported inhibitors with experimentally determined IC50 values against the Plasmodium falciparum bc1 complex. We produced a molecular docking model that correlated the calculated binding free energy with the experimental inhibitory activity of each compound. This Qo model was used to search the drug-like database included in the MOE package for novel potential bc1 complex inhibitors. Twenty three compounds were chosen to be tested for their antimalarial activity and four of these compounds demonstrated activity against the chloroquine-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. The most active compounds were also active against the atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum FCR3 strain and S. cerevisiae. Our study suggests the validity of the yeast bc1 complex structure as a model for the discovery of new antimalarial hits.

  13. The Molecular Basis of High-Altitude Adaptation in Deer Mice

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F; Sabatino, Stephen J; Hoffmann, Federico G; Gering, Eben J; Moriyama, Hideaki; Ferrand, Nuno; Monteiro, Bruno; Nachman, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    Elucidating genetic mechanisms of adaptation is a goal of central importance in evolutionary biology, yet few empirical studies have succeeded in documenting causal links between molecular variation and organismal fitness in natural populations. Here we report a population genetic analysis of a two-locus α-globin polymorphism that underlies physiological adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in natural populations of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus. This system provides a rare opportunity to examine the molecular underpinnings of fitness-related variation in protein function that can be related to a well-defined selection pressure. We surveyed DNA sequence variation in the duplicated α-globin genes of P. maniculatus from high- and low-altitude localities (i) to identify the specific mutations that may be responsible for the divergent fine-tuning of hemoglobin function and (ii) to test whether the genes exhibit the expected signature of diversifying selection between populations that inhabit different elevational zones. Results demonstrate that functionally distinct protein alleles are maintained as a long-term balanced polymorphism and that adaptive modifications of hemoglobin function are produced by the independent or joint effects of five amino acid mutations that modulate oxygen-binding affinity. PMID:17397259

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Arthur H.; de Sousa, Marcelo V.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis. PMID:27790611

  15. Structure of soybean [beta]-cyanoalanine synthase and the molecular basis for cyanide detoxification in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hankuil; Juergens, Matthew; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-09-07

    Plants produce cyanide (CN{sup -}) during ethylene biosynthesis in the mitochondria and require {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) for CN{sup -} detoxification. Recent studies show that CAS is a member of the {beta}-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) family, which also includes the Cys biosynthesis enzyme O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), but how the BSAS evolved distinct metabolic functions is not understood. Here we show that soybean (Glycine max) CAS and OASS form {alpha}-aminoacrylate reaction intermediates from Cys and O-acetylserine, respectively. To understand the molecular evolution of CAS and OASS in the BSAS enzyme family, the crystal structures of Gm-CAS and the Gm-CAS K95A mutant with a linked pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-Cys molecule in the active site were determined. These structures establish a common fold for the plant BSAS family and reveal a substrate-induced conformational change that encloses the active site for catalysis. Comparison of CAS and OASS identified residues that covary in the PLP binding site. The Gm-OASS T81M, S181M, and T185S mutants altered the ratio of OASS:CAS activity but did not convert substrate preference to that of a CAS. Generation of a triple mutant Gm-OASS successfully switched reaction chemistry to that of a CAS. This study provides new molecular insight into the evolution of diverse enzyme functions across the BSAS family in plants.

  16. Molecular and structural basis of androgen receptor responses to dihydrotestosterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate and Δ(4)-tibolone.

    PubMed

    Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Trotta, Andrew P; Need, Eleanor F; Lee, Alice M C; Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Giorgio, Lauren; Leach, Damien A; Swinstead, Erin E; O'Loughlin, Melissa A; Newman, Michelle R; Birrell, Stephen N; Butler, Lisa M; Harris, Jonathan M; Buchanan, Grant

    2014-02-15

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) has widely been used in hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, possibly due to disruption of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. In contrast, the synthetic HRT Tibolone does not increase breast density, and is rapidly metabolized to estrogenic 3α-OH-tibolone and 3β-OH-tibolone, and a delta-4 isomer (Δ(4)-TIB) that has both androgenic and progestagenic properties. Here, we show that 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and Δ(4)-TIB, but not MPA, stabilize AR protein levels, initiate specific AR intramolecular interactions critical for AR transcriptional regulation, and increase proliferation of AR positive MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Structural modeling and molecular dynamic simulation indicate that Δ(4)-TIB induces a more stable AR structure than does DHT, and MPA a less stable one. Microarray expression analyses confirms that the molecular actions of Δ(4)-TIB more closely resembles DHT in breast cancer cells than either ligand does to MPA. PMID:24239616

  17. Molecular basis of non-self recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Tsuda, Ryoko

    2002-09-19

    The self/non-self discrimination by innate immunity through simple ligands universally expressed both on pathogens and hosts, such as monosaccharides and acetyl group, depends on the density or clustering patterns of the ligands. The specific recognition by the horseshoe crab tachylectins with a propeller-like fold or a propeller-like oligomeric arrangement is reinforced by the short distance between the individual binding sites that interact with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). There is virtually no conformational change in the main or side chains of tachylectins upon binding with the ligands. This low structural flexibility of the propeller structures must be very important for specific interaction with PAMPs. Mammalian lectins, such as mannose-binding lectin and ficolins, trigger complement activation through the lectin pathway in the form of opsonins. However, tachylectins have no effector collagenous domains and no lectin-associated serine proteases found in the mammalian lectins. Furthermore, no complement-like proteins have been found in horseshoe crabs, except for alpha(2)-macroglobulin. The mystery of the molecular mechanism of the scavenging pathway of pathogens in horseshoe crabs remains to be solved.

  18. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  19. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles.

  20. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  1. Molecular Basis of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: The Role of RET Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Siqueira, Débora R.; Romitti, Mírian; Ferreira, Carla V.; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor originating in parafollicular C cells. It accounts for 5 to 8% of all thyroid cancers. MTC develops in either sporadic (75%) or hereditary form (25%). Genetic and molecular studies have demonstrated the involvement of the RET proto-oncogene in hereditary MTC and, less often, in its sporadic form. Although a strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been described, wide clinical heterogeneity is observed among families with the same RET mutation or even in carriers of the same kindred. In recent years, several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the RET gene have been described in the general population as well as in patients with MTC. Some studies have reported associations between the presence of polymorphisms and development or progression of MTC. Nonetheless, other studies failed to demonstrate any effect of the RET variants. Differences in the genetic background of distinct populations or methodological approaches have been suggested as potential reasons for the conflicting results. Here, we review current knowledge concerning the molecular pathogenesis of sporadic and hereditary MTC. In particular, we analyze the role of RET polymorphisms in the clinical presentation and prognosis of MTC based on the current literature. PMID:22312249

  2. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles. PMID:25741476

  3. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. )

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular Basis for the Generation in Pigs of Influenza A Viruses with Pandemic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Toshihiro; Couceiro, J. Nelson S. S.; Kelm, Sørge; Baum, Linda G.; Krauss, Scott; Castrucci, Maria R.; Donatelli, Isabella; Kida, Hiroshi; Paulson, James C.; Webster, Robert G.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    1998-01-01

    Genetic and biologic observations suggest that pigs may serve as “mixing vessels” for the generation of human-avian influenza A virus reassortants, similar to those responsible for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics. Here we demonstrate a structural basis for this hypothesis. Cell surface receptors for both human and avian influenza viruses were identified in the pig trachea, providing a milieu conducive to viral replication and genetic reassortment. Surprisingly, with continued replication, some avian-like swine viruses acquired the ability to recognize human virus receptors, raising the possibility of their direct transmission to human populations. These findings help to explain the emergence of pandemic influenza viruses and support the need for continued surveillance of swine for viruses carrying avian virus genes. PMID:9696833

  5. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Thomas H; Snyder, Emily R; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K

    2015-10-15

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1-Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:26494786

  6. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Thomas H; Snyder, Emily R; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K

    2015-10-15

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1-Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine.

  7. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Thomas H.; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1–Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:26494786

  8. Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Misasi, John; Gilman, Morgan S A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Gui, Miao; Cagigi, Alberto; Mulangu, Sabue; Corti, Davide; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Cunningham, James; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean Jacques; Baxa, Ulrich; Graham, Barney S; Xiang, Ye; Sullivan, Nancy J; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus causes hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate for which there is no approved therapy. Two human monoclonal antibodies, mAb100 and mAb114, in combination, protect nonhuman primates against all signs of Ebola virus disease, including viremia. Here, we demonstrate that mAb100 recognizes the base of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) trimer, occludes access to the cathepsin-cleavage loop, and prevents the proteolytic cleavage of GP that is required for virus entry. We show that mAb114 interacts with the glycan cap and inner chalice of GP, remains associated after proteolytic removal of the glycan cap, and inhibits binding of cleaved GP to its receptor. These results define the basis of neutralization for two protective antibodies and may facilitate development of therapies and vaccines.

  9. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  10. Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion to Geochemical Surfaces: Computer Simulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adhesion to Goethite

    PubMed Central

    Shroll, Robert M.; Straatsma, T. P.

    2003-01-01

    The adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the goethite mineral is investigated using classical molecular simulation. A fragment model for goethite has been integrated into a fully atomistic membrane model. Properties for the resulting system are evaluated for a 1.5-ns simulation in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. The response of the membrane to the presence of the mineral is investigated. Radial distribution functions are used to present an average picture of the hydrogen bonding. Orientational vectors, assigned to the saccharide groups, reveal the extent of the mineral's perturbations on the membrane. Significant structural changes were observed for the outermost saccharide groups, several of which rotate to form hydrogen bonds with the mineral surface. The structure of the inner core, and the corresponding integrity of the membrane, is maintained. The mineral surface dehydrates slightly in the presence of the membrane as saccharide hydroxyl groups compete with water molecules for hydrogen-bonding sites on its surface. PMID:12609878

  11. Deciphering the stem cell machinery as a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bosnali, Manal; Münst, Bernhard; Thier, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells provide fascinating prospects for biomedical applications by combining the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types. Since the first isolation of embryonic stem (ES) cells about 30 years ago, there has been a series of groundbreaking discoveries that have the potential to revolutionize modern life science. For a long time, embryos or germ cell-derived cells were thought to be the only source of pluripotency—a dogma that has been challenged during the last decade. Several findings revealed that cell differentiation from (stem) cells to mature cells is not in fact an irreversible process. The molecular mechanism underlying cellular reprogramming is poorly understood thus far. Identifying how pluripotency maintenance takes place in ES cells can help us to understand how pluripotency induction is regulated. Here, we review recent advances in the field of stem cell regulation focusing on key transcription factors and their functional interplay with non-coding RNAs. PMID:19662495

  12. Crystal structures reveal the molecular basis of ion translocation in sodium/proton antiporters.

    PubMed

    Coincon, Mathieu; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Nji, Emmanuel; Dotson, David L; Winkelmann, Iven; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Cameron, Alexander D; Beckstein, Oliver; Drew, David

    2016-03-01

    To fully understand the transport mechanism of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, it is necessary to clearly establish the global rearrangements required to facilitate ion translocation. Currently, two different transport models have been proposed. Some reports have suggested that structural isomerization is achieved through large elevator-like rearrangements similar to those seen in the structurally unrelated sodium-coupled glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh. Others have proposed that only small domain movements are required for ion exchange, and a conventional rocking-bundle model has been proposed instead. Here, to resolve these differences, we report atomic-resolution structures of the same Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NapA from Thermus thermophilus) in both outward- and inward-facing conformations. These data combined with cross-linking, molecular dynamics simulations and isothermal calorimetry suggest that Na(+)/H(+) antiporters provide alternating access to the ion-binding site by using elevator-like structural transitions. PMID:26828964

  13. Signaling required for blood vessel maintenance: molecular basis and pathological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to vascular formation increases, vessel maintenance including stabilization of new vessels and prevention of vessel regression began to be considered as an active process that requires specific cellular signaling. While signaling pathways such as VEGF, FGF, and angiopoietin-Tie2 are important for endothelial cell survival and junction stabilization, PDGF and TGF-β signaling modify mural cell (vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes) functions, thus they fortify vessel integrity. Breakdown of these signaling systems results in pathological hyperpermeability and/or genetic vascular abnormalities such as vascular malformations, ultimately progressing to hemorrhage and edema. Hence, blood vessel maintenance is fundamental to controlling vascular homeostasis and tissue functions. This paper discusses signaling pathways essential for vascular maintenance and clinical conditions caused by deterioration of vessel integrity.

  14. Genetic-molecular basis for a simple Drosophila melanogaster somatic system that detects environmental mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.M.; Todo, T.; Ryo, H.; Fujikawa, K.

    1986-09-01

    We have developed a simple, objectively scorable test for the mutagenicity of chemical compounds which can be fed Drosophila melanogaster. The test depends upon the somatic reversion of the X chromosome, recessive eye color mutation, white-ivory (wi) to wild type (w+). Reversions are scored as clones of w+ facets in the wi eyes of eclosing adults. To increase the sensitivity, a tandem quadruplication containing four wi mutations was synthesized. Thus, in homozygous females eight wi mutations are potentially revertible. Six mutagenic compounds, all alkylating agents, all gave positive results at several concentrations tested. Molecular analysis demonstrates that the induced reversions, germinal and somatic, are associated with the loss of 2.9-kilobase DNA duplicated in the wi mutation.

  15. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Savage, Michael D; Cerro, Ramon L

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations-particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant. PMID:27627371

  16. Communicating the molecular basis of cancer cell-by-cell: an interview with Tatsushi Igaki.

    PubMed

    Igaki, Tatsushi

    2015-12-01

    Tatsushi Igaki is currently based at the Kyoto University Graduate School of Biostudies, where he leads a research group dedicated to using Drosophila genetics to build a picture of the cell-cell communications underlying the establishment and maintenance of multicellular systems. His work has provided insight into the molecular bases of cell competition in the context of development and tumorigenesis, including the landmark discovery that oncogenic cells communicate with normal cells in the tumor microenvironment to induce tumor progression in a non-autonomous fashion. In this interview, he describes his career path, highlighting the shift in his research focus from the basic principles of apoptosis to clonal evolution in cancer, and also explains why Drosophila provides a powerful model system for studying cancer biology. PMID:26637532

  17. The molecular basis for carcinogenesis in metaplastic columnar-lined esophagus.

    PubMed

    Souza, R F; Meltzer, S J

    1997-09-01

    A wide variety of biologic events and mechanisms appear to have roles in the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus-associated neoplastic lesions. Figure 5 is a schematic depiction of these events. This is known as an infernogram (named after Dante's Inferno) (S. Kern, unpublished presentations, 1996). Events at the bottom rings of the inferno are high-frequency mutations; nearer to the top of the inferno are the less common events. The next several years promise many further discoveries of not only high-frequency and low-frequency events, but also their application. Some of the molecular alterations already studied show promise as markers for early cancer detection or prognostication. Eventually, applications of these discoveries should yield new and more effective means of preventing and treating the deadly complications of this troublesome premalignant condition.

  18. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  19. Molecular basis of physiological heart growth: fundamental concepts and new players.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Marjorie; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2013-01-01

    The heart hypertrophies in response to developmental signals as well as increased workload. Although adult-onset hypertrophy can ultimately lead to disease, cardiac hypertrophy is not necessarily maladaptive and can even be beneficial. Progress has been made in our understanding of the structural and molecular characteristics of physiological cardiac hypertrophy, as well as of the endocrine effectors and associated signalling pathways that regulate it. Physiological hypertrophy is initiated by finite signals, which include growth hormones (such as thyroid hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor) and mechanical forces that converge on a limited number of intracellular signalling pathways (such as PI3K, AKT, AMP-activated protein kinase and mTOR) to affect gene transcription, protein translation and metabolism. Harnessing adaptive signalling mediators to reinvigorate the diseased heart could have important medical ramifications.

  20. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance-different approaches through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most widely used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple, small molecule is mainly attributable to the high specificity of glyphosate for the plant enzyme enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway, leading to the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced, thus allowing application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene-shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer a rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect.

  1. Craniofacial development: current concepts in the molecular basis of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Daniel Richard; Tucker, Abigail S; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2013-07-01

    The human face and skull are an elegant example of the anatomical sophistication that results from the interplay between the molecular cascades and the tissue interactions that are necessary for the proper development of the craniofacial complex. When it fails to develop normally the consequences can have life-long implications for the biological, psychological, and aesthetic wellbeing of an affected person. Among the many syndromes that affect the region, understanding of the biology that underlies Treacher Collins syndrome has advanced in the last decade, particularly concerning the causative TCOF1 gene that encodes TREACLE protein, a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phosphoprotein with an essential function during ribosome biogenesis in cranial neural crest cells. Abnormal growth and differentiation of these cells affect much of the craniofacial skeleton.

  2. Heritability and Molecular-Genetic Basis of Resting EEG Activity: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Stephen M.; Burwell, Scott J.; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Several EEG parameters are potential endophenotypes for different psychiatric disorders. The present study consists of a comprehensive behavioral- and molecular-genetic analysis of such parameters in a large community sample (N = 4,026) of adolescent twins and their parents, genotyped for 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Biometric heritability estimates ranged from .49 to .85, with a median of .78. The additive effect of all SNPs (SNP heritability) varied across electrodes. Although individual SNPs were not significantly associated with EEG parameters, several genes were associated with delta power. We also obtained an association between the GABRA2 gene and beta power (p < .014), consistent with findings reported by others, although this did not survive Bonferroni correction. If EEG parameters conform to a largely polygenic model of inheritance, larger sample sizes will be required to detect individual variants reliably. PMID:25387704

  3. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Savage, Michael D; Cerro, Ramon L

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations-particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  4. Molecular Basis of Acute Cystitis Reveals Susceptibility Genes and Immunotherapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cafaro, Caterina; Nadeem, Aftab; Butler, Daniel S. C.; Rydström, Gustav; Filenko, Nina A.; Wullt, Björn; Miethke, Thomas; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Tissue damage is usually regarded as a necessary price to pay for successful elimination of pathogens by the innate immune defense. Yet, it is possible to distinguish protective from destructive effects of innate immune activation and selectively attenuate molecular nodes that create pathology. Here, we identify acute cystitis as an Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-driven, hyper-inflammatory condition of the infected urinary bladder and IL-1 receptor blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy. Disease severity was controlled by the mechanism of IL-1β processing and mice with intact inflammasome function developed a moderate, self-limiting form of cystitis. The most severe form of acute cystitis was detected in mice lacking the inflammasome constituents ASC or NLRP-3. IL-1β processing was hyperactive in these mice, due to a new, non-canonical mechanism involving the matrix metalloproteinase 7- (MMP-7). ASC and NLRP-3 served as transcriptional repressors of MMP7 and as a result, Mmp7 was markedly overexpressed in the bladder epithelium of Asc-/- and Nlrp3-/- mice. The resulting IL-1β hyper-activation loop included a large number of IL-1β-dependent pro-inflammatory genes and the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra inhibited their expression and rescued susceptible Asc-/- mice from bladder pathology. An MMP inhibitor had a similar therapeutic effect. Finally, elevated levels of IL-1β and MMP-7 were detected in patients with acute cystitis, suggesting a potential role as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets. The results reproduce important aspects of human acute cystitis in the murine model and provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acute cystitis, one of the most common infections in man. Trial Registration The clinical studies were approved by the Human Ethics Committee at Lund University (approval numbers LU106-02, LU236-99 and Clinical Trial Registration RTP-A2003, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, www

  5. Exploring the molecular basis of neurosteroid binding to the β3 homopentameric GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lautaro D; Estrin, Darío A

    2015-11-01

    Neurosteroids are the principal endogenous modulators of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which are pentameric membrane-bound proteins that regulate the passage of chloride ions from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment. As consequence of their ability to modify inhibitory functions in the brain, neurosteroids have high physiological and clinical importance and may act as anesthetic, anticonvulsant and anxiolytic drugs. Despite their relevance, essential issues regarding neurosteroid action on GABA(A)Rs are still unsettled. In particular, residues taking part of the steroid recognition are not definitely identified. Taking as starting point the first reported crystal structure of a human GABAA receptor (a β3 homopentamer), we have explored through a combination of computational methods (a cavity-detection algorithm, docking and molecular dynamics simulations) the binding mode of two structurally different representative neurosteroids, pregnanolone and allopregnanolone. We have identified a neurosteroid binding site between the TM3 of one subunit and TM1 and TM4 of the adjacent subunit that is consistent with the set of experimental data reported for the action of neurosteroids on β3 homopentamers. These sites are able to properly accommodate both overall torsioned and flat steroidal structures and they specifically recognize the 3-OH group, explaining the requirement of a 3α-configuration for the activity. We believe that this work provides for first time convincing information about the molecular interaction between neurosteroids and a GABA(A)R. This information largely increases our understanding of this fundamental ligand-receptor system. PMID:26223009

  6. Establishing a reference group for distal 18q-: Clinical description and molecular basis

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Jannine D.; Hasi, Minire; Soileau, Bridgette; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Sebold, Courtney; O’Donnell, Louise; Perry, Brian; Stratton, Robert F.; Hale, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Although constitutional chromosome abnormalities have been recognized since the 1960s, clinical characterization and development of treatment options have been hampered by their obvious genetic complexity and relative rarity. Additionally, deletions of 18q are particularly heterogeneous, with no two people having the same breakpoints. We identified sixteen individuals with deletions that, despite unique breakpoints, encompass the same set of genes within a 17.6 Mb region. This group represents the most genotypically similar group yet identified with distal 18q deletions. As the deletion is of average size when compared with other 18q deletions, this group can serve as a reference point for the clinical and molecular description of this condition. We performed a thorough medical record review as well as a series of clinical evaluations on 14 of the 16 individuals. Common functional findings included developmental delays, hypotonia, growth hormone deficiency, and hearing loss. Structural anomalies included foot anomalies, ear canal atresia/stenosis, and hypospadias. The majority of individuals performed within the low normal range of cognitive ability but had more serious deficits in adaptive abilities. Of interest, the hemizygous region contains 38 known genes, 26 of which are sufficiently understood to tentatively determine dosage sensitivity. Published data suggest that 20 are unlikely to cause an abnormal phenotype in the hemizygous state and five are likely to be dosage sensitive: TNX3, NETO1, ZNF407, TSHZ1, and NFATC. A sixth gene, ATP9B, may be conditionally dosage sensitive. Not all distal 18q- phenotypes can be attributed to these six genes; however, this is an important advance in the molecular characterization of 18q deletions. PMID:24092497

  7. Molecular basis of positive allosteric modulation of GluN2B NMDA receptors by polyamines.

    PubMed

    Mony, Laetitia; Zhu, Shujia; Carvalho, Stéphanie; Paoletti, Pierre

    2011-06-17

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) form glutamate-gated ion channels that have central roles in neuronal communication and plasticity throughout the brain. Dysfunctions of NMDARs are involved in several central nervous system disorders, including stroke, chronic pain and schizophrenia. One hallmark of NMDARs is that their activity can be allosterically regulated by a variety of extracellular small ligands. While much has been learned recently regarding allosteric inhibition of NMDARs, the structural determinants underlying positive allosteric modulation of these receptors remain poorly defined. Here, we show that polyamines, naturally occurring polycations that selectively enhance NMDARs containing the GluN2B subunit, bind at a dimer interface between GluN1 and GluN2B subunit N-terminal domains (NTDs). Polyamines act by shielding negative charges present on GluN1 and GluN2B NTD lower lobes, allowing their close apposition, an effect that in turn prevents NTD clamshell closure. Our work reveals the mechanistic basis for positive allosteric modulation of NMDARs. It provides the first example of an intersubunit binding site in this class of receptors, a discovery that holds promise for future drug interventions.

  8. Molecular And Structural Basis of Cytokine Receptor Pleiotropy in the Interleukin-4/13 System

    SciTech Connect

    LaPorte, S.L.; Juo, Z.S.; Vaclavikova, J.; Colf, L.A.; Qi, X.; Heller, N.M.; Keegan, A.D.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-20

    Interleukin-4 and Interleukin-13 are cytokines critical to the development of T cell-mediated humoral immune responses, which are associated with allergy and asthma, and exert their actions through three different combinations of shared receptors. Here we present the crystal structures of the complete set of type I (IL-4R{alpha}/{gamma}{sub c}/IL-4) and type II (IL-4R/IL-13R{alpha}1/IL-4, IL-4R{alpha}/IL-13R{alpha}1/IL-13) ternary signaling complexes. The type I complex reveals a structural basis for {gamma}{sub c}'s ability to recognize six different {gamma}{sub c}-cytokines. The two type II complexes utilize an unusual top-mounted Ig-like domain on IL-13R{alpha}1 for a novel mode of cytokine engagement that contributes to a reversal in the IL-4 versus IL-13 ternary complex assembly sequences, which are mediated through substantially different recognition chemistries. We also show that the type II receptor heterodimer signals with different potencies in response to IL-4 versus IL-13 and suggest that the extracellular cytokine-receptor interactions are modulating intracellular membrane-proximal signaling events.

  9. Molecular basis of differential resistance to cycloguanil and pyrimethamine in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D S; Milhous, W K; Wellems, T E

    1990-01-01

    Proguanil and pyrimethamine are antifolate drugs with distinct chemical structures that are used commonly in the prophylaxis and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Clinical reports and field studies have suggested that some parasites refractory to proguanil can be treated with pyrimethamine, and vice versa. Analysis of the P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from different parasites reveals the structural basis for differential susceptibility to these antifolate drugs. Parasites harboring a pair of point mutations from Ala-16 to Val-16 and from Ser-108 to Thr-108 are resistant to cycloguanil (the active metabolite of proguanil) but not to pyrimethamine. A single Asn-108 mutation, on the other hand, confers resistance to pyrimethamine with only a moderate decrease in susceptibility to cycloguanil. Significant cross-resistance to both drugs occurs in parasites having mutations that include Ser-108----Asn-108 and Ile-164----Leu-164. These results reflect the distinct structures of pyrimethamine and cycloguanil and suggest fine differences in binding within the active site cavity of DHFR. Alternative inhibitors, used alone or in combination, may be effective against some strains of cycloguanil- or pyrimethamine-resistant malaria. Images PMID:2183222

  10. Mechanical and molecular basis for the symmetrical division of the fission yeast nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Božič, Bojan; Svetina, Saša

    2015-06-28

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout mitosis and undergoes a series of symmetrical morphological changes when the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), embedded in the nuclear envelope, are pushed apart by elongating spindle microtubules. These symmetrical membrane shape transformations do not correspond to the shape behavior of an analogous system based on lipid vesicles. Here we report that the symmetry of the dividing fission yeast nucleus is ensured by SPB-chromosome attachments, as loss of kinetochore clustering in the vicinity of SPBs results in the formation of abnormal asymmetric shapes with long membrane tethers. We integrated these findings in a biophysical model, which explains the symmetry of the nuclear shapes on the basis of forces exerted by chromosomes clustered at SPBs on the extending nuclear envelope. Based on this analysis we conclude that the fission yeast nuclear envelope exhibits the same mechanical properties as simple lipid vesicles, but interactions with other cellular components, such as chromosomes, influence the nuclear shape during mitosis, allowing the formation of otherwise energetically unfavorable symmetrical dumbbell structures upon spindle elongation. The model allows us to explain the appearance of abnormal asymmetric shapes in fission yeast mutants with mis-segregated chromosomes as well as with altered nuclear membrane composition.

  11. Molecular basis of canalization in an ascidian species complex adapted to different thermal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsuko; Kawashima, Takeshi; Fujie, Manabu; Hughes, Samantha; Satoh, Noriyuki; Shimeld, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Canalization is a result of intrinsic developmental buffering that ensures phenotypic robustness under genetic variation and environmental perturbation. As a consequence, animal phenotypes are remarkably consistent within a species under a wide range of conditions, a property that seems contradictory to evolutionary change. Study of laboratory model species has uncovered several possible canalization mechanisms, however, we still do not understand how the level of buffering is controlled in natural populations. We exploit wild populations of the marine chordate Ciona intestinalis to show that levels of buffering are maternally inherited. Comparative transcriptomics show expression levels of genes encoding canonical chaperones such as Hsp70 and Hsp90 do not correlate with buffering. However the expression of genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones does correlate. We also show that ER chaperone genes are widely conserved amongst animals. Contrary to previous beliefs that expression level of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) can be used as a measurement of buffering levels, we propose that ER associated chaperones comprise a cellular basis for canalization. ER chaperones have been neglected by the fields of development, evolution and ecology, but their study will enhance understanding of both our evolutionary past and the impact of global environmental change. PMID:26577490

  12. Molecular basis of canalization in an ascidian species complex adapted to different thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuko; Kawashima, Takeshi; Fujie, Manabu; Hughes, Samantha; Satoh, Noriyuki; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2015-01-01

    Canalization is a result of intrinsic developmental buffering that ensures phenotypic robustness under genetic variation and environmental perturbation. As a consequence, animal phenotypes are remarkably consistent within a species under a wide range of conditions, a property that seems contradictory to evolutionary change. Study of laboratory model species has uncovered several possible canalization mechanisms, however, we still do not understand how the level of buffering is controlled in natural populations. We exploit wild populations of the marine chordate Ciona intestinalis to show that levels of buffering are maternally inherited. Comparative transcriptomics show expression levels of genes encoding canonical chaperones such as Hsp70 and Hsp90 do not correlate with buffering. However the expression of genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones does correlate. We also show that ER chaperone genes are widely conserved amongst animals. Contrary to previous beliefs that expression level of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) can be used as a measurement of buffering levels, we propose that ER associated chaperones comprise a cellular basis for canalization. ER chaperones have been neglected by the fields of development, evolution and ecology, but their study will enhance understanding of both our evolutionary past and the impact of global environmental change. PMID:26577490

  13. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products.

  14. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products. PMID:27181392

  15. Molecular basis of proton block of L-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen ions are important regulators of ion flux through voltage- gated Ca2+ channels but their site of action has been controversial. To identify molecular determinants of proton block of L-type Ca2+ channels, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and unitary current recordings from wild-type (WT) and mutant L-type Ca2+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. WT channels in 150 mM K+ displayed two conductance states, deprotonated (140 pS) and protonated (45 pS), as found previously in native L-type Ca2+ channels. Proton block was altered in a unique fashion by mutation of each of the four P-region glutamates (EI-EIV) that form the locus of high affinity Ca2+ interaction. Glu(E)-->Gln(Q) substitution in either repeats I or III abolished the high-conductance state, as if the titration site had become permanently protonated. While the EIQ mutant displayed only an approximately 40 pS conductance, the EIIIQ mutant showed the approximately 40 pS conductance plus additional pH-sensitive transitions to an even lower conductance level. The EIVQ mutant exhibited the same deprotonated and protonated conductance states as WT, but with an accelerated rate of deprotonation. The EIIQ mutant was unusual in exhibiting three conductance states (approximately 145, 102, 50 pS, respectively). Occupancy of the low conductance state increased with external acidification, albeit much higher proton concentration was required than for WT. In contrast, the equilibrium between medium and high conductance levels was apparently pH-insensitive. We concluded that the protonation site in L-type Ca2+ channels lies within the pore and is formed by a combination of conserved P-region glutamates in repeats I, II, and III, acting in concert. EIV lies to the cytoplasmic side of the site but exerts an additional stabilizing influence on protonation, most likely via electrostatic interaction. These findings are likely to hold for all voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and provide a simple molecular explanation

  16. Defending against pathogens - immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  17. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  18. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  19. Defending against pathogens – immunological priming and its molecular basis in a sea anemone, cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tanya; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, in general, are long-lived organisms and hence may repeatedly encounter common pathogens during their lifespans. It remains unknown whether these early diverging animals possess some type of immunological reaction that strengthens the defense response upon repeated infections, such as that described in more evolutionary derived organisms. Here we show results that sea anemones that had previously encountered a pathogen under sub-lethal conditions had a higher survivorship during a subsequently lethal challenge than naïve anemones that encountered the pathogen for the first time. Anemones subjected to the lethal challenge two and four weeks after the sub-lethal exposure presented seven- and five-fold increases in survival, respectively, compared to the naïve anemones. However, anemones challenged six weeks after the sub-lethal exposure showed no increase in survivorship. We argue that this short-lasting priming of the defense response could be ecologically relevant if pathogen encounters are restricted to short seasons characterized by high stress. Furthermore, we discovered significant changes in proteomic profiles between naïve sea anemones and those primed after pathogen exposure suggesting a clear molecular signature associated with immunological priming in cnidarians. Our findings reveal that immunological priming may have evolved much earlier in the tree of life than previously thought. PMID:26628080

  20. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  1. Molecular neuroendocrine basis of lunar-related spawning in grass puffer.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hironori; Shahjahan, Md; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2013-01-15

    Grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, exhibits unique spawning behavior: it spawns on beach in semilunar cycles during spring tide in early summer. The fish aggregate at certain seashore locations several hours before high tide every two weeks. To explore the molecular and neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the regulation of the lunar-related spawning rhythm, seasonal and cyclic variations in gene expression for hypothalamic neuropeptides related to reproduction were examined by quantitative real-time PCR. The expression levels of genes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, kisspeptin, LPXRFamide peptide and PQRFamide peptide in the hypothalamus varied differently depending on reproductive stage and gender, suggesting their specific roles in reproduction. In the spawning period, the expression levels of LPXRFamide peptide and its receptor genes showed diurnal and circadian variations in association with the expression of four subtypes of melatonin receptor genes. Together with the nocturnal secretion of melatonin from the pineal gland, melatonin may play an important role in transmitting the photoperiodic information of moonlight to the reproductive neuroendocrine center in the hypothalamus of grass puffer.

  2. Diseases of the tooth: the genetic and molecular basis of inherited anomalies affecting the dentition.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    In humans, inherited variation in the number, size, and shape of teeth within the dentitions are relatively common, while rarer defects of hard tissue formation, including amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, and problems associated with tooth eruption are also seen. In many cases, these anomalies occur in isolation, but they can also present as a feature of numerous well-characterized developmental syndromes. Complex reiterative signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme is a feature of normal tooth development in the embryo, occurring from early patterning through morphogenesis, hard tissue formation and during root development. Significant events also occur during postnatal development of the dentition, including hard tissue maturation and tooth eruption. In the last decade, advances in human and mouse genetics have meant that in many cases candidate genes have been identified for these anomalies. These genes have provided a useful platform for developmental biologists, allowing them to begin elucidating how these signals interact to generate a functional dentition and understand the mechanisms underlying many of the anomalies that are seen in human populations. In this article, we review current concepts relating to the developmental biology of tooth number, size, and shape, formation of the dental hard tissues and eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. We will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in both health and disease.

  3. Molecular basis of ornithine aminotransferase deficiency in B-6-responsive and -nonresponsive forms of gyrate atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, V.; McClatchey, A.I.; Ramesh, N.; Benoit, L.A.; Berson, E.L.; Shih, V.E.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-06-01

    Gyrate atrophy (GA), a recessive eye disease involving progressive loss of vision due to chorioretinal degeneration, is associated with a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine aminotransferase with consequent hyperornithinemia. Genetic heterogeneity of GA has been suggested by the demonstration that administration of pyridoxine to increase the level of pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor of OATase, reduces hyperornithinemia in a subset of patients. The authors have cloned and sequences cDNAs for OATase from two GA patients, one responsive and one nonresponsive to pyridoxine treatment. The respective cDNAs contained different single missense mutations, which were sufficient to eliminate OATase activity when each cDNA was tested in a eukaryotic expression system. However, like the enzyme in fibroblasts from the pyridoxine-responsive patient, OATase encoded by the corresponding cDNA from this individual showed a significant increase in activity when assayed in the presence of an increased pyridoxal phosphate concentration. These data firmly establish that both pyridoxine responsive and nonresponsive forms of GA result from mutations in the OATase structural gene. Moreover, they provide a molecular characterization of the primary lesion in a pyridoxine-responsive genetic disorder.

  4. Structural flexibility of RNA as molecular basis for Hfq chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Konarev, Petr V.; Shang, Weifeng; Večerek, Branislav; Kontaxis, Georg; Hämmerle, Hermann; Peterlik, Herwig; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Bläsi, Udo; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, many small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) associate with the RNA chaperone host factor Q (Hfq) and often require the protein for regulation of target mRNAs. Previous studies suggested that the hexameric Escherichia coli Hfq (HfqEc) binds sRNAs on the proximal site, whereas the distal site has been implicated in Hfq–mRNA interactions. Employing a combination of small angle X-ray scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical approaches, we report the structural analysis of a 1:1 complex of HfqEc with a 34-nt-long subsequence of a natural substrate sRNA, DsrA (DsrA34). This sRNA is involved in post-transcriptional regulation of the E. coli rpoS mRNA encoding the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS. The molecular envelopes of HfqEc in complex with DsrA34 revealed an overall asymmetric shape of the complex in solution with the protein maintaining its doughnut-like structure, whereas the extended DsrA34 is flexible and displays an ensemble of different spatial arrangements. These results are discussed in terms of a model, wherein the structural flexibility of RNA ligands bound to Hfq stochastically facilitates base pairing and provides the foundation for the RNA chaperone function inherent to Hfq. PMID:22718981

  5. Molecular basis for changes in behavioral state in ant social behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Christophe; Sokolowski, Marla B.

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark of behavior is that animals respond to environmental change by switching from one behavioral state to another. However, information on the molecular underpinnings of these behavioral shifts and how they are mediated by the environment is lacking. The ant Pheidole pallidula with its morphologically and behaviorally distinct major and minor workers is an ideal system to investigate behavioral shifts. The physically larger majors are predisposed to defend the ant nest, whereas the smaller minors are the foragers. Despite this predisposition, majors are able to shift to foraging according to the needs of the colony. We show that the ant foraging (ppfor) gene, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), mediates this shift. Majors have higher brain PKG activities than minors, and the spatial distribution of the PPFOR protein differs in these workers. Specifically, majors express the PPFOR protein in 5 cells in the anterior face of the ant brain, whereas minors do not. Environmental manipulations show that PKG is lower in the presence of a foraging stimulus and higher when defense is required. Finally, pharmacological activation of PKG increases defense and reduces foraging behavior. Thus, PKG signaling plays a critical role in P. pallidula behavioral shifts. PMID:19332792

  6. Molecular basis of a novel renal amyloidosis due to N184K gelsolin variant.

    PubMed

    Bonì, Francesco; Milani, Mario; Porcari, Riccardo; Barbiroli, Alberto; Ricagno, Stefano; de Rosa, Matteo

    2016-09-16

    Mutations in gelsolin are responsible for a systemic amyloidosis first described in 1969. Until recently, the disease was associated with two substitutions of the same residue, leading to the loss of the calcium binding site. Novel interest arose in 2014 when the N184K variant of the protein was identified as the etiological agent of a novel kidney-localized amyloidosis. Here we provide a first rationale for N184K pathogenicity. We show that the mutation induces a destabilization of gelsolin second domain, without compromising its calcium binding capacity. X-ray data combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the primary source of the destabilization is a loss of connectivity in proximity of the metal. Such rearrangement of the H-bond network does not have a major impact on the overall fold of the domain, nevertheless, it increases the flexibility of a stretch of the protein, which is consequently processed by furin protease. Overall our data suggest that the N184K variant is subjected to the same aberrant proteolytic events responsible for the formation of amyloidogenic fragments in the previously characterized mutants. At the same time our data suggest that a broader number of mutations, unrelated to the metal binding site, can lead to a pathogenic phenotype.

  7. MicroRNAs as a molecular basis for mental retardation, Alzheimer's and prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Provost, Patrick

    2010-06-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, approximately 21- to 23-nucleotide (nt) non-coding RNA species that act as key regulators of gene expression along a central and well-defined cellular process known as RNA silencing, and involving the recognition and translational control of specific messenger RNA (mRNAs). Generated through the well-orchestrated and sequential processing of miRNA precursor molecules, mature miRNAs are subsequently incorporated into miRNA-containing ribonucleoprotein effector complexes to regulate mRNA translation through the recognition of specific binding sites of imperfect complementarity located mainly in the 3' untranslated region. Predicted to regulate up to 90% of the genes in humans, miRNAs may thus control cellular processes in all cells and tissues of the human body. Likely to play a central role in health and disease, a dysfunctional miRNA-based regulation of gene expression may represent the main etiologic factor underlying diseases affecting major organs, such as the brain. In this review article, the molecular mechanisms underlying the role and function of miRNAs in the regulation of genes involved in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases will be discussed, with a focus on the fragile X syndrome, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease.

  8. The Molecular Basis of Memory. Part 2: Chemistry of the Tripartite Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We propose a tripartite mechanism to describe the processing of cognitive information (cog-info), comprising the (1) neuron, (2) surrounding neural extracellular matrix (nECM), and (3) numerous “trace” metals distributed therein. The neuron is encased in a polyanionic nECM lattice doped with metals (>10), wherein it processes (computes) and stores cog-info. Each [nECM:metal] complex is the molecular correlate of a cognitive unit of information (cuinfo), similar to a computer “bit”. These are induced/sensed by the neuron via surface iontophoretic and electroelastic (piezoelectric) sensors. The generic cuinfo are used by neurons to biochemically encode and store cog-info in a rapid, energy efficient, but computationally expansive manner. Here, we describe chemical reactions involved in various processes that underline the tripartite mechanism. In addition, we present novel iconographic representations of various types of cuinfo resulting from“tagging” and cross-linking reactions, essential for the indexing cuinfo for organized retrieval and storage of memory. PMID:23419130

  9. Molecular basis of a novel renal amyloidosis due to N184K gelsolin variant

    PubMed Central

    Bonì, Francesco; Milani, Mario; Porcari, Riccardo; Barbiroli, Alberto; Ricagno, Stefano; de Rosa, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in gelsolin are responsible for a systemic amyloidosis first described in 1969. Until recently, the disease was associated with two substitutions of the same residue, leading to the loss of the calcium binding site. Novel interest arose in 2014 when the N184K variant of the protein was identified as the etiological agent of a novel kidney-localized amyloidosis. Here we provide a first rationale for N184K pathogenicity. We show that the mutation induces a destabilization of gelsolin second domain, without compromising its calcium binding capacity. X-ray data combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the primary source of the destabilization is a loss of connectivity in proximity of the metal. Such rearrangement of the H-bond network does not have a major impact on the overall fold of the domain, nevertheless, it increases the flexibility of a stretch of the protein, which is consequently processed by furin protease. Overall our data suggest that the N184K variant is subjected to the same aberrant proteolytic events responsible for the formation of amyloidogenic fragments in the previously characterized mutants. At the same time our data suggest that a broader number of mutations, unrelated to the metal binding site, can lead to a pathogenic phenotype. PMID:27633054

  10. The molecular basis of skeletal muscle weakness in a mouse model of inflammatory myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Coley, William; Rayavarapu, Sree; Pandey, Gouri S.; Sabina, Richard L.; vander Meulen, Jack H.; Ampong, Beryl; Wortmann, Robert L.; Rawat, Rashmi; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE It is generally believed that muscle weakness in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis is due to autoimmune and inflammatory processes. However, it has been observed that there is a poor correlation between the suppression of inflammation and a recovery of muscle function in patients. We have therefore hypothesized that non-immune mechanisms also contribute to muscle weakness. In particular, it has been suggested that an acquired deficiency of AMP deaminase (AMPD1) may be responsible for muscle weakness in myositis. METHODS We have used comprehensive functional, behavioral, histological, molecular, enzymatic and metabolic assessments before and after the onset of inflammation in MHC class I mouse model of autoimmune inflammatory myositis. RESULTS We found that muscle weakness and metabolic disturbances were detectable in the mice prior to the appearance of infiltrating mononuclear cells. Force contraction analysis of muscle function revealed that weakness was correlated with AMDP1 expression and was myositis-specific. We also demonstrated that decreasing AMPD1 expression results in decreased muscle strength in healthy mice. Fiber typing suggested that fast-twitch muscles are converted to slow-twitch muscles as myositis progresses, and microarray results indicated that AMPD1 and other purine nucleotide pathway genes are suppressed, along with genes essential to glycolysis. CONCLUSION These data suggest that an AMPD1 deficiency is acquired prior to overt muscle inflammation and is responsible, at least in part, for the muscle weakness that occurs in the mouse model of myositis. AMPD1 is therefore a potential therapeutic target in myositis. PMID:22806328

  11. DYRK1A in neurodegeneration and cancer: Molecular basis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Ramzi; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinases are one of the most studied drug targets in current pharmacological research, as evidenced by the vast number of kinase-targeting agents enrolled in active clinical trials. Dual-specificity Tyrosine phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1A (DYRK1A) has been much less studied compared to many other kinases. DYRK1A primary function occurs during early development, where this protein regulates cellular processes related to proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells. Although most extensively characterised for its role in brain development, DYRK1A is over-expressed in a variety of diseases including a number of human malignancies, such as haematological and brain cancers. Here we review the accumulating molecular studies that support our understanding of how DYRK1A signalling could underlie these pathological functions. The relevance of DYRK1A in a number of diseases is also substantiated with intensive drug discovery efforts to develop potent and selective inhibitors of DYRK1A. Several classes of DYRK1A inhibitors have recently been disclosed and some molecules are promising leads to develop DYRK1A inhibitors as drugs for DYRK1A-dependent diseases. PMID:25795597

  12. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid.

    PubMed

    Cattò, Cristina; Dell'Orto, Silvia; Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Vitali, Alberto; Marzano, Valeria; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and screened against Escherichia coli to understand the structural requirements necessary for biofilm inhibition at sub-lethal concentrations. Considerations concerning the relationship between structure and anti-biofilm activity revealed that i) the para-sulfoxy ester group is not needed to exploit the anti-biofilm activity of the molecule, it is the cinnamic acid scaffold that is responsible for anti-biofilm performance; ii) the anti-biofilm activity of ZA derivatives depends on the presence of a carboxylate anion and, consequently, on its hydrogen-donating ability; iii) the conjugated aromatic system is instrumental to the anti-biofilm activities of ZA and its analogues. Using a protein pull-down approach, combined with mass spectrometry, the herein-defined active structure of ZA was matrix-immobilized, and was proved to interact with the E. coli NADH:quinone reductase, WrbA, suggesting a possible role of this protein in the biofilm formation process. PMID:26132116

  13. Molecular basis of major psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and depression.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Masaya; Miyata, Shingo; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Matsuzaki, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Recently several potential susceptibility genes for major psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia and major depression) such as disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1(DISC1), dysbindin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) have been reported. DISC1 is involved in neural development directly via adhesion molecules or via its binding partners of DISC1 such as elongation protein ζ-1 (FEZ1), DISC1-binding zinc-finger protein (DBZ) and kendrin. PACAP also regulates neural development via stathmin 1 or via regulation of the DISC1-DBZ binding. Dysbindin is also involved in neural development by regulating centrosomal microtubule network formation. All such molecules examined to date are involved in neural development. Thus, these findings provide new molecular insights into the mechanisms of neural development and neuropsychiatric disorders. On the other hand, in addition to neurons, both DISC and DBZ have been detected in oligodendrocytes and implicated in regulating oligodendrocyte differentiation. DISC1 inhibits the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into oligodendrocytes, while DBZ has a positive regulatory role in oligodendrocyte differentiation. Evidence suggesting that disturbance of oligodendrocyte development causes major depression is also described.

  14. Molecular Basis for Redox Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase.

    PubMed

    Truong, Thu H; Ung, Peter Man-Un; Palde, Prakash B; Paulsen, Candice E; Schlessinger, Avner; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-07-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of signal-derived H2O2, and oxidation of active-site cysteine 797 to sulfenic acid enhances kinase activity. Although a major class of covalent drugs targets C797, nothing is known about its catalytic importance or how S-sulfenylation leads to activation. Here, we report the first detailed functional analysis of C797. In contrast to prior assumptions, mutation of C797 diminishes catalytic efficiency in vitro and cells. The experimentally determined pKa and reactivity of C797 toward H2O2 correspondingly distinguish this residue from the bulk of the cysteinome. Molecular dynamics simulation of reduced versus oxidized EGFR, reinforced by experimental testing, indicates that sulfenylation of C797 allows new electrostatic interactions to be formed with the catalytic loop. Finally, we show that chronic oxidative stress yields an EGFR subpopulation that is refractory to the FDA-approved drug afatinib. Collectively, our data highlight the significance of redox biology to understanding kinase regulation and drug pharmacology. PMID:27427230

  15. The molecular basis for the alternative stable phenotype in a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, A; Takahashi, M

    2001-10-01

    In the sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia, the somatic nucleus (macronucleus) undergoes massive genomic rearrangement, including gene amplification and excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), in its normal developmental process. Strain d4-662, one of the pawn mutants, is a behavioral mutant of P. tetraurelia that carries a recessive allele of pwB662. ThepwB gene in the macronucleus of the strain has an insertion of the IES because a base substitution within the IES prevents its excision during gene rearrangement. Cultures of this strain frequently contain cells reverting to the wild type in the behavioral phenotype. The mutant and revertant cells maintained stable clonal phenotypes under the various environmental conditions examined unless they underwent sexual reproduction. After sexual reproduction, both mutant and revertant produced 2.7-7.1% reverted progeny. A molecular analysis performed on the macronuclear DNA of the mutant and revertant of d4-662 showed that much less than 1% of the mutant IES was precisely excised at every sexual reproduction of the strain. Therefore, the alternative phenotype of strain d4-662 seems to be caused by an alternative excision of the mutant IES. PMID:11817644

  16. Molecular basis for interaction of let-7 microRNAs with Lin28

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yunsun; Chen, Casandra; Gregory, Richard I; Chou, James J; Sliz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Among these, members of the let-7 miRNA family control many cell fate determination genes to influence pluripotency, differentiation, and transformation. Lin28 is a specific, post-transcriptional inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis. We report crystal structures of mouse Lin28 in complex with sequences from let-7d, let-7-f1, and let-7g precursors. The two folded domains of Lin28 recognize two distinct regions of the RNA and are sufficient for inhibition of let-7 in vivo. We also show by NMR spectroscopy that the linker connecting the two folded domains is flexible, accommodating Lin28 binding to diverse let-7 family members. Protein-RNA complex formation imposes specific conformations on both components that could affect downstream recognition by other processing factors. Our data provide a molecular explanation for Lin28 specificity and a model for how it regulates let-7. PMID:22078496

  17. Molecular basis of a novel renal amyloidosis due to N184K gelsolin variant.

    PubMed

    Bonì, Francesco; Milani, Mario; Porcari, Riccardo; Barbiroli, Alberto; Ricagno, Stefano; de Rosa, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in gelsolin are responsible for a systemic amyloidosis first described in 1969. Until recently, the disease was associated with two substitutions of the same residue, leading to the loss of the calcium binding site. Novel interest arose in 2014 when the N184K variant of the protein was identified as the etiological agent of a novel kidney-localized amyloidosis. Here we provide a first rationale for N184K pathogenicity. We show that the mutation induces a destabilization of gelsolin second domain, without compromising its calcium binding capacity. X-ray data combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrates that the primary source of the destabilization is a loss of connectivity in proximity of the metal. Such rearrangement of the H-bond network does not have a major impact on the overall fold of the domain, nevertheless, it increases the flexibility of a stretch of the protein, which is consequently processed by furin protease. Overall our data suggest that the N184K variant is subjected to the same aberrant proteolytic events responsible for the formation of amyloidogenic fragments in the previously characterized mutants. At the same time our data suggest that a broader number of mutations, unrelated to the metal binding site, can lead to a pathogenic phenotype. PMID:27633054

  18. The molecular basis of O2-sensing and hypoxia tolerance in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Conforti, L; Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Yuan, Y; Kim, H W; Kim, R H; Seta, K; Millhorn, D E

    2001-02-01

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stimulus. However, very little is known about the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to changes in oxygen. Our laboratory has utilized the PC12 cell line in order to study the biophysical and molecular response to hypoxia. The current review summarizes our results. We demonstrate that the O2-sensitive K(+) channel, Kv1.2, is present in PC12 cells and plays a critical role in the hypoxia-induced depolarization of PC12 cells. Previous studies have shown that PC12 cells secrete a variety of autocrine/paracrine factors, including dopamine, norepinephrine, and adenosine during hypoxia. We investigated the mechanisms by which adenosine modulates cell function and the effect of chronic hypoxia on this modulation. Finally, we present results identifying the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and SAPKs) as hypoxia-regulated protein kinases. Specifically, we show that p38 and an isoform, p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia. In addition, our results demonstrate that the p42/p44 MAPK protein kinases are activated by hypoxia. We further show that p42/p44 MAPK is critical for the hypoxia-induced transactivation of endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor. Together, these results provide greater insight into the mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to hypoxia. PMID:11207433

  19. The Molecular Basis of Radial Intercalation during Tissue Spreading in Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Cobo, Isidoro; Omara, Sharif; McLachlan, Sophie; Keller, Ray; Mayor, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Radial intercalation is a fundamental process responsible for the thinning of multilayered tissues during large-scale morphogenesis; however, its molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Using amphibian epiboly, the thinning and spreading of the animal hemisphere during gastrulation, here we provide evidence that radial intercalation is driven by chemotaxis of cells toward the external layer of the tissue. This role of chemotaxis in tissue spreading and thinning is unlike its typical role associated with large-distance directional movement of cells. We identify the chemoattractant as the complement component C3a, a factor normally linked with the immune system. The mechanism is explored by computational modeling and tested in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. This mechanism is robust against fluctuations of chemoattractant levels and expression patterns and explains expansion during epiboly. This study provides insight into the fundamental process of radial intercalation and could be applied to a wide range of morphogenetic events. PMID:27165554

  20. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  1. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  2. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cattò, Cristina; Dell’Orto, Silvia; Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Vitali, Alberto; Marzano, Valeria; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and screened against Escherichia coli to understand the structural requirements necessary for biofilm inhibition at sub-lethal concentrations. Considerations concerning the relationship between structure and anti-biofilm activity revealed that i) the para-sulfoxy ester group is not needed to exploit the anti-biofilm activity of the molecule, it is the cinnamic acid scaffold that is responsible for anti-biofilm performance; ii) the anti-biofilm activity of ZA derivatives depends on the presence of a carboxylate anion and, consequently, on its hydrogen-donating ability; iii) the conjugated aromatic system is instrumental to the anti-biofilm activities of ZA and its analogues. Using a protein pull-down approach, combined with mass spectrometry, the herein-defined active structure of ZA was matrix-immobilized, and was proved to interact with the E. coli NADH:quinone reductase, WrbA, suggesting a possible role of this protein in the biofilm formation process. PMID:26132116

  3. Evolutionary Genomics of Staphylococcus aureus Reveals Insights into the Origin and Molecular Basis of Ruminant Host Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Guinane, Caitriona M.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Tormo-Mas, Maria A.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Lowder, Bethan V.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Smyth, Davida S.; Smyth, Cyril J.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Gould, Katherine A.; Witney, Adam; Hinds, Jason; Bollback, Jonathan P.; Rambaut, Andrew; Penadés, José R.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic biotyping has traditionally been used to differentiate bacteria occupying distinct ecological niches such as host species. For example, the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus from sheep to coagulate ruminant plasma, reported over 60 years ago, led to the description of small ruminant and bovine S. aureus ecovars. The great majority of small ruminant isolates are represented by a single, widespread clonal complex (CC133) of S. aureus, but its evolutionary origin and the molecular basis for its host tropism remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the CC133 clone evolved as the result of a human to ruminant host jump followed by adaptive genome diversification. Comparative whole-genome sequencing revealed molecular evidence for host adaptation including gene decay and diversification of proteins involved in host–pathogen interactions. Importantly, several novel mobile genetic elements encoding virulence proteins with attenuated or enhanced activity in ruminants were widely distributed in CC133 isolates, suggesting a key role in its host-specific interactions. To investigate this further, we examined the activity of a novel staphylococcal pathogenicity island (SaPIov2) found in the great majority of CC133 isolates which encodes a variant of the chromosomally encoded von Willebrand-binding protein (vWbpSov2), previously demonstrated to have coagulase activity for human plasma. Remarkably, we discovered that SaPIov2 confers the ability to coagulate ruminant plasma suggesting an important role in ruminant disease pathogenesis and revealing the origin of a defining phenotype of the classical S. aureus biotyping scheme. Taken together, these data provide broad new insights into the origin and molecular basis of S. aureus ruminant host specificity. PMID:20624747

  4. Phylogeny and Molecular Identification of Vibrios on the Basis of Multilocus Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, F. L.; Gevers, D.; Thompson, C. C.; Dawyndt, P.; Naser, S.; Hoste, B.; Munn, C. B.; Swings, J.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the usefulness of rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequences for the identification of vibrios. We sequenced fragments of these loci from a collection of 208 representative strains, including 192 well-documented Vibrionaceae strains and 16 presumptive Vibrio isolates associated with coral bleaching. In order to determine the intraspecies variation among the three loci, we included several representative strains per species. The phylogenetic trees constructed with the different genetic loci were roughly in agreement with former polyphasic taxonomic studies, including the 16S rRNA-based phylogeny of vibrios. The families Vibrionaceae, Photobacteriaceae, Enterovibrionaceae, and Salinivibrionaceae were all differentiated on the basis of each genetic locus. Each species clearly formed separated clusters with at least 98, 94, and 94% rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequence similarity, respectively. The genus Vibrio was heterogeneous and polyphyletic, with Vibrio fischeri, V. logei, and V. wodanis grouping closer to the Photobacterium genus. V. halioticoli-, V. harveyi-, V. splendidus-, and V. tubiashii-related species formed groups within the genus Vibrio. Overall, the three genetic loci were more discriminatory among species than were 16S rRNA sequences. In some cases, e.g., within the V. splendidus and V. tubiashii group, rpoA gene sequences were slightly less discriminatory than recA and pyrH sequences. In these cases, the combination of several loci will yield the most robust identification. We can conclude that strains of the same species will have at least 98, 94, and 94% rpoA, recA, and pyrH gene sequence similarity, respectively. PMID:16151093

  5. Molecular basis for designing selective modulators of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P

    2001-08-01

    Retinoic acid receptors are ligand-regulated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which comprises 49 members in the human genome. all-trans retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) are each encoded by three distinct genes and several isoforms arise from alternative splicing and the use of different promoters. While RXRs are promiscuous dimerization partners of several other nuclear receptors, RARs are active, in-vivo, when associated to RXRs. Retinoids are therefore regulators of multiple physiological processes, from embryogenesis to metabolism. Different combinations of RXR:RAR heterodimers occur as a function of their tissue-specific expression and their activity is mostly conditioned by the activation status of RAR. These heterodimers are defined as non permissive heterodimers, in opposition to permissive dimers whose transcriptional activity may be modulated through RXR and its dimerization partner. The transcriptional activity of these dimers also relies on their ability to recruit nuclear coactivators and corepressors, which function as multi proteic complexes harboring several enzymatic activities (acetylases, kinases). The structure of the ligand bound to the RAR moiety of the dimer, as well as the nature of the DNA sequence to which dimers are bound, dictate the relative affinity of dimers for coactivators and thus its overall transcriptional activity. RARs are also able to repress the activity of unrelated transcription factors such as AP1 and NF-kappa-B, and therefore have potent anti proliferative and anti inflammatory properties. This review summarizes our current view of molecular mechanisms governing these various activities and emphasizes the need for a detailed understanding of how retinoids may dictate transactivating and transrepressive properties of RARs and RXRs, which may be considered as highly valuable therapeutic targets in many diseases such as cancer, skin hyperproliferation and

  6. Molecular basis for pH-dependent mucosal dehydration in cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed

    Garland, Alaina L; Walton, William G; Coakley, Raymond D; Tan, Chong D; Gilmore, Rodney C; Hobbs, Carey A; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Clunes, Lucy A; Bencharit, Sompop; Stutts, M Jackson; Betts, Laurie; Redinbo, Matthew R; Tarran, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The ability to maintain proper airway surface liquid (ASL) volume homeostasis is vital for mucus hydration and clearance, which are essential aspects of the mammalian lung's innate defense system. In cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common life-threatening genetic disorders, ASL dehydration leads to mucus accumulation and chronic infection. In normal airways, the secreted protein short palate lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) effectively inhibits epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-dependent Na(+) absorption and preserves ASL volume. In CF airways, it has been hypothesized that increased ENaC-dependent Na(+) absorption contributes to ASL depletion, and hence increased disease. However, this theory is controversial, and the mechanism for abnormal ENaC regulation in CF airways has remained elusive. Here, we show that SPLUNC1 is a pH-sensitive regulator of ENaC and is unable to inhibit ENaC in the acidic CF airway environment. Alkalinization of CF airway cultures prevented CF ASL hyperabsorption, and this effect was abolished when SPLUNC1 was stably knocked down. Accordingly, we resolved the crystal structure of SPLUNC1 to 2.8 Å. Notably, this structure revealed two pH-sensitive salt bridges that, when removed, rendered SPLUNC1 pH-insensitive and able to regulate ASL volume in acidic ASL. Thus, we conclude that ENaC hyperactivity is secondary to reduced CF ASL pH. Together, these data provide molecular insights into the mucosal dehydration associated with a range of pulmonary diseases, including CF, and suggest that future therapy be directed toward alkalinizing the pH of CF airways. PMID:24043776

  7. Clinical spectrum and molecular basis of recessive congenital methemoglobinemia in India.

    PubMed

    Warang, P P; Kedar, P S; Shanmukaiah, C; Ghosh, K; Colah, R B

    2015-01-01

    We report the clinical features and molecular characterization of 23 patients with cyanosis due to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (NADH-CYB5R) deficiency from India. The patients with type I recessive congenital methemoglobinemia (RCM) presented with mild to severe cyanosis only whereas patients with type II RCM had cyanosis associated with severe neurological impairment. Thirteen mutations were identified which included 11 missense mutations causing single amino acid changes (p.Arg49Trp, p.Arg58Gln, p.Pro145Ser, p.Gly155Glu, p.Arg160Pro, p.Met177Ile, p.Met177Val, p.Ile178Thr, p.Ala179Thr, p.Thr238Met, and p.Val253Met), one stop codon mutation (p.Trp236X) and one splice-site mutation (p.Gly76Ser). Seven of these mutations (p.Arg50Trp, p.Gly155Glu, p.Arg160Pro, p.Met177Ile, p.Met177Val, p.Ile178Thr, and p.Thr238Met) were novel. Two mutations (p.Gly76Ser and p.Trp236X) were identified for the first time in the homozygous state globally causing type II RCM. We used the three-dimensional (3D) structure of human erythrocyte NADH-CYB5R to evaluate the protein structural context of the affected residues. Our data provides a rationale for the observed enzyme deficiency and contributes to a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation in NADH-CYB5R deficiency. PMID:24266649

  8. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Miller, Cassandra L.; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Zou, Juan; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT) domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR's cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs) in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics. PMID:27746744

  9. Molecular basis for competitive solvation of the Burkholderia cepacia lipase by sorbitol and urea.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ivan P; Martínez, Leandro

    2016-08-21

    Increasing the stability of proteins is important for their application in industrial processes. In the intracellular environment many small molecules, called osmolytes, contribute to protein stabilization under physical or chemical stress. Understanding the nature of the interactions of these osmolytes with proteins can help the design of solvents and mutations to increase protein stability in extracellular media. One of the most common stabilizing osmolyes is sorbitol and one of the most common chemical denaturants is urea. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a detailed picture of the solvation of the Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) in the presence of the protecting osmolyte sorbitol and of the urea denaturant. We show that both sorbitol and urea compete with water for interactions with the protein surface. Overall, sorbitol promotes the organization of water in the first solvation shell and displaces water from the second solvation shell, while urea causes opposite effects. These effects are, however, highly heterogeneous among residue types. For instance, the depletion of water from the first protein solvation shell by urea can be traced down essentially to the side chain of negatively charged residues. The organization of water in the first solvation shell promoted by sorbitol occurs at polar (but not charged) residues, where the urea effect is minor. By contrast, sorbitol depletes water from the second solvation shell of polar residues, while urea promotes water organization at the same distances. The interactions of urea with negatively charged residues are insensitive to the presence of sorbitol. This osmolyte removes water and urea particularly from the second solvation shell of polar and non-polar residues. In summary, we provide a comprehensive description of the diversity of protein-solvent interactions, which can guide further investigations on the stability of proteins in non-conventional media, and assist solvent and

  10. Molecular basis of a novel adaptation to hypoxic-hypercapnia in a strictly fossorial mole

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated blood O2 affinity enhances survival at low O2 pressures, and is perhaps the best known and most broadly accepted evolutionary adjustment of terrestrial vertebrates to environmental hypoxia. This phenotype arises by increasing the intrinsic O2 affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) molecule, by decreasing the intracellular concentration of allosteric effectors (e.g., 2,3-diphosphoglycerate; DPG), or by suppressing the sensitivity of Hb to these physiological cofactors. Results Here we report that strictly fossorial eastern moles (Scalopus aquaticus) have evolved a low O2 affinity, DPG-insensitive Hb - contrary to expectations for a mammalian species that is adapted to the chronic hypoxia and hypercapnia of subterranean burrow systems. Molecular modelling indicates that this functional shift is principally attributable to a single charge altering amino acid substitution in the β-type δ-globin chain (δ136Gly→Glu) of this species that perturbs electrostatic interactions between the dimer subunits via formation of an intra-chain salt-bridge with δ82Lys. However, this replacement also abolishes key binding sites for the red blood cell effectors Cl-, lactate and DPG (the latter of which is virtually absent from the red cells of this species) at δ82Lys, thereby markedly reducing competition for carbamate formation (CO2 binding) at the δ-chain N-termini. Conclusions We propose this Hb phenotype illustrates a novel mechanism for adaptively elevating the CO2 carrying capacity of eastern mole blood during burst tunnelling activities associated with subterranean habitation. PMID:20637064

  11. Molecular and structural basis for redox regulation of beta-actin.

    PubMed

    Lassing, Ingrid; Schmitzberger, Florian; Björnstedt, Mikael; Holmgren, Arne; Nordlund, Pär; Schutt, Clarence E; Lindberg, Uno

    2007-07-01

    An essential consequence of growth factor-mediated signal transduction is the generation of intracellular H(2)O(2). It operates as a second messenger in the control of actin microfilament dynamics, causing rapid and dramatic changes in the morphology and motile activity of stimulated cells. Little is understood about the molecular mechanisms causing these changes in the actin system. Here, it is shown that H(2)O(2) acts directly upon several levels of this system, and some of the mechanistic effects are detailed. We describe the impact of oxidation on the polymerizability of non-muscle beta/gamma-actin and compare with that of muscle alpha-actin. Oxidation of beta/gamma-actin can cause a complete loss of polymerizability, crucially, reversible by the thioredoxin system. Further, oxidation of the actin impedes its interaction with profilin and causes depolymerization of filamentous actin. The effects of oxidation are critically dependent on the nucleotide state and the concentration of Ca(2+). We have determined the crystal structure of oxidized beta-actin to a resolution of 2.6 A. The arrangement in the crystal implies an antiparallel homodimer connected by an intermolecular disulfide bond involving cysteine 374. Our data indicate that this dimer forms under non-polymerizing and oxidizing conditions. We identify oxidation of cysteine 272 in the crystallized actin dimer, likely to a cysteine sulfinic acid. In beta/gamma-actin, this is the cysteine residue most reactive towards H(2)O(2) in solution, and we suggest plausible structural determinants for its reactivity. No other oxidative modification was obvious in the structure, highlighting the specificity of the oxidation by H(2)O(2). Possible consequences of the observed effects in a cellular context and their potential relevance are discussed.

  12. Receptor model for the molecular basis of tissue selectivity of 1, 4-dihydropyridine calcium channel drugs.

    PubMed

    Langs, D A; Strong, P D; Triggle, D J

    1990-09-01

    Our analysis of the solid state conformations of nifedipine [dimethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate ] and its 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) analogues produced a cartoon description of the important interactions between these drugs and their voltage-dependent calcium channel receptor. In the present study a molecular-level detailed model of the 1,4-DHP receptor binding site has been built from the published amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes. The voltage-sensing component of the channel described in this work differs from other reported for the homologous sodium channel in that it incorporates a water structure and a staggered, rather than eclipsed, hydrogen bonded S4 helix conformation. The major recognition surfaces of the receptor lie in helical grooves on the S4 or voltage-sensing alpha-helix that is positioned in the center of the bundle of transmembrane helices that define each of the four calcium channel domains. Multiple binding clefts defined by Arg-X-X-Arg-P-X-X-S 'reading frames' exist on the S4 strand. The tissue selectivity of nifedipine and its analogues may arise, in part, from conservative changes in the amino acid residues at the P and S positions of the reading frame that define the ester-binding regions of receptors from different tissues. The crystal structures of two tissue-selective nifedipine analogues, nimodipine [isopropyl (2-methoxyethyl) 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate ] and nitrendipine [ethyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3, 5-pyridinecarboxylate] are reported. Nimodipine was observed to have an unusual ester side chain conformation that enhances the fit to the proposed ester-sensing region of the receptor.

  13. Microbes on building materials--evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lopandic, Ksenija; Spangl, Bernhard; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Voitl, Christian; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-11-15

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials - common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials.

  14. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide in a remarkable reaction that requires manganese and dioxygen. Previous studies have shown that replacing an active-site loop segment Ser161-Glu162-Asn163-Ser164 in the N-terminal domain of OxDC with the cognate residues Asp161-Ala162-Ser-163-Asn164 of an evolutionarily related, Mn-dependent oxalate oxidase gives a chimeric variant (DASN) that exhibits significantly increased oxidase activity. The mechanistic basis for this change in activity has now been investigated using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope effect (IE) measurements. Quantitative analysis of the reaction stoichiometry as a function of oxalate concentration, as determined by MIMS, suggests that the increased oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant is associated with only a small fraction of the enzyme molecules in solution. In addition, IE measurements show that C–C bond cleavage in the DASN OxDC variant proceeds via the same mechanism as in the wild-type enzyme, even though the Glu162 side chain is absent. Thus, replacement of the loop residues does not modulate the chemistry of the enzyme-bound Mn(II) ion. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the observed oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant arises from an increased level of access of the solvent to the active site during catalysis, implying that the functional role of Glu162 is to control loop conformation. A 2.6 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between oxalate and the Co(II)-substituted ΔE162 OxDC variant, in which Glu162 has been deleted from the active site loop, reveals the likely mode by which the substrate coordinates the catalytically active Mn ion prior to C–C bond cleavage. The “end-on” conformation of oxalate observed in the structure is consistent with the previously published V/K IE data and provides an empty coordination site for the dioxygen ligand that is thought to

  15. Myocardial contractility in the echo lab: molecular, cellular and pathophysiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Bombardini, Tonino

    2005-01-01

    In the standard accepted concept, contractility is the intrinsic ability of heart muscle to generate force and to shorten, independently of changes in the preload or afterload with fixed heart rates. At molecular level the crux of the contractile process lies in the changing concentrations of Ca2+ ions in the myocardial cytosol. Ca2+ ions enter through the calcium channel that opens in response to the wave of depolarization that travels along the sarcolemma. These Ca2+ ions "trigger" the release of more calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and thereby initiate a contraction-relaxation cycle. In the past, several attempts were made to transfer the pure physiological concept of contractility, expressed in the isolated myocardial fiber by the maximal velocity of contraction of unloaded muscle fiber (Vmax), to the in vivo beating heart. Suga and Sagawa achieved this aim by measuring pressure/volume loops in the intact heart: during a positive inotropic intervention, the pressure volume loop reflects a smaller end-systolic volume and a higher end-systolic pressure, so that the slope of the pressure volume relationship moves upward and to the left. The pressure volume relationship is the most reliable index for assessing myocardial contractility in the intact circulation and is almost insensitive to changes in preload and after load. This is widely used in animal studies and occasionally clinically. The limit of the pressure volume relationship is that it fails to take into account the frequency-dependent regulation of contractility: the frequency-dependent control of transmembrane Ca2+ entry via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels provides cardiac cells with a highly sophisticated short-term system for the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. An increased stimulation rate increases the force of contraction: the explanation is repetitive Ca2+ entry with each depolarization and, hence, an accumulation of cytosolic calcium. As the heart fails, there is a change in

  16. Molecular basis for chloronium-mediated meroterpene cyclization: cloning, sequencing, and heterologous expression of the napyradiomycin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Moffitt, Michelle C; Zazopoulos, Emmanuel; McAlpine, James B; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Moore, Bradley S

    2007-06-01

    Structural inspection of the bacterial meroterpenoid antibiotics belonging to the napyradiomycin family of chlorinated dihydroquinones suggests that the biosynthetic cyclization of their terpenoid subunits is initiated via a chloronium ion. The vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases that catalyze such reactions are distributed in fungi and marine algae and have yet to be characterized from bacteria. The cloning and sequence analysis of the 43-kb napyradiomycin biosynthetic cluster (nap) from Streptomyces aculeolatus NRRL 18422 and from the undescribed marine sediment-derived Streptomyces sp. CNQ-525 revealed 33 open reading frames, three of which putatively encode vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases. Heterologous expression of the CNQ-525-based nap biosynthetic cluster in Streptomyces albus produced at least seven napyradiomycins, including the new analog 2-deschloro-2-hydroxy-A80915C. These data not only revealed the molecular basis behind the biosynthesis of these novel meroterpenoid natural products but also resulted in the first in vivo verification of vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases.

  17. Identification of the molecular basis of inhibitor selectivity between the human and streptococcal type I methionine aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Arya, Tarun; Reddi, Ravikumar; Kishor, Chandan; Ganji, Roopa Jones; Bhukya, Supriya; Gumpena, Rajesh; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2015-03-12

    The methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) family is responsible for the cleavage of the initiator methionine from newly synthesized proteins. Currently, there are no small molecule inhibitors that show selectivity toward the bacterial MetAPs compared to the human enzyme. In our current study, we have screened 20 α-aminophosphonate derivatives and identified a molecule (compound 15) that selectively inhibits the S. pneumonia MetAP in low micromolar range but not the human enzyme. Further bioinformatics, biochemical, and structural analyses suggested that phenylalanine (F309) in the human enzyme and methionine (M205) in the S. pneumonia MetAP at the analogous position render them with different susceptibilities against the identified inhibitor. X-ray crystal structures of various inhibitors in complex with wild type and F309M enzyme further established the molecular basis for the inhibitor selectivity.

  18. Molecular basis of polyspecificity of the Small Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AbeS from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, Iryna; Brill, Shlomo; Oswald, Christine; Pos, Klaas M

    2016-02-13

    Secondary multidrug efflux transporters play a key role in the bacterial resistance phenotype. One of the major questions concerns the polyspecific recognition of substrates by these efflux pumps. To understand the molecular basis of this promiscuous recognition, we compared the substrate specificity of the well-studied Escherichia coli small multidrug resistance protein EmrE with that of the poorly studied Acinetobacter baumannii homologue AbeS. The latter drug/H(+) antiporter is a 109-amino-acid membrane protein with predicted four transmembrane helices. It effectively confers resistance toward ethidium, acriflavine and benzalkonium in an E. coli ΔemrEΔmdfA background. Purified AbeS and the substrate-specific hyperactive variant A16G bind tetraphenylphosphonium with nanomolar affinity and exhibit electrogenic transport of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium after reconstitution into liposomes. A16G hyperactivity was apparent toward acriflavine and ethidium, resulting in 7- to 10-fold higher normalized IC50 values, respectively, but not toward substrates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and benzalkonium. Substitution of Y3 and A42 with Ala or Ser, respectively, also displayed a substrate-dependent phenotype, as these variants were strongly affected in their properties to confer resistance against acriflavine and ethidium, but not against benzalkonium. The size and planarity of the conjugated aromatic moieties appear to be a critical and subtle criterion for substrate recognition by these transporters. Rather moderate changes in the property of side chains postulated to be part of the substrate binding site result in a large phenotypical difference. These observations provide indications for the molecular basis of specificity within the binding pocket of polyspecific transporters. PMID:26707198

  19. Molecular Basis of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Docking to Its Intact Receptor Studied with Carboxyl-terminal Photolabile Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Pinon, Delia I.; Miller, Laurence J.; Dong, Maoqing

    2009-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is a member of Family B G protein-coupled receptors and represents an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino-terminal domain of this receptor and that of several close family members, understanding of the molecular basis of natural ligand GLP1 binding to its intact receptor remains limited. The goal of this study was to explore spatial approximations between specific receptor residues within the carboxyl terminus of GLP1 and its receptor as normally docked. Therefore, we developed and characterized two high affinity, full-agonist photolabile GLP1 probes having sites for covalent attachment in positions 24 and 35. Both probes labeled the receptor specifically and saturably. Subsequent peptide mapping using chemical and proteinase cleavages of purified wild-type and mutant GLP1 receptor identified that the Arg131–Lys136 segment at the juxtamembrane region of the receptor amino terminus contained the site of labeling for the position 24 probe, and the specific receptor residue labeled by this probe was identified as Glu133 by radiochemical sequencing. Similarly, nearby residue Glu125 within the same region of the receptor amino-terminal domain was identified as the site of labeling by the position 35 probe. These data represent the first direct demonstration of spatial approximation between GLP1 and its intact receptor as docked, providing two important constraints for the modeling of this interaction. This should expand our understanding of the molecular basis of natural agonist ligand binding to the GLP1 receptor and may be relevant to other family members. PMID:19815559

  20. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by Na+/H+ exchanger-3

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Victor; Vadnagara, Komal; Di Sole, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial Na+/H+ exchanger-3 (NHE3) transport is fundamental for renal and intestinal sodium reabsorption. Cytoplasmic protons are thought to serve as allosteric modifiers of the exchanger and to trigger its transport through protein conformational change. This effect presupposes an intracellular pH (pHi) dependence of NHE3 activity, although the biophysical and molecular basis of NHE3 pHi sensitivity have not been defined. NHE3, when complexed with the calcineurin homologous protein-1 (CHP1), had a shift in pHi sensitivity (0.4 units) toward the acidic side in comparison with NHE3 alone, as measured by oscillating pH electrodes combined with whole-cell patch clamping. Indeed, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 inhibited NHE3 transport in a pHi -dependent manner. CHP1 binding to NHE3 also affected its acute regulation. Intracellular perfusion of peptide from the CHP1 binding region (or pHi modification to reduce the CHP1 amount bound to NHE3) was permissive and cooperative for dopamine inhibition of NHE3 but reversed that of adenosine. Thus, CHP1 interaction with NHE3 apparently establishes the exchanger set point for pHi, and modification in this set point is effective in the hormonal stimuli–mediated regulation of NHE3. CHP1 may serve as a regulatory cofactor for NHE3 conformational change, dependent on intracellular protonation.—Babich V., Vadnagara K., Di Sole, F. The biophysical and molecular basis of intracellular pH sensing by the Na+/H+ exchanger-3. PMID:23934281

  1. The molecular genetic basis of Glanzmann thrombasthenia in the Iraqi-Jewish and Arab populations in Israel

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.J. Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee ); Seligsohn, U. ); Lyman, S. ); Coller, B.S. )

    1991-04-15

    Glanzmann thrombasthenia is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by a decrease or absence of functional platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa ({alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3}) integrin receptors. Although thrombasthenia is a rare disorder, its occurrence is increased in some regions of the world where intracommunity marriage and consanguinity are commonplace, resulting in increased expression of autosomal recessive traits. The authors have been studying two populations having an unusually high frequency of Glanzmann disease, Iraqi Jews and Arabs living in Israel, and were able to distinguish the populations on the basis of immunodetectable GPIIIa and populations on the basis of immunodetectable GPIIIa and platelet surface vitronectin receptor ({alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}) expression. In this article, they describe molecular genetic studies based on use of the PCR that have allowed us to characterize platelet mRNA sequences encoding GPIIb and GPIIIa from patients in these populations. These studies demonstrate the heterogeneity of Glanzmann thrombasthenia in different populations, and its homogeneity within geographically restricted populations, and offer insight into the requirements for integrin surface expression.

  2. Structural and Functional Analysis of JMJD2D Reveals Molecular Basis for Site-Specific Demethylation among JMJD2 Demethylases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Swathi; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-01-08

    We found that JMJD2 lysine demethylases (KDMs) participate in diverse genomic processes. Most JMJD2 homologs display dual selectivity toward H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, with the exception of JMJD2D, which is specific for H3K9me3. Here, we report the crystal structures of the JMJD2D•2-oxoglutarate•H3K9me3 ternary complex and JMJD2D apoenzyme. Utilizing structural alignments with JMJD2A, molecular docking, and kinetic analysis with an array of histone peptide substrates, we elucidate the specific signatures that permit efficient recognition of H3K9me3 by JMJD2A and JMJD2D, and the residues in JMJD2D that occlude H3K36me3 demethylation. Surprisingly, these results reveal that JMJD2A and JMJD2D exhibit subtle yet important differences in H3K9me3 recognition, despite the overall similarity in the substrate-binding conformation. Further, we show that H3T11 phosphorylation abrogates demethylation by JMJD2 KDMs. These studies reveal the molecular basis for JMJD2 site specificity and provide a framework for structure-based design of selective inhibitors of JMJD2 KDMs implicated in disease.

  3. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Moody, D. Branch; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  4. Molecular basis for inhibition of AcrB multidrug efflux pump by novel and powerful pyranopyridine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Sjuts, Hanno; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Nguyen, Son T.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Ornik, Alina R.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Bowlin, Terry L.; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pos, Klaas M.; Opperman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC efflux pump is the archetype of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) exporters from Gram-negative bacteria. Overexpression of RND-type efflux pumps is a major factor in multidrug resistance (MDR), which makes these pumps important antibacterial drug discovery targets. We have recently developed novel pyranopyridine-based inhibitors of AcrB, which are orders of magnitude more powerful than the previously known inhibitors. However, further development of such inhibitors has been hindered by the lack of structural information for rational drug design. Although only the soluble, periplasmic part of AcrB binds and exports the ligands, the presence of the membrane-embedded domain in AcrB and its polyspecific binding behavior have made cocrystallization with drugs challenging. To overcome this obstacle, we have engineered and produced a soluble version of AcrB [AcrB periplasmic domain (AcrBper)], which is highly congruent in structure with the periplasmic part of the full-length protein, and is capable of binding substrates and potent inhibitors. Here, we describe the molecular basis for pyranopyridine-based inhibition of AcrB using a combination of cellular, X-ray crystallographic, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations studies. The pyranopyridines bind within a phenylalanine-rich cage that branches from the deep binding pocket of AcrB, where they form extensive hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, the increasing potency of improved inhibitors correlates with the formation of a delicate protein- and water-mediated hydrogen bond network. These detailed insights provide a molecular platform for the development of novel combinational therapies using efflux pump inhibitors for combating multidrug resistant Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26976576

  5. The route to MBxNyCz molecular wheels: II. Results using accurate functionals and basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güthler, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandey, R.; Boustani, I.

    2014-04-01

    Applying ab initio quantum chemical methods, molecular wheels composed of metal and light atoms were investigated. High quality basis sets 6-31G*, TZPV, and cc-pVTZ as well as exchange and non-local correlation functionals B3LYP, BP86 and B3P86 were used. The ground-state energy and structures of cyclic planar and pyramidal clusters TiBn (for n = 3-10) were computed. In addition, the relative stability and electronic structures of molecular wheels TiBxNyCz (for x, y, z = 0-10) and MBnC10-n (for n = 2 to 5 and M = Sc to Zn) were determined. This paper sustains a follow-up study to the previous one of Boustani and Pandey [Solid State Sci. 14 (2012) 1591], in which the calculations were carried out at the HF-SCF/STO3G/6-31G level of theory to determine the initial stability and properties. The results show that there is a competition between the 2D planar and the 3D pyramidal TiBn clusters (for n = 3-8). Different isomers of TiB10 clusters were also studied and a structural transition of 3D-isomer into 2D-wheel is presented. Substitution boron in TiB10 by carbon or/and nitrogen atoms enhances the stability and leads toward the most stable wheel TiB3C7. Furthermore, the computations show that Sc, Ti and V at the center of the molecular wheels are energetically favored over other transition metal atoms of the first row.

  6. [Molecular basis of oncogenesis].

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Régulier, E

    2001-01-01

    After a quarter century of rapid advances, cancer research has generated a rich and complex body of knowledge, revealing cancer to be a disease involving dynamic changes in the genome. Several lines of evidence indicate that tumorigenesis in humans is a multistep process and that these steps reflect genetic alterations that drive the progressive transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. The barriers to development of cancer are embodied in a teleology: cancer cells have defects in regulatory circuits that govern normal cell proliferation and homeostasis. This review concern the description of novel capabilities acquired during tumor development. PMID:11470634

  7. Structural and Molecular Basis for Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics by the Adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg2+ ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4′)-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. Importance   To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a

  8. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  9. Molecular basis of antithrombin deficiency in four Japanese patients with antithrombin gene abnormalities including two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Kyotani, Mayu; Okumura, Kaoru; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Yamamoto, Koji; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sugimura, Motoi; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2007-08-01

    We analyzed the antithrombin (AT) gene in four unrelated Japanese patients with an AT deficiency, and individually identified four distinct mutations in the heterozygous state. There were two novel mutations, 2417delT leading to a frameshift with a premature termination at amino acid -3 (FS-3Stop) and C2640T resulting in a missense mutation (Ala59Val). Previously reported mutations, T5342C (Ser116Pro) and T72C (Met-32Thr), were also found in the other two patients. To understand the molecular basis responsible for the AT deficiency in these patients, in vitro expression experiments were performed using HEK293 cells transfected with either wild type or respective mutant AT expression vector. We found that -3Stop-AT and -32Thr-AT were not secreted into the culture media, whereas 116Pro-AT and 59Val-AT were secreted normally. We further studied the heparin cofactor activity and the binding to heparin of each recombinant AT molecule. Ser116Pro mutation significantly impaired the binding affinity to heparin resulting in a reduced heparin cofactor activity. In contrast, we found that Ala59Val mutant AT unexpectedly showed a normal affinity to heparin, but severely impaired the heparin cofactor activity. Our findings suggested that FS-3Stop and Met-32Thr mutations are responsible for type I AT deficiency, whereas Ser116Pro and Ala59Val mutations contribute to type II AT deficiency, confirming that there were diverse molecular mechanisms of AT deficiency depend upon discrete AT gene abnormalities as reported previously.

  10. Structural Basis for Cooperative Binding of Azoles to CYP2E1 as Interpreted through Guided Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph W.; Hartman, Jessica H.; Perry, Martin D.; Miller, Grover P.

    2015-01-01

    CYP2E1 metabolizes a wide array of small, hydrophobic molecules, resulting in their detoxification or activation into carcinogens through Michaelis-Menten as well as cooperative mechanisms. Nevertheless, the molecular determinants for CYP2E1 specificity and metabolic efficiency toward these compounds are still unknown. Herein, we employed computational docking studies coupled to Molecular Dynamics simulations to provide a critical perspective for understanding a structural basis for cooperativity observed for an array of azoles from our previous binding and catalytic studies (Hartman, JH et al (2014) Biochem Pharmacol 87, 523-33). The resulting 28 CYP2E1 complexes in this study revealed a common passageway for azoles that included a hydrophobic steric barrier causing a pause in movement toward the active site. The entrance to the active site acted like a second sieve to restrict access to the inner chamber. Collectively, these interactions impacted the final orientation of azoles reaching the active site and hence could explain differences in their biochemical properties observed in our previous studies, such as the consequences of methylation at position 5 of the azole ring. The association of a second azole demonstrated significant differences in interactions stabilizing the bound complex than observed for the first binding event. Intermolecular interactions occurred between the two azoles as well as CYP2E1 residue side chains and backbone and involved both hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds. The relative importance of these interactions depended on the structure of the respective azoles indicating the absence of specific defining criteria for binding unlike the well-characterized dominant role of hydrophobicity in active site binding. Consequently, the structure activity relationships described here and elsewhere are necessary to more accurately identify factors impacting the observation and significance of cooperativity in CYP2E1 binding and catalysis

  11. A unique mono- and diacylglycerol lipase from Penicillium cyclopium: heterologous expression, biochemical characterization and molecular basis for its substrate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhong-Biao; Li, Jian-Fang; Li, Xue-Ting; Gu, Ying; Wu, Min-Chen; Wu, Jing; Wang, Jun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA gene encoding a mature peptide of the mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (abbreviated to PcMdl) from Penicillium cyclopium PG37 was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The recombinant PcMdl (rePcMdl) with an apparent molecular weight of 39 kDa showed the highest activity (40.5 U/mL of culture supernatant) on 1,2-dibutyrin substrate at temperature 35°C and pH 7.5. The rePcMdl was stable at a pH range of 6.5-9.5 and temperatures below 35°C. The activity of rePcMdl was inhibited by Hg2+ and Fe3+, but not significantly affected by EDTA or the other metal ions such as Na+, K+, Li+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Fe2+. PcMdl was identified to be strictly specific to mono- and diacylglycerol, but not triacylglycerol. Stereographic view of PcMdl docked with substrate (tri- or diacylglycerol) analogue indicated that the residue Phe256 plays an important role in conferring the substrate selectivity. Phe256 projects its side chain towards the substrate binding groove and makes the sn-1 moiety difficult to insert in. Furthermore, sn-1 moiety prevents the phosphorus atom (substitution of carboxyl carbon) from getting to the Oγ of Ser145, which results in the failure of triacylglycerol hydrolysis. These results should provide a basis for molecular engineering of PcMdl and expand its applications in industries. PMID:25051359

  12. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Heroux, A.; Scott, J. L.; Roy, S.; Lenoir, M.; Overduin, M.; Stahelin, R. V.; Kutateladze, T. G.

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded {beta}-barrel capped by an {alpha}-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the {beta}4 and {beta}7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the {beta}-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the {beta}-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  13. Molecular Basis of Secretin Docking to Its Intact Receptor Using Multiple Photolabile Probes Distributed throughout the Pharmacophore*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Hosohata, Keiko; Orry, Andrew; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular basis of ligand binding and activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors is not yet clear due to the lack of insight into the structure of intact receptors. Although NMR and crystal structures of amino-terminal domains of several family members support consistency in general structural motifs that include a peptide-binding cleft, there are variations in the details of docking of the carboxyl terminus of peptide ligands within this cleft, and there is no information about siting of the amino terminus of these peptides. There are also no empirical data to orient the receptor amino terminus relative to the core helical bundle domain. Here, we prepared a series of five new probes, incorporating photolabile moieties into positions 2, 15, 20, 24, and 25 of full agonist secretin analogues. Each bound specifically to the receptor and covalently labeled single distinct receptor residues. Peptide mapping of labeled wild-type and mutant receptors identified that the position 15, 20, and 25 probes labeled residues within the distal amino terminus of the receptor, whereas the position 24 probe labeled the amino terminus adjacent to TM1. Of note, the position 2 probe labeled a residue within the first extracellular loop of the receptor, a region not previously labeled, providing an important new constraint for docking the amino-terminal region of secretin to its receptor core. These additional experimentally derived constraints help to refine our understanding of the structure of the secretin-intact receptor complex and provide new insights into understanding the molecular mechanism for activation of family B G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:21566140

  14. Molecular Basis of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Coupling to the G Protein Heterotrimer Gαiβγ

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Ahn, Kwang H.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    The cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is a member of the rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The human CB1 receptor, which is among the most expressed receptors in the brain, has been implicated in several disease states, including drug addiction, anxiety, depression, obesity, and chronic pain. Different classes of CB1 agonists evoke signaling pathways through the activation of specific subtypes of G proteins. The molecular basis of CB1 receptor coupling to its cognate G protein is unknown. As a first step toward understanding CB1 receptor-mediated G protein signaling, we have constructed a ternary complex structural model of the CB1 receptor and Gi heterotrimer (CB1-Gi), guided by the x-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in complex with Gs (β2AR-Gs), through 824-ns duration molecular dynamics simulations in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer environment. We identified a group of residues at the juxtamembrane regions of the intracellular loops 2 and 3 (IC2 and IC3) of the CB1 receptor, including Ile-2183.54, Tyr-224IC2, Asp-3386.30, Arg-3406.32, Leu-3416.33, and Thr-3446.36, as potential key contacts with the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. Ala mutations of these residues at the receptor-Gi interface resulted in little G protein coupling activity, consistent with the present model of the CB1-Gi complex, which suggests tight interactions between CB1 and the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. The model also suggests that unique conformational changes in the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gα play a crucial role in the receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:24092756

  15. Molecular basis for variable expression of merozoite surface antigen gp45 among American isolates of Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Fisher, T G; McElwain, T F; Palmer, G H

    2001-06-01

    Immunization with the merozoite surface glycoprotein gp45 induces protection against challenge using the homologous Babesia bigemina strain. However, gp45 B-cell epitopes are highly polymorphic among B. bigemina strains isolated from different geographical locations within North and South America. The molecular basis for this polymorphism was investigated using the JG-29 biological clone of a Mexico strain of B. bigemina and comparison with the Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Texcoco strains. The molecular size and antibody reactivity of gp45 expressed by the JG-29 clone were identical to those of the parental Mexico strain. gp45 cDNA and the genomic locus encompassing gp45 were cloned and sequenced from JG-29. The locus sequence and Southern blot data were consistent with a single gp45 copy in the JG-29 genome. The JG-29 cDNA expressed the full-length protein recognized by the gp45-specific monoclonal antibody 14/1.3.2. The genomes of the Puerto Rico and St. Croix strains of B. bigemina were shown to lack a closely related gp45-like gene by PCR using multiple primer sets and by Southern blots using both full-length and region-specific gp45 probes. This genomic difference was confirmed using unpassaged isolates from a 1999 disease outbreak in Puerto Rico. In contrast, the Texcoco strain retains a gp45 gene, encoding an open reading frame identical to that of JG-29. However, the Texcoco gp45 gene is not transcribed. These two mechanisms, lack of a closely related gp45-like gene and failure to transcribe gp45, result in generation of antigenic polymorphism among B. bigemina strains, and the latter mechanism is unique compared to prior mechanisms of antigenic polymorphism identified in babesial parasites.

  16. Molecular basis for arsenic-induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi, Jingbo

    2004-08-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed.

  17. The molecular basis of inactivation of metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori using polyethyleneimine functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Chowdhury, Rukhsana; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2013-01-01

    In view of the world wide prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, its potentially serious consequences, and the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains there is an urgent need for the development of alternative strategies to combat the infection. In this study it has been demonstrated that polyethyleneimine (PEI) functionalized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) inhibit the growth of a metronidazole-resistant strain of H. pylori and the molecular basis of the anti-bacterial activity of ZnO-PEI NP has been investigated. The ZnO-PEI NP was synthesized using a wet chemical method with a core size of approximately 3-7 nm. Internalization and distribution of ZnO-PEI NP without agglomeration was observed in H. pylori cytosol by electron microscopy. Several lines of evidence including scanning electron microscopy, propidium iodide uptake and ATP assay indicate severe membrane damage in ZnO-PEI NP treated H. pylori. Intracellular ROS generation increased rapidly following the treatment of H. pylori with ZnO-PEI NP and extensive degradation of 16S and 23S rRNA was observed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. Finally, considerable synergy between ZnO-PEI NP and antibiotics was observed and it has been demonstrated that the concentration of ZnO-PEI NP (20 µg/ml) that is non-toxic to human cells could be used in combination with sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics for the inhibition of H. pylori growth.

  18. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  19. Molecular Design, Functional Characterization and Structural Basis of a Protein Inhibitor Against the HIV-1 Pathogenicity Factor Nef

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Sebastian; Schievink, Simone I.; Schulte, Antje; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Fackler, Oliver T.; Geyer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Increased spread of HIV-1 and rapid emergence of drug resistance warrants development of novel antiviral strategies. Nef, a critical viral pathogenicity factor that interacts with host cell factors but lacks enzymatic activity, is not targeted by current antiviral measures. Here we inhibit Nef function by simultaneously blocking several highly conserved protein interaction surfaces. This strategy, referred to as “wrapping Nef”, is based on structure-function analyses that led to the identification of four target sites: (i) SH3 domain interaction, (ii) interference with protein transport processes, (iii) CD4 binding and (iv) targeting to lipid membranes. Screening combinations of Nef-interacting domains, we developed a series of small Nef interacting proteins (NIs) composed of an SH3 domain optimized for binding to Nef, fused to a sequence motif of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail and combined with a prenylation signal for membrane association. NIs bind to Nef in the low nM affinity range, associate with Nef in human cells and specifically interfere with key biological activities of Nef. Structure determination of the Nef-inhibitor complex reveals the molecular basis for binding specificity. These results establish Nef-NI interfaces as promising leads for the development of potent Nef inhibitors. PMID:21625496

  20. Hidden variability of floral homeotic B genes in Solanaceae provides a molecular basis for the evolution of novel functions.

    PubMed

    Geuten, Koen; Irish, Vivian

    2010-08-01

    B-class MADS box genes specify petal and stamen identities in several core eudicot species. Members of the Solanaceae possess duplicate copies of these genes, allowing for diversification of function. To examine the changing roles of such duplicate orthologs, we assessed the functions of B-class genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference approaches. Loss of function of individual duplicates can have distinct phenotypes, yet complete loss of B-class gene function results in extreme homeotic transformations of petal and stamen identities. We also show that these duplicate gene products have qualitatively different protein-protein interaction capabilities and different regulatory roles. Thus, compensatory changes in B-class MADS box gene duplicate function have occurred in the Solanaceae, in that individual gene roles are distinct, but their combined functions are equivalent. Furthermore, we show that species-specific differences in the stamen regulatory network are associated with differences in the expression of the microRNA miR169. Whereas there is considerable plasticity in individual B-class MADS box transcription factor function, there is overall conservation in the roles of the multimeric MADS box B-class protein complexes, providing robustness in the specification of petal and stamen identities. Such hidden variability in gene function as we observe for individual B-class genes can provide a molecular basis for the evolution of regulatory functions that result in novel morphologies.

  1. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  2. A mutation in the lipoprotein lipase gene is the molecular basis of chylomicronemia in a colony of domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Ginzinger, D G; Lewis, M E; Ma, Y; Jones, B R; Liu, G; Jones, S D

    1996-01-01

    Members of a domestic cat colony with chylomicronemia share many phenotypic features with human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency. Biochemical analysis reveals that these cats do have defective LPL catalytic activity and have a clinical phenotype very similar to human LPL deficiency. To determine the molecular basis underlying this biochemical phenotype, we have cloned the normal and affected cat LPL cDNAs and shown that the affected cat has a nucleotide change resulting in a substitution of arginine for glycine at residue 412 in exon 8. In vitro mutagenesis and expression studies, in addition to segregation analysis, have shown that this DNA change is the cause of LPL deficiency in this cat colony. Reduced body mass, growth rates, and increased stillbirth rates are observed in cats homozygous for this mutation. These findings show that this LPL deficient cat can serve as an animal model of human LPL deficiency and will be useful for in vivo investigation of the relationship between triglyceride rich lipoproteins and atherogenic risk and for the assessment of new approaches for treatment of LPL deficiency, including gene therapy. PMID:8636438

  3. Different molecular basis for fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency in the two clinical forms of hereditary tyrosinemia (type I).

    PubMed Central

    Tanguay, R M; Valet, J P; Lescault, A; Duband, J L; Laberge, C; Lettre, F; Plante, M

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2), the last enzyme in the catabolic pathway of tyrosine. FAH was purified from rat and human liver and was used to immunize rabbits. Specific antibodies were used to probe protein extracts of livers and other tissues of normal and tyrosinemic patients. No immunoreactive FAH band was observed on immunoblots of liver, kidneys, and lymphocytes from patients presenting with the acute form of hereditary tyrosinemia. Patients with the chronic form had immunoreactive FAH at a level approximately 20% of normal liver values, which was correlated with the measured enzymatic activity. Immunoblot analysis of aborted fetal tissues revealed normal FAH immunoreactivity in normal liver and kidneys. No FAH immunoreactivity was found in liver and kidneys of tyrosinemic fetuses. The presence of FAH immunoreactivity in normal fetal tissues suggests that deficient FAH activity in tyrosinemia is not simply related to a developmentally regulated expression of the enzyme. By this immunoblot assay, FAH was detected in most human tissues, with maximal immunoreactivity in liver and kidneys and with only trace amounts in chorionic villi and cultured amniocytes. These data confirm that the primary defect in the acute form of hereditary tyrosinemia is an absence of FAH. Moreover, these data suggest that both clinical forms of the disease have a different molecular basis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2378356

  4. Structural basis for regulation of stability and activity in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makshakova, Olga N; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Ermakova, Elena A; Zuev, Yuriy F; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    Tissue specific isoforms of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, somatic (GAPD) and sperm-specific (GAPDS), have been reported to display different levels of both stability and catalytic activity. Here we apply MD simulations to investigate molecular basis of this phenomenon. The protein is a tetramer where each subunit consists of two domains - catalytic and NAD-binding one. We demonstrated key residues responsible for intersubunit and interdomain interactions. Effect of several residues was studied by point mutations. Overall we considered three mutations (Glu96Gln, Glu244Gln and Asp311Asn) disrupting GAPDS-specific salt bridges. Comparison of calculated interaction energies with calorimetric enthalpies confirmed that intersubunit interactions were responsible for enhanced thermostability of GAPDS whereas interdomain interactions had indirect influence on intersubunit contacts. Mutation Asp311Asn was around 10Å far from the active center and corresponded to the closest natural substitution in the isoenzymes. MD simulations revealed that this residue had slight interaction with catalytic residues but influenced the hydrogen bond net and dynamics in active site. These effects can be responsible for a strong influence of this residue on catalytic activity. Overall, our results provide new insight into glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structure-function relationships and can be used for the engineering of mutant proteins with modified properties and for development of new inhibitors with indirect influence on the catalytic site. PMID:25869789

  5. Elucidation of the Molecular Basis of Cholecystokinin Peptide Docking to Its Receptor Using Site-Specific Intrinsic Photoaffinity Labeling and Molecular Modeling†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pino, Delia I.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors represent the largest family of receptors and the major target of current drug development efforts. Understanding of the mechanisms of ligand binding and activation of these receptors remains limited, despite recent advances in structural determination of family members. This work focuses on the use of photoaffinity labeling and molecular modeling to elucidate the structural basis of binding a natural peptide ligand to a family A G protein-coupled receptor, the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Two photolabile cholecystokinin analogues were developed and characterized as representing high-affinity, fully biologically active probes with sites of covalent attachment at positions 28 and 31. The sites of receptor labeling were identified by purification, proteolytic peptide mapping, and radiochemical sequencing of labeled wild-type and mutant cholecystokinin receptors. The position 28 probe labeled second extracellular loop residue Leu199, while the position 31 probe labeled first extracellular loop residue Phe107. Along with five additional spatial approximation constraints coming from previous photoaffinity labeling studies and 12 distance restraints from fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies, these were built into two homology models of the cholecystokinin receptor, based on the recent crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor and A2a-adenosine receptor. The resultant agonist ligand-occupied receptor models fully accommodate all existing experimental data and represent the best refined models of a peptide hormone receptor in this important family. PMID:19441839

  6. Molecular basis of requirement of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB signaling for interleukin 1-mediated osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jules, Joel; Zhang, Ping; Ashley, Jason W; Wei, Shi; Shi, Zhenqi; Liu, Jianzhong; Michalek, Suzanne M; Feng, Xu

    2012-05-01

    IL-1, a proinflammatory cytokine, is implicated in bone loss in various pathological conditions by promoting osteoclast formation, survival, and function. Although IL-1 alone can sufficiently prolong osteoclast survival and activate osteoclast function, IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis requires the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL). However, the molecular basis of the dependence of IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis on RANKL is not fully understood. Here we show that although IL-1 cannot activate the expression of the osteoclast genes encoding matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and carbonic anhydrase II in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), RANKL renders these osteoclast genes responsive to IL-1. We further demonstrate that IL-1 alone fails to induce the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a master transcriptional regulator of osteoclastogenesis), in BMMs but can up-regulate its expression in the presence of permissive levels of RANKL or with RANKL pretreatment. The RANK IVVY motif, which has been previously shown to commit BMMs to the osteoclast lineage in RANKL- and TNF α-mediated osteoclastogenesis, also plays a crucial role in IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis by changing the four osteoclast marker and NFATc1 genes to an IL-1-inducible state. Finally, we show that MyD88, a known critical component of the IL-1 receptor I signaling pathway, plays a crucial role in IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis from RANKL-primed BMMs by up-regulating the expression of the osteoclast marker and NFATc1 genes. This study reveals a novel mechanism of IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis and supports the promising potential of the IVVY motif to serve as a therapeutic target for inflammatory bone loss.

  7. Fungicide-Driven Evolution and Molecular Basis of Multidrug Resistance in Field Populations of the Grey Mould Fungus Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Mosbach, Andreas; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Fillinger, Sabine; Mernke, Dennis; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Leroux, Pierre; De Waard, Maarten A.; Hahn, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification resulting in reduced drug binding. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) caused by increased efflux activity is common in human pathogenic microbes, but rarely described for plant pathogens. Annual monitoring for fungicide resistance in field isolates from fungicide-treated vineyards in France and Germany revealed a rapidly increasing appearance of B. cinerea field populations with three distinct MDR phenotypes. All MDR strains showed increased fungicide efflux activity and overexpression of efflux transporter genes. Similar to clinical MDR isolates of Candida yeasts that are due to transcription factor mutations, all MDR1 strains were shown to harbor activating mutations in a transcription factor (Mrr1) that controls the gene encoding ABC transporter AtrB. MDR2 strains had undergone a unique rearrangement in the promoter region of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2, induced by insertion of a retrotransposon-derived sequence. MDR2 strains carrying the same rearranged mfsM2 allele have probably migrated from French to German wine-growing regions. The roles of atrB, mrr1 and mfsM2 were proven by the phenotypes of knock-out and overexpression mutants. As confirmed by sexual crosses, combinations of mrr1 and mfsM2 mutations lead to MDR3 strains with higher broad-spectrum resistance. An MDR3 strain was shown in field experiments to be selected against sensitive strains by fungicide treatments. Our data document for the first time the rising prevalence, spread and molecular basis of MDR populations in a major plant pathogen in agricultural environments. These populations will increase the risk of grey mould rot and hamper the effectiveness of current strategies for

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Portunus trituberculatus in Response to Salinity Stress Provides Insights into the Molecular Basis of Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jianjian; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yu; Gao, Baoquan; Chen, Ping; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, which is naturally distributed in the coastal waters of Asia-Pacific countries, is an important farmed species in China. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic factors that influence not only the distribution and abundance of crustaceans, it is also an important factor for artificial propagation of the crab. To better understand the interaction between salinity stress and osmoregulation, we performed a transcriptome analysis in the gills of Portunus trituberculatus challenged with salinity stress, using the Illumina Deep Sequencing technology. Results We obtained 27,696,835, 28,268,353 and 33,901,271 qualified Illumina read pairs from low salinity challenged (LC), non-challenged (NC), and high salinity challenged (HC) Portunus trituberculatus cDNA libraries, respectively. The overall de novo assembly of cDNA sequence data generated 94,511 unigenes, with an average length of 644 bp. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 1,705 genes differentially expressed in salinity stress compared to the controls, including 615 and 1,516 unigenes in NC vs LC and NC vs HC respectively. GO functional enrichment analysis results showed some differentially expressed genes were involved in crucial processes related to osmoregulation, such as ion transport processes, amino acid metabolism and synthesis processes, proteolysis process and chitin metabolic process. Conclusion This work represents the first report of the utilization of the next generation sequencing techniques for transcriptome analysis in Portunus trituberculatus and provides valuable information on salinity adaptation mechanism. Results reveal a substantial number of genes modified by salinity stress and a few important salinity acclimation pathways, which will serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular basis of osmoregulation in Portunus trituberculatus. In addition, the most comprehensive sequences of transcripts reported in this study

  9. Molecular basis of catalytic chamber-assisted unfolding and cleavage of human insulin by human insulin-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-05-22

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  10. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-06-02

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  11. Molecular Basis of Reduced Pyridoxine 5′-Phosphate Oxidase Catalytic Activity in Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy Disorder*

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Di Salvo, Martino L.; Saavedra, Mario A.; Contestabile, Roberto; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Haynes, Alexina; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase are known to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy. This disorder has no cure or effective treatment and is often fatal. Pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate to pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, the active cofactor form of vitamin B6 required by more than 140 different catalytic activities, including enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanism by which a homozygous missense mutation (R229W) in the oxidase, linked to neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, leads to reduced oxidase activity. The R229W variant is ∼850-fold less efficient than the wild-type enzyme due to an ∼192-fold decrease in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate affinity and an ∼4.5-fold decrease in catalytic activity. There is also an ∼50-fold reduction in the affinity of the R229W variant for the FMN cofactor. A 2.5 Å crystal structure of the R229W variant shows that the substitution of Arg-229 at the FMN binding site has led to a loss of hydrogen-bond and/or salt-bridge interactions between FMN and Arg-229 and Ser-175. Additionally, the mutation has led to an alteration of the configuration of a β-strand-loop-β-strand structure at the active site, resulting in loss of two critical hydrogen-bond interactions involving residues His-227 and Arg-225, which are important for substrate binding and orientation for catalysis. These results provide a molecular basis for the phenotype associated with the R229W mutation, as well as providing a foundation for understanding the pathophysiological consequences of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase mutations. PMID:19759001

  12. Molecular basis of IgE-recognition of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Suphioglu, C; Blaher, B; Rolland, J M; McCluskey, J; Schäppi, G; Kenrick, J; Singh, M B; Knox, R B

    1998-04-01

    Grass pollen, especially of rye-grass (Lolium perenne). represents an important cause of type I allergy. Identification of IgE-binding (allergenic) epitopes of major grass pollen allergens is essential for understanding the molecular basis of interaction between allergens and human IgE antibodies and therefore facilitates the devising of safer and more effective diagnostic and immunotherapy reagents. The aim of this study was to identify the allergenic epitopes of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen, immunodissect these epitopes further so that the amino acid residues critical for antibody binding can be determined and investigate the conservation and nature of these epitopes within the context of the natural grass pollen allergens. Peptides, 12-13 amino acid residues long and overlapping each other by 4 amino acid residues, based on the entire deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region of Lol p 5, were synthesised and assayed for IgE-binding. Two strong IgE-binding epitopes (Lol p 5 (49-60) and (265-276), referred to as peptides 7 and 34, respectively) were identified. These epitopes were further resolved by truncated peptides and amino acid replacement studies and the amino acid residues critical for IgE-binding determined (Lol p 5 (49-60) residue Lys57 and (265-276) residue Lys275). Sequences of these epitopes were conserved in related allergens and may form the conserved allergenic domains responsible for the cross-reactivity observed between pollen allergens of taxonomically related grasses. Furthermore, due to its strong IgE-reactivity, synthetic peptide Lol p 5 (265-276) was used to affinity-purify specific IgE antibodies which recognised proteins of other clinically important grass pollens. further indicating presence of allergenic cross-reactivity at the level of allergenic epitope. Moreover, Lol p 5 (265 276) demonstrated a strong capacity to inhibit IgE-binding to natural rye-grass pollen proteins highlighting the antibody accessibility

  13. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-14

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H-X, 49 X-Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ∼4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0.0019 (D

  14. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-14

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H-X, 49 X-Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ∼4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0.0019 (D

  15. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-01

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H—X, 49 X—Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ˜4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0

  16. The molecular basis of memantine action in Alzheimer's disease and other neurologic disorders: low-affinity, uncompetitive antagonism.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Stuart A

    2005-04-01

    In western countries, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. In fact, if left uncurbed, the economic cost of caring for AD patients could consume the entire gross national product of the USA by the middle of this century. Until recently, the only available drugs for this condition were cholinergic treatments, which symptomatically enhance cognitive state to some degree, but they were not neuroprotective. In fact, many potential neuroprotective drugs tested in clinical trials failed because they were poorly tolerated. However, after our discovery of its clinically-tolerated mechanism of action, one neuroprotective drug, memantine, was recently approved by the European Union and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Recent phase 3 clinical trials have shown that memantine is effective in the treatment of both mild and moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease and possibly vascular dementia (multi-infarct dementia). Here we review the molecular mechanism of memantine's action and also the basis for the drug's use in these neurological diseases, which are mediated at least in part by excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity is defined as excessive exposure to the neurotransmitter glutamate or overstimulation of its membrane receptors, leading to neuronal injury or death. Excitotoxic neuronal cell death is mediated in part by overactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors, which results in excessive Ca2+ influx through the receptor's associated ion channel. Physiological NMDA receptor activity, however, is also essential for normal neuronal function. This means that potential neuroprotective agents that block virtually all NMDA receptor activity will very likely have unacceptable clinical side effects. For this reason many previous NMDA receptor antagonists have disappointingly failed advanced clinical trials for a number of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast, studies in our

  17. Molecular basis of the clinical features of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild (limb/pelvis/uterus-hypoplasia/aplasia) syndrome (AARRS) and Fuhrmann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2013-09-01

    This paper reviews the molecular basis of the clinical features of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild (limb/pelvis/uterus-hypoplasia-aplasia) (AARRS) syndrome and Fuhrmann syndrome. Human WNT7A mutations are also reviewed. Based on this review, these mutations will be classified into two main groups of phenotypes: Fuhrmann and AARRS phenotypes in which there is partial and complete loss of WNT7A functions, respectively.

  18. Molecular basis of structural makeup of hulless barley in relation to rumen degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Damiran, D; Yu, P

    2011-10-01

    To date, no study has been done of molecular structures in relation to nutrient degradation kinetics and intestinal availability in dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to (1) reveal molecular structures of hulless barley affected by structural alteration using molecular spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) as a novel approach, and (2) quantify structure features on a molecular basis in relation to digestive kinetics and nutritive value in the rumen and intestine in cattle. The modeled feeds in this study were 4 types of hulless barley (HB) cultivars modified in starch traits: (a) normal starch cultivar, (b) zero-amylose waxy, (c) waxy, and (d) high-amylose. The molecular structural features were determined using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (ca. 4,000-800 cm(-1)) of the electromagnetic spectrum. The items assessed included infrared intensity attributed to protein amide I (ca. 1,715-1,575 cm(-1)), amide II (ca. 1,575-1,490 cm(-1)), α-helix (ca. 1,648-1,660 cm(-1)), β-sheet (ca. 1,625-1,640 cm(-1)), and their ratio, β-glucan (ca. 1,445-1,400 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO; ca. 1,188-820 cm(-1)) and their 3 major peaks, structural carbohydrates (ca. 1,277-1,190 cm(-1)), and ratios of amide I to II and amide I to CHO. The results show that (1) the zero-amylose waxy was the greatest in amide I and II peak areas, as well as in the ratio of protein amide I to CHO among HB; (2) α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio differed among HB: the high-amylose was the greatest, the zero-amylose waxy and waxy were the intermediate, and the normal starch was the lowest; (3) HB were similar in β-glucan and CHO molecular structural makeup; (4) altered starch HB cultivars were similar to each other, but were different from the normal starch cultivar in protein molecular makeup; and (5) the rate and extent of rumen degradation of starch and protein were highly related to the molecular structural

  19. [Molecular Karyotyping of Cell-Free DNA from Blastocoele Fluid as a Basis for Noninvasive Preimplantation Genetic Screening of Aneuploidy].

    PubMed

    Skryabin, N A; Lebedev, I N; Artukhova, V G; Zhigalina, D I; Stepanov, I A; Krivoschekova, G V; Svetlakov, A V

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of DNA fragments in the blastocoele fluid is promising for the development of new noninvasive methods for the preimplantation genetic diagnosis of chromosomal diseases. However, to date there are no data confirming the concordance between the molecular karyotype of cell-free DNA from blastocoele fluid and the blastocyst cells per se. This paper reports on this concordance according to the results of molecular-cytogenetic analysis of the chromosomal set with the use of comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:26845860

  20. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, February-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1981-09-01

    Laser-spectroscopy experiments have focused on cones in the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. Choice of this system was based on the desire to correlate molecular data with the extensive data being collected on this system by Dr. Zwick in his studies on laser hazards at LAIR. Thus, a detailed collaborative effort was initiated on this system during the past year. The experiments resulted in important information that opens new avenues to explore fundamental molecular mechanisms of retinal damage with laser irradiation. Results of these experiments are summarized in the following sections: I. Elucidation of the role of oil droplets in the absorption of light by the turtle retina; II. A Selective Probe of Membrane Potentials in Turtle Cone Cells; III. Angstrom Resolution Light Microscopy of Photoreceptor Cells; IV. Identification and Selective Staining of Other Important Molecular Components of Photoreceptor Cells.

  1. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1982-09-01

    This research led to new insights in the fundamental mechanisms involved in laser induced retinal damage and some of the fundamental work on these mechanisms lead to new and exciting avenues in the development of rapidly adjustable molecular light filters with important new possibilities for pulsed-laser eye protection. This report summarizes the significant progress of the past year: (1) Development and Fundamental Mechanism of a Rapidly Adjustable Molecular Filter for Pulsed Laser Eye Protection - this research direction resulted from our investigations on cones of the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. (2) The Optical Density of Turtle Oil Droplet Solutions - it is important both from a practical and fundamental point of view to determine the optical density of turtle oil-droplet suspensions. In view of the high optical densities in this system, tunable-laser resonance Raman spectroscopy, which is the only technique that has been able to provide high-resolution data, is the only technique that is potentially able to obtain the information. (3) Laser-Induced Molecular Alterations in Turtle Retina. (4) Light Driven Enzymatic Reactions in Photoreceptors. (5) Molecular Cytology of Rod Outer Segments.

  2. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  3. HMGI-C rearrangements as the molecular basis for the majority of pulmonary chondroid hamartomas: a survey of 30 tumors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, B; Rosigkeit, J; Wanschura, S; Meyer-Bolte, K; Van de Ven, W J; Kayser, K; Krieghoff, B; Kastendiek, H; Bartnitzke, S; Bullerdiek, J

    1996-02-01

    Pulmonary chondroid hamartomas (PCH) are benign tumors of the lung characterized by a more or less high degree of mesenchymal metaplasia. In our series we investigated 30 PCH by a combination of cytogenetic and molecular methods. 18 tumors (60%) had cytogenetically detectable aberrations involving either 12q14-15 or 6p21 with a clear predominance of chromosomal abnormalities involving 12q14-15 (15 tumors). As in subgroups of pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, leiomyomas of the uterus, and lipomas with 12q14-15 abnormalities the HMGI-C gene is frequently rearranged we tested PCH with either 12q14-15 abnormalities or normal karyotype by FISH and 3' RACE experiments for rearrangements of HMGI-C. Rearrangements were found in all cases with chromosomal 12q14-15 abnormalities and further six cases with an apparently normal karyotype. By the combination of cytogenetics with molecular techniques the percentage of cases with intragenic rearrangements of HMGI-C or rearrangements of its immediate surrounding was thus increased to 70% (21/30 cases). Considering all types of aberrations within this series 80% (24/30) of all PCH were aberrant. This is the first report on a combined molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a large series of pulmonary chondroid hamartomas indicating that rearrangements of HMGI-C, a member of the high mobility group protein gene family, are the leading molecular events in the genesis of PCH.

  4. Development of a Highly Selective Allosteric Antagonist Radioligand for the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor and Elucidation of Its Molecular Basis of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Vattelana, Ashton M.; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Orry, Andrew J.; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Haines, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of ligand binding to receptors provides insights useful for rational drug design. This work describes development of a new antagonist radioligand of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R), (2-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydro-3-[(3-isoquinolinylcarbonyl)amino]-6-methoxy-2-oxo-l-H-indole-3-propanoate (T-0632), and exploration of the molecular basis of its binding. This radioligand bound specifically with high affinity within an allosteric pocket of CCK1R. T-0632 fully inhibited binding and action of CCK at this receptor, while exhibiting no saturable binding to the closely related type 2 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK2R). Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs were used to explore the molecular basis of T-0632 binding. Exchanging exonic regions revealed the functional importance of CCK1R exon 3, extending from the bottom of transmembrane segment (TM) 3 to the top of TM5, including portions of the intramembranous pocket as well as the second extracellular loop region (ECL2). However, CCK1R mutants in which each residue facing the pocket was changed to that present in CCK2R had no negative impact on T-0632 binding. Extending the chimeric approach to ECL2 established the importance of its C-terminal region, and site-directed mutagenesis of each nonconserved residue in this region revealed the importance of Ser208 at the top of TM5. A molecular model of T-0632-occupied CCK1R was consistent with these experimental determinants, also identifying Met121 in TM3 and Arg336 in TM6 as important. Although these residues are conserved in CCK2R, mutating them had a distinct impact on the two closely related receptors, suggesting differential orientation. This establishes the molecular basis of binding of a highly selective nonpeptidyl allosteric antagonist of CCK1R, illustrating differences in docking that extend beyond determinants attributable to distinct residues lining the intramembranous pocket in the two receptor subtypes. PMID:25319540

  5. Molecular analysis of lungworms from European bison (Bison bonasus) on the basis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M

    2014-03-01

    Dictyocaulosis (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea) is a widespread parasitosis of the European bison (Bison bonasus) inhabiting Bialowieza Primeval Forest. Bearing in mind the current coexistence of bison with wild cervids, and with domestic ruminants in the 19th and 20th century, the need arose for molecular identification of lungworm species. Molecular analysis was done on adult lungworms that were obtained from the respiratory track of four free-roaming bison euthanized as a part of the population health control program. As the result of the study four identical small subunit-ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the lungworms were obtained and deposited in GenBank as sequence, 1708 bp long (GenBank KC771250). Comparative analysis of the SSU rRNA sequences revealed the European bison to be a host for the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus.

  6. New insights into heat induced structural changes of pectin methylesterase on fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, Oana Viorela; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Botez, Elisabeta

    2014-07-01

    Heat-induced structural changes of Aspergillus oryzae pectin methylesterase (PME) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling, whereas the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. The fluorescence spectroscopy experiments were performed at two pH value (4.5 and 7.0). At both pH values, the phase diagrams were linear, indicating the presence of two molecular species induced by thermal treatment. A red shift of 7 nm was observed at neutral pH by increasing temperature up to 60 °C, followed by a blue shift of 4 nm at 70 °C, suggesting significant conformational rearrangements. The quenching experiments using acrylamide and iodide demonstrate a more flexible conformation of enzyme with increasing temperature, especially at neutral pH. The experimental results were complemented with atomic level observations on PME model behavior after performing molecular dynamics simulations at different temperatures. The inactivation kinetics of PME in buffer solutions was fitted using a first-order kinetics model, resulting in activation energy of 241.4 ± 7.51 kJ mol-1.

  7. Calculation of wave-functions with frozen orbitals in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. II. Application of the local basis equation.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, György G

    2013-04-01

    The application of the local basis equation (Ferenczy and Adams, J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134108) in mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and quantum mechanics/quantum mechanics (QM/QM) methods is investigated. This equation is suitable to derive local basis nonorthogonal orbitals that minimize the energy of the system and it exhibits good convergence properties in a self-consistent field solution. These features make the equation appropriate to be used in mixed QM/MM and QM/QM methods to optimize orbitals in the field of frozen localized orbitals connecting the subsystems. Calculations performed for several properties in divers systems show that the method is robust with various choices of the frozen orbitals and frontier atom properties. With appropriate basis set assignment, it gives results equivalent with those of a related approach [G. G. Ferenczy previous paper in this issue] using the Huzinaga equation. Thus, the local basis equation can be used in mixed QM/MM methods with small size quantum subsystems to calculate properties in good agreement with reference Hartree-Fock-Roothaan results. It is shown that bond charges are not necessary when the local basis equation is applied, although they are required for the self-consistent field solution of the Huzinaga equation based method. Conversely, the deformation of the wave-function near to the boundary is observed without bond charges and this has a significant effect on deprotonation energies but a less pronounced effect when the total charge of the system is conserved. The local basis equation can also be used to define a two layer quantum system with nonorthogonal localized orbitals surrounding the central delocalized quantum subsystem.

  8. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods. PMID:27308221

  9. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First-Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree-Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double-zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6-31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean-field methods.

  10. Small Atomic Orbital Basis Set First‐Principles Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Molecular and Periodic Systems: A Critical Analysis of Error Sources

    PubMed Central

    Sure, Rebecca; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In quantum chemical computations the combination of Hartree–Fock or a density functional theory (DFT) approximation with relatively small atomic orbital basis sets of double‐zeta quality is still widely used, for example, in the popular B3LYP/6‐31G* approach. In this Review, we critically analyze the two main sources of error in such computations, that is, the basis set superposition error on the one hand and the missing London dispersion interactions on the other. We review various strategies to correct those errors and present exemplary calculations on mainly noncovalently bound systems of widely varying size. Energies and geometries of small dimers, large supramolecular complexes, and molecular crystals are covered. We conclude that it is not justified to rely on fortunate error compensation, as the main inconsistencies can be cured by modern correction schemes which clearly outperform the plain mean‐field methods. PMID:27308221

  11. Climate variations and the physiological basis of temperature dependent biogeography: systemic to molecular hierarchy of thermal tolerance in animals.

    PubMed

    Pörtner, H O

    2002-08-01

    The physiological mechanisms limiting and adjusting cold and heat tolerance have regained interest in the light of global warming and associated shifts in the geographical distribution of ectothermic animals. Recent comparative studies, largely carried out on marine ectotherms, indicate that the processes and limits of thermal tolerance are linked with the adjustment of aerobic scope and capacity of the whole animal as a crucial step in thermal adaptation on top of parallel adjustments at the molecular or membrane level. In accordance with Shelford's law of tolerance decreasing whole animal aerobic scope characterises the onset of thermal limitation at low and high pejus thresholds (pejus=getting worse). The drop in aerobic scope of an animal indicated by falling oxygen levels in the body fluids and or the progressively limited capacity of circulatory and ventilatory mechanisms. At high temperatures, excessive oxygen demand causes insufficient oxygen levels in the body fluids, whereas at low temperatures the aerobic capacity of mitochondria may become limiting for ventilation and circulation. Further cooling or warming beyond these limits leads to low or high critical threshold temperatures (T(c)) where aerobic scope disappears and transition to an anaerobic mode of mitochondrial metabolism and progressive insufficiency of cellular energy levels occurs. The adjustments of mitochondrial densities and their functional properties appear as a critical process in defining and shifting thermal tolerance windows. The finding of an oxygen limited thermal tolerance owing to loss of aerobic scope is in line with Taylor's and Weibel's concept of symmorphosis, which implies that excess capacity of any component of the oxygen delivery system is avoided. The present study suggests that the capacity of oxygen delivery is set to a level just sufficient to meet maximum oxygen demand between the average highs and lows of environmental temperatures. At more extreme temperatures only

  12. Reclassification of the Penicillium roqueforti group into three species on the basis of molecular genetic and biochemical profiles.

    PubMed

    Boysen, M; Skouboe, P; Frisvad, J; Rossen, L

    1996-03-01

    Penicillium roqueforti is currently divided into two varieties, one used for cheese starter cultures, P. roqueforti var. roqueforti, and one ubiquitous patulin-producing variety, P. roqueforti var. carneum. The ribosomal regions comprising the 5.8S gene and the internal transcribed spacers, ITS I and ITS II, have been analysed from 10 isolates belonging to each variety. The 10 P. roqueforti var. carneum isolates were separated into two groups of five on the basis of 12 base-pair differences in the ITS regions. One of the groups of P. roqueforti var. carneum, in the following designated P. carneum, differed from P. roqueforti var. roqueforti, here designated P. roqueforti, in just two positions, while the other group, here called P. paneum, differed from P. roqueforti in 12 positions. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis substantiated these findings, and a comparison of secondary metabolites produced by the three groups showed that the P. roqueforti isolates all produce Penicillium Roqueforti (PR) toxin, marcfortines and fumigaclavine A, while the P. carneum isolates produce patulin, penitrem A and mycophenolic acid, as well as unidentified metabolites. P. paneum produces secondary metabolites in five chromophore families including the known mycotoxins patulin and botryodiploidin. On the basis of these findings it is proposed that P. roqueforti is reclassified into three species named P. roqueforti, P. carneum and P. paneum. PMID:8868429

  13. Molecular basis of Refsum disease: sequence variations in phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PHYH) and the PTS2 receptor (PEX7).

    PubMed

    Jansen, Gerbert A; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2004-03-01

    Refsum disease has long been known to be an inherited disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by the accumulation of phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) caused by an alpha-oxidation deficiency of this branched chain fatty acid in peroxisomes. The mechanism of phytanic acid alpha-oxidation and the enzymes involved had long remained mysterious, but they have been resolved in recent years. This has led to the resolution of the molecular basis of Refsum disease. Interestingly, Refsum disease is genetically heterogeneous; two genes, PHYH (also named PAHX) and PEX7, have been identified to cause Refsum disease, as reviewed in this work.

  14. Analysis of the Structural and Molecular Basis of Voltage-sensitive Sodium Channel Inhibition by the Spider Toxin Huwentoxin-IV (μ-TRTX-Hh2a)

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Natali A.; Gibbs, Alan; Shih, Amy Y.; Liu, Yi; Neff, Robert A.; Sutton, Steven W.; Mirzadegan, Tara; Connor, Judith; Fellows, Ross; Husovsky, Matthew; Nelson, Serena; Hunter, Michael J.; Flinspach, Mack; Wickenden, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are essential to the normal function of the vertebrate nervous system. Aberrant function of VGSCs underlies a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and pain. A large number of animal toxins target these ion channels and may have significant therapeutic potential. Most of these toxins, however, have not been characterized in detail. Here, by combining patch clamp electrophysiology and radioligand binding studies with peptide mutagenesis, NMR structure determination, and molecular modeling, we have revealed key molecular determinants of the interaction between the tarantula toxin huwentoxin-IV and two VGSC isoforms, Nav1.7 and Nav1.2. Nine huwentoxin-IV residues (F6A, P11A, D14A, L22A, S25A, W30A, K32A, Y33A, and I35A) were important for block of Nav1.7 and Nav1.2. Importantly, molecular dynamics simulations and NMR studies indicated that folding was normal for several key mutants, suggesting that these amino acids probably make specific interactions with sodium channel residues. Additionally, we identified several amino acids (F6A, K18A, R26A, and K27A) that are involved in isoform-specific VGSC interactions. Our structural and functional data were used to model the docking of huwentoxin-IV into the domain II voltage sensor of Nav1.7. The model predicts that a hydrophobic patch composed of Trp-30 and Phe-6, along with the basic Lys-32 residue, docks into a groove formed by the Nav1.7 S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops. These results provide new insight into the structural and molecular basis of sodium channel block by huwentoxin-IV and may provide a basis for the rational design of toxin-based peptides with improved VGSC potency and/or selectivity. PMID:23760503

  15. Analysis of the structural and molecular basis of voltage-sensitive sodium channel inhibition by the spider toxin huwentoxin-IV (μ-TRTX-Hh2a).

    PubMed

    Minassian, Natali A; Gibbs, Alan; Shih, Amy Y; Liu, Yi; Neff, Robert A; Sutton, Steven W; Mirzadegan, Tara; Connor, Judith; Fellows, Ross; Husovsky, Matthew; Nelson, Serena; Hunter, Michael J; Flinspach, Mack; Wickenden, Alan D

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are essential to the normal function of the vertebrate nervous system. Aberrant function of VGSCs underlies a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and pain. A large number of animal toxins target these ion channels and may have significant therapeutic potential. Most of these toxins, however, have not been characterized in detail. Here, by combining patch clamp electrophysiology and radioligand binding studies with peptide mutagenesis, NMR structure determination, and molecular modeling, we have revealed key molecular determinants of the interaction between the tarantula toxin huwentoxin-IV and two VGSC isoforms, Nav1.7 and Nav1.2. Nine huwentoxin-IV residues (F6A, P11A, D14A, L22A, S25A, W30A, K32A, Y33A, and I35A) were important for block of Nav1.7 and Nav1.2. Importantly, molecular dynamics simulations and NMR studies indicated that folding was normal for several key mutants, suggesting that these amino acids probably make specific interactions with sodium channel residues. Additionally, we identified several amino acids (F6A, K18A, R26A, and K27A) that are involved in isoform-specific VGSC interactions. Our structural and functional data were used to model the docking of huwentoxin-IV into the domain II voltage sensor of Nav1.7. The model predicts that a hydrophobic patch composed of Trp-30 and Phe-6, along with the basic Lys-32 residue, docks into a groove formed by the Nav1.7 S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops. These results provide new insight into the structural and molecular basis of sodium channel block by huwentoxin-IV and may provide a basis for the rational design of toxin-based peptides with improved VGSC potency and/or selectivity. PMID:23760503

  16. The molecular basis for venation patterning of pigmentation and its effect on pollinator attraction in flowers of Antirrhinum.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yongjin; Venail, Julien; Mackay, Steve; Bailey, Paul C; Schwinn, Kathy E; Jameson, Paula E; Martin, Cathie R; Davies, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    Pigment stripes associated with veins (venation) is a common flower colour pattern. The molecular genetics and function of venation were investigated in the genus Antirrhinum, in which venation is determined by Venosa (encoding an R2R3MYB transcription factor). Pollinator preferences were measured by field tests with Antirrhinum majus. Venosa function was examined using in situ hybridization and transient overexpression. The origin of the venation trait was examined by molecular phylogenetics. Venation and full-red flower colouration provide a comparable level of advantage for pollinator attraction relative to palely pigmented or white lines. Ectopic expression of Venosa confers pigmentation outside the veins. Venosa transcript is produced only in small areas of the corolla between the veins and the adaxial epidermis. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that venation patterning is an ancestral trait in Antirrhinum. Different accessions of three species with full-red pigmentation with or without venation patterning have been found. Epidermal-specific venation is defined through overlapping expression domains of the MYB (myoblastoma) and bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) co-regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis, with the bHLH providing epidermal specificity and Venosa vein specificity. Venation may be the ancestral trait, with full-red pigmentation a derived, polyphyletic trait. Venation patterning is probably not fixed once species evolve full-red floral pigmentation.

  17. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Brissett, Nigel C.; Martin, Maria J.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Bianchi, Julie; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks. PMID:24239356

  18. Molecular Basis of Filtering Carbapenems by Porins from β-Lactam-resistant Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Harsha; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Moynié, Lucile; Page, Malcolm G P; Naismith, James H; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Integral membrane proteins known as porins are the major pathway by which hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Single point mutations in porins can decrease the permeability of an antibiotic, either by reduction of channel size or modification of electrostatics in the channel, and thereby confer clinical resistance. Here, we investigate four mutant OmpC proteins from four different clinical isolates of Escherichia coli obtained sequentially from a single patient during a course of antimicrobial chemotherapy. OmpC porin from the first isolate (OmpC20) undergoes three consecutive and additive substitutions giving rise to OmpC26, OmpC28, and finally OmpC33. The permeability of two zwitterionic carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, measured using liposome permeation assays and single channel electrophysiology differs significantly between OmpC20 and OmpC33. Molecular dynamic simulations show that the antibiotics must pass through the constriction zone of porins with a specific orientation, where the antibiotic dipole is aligned along the electric field inside the porin. We identify that changes in the vector of the electric field in the mutated porin, OmpC33, create an additional barrier by "trapping" the antibiotic in an unfavorable orientation in the constriction zone that suffers steric hindrance for the reorientation needed for its onward translocation. Identification and understanding the underlying molecular details of such a barrier to translocation will aid in the design of new antibiotics with improved permeation properties in Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Green light emitting diodes accelerate wound healing: characterization of the effect and its molecular basis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Tomohiro; Inui, Shigeki; Nakajima, Takeshi; Ogasawara, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Ko; Itami, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Because light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are low-coherent, quasimonochromatic, and nonthermal, they are an alternative for low level laser therapy, and have photobiostimulative effects on tissue repair. However, the molecular mechanism(s) are unclear, and potential effects of blue and/or green LEDs on wound healing are still unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of red (638 nm), blue (456 nm), and green (518 nm) LEDs on wound healing. In an in vivo study, wound sizes in the skin of ob/ob mice were significantly decreased on day 7 following exposure to green LEDs, and complete reepithelialization was accelerated by red and green LEDs compared with the control mice. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we investigated the effects of LEDs on human fibroblasts in vitro by measuring mRNA and protein levels of cytokines secreted by fibroblasts during the process of wound healing and on the migration of HaCat keratinocytes. The results suggest that some cytokines are significantly increased by exposure to LEDs, especially leptin, IL-8, and VEGF, but only by green LEDs. The migration of HaCat keratinocytes was significantly promoted by red or green LEDs. In conclusion, we demonstrate that green LEDs promote wound healing by inducing migratory and proliferative mediators, which suggests that not only red LEDs but also green LEDs can be a new powerful therapeutic strategy for wound healing.

  20. Molecular basis of processing-induced changes in protein structure in relation to intestinal digestion in yellow and green type pea (Pisum sativum L.): A molecular spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Warkentin, Tom; Niu, Zhiyuan; Khan, Nazir A; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify the protein inherent molecular structural features of green cotyledon (CDC Striker) and yellow cotyledon (CDC Meadow) pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds using molecular spectroscopic technique (FT/IR-ATR); (2) measure the denaturation of protein molecular makeup in the two types of pea during dry roasting (120°C for 60 min), autoclaving (120°C for 60 min) or microwaving (for 5 min); and (3) correlate the heat-induced changes in protein molecular makeup to the corresponding changes in protein digestibility determined using modified three-step in vitro procedure. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had higher (P<0.05) ratios of amide I to II peak height (1.698 vs. 1.805) and area (1.843 vs. 2.017). A significant correlation was observed between the amide I and II peak height (r=0.48) and peak area (r=-0.42) ratio with protein content. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had lower (P<0.05) α-helix:β-sheet ratio (1.015 vs. 0.926), indicating varietal difference in protein secondary structure makeup. All processing applications increased α-helix:β-sheet ratio, with the largest (P<0.05) increase being observed with roasting and microwaving. The heat-induced changes in α-helix:β-sheet ratio was strongly correlated to intestinal digestibility of protein within the green (r=-0. 86) and yellow (r=0.81) pea-types. However, across the pea types the correlation was not significant. Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses on the entire spectral data from the amide region (ca. 1727-1480 cm(-1)) were able to visualize and discriminate the structural difference between pea varieties and processing treatments. This study shows that the molecular spectroscopy can be used as a rapid tool to screen the protein value of raw and heat-treated peas.

  1. Crystal Structures of Glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 Reveal the Molecular Basis for Glycosylation and Deglycosylation of (Iso)flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Modolo, Luzia V.; Li, Lenong; Pan, Haiyun; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2010-09-21

    The glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 from Medicago truncatula catalyzes the glycosylation of various (iso)flavonoids such as the flavonols kaempferol and myricetin, the isoflavone formononetin, and the anthocyanidins pelargonidin and cyanidin. It also catalyzes a reverse reaction to remove the sugar moiety from glycosides. The structures of UGT78G1 bound with uridine diphosphate or with both uridine diphosphate and myricetin were determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, revealing detailed interactions between the enzyme and substrates/products and suggesting a distinct binding mode for the acceptor/product. Comparative structural analysis and mutagenesis identify glutamate 192 as a key amino acid for the reverse reaction. This information provides a basis for enzyme engineering to manipulate substrate specificity and to design effective biocatalysts with glycosylation and/or deglycosylation activity.

  2. Contributions of a unique β-clamp to substrate recognition illuminates the molecular basis of exolysis in ferulic acid esterases.

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; Cote, Chris; McAllister, Tim A; Abbott, D Wade

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising renewable resource; however, deconstruction of this material is still the rate-limiting step. Major obstacles in the biocatalytic turnover of lignocellulose are ester-linked decorations that prevent access to primary structural polysaccharides. Enzymes targeting these esters represent promising biotools for increasing bioconversion efficiency. Ruminant livestock are unique in their ability to degrade lignocellulose through the action of their gut microbiome. The anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) are key members of this ecosystem that express a large repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) with little sequence identity with characterized CAZymes [Lombard, Golaconda, Drula, Coutinho and Henrissat (2014) Nucleic Acids Res. 42: , D490-D495]. We have identified a carbohydrate esterase family 1 (CE1) ferulic acid esterase (FAE) belonging to Anaeromyces mucronatus(AmCE1/Fae1a), and determined its X-ray structure in both the presence [1.55 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm)] and absence (1.60 Å) of ferulic acid. AmCE1 adopts an α/β-hydrolase fold that is structurally conserved with bacterial FAEs, and possesses a unique loop, termed the β-clamp, that encloses the ligand. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that substrate binding is driven by enthalpic contributions, which overcomes a large entropic penalty. A comparative analysis of AmCE1 with related enzymes has uncovered the apparent structural basis for differential FAE activities targeting cross-linking ferulic acid conjugates compared with terminal decorations. Based on comparisons to structurally characterized FAEs, we propose that the β-clamp may define the structural basis of exolytic activities in FAEs. This provides a structure-based tool for predicting exolysis and endolysis in CE1. These insights hold promise for rationally identifying enzymes tailored for bioconversion of biomass with variations in cell wall composition.

  3. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  4. The 1.9 Astroms Structure of Human α-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase: The Molecular Basis of Schindler and Kanzaki Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Garman, S

    2009-01-01

    ?-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (?-NAGAL; E.C. 3.2.1.49) is a lysosomal exoglycosidase that cleaves terminal ?-N-acetylgalactosamine residues from glycopeptides and glycolipids. In humans, a deficiency of ?-NAGAL activity results in the lysosomal storage disorders Schindler disease and Kanzaki disease. To better understand the molecular defects in the diseases, we determined the crystal structure of human ?-NAGAL after expressing wild-type and glycosylation-deficient glycoproteins in recombinant insect cell expression systems. We measured the enzymatic parameters of our purified wild-type and mutant enzymes, establishing their enzymatic equivalence. To investigate the binding specificity and catalytic mechanism of the human ?-NAGAL enzyme, we determined three crystallographic complexes with different catalytic products bound in the active site of the enzyme. To better understand how individual defects in the ?-NAGAL glycoprotein lead to Schindler disease, we analyzed the effect of disease-causing mutations on the three-dimensional structure.

  5. Molecular basis of the interaction specificity between the human glucocorticoid receptor and its endogenous steroid ligand cortisol.

    PubMed

    von Langen, Johannes; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Diekmann, Stephan; Hillisch, Alexander

    2005-06-01

    We analyzed the binding of five steroids to the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) experimentally as well as theoretically. In vitro, we measured the binding affinity of aldosterone, cortisol, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone to hGR in competition with the ligand dexamethasone. The binding affinity relative to the endogenous ligand cortisol (100%) is reduced for progesterone (22%) and aldosterone (20%) and is very weak for testosterone (1.5%) and estradiol (0.2%). In parallel, we constructed a homology model of the hGR ligand-binding domain (LBD) based on the crystal structure of the human progesterone receptor (hPR). After docking the five steroids into the hGR model ligand-binding pocket, we performed five separate 4-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with these complexes in order to study the complex structures. We calculated the binding affinities with two different approaches (MM/PBSA, FlexX) and compared them with the values of the experimentally determined relative binding affinities. Both theoretical methods allowed discrimination between strongly and weakly binding ligands and recognition of cortisol as the endogenous ligand of the hGR in silico. Cortisol binds most strongly due to a nearly perfect steric and electrostatic complementarity with the hGR binding pocket. Chemically similar ligands such as estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone also fit into the hGR binding pocket, but they are unable to form all those contacts with the amino acids of the protein that are necessary to yield a stable, transcriptionally active receptor conformation. Our analysis thus explains the selectivity of the human glucocorticoid receptor for its endogenous ligand cortisol at a molecular level. PMID:15883974

  6. Curvy-steps approach to constraint-free extended-Lagrangian ab initio molecular dynamics, using atom-centered basis functions: convergence toward Born-Oppenheimer trajectories.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-12-15

    A dynamical extension of the "curvy-steps" approach to linear-scaling self-consistent field calculations is presented, which yields an extended-Lagrangian formulation of ab initio molecular dynamics. An exponential parametrization of the one-electron density matrix, expressed in terms of atom-centered Gaussian basis functions, facilitates propagation along the manifold of density matrices in a geometrically correct fashion that automatically enforces idempotency constraints. The extended Lagrangian itself is constraint free, thus neither density matrix purification nor expensive, iterative solution for Lagrange multipliers is required. Propagation is highly efficient, and time steps compare favorably to those used in Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The behavior of the method, especially with regard to the maintenance of adiabatic decoupling of nuclei and electrons, is examined for a sequence of diatomic molecules, and comparison is made to trajectories propagated on the converged Born-Oppenheimer surface. Certain claims to the contrary notwithstanding, our results demonstrate that vibrational frequencies may depend on the value of the fictitious mass parameter, even in an atom-centered basis. Light-atom stretching frequencies can be significantly redshifted, even when the nuclear and electronic energy scales are well separated. With a sufficiently small fictitious mass and a short time step, accurate frequencies can be obtained; we characterize appropriate values of these parameters for a wide range of vibrational frequencies.

  7. The Structure of Interleukin-23 Reveals in the Molecular Basis of P40 Subunit Sharing With Interleukin-12

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Interleukin-23 is a recently identified member of the IL-12 family of heterodimeric cytokines that modulate subpopulations of T helper cells, and both IL-12 and IL-23 are attractive targets for therapy of autoimmune diseases. IL-23 is a binary complex of a four-helix bundle cytokine (p19) and a soluble class I cytokine receptor p40. IL-12 and IL-23 share p40 as an {alpha}-receptor subunit, yet show only 15% sequence homology between their four-helix cytokines p19 and p35, respectively, and signal through different combinations of shared receptors. In order to elucidate the structural basis of p40 sharing, we have determined a 2.3{angstrom} crystal structure of IL-23 for comparison to the previously determined structure of IL-12. The docking mode of p19 to p40 is altered compared to p35, deviating by a 'tilt' and 'roll' that results in an altered footprint of p40 on the A and D helices of the respective cytokines. Binding of p19 to p40 is mediated primarily by an Arginine residue on helix D of p19 that forms an extensive charge and hydrogen-bonding network with residues at the base of the pocket on p40. This 'Arginine pocket' is lined with an inner shell of hydrophobic interactions that are ringed by an outer shell of polar interactions. Comparative analysis indicates that the IL-23 and IL-12 complexes 'mimic' the network of interactions constituting the central Arginine pocket despite p19 and p35 having limited sequence homology. The majority of the structural epitopes in the two complexes are composed of unique p19 and p35 pair-wise contacts with common residues on p40. Thus, while the critical hotspot is maintained in the two complexes, the majority of the interfaces are structurally distinct and, therefore, provide a basis for the therapeutic targeting of IL-12 versus IL-23 heterodimer formation despite their use of a common receptor subunit.

  8. Molecular and structural basis of resting and use-dependent block of sodium current defined using disopyramide analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, J. Z.; TenEick, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of disopyramide (Norpace) and 14 closely related structural analogues on the Na current of voltage clamped squid axons were examined to determine which physico-chemical properties and which changes in the structure of the Norpace molecule can alter the nature of its sodium channel blocking actions. Conventional voltage clamp technique for internally perfused giant axons was used. Axons were exposed to 100 microM concentrations via the internal perfusion solution, and the actions of the 15 analogues to produce resting and use-dependent block of Na current were assessed. The roles of Na ions and the activation and inactivation processes in the development of and recovery from use-dependent block of Na current induced by the Norpace analogues were also examined. The results indicate that for both mono-tertiary and bis-tertiary amines the potency to produce use-dependent block was proportional to molecular weight, whereas the correlation between potency to produce resting block and molecular weight was significant only for bis-tertiary amines. The mono- were more potent than the bis-compounds. However, comparisons between compounds having similar molecular weights and/or pKa values indicate that other factors also can influence blocking potency. For compounds within each homologous mono- or bis-tertiary amine series, hydrophobicity as estimated from log P values (P = octanol/water partition coefficient) was found to influence the potency to produce use dependent block of Na current. Use-dependent block was extant in axons internally exposed to pronase to remove the inactivation process, which indicates that inactivation is not an obligate condition for development of use-dependent block of Na current. An important role for the activation process in the development of use-dependent block of Na current is suggested by the finding that, in general, the voltage dependence of Na current activation paralleled that of use-dependent block. However, the potential

  9. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.

    1984-09-01

    Advances made in the work for the Ocular Hazards Program at the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR) are described. The research has seen the first application of femtosecond lasers to the visual system; it is giving new insights into how these ultimate laser sources interact with biological tissue in general and with the visual system in particular. The authors have discovered that simple anions can activate visual photoreceptors in the dark; among these anionic activators is the dental agent fluoride. Research has continued into identifying selectively and spatially the image of various elements in photoreceptors and adjacent tissue. The authors were able to extend our preparation procedures to view the elemental composition of such components as melanin granules. The sensitive and selective spatial images should play important roles in extending understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage. The staining procedures developed can be applied to study laser-damaged retina. Data were obtained demonstrating rapid mechanical motions in vertebrate photoreceptors. Such rapid mechanical motions which parallel electrophysiological responses in the cell may lie at the very basis of photoreceptor function. Laser-damage mechanisms should now be reevaluated in terms of this new data. The effect of laser light on these newly discovered mechanical motions will surely lead to new and improved understanding of low-level laser ocular hazards.

  10. Structure of human MDM2 complexed with RPL11 reveals the molecular basis of p53 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiangge; Lang, Yue; Zhang, Qi; Cui, Di; Sun, Haili; Jiang, Lun; Chen, Zhenhang; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yina; Tian, Wenli; Wu, Wei; Tang, Jun; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The central region of MDM2 is critical for p53 activation and tumor suppression. Upon ribosomal stress, this region is bound by ribosomal proteins, particularly ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), leading to MDM2 inactivation and subsequent p53 activation. Here, we solved the complex structure of human MDM2–RPL11 at 2.4 Å. MDM2 extensively interacts with RPL11 through an acidic domain and two zinc fingers. Formation of the MDM2–RPL11 complex induces substantial conformational changes in both proteins. RPL11, unable to bind MDM2 mutants, fails to induce the activation of p53 in cells. MDM2 mimics 28S rRNA binding to RPL11. The C4 zinc finger determines RPL11 binding to MDM2 but not its homolog, MDMX. Our results highlight the essential role of the RPL11–MDM2 interaction in p53 activation and tumor suppression and provide a structural basis for potential new anti-tumor drug development. PMID:26220995

  11. Dominance Is the Major Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Rice as Revealed by Qtl Analysis Using Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, L.; Tanksley, S. D.

    1995-01-01

    A set of 194 F(7) lines derived from a subspecific rice cross showing strong F(1) heterosis was backcrossed to the two parents. The materials (388 BC(1)F(7) lines, 194 F(8) lines, two parents, F(1)) were phenotyped for 12 quantitative traits. A total of 37 significant QTLs (LOD >/= 2.0) was detected through 141 RFLP markers in the BC(1)F(7) populations. Twenty-seven (73%) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected in only one of the BC(1)F(7) populations. In 82% of these cases, the heterozygotes were superior to the respective homozygotes. The remaining 10 (27%) QTLs were detected in both BC(1)F(7) populations, and the heterozygote had a phenotype falling between those of the two homozygotes and in no instances were the heterozygotes found to be superior to both homozygotes. These results suggest that dominance complementation is the major genetic basis of heterosis in rice. This conclusion was strengthened by the finding that there was no correlation between most traits and overall genome heterozygosity and that there were some recombinant inbred lines in the F(8) population having phenotypic values superior to the F(1) for all of the traits evaluated--a result not expected if overdominance was a major contributor to heterosis. Digenic epistasis was not evident. PMID:7498751

  12. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Sieuwerts, Sander; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Stevens, Marc J A; Janssen, Patrick W M; Ingham, Colin J; de Bok, Frank A M; de Vos, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2010-12-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) is one of the best-described mixed-culture fermentations. These species are believed to stimulate each other's growth by the exchange of metabolites such as folic acid and carbon dioxide. Recently, postgenomic studies revealed that an upregulation of biosynthesis pathways for nucleotides and sulfur-containing amino acids is part of the global physiological response to mixed-culture growth in S. thermophilus, but an in-depth molecular analysis of mixed-culture growth of both strains remains to be established. We report here the application of mixed-culture transcriptome profiling and a systematic analysis of the effect of interaction-related compounds on growth, which allowed us to unravel the molecular responses associated with batch mixed-culture growth in milk of S. thermophilus CNRZ1066 and L. bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365. The results indicate that interactions between these bacteria are primarily related to purine, amino acid, and long-chain fatty acid metabolism. The results support a model in which formic acid, folic acid, and fatty acids are provided by S. thermophilus. Proteolysis by L. bulgaricus supplies both strains with amino acids but is insufficient to meet the biosynthetic demands for sulfur and branched-chain amino acids, as becomes clear from the upregulation of genes associated with these amino acids in mixed culture. Moreover, genes involved in iron uptake in S. thermophilus are affected by mixed-culture growth, and genes coding for exopolysaccharide production were upregulated in both organisms in mixed culture compared to monocultures. The confirmation of previously identified responses in S. thermophilus using a different strain combination

  13. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate–aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  14. Viscoelastic properties of self-assembled type I collagen fibers: molecular basis of elastic and viscous behaviors.

    PubMed

    Silver, Frederick H; Ebrahimi, Ali; Snowhill, Patrick B

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the strain rate dependence of incremental stress-strain curves of self-assembled type I collagen fibers in an effort to understand the molecular phenomena that contribute to the macroscopic mechanical behavior of tendons. Results of viscoelastic tests at strain rates between 10% and 1000% per min suggest that the slope of the elastic stress-strain curve is to a first approximation independent of strain rate while the slope of the viscous stress-strain curve increases with increased strain rate. After correction of the slope of the viscous stress-strain curve for the changes in strain rate, it is observed that the apparent viscosity decreases with increased strain rate. It is concluded that the approximate strain rate independence of the elastic spring constant of collagen is consistent with the spring-like behavior of the 12 flexible regions that make up the collagen D-period. These regions are poor in the rigid amino acid residues proline and hydroxyproline. In contrast, the thixotropy of collagen is consistent with the slippage of subfibrillar subunits during tensile deformation. It is hypothesized that at high strain rates subfibrillar subunits appear to "hydroplane" by each other on a layer of loosely bound water. PMID:12685863

  15. Molecular Basis of the Receptor Interactions of Polysialic Acid (polySia), polySia Mimetics, and Sulfated Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiyan; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Boelens, Rolf; Wienk, Hans; Siebert, Simone; Eckert, Thomas; Kraan, Stefan; Rojas-Macias, Miguel A; Lütteke, Thomas; Galuska, Sebastian P; Scheidig, Axel; Petridis, Athanasios K; Liang, Songping; Billeter, Martin; Schauer, Roland; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Siebert, Hans-Christian

    2016-05-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) and polySia glycomimetic molecules support nerve cell regeneration, differentiation, and neuronal plasticity. With a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, as well as data mining and molecular modeling techniques, it is possible to correlate specific ligand-receptor interactions with biochemical processes and in vivo studies that focus on the potential therapeutic impact of polySia, polySia glycomimetics, and sulfated polysaccharides in neuronal diseases. With this strategy, the receptor interactions of polySia and polySia mimetics can be understood on a submolecular level. As the HNK-1 glycan also enhances neuronal functions, we tested whether similar sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides from seaweed could be suitable, in addition to polySia, for finding potential new routes into patient care focusing on an improved cure for various neuronal diseases. The knowledge obtained here on the structural interplay between polySia or sulfated polysaccharides and their receptors can be exploited to develop new drugs and application routes for the treatment of neurological diseases and dysfunctions. PMID:27136597

  16. The Crosstalk of Pathways Involved in Immune Response Maybe the Shared Molecular Basis of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Na; Jiang, Miao; Li, Li; Bian, Yanqin; Xu, Gang; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are both systemic diseases linked with altered immune response, moderate mortality when present together. The treatment for both RA and T2D are not satisfied, partly because of the linkage between them has not yet been appreciated. A comprehensive study for the potential associations between the two disorders is needed. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to explore the differently expressed genes (DEGs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 10 RA and 10 T2D patients comparing with 10 healthy volunteers (control). We used bioinformatics analysis and the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to predict the commonalities on signaling pathways and molecular networks between those two diseases. 212 DEGs in RA and 114 DEGs in T2D patients were identified compared with healthy controls, respectively. 32 DEGs were shared between the two comparisons. The top 10 shared pathways interacted in cross-talking networks, regulated by 5 shared predicted upstream regulators, leading to the activated immune response were explored, which was considered as partly of the association mechanism of this two disorders. These discoveries would be considered as new understanding on the associations between RA and T2D, and provide novel treatment or prevention strategy. PMID:26252209

  17. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of homoserine dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium leprae TN toward inhibitors: a virtual screening study.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Dongling; Wang, Dongmei; Min, Weihong; Han, Weiwei

    2014-01-24

    Homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) from Mycobacterium leprae TN is an antifungal target for antifungal properties including efficacy against the human pathogen. The 3D structure of HSD has been firmly established by homology modeling methods. Using the template, homoserine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus denitrificans (PDB Id 3MTJ), a sequence identity of 40% was found and molecular dynamics simulation was used to optimize a reliable structure. The substrate and co-factor-binding regions in HSD were identified. In order to determine the important residues of the substrate (L-aspartate semialdehyde (L-ASA)) binding, the ASA was docked to the protein; Thr163, Asp198, and Glu192 may be important because they form a hydrogen bond with HSD through AutoDock 4.2 software. neuraminidaseAfter use of a virtual screening technique of HSD, the four top-scoring docking hits all seemed to cation-π ion pair with the key recognition residue Lys107, and Lys207. These ligands therefore seemed to be new chemotypes for HSD. Our results may be helpful for further experimental investigations.

  18. The Risk of Some Veterinary Antimicrobial Agents on Public Health Associated with Antimicrobial Resistance and their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Sander, Pascal; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Yulian; Cheng, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data, and risk assessment results of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in humans. From the selected examples, it was apparent from reviewing the published scientific literature that the ban on use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., avoparcin, fluoroquinolone, tetracyclines) did not change drug resistance patterns and did not mitigate the intended goal of minimizing antimicrobial resistance. The use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., virginiamycin, macrolides, and cephalosporins) in food animals may have an impact on the antimicrobial resistance in humans, but it was largely depended on the pattern of drug usage in different geographical regions. The epidemiological characteristics of resistant bacteria were closely related to molecular mechanisms involved in the development, fitness, and transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27803693

  19. Molecular basis for the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis: An experimental study in the Sprague-dawley rat model

    PubMed Central

    Omu, Alexander E.; Al-Azemi, Majedah K.; Al-Maghrebi, May; Mathew, Chacko T.; Omu, Florence E.; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Anim, Jehoram T.; Oriowo, Mabayoje A.; Memon, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. Materials and Methods: Three groups of eight adult male SD rats were maintained for 4 weeks on a normal diet as control, zinc deficient diet and zinc deficient diet with zinc supplementation of 28 mg zinc/kg body weight respectively. Using standard techniques, the following parameters were compared between the three groups of experimental animals at the end of 4 weeks: (a) Serum zinc, magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), selenium (Se) and cadmium (Cd), (b) serum sex hormones, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), (c) interleukin-4 (IL-4), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 expression in the testes, (d) assessment of apoptosis of testicular cells using electron microscopy and (e) testicular volume and histology using the orchidometer and Johnsen score, respectively. Results: The zinc deficient group showed a reduction of testicular volume, serum concentrations of Zn, Cu, Se, Mg, SOD, GPX, IL-4, Bcl-2 and testosterone (P < 0.05), as well as increased levels of serum Cd, MDA and tissue TNF-α, Bax, caspase-3 and apoptosis of the germ cells (P < 0.05) compared with control and zinc supplementation groups. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency is associated with impaired spermatogenesis because of reduced testosterone production, increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. These findings suggest that zinc has a role in male reproduction. PMID:25624578

  20. Molecular basis of the mechanism of thiol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution: challenging the SN2 paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Zeida, Ari; Babbush, Ryan; Lebrero, Mariano C. González; Trujillo, Madia; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Darío A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation of cellular thiol containing compounds, such as glutathione and protein Cys residues, is considered to play an important role in many biological processes. Among possible oxidants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is known to be produced in many cell types as a response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and could work as an intracellular messenger. This reaction has been reported to proceed through a SN2 mechanism, but despite its importance, the reaction is not completely understood at the atomic level. In this work we elucidate the reaction mechanism of thiol oxidation by H2O2 for a model methanethiolate system using state of the art hybrid quantum-classical (QM-MM) molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the solvent plays a key role in positioning the reactants, that there is a significant charge redistribution in the first stages of the reaction, and that there is a hydrogen transfer process between H2O2 oxygen atoms that occurs after reaching the transition state. These observations contradict the SN2 mechanism hypothesis for this reaction. Specifically, our results indicate that the reaction is driven by a tendency of the slightly charged peroxidatic oxygen to become even more negative in the product via an electrophilic attack on the negative sulfur atom. This is inconsistent with the SN2 mechanism, which predicts a protonated sulfenic acid and hydroxyl anion as stable intermediates. These intermediates are not found. Instead, the reaction proceeds directly to unprotonated sulfenic acid and water. PMID:22303921

  1. The challenges involved in elucidating the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition in mammals and approaches to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gavin J; Bianchi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is used by many different organisms to create a new generation of genetically distinct progeny. Cells originating from separate sexes or mating types segregate their genetic material into haploid gametes which must then recognize and fuse with each other in a process known as fertilization to form a diploid zygote. Despite the central importance of fertilization, we know remarkably little about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in how gametes recognize each other, particularly in mammals, although the proteins that are displayed on their surfaces are almost certainly involved. This paucity of knowledge is largely due to both the unique biological properties of mammalian gametes (sperm and egg) which make them experimentally difficult to manipulate, and the technical challenges of identifying interactions between membrane-embedded cell surface receptor proteins. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of animal gamete recognition, highlighting where important contributions to our understanding were made, why particular model systems were helpful, and why progress in mammals has been particularly challenging. We discuss how the development of mammalian in vitro fertilization and targeted gene disruption in mice were important technological advances that triggered progress. We argue that approaches employed to discover novel interactions between cell surface gamete recognition proteins should account for the unusual biochemical properties of membrane proteins and the typically highly transient nature of their interactions. Finally, we describe how these principles were applied to identify Juno as the egg receptor for sperm Izumo1, an interaction that is essential for mammalian fertilization.

  2. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  3. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis uncovers the molecular basis underlying early flowering and apetalous characteristic in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kunjiang; Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Feng; Chen, Song; Peng, Qi; Li, Hongge; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Maolong; Chu, Pu; Zhang, Jiefu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-01-01

    Floral transition and petal onset, as two main aspects of flower development, are crucial to rapeseed evolutionary success and yield formation. Currently, very little is known regarding the genetic architecture that regulates flowering time and petal morphogenesis in Brassica napus. In the present study, a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis was performed with an absolutely apetalous and early flowering line, APL01, and a normally petalled line, PL01, using high-throughput RNA sequencing. In total, 13,205 differential expressed genes were detected, of which 6111 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 7094 genes were significantly up-regulated in the young inflorescences of APL01 compared with PL01. The expression levels of a vast number of genes involved in protein biosynthesis were altered in response to the early flowering and apetalous character. Based on the putative rapeseed flowering genes, an early flowering network, mainly comprised of vernalization and photoperiod pathways, was built. Additionally, 36 putative upstream genes possibly governing the apetalous character of line APL01 were identified, and six genes potentially regulating petal origination were obtained by combining with three petal-related quantitative trait loci. These findings will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying floral transition and petal initiation in B. napus. PMID:27460760

  4. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis uncovers the molecular basis underlying early flowering and apetalous characteristic in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kunjiang; Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Feng; Chen, Song; Peng, Qi; Li, Hongge; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Maolong; Chu, Pu; Zhang, Jiefu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2016-01-01

    Floral transition and petal onset, as two main aspects of flower development, are crucial to rapeseed evolutionary success and yield formation. Currently, very little is known regarding the genetic architecture that regulates flowering time and petal morphogenesis in Brassica napus. In the present study, a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis was performed with an absolutely apetalous and early flowering line, APL01, and a normally petalled line, PL01, using high-throughput RNA sequencing. In total, 13,205 differential expressed genes were detected, of which 6111 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 7094 genes were significantly up-regulated in the young inflorescences of APL01 compared with PL01. The expression levels of a vast number of genes involved in protein biosynthesis were altered in response to the early flowering and apetalous character. Based on the putative rapeseed flowering genes, an early flowering network, mainly comprised of vernalization and photoperiod pathways, was built. Additionally, 36 putative upstream genes possibly governing the apetalous character of line APL01 were identified, and six genes potentially regulating petal origination were obtained by combining with three petal-related quantitative trait loci. These findings will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying floral transition and petal initiation in B. napus. PMID:27460760

  5. Understanding the molecular basis of autism in a dish using hiPSCs-derived neurons from ASD patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae-Seok; Yang, Jung-Eun; Lee, You-Kyung; Lee, Kyungmin; Lee, Jin-A; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social cognition, language development, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Due to the complexity and heterogeneity of ASD and lack of a proper human cellular model system, the pathophysiological mechanism of ASD during the developmental process is largely unknown. However, recent progress in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology as well as in vitro neural differentiation techniques have allowed us to functionally characterize neurons and analyze cortical development during neural differentiation. These technical advances will increase our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of heterogeneous ASD and help identify molecular biomarkers for patient stratification as well as personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of iPSC generation, differentiation of specific neuronal subtypes from iPSCs, and phenotypic characterizations of human ASD patient-derived iPSC models. Finally, we discuss the current limitations of iPSC technology and future directions of ASD pathophysiology studies using iPSCs. PMID:26419846

  6. The challenges involved in elucidating the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition in mammals and approaches to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gavin J; Bianchi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is used by many different organisms to create a new generation of genetically distinct progeny. Cells originating from separate sexes or mating types segregate their genetic material into haploid gametes which must then recognize and fuse with each other in a process known as fertilization to form a diploid zygote. Despite the central importance of fertilization, we know remarkably little about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in how gametes recognize each other, particularly in mammals, although the proteins that are displayed on their surfaces are almost certainly involved. This paucity of knowledge is largely due to both the unique biological properties of mammalian gametes (sperm and egg) which make them experimentally difficult to manipulate, and the technical challenges of identifying interactions between membrane-embedded cell surface receptor proteins. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of animal gamete recognition, highlighting where important contributions to our understanding were made, why particular model systems were helpful, and why progress in mammals has been particularly challenging. We discuss how the development of mammalian in vitro fertilization and targeted gene disruption in mice were important technological advances that triggered progress. We argue that approaches employed to discover novel interactions between cell surface gamete recognition proteins should account for the unusual biochemical properties of membrane proteins and the typically highly transient nature of their interactions. Finally, we describe how these principles were applied to identify Juno as the egg receptor for sperm Izumo1, an interaction that is essential for mammalian fertilization. PMID:26224538

  7. Molecular basis of the low activity of antitumor anthracenediones, mitoxantrone and ametantrone, in oxygen radical generation catalyzed by NADH dehydrogenase. Enzymatic and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, Jolanta; Mazerski, Jan; Tkaczyk-Gobis, Katarzyna; Borowski, Edward

    2005-04-01

    Synthetic antitumor anthracenedione drugs, in contrast to anthracycline antibiotics, are ineffective in free radical formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. Our results have indicated that neither the reduction potential nor the side chain conformation and the energies of border orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) determine the ability of anthracenediones to stimulate reactive oxygen species formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. It was shown that the distribution of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), around the quinone system was crucial for this ability. We have found for non-stimulating anthracenediones that the clouds of positive MEP cover the quinone carbon atoms while for agents effective in stimulating reactive oxygen species formation the clouds of negative MEP cover continuously the aromatic core together with the quinone system.

  8. Molecular Structural Basis for the Cold Adaptedness of the Psychrophilic β-Glucosidase BglU in Micrococcus antarcticus

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Li-Li; Hou, Yan-Jie; Fan, Hong-Xia; Qu, Jie; Qi, Chao; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes play crucial roles in cold adaptation of microbes and provide useful models for studies of protein evolution, folding, and dynamic properties. We examined the crystal structure (2.2-Å resolution) of the psychrophilic β-glucosidase BglU, a member of the glycosyl hydrolase 1 (GH1) enzyme family found in the cold-adapted bacterium Micrococcus antarcticus. Structural comparison and sequence alignment between BglU and its mesophilic and thermophilic counterpart enzymes (BglB and GlyTn, respectively) revealed two notable features distinct to BglU: (i) a unique long-loop L3 (35 versus 7 amino acids in others) involved in substrate binding and (ii) a unique amino acid, His299 (Tyr in others), involved in the stabilization of an ordered water molecule chain. Shortening of loop L3 to 25 amino acids reduced low-temperature catalytic activity, substrate-binding ability, the optimal temperature, and the melting temperature (Tm). Mutation of His299 to Tyr increased the optimal temperature, the Tm, and the catalytic activity. Conversely, mutation of Tyr301 to His in BglB caused a reduction in catalytic activity, thermostability, and the optimal temperature (45 to 35°C). Loop L3 shortening and H299Y substitution jointly restored enzyme activity to the level of BglU, but at moderate temperatures. Our findings indicate that loop L3 controls the level of catalytic activity at low temperatures, residue His299 is responsible for thermolability (particularly heat lability of the active center), and long-loop L3 and His299 are jointly responsible for the psychrophilic properties. The described structural basis for the cold adaptedness of BglU will be helpful for structure-based engineering of new cold-adapted enzymes and for the production of mutants useful in a variety of industrial processes at different temperatures. PMID:26801571

  9. Structure of the hemoglobin-IsdH complex reveals the molecular basis of iron capture by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Claire F; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins.

  10. Molecular basis of the clotting defect in a bleeding patient missing the Asp-185 codon in the factor X gene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2014-11-01

    Factor X (FX) is a vitamin K-dependent plasma zymogen, which following activation to factor Xa (FXa), converts prothrombin to thrombin in the blood clotting cascade. It was recently demonstrated that a natural variant of FX carrying the Asp-185 deletion (FX-D185del, chymotrypsinogen numbering) was associated with mild bleeding in a patient with severe FX deficiency. In this study, we expressed FX-D185del in mammalian cells and characterized its properties in appropriate kinetic assays in purified systems. We discovered that while the FX variant can be normally activated by physiological activators; both amidolytic and proteolytic activities of the mutant are dramatically impaired. Interestingly, factor Va (FVa) significantly improved the proteolytic defect when the mutant protease was assembled into the prothrombinase complex. Thus, in contrast to >50-fold catalytic defect in the absence of FVa, the variant activated prothrombin with only ~2.5-fold decreased catalytic efficiency in the presence of the cofactor. The FXa variant dramatically lost its susceptibility to inhibition by antithrombin and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, thus exhibiting ~2-3 orders of magnitude lower reactivity with the plasma inhibitors. Further studies revealed that Na(+) no longer activates the variant protease, suggesting that the functionally important allosteric linkage between the Na(+)-binding and the P1-binding sites of the protease has been eliminated. These results suggest that the lower catalytic efficiency of FXa-D185del in the bleeding patient may be partially compensated by the loss of its reactivity with plasma inhibitors, possibly explaining the basis for the paradoxical severe FX deficiency with only mild bleeding tendency for this mutation. PMID:25179519

  11. Structure of the Hemoglobin-IsdH Complex Reveals the Molecular Basis of Iron Capture by Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Claire F.; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A.; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P.; Clubb, Robert T.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Gell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins. PMID:24425866

  12. Molecular Basis for the Selective Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase by 2'-Fluoro-4'-Chloromethyl-Cytidine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Deval, Jerome; Hong, Jin; Wang, Guangyi; Taylor, Josh; Smith, Lucas K.; Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K.; Liu, Hong; Jin, Zhinan; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Stoycheva, Antitsa D.; Serebryany, Vladimir; Liu, Jyanwei; Smith, David B.; Tam, Yuen; Zhang, Qingling; Moore, Martin L.; Fearns, Rachel; Chanda, Sushmita M.; Blatt, Lawrence M.; Symons, Julian A.; Beigelman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infections, yet no vaccines or effective therapeutics are available. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in RSV-infected adult volunteers, and currently under evaluation in hospitalized infants. Here, we report the mechanism of inhibition and selectivity of ALS-8176 and its parent ALS-8112. ALS-8176 inhibited RSV replication in non-human primates, while ALS-8112 inhibited all strains of RSV in vitro and was specific for paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses. The antiviral effect of ALS-8112 was mediated by the intracellular formation of its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP) inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase. ALS-8112 selected for resistance-associated mutations within the region of the L gene of RSV encoding the RNA polymerase. In biochemical assays, ALS-8112-TP was efficiently recognized by the recombinant RSV polymerase complex, causing chain termination of RNA synthesis. ALS-8112-TP did not inhibit polymerases from host or viruses unrelated to RSV such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whereas structurally related molecules displayed dual RSV/HCV inhibition. The combination of molecular modeling and enzymatic analysis showed that both the 2'F and the 4'ClCH2 groups contributed to the selectivity of ALS-8112-TP. The lack of antiviral effect of ALS-8112-TP against HCV polymerase was caused by Asn291 that is well-conserved within positive-strand RNA viruses. This represents the first comparative study employing recombinant RSV and HCV polymerases to define the selectivity of clinically relevant nucleotide analogs. Understanding nucleotide selectivity towards distant viral RNA polymerases could not only be used to repurpose existing drugs against new viral infections, but also to design novel molecules. PMID:26098424

  13. Bicontinuous Fluid Structure with Low Cohesive Energy: Molecular Basis for Exceptionally Low Interfacial Tension of Complex Coacervate Fluids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Ying; Yoo, Hee Young; Jho, YongSeok; Han, Songi; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-05-24

    An exceptionally low interfacial tension of a dense fluid of concentrated polyelectrolyte complexes, phase-separated from a biphasic fluid known as complex coacervates, represents a unique and highly sought-after materials property that inspires novel applications from superior coating to wet adhesion. Despite extensive studies and broad interest, the molecular and structural bases for the unique properties of complex coacervates are unclear. Here, a microphase-separated complex coacervate fluid generated by mixing a recombinant mussel foot protein-1 (mfp-1) as the polycation and hyaluronic acid (HA) as the polyanion at stoichiometric ratios was macroscopically phase-separated into a dense complex coacervate and a dilute supernatant phase to enable separate characterization of the two fluid phases. Surprisingly, despite up to 4 orders of magnitude differing density of the polyelectrolytes, the diffusivity of water in these two phases was found to be indistinguishable. The presence of unbound, bulk-like, water in the dense fluid can be reconciled with a water population that is only weakly perturbed by the polyelectrolyte interface and network. This hypothesis was experimentally validated by cryo-TEM of the macroscopically phase-separated dense complex coacervate phase that was found to be a bicontinuous and biphasic nanostructured network, in which one of the phases was confirmed by staining techniques to be water and the other polyelectrolyte complexes. We conclude that a weak cohesive energy between water-water and water-polyelectrolytes manifests itself in a bicontinuous network, and is responsible for the exceptionally low interfacial energy of this complex fluid phase with respect to virtually any surface within an aqueous medium.

  14. Molecular basis for increased susceptibility of isolates with atazanavir resistance-conferring substitution I50L to other protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yanchunas, Joseph; Langley, David R; Tao, Li; Rose, Ronald E; Friborg, Jacques; Colonno, Richard J; Doyle, Michael L

    2005-09-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are highly effective drugs against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet long-term therapeutic use is limited by emergence of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) protease substitutions that confer cross-resistance to multiple protease inhibitor drugs. Atazanavir is a highly potent HIV protease inhibitor with a distinct resistance profile that includes effectiveness against most HIV-1 isolates resistant to one or two PIs. The signature resistance substitution for atazanavir is I50L, and it is frequently (53%) accompanied by a compensatory A71V substitution that helps restore viability and increases atazanavir resistance levels. We measured the binding affinities of wild-type (WT) and I50L/A71V HIV-1 proteases to atazanavir and other currently approved PIs (ritonavir, lopinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir, indinavir, and amprenavir) by isothermal titration calorimetry. Remarkably, we find that all of the PIs have 2- to 10-fold increased affinities for I50L/A71V protease, except for atazanavir. The results are also manifested by thermal stability measures of affinity for WT and I50L/A71V proteases. Additional biophysical and enzyme kinetics experiments show I50L/A71V protease is a stable enzyme with catalytic activity that is slightly reduced (34%) relative to the WT. Computational modeling reveals that the unique resistance phenotype of I50L/A71V protease likely originates from bulky tert-butyl groups at P2 and P2' (specific to atazanavir) that sterically clash with methyl groups on residue L50. The results of this study provide a molecular understanding of the novel hypersusceptibility of atazanavir-resistant I50L/A71V-containing clinical isolates to other currently approved PIs.

  15. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201–restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Josephs, Tracy M.; Clemens, E. Bridie; Grant, Emma J.; Nguyen, Thi H. O.; Wang, George C.; Price, David A.; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Doherty, Peter C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide–HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158 and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418 antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418+ CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201+ donors responding to M158. This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158 variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19+ TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158 peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201+ individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158. Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  16. Physical Meaning of Virtual Kohn-Sham Orbitals and Orbital Energies: An Ideal Basis for the Description of Molecular Excitations.

    PubMed

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, several benchmark studies on the performance of large sets of functionals in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of excitation energies have been performed. The tested functionals do not approximate exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies closely. We highlight the advantages of (close to) exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies for a simple description, very often as just a single orbital-to-orbital transition, of molecular excitations. Benchmark calculations are performed for the statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP) functional for the potential [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 1344; 2001, 114, 652], which approximates the true Kohn-Sham potential much better than LDA, GGA, mGGA, and hybrid potentials do. An accurate Kohn-Sham potential does not only perform satisfactorily for calculated vertical excitation energies of both valence and Rydberg transitions but also exhibits appealing properties of the KS orbitals including occupied orbital energies close to ionization energies, virtual-occupied orbital energy gaps very close to excitation energies, realistic shapes of virtual orbitals, leading to straightforward interpretation of most excitations as single orbital transitions. We stress that such advantages are completely lost in time-dependent Hartree-Fock and partly in hybrid approaches. Many excitations and excitation energies calculated with local density, generalized gradient, and hybrid functionals are spurious. There is, with an accurate KS, or even the LDA or GGA potentials, nothing problematic about the "band gap" in molecules: the HOMO-LUMO gap is close to the first excitation energy (the optical gap).

  17. Molecular basis for universal HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell immunity against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Sophie A; Josephs, Tracy M; Clemens, E Bridie; Grant, Emma J; Nguyen, Thi H O; Wang, George C; Price, David A; Miller, Adrian; Tong, Steven Y C; Thomas, Paul G; Doherty, Peter C; Rossjohn, Jamie; Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-04-19

    Memory CD8(+)T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for antigenic peptides derived from internal viral proteins confer broad protection against distinct strains of influenza A virus (IAV). However, immune efficacy can be undermined by the emergence of escape mutants. To determine how T-cell receptor (TCR) composition relates to IAV epitope variability, we used ex vivo peptide-HLA tetramer enrichment and single-cell multiplex analysis to compare TCRs targeted to the largely conserved HLA-A*0201-M158and the hypervariable HLA-B*3501-NP418antigens. The TCRαβs for HLA-B*3501-NP418 (+)CTLs varied among individuals and across IAV strains, indicating that a range of mutated peptides will prime different NP418-specific CTL sets. Conversely, a dominant public TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCRαβ was selected in HLA-A*0201(+)donors responding to M158 This public TCR cross-recognized naturally occurring M158variants complexed with HLA-A*0201. Ternary structures showed that induced-fit molecular mimicry underpins TRAV27/TRBV19(+)TCR specificity for the WT and mutant M158peptides, suggesting the possibility of universal CTL immunity in HLA-A*0201(+)individuals. Combined with the high population frequency of HLA-A*0201, these data potentially explain the relative conservation of M158 Moreover, our results suggest that vaccination strategies aimed at generating broad protection should incorporate variant peptides to elicit cross-reactive responses against other specificities, especially those that may be relatively infrequent among IAV-primed memory CTLs. PMID:27036003

  18. Molecular Basis of Calpain Cleavage and Inactivation of the Sodium-Calcium Exchanger 1 in Heart Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Hodne, Kjetil; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Lunde, Ida Gjervold; Dalhus, Bjørn; Lunde, Marianne; Kvaløy, Heidi; Louch, William Edward; Tønnessen, Theis; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac sodium (Na+)-calcium (Ca2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) is central to the maintenance of normal Ca2+ homeostasis and contraction. Studies indicate that the Ca2+-activated protease calpain cleaves NCX1. We hypothesized that calpain is an important regulator of NCX1 in response to pressure overload and aimed to identify molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of calpain binding and cleavage of NCX1 in the heart. NCX1 full-length protein and a 75-kDa NCX1 fragment along with calpain were up-regulated in aortic stenosis patients and rats with heart failure. Patients with coronary artery disease and sham-operated rats were used as controls. Calpain co-localized, co-fractionated, and co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1 in rat cardiomyocytes and left ventricle lysate. Immunoprecipitations, pull-down experiments, and extensive use of peptide arrays indicated that calpain domain III anchored to the first Ca2+ binding domain in NCX1, whereas the calpain catalytic region bound to the catenin-like domain in NCX1. The use of bioinformatics, mutational analyses, a substrate competitor peptide, and a specific NCX1-Met369 antibody identified a novel calpain cleavage site at Met369. Engineering NCX1-Met369 into a tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site revealed that specific cleavage at Met369 inhibited NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode). Finally, a short peptide fragment containing the NCX1-Met369 cleavage site was modeled into the narrow active cleft of human calpain. Inhibition of NCX1 activity, such as we have observed here following calpain-induced NCX1 cleavage, might be beneficial in pathophysiological conditions where increased NCX1 activity contributes to cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25336645

  19. The molecular and biochemical basis for varietal variation in sesquiterpene content in melon (Cucumis melo L.) rinds.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Vitaly; Benyamini, Yael; Bar, Einat; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Gepstein, Shimon; Giovannoni, James J; Schaffer, Arthur A; Burger, Joseph; Tadmor, Yaakov; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Katzir, Nurit

    2008-04-01

    A combined chemical, biochemical and molecular study was conducted to understand the differential accumulation of volatile sesquiterpenes in melon fruits. Sesquiterpenes were present mainly in the rinds of climacteric varieties, and a great diversity in their composition was found among varieties. Sesquiterpenes were generally absent in non-climacteric varieties. Two climacteric melon varieties, the green-fleshed 'Noy Yizre'el', and the orange-fleshed 'Dulce' were further examined. In 'Noy Yizre'el' the main sesquiterpenes accumulated are delta-cadinene, gamma-cadinene and alpha-copaene, while alpha-farnesene is the main sesquiterpene in 'Dulce'. Sesquiterpene synthase activities, mainly restricted to rinds of mature fruits, were shown to generate different sesquiterpenes in each variety according to the compositions found in rinds. EST melon database mining yielded two novel cDNAs coding for members of the Tps gene family termed CmTpsNY and CmTpsDul respectively, that are 43.2% similar. Heterologous expression in E. coli of CmTpsNY produced mainly delta-copaene, alpha-copaene, beta-caryophyllene, germacrene D, alpha-muurolene, gamma-cadinene, delta-cadinene, and alpha-cadinene, while CmTpsDul produced alpha-farnesene only. CmTpsNY was mostly expressed in 'Noy Yizre'el' rind while CmTpsDul expression was specific to 'Dulce' rind. None of these genes was expressed in rinds of the non-climacteric 'Tam Dew' cultivar. Our results indicate that different sesquiterpene synthases encoded by different members of the Tps gene family are active in melon varieties and this specificity modulates the accumulation of sesquiterpenes. The genes are differentially transcriptionally regulated during fruit development and according to variety and are likely to be associated with chemical differences responsible for the unique aromas of melon varieties. PMID:18264780

  20. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  1. Structural basis of the tight binding of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Van Etten, R L

    1999-03-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) binds tightly to bovine low Mr protein tyrosine phosphatase (BPTP), but it is a very poor substrate for the enzyme. The structural basis of this tight binding of PLP is examined here by a variety of methods. Binding constants of a number of PLP analogues were measured with wild-type BPTP, and PLP binding constants of some site-specific mutants of BPTP were determined at pH 5.0 through the use of several independent methods. The tight binding of PLP (Ki = 7.6 microM) causes a downfield shift of the His-72 Cepsilon1H resonance in the 1H NMR spectrum of the protein, consistent with a structural alteration in the phosphate binding loop transmitted through a complex hydrogen bond network that exists between His-72 and Asn-15, which is a residue in the phosphate binding loop. 1H NMR spectroscopy with an MLEV-17 spectral editing scheme was used to monitor the aldehyde resonance of PLP during titration of a catalytically inactive C12A mutant of BPTP. The aldehydic proton resonance of PLP shifted from 10.43 to 10.26 ppm upon complex formation with the C12A mutant. This resonance occurs far from the region where a hemithioacetal hydrogen would be expected to appear, consistent with the conclusion that the Cys-17 side chain of BPTP does not add to the aldehyde group of PLP. UV-visible spectrophotometric titration also supported this conclusion. The binding constant of PLP to a C17A mutant was similar to that exhibited with wild-type protein. These results show that Cys-17 makes virtually no contribution to the tight binding of PLP by BPTP, in contrast to a published report that it is "essential" for binding PLP. On the other hand, Asp-129 of BPTP was found to be very important for binding PLP. It is concluded that Asp-129 binds to the pyridinium nitrogen of PLP and that this renders Asp-129 effectively unavailable to serve its essential catalytic role as a general acid. The interactions described here should be useful in the design of specific

  2. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Asp kinase toward its natural substrates and feedback inhibitors: a docking and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, M; Babajan, B; Anuradha, C M; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, C; Madhusudana, P; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem, compounded by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-TB co-infection and recent emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. In this context, aspartokinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis has drawn attention for designing novel anti-TB drugs. Asp kinase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate and involved in the branched biosynthetic pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine. An intermediate of lysine biosynthetic branch, mesodiaminopimelate is also a component of the peptidoglycan which is a component of bacterial cell wall. To interfere with the production of all these amino acids and cell wall, it is possible to inhibit Asp kinase activity. This can be achieved using Asp kinase inhibitors. In order to design novel Asp kinase inhibitors as effective anti-TB drugs, it is necessary to have an understanding of the binding sites of Asp kinase. As no crystal structure of the enzyme has yet been published, we built a homology model of Asp kinase using the crystallized Asp kinase from M. Jannaschii, as template structures (2HMF and 3C1M). After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and VERIFY-3D. The results of molecular docking studies with natural substrates, products and feedback inhibitors are in agreement with the published data and showed that ACT domain plays an important role in binding to ligands. Based on the docking conformations, pharmacophore model can be developed by probing the common features of ligands. By analyzing the results, ACT domain architecture, certain key residues that are responsible for binding to feedback inhibitors and natural substrates were identified. This would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Asp kinase and providing insights

  3. Understanding the molecular basis of agonist/antagonist mechanism of GPER1/GPR30 through structural and energetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Luna, David; Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, José

    2016-04-01

    The G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest superfamily of membrane proteins in charge to pass the cell signaling after binding with their cognate ligands to the cell interior. In breast cancer, a GPCR named GPER1 plays a key role in the process of growth and the proliferation of cancer cells. In a previous study, theoretical methods were applied to construct a model of GPER1, which later was submitted to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to perform a docking calculation. Based on this preceding work, it is known that GPER1 is sensitive to structural differences in its binding site. However, due to the nature of that past study, conformational changes linked to the ligand binding were not observed. Therefore, in this study, in order to explore the conformational changes coupled to the agonist/antagonist binding, MD simulations of about 0.25μs were performed for the free and bound states, summarizing 0.75μs of MD simulation in total. For the bound states, one agonist (G-1) and antagonist (G-15) were chosen since is widely known that these two molecules cause an impact on GPER1 mobility. Based on the conformational ensemble generated through MD simulations, we found that despite G-1 and G-15 being stabilized by similar map of residues, the structural differences between both ligands impact the hydrogen bond pattern not only at the GPER1 binding site but also along the seven-helix bundle, causing significant differences in the conformational mobility along the extracellular and cytoplasmic domain, and to a lesser degree in the curvatures of helix 2, helix 3 and helix 7 between the free and bound states, which is in agreement with reported literature, and might be linked to microscopic characteristics of the activated-inactivated transition. Furthermore, binding free energy calculations using the MM/GBSA method for the bound states, followed by an alanine scanning analysis allowed us to identify some important residues for the complex

  4. A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

    2012-04-21

    A semi-empirical counterpoise-type correction for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in molecular systems is presented. An atom pair-wise potential corrects for the inter- and intra-molecular BSSE in supermolecular Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This geometrical counterpoise (gCP) denoted scheme depends only on the molecular geometry, i.e., no input from the electronic wave-function is required and hence is applicable to molecules with ten thousands of atoms. The four necessary parameters have been determined by a fit to standard Boys and Bernadi counterpoise corrections for Hobza's S66×8 set of non-covalently bound complexes (528 data points). The method's target are small basis sets (e.g., minimal, split-valence, 6-31G*), but reliable results are also obtained for larger triple-ζ sets. The intermolecular BSSE is calculated by gCP within a typical error of 10%-30% that proves sufficient in many practical applications. The approach is suggested as a quantitative correction in production work and can also be routinely applied to estimate the magnitude of the BSSE beforehand. The applicability for biomolecules as the primary target is tested for the crambin protein, where gCP removes intramolecular BSSE effectively and yields conformational energies comparable to def2-TZVP basis results. Good mutual agreement is also found with Jensen's ACP(4) scheme, estimating the intramolecular BSSE in the phenylalanine-glycine-phenylalanine tripeptide, for which also a relaxed rotational energy profile is presented. A variety of minimal and double-ζ basis sets combined with gCP and the dispersion corrections DFT-D3 and DFT-NL are successfully benchmarked on the S22 and S66 sets of non-covalent interactions. Outstanding performance with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.51 kcal/mol (0.38 kcal/mol after D3-refit) is obtained at the gCP-corrected HF-D3/(minimal basis) level for the S66 benchmark. The gCP-corrected B3LYP-D3/6-31G* model

  5. Molecular basis of acid ceramidase deficiency in a neonatal form of Farber disease: identification of the first large deletion in ASAH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mariana Q; Le Trionnaire, Emmanuelle; Ribeiro, Isaura; Carpentier, Stéphane; Harzer, Klaus; Levade, Thierry; Ribeiro, M Gil

    2013-07-01

    Farber disease, also known as Farber's lipogranulomatosis, is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the ASAH1 gene. This gene codes for acid ceramidase, a lysosomal heterodimeric enzyme that hydrolyzes ceramide into sphingosine and fatty acid. To date, less than 25 distinct mutations have been identified in Farber patients, but no large deletions have yet been reported. In this work, cultured fibroblasts from a Farber patient with the rare neonatal form of Farber disease were studied to elucidate the molecular basis of this extremely severe phenotype. Direct sequencing of ASAH1 genomic DNA revealed the causative heterozygous mutation in the donor splice site consensus sequence of intron 11, g.24491A > G (c.917 + 4A > G), that resulted in the absence of detectable mRNA. Subsequent analysis of ASAH1 mRNA showed total skipping of exons 3 to 5. Long-range PCR and sequencing led to the identification of a gross deletion of ASAH1 gene, g.8728_18197del (c.126-3941_382 + 1358del) predicting the synthesis of a truncated polypeptide, p.Tyr42_Leu127delinsArgfs*10. Accordingly, no molecular forms corresponding to precursor or proteolytically processed mature protein were observed. These findings indicate that any functionally active acid ceramidase is absent in patient cells, underscoring the severity of the clinical phenotype. Molecular findings in the non-consanguineous parents confirmed the compound heterozygous ASAH1 genotype identified in this Farber case. This work unravels for the first time the mutations underlying the neonatal form of Farber disease and represents the first report of a large deletion identified in the ASAH1 gene. Screening for gross deletions in other patients in whom the mutation present in the second allele had not yet been identified is required to elucidate further its overall contribution for the molecular pathogenesis of this devastating disease.

  6. Molecular dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis expansin EXLX1: interaction with substrates and structural basis of the lack of activity of mutants.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-02-01

    Expansins are disruptive proteins that loosen growing plant cell walls and can enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The canonical expansin structure consists of one domain responsible for substrate binding (D2) and another domain (D1) of unknown function, but essential for activity. Although the effects of expansins on cell walls and cellulose fibrils are known, the molecular mechanism underlying their biophysical function is poorly understood. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain insights into the mechanism of action of the Bacillus subtilis expansin BsEXLX1. We show that BsEXLX1 can slide on the hydrophobic surface of crystalline cellulose via the flat aromatic surface of its binding domain D2, comprised mainly of residues Trp125 and Trp126. Also, we observe that BsEXLX1 can hydrogen bond a free glucan chain in a twisted conformation and that the twisting is chiefly induced by means of residue Asp82 located on D1, which has been shown to be essential for expansin activity. These results suggest that BsEXLX1 could move on the surface of cellulose and disrupt hydrogen bonds by twisting glucan chains. Simulations of the inactive BsEXLX1 mutants Asp82Asn and Tyr73Ala indicate structural alterations around the twisting center in the domain D1, which suggest a molecular basis for the lack of activity of these mutants and corroborate the idea that BsEXLX1 works by inducing twists on glucan chains. Moreover, simulations of the double mutant Asp82Asn/Tyr73Leu predict the recovery of the lost activity of BsEXLX1-Asp82Asn. Our results provide a dynamical view of the expansin-substrate interactions at the molecular scale and help shed light on the expansin mechanism.

  7. Molecular characterization of the C3HfB/HeN H-2Kkm2 mutation. Implications for the molecular basis of alloreactivity

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The C3HfB/HeN (C3Hf) mouse strain expresses an H-2Kk molecule, previously denoted H-2Kkv1, that is structurally and functionally distinct from H-2Kk of the parental C3H strain. By molecular genetic analysis, we demonstrate that the C3Hf H-2K gene carries a homozygous coding region mutation relative to the C3H allele, revealing that C3Hf meets the requirements for assignment of a mutant haplotype, H-2km2. C3Hf H-2Kkm2 bears a single clustered substitution of four nucleotides within 14 contiguous nucleotides in exon 3. Since this sequence also is present intact at the homologous position in H-2Dk of both C3H and C3Hf, the origin of the H-2Kkm2 mutation is consistent with a nonreciprocal sequence transfer from the H-2Dk donor gene, analogous to the mechanism proposed for generation of the H-2Kb mutations. The H- 2Kkm2 mutation encodes three clustered amino acid substitutions, at positions 95, 98, and 99, that map to one of the large beta strands at the bottom of the peptide antigen binding cleft of the H-2Kkm2 molecule. The nature and location of these amino acid substitutions are unique relative to any other known H-2 mutant or HLA variant, and underscore the importance of the beta-pleated sheet in influencing CTL recognition. These results indicate that H-2Kkm2 alloantigenicity may derive largely from altered presentation of self cellular peptides. PMID:2903213

  8. Molecular basis of a microbe-mediated enhancement of symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixation. [Rhizobium meliloti; Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1987-04-01

    Improvement of biological nitrogen fixation represents a potential source of both increased food production and decreased dependence on costly chemical fertilizer. They report the results of an investigation of the molecular basis of a unique, microbial-mediated mechanism for increased growth and nitrogen fixation rates in alfalfa. Inoculation of alfalfa plants with both Rhizobium meliloti and Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci provides increased growth and N/sub 2/-fixation rates of alfalfa. Tabaci produces tabtoxinine-..beta..-lactam (T..beta..L), an exocellular product and glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. The association of this pathogen with nodulating alfalfa plants appears to alter the normal regulation of nitrogen fixation such that nitrogenase activity is stimulated and GS activity is inhibited. Studies of the soluble amino acids in these nodules and the activities of the ammonia assimilatory enzymes indicate alternative pathways of ammonia assimilation are being employed.

  9. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Steven D. Brown; Robert L. Hettich; Nathan VerBerkmoes; Jizhong Zhou

    2004-03-17

    The mediation of metal reduction by microorganisms has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives; however, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE field sites. Chromium(VI), for example, is one of several risk-driving contaminants at DOE sites and has been targeted by the DOE for bioremediation research. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can potentially be used to immobilize chromium, a toxic and mutagenic metal, by reducing soluble Cr(VI) to the insoluble and less bioavailable form of Cr(III), thus facilitating its removal from contained-storage and natural sites. The overall goal of this study is to integrate targeted biochemical and proteomic analyses with genome-wide gene expression profiling to examine the molecular basis and regulation of chromium(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Towards this goal, we will (1) isolate and identify the terminal chromium(VI) reductase and the gene(s) encoding this activity using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques; (2) verify the function of the gene(s) encoding the terminal Cr(VI) reductase and compare whole transcriptome data with whole proteome data in order to understand the regulation of chromium reduction; and (3) investigate the molecular stress response and adaptation of S. oneidensis to toxic levels of soluble Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. This research will provide important information on the functional components and regulatory mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, which should prove valuable in developing effective assessment strategies for in situ bioremediation and genetically engineering desired bacteria for enhanced bioremediation.

  10. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudopotential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new method for the computation of forces with finite variance on open systems and a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow-Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets. PMID:24526929

  11. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-10-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculat