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Sample records for molecular beam deposition

  1. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time.

  2. Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-01-10

    A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time. 9 figures.

  3. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  4. The nanoscale implications of a molecular gas beam during electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Fowlkes, Jason; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Utke, Ivo; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2014-02-26

    The gas flux direction in focused electron beam induced processes can strongly destabilize the morphology on the nanometer scale. We demonstrate how pattern parameters such as position relative to the gas nozzle, axial rotation, scanning direction, and patterning sequence result in different growth modes for identical structures. This is mainly caused by nanoscale geometric shadowing, particularly when shadowing distances are comparable to surface diffusion lengths of (CH3)3-Pt-CpCH3 adsorbates. Furthermore, two different adsorbate replenishment mechanisms exist and are governed by either surface diffusion or directional gas flux adsorption. The experimental study is complemented by calculations and dynamic growth simulations which successfully emulate the observed morphology instabilities and support the proposed growth model.

  5. Temperature stabilized effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, H. F.; Brodie, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    A simple effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy is described. The source consists of a crucible with a thermocouple temperature sensor heated by a resistive crucible heater. Radiation heat transfer from the crucible to the thermocouple produces a consistent and reproducible thermocouple temperature for a given crucible temperature, without direct contact between the thermocouple and the crucible. The thermocouple temperature is somewhat less than the actual crucible temperature because of heat flow from the thermocouple junction along the thermocouple lead wires. In a typical case, the thermocouple temperature is 1007 °C while the crucible is at 1083 °C. The crucible temperature stability is estimated from the measured sensitivity of the evaporation rate of indium to temperature, and the observed variations in the evaporation rate for a fixed thermocouple temperature. The crucible temperature peak-to-peak variation over a one hour period is 1.2 °C. Machined molybdenum crucibles were used in the indium and copper sources for depositing CuInSe2 thin films for solar cells.

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of magnetoelectric oxide heterostructures deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterbinsky, George Evan

    There is considerable interest in incorporating magnetic materials into electronic devices to achieve new functions such as nonvolatile memories. Electric field control of magnetism is of much interest for new low power electronic devices because it eliminates the need to apply magnetic fields. One approach to achieving electrical control of magnetism is to exploit magnetoelastic effects in composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials. Application of an electric field to the composite will induce a strain through the piezo-electric effect, and the strain will alter the magnetization of the ferromagnetic constituent through the magnetoelastic effect. In this work, we examine the relationships between growth, strain, and magnetic properties of epitaxial ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 (magnetite) and ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin film heterostructures. We find that altering the strain state of a magnetite layer deposited on a BaTiO3 substrate has a profound effect on its magnetization. Here, we demonstrate the interaction between strain and magnetization is mediated by magnetic anisotropy and the magnetic domains structure of the films. Epitaxial magnetite films were deposited on MgO, BaTiO3, and SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy between temperatures of 573 and 723 K. Examination of the morphologies of Fe3O 4 films indicates that island growth is favored. Films exhibit in-plane magnetic isotropy and reduced saturation magnetizations with respect to the bulk material, as demonstrated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Magnetic hysteresis measurements suggest that these differences originate from antiphase boundary defects within the films. The strain in magnetite films deposited on BaTiO3 single crystal substrates was measured by x-ray diffraction. Measurements reveal a dependence of magnetization (M) on strain (epsilon) with discontinuities in magnetization versus temperature curves resulting from changes in the domain structure of the

  7. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  8. Molecular beam epitaxy deposition of Gd2O3 thin films on SrTiO3 (100) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxing; Hao, Jinghua; Zhang, Yangyang; Wei, Hongmei; Mu, Juyi

    2016-06-01

    Gd2O3 thin films are grown on the SrTiO3 (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) are performed to investigate the microstructure of deposited thin films. It is found that the as-deposited thin film possesses a very uniform thickness of ∼40 nm and is composed of single cubic phase Gd2O3 grains. STEM and TEM observations reveal that Gd2O3 thin film grows epitaxially on the SrTiO3 (100) substrate with (001)Gd2O3//(100)STO and [110]Gd2O3//[001]STO orientations. Furthermore, the Gd atoms are found to diffuse into the SrTiO3 substrate for a depth of one unit cell and substitute for the Sr atoms near the interface.

  9. Morphological and optical properties of titanyl phthalocyanine films deposited by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy (SuMBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walzer, Karsten; Toccoli, Tullio; Pallaoro, Alessia; Verucchi, Roberto; Fritz, Torsten; Leo, Karl; Boschetti, Andrea; Iannotta, Salvatore

    2004-12-01

    We studied the growth and properties of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) thin films made by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy (SuMBE). Interesting differences in the growth properties on amorphous (quartz) and crystalline (mica) substrates were found, indicating that SuMBE gives rise to an epitaxy of disc-like organic molecules on crystalline substrates. The combined control of the kinetic energy of the molecules in the supersonic beam specific to SuMBE and of the substrate temperature during deposition are the key parameters used to determine the final properties of the films. We show that SuMBE is a well-suited epitaxy method for the deposition of relatively large organic molecules, leading to layers of thin organic (single-)crystals with lateral dimensions in the micrometer range. By SuMBE we can control the growth of different polymorphs of TiOPc. We found and studied two ways to produce films of red and infrared absorbing phase II TiOPc, which is of interest for applications in organic solar cells.

  10. Experimental cell for molecular beam deposition and magnetic resonance studies of matrix isolated radicals at temperatures below 1 K

    SciTech Connect

    Sheludiakov, S. Ahokas, J.; Vainio, O.; Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Vasiliev, S.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Mao, S.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present the design and performance of an experimental cell constructed for matrix isolation studies of H and D atoms in solid H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} films, which are created by molecular beam deposition at temperatures below 1 K. The sample cell allows sensitive weighing of the films by a quartz microbalance (QM) and their studies by magnetic resonance techniques in a strong magnetic field of 4.6 T. We are able to regulate the deposition rate in the range from 0.01 to 10 molecular layers/s, and measure the thickness with ≈0.2 monolayer resolution. The upper QM electrode serves as a mirror for a 128 GHz Fabry-Perot resonator connected to an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. H and D atoms were created by RF discharge in situ in the sample cell, and characterized by ESR and electron-nuclear double resonance. From the magnetic resonance measurements we conclude that the films are smooth and provide homogeneous trapping conditions for embedded atoms. The current sample cell design also makes it possible to calibrate the ESR signal and estimate the average and local concentrations of H and D radicals in the film.

  11. Comparison of morphology evolution of Ge(001) homoepitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Byungha; Leonard, John P.; McCamy, James W.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2005-10-31

    Using a dual molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) ultrahigh vacuum chamber, we have conducted the first experiments under identical thermal, background, and surface preparation conditions to compare Ge(001) homoepitaxial growth morphology in PLD and MBE. We find that in PLD with low kinetic energy and in MBE the film morphology evolves in a similar fashion: initially irregularly shaped mounds form, followed by pyramidal mounds with edges of the square-base along the <100> directions; the film roughness and mound separation increase with film thickness. In PLD with high kinetic energy, well-defined pyramidal mounds are not observed and the morphology rather resembles that of an ion-etched Ge(001) surface. The areal feature density is higher for PLD films than for MBE films grown at the same average growth rate and temperature. Furthermore, the dependence upon film thickness of roughness and feature separation differ for PLD and MBE. We attribute these differences to the higher yield of defect generation by energetic species in PLD.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of epitaxial CdTe on (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouhi, A.; Radhakrishnan, G.; Katz, J.; Koliwad, K.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100)GaAs/Si and (111)GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been employed for the first time to achieve this growth: the GaAs layers are grown on Si substrates by MBE and the CdTe film is subsequently deposited on GaAs/Si by MOCVD. The grown layers have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence.

  13. Comparative study of LaNiO3/LaAlO3 heterostructures grown by pulsed laser deposition and oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, F.; Mark, A. F.; Christiani, G.; Sigle, W.; Habermeier, H.-U.; van Aken, P. A.; Logvenov, G.; Keimer, B.; Benckiser, E.

    2017-01-01

    Variations in growth conditions associated with different deposition techniques can greatly affect the phase stability and defect structure of complex oxide heterostructures. We synthesized superlattices of the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3 and the large band gap insulator LaAlO3 by atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and compared their crystallinity and microstructure as revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images and resistivity. The MBE samples show a higher density of stacking faults but smoother interfaces and generally higher electrical conductivity. Our study identifies the opportunities and challenges of MBE and PLD growth and serves as a general guide for the choice of the deposition technique for perovskite oxides.

  14. Ion beam deposited protective films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Single or dual ion beam sources were used to deposit thin films for different applications. Metal and metal oxide films were evaluated as protective coatings for the materials. Film adherence was measured and the most promising films were then tested under environments similar to operating conditions. It was shown that some materials do protect die material (H-13 steel) and do reduce thermal fatigue. Diamondlike films have many useful applications. A series of experiments were conducted to define and optimize new approaches to the manufacture of such films. A dual beam system using argon and methane gases was developed to generate these films.

  15. Room temperature photoluminescence from In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, W. Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S.; Mohanta, A.; Roberts, A. T.; Fournelle, J.; Losurdo, M.; Everitt, H. O.

    2014-09-29

    InAlN films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy exhibited a lateral composition modulation characterized by 10–12 nm diameter, honeycomb-shaped, columnar domains with Al-rich cores and In-rich boundaries. To ascertain the effect of this microstructure on its optical properties, room temperature absorption and photoluminescence characteristics of In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N were comparatively investigated for indium compositions ranging from x = 0.092 to 0.235, including x = 0.166 lattice matched to GaN. The Stokes shift of the emission was significantly greater than reported for films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, possibly due to the phase separation in these nanocolumnar domains. The room temperature photoluminescence also provided evidence of carrier transfer from the InAlN film to the GaN template.

  16. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  17. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Boschker, Jos E.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea

    2015-01-12

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80–150 nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles.

  18. Room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in Mn-implanted and postannealed InAs layers deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Arrabal, R.; González, Y.; González, L.; García-Hernández, M.; Munnik, F.; Martín-González, M. S.

    2009-04-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of Ar- and Mn-implanted InAs epitaxial films grown on GaAs (100) by molecular beam epitaxy and the effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) for 30 s at 750 °C. Channeling particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) experiments reveal that after Mn implantation almost all Mn atoms are substitutional in the In site of the InAs lattice, like in a diluted magnetic semiconductor. All of these samples show diamagnetic behavior. However, after RTA treatment the Mn-InAs films exhibit room-temperature magnetism. According to PIXE measurements the Mn atoms are no longer substitutional. When the same set of experiments was performed with Ar as implantation ion, all of the layers present diamagnetism without exception. This indicates that the appearance of room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in the Mn-InAs-RTA layer is not related to lattice disorder produced during implantation but to a Mn reaction produced after a short thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns and Rutherford backscattering measurements evidence the segregation of an oxygen-deficient MnO2 phase (nominally MnO1.94) in the Mn-InAs-RTA epitaxial layers which might be the origin of the room-temperature ferromagneticlike response observed.

  19. Room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in Mn-implanted and postannealed InAs layers deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martin-Gonzalez, M. S.; Munnik, F.

    2009-04-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of Ar- and Mn-implanted InAs epitaxial films grown on GaAs (100) by molecular beam epitaxy and the effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) for 30 s at 750 deg. C. Channeling particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) experiments reveal that after Mn implantation almost all Mn atoms are substitutional in the In site of the InAs lattice, like in a diluted magnetic semiconductor. All of these samples show diamagnetic behavior. However, after RTA treatment the Mn-InAs films exhibit room-temperature magnetism. According to PIXE measurements the Mn atoms are no longer substitutional. When the same set of experiments was performed with Ar as implantation ion, all of the layers present diamagnetism without exception. This indicates that the appearance of room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in the Mn-InAs-RTA layer is not related to lattice disorder produced during implantation but to a Mn reaction produced after a short thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns and Rutherford backscattering measurements evidence the segregation of an oxygen-deficient MnO{sub 2} phase (nominally MnO{sub 1.94}) in the Mn-InAs-RTA epitaxial layers which might be the origin of the room-temperature ferromagneticlike response observed.

  20. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  1. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuan Hsiung

    Ga(,0.48)In(,0.52)As recently emerges as a promising material for high speed applications. It also has a direct bandgap with gap energy suitable for optical applications. It is the purpose of this thesis to grow high quality Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As, lattice-matched Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As and heterojunction structures by molecular beam epitaxy technique for applications in the areas of modulation-doped high mobility devices and internal photoemission Schottky diodes for infrared detection. Single crystal Al metal deposition on GaInAs by MBE is also studied for its electrical properties. Mobility enhancement has been demonstrated in modulation-doped structures at low temperatures. Very high mobilities were obtained: 10,900 cm('2)/Vs at room temperature, 55,500 cm('2)/Vs at 77K and 70,200 cm('2)/Vs at 10K with corresponding two-dimensional electron gas densities greater than 1 x 10('12) l/cm('2). The quality of Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As and the parallel conduction in this material are the limiting factors in its mobility. A new ohmic contact phenomenon has been observed in the MBE single crystal Al metal on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)AS samples. Its contact resistivity is measured to be as small as 1 x 10('-6) (OMEGA)-cm('2). The Fermi-level pinning near the conduction band edge might be caused by the interface defects. A planar doping technique has been employed to enhance the built-in barrier height to a value of about 0.5 eV in the single crystal Al on n-p('+)-n-Ga(,0.47)In(,0.52)As structures. This novel quasi-Schottky diode also shows a forward ideal factor of 1.03. As for optical detectors, four kinds of diodes were made for internal photoemission studies: Au Schottky on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As in the wavelength range of 1.9 (mu)m to 2.5 (mu)m, Au Schottky on Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As in 1.1 (mu)m to 2.0 (mu)m range, single crystal Al on (Al(,0.8)Ga(,0.2))(,0.48)In(,0.52)As with improved quantum yields and lastly a Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As/Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As heterojunction with a measured

  2. Use of ultraviolet/ozone cleaning to remove C and O from GaAs prior to metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.; Abernathy, C. R.; Hobson, W. S.; Luftman, H. S.

    1991-04-01

    Ultraviolet/ozone cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy at 500 °C is shown to reduce the interfacial C and O concentrations by more than two orders of magnitude. Metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) utilizing this cleaning prior to growth of the component epitaxial layers display superior current voltage (I-V) saturation characteristics compared to identical devices grown without the cleaning step. By contrast, provided the GaAs surface is not contaminated with silicates, the atomic hydrogen generated at the growth surface during growth by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) leads to lower O and C interfacial concentrations, thereby circumventing the need for ozone cleaning. MESFETs grown by MOCVD with or without this cleaning have excellent I-V characteristics.

  3. Vertical transport through AlGaN barriers in heterostructures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, David A.; Fireman, Micha N.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Kuritzky, Leah Y.; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Speck, James S.

    2017-02-01

    The results of vertical transport through AlGaN heterobarriers are presented for ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) on c-plane GaN on sapphire templates and on m-plane bulk GaN substrates, as well as by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on m-plane bulk GaN substrates. Experiments were performed to determine the role of the AlGaN alloy as an effective barrier to vertical transport, which is an essential component of both optoelectronic and power electronic devices. The alloy composition, thickness, and doping levels of the AlGaN layers, as well as substrate orientation, were systematically varied to examine their influence on electron transport. Atom probe tomography (APT) was used to directly determine the alloy composition at the atomic scale to reveal the presence of random alloy fluctuations which provides insight into the nature of the observed transport.

  4. Delayed Shutters For Dual-Beam Molecular Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.; Liu, John L.; Hancock, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    System of shutters for dual-molecular-beam epitaxy apparatus delays start of one beam with respect to another. Used in pulsed-beam equipment for deposition of low-dislocation layers of InAs on GaAs substrates, system delays application of arsenic beam with respect to indium beam to assure proper stoichiometric proportions on newly forming InAs surface. Reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) instrument used to monitor condition of evolving surface of deposit. RHEED signal used to time pulsing of molecular beams in way that minimizes density of defects and holds lattice constant of InAs to that of GaAs substrate.

  5. Improvements in Ionized Cluster-Beam Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.; Compton, L. E.; Pawlik, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    Lower temperatures result in higher purity and fewer equipment problems. In cluster-beam deposition, clusters of atoms formed by adiabatic expansion nozzle and with proper nozzle design, expanding vapor cools sufficiently to become supersaturated and form clusters of material deposited. Clusters are ionized and accelerated in electric field and then impacted on substrate where films form. Improved cluster-beam technique useful for deposition of refractory metals.

  6. The effect of laser energy on V2O5 thin film growth prepared by laser assisted molecular beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Samad, B.; Ashrit, P. V.

    2014-09-01

    Vanadium pentoxide V2O5 thin films were grown on glass substrates by the LAMBD deposition system with different laser energies. The structure, composition and optical properties of the films have been investigated with atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ellipsometry and the transmittance analysis. Upon the increase of laser energy, the results showed that the changes in the optical constants are consistent with the thickness changes of the film. The refractive index increases and the absorption coefficient increases when the laser energy increases. The AFM analysis showed a change of the roughness and structure of the deposited films at different laser energies. The prepared films deposited by LAMBD showed interesting properties with correct V2O5 phase without need of annealing after deposition.

  7. Ion-beam assisted, electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is a relatively new technology that has overcome some of the difficulties associated with chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and thermal spray processes. In the EB-PVD process, focused high-energy electron beams generated from electron guns are directed to melt and evaporate ingots, as well as preheat the substrate inside a vacuum chamber. By adding the assistance of ion beams to the process, coating density and adhesion are improved, while costs are reduced. This article describes physical vapor deposition and ion-beam processes, explains the advantages of EB-PVD, shows how ion beams optimize the benefits of EB-PVD, and enumerates a variety of applications.

  8. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  9. Study of the Mechanism of Electrical Conductivity in Molecular Beam- Deposited Polymer Films of Ethylene on Silicon Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-25

    the He cryostat.... 10 Figure 7. Van der Pauw sample geometry and connections: a) basic electrical circuit for measuring sample resistivity; b) high...dictated by the Van der Pauw method ............................ 20 v viv vl0 ABSTRACT 4 he following report describes experiments performed on a molecular...function of sample and electrode geometry, a four-probe method was used, based on a technique described by Van der Pauw .3 The method consists of

  10. Chopped molecular beam multiplexing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Billy R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The integration of a chopped molecular beam mass spectrometer with a time multiplexing system is described. The chopping of the molecular beam is synchronized with the time intervals by a phase detector and a synchronous motor. Arithmetic means are generated for phase shifting the chopper with respect to the multiplexer. A four channel amplifier provides the capacity to independently vary the baseline and amplitude in each channel of the multiplexing system.

  11. Optical and structural properties of microcrystalline GaN on an amorphous substrate prepared by a combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Kang, Eun-Kyu; Park, Kwangwook; Kim, Ci-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Seon; Jho, Young-Dahl; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Yong-Tak

    2016-05-01

    Microscale platelet-shaped GaN grains were grown on amorphous substrates by a combined epitaxial growth method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). First, MBE GaN was grown on an amorphous substrate as a pre-orienting layer and its structural properties were investigated. Second, MOCVD grown GaN samples using the different growth techniques of planar and selective area growth (SAG) were comparatively investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and photoluminescence (PL). In MOCVD planar GaN, strong bound exciton peaks dominated despite the high density of the threading dislocations (TDs). In MOCVD SAG GaN, on the other hand, TDs were clearly reduced with bending, but basal stacking fault (BSF) PL peaks were observed at 3.42 eV. The combined epitaxial method not only provides a deep understanding of the growth behavior but also suggests an alternative approach for the growth of GaN on amorphous substances.

  12. Optical and Structural Properties of Microcrystalline GaN on an Amorphous Substrate Prepared by a Combination of Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Kang, Eun-Kyu; Park, Kwangwook; Kim, Ci-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Seon; Jho, Young-Dahl; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Yong-Tak

    2016-05-01

    Microscale platelet-shaped GaN grains were grown on amorphous substrates by a combined epitaxial growth method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). First, MBE GaN was grown on an amorphous substrate as a pre-orienting layer and its structural properties were investigated. Second, MOCVD grown GaN samples using the different growth techniques of planar and selective area growth (SAG) were comparatively investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and photoluminescence (PL). In MOCVD planar GaN, strong bound exciton peaks dominated despite the high density of the threading dislocations (TDs). In MOCVD SAG GaN, on the other hand, TDs were clearly reduced with bending, but basal stacking fault (BSF) PL peaks were observed at 3.42 eV. The combined epitaxial method not only provides a deep understanding of the growth behavior but also suggests an alternative approach for the growth of GaN on amorphous substances.

  13. Field-effect transistors with LaAlO3 and LaAlOxNy gate dielectrics deposited by laser molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. B.; Lu, H. B.; Chen, Z. H.; Zhang, X.; Huang, R.; Zhou, H. W.; Wang, X. P.; Nguyen, B. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Xiang, W. F.; He, M.; Cheng, B. L.

    2004-10-01

    High permittivity LaAlO3 (LAO) and LaAlOxNy (LAON) thin films have been deposited directly on a Si(100) substrate using a laser molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are fabricated using such LAO and LAON thin films as gate dielectrics and well-behaved transistor characteristics have been observed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations indicate that LAO thin films can remain amorphous structure even after annealing at 1000°C. The small equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of 17Å is achieved for 75Å LAO film with an effective dielectric constant of 17.2±1 for the whole gate stack. Furthermore, a smaller EOT, larger drive current, and lower subthreshold slope have been observed for devices with the LAON thin film. For all the devices, the gate leakage currents are at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the same electrical thickness SiO2. Reasonable subthreshold slopes of 248 and 181mV /dec were obtained for MOSFETs with LAO and LAON films, respectively.

  14. Photoconduction efficiencies and dynamics in GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Tsai, H. Y.; Huang, Y. S.; Chen, Y. T.; Chen, L. C.; Chen, K. H.

    2012-09-01

    The normalized gains, which determines the intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiencies, have been defined and compared for the gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By excluding the contributions of experimental parameters and under the same light intensity, the CVD-grown GaN NWs exhibit the normalized gain which is near two orders of magnitude higher than that of the MBE-ones. The temperature-dependent time-resolved photocurrent measurement further indicates that the higher photoconduction efficiency in the CVD-GaN NWs is originated from the longer carrier lifetime induced by the higher barrier height (ϕB = 160 ± 30 mV) of surface band bending. In addition, the experimentally estimated barrier height at 20 ± 2 mV for the MBE-GaN NWs, which is much lower than the theoretical value, is inferred to be resulted from the lower density of charged surface states on the non-polar side walls.

  15. Core and grain boundary sensitivity of tungsten-oxide sensor devices by molecular beam assisted particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelser, T. P.; Lorke, A.; Ifeacho, P.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the synthesis of WO3 and WOx (2.6≥x≤2.8) by adding different concentrations of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) into a H2/O2/Ar premixed flame within a low-pressure reactor equipped with a particle-mass spectrometer (PMS). The PMS results show that mean particle diameters dp between 5 and 9 nm of the as-synthesized metal-oxides can be obtained by varying the residence time and precursor concentration in the reactor. This result is further validated by N2 adsorption measurements on the particle surface, which yielded a 91 m2/g surface area, corresponding to a spherical particle diameter of 9 nm (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique). H2/O2 ratios of 1.6 and 0.63 are selected to influence the stoichiometry of the powders, resulting in blue-colored WOx and white WO3 respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the as-synthesized materials indicates that the powders are mostly amorphous, and the observed broad reflexes can be attributed to the orthorhombic structure of β-WO3. Thermal annealing at 973 K for 3 h in air resulted in crystalline WO3 comprised of both monoclinic and orthorhombic phases. The transmission electron microscope micrograph analysis shows that the particles exhibit spherical morphology with some degree of agglomeration. Impedance spectroscopy is used for the electrical characterization of tungsten-oxide thin films with a thickness of 50 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent gas-sensing properties of the material deposited on interdigital capacitors are investigated. Sensitivity experiments reveal two contributions to the overall sensitivity, which result from the surface and the core of each particle.

  16. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  17. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  18. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  19. Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Patricia D.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) computer program developed to aid in design of single- and double-junction cascade cells made of silicon. Cascade cell has efficiency 1 or 2 percent higher than single cell, with twice the open-circuit voltage. Input parameters include doping density, diffusion lengths, thicknesses of regions, solar spectrum, absorption coefficients of silicon (data included for 101 wavelengths), and surface recombination velocities. Results include maximum power, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  20. Dual ion beam assisted deposition of biaxially textured template layers

    DOEpatents

    Groves, James R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Hammond, Robert H.

    2005-05-31

    The present invention is directed towards a process and apparatus for epitaxial deposition of a material, e.g., a layer of MgO, onto a substrate such as a flexible metal substrate, using dual ion beams for the ion beam assisted deposition whereby thick layers can be deposited without degradation of the desired properties by the material. The ability to deposit thicker layers without loss of properties provides a significantly broader deposition window for the process.

  1. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  2. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  3. Molecular beam source for high vapor pressure materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.H.; Schetzina, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    A molecular beam source for deposition of high vapor pressure materials in MBE systems is described. The source consists of a collimating effusion cell of original design which is heated by a temperature-controlled Radak II oven (Luxel Corporation). Construction details of the source are given along with calibration and performance data.

  4. Focused electron beam induced deposition of pure SIO II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perentes, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Patrik; Munnik, Frans

    2007-02-01

    Focused electron beam induced processing (FEBID) equipments are the "all in one" tools for high resolution investigation, and modification of nano-devices. Focused electron beam induced deposition from a gaseous precursor usually results in a nano-composite sub-structured material, in which the interesting material is embedded in an amorphous carbonaceous matrix. Using the Hydrogen free tetraisocyanatosilane Si(NCO) 4 molecule as Si source, we show how a controlled oxygen flux, simultaneously injected with the precursor vapors, causes contaminants to vanish from the FEB deposits obtained and leads to the deposition of pure SiO II. The chemical composition of the FEBID material could be controlled from SiC IINO 3 to SiO II, the latter containing undetectable foreign element contamination. The [O II] / [TICS] ratio needed to obtain SiO II in our FEB deposition equipment is larger than 300. The evolution of the FEBID material chemical composition is presented as function of the [O II] / [TICS] molecular flux ratios. A hypothetical decomposition pathway of this silane under these conditions is discussed based on the different species formed under electron bombardment of TICS. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated that the deposited oxide is smooth (roughness sub 2nm) and amorphous. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the low concentration of hydroxyl groups. The Hydrogen content of the deposited oxide, measured by elastic recoil detection analysis, is as low as 1 at%. 193nm wavelength AIMS investigations of 125nm thick SiO II pads (obtained with [O II] / [TICS] = 325) showed an undetectable light absorption.

  5. Investigation on the electrical transport properties of highly (00l)-textured Sb2Te3 films deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangpeng; Zeng, Zhigang; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Ziqiang; Wang, Zhichong; Lin, Cong; Hu, Zhiyu

    2014-01-01

    Highly (00l)-textured antimony telluride films were fabricated using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si (111) substrate at 280 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis implying the samples have good crystalline quality, simultaneously, the grain sizes coarsening with increasing thickness. The results of Hall coefficient measurement demonstrated that the carrier concentration and mobility are strongly affected by grain boundaries and microcrystalline internal defects. It was found that the grain boundaries play a primary factor influencing the carrier concentration in thinner film. At room temperature, the results in a maximum mobility value of 305 cm2/Vs for 121-nm-thick film, and the electrical conductivity increased from 425.7 S/cm to 1036 S/cm as the thickness varied from 28 nm to 121 nm. In the range of room temperature to 150 °C, the resistivity almost linearly increased with increasing temperature. This may be explained by low concentration of impurities or defects and shallow impurity band. For difference thickness films, temperature coefficients of resistivity are substantially equal, and the values are about 3 ˜ 4 μΩ ṡcm/K.

  6. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states. Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic) Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical strain

  7. Molecular beams: our legacy from Otto Stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1988-06-01

    It is an honor to contribute to this celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Otto Stern, who developed molecular beams to become one of the most nowerful and fruitful physics research methods.

  8. Patterned electrochemical deposition of copper using an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Heijer, Mark den; Shao, Ingrid; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Radisic, Alex

    2014-02-01

    We describe a technique for patterning clusters of metal using electrochemical deposition. By operating an electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope, we deposit Cu on Au under potentiostatic conditions. For acidified copper sulphate electrolytes, nucleation occurs uniformly over the electrode. However, when chloride ions are added there is a range of applied potentials over which nucleation occurs only in areas irradiated by the electron beam. By scanning the beam we control nucleation to form patterns of deposited copper. We discuss the mechanism for this effect in terms of electron beam-induced reactions with copper chloride, and consider possible applications.

  9. Fifty-five years of molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1993-05-01

    The history of molecular beams since the invention of molecular beam magnetic resonance is discussed. Rabi`s 1937 theoretical paper on resonance transitions led Rabi, Zacharias, Millman and Kusch to measure various nuclear magnetic moments by magnetic resonance. Kellogg, Rabi, Ramsey and Zacharias found a multiple line radio frequency spectrum in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD which enabled them to measure not only the nuclear magnetic moments but also internal molecular interactions including that of the deuteron electric quadrupole moment. The method was successfully extended to atoms. In 1947 Nafe, Nelson and Rabi found that the observed hyperfine separations in atomic hydrogen and deuterium differed from theoretical predictions and Lamb and Retherford soon thereafter observed the large Lamb shift in the atomic fine structures; these two discoveries were the principal incentives for the development of QED, which was confirmed by Kusch`s measurement of the electron magnetic moment. Ramsey`s separated oscillatory field method increased the accuracy and frequency range of the resonance method and provided the basis for accurate atomic clocks. Townes and his associates used a molecular beam for the first Maser as did Goldenberg, Klepper and Ramsey for the atomic hydrogen maser. Many nuclear, atomic and molecular properties have been measured with the molecular beam magnetic resonance. Van der Waal`s molecules and highly excited Rydberg atoms have been examined. Laser spectroscopy has been extensively studied with atomic beams and lasers have been used for state selection and excitation. Wieman and others used atomic beams to study parity and time reversal symmetry. Atomic beams have been slowed by laser cooling and Phillips and others have shown that the atoms can be cooled to about one micro-Kelvin, well below the Doppler limit. Collision experiments between two beams, often from jet sources, provided extensive and detailed information about molecular interactions.

  10. Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C.

    1995-02-08

    Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

  11. Deposition of reactively ion beam sputtered silicon nitride coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.

    1982-01-01

    An ion beam source was used to deposit silicon nitride films by reactively sputtering a silicon target with beams of Ar + N2 mixtures. The nitrogen fraction in the sputtering gas was 0.05 to 0.80 at a total pressure of 6 to 2 millionth torr. The ion beam current was 50 mA at 500 V. The composition of the deposited films was investigated by auger electron spectroscopy and the rate of deposition was determined by interferometry. A relatively low rate of deposition of about 2 nm. one-tenth min. was found. AES spectra of films obtained with nitrogen fractions higher than 0.50 were consistent with a silicon to nitrogen ratio corresponding to Si3N4. However the AES spectra also indicated that the sputtered silicon nitride films were contaminated with oxygen and carbon and contained significant amounts of iron, nickel, and chromium, most probably sputtered from the holder of the substrate and target.

  12. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  13. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  14. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmore, J. E.; Appelhans, A. D.; Dahl, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  15. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  16. Zeeman-Sisyphus Deceleration of Molecular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Noah; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules are useful for testing fundamental physics and studying strongly-interacting quantum systems. One production method is via direct laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). In this endeavor, one major challenge is to produce molecules below the MOT capture velocity. Established molecular beam deceleration techniques are poorly suited because they decelerate only a small fraction of a typical molecular pulse. Direct laser cooling is a natural choice, but is also problematic due to transverse heating and the associated molecule loss. I will present a new technique that we are developing, which we call Zeeman-Sisyphus deceleration and which shows great promise for preparing molecular beams for MOT loading. This technique decelerates molecules using a linear array of permanent magnets, along with lasers that periodically optically pump molecules between weak and strong-field seeking quantum states. Being time-independent, this method is well-suited for temporally extended molecular beams. Simultaneous deceleration and transverse guiding makes this approach attractive as an alternative to direct laser cooling. I will present our development of the Zeeman-Sisyphus decelerator and its application to a molecular MOT of CaF and an ultracold fountain of YbF.

  17. Power deposition of deuteron beam in fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadifar, R.; Mahdavi, M.

    2017-02-01

    In ion fast ignition (FI) inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a laser accelerated ion beam called igniter provides energy required for ignition of a fuel pellet. The laser accelerated deuteron beam is considered as igniter. The deuteron beam with Maxwellian energy distribution produced at the distance d = 500 μm, from fuel surface, travels during time t = 20 ps and arrives with power P1D(t,TD) to the fuel surface. Then, the deuteron beam deposits its energy into fuel by Coulomb and nuclear interactions with background plasma particles during time t = 10 ps, with power P2D(t,TD,Tb). Since time and power of the two stages have same order, to calculate the total power deposited by igniter beam, both stages must be considered simultaneously. In this paper, the exact power of each stage has been calculated separately, and the total power Ptotal(t,TD,Tb) has been obtained. The obtained results show that the total power deposition Ptotal(t,TD,Tb) is significantly reduced due to reducing different temperature between projectile and target particles.

  18. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  19. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  20. Laser Deposition of Polymer Micro- and Nanoassembly from Solution Using Focused Near-Infrared Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabetani, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Müllen, Klaus; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated the laser deposition of polymer micro- and nanoassemblies from a solution onto a glass substrate. The size and shape of the deposited dot-like assembly can be controlled by the laser power (P) and the concentration of the solution (C). For an example, a nanoassembly of a π-conjugated polymer, whose width and height are 280 and 23 nm, respectively, is deposited at the conditions of C=1.0× 10-5 mg/ml and P=700 mW. This laser deposition can be attributed to the optical trapping and the surface deformation of the solution layer using a focused laser beam. It is also demonstrated that the molecular orientation in the assembly can be aligned in the direction of the laser polarization. The present laser deposition is applicable to the micropatterning of various polymers dissolved in an organic solvent.

  1. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication: A Rapid Metal Deposition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley REsearch Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Thus far, this technique has been demonstrated on aluminum and titanium alloys of interest for aerospace structural applications nickel and ferrous based alloys are also planned. Deposits resulting from 2219 aluminum demonstrations have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials ave exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rated in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 cubic inches per our) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  2. Dual Ion Beam Deposition Of Diamond Films On Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Arnold H.; Partyka, Robert J.; Lewis, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Diamond film deposition processes are of great interest because of their potential use for the formation of both protective as well as anti-reflective coatings on the surfaces of optical elements. Conventional plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond coating processes are not ideal for use on optical components because of the high processing temperatures required, and difficulties faced in nucleating films on most optical substrate materials. A unique dual ion beam deposition technique has been developed which now makes possible deposition of diamond films on a wide variety of optical elements. The new DIOND process operates at temperatures below 150 aegrees Farenheit, and has been used to nucleate and grow both diamondlike carbon and diamond films on a wide variety of optical :taterials including borosilicate glass, quartz glass, plastic, ZnS, ZnSe, Si, and Ge.

  3. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  4. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  5. Reactive ion beam deposition of aluminum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, S.; Ashok, S.; Fonash, S. J.; Tongson}, L.

    1985-07-01

    Aluminum nitride thin films have been prepared at room temperature by reactive ion beam sputtering for potential use as a passivant and diffusion/anneal cap in compound semiconductor technology. The electrical and optical pro-perties of these films have been studied along with the in-fluence of thermal annealing on the material characteristics. The quality of the films has also been found to improve in the presence of atomic hydrogen during the deposition.

  6. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  7. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  8. Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. C., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

  9. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dorp, W. F. van; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-10-15

    An extensive review is given of the results from literature on electron beam induced deposition. Electron beam induced deposition is a complex process, where many and often mutually dependent factors are involved. The process has been studied by many over many years in many different experimental setups, so it is not surprising that there is a great variety of experimental results. To come to a better understanding of the process, it is important to see to which extent the experimental results are consistent with each other and with the existing model. All results from literature were categorized by sorting the data according to the specific parameter that was varied (current density, acceleration voltage, scan patterns, etc.). Each of these parameters can have an effect on the final deposit properties, such as the physical dimensions, the composition, the morphology, or the conductivity. For each parameter-property combination, the available data are discussed and (as far as possible) interpreted. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid, two different growth regimes, and electron beam induced heating, the majority of the experimental results were explained qualitatively. This indicates that the physical processes are well understood, although quantitatively speaking the models can still be improved. The review makes clear that several major issues remain. One issue encountered when interpreting results from literature is the lack of data. Often, important parameters (such as the local precursor pressure) are not reported, which can complicate interpretation of the results. Another issue is the fact that the cross section for electron induced dissociation is unknown. In a number of cases, a correlation between the vertical growth rate and the secondary electron yield was found, which suggests that the secondary electrons dominate the dissociation rather than the primary electrons. Conclusive evidence for this hypothesis has not been found. Finally

  10. ALLIGATOR - An apparatus for ion beam assisted deposition with a broad-beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wituschek, H.; Barth, M.; Ensinger, W.; Frech, G.; Rück, D. M.; Leible, K. D.; Wolf, G. K.

    1992-04-01

    Ion beam assisted deposition is a versatile technique for preparing thin films and coatings for various applications. Up to now a prototype setup for research purposes has been used in our laboratory. Processing of industrial standard workpieces requires a high current ion source with broad beam and high uniformity for homogeneous bombardment. In this contribution a new apparatus for large area samples will be described. It is named ALLIGATOR (German acronym of facility for ion assisted evaporation on transverse movable or rotary targets). In order to have a wide energy range available two ion sources are used. One delivers a beam energy up to 1.3 keV. The other is suitable for energies from 5 keV up to 40 keV. The ``high-energy'' ion source is a multicusp multiaperture source with 180-mA total current and a beam diameter of 280 mm at the target position.

  11. Ion-beam and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1995-02-01

    Ion-beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. The optical properties, i.e., refractive index and extinction coefficient, of IBS films were determined in the 250- to 1100-nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS, i.e., deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 to 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 to 40 (mu) A/cm2), showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy, whereas composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target whereas assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS-deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS-deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals

  12. Ion beam and dual ion beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1994-11-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual ion beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. Optical properties ie refractive index and extinction coefficient of IBS films were determined in the 250 - 1100 nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n equals 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS ie deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 - 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 - 40 (mu) A/cm2) showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy while composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target while assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals 35 (mu) A/cm2. All

  13. Surface chemistry on semiconductors studied by molecular-beam reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming L.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    This Report reviews the use of molecular-beam reactive scattering to study the surface reactions of gas molecules on semiconductors which have relevance to microelectronic technologies. Modern semiconductor fabrication techniques rely heavily on dry processes where gas-surface reactions are the basic premise. This article focuses on the use of supersonic molecular-beam-surface scattering to study the dynamics and kinetics of surface reactions connected with the growth and etching processes on semiconductor surfaces. The discussion on growth processes covers the oxidation of silicon and germanium, the tungsten-hexafluoride-based tungsten deposition, and the organometallic chemical vapor deposition of gallium arsenide. The discussion on etching processes covers the halogen-based etching of gallium arsenide and silicon. An overview of the experimental technique and the underlying principles in surface-reaction dynamics and kinetics is included for readers in the technology area. The potential use of the molecular beams for actual semiconductor materials processing is also discussed.

  14. Infrared Rugates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rona, M.

    1993-01-01

    Rugates are optical structures that have a sinusoidal index of refraction (harmonic gradient-index field). As their discrete high/ low index filter counterparts, they can be used as narrow rejection band filters. However, since rugates do not have abrupt interfaces, they tend to have a smaller absorption, hence deliver a higher in band reflectivity. The absence of sharp interfaces makes rugates even more desirable for high-energy narrow band reflectors. In this application, the lack of a sharp interface at the maximum internal standing wave electric field results in higher breakdown strengths. Our method involves fabricating rugates, with molecular beam epitaxy, on GaAs wafers as an Al(x)Ga(1-x)As single-crystal film.

  15. Molecular dynamics and quasidynamics simulations of the annealing of bulk and near-surface interstitials formed in molecular-beam epitaxial Si due to low-energy particle bombardment during deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitabatake, M.; Fons, P.; Greene, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation, diffusion, and annihilation of split and hexagonal interstitials resulting from 10 eV Si irradiation of (2x1)-terminated Si(100) are investigated. Molecular dynamics and quasidynamics simulations, utilizing the Tersoff many-body potential are used in the investigation. The interstitials are created in layers two through six, and stable atomic configurations and total potential energies are derived as a function of site symmetry and layer depth. The interstitial Si atoms are allowed to diffuse, and the total potential energy changes are calculated. Lattice configurations along each path, as well as the starting configurations, are relaxed, and minimum energy diffusion paths are derived. The results show that the minimum energy paths are toward the surface and generally involved tetrahedral sites. The calculated interstitial migration activation energies are always less than 1.4 eV and are much lower in the near-surface region than in the bulk.

  16. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C (60) (q+) cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique.

  17. Deposition of silver on titania films by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xue-Nan; Ye, Mao; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wei, Lin; Hu, Yan; Hou, Xing-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, An-Dong

    2006-06-01

    The deposition of silver on titania films prepared with sol-gel method was performed by electron beam irradiation of silver nitrate solutions. The high efficient Ag/TiO2 films were formed and exhibited enhanced photo-catalytic functions in degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under UV illumination. Metallic Ag nano-clusters were confirmed by XPS, XRD and TEM. The relationship between the silver nitrate concentrations and the photo-catalytic efficiencies of the films was investigated. The optimum concentration of silver nitrate solution was found to be 5 × 10-4 M.

  18. On the Growth of Complex Oxides by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Dillon

    Functional materials based on complex oxides in thin film form offer new and exciting strategies for meeting many of our outstanding energy challenges through systematic control of layer sequencing, strain, etc. However, the synthesis of such oxide films can be a major challenge even when utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), a powerful deposition technique that allows the construction of materials atomic plane by atomic plane. To understand the fundamental physics of oxide growth by reactive MBE, we present in situ surface x-ray diffraction results on the growth of SrTiO3 and SrO-SrTiO3 thin films on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates. For homoepitaxy, we compare sequential deposition (alternating Sr and Ti monolayer doses) with that of co-deposition of Sr and Ti, both in a background of oxygen pressure, and observe drastically different growth pathways due to the presence of a TiO2 double layer. For heteroepitaxial growth of Ruddlesden-Popper SrO-SrTiO3 films, we find that layers rearrange dynamically, resulting in layer sequences distinct from the shutter sequence. In general, the starting surface structure and composition, in combination with local thermodynamic considerations, strongly influence our ability to atomically construct new complex oxides.

  19. Molecular contamination study by interaction of a molecular beam with a platinum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The capability of molecular beam scattering from a solid surface is analyzed for identification of molecular contamination of the surface. The design and setup of the molecular beam source and the measuring setup for the application of a phase sensitive measuring technique for the determination of the scattered beam intensity are described. The scattering distributions of helium and nitrogen molecular beams interacting with a platinum surface were measured for different amounts of contamination from diffusion pump oil for surface temperatures ranging from 30 to 400 C. The results indicate the scattering of molecular beams from a platinum surface is a very sensitive method for detecting surface contamination.

  20. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  1. Anomalous scaling behavior and surface roughening in molecular thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-04-15

    The thin film growth dynamics of a molecular semiconductor, free-base phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc), deposited by organic molecular beam deposition, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and height difference correlation function (HDCF) analysis. The measured dynamic scaling components ({alpha}{sub loc}=0.61{+-}0.12, {beta}=1.02{+-}0.08, and 1/z=0.72{+-}0.13) are consistent with rapid surface roughening and anomalous scaling behavior. A detailed analysis of AFM images and simple growth models suggest that this behavior arises from the pronounced upward growth of crystalline H{sub 2}Pc mounds during the initial stages of thin film growth.

  2. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  3. Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

  4. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  5. Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Prepared For: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Lab(WRDC/MLBT), Wright-Patterson AFB,OH 45433 Descriptors, Keywords: ion beam film deposition MoS2 solid...NUMBERS Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films PE - 63224C, 61153N WU -2855, 3409 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert N. Bolster 7... MoS2 ) are effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam-assisted deposition, which employs ion beam sputtering with an assist beam impinging on the growing

  6. Creating Ruddlesden-Popper phases by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haislmaier, Ryan C.; Stone, Greg; Alem, Nasim; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of a 50 unit cell thick n = 4 Srn+1TinO3n+1 (Sr5Ti4O13) Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase film is demonstrated by sequentially depositing SrO and TiO2 layers in an alternating fashion using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where Ti was supplied using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). A detailed calibration procedure is outlined for determining the shuttering times to deposit SrO and TiO2 layers with precise monolayer doses using in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as feedback. Using optimized Sr and TTIP shuttering times, a fully automated growth of the n = 4 RP phase was carried out over a period of >4.5 h. Very stable RHEED intensity oscillations were observed over the entire growth period. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that a constant periodicity of four SrTiO3 perovskite unit cell blocks separating the double SrO rocksalt layer was maintained throughout the entire film thickness with a very little amount of planar faults oriented perpendicular to the growth front direction. These results illustrate that hybrid MBE is capable of layer-by-layer growth with atomic level precision and excellent flux stability.

  7. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor L.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Tropin, Igor S.

    2015-01-29

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  8. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  9. Residual stress control by ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Jones, J.W.; Parfitt, L.; Kalnas, C.E.; Goldiner, M.

    1996-12-31

    The origin of residual stresses were studied in both crystalline metallic films and amorphous oxide films made by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Monolithic films of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited during bombardment by Ne, Ar or Kr over a narrow range of energies, E, and a wide range of ion-to-atom arrival rate ratios, R and were characterized in terms of composition, thickness, density, crystallinity, microstructure and residual stress. The stress was a strong function of ion beam parameters and gas content and compares to the behavior of other amorphous compounds such as MoSi{sub x} and WSi{sub 2.2}. With increasing normalized energy (eV/atom), residual stress in crystalline metallic films (Mo, W) increases in the tensile direction before reversing and becoming compressive at high normalized energy. The origin of the stress is most likely due to densification or interstitial generation. Residual stress in amorphous films (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoSi{sub x} and WSi{sub 2.2}) is initially tensile and monotonically decreases into the compressive region with increasing normalized energy. The amorphous films also incorporate substantially more gas than crystalline films and in the case of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are characterized by a high density of voids. Stress due to gas pressure in existing voids explains neither the functional dependence on gas content nor the magnitude of the observed stress. A more likely explanation for the behavior of stress is gas incorporation into the matrix, where the amount of incorporated gas is controlled by trapping.

  10. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  11. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  12. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Supekar, O D; Brown, J J; Eigenfeld, N T; Gertsch, J C; Bright, V M

    2016-12-09

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga(+)) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (<40 nm thin) of heterogeneous composition (metal, insulator, semiconductor, etc) with large lateral dimension structures (aspect ratio >1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga(+) ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  13. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  14. III-nitride ultraviolet emitters produced by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban

    In this dissertation, the growth of III-Nitride based ultraviolet (UV) emitters by molecular beam epitaxy has been addressed. These devices can find applications in optical data storage, solid-state lighting, and in biological detection. A significant part of the research involved materials development, as there are several major scientific and technological hurdles that must be overcome in order to produce commercially viable devices. For emission in the wavelength region 330 nm to 350 nm, the devices were designed as electrically-injected light emitting diodes (LEDs). Each layer of this structure was individually optimized to improve the materials properties. To overcome the difficulties in p-type doping, a new growth regime has been explored which led to films with hole concentrations of up to 2 x 10 18/cm3. Multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown along polar and non-polar directions to understand the effects of the presence of built-in polarization fields. It was found that these detrimental effects are minimized for ultra thin wells. Use of an Indium flux as a surfactant was found to substantially improve the luminescence properties of bulk Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) alloys and MQWs. UV-LEDs grown under these optimized conditions show an optical power output of 0.75 mW at 340 nm and 4.5 mW at 350nm. For emission in the wavelength region below 270 nm, due to the difficulty of doping AlGaN alloys with high Aluminum Nitride (AlN) mole fraction, edge or vertical emitting electron beam-pumped laser structures have been developed. Since it is difficult to cleave III-Nitrides deposited onto C-plane sapphire, edge emitting laser structures using a Graded-Index Separate Confinement Heterostructure (GRINSCH) based geometry have been deposited onto A-plane sapphire using a novel AlN buffer layer. An AlGaN bulk film or a set of AlN/AlGaN MQWs is used as the active region. For use in these devices, the growth of high Al content AlGaN was optimized to reduce the deep

  15. Comparison of measured electron density rise and calculated neutral beam particle deposition in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Budny, R.; McCune, D.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Barnes, C.W. )

    1991-12-01

    The initial rate of rise of the central electron density during {approximately}100 keV deuterium neutral beam injection is found to agree well with calculations of the beam deposition rate. The best agreement is with beam deposition calculations using older tabulations of the atomic cross-sections; the effects of using new tabulations or including multi-step ionization processes appear to approximately cancel. The neutral-beam deposition profile is a strong function of both the magnitude and the shape of the target plasma density. Peaked heating profiles can be achieved at high target densities only from peaked target density profiles. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Orientational anisotropy in simulated vapor-deposited molecular glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Ivan; Antony, Lucas; Walters, Diane M.; Ediger, M. D.; Rodney, David; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-09-07

    Enhanced kinetic stability of vapor-deposited glasses has been established for a variety of glass organic formers. Several recent reports indicate that vapor-deposited glasses can be orientationally anisotropic. In this work, we present results of extensive molecular simulations that mimic a number of features of the experimental vapor deposition process. The simulations are performed on a generic coarse-grained model and an all-atom representation of N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), a small organic molecule whose vapor-deposited glasses exhibit considerable orientational anisotropy. The coarse-grained model adopted here is found to reproduce several key aspects reported in experiments. In particular, the molecular orientation of vapor-deposited glasses is observed to depend on substrate temperature during deposition. For a fixed deposition rate, the molecular orientation in the glasses changes from isotropic, at the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, to slightly normal to the substrate at temperatures just below T{sub g}. Well below T{sub g}, molecular orientation becomes predominantly parallel to the substrate. The all-atom model is used to confirm some of the equilibrium structural features of TPD interfaces that arise above the glass transition temperature. We discuss a mechanism based on distinct orientations observed at equilibrium near the surface of the film, which get trapped within the film during the non-equilibrium process of vapor deposition.

  17. Fluorocarbon thin-film deposition on polymer surfaces from low-energy polyatomic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Muthu Bandage Jayathilaka

    Low energy polyatomic ion deposition is attractive for selective surface modification of advanced materials. Surface modification by fluorocarbon (FC) thin film deposition is widely used for many technological applications. Thus, polymer surface modification by FC thin film deposition was carried out using mass-separated low energy FC ion beams. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and air/water contact angles were employed to examine how the FC film chemistry, morphology, and long term stability depend on incident ion structure, kinetic energy, and fluence. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to support experimental data. 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F 5+ ion deposition on polystyrene (PS) surface was examined. CF3+ and C3F5+ each formed a distribution of different FC functional groups on PS in amounts dependent upon the incident ion energy, structure, and fluence. Both ions deposited mostly intact upon the surface at 25 eV. The total fluorine and fluorinated carbon content were increased with ion energy. The fluorination efficiency was higher for the larger ion. The simulations revealed that the fragmentation behavior depends on the incident ion structure and its energy. The simulations also confirmed that FC ions only penetrated a few angstroms into the surface. The compositional changes of 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F5+ ion-modified PS surfaces were examined after being exposed to atmosphere for four and eight weeks. The FC films oxidized in atmospheric conditions. Oxygen incorporation into the ion-modified surfaces increased with ion energy due to higher surface bond breakage and active site formation at high collision energy. Overall, the aging process of these ion-deposited films appeared similar to that of plasma-deposited films. Mass-selected 50 eV C3F5+ ion deposition was employed to create chemical gradient thin films on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by variation of the ion fluence across the substrate surface. The surface chemistry

  18. Electromigration in focused ion beam deposited tungsten single nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pabitra; Das, Bipul; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    As the focused ion beam induced deposited (FIBID) nanowires (NWs) of W, Pt are being used in nanoelectronic technology to connect individual nanodevices, repairing damaged interconnects in integrated circuit (IC), electromigration study in FIBID-NWs has become essential. Briefly, when a thin conductor, like metallic Al, Cu interconnects in an IC chip carry quite high current density ~1012 A/m2, ions or atoms start migrating. Such migration causes void and hillock formation leading to interconnect discontinuity, short circuit and ultimately IC failure. Our electromigration study in single FIBID-NWs of W reveals that failure in NWs of width and thickness ~100 nm occurs typically at 1011 A/m2. Most notably, void and hillock always form in opposite polarity compared to typical metallic NWs. Such distinctly new outcome is explained via electromigration driven by direct force (ionic charge*electric field) opposed to wind force driven migration observed in metallic NWs. As FIBID-NWs are composite in nature, different species (e.g., Ga, W and C) migrate with different degree and direction depending on their oxidation state, leading to redistribution of species across NW length and formation of a Ga rich hillock. S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata-98, India.

  19. Mechanism of molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaN nanowires on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, R. K.; Meijers, R.; Richter, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Lüth, H.

    2007-03-01

    GaN nanowires have been grown without external catalyst on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Nanowire aspect ratios (length/diameter) of about 250 have been achieved. During the initial stage of the growth, there is a nucleation process in which the number of wires increases and the most probable nucleation diameter of about 10nm has been observed, which slowly increases with deposition time. For deposition time longer than the nucleation stage, the nanowire length as a function of diameter monotonically decreases. This phenomenon can be explained by adatom diffusion on the nanowire lateral surface towards the tip.

  20. Measuring Incorporation Of Arsenic In Molecular-Beam Expitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Blair F.; Fernandez, Rouel F.; Madhukar, Anupam; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in surface layers cause oscillations in RHEED measurements. Specular RHEED Beam intensity measured before, during, and after deposition of seven to eight monomolecular layers of gallium during 1.5 seconds. Arsenic pressure was 1.7x10 to the negative seventh power torr (2.3x10 to the negative fifth power Pa) throughout measurements.

  1. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces.

  2. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  3. Molecular-beam Studies of Primary Photochemical Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  4. Ion beam sculpting molecular scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek Martin

    We envision solid-state nanopores at the heart of a device capable of detecting, manipulating, and ultimately sequencing individual DNA molecules. To reliably fabricate holes whose diameter is commensurate with that of the DNA molecule (˜2nm), low energy ion beams are employed to tailor the size of holes in solid-state membranes by a new technique we call "ion beam sculpting". The transmission rate of ions through the hole is monitored to provide a direct, real-time measure of the hole area that is used as a feedback signal to trigger the termination of the ion irradiation process when the desired hole size is obtained. The sensitivity of the transmitted ion count rate to atomic-scale material rearrangements at the perimeter of a hole led to a surprising discovery: Low-energy ion beams stimulate the lateral transport of matter when incident on a surface, resulting in the growth of a thin film from the boundary of a hole that closes the hole. The net flow of matter is determined by a competition between sputter erosion, which opens the hole, and a hole closing process that dominates at high temperature and low flux. The timescale for lateral matter transport under ion irradiation is surprisingly long---on the order of a second. Two physical models are proposed to account for the surprising ion-stimulated transport of matter. One model is based on the viscous flow of a stressed surface layer, while the other is based on the diffusion of mobile, ion-stimulated species at the surface of the material into the hole. The predictions of the latter are compared to ion beam sculpting experiments. We exploit ion beam sculpting to fabricate solid-state nanopores used as electronic detectors of individual DNA molecules. In ionic solution, negatively charged DNA molecules are drawn to the nanopore by an applied electrochemical potential, resulting in a detectable characteristic ionic current blockade when a molecules occludes the nanopore. The applicability of the ion sculpting

  5. (abstract) Optical Scattering and Surface Microroughness of Ion Beam Deposited Au and Pt Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Jumaily, Ghanim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Edlou, Samad M.; Simons, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of gold and platinum have been deposited onto superpolished fused silica substrates using thermal evaporation, ion assisted deposition (IAD), and ion assisted sputtering. The influence of ion beam flux, thin film material, and deposition rate on the films microroughness have been investigated. Short range surface microroughness of the films has been examined using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Long range surface microroughness has been characterized using an angle resolved optical scatterometer. Results indicate that ion beam deposited coatings have improved microstructure over thermally evaporated films.

  6. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  7. Laser damage resistance of hafnia thin films deposited by electron beam deposition, reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, Laurent; Capoulade, Jeremie; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille; Cathelinaud, Michel; Koc, Cian; Lequime, Michel

    2008-05-01

    A comparative study is made of the laser damage resistance of hafnia coatings deposited on fused silica substrates with different technologies: electron beam deposition (from Hf or HfO2 starting material), reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering.The laser damage thresholds of these coatings are determined at 1064 and 355 nm using a nanosecond pulsed YAG laser and a one-on-one test procedure. The results are associated with a complete characterization of the samples: refractive index n measured by spectrophotometry, extinction coefficient k measured by photothermal deflection, and roughness measured by atomic force microscopy.

  8. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  9. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  10. Space processing applications of ion beam technology. [surface finishing, welding, milling and film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion thruster engines for spacecraft propulsion can serve as ion beam sources for potential space processing applications. The advantages of space vacuum environments and the possible gravity effects on thruster ion beam materials operations such as thin film growth, ion milling, and surface texturing were investigated. The direct gravity effect on sputter deposition and vapor deposition processes are discussed as well as techniques for cold and warm welding.

  11. Laser controlled deposition of metal microstructures via nondiffracting Bessel beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-04-01

    The technique of the laser controlled deposition of sodium and rubidium deposits on the sapphire substrate is presented. The metals were deposited on the clean sapphire substrate from the vapor phase contained in the evacuated and sealed cell. We use an axicon to produce a non-diffracting Bessel beam out of the beam got from the cw diode laser with 200 mW power at the wavelength of 532 nm. After 30 minutes of the laser-controlled deposition the substrates were examined in the optical microscope. The obtained metal deposits form the sharp-cut circles with the pitch of 10 μm, coincident with the tens of dark rings of the Bessel beam. Reduction of the laser power leads to the build up of the continuous metal film over the whole substrate.

  12. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-09

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  13. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  14. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  15. Ion beam assisted deposition of MgO barriers for magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, S.; Macedo, R. J.; Ferreira, R.; Augusto, A.; Wisniowski, P.; Freitas, P. P.

    2008-04-01

    This work reports for the first time results on MgO tunnel junctions prepared by ion beam. The MgO barrier was deposited from a ceramic MgO target using an assisted beam, following the deposition and assisted beam phase diagram which relate the beam profile with the current and energy. The deposition rate for MgO is calculated with and without assisted beam, and compared with the experimental values. The MgO film growth on Ta/CoFeB/MgO simple stacks was optimized aiming at a (002) preferred orientation for the MgO growth, measured by x-ray diffraction. The optimum assist beam energy was tuned for each deposition beam condition (+800,+1000,+1200 V), using assist beams of 40 mA ({approx}130 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) with 0 to +600 V. Without assist beam, no texture is observed for the MgO, while the (002) orientation appears for assisted deposition. The optimum range of assist voltages is large, being limited by the onset of etching at high voltages, reducing the deposition rate. Magnetic tunnel junctions were deposited with the structure Ta 50 A/Ru 200 A/Ta 50 A/Mn{sub 78}Ir{sub 22} 150 A/Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} 30 A/Ru 8 A/Co{sub 56}Fe{sub 24}B{sub 20} 40 A/MgO t/Co{sub 56}Fe{sub 24}B{sub 20} 30 A/Ru 30 A/Ta 50 A, with the MgO barrier deposited with the conditions optimized by x rays. The effect of the assist beam energy on the junction properties (magnetoresistance and magnetization) are discussed. Tunnel magnetoresistance values up to 110%, with RA products of 100-400 {omega} {mu}m{sup 2}, for 11 A thick MgO barriers are obtained using assisted deposition with a +100 V assist beam, which is a major improvement of the {approx}30% of TMR, if no beam is used.

  16. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C.

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  17. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  18. Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-11

    Naval Research Laboratory AD-A255 222 Dunon C 203MU32 tID~li ___ NR1JMR6176-02-nM3 Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition of MoS2 and Other Low-Friction Films...unlimited.J 13. ABSTRACT (fxMmrn, 200 iw~tds Vacuum-deposited films of molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) ame effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam...optimized and the assist beamn ion flux was quantified and found to follow a power-law relationship with beam power. The beat way to produce MoS2 films was

  19. Ion Beam Induced Surface Modulations from Nano to Pico: Optimizing Deposition During Erosion and Erosion During Deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    MoberlyChan, W J; Schalek, R

    2007-11-08

    Ion beams of sufficient energy to erode a surface can lead to surface modulations that depend on the ion beam, the material surface it impinges, and extrinsic parameters such as temperature and geometric boundary conditions. Focused Ion Beam technology both enables site-specific placement of these modulations and expedites research through fast, high dose and small efficient use of material. The DualBeam (FIB/SEM) enables in situ metrology, with movies observing ripple formation, wave motion, and the influence of line defects. Nanostructures (ripples of >400nm wavelength to dots spaced <40nm) naturally grow from atomically flat surfaces during erosion, however, a steady state size may or may not be achieved as a consequence of numerous controlled parameters: temperature, angle, energy, crystallography. Geometric factors, which can be easily invoked using a FIB, enable a controlled component of deposition (and/or redeposition) to occur during erosion, and conversely allow a component of etching to be incurred during (ion-beam assisted) deposition. High angles of ion beam inclination commonly lead to 'rougher' surfaces, however, the extreme case of 90.0{sup o} etching enables deposition of organized structures 1000 times smaller than the aforementioned, video-recorded nanostructures. Orientation and position of these picostructures (naturally quantized by their atomic spacings) may be controlled by the same parameters as for nanostructures (e.g. ion inclination and imposed boundary conditions, which are flexibly regulated by FIB). Judicious control of angles during FIB-CVD growth stimulates erosion with directionality that produces surface modulations akin to those observed for sputtering. Just as a diamond surface roughens from 1-D ripples to 2-D steps with increasing angle of ion sputtering, so do ripples and steps appear on carbon-grown surfaces with increase in angle of FIB-CVD. Ion beam processing has been a stalwart of the microelectronics industry, is now a

  20. Molecular beam brightening by shock-wave suppression

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Akerman, Nitzan; Shagam, Yuval; Luski, Alon; Karpov, Michael; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic beams are a prevalent source of cold molecules used in the study of chemical reactions, atom interferometry, gas-surface interactions, precision spectroscopy, molecular cooling, and more. The triumph of this method emanates from the high densities produced in relation to other methods; however, beam density remains fundamentally limited by interference with shock waves reflected from collimating surfaces. We show experimentally that this shock interaction can be reduced or even eliminated by cryocooling the interacting surface. An increase of nearly an order of magnitude in beam density was measured at the lowest surface temperature, with no further fundamental limitation reached. Visualization of the shock waves by plasma discharge and reproduction with direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations both indicate that the suppression of the shock structure is partially caused by lowering the momentum flux of reflected particles and significantly enhanced by the adsorption of particles to the surface. We observe that the scaling of beam density with source pressure is recovered, paving the way to order-of-magnitude brighter, cold molecular beams. PMID:28345047

  1. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brett B; Stanford, Michael G; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention. PMID:25977862

  2. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhancesmore » the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.« less

  3. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  4. Molecular structure of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Li, C.; Pennycook, S. J.; Schneider, J.; Blom, A.; Zhao, W.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of amorphous selenium is clouded with much uncertainty and contradictory results regarding the dominance of polymeric chains versus monomer rings. The analysis of the diffraction radial distribution functions are inconclusive because of the similarities between the crystalline allotropes of selenium in terms of the coordination number, bond length, bond angle, and dihedral angle. Here, we took a much different approach and probed the molecular symmetry of the thermodynamically unstable amorphous state via analysis of structural phase transformations. We verified the structure of the converted metastable and stable crystalline structures using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In addition, given that no experimental technique can tell us the exact three-dimensional atomic arrangements in glassy semiconductors, we performed molecular-dynamic simulations using a well-established empirical three-body interatomic potential. We developed a true vapor-deposited process for the deposition of selenium molecules onto a substrate using empirical molecular vapor compositions and densities. We prepared both vapor-deposited and melt-quenched samples and showed that the simulated radial distribution functions match very well to experiment. The combination of our experimental and molecular-dynamic analyses shows that the structures of vapor- and melt-quenched glassy/amorphous selenium are quite different, based primarily on rings and chains, respectively, reflecting the predominant structure of the parent phase in its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  5. Diffusion and Interface Reaction of Cu/Si (100) Films Prepared by Cluster Beam Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xing-Xin; Jia, Yan-Hui; Li, Gong-Ping; Cho, Seong-Jin; Kim, Hee

    2011-03-01

    Cu thin films are deposited on Si (100) substrates by neutral cluster beams and ionized cluster beams. The atomic diffusion and interface reaction between the Cu films and the Si substrates of as-deposited and annealed at different temperatures (230°C, 450°C, 500°C and 600°C) are investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Some significant results are obtained on the following aspects: (1) For the Cu/Si(100) samples prepared by neutral cluster beams and ionized cluster beams at Va = 0kV, atomic diffusion phenomena are observed clearly in the as-deposited samples. With the increase of annealing temperature, the interdiffusion becomes more apparent. However, the diffusion intensities of the RBS spectra of the Cu/Si(100) films using neutral cluster beams are always higher than that of the Cu/Si(100) films using ionized cluster beams at Va=0kV in the as-deposited and samples annealed at the same temperature. The compound of Cu3Si is observed in the as-deposited samples. (2) For the Cu/Si(100) samples prepared by ionized cluster beams at Va=1, 3, 5kV, atomic diffusion phenomena are observed in the as-deposited samples at Va=1, 5kV. For the samples prepared at Va = 3kV, the interdiffusion phenomenon is observed until 500°C annealing temperature. The reason for the difference is discussed.

  6. Chemical modification of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) copolymer surface through fluorocarbon ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.-D.; Jang, Inkook; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-07-15

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the effects of continuous fluorocarbon ion beam deposition on a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-trFE)] surface, a polymer with electromechanical properties. Fluorocarbon plasma processing is widely used to chemically modify surfaces and deposit thin films. It is well accepted that polyatomic ions and neutrals within low-energy plasmas have a significant effect on the surface chemistry induced by the plasma. The deposition of mass selected fluorocarbon ions is useful to isolate the effects specific to polyatomic ions. Here, the differences in the chemical interactions of C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} and CF{sub 3}{sup +} ions with the P(VDF-trFE) surface are examined. The incident energy of the ions in both beams is 50 eV. The CF{sub 3}{sup +} ions are predicted to be more effective at fluorinating the P(VDF-trFE) surface than C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} ions. At the same time, the C{sub 3}F{sub 5}{sup +} ions are predicted to be more effective at growing fluorocarbon thin films. The simulations also reveal how the deposition process might ultimately modify the electromechanical properties of this polymer surface.

  7. Energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during laser and electron beam irradiation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.W.; Aziz, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The fundamentals of energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during energy deposition from lasers and electron beams is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the deposition of energy from pulsed sources (10 to 100 ns pulse duration time) in order to achieve high heating and cooling rates (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/C/s) in the near surface region. The response of both metals and semiconductors to pulsed energy deposition is considered. Guidelines are presented for the choice of energy source, wavelength, and pulse duration time.

  8. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  9. Fundamental Study of Antimonide Nanostructures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-04

    to conduct experimental work in molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaSb/GaAs and InSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are conducted and compared with...Nanoelectronics, Quantum Nanostructures 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a.  NAME OF...September 2014 to July 2015 being conducted at Chulalongkorn University in Thailand. Following the research work on InAs quantum dots (QDs) and quantum

  10. Optimization of Uranium Molecular Deposition for Alpha-Counting Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Monzo, Ellen; Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Genetti, Victoria; Knight, Kimberly

    2016-12-12

    Method development for molecular deposition of uranium onto aluminum 1100 plates was conducted with custom plating cells at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The method development focused primarily on variation of electrode type, which was expected to directly influence plated sample homogeneity. Solid disc platinum and mesh platinum anodes were compared and data revealed that solid disc platinum anodes produced more homogenous uranium oxide films. However, the activity distribution also depended on the orientation of the platinum electrode relative to the aluminum cathode, starting current, and material composition of the plating cell. Experiments demonstrated these variables were difficult to control under the conditions available. Variation of plating parameters among a series of ten deposited plates yielded variations up to 30% in deposition efficiency. Teflon particles were observed on samples plated in Teflon cells, which poses a problem for alpha activity measurements of the plates. Preliminary electropolishing and chemical polishing studies were also conducted on the aluminum 1100 cathode plates.

  11. Corrosion properties of aluminium coatings deposited on sintered NdFeB by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shoudong; Yang, Hengxiu; Li, Jinlong; Huang, Feng; Song, Zhenlun

    2011-04-01

    Pure Al coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering to protect sintered NdFeB magnets. The effects of Ar+ ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on the structure and the corrosion behaviour of Al coatings were investigated. The Al coating prepared by DC magnetron sputtering with IBAD (IBAD-Al-coating) had fewer voids than the coating without IBAD (Al-coating). The corrosion behaviour of the Al-coated NdFeB specimens was investigated by potentiodynamic polarisation, a neutral salt spray (NSS) test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting corrosion of the Al coatings always began at the voids of the grain boundaries. Bombardment by the Ar+ ion-beams effectively improved the corrosion resistance of the IBAD-Al-coating.

  12. Applications of Ion-Beam Milling and Deposition Techniques to HEL (High Energy Laser) Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-23

    using a Twyman -Green interferometer with one leg in the vacuum deposition chamber ........ ...................... .. 14 Figure 3. Deomonstration of...of beam current and voltage. 13 b) I Figure 2. Photographs of interference pattern produced using a Twyman -Green interferometer with one leg in the...Measurements of optical surface roughness were made versus milling depth for various ion beam conditions and geometry arrangements. A Twyman -Green

  13. Beam-deposited platinum as versatile catalyst for bottom-up silicon nanowire synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hibst, N.; Strehle, S.; Knittel, P.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2014-10-13

    The controlled localized bottom-up synthesis of silicon nanowires on arbitrarily shaped surfaces is still a persisting challenge for functional device assembly. In order to address this issue, electron beam and focused ion beam-assisted catalyst deposition have been investigated with respect to platinum expected to form a PtSi alloy catalyst for a subsequent bottom-up nanowire synthesis. The effective implementation of pure platinum nanoparticles or thin films for silicon nanowire growth has been demonstrated recently. Beam-deposited platinum contains significant quantities of amorphous carbon due to the organic precursor and gallium ions for a focused ion beam-based deposition process. Nevertheless, silicon nanowires could be grown on various substrates regardless of the platinum purity. Additionally, p-type doping could be realized with diborane whereas n-type doping suppressed a nanowire growth. The rational utilization of this beam-assisted approach enables us to control the localized synthesis of single silicon nanowires at planar surfaces but succeeded also in single nanowire growth at the three-dimensional apex of an atomic force microscopy tip. Therefore, this catalyst deposition method appears to be a unique extension of current technologies to assemble complex nanowire-based devices.

  14. Optical and scratch resistant properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited with single and dual ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance and frictional and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  15. TEM study of annealed Pt nanostructures grown by electron beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frabboni, S.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Spessot, A.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we report on the microstructural characterization of Pt nanostructures fabricated by electron beam-induced deposition in a dual beam system and subsequently annealed in furnace. The as-deposited nanostructures are made of a mixture of nanocrystalline Pt and amorphous carbon. We show by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy that the annealing in presence of oxygen at 550 °C for 30 min is able to remove the amorphous carbon from the nanostructure, leaving polycrystalline Pt grains.

  16. Optical and Scratch Resistant Properties of Diamondlike Carbon Films Deposited with Single and Dual Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance, frictional, and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  17. Single-crystal nanowires grown via electron-beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Randolph, Steven J; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L; Rack, Philip D

    2008-01-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a useful technique for direct-writing of 3-dimensional dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials with nanoscale precision and resolution. The EBID process, however, has been limited in many cases because precursor byproducts (typically from organic precursors like W(CO)6) are incorporated into the deposited material resulting in contaminated and amorphous structures. In this manuscript, we have investigated the structure and composition of EBID tungsten nanostructures as-deposited from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron spectroscopy were employed to determine the effects that the electron beam scanning conditions have on the deposit characteristics. The results show that slow, one-dimensional lateral scanning produces textured -tungsten nanowire cores surrounded by an oxide secondary layer, while stationary vertical growth leads to single-crystal [100]-oriented W3O nanowires. Furthermore we correlate how the growth kinetics affect the resultant nanowire structure and composition.

  18. Photocatalytic activity of nanostructured TiO2 films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Foglia, Flavio; Losco, Tonia; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo; Selli, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The photocatalytic activity of thin, nanostructured films of titanium dioxide, synthesized by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from the gas phase, has been investigated employing the photodegradation of salicylic acid as test reaction. Because of the low deposition energy, the so-deposited highly porous TiO2 films are composed of nanoparticles maintaining their original properties in the film, which can be fully controlled by tuning the deposition and post-deposition treatment conditions. A systematic investigation on the evolution of light absorption properties and photoactivity of the films in relation to their morphology, determined by AFM analysis, and phase composition, determined by Raman spectroscopy, has been performed. The absorption and photocatalytic activity of the nanostructured films in the visible region could be enhanced either through post-deposition annealing treatment in ammonia containing atmosphere or employing mild oxidation conditions, followed by annealing in N2 at 600 °C.

  19. Properties of ITO thin films deposited on amorphous and crystalline substrates with e-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. X.; Beling, C. D.; Djurisic, A. B.; Li, S.; Fung, S.

    2004-06-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited using the e-beam evaporation method on amorphous and crystalline substrates under identical conditions. The properties of the films were investigated using optical transmittance, XRD and XPS techniques. It was found that the properties of the films depend strongly on the nature of the substrate surface. Analysis suggests that changes in chemical composition and microstructure of the ITO films deposited on crystalline and amorphous substrates are responsible for the differences in optical properties.

  20. An all-optical velocity filter and beam splitter for generating cold molecular beams: a proposal and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingjia; Liu, Runqin; Yin, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    In order to generate one or two cold molecular beams that have neither a permanent electric dipole moment nor a magnetic dipole one, a controllable scheme to form an all-optical velocity filter and molecular beam splitter by using two red-detuned, crossing and cavity-enhanced guiding laser beams is proposed, and both the dynamic velocity filtering and beam splitting processes of the guided cold I2 molecular beam are studied by using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo method. Our study shows that by adjusting the laser power difference between the two guiding laser beams from -124 W to 124 W, a splitting ratio of the two-arm output molecular beams from about 10.3% to 89.7% can be obtained. Also, by adjusting the intersection angle between the two standing wave cavities from 80° to 10°, an adjustable splitting ratio from about 1.6% to 98.4% can be obtained. If the intersection angle between the guided oblique beam and the guided straight beam is set to 80°, a cold I2 molecular beam with a full-width at half-maximum longitudinal velocity of 1 m s-1 and a longitudinal temperature of 8 mK can be generated by using an all-optical velocity filter.

  1. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J. Todd

    2017-03-01

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–SDS–H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–PEG–H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  2. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J Todd

    2017-03-24

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  3. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  4. Growth of MoO3 films by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Eric I.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2002-07-22

    The growth of MoO₃ films on SrLaAlO₄(0 0 1), a substrate lattice-matched to b-MoO , by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy was characterized using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Xray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies (AFM and STM).It was found that the flux of reactive oxygen species to the surface was not high enough to maintain the proper stoichiometry, even at the lowest measurable deposition rates. Therefore, the films were grown by depositing Mo in small increments and then allowing the Mo to oxidize. At 675 K, the films grew epitaxially but in a three-dimensional manner. XRD of films grown under these conditions revealed atetragonal structure that has not been previously observed in bulk MoO₃ samples.

  5. Synthesis of single source molecular precursors for copper indium diselenide and copper indium disulfide production via confined plume chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jason D.

    A one-step process for preparing coatings of known photovoltaic materials on either inorganic or organic substrates is reported. IR laser (2.94 microm wavelength) and femtosecond visible laser (800 nm wavelength) irradiation of single-source molecular precursors layered between transparent supports under temporal and spatial confinement at a laser wavelength (2.94 microm or 800 nm) resonant with a precursor vibrational band gives one-step deposition of copper indium diselenide (CISe) or copper indium disulfide (CIS) without incurring noticeable collateral thermal damage to the substrate material. Reaction plume formation at the precursor/laser beam interface initiates confined plume, chemical deposition (CPCD) of nano CIS product. Continuous coatings are produced by rastering the laser beam over a sample specimen. CPCD processing of precursors 1-6 on confined substrates, ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)/glass, and glass/sapphire gives CISe, CIS respectively.

  6. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  7. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  8. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.

    2016-01-15

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  9. Molecular layer deposition of alucone films using trimethylaluminum and hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Devika; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid organic–inorganic polymer film grown by molecular layer deposition (MLD) is demonstrated here. Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] and hydroquinone [C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}] are used to deposit the polymeric films, which is a representative of a class of aluminum oxide polymers known as “alucones.” In-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies are employed to determine the growth characteristics. An average growth rate of 4.1 Å per cycle at 150 °C is obtained by QCM and subsequently verified with x-ray reflectivity measurements. Surface chemistry during each MLD-half cycle is studied in depth by in-situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibration spectroscopy. Self limiting nature of the reaction is confirmed from both QCM and FTIR measurements. The conformal nature of the deposit, typical for atomic layer deposition and MLD, is verified with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements confirm the uniform elemental distribution along the depth of the films.

  10. A comparison of neon versus helium ion beam induced deposition via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D

    2013-03-22

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of PtCx (where x ∼ 5) using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated by performing Monte Carlo simulations of helium and neon ions. The helium beam leads to more lateral growth relative to the neon beam because of its larger interaction volume. The lateral growth of the nanopillars is dominated by molecules deposited via secondary electrons in both the simulations. Notably, the helium pillars are dominated by SE-I electrons whereas the neon pillars are dominated by SE-II electrons. Using a low precursor residence time of 70 μs, resulting in an equilibrium coverage of ∼4%, the neon simulation has a lower deposition efficiency (3.5%) compared to that of the helium simulation (6.5%). At larger residence time (10 ms) and consequently larger equilibrium coverage (85%) the deposition efficiencies of helium and neon increased to 49% and 21%, respectively; which is dominated by increased lateral growth rates leading to broader pillars. The nanoscale growth is further studied by varying the ion beam diameter at 10 ms precursor residence time. The study shows that total SE yield decreases with increasing beam diameters for both the ion types. However, helium has the larger SE yield as compared to that of neon in both the low and high precursor residence time, and thus pillars are wider in all the simulations studied.

  11. Texture-Induced Anisotropy in an Inconel 718 Alloy Deposited Using Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, W.; Shenoy, R.; Bird, R.; Hafley, R.; Redding, M.

    2014-01-01

    A test block of Inconel (IN) 718 was fabricated using electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) to examine how the EBF(sup 3) deposition process affects the microstructure, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties of IN 718. Tests revealed significant anisotropy in the elastic modulus for the as-deposited IN 718. Subsequent tests were conducted on specimens subjected to a heat treatment designed to decrease the level of anisotropy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize crystallographic texture in the as-deposited and heat treated conditions. The anisotropy in the as-deposited condition was strongly affected by texture as evidenced by its dependence on orientation relative to the deposition direction. Heat treatment resulted in a significant improvement in modulus of the EBF(sup 3) product to a level nearly equivalent to that for wrought IN 718 with reduced anisotropy; reduction in texture through recrystallization; and production of a more homogeneous microstructure.

  12. Thermal imaging for assessment of electron-beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) additive manufacturing deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Brewer, Amy; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-05-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing field where 3-dimensional parts can be produced layer by layer. NASA's electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) technology is being evaluated to manufacture metallic parts in a space environment. The benefits of EBF3 technology are weight savings to support space missions, rapid prototyping in a zero gravity environment, and improved vehicle readiness. The EBF3 system is composed of 3 main components: electron beam gun, multi-axis position system, and metallic wire feeder. The electron beam is used to melt the wire and the multi-axis positioning system is used to build the part layer by layer. To insure a quality deposit, a near infrared (NIR) camera is used to image the melt pool and solidification areas. This paper describes the calibration and application of a NIR camera for temperature measurement. In addition, image processing techniques are presented for deposit assessment metrics.

  13. Tribological properties of boron nitride synthesized by ion beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of boron nitride films on 440 C bearing stainless steel substrates was examined. The thin films containing the boron nitride were synthesized using an ion beam extracted from a borazine plasma. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with BN in sliding contact with itself and various transition metals. It is indicated that the surfaces of atomically cleaned BN coating film contain a small amount of oxides and carbides, in addition to boron nitride. The coefficients of friction for the BN in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and BN increases the shear strength of the metal - BN contact and increases the friction. The friction for BN-BN contact is a function of the shear strength of the elastic contacts. Clean BN surfaces exhibit relatively strong interfacial adhesion and high friction. The presence of adsorbates such as adventitious carbon contaminants on the BN surfaces reduces the shear strength of the contact area. In contrast, chemically adsorbed oxygen enhances the shear strength of the BN-BN contact and increases the friction.

  14. Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Of IrSi3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy grows layers of iridium silicide (IrSi3) on silicon at temperatures of 630 to 800 degrees C. Particularly useful as photodetector material because it forms Schottky diodes having potential barriers of only 0.12 to 0.15 eV - lowest of any metal on silicon. Photodiodes sensitive to infrared radiation at wavelengths as large as 8 to 10 micrometers. New, lower formation temperature expected to enable growth of arrays of IrSi3/Si infrared detectors on Si wafers without thermally damaging image-processing circuitry integrated on wafers.

  15. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces using molecular beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Thermal energy molecular beams have been used to study chemical interactions with metal surfaces. Chemisorption of simple molecules such as H2, O2, CH4, C2Hx and CO was investigated on single and polycrystalline surfaces of Pt, Ni, Co, and Ag. Kinetic parameters and reaction mechanisms were determined for model catalytic reactions including CO and C2Hx oxidation and methanation from H2/CO mixtures. Chemical reactions of NOx with CO and D2 on Pt(111) and other surfaces have been surveyed and the kinetics of NO and O2 chemisorption have been measured. The theory of adsorption/desorption kinetics is reviewed and certain deficiencies identified.

  16. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  17. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  18. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  19. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-05

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  20. Hydroquinone-ZnO nano-laminate deposited by molecular-atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jie; Lucero, Antonio T.; Cheng, Lanxia; Kim, Jiyoung; Hwang, Hyeon Jun; Ha, Min-Woo

    2015-03-23

    In this study, we have deposited organic-inorganic hybrid semiconducting hydroquinone (HQ)/zinc oxide (ZnO) superlattices using molecular-atomic layer deposition, which enables accurate control of film thickness, excellent uniformity, and sharp interfaces at a low deposition temperature (150 °C). Self-limiting growth of organic layers is observed for the HQ precursor on ZnO surface. Nano-laminates were prepared by varying the number of HQ to ZnO cycles in order to investigate the physical and electrical effects of different HQ to ZnO ratios. It is indicated that the addition of HQ layer results in enhanced mobility and reduced carrier concentration. The highest Hall mobility of approximately 2.3 cm{sup 2}/V·s and the lowest n-type carrier concentration of approximately 1.0 × 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3} were achieved with the organic-inorganic superlattice deposited with a ratio of 10 ZnO cycles to 1 HQ cycle. This study offers an approach to tune the electrical transport characteristics of ALD ZnO matrix thin films using an organic dopant. Moreover, with organic embedment, this nano-laminate material may be useful for flexible electronics.

  1. Controls of crystallinity and surface roughness of Cu film in partially ionized beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, S.K.; Kim, K.H.; Choi, W.K.; Jang, H.G.; Yoon, Y.S.; Han, S.; Jung, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    Changes of crystallinity and surface roughness are discussed in terms of the average energy per deposited atom in the partially ionized beam (PIB) deposition. The average energy per deposited atom can be controlled by adjusting the ionization potential, Vi and acceleration potential Va. The ion beam consists of a Cu ion beam and residual gas ion beam and residual gases as well as Cu particles that were ionized and accelerated to provide the film with energy required for film-growth. The relative contribution of residual gas ions and Cu ions to total average energy per deposited atom was varied with the ionization potential. At fixed ionization potentials of Vi = 400 V and Vi = 450 V, the average energy per deposited atom was varied in the range of 0 to 120 eV with acceleration potential Va, of 0 to 4 kV. The relative intensity ratio, I(111)/I(200), of the Cu films increased from 6 to 37 and the root mean square (R{sub ms}) surface roughness decreased with an increase in acceleration potential at Vi = 400 V. The relative intensity ratio, I(111)/I(200), of Cu films increased up to Va = 2 kV at Vi = 2 kV, above which a decrease occurred, and the surface roughness of Cu films increased as a function of acceleration potential. The degree of preferred orientation was closely related with the average energy per deposited atom. The change of R{sub ms} roughness might be affected by ion flux, particle energy and preferred orientation.

  2. Hyperthermal molecular beam source using a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a hyperthermal molecular beam source employing a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube for gas-surface interaction studies. Unlike conventional shock-heated beam sources, the capability of repetitive beam generation without the need for replacing a diaphragm makes our beam source suitable for scattering experiments, which require signal accumulation for a large number of beam pulses. The short duration of shock heating alleviates the usual temperature limit due to the nozzle material, enabling the generation of a molecular beam with higher translational energy or that containing dissociated species. The shock-heated beam is substantially free from surface-contaminating impurities that are pronounced in arc-heated beams. We characterize the properties of nitrogen and oxygen molecular beams using the time-of-flight method. When both the timing of beam extraction and the supply quantity of nitrogen gas are appropriately regulated, our beam source can generate a nitrogen molecular beam with translational energy of approximately 1 eV, which corresponds to the typical activation energy of surface reactions. Furthermore, our beam source can generate an oxygen molecular beam containing dissociated oxygen atoms, which can be a useful probe for surface oxidation. The dissociation fraction along with the translational energy can be adjusted through the supply quantity of oxygen gas.

  3. Supercritical fluid molecular spray film deposition and powder formation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. Upon expansion and supersonic interaction with background gases in the low pressure region, any clusters of solvent are broken up and the solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solute concentration in the solution is varied primarily by varying solution pressure to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solvent clustering and solute nucleation are controlled by manipulating the rate of expansion of the solution and the pressure of the lower pressure region. Solution and low pressure region temperatures are also controlled.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of electron beam deposited dielectrics for 1-m class optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervy, Adrien; Gallais, Laurent; Chériaux, Gilles; Mouricaud, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In order to transport multi-petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser beams with large spectral bandwidth, specific mirrors have to be designed and manufactured. We report on an experimental study of the laser-damage resistance and other optical properties of coating materials deposited in a 1-m class coating chamber. The study is conducted on single-layer coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation at 500 fs. Based on the experience of large optics for nanosecond applications, hafnia and silica are particularly investigated. However, in the case of sub-15 fs, the spectral specifications for PW beam transport mirrors cannot be reached by classical high laser-resistant quarter-wave SiO2/HfO2 stacks. Therefore, we investigate the laser resistance of different dielectrics of interest deposited with electron-beam processes: Al2O3, Y2O3, Sc2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5, TiO2. The influence of multiple pulse irradiations and environmental conditions, such as vacuum and temperature, is studied. With the investigation of multilayer stacks, we also show that there is no difference in behavior when a film is studied as a single layer or embedded in a stack. Based on these results, we were able to optimize high reflective (>99.5%), broadband (300 nm) and high laser-induced damage threshold (2.5 J/cm2) mirrors for PW applications.

  5. The effect of energy deposition on pattern resolution in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Ananthan

    Electron beam lithography is one of the most important tools for nanofabrication. Electron beam lithography has consistently been able to offer higher resolution, typically better than 10 nm or so, compared to other techniques. In this work the contribution of electron-substrate interaction to pattern resolution is investigated. In electron beam lithography the incident beam is scattered in the resist-substrate stack by a combination of elastic and inelastic events which is described by the point spread function. Using a Vistec VB300 Gaussian beam lithography tool operating at 100 keV the experimental point spread function is investigated by a technique called point exposure distribution measurements. The experimental results indicate that the scattering in the sub-100 nm range shows several orders of the magnitude difference with that obtained via Monte Carlo simulations. In high energy electron beam lithography where forward scattering in small, contribution of secondary electrons generated by the primary beam must be taken into account. The chemical change leading to resist exposure is through bond scission, which is typically a low energy event between 3 -- 5 eV. Compared to the primary beam, the secondary electrons have a significantly higher probability of scission due to their lower energy. These secondary electrons are also generated with large emission angles and can travel several nanometers, leading to an increase in observed line widths compared to the size of the beam. An analytical model developed here, that considers the energy deposited by the secondary electrons, is able to predict the dependence of dose on observed diameter to within a reasonable accuracy. This technique used in conjunction with the knowledge of resist contrast is also indicative of pattern resolution limits in high energy electron beam lithography. It is also found that for negative resists, backscatter effects and resist contrast significantly degrade the resolution for large

  6. A molecular beam/quadrupole mass spectrometer system with synchronized beam modulation and digital waveform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Adams, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    A performance evaluation is conducted for a molecular beam/mass spectrometer (MB/MS) system, as applied to a 1-30 torr microwave-discharge flow reactor (MWFR) used in the formation of the methylperoxy radical and a study of its subsequent destruction in the presence or absence of NO(x). The modulated MB/MS system is four-staged and differentially pumped. The results obtained by the MWFR study is illustrative of overall system performance, including digital waveform analysis; significant improvements over previous designs are noted in attainable S/N ratio, detection limit, and accuracy.

  7. Annealing-Based Electrical Tuning of Cobalt-Carbon Deposits Grown by Focused-Electron-Beam-Induced Deposition.

    PubMed

    Puydinger Dos Santos, Marcos V; Velo, Murilo F; Domingos, Renan D; Zhang, Yucheng; Maeder, Xavier; Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Best, James P; Béron, Fanny; Pirota, Kleber R; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Diniz, José A; Utke, Ivo

    2016-11-30

    An effective postgrowth electrical tuning, via an oxygen releasing method, to enhance the content of non-noble metals in deposits directly written with gas-assisted focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) is presented. It represents a novel and reproducible method for improving the electrical transport properties of Co-C deposits. The metal content and electrical properties of Co-C-O nanodeposits obtained by electron-induced dissociation of volatile Co2(CO)8 precursor adsorbate molecules were reproducibly tuned by applying postgrowth annealing processes at 100 °C, 200 °C, and 300 °C under high-vacuum for 10 min. Advanced thin film EDX analysis showed that during the annealing process predominantly oxygen is released from the Co-C-O deposits, yielding an atomic ratio of Co:C:O = 100:16:1 (85:14:1) with respect to the atomic composition of as-written Co:C:O = 100:21:28 (67:14:19). In-depth Raman analysis suggests that the amorphous carbon contained in the as-written deposit turns into graphite nanocrystals with size of about 22.4 nm with annealing temperature. Remarkably, these microstructural changes allow for tuning of the electrical resistivity of the deposits over 3 orders of magnitude from 26 mΩ cm down to 26 μΩ cm, achieving a residual resistivity of ρ2K/ρ300 K = 0.56, close to the value of 0.53 for pure Co films with similar dimensions, making it especially interesting and advantageous over the numerous works already published for applications such as advanced scanning-probe systems, magnetic memory, storage, and ferroelectric tunnel junction memristors, as the graphitic matrix protects the cobalt from being oxidized under an ambient atmosphere.

  8. Area selective molecular layer deposition of polyurea films.

    PubMed

    Prasittichai, Chaiya; Zhou, Han; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-12-26

    Patterned organic thin films with submicrometer features are of great importance in applications such as nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We present here a new approach for creating patterned organic films using area selective molecular layer deposition (MLD). MLD is a technique that allows for conformal deposition of nanoscale organic thin films with exceptional control over vertical thickness and composition. By expanding the technique to allow for area selective MLD, lateral patterning of the film can be achieved. In this work, polyurea thin films were deposited by alternating pulses of 1,4-phenylenediisocyanate (PDIC) and ethylenediamine (ED) in a layer-by-layer fashion with a linear growth rate of 5.3 Å/cycle. Studies were carried out to determine whether self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) could block MLD on silicon substrates. Results show that the MLD process is impeded by the SAM. To test lateral patterning in MLD, SAMs were patterned onto silicon substrates using two different approaches. In one approach, SiO2-coated Si(100) substrates were patterned with an ODTS SAM by soft lithography in a well-controlled environment. In the second approach, patterned ODTS SAM was formed on H-Si/SiO2 patterned wafers by employing the chemically selective adsorption of ODTS on SiO2 over H-Si. Auger electron spectroscopy results revealed that the polyurea film is deposited predominantly on the ODTS-free regions of both patterned substrates, indicating sufficient blocking of MLD by the ODTS SAM layer to replicate the pattern. The method we describe here offers a novel approach for fabricating high quality, three-dimensional organic structures.

  9. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Cushing, G W; Navin, J K; Valadez, L; Johánek, V; Harrison, I

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T(g), T(s); ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, T(g), and surface temperature, T(s), can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with T(g) = T(s) = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(T(g), T(s); ϑ) measurements for which T(g) ≠ T(s) provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the T(g) of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  10. Novel photoresist thin films with in-situ photoacid generator by molecular layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Bent, Stacey F.

    2013-03-01

    Current photoresist materials are facing many challenges introduced by advanced lithographies, particularly the need for excellent compositional homogeneity and ultrathin film thickness. Traditional spin-on polymeric resists have inherent limitations in achieving a high level of control over the chemical composition, leading to interest in development of alternative methods for making photoresists. In this work, we demonstrate that molecular layer deposition (MLD) is a potential method for synthesizing photoresists because it allows for precise control over organic film thickness and composition. MLD utilizes sequential, self-limiting reactions of organic precursors to build a thin film directly on a substrate surface and grows organic films by depositing only one molecular layer at each precursor dose, which in turn allows for fine-tuning of the position and concentration of various functionalities in the deposited film. In this study, we use bifunctional precursors, diamine and diisocyanate, to build polyurea resist films via urea coupling reaction between the amine and isocyanate groups. Acid-labile groups and photoacid generators (PAGs) are embedded in the backbone of the resist films with a highly uniform distribution. The resist films were successfully deposited and characterized for both materials properties and resist response. E-beam patterning was achieved with the resist films. Cross-linking behavior of the resist films was observed, likely due to the aromatic rings in the films, which is undesirable for application as a positive-tone photoresist. Moreover, the in-situ polymer-bound PAGs had low sensitivity. It is suggested that this effect may arise because the PAG is cation-bound, leading to lower efficiency of sulfur-carbon bond cleavage in the sulfonium cation, which is needed to produce the photoacid, and consequently a lower photoacid yield. Further work is needed to improve the performance of the MLD resist films.

  11. Physical properties of nitrogenated amorphous carbon films produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francois; Andre, Bernard; Veen, A. Van; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Labohm, F.; Delplancke, Marie Paule; Dunlop, Hugh; Anger, Eric

    1994-12-01

    Carbon films with up to 32 at.% N (a-C:N) have been prepared using an ion-beam-assisted magnetron, with an N2(+) beam at energies between 50 and 300 eV. The composition and density of the films vary strongly with the deposition parameters. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that these a-C:N films are mostly graphitic with up to 20% C Sp3 bonding. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling show that the density goes through a maximum as the average deposited energy per unit depth increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that nitrogen is mostly combined with carbon in triple (C(triple bond)N and double (C=N) bonds. Positron annihilation spectroscopy shows that the void concentration in the films goes through a minimum with deposited energy. These results are consistent with a densification induced by the collisions at low deposited energy, and damage-induced graphitization at high deposited energy values.

  12. Extended bulk defects induced by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.I.; Wong, J.; Borrego, J.M.; Lu, T.

    1988-08-15

    The study of possible defects generated by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam (PIB) depositions was performed. No defects were observed when acceleration voltage was set lower than 1 kV. Surprisingly, several deep levels were detected up to the depth of 4000 A in the 3-kV sample. However, these levels can be annealed out at a relatively low temperature of 400 /sup 0/C. It is concluded in this study that, by properly choosing the ion energy range, PIB deposition will not cause severe damage to the substrate and can be a viable technique for growing heterostructures.

  13. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  14. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  15. Growth of cluster assembled ZnO film by nanocluster beam deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Nilanjan

    2015-06-24

    ZnO is considered as one of the most promising material for optoelectronic devices. The present work emphasizes production of cluster assembled ZnO films by a UHV nanocluster beam deposition technique where the nanoclusters were produced in a laser vaporization cluster source. The microstructural and the optical properties of the ZnO nanocluster film deposited were investigated. As the wet chemical processes are not compatible with current solid state methods of device fabrication, therefore alternative UHV technique described in the paper is the need of the hour.

  16. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  17. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization. PMID:27666531

  18. Thermally induced transformations of amorphous carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Kim, Songkil; Fedorov, Andrei G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2011-03-01

    We studied the thermally induced phase transformations of electron-beam-induced deposited (EBID) amorphous carbon nanostructures by correlating the changes in its morphology with internal microstructure by using combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution confocal Raman microscopy. These carbon deposits can be used to create heterogeneous junctions in electronic devices commonly known as carbon-metal interconnects. We compared two basic shapes of EBID deposits: dots/pillars with widths from 50 to 600 nm and heights from 50 to 500 nm and lines with variable heights from 10 to 150 nm but having a constant length of 6 μm. We observed that during thermal annealing, the nanoscale amorphous deposits go through multistage transformation including dehydration and stress-relaxation around 150 °C, dehydrogenation within 150-300 °C, followed by graphitization (>350 °C) and formation of nanocrystalline, highly densified graphitic deposits around 450 °C. The later stage of transformation occurs well below commonly observed graphitization for bulk carbon (600-800 °C). It was observed that the shape of the deposits contribute significantly to the phase transformations. We suggested that this difference is controlled by different contributions from interfacial footprints area. Moreover, the rate of graphitization was different for deposits of different shapes with the lines showing a much stronger dependence of its structure on the density than the dots.

  19. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-09-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization.

  20. Superconductivity in the system MoxCyGazOδ prepared by focused ion beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, P. M.; Schwalb, C. H.; Winhold, M.; Huth, M.

    2014-05-01

    We have prepared the new amorphous superconductor MoxCyGazOδ with a maximum critical temperature Tc of 3.8 K by the direct-write nano-patterning technique of focused (gallium) ion beam induced deposition (FIBID) using Mo(CO)6 as precursor gas. From a detailed analysis of the temperature-dependent resistivity and the upper critical field, we found clear evidence for proximity of the samples to a disorder-induced metal-insulator transition. We observed a strong dependence of Tc on the deposition parameters and identified clear correlations between Tc, the localization tendency visible in the resistance data and the sample composition. By an in-situ feedback-controlled optimization process in the FIB-induced growth, we were able to identify the beam parameters which lead to samples with the largest Tc-value and sharpest transition into the superconducting state.

  1. Energy deposition through radiative processes in absorbers irradiated by electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuo, Tabata; Pedro, Andreo; Kunihiko, Shinoda; Rinsuke, Ito

    1994-09-01

    The component of energy deposition due to radiative processes (bremsstrahlung component) in absorbers irradiated by electron beams has been computed together with the total energy deposition by using the ITS Monte Carlo system version 3.0. Plane-parallel electron beams with energies from 0.1 to 100 MeV have been assumed to be incident normally on the slab absorber, whose thickness is 2.5 times the continuous slowing-down approximation (csda) range of the incident electrons. Absorber materials considered are elemental solids with atomic numbers between 4 and 92 (Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U). An analytic formula is given to express the depth profile of the bremsstrahlung component as a function of scaled depth (depth in units of the csda range), incident-electron energy and absorber atomic number. It is also applicable to compounds.

  2. Ion-beam inertial fusion: the requirements posed by target and deposition physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-10-19

    The demonstration of ICF scientific feasibility requires success in target design, driver development and target fabrication. Since these are interrelated, we present here some results of ion beam target studies and relate them to parameters of interest to ion accelerators. Ion deposition physics have long been a well known subject apart from high beam currents. Recent NRL experiments at up to 250 kA/cm/sup 2/ ions confirm the classical deposition physics now at current densities which are comparable to most ion targets. On the other hand, GSI data at low current density but 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon are continually being accumulated. They have yet to find anomalous results. Relying on target concepts outlined briefly, we report on the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion ranges and focal spot radius. We also comment on some consequences of target gain versus driver and reactor requirements.

  3. Growth of Zircone on Nanoporous Alumina Using Molecular Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert A.; George, Steven M.; Kim, Yeongae; Hwang, Woonbong; Samberg, Meghan E.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Narayan, Roger J.

    2014-04-01

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) is a sequential and self-limiting process that may be used to create hybrid organic/inorganic thin films from organometallic precursors and organic alcohol precursors. In this study, films of a zirconium-containing hybrid organic/inorganic polymer known as zircone were grown on nanoporous alumina using MLD. Scanning electron microscopy data showed obliteration of the pores in zircone-coated nanoporous alumina. An in vitro cell viability study indicated that the growth of human epidermal keratinocytes was the greatest on zircone-coated nanoporous alumina than on uncoated nanoporous alumina. Our results suggest that MLD may be used to create biocompatible coatings for use in many types of medical devices.

  4. Transparent and Conductive Cadmium-Tin Oxide Films Deposited by Atom Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Tatsuo; Ito, Kentaro

    1988-09-01

    Transparent and conductive cadmium-tin oxide films with resistivities of 9× 10-4 Ω cm and transmittance higher than 80% over the visible range were prepared by atom beam sputtering. The structure of the deposited film was amorphous and its composition was highly deficient in CdO compared with Cd2SnO4. This CTO film was used as the window layer of a heterojunction solar cell.

  5. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Schlegel, T.; Malka, G.; Aleonard, M. M.; Claverie, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M.; Amthor, K. U.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.

    2007-06-15

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range.

  6. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range.

  7. Production and all-optical deceleration of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gary; Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold molecules open up new opportunities in many areas of study, including many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. Current methods cannot easily address the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states without an amalgam of repump lasers. We present an alternative method to produce cold molecules. A cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) is used to create an intense, slow, cold source of molecules. By using a CBGB for the production, we can quench vibrational modes that cannot be addressed with optical methods. This is then followed by an all-optical scheme using a single ultra-fast laser to decelerate the molecules and a continuous wave laser to cool the species. We have started experiments with strontium monohydride (SrH), but the proposed method should be applicable to a wide range of molecular species.

  8. Silicon surface preparation for III-V molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiomanana, K.; Bahri, M.; Rodriguez, J. B.; Largeau, L.; Cerutti, L.; Mauguin, O.; Castellano, A.; Patriarche, G.; Tournié, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a silicon substrate preparation for III-V molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). It combines sequences of ex situ and in situ treatments. The ex situ process is composed of cycles of HF dip and O2 plasma treatments. Ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy performed after each step during the substrate preparation reveal surface cleaning and de-oxidation. The in situ treatment consists in flash annealing the substrate in the MBE chamber prior to epitaxial growth. GaSb-based multiple quantum well heterostructures emitting at 1.55 μm were grown by MBE on Si substrates prepared by different methods. Structural characterizations using XRD and TEM coupled with photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates the efficiency of our preparation process. This study thus unravels a simple and reproducible protocol to prepare the Si surface prior to III-V MBE.

  9. InPBi single crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Gu, Y; Zhou, H F; Zhang, L Y; Kang, C Z; Wu, M J; Pan, W W; Lu, P F; Gong, Q; Wang, S M

    2014-06-26

    InPBi was predicted to be the most robust infrared optoelectronic material but also the most difficult to synthesize within In-VBi (V = P, As and Sb) 25 years ago. We report the first successful growth of InPBi single crystals with Bi concentration far beyond the doping level by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The InPBi thin films reveal excellent surface, structural and optical qualities making it a promising new III-V compound family member for heterostructures. The Bi concentration is found to be 2.4 ± 0.4% with 94 ± 5% Bi atoms at substitutional sites. Optical absorption indicates a band gap of 1.23 eV at room temperature while photoluminescence shows unexpectedly strong and broad light emission at 1.4-2.7 μm which can't be explained by the existing theory.

  10. Graphitic carbon grown on fluorides by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Seung; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-03

    We study the growth mechanism of carbon molecules supplied by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates (MgF2, CaF2, and BaF2). All the carbon layers form graphitic carbon with different crystallinities depending on the cation. Especially, the growth on MgF2 results in the formation of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG). Such dependence on the cation is a new observation and calls for further systematic studies with other series of substrates. At the same growth temperature, the NCG on MgF2 has larger clusters than those on oxides. This is contrary to the general expectation because the bond strength of the carbon-fluorine bond is larger than that of the carbon-oxygen bond. Our results show that the growth of graphitic carbon does not simply depend on the chemical bonding between the carbon and the anion in the substrate.

  11. Effects of shutter transients in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gozu, Shin-Ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-11-12

    : We have studied the effects of shutter transients (STs) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two series of samples were grown by MBE and evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. The effects of STs were evaluated by growth rate (GR) analysis using a combination of growth time (GT) and thickness evaluated by XRD and XRR measurements. We revealed two opposite effects of STs: (1) overshoot of GR and (2) increase in GR with GT and subsequent saturation. Each effect was consistent with the previous studies; however, the previous studies showed no relationships between these two effects. By considering closing time of the shutter, the two opposite effects were well understood.

  12. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  13. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  14. Indium antimonide doped with manganese grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. L.; Heremans, J.; Thrush, C. M.

    1997-05-01

    Indium antimonide is of interest for infrared detecting and emitting devices and for magnetic field sensors. In this study, indium antimonide doped with manganese and grown by molecular beam epitaxy was investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to show that the incorporation of managenese is near unity over a wide range of manganese concentrations. Manganese is observed to be an acceptor with a dopant efficiency which follows a power law in which the hole density is proportional to the manganese concentration raised to the power α. The power α depends on the growth temperature; at 300°C, α = 0.86 and at 360°C, α = 0.78. Lightly manganese doped samples have transport dominated by electrons at low temperatures due to hole freeze out, followed by holes at intermediate temperatures and finally by intrinsic electrons at high temperatures. Additional SIMS studies showed that manganese diffuses relatively slowly in indium antimonide.

  15. Porous ZnO nanonetworks grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C. T.; Kendrick, C. E.; Millane, R. P.; Liu, Z.; Ringer, S. P.; Washburn, K.; Callaghan, P. T.; Durbin, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was employed to create porous nanonetworks of ZnO directly on GaN epilayers without the use of catalysts or templates. Detailed analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both as-grown and etched samples reveals that the typical porous nanonetwork structure is multilayered, and suggests that dislocations originating at the GaN/sapphire heterointerface and/or defects characterizing an unusually rough GaN surface are responsible. The pore size distribution of the nanonetwork was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry. A bimodal pore size distribution centred at 4 nm and 70 nm, respectively, was observed, consistent with the existence of small nanoscale pores in the bulk of the sample, and large open pores on the surface of the porous nanonetwork as observed by SEM.

  16. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  17. Synchrotron radiation x-ray beam profile monitor using chemical vapor deposition diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Togo; Takahashi, Sunao; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Hirono, Toko; Tachibana, Takeshi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2006-12-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) of a Si-doped polycrystalline diamond film fabricated using the chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to measure the profile of a synchrotron radiation pink x-ray beam emitted from an in-vacuum hybrid undulator at the SPring-8 facility. The spectrum of the section of the diamond film penetrated by the emitted visible red light exhibited a peak at 739 nm and a wideband structure extending from 550 to 700 nm. The PL intensity increased with the absorbed dose of the incident beam in the diamond within a dynamic range of 10{sup 3}. A two-dimensional distribution of the PL intensity revealed the undulator beam profile.

  18. Normal incidence reflectance of ion beam deposited SiC films in the EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A. M.; Osantowski, John F.; Herzig, Howard; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Toft, Albert R.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of the normal-incidence reflectance at 58.4, 92.0, and 121.6 nm wavelength of 30- and 80-nm-thick SiC films produced by ion-beam deposition on unheated 5 x 5-cm microscope slides. The films were deposited in the 2-m evaporator described by Bradford et al. (1969) with chamber base pressure 1 microtorr, operating pressure 40 microtorr, and a 50-62-mA 750-eV Ar ion beam; the reflectance measurements were obtained in the reflector-monochromator system described by Osantowski (1974). Reflectances of over 30 percent were found at 92 and 121.6 nm, almost equal to those of polished CVD films of SiC and degrading only slightly after aging for 4 months. It is suggested that ion-beam deposition may be the best low-temperature technique for coating EUV optics for space astronomy.

  19. An analytical model of beam attenuation and powder heating during coaxial laser direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    In the laser direct metal deposition process, interaction between the laser beam and powder from a coaxial powder delivery nozzle alters the temperature of powder and the amount and spatial distribution of laser intensity reaching the deposition melt pool. These factors significantly affect the process and are also important input parameters for any finite element or analytical models of the melt pool and deposition tracks. The analytical model in this paper presents a method to calculate laser attenuation and powder temperatures at every point below such a nozzle. It is applicable to laser beams that are approximately parallel over the beam-powder interaction distance of any initial intensity distribution (Top Hat, Gaussian, TEM01ast or other). The volume below the nozzle is divided into the region above the powder consolidation plane, where the powder stream is annular, and below it, where it is a single Gaussian stream, and expressions derived for each region. Modelled and measured results are reasonably matched. Results indicate that attenuation is more severe once the annular powder stream has consolidated into a single stream but is not zero before that point. The temperature of powder reaching any point is not constant but the mean value is a maximum at the centre of the stream.

  20. Ion beam deposition and surface characterization of thin multi-component oxide films during growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A.R.; Im, J.; Smentkowski, V.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.; Gruen, D.M.; Holocek, J.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1998-01-13

    Ion beam deposition of either elemental targets in a chemically active gas such as oxygen or nitrogen, or of the appropriate oxide or nitride target, usually with an additional amount of ambient oxygen or nitrogen present, is an effective means of depositing high quality oxide and nitride films. However, there are a number of phenomena which can occur, especially during the production of multicomponent films such as the ferroelectric perovskites or high temperature superconducting oxides, which make it desirable to monitor the composition and structure of the growing film in situ. These phenomena include thermodynamic (Gibbsian), and oxidation or nitridation-driven segregation, enhanced oxidation or nitridation through production of a highly reactive gas phase species such as atomic oxygen or ozone via interaction of the ion beam with the target, and changes in the film composition due to preferential sputtering of the substrate via primary ion backscattering and secondary sputtering of the film. Ion beam deposition provides a relatively low background pressure of the sputtering gas, but the ambient oxygen or nitrogen required to produce the desired phase, along with the gas burden produced by the ion source, result in a background pressure which is too high by several orders of magnitude to perform in situ surface analysis by conventional means. Similarly, diamond is normally grown in the presence of a hydrogen atmosphere to inhibit the formation of the graphitic phase.

  1. Power deposition measurements at 800 MeV-direct proton beam heating of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, D.L.; Langenbrunner, J.; Morgan, G.

    1999-07-01

    A slug calorimetric sensor with several novel design features was developed to measure the power deposition in a cylindrical test article with lead, aluminum, polyethylene and tungsten components. A small, solid slug (volume = 347.5 mm{sup 3}) was suspended by Kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. A small, calibrated, 100-kOhm thermistor was placed in the slug to monitor the temperature. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug was measured from the rate of temperature rise. Lead, tungsten, and Inconel-718 slugs were placed on the beam axis of the test article and were irradiated with an 800 MeV proton beam. The data from these sensors will provide an accurate determination of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target/blanket components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  2. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of GaBi, InBi and InGaBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Piper, L. F. J.; McCombe, B.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest in bismuth alloys of III-V semiconductors for infrared and far-infrared device applications, specifically GaAsBi and InAsBi, has indicated that further study of the III-Bi family of binary compounds would be of great help in improving the quality of these material systems. While immiscibility issues have so far frustrated the growth of GaBi and AlBi, InBi is less problematic, and we have grown it by molecular beam epitaxy on (001) GaAs substrates. However, regions of varying composition exist across the substrate due to poor wetting of the surface. In an effort to improve film quality we have continued to refine the growth parameters by adjusting substrate temperature, beam flux ratio, and deposition rate. Characterization of these films has been performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, we have explored growth of GaBi and In1-xGaxBi at low Ga mole fractions, and modeled this using molecular dynamics simulations. This work is supported by the Research Foundation of the State University of New York Collaborations Fund.

  3. Partially Ionized Beam-Deposited Aluminum on Silicon: Interface Reactions and Epitaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Radhika

    Aluminum, although a popular choice for metallization for Si based ICs, possesses a number of inherent problems when used as contact metal directly on Si, or as inter -connects. Two of the more critical ones are junction spiking and electromigration, both of which are diffusion related phenomena. The predominant mode of diffusion in thin films has long been established to be that due to grain boundaries. The polycrystalline nature of the deposited aluminum films is hence chiefly responsible for the above mentioned problems. If it were possible to reduce the number of grain boundaries and obtain epitaxial single crystal Al films on Si, the situation could be improved considerably. Epitaxial aluminum films on both Si(111) and (100) single crystal substrates can be deposited, using an ion assisted deposition method, referred to as the Partially Ionized Beam technique, where beam energy, current and direction can be controlled to optimize single crystallinity. This is inspite of the fact that the mismatch between Al and Si lattices is about 26%. In this research this technique is used to study the epitaxy of Al on Si. Electrical properties of such deposits were examined and defects present in these epitaxial deposits have been studied. Various x-ray and electron diffraction studies have been performed, including HRTEM to confirm the integrity of the interface and the 4 Al to 3 Si atom relationship. The orientation of the overlayers were found to be a strong function of beam energy and current. Use of high beam energies and currents while depositing ultra thin aluminum films were found to create donor like defects near the substrate surface, altering the electrical characteristics, especially of films on high resistivity p-silicon, where 'inverted' current-voltage characteristics were observed. These characteristics were also found to vary with thickness of deposited films. A MIS tunnel diode (with aluminum oxide as the insulator) model and an ion damage related defect

  4. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  5. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangwal Pandey, A.; Krausert, K.; Franz, D.; Grânäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Müller, P.; Keller, T. F.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V.; Stierle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated systematically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Our study reveals (111) oriented iridium films with high crystalline quality and extremely low surface roughness, on which the formation of large-area epitaxial graphene is achieved. The presence of defects, like dislocations, twins, and 30° rotated domains in the iridium films is also discussed. The coverage of graphene was found to be influenced by the presence of 30° rotated domains in the Ir films. Low iridium deposition rates suppress these rotated domains and an almost complete coverage of graphene was obtained. This synthesis route yields inexpensive, air-stable, and large-area graphene with a well-defined orientation, making it accessible to a wider community of researchers for numerous experiments or applications, including those which use destructive analysis techniques or irreversible processes. Moreover, this approach can be used to tune the structural quality of graphene, allowing a systematic study of the influence of defects in various processes like intercalation below graphene.

  6. Single-crystal nanowires grown via electron-beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. L.; Randolph, S. J.; Fowlkes, J. D.; Allard, L. F.; Meyer, H. M., III; Simpson, M. L.; Rack, P. D.

    2008-08-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a useful technique for direct-writing of three-dimensional dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials with nanoscale precision and resolution. The EBID process, however, has been limited in many cases because precursor byproducts (typically from organic precursors like W(CO)6) are incorporated into the deposited material resulting in contaminated and amorphous structures. In this work, we have investigated the structure and composition of EBID tungsten nanostructures as-deposited from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) precursor. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron spectroscopy were employed to determine the effects that the electron beam scanning conditions have on the deposit characteristics. The results show that slow, one-dimensional lateral scanning produces textured β-tungsten nanowire cores surrounded by an oxide secondary layer, while stationary vertical growth leads to single-crystal [100]-oriented W3O nanowires. Furthermore we correlate how the growth kinetics affect the resultant nanowire structure and composition.

  7. Pressure effect of growing with electron beam-induced deposition with tungsten hexafluoride and tetraethylorthosilicate precursor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young R; Rack, Philip D; Randolph, Steven J; Smith, Daryl A; Joy, David C

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) provides a simple way to fabricate submicron- or nanometer-scale structures from various elements in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The growth rate and shape of the deposits are influenced by many factors. We have studied the growth rate and morphology of EBID-deposited nanostructures as a function of the tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) precursor gas pressure and growth time, and we have used Monte Carlo simulations to model the growth of tungsten and silicon oxide to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the EBID growth. The lateral radius of the deposit decreases with increasing pressure because of the enhanced vertical growth rate which limits competing lateral broadening produced by secondary and forward-scattered electrons. The morphology difference between the conical SiO(x) and the cylindrical W nanopillars is related to the difference in interaction volume between the two materials. A key parameter is the residence time of the precursor gas molecules. This is an exponential function of the surface temperature; it changes during nanopillar growth and is a function of the nanopillar material and the beam conditions.

  8. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques. PMID:24367761

  9. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt-C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  10. Solution deposition planarization for ion beam texturing of long-length flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Chris J; Jung, Yehyun; Holesinger, Terry G; Matias, Vladimir

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of a study of solution deposition planarization (SDP) for preparing smooth flexible substrates in long lengths. Roll to roll fabrication of electronic and power devices with single-crystal properties are desired for inexpensive production. Using the SDP process we have achieved 0.5 nm RMS roughness from a starting roughness of over 20 nm on 5 {micro}m areas. We model the surface roughness reduction as governed by the amount of film shrinkage during solution deposition, number of coatings, solution composition and a residual roughness based on film thickness. This process is extremely well suited for ion-beam texturing of MgO. By utilizing solution deposition of a-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} to planarize the substrate we create the required surface for in-plane MgO texturing using assisted ion-beam deposition. We have achieved in-plane texture FWHM of 4{sup o} on the SDP substrates. Using an appropriate simple layer architecture for superconducting coated conductors we attained critical currents in excess of 3 MA/cm{sup 2} at 75 K for 1-1.2 {micro}m thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} films.

  11. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  12. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  13. Growth regimes during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrion, A. L.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    c-plane GaN films were grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition templates for a wide range of NH3:Ga flux ratios and growth temperatures, and the resulting films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three distinct nitrogen-rich growth regimes—unstable layer-by-layer, quasi-stable step flow, and dislocation-mediated pitting—were identified based on the growth mode and film properties. In addition, step flow growth was observed under conditions of gallium droplet accumulation. The results indicate the existence of two regimes for step-flow growth of GaN by ammonia MBE—both gallium-rich and nitrogen-rich. Growth mode instabilities and mound formation were observed and are discussed in the context of a step-edge energy barrier to adatom diffusion over a terrace.

  14. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  15. Ferromagnet-semiconductor nanowire coaxial heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, M.; Takagaki, Y.; Herfort, J.; Ramsteiner, M.; Herrmann, C.; Breuer, S.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2009-09-01

    GaAs-MnAs core-shell structures are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using wurtzite GaAs nanowires on GaAs(111)B. The nanowire structures curve due to the strain at the heterointerface when the substrate is not rotated during the growth, evidencing the diffusion length in the MnAs overgrowth being less than the perimeter of the columns. The MnAs growth is thus demonstrated to take place by direct deposition on the sidewall. The MnAs envelope is m-plane-oriented with the c-axis along the nanowire axis. The magnetic easy axis hence lies in the surface plane of the substrate, which is confirmed by magnetization measurements and magnetic-force microscopy.

  16. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Baiutti, Federico; Christiani, Georg; Logvenov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2- x Sr x NiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control.

  17. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J. Riechert, H.

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  18. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-05-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  19. Silicon dioxide mask by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in focused ion beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Shah, Ali; Alasaarela, Tapani; Chekurov, Nikolai; Savin, Hele; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2017-02-01

    In this work, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was developed for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) silicon dioxide SiO2 hard mask. The PEALD process greatly decreases the deposition temperature of the SiO2 hard mask. FIB Ga+ ion implantation on the deposited SiO2 layer increases the wet etch resistivity of the irradiated region. A programmed exposure in FIB followed by development in a wet etchant enables the precisely defined nanoscale patterning. The combination of FIB exposure parameters and the development time provides greater freedom for optimization. The developed process provides high pattern dimension accuracy over the tested range of 90–210 nm. Utilizing the SiO2 mask developed in this work, silicon nanopillars with 40 nm diameter were successfully fabricated with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching and the aspect ratio reached 16:1. The fabricated mask is suitable for sub-100 nm high aspect ratio silicon structure fabrication.

  20. Silicon dioxide mask by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in focused ion beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengjun; Shah, Ali; Alasaarela, Tapani; Chekurov, Nikolai; Savin, Hele; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2017-02-24

    In this work, focused ion beam (FIB) lithography was developed for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) silicon dioxide SiO2 hard mask. The PEALD process greatly decreases the deposition temperature of the SiO2 hard mask. FIB Ga(+) ion implantation on the deposited SiO2 layer increases the wet etch resistivity of the irradiated region. A programmed exposure in FIB followed by development in a wet etchant enables the precisely defined nanoscale patterning. The combination of FIB exposure parameters and the development time provides greater freedom for optimization. The developed process provides high pattern dimension accuracy over the tested range of 90-210 nm. Utilizing the SiO2 mask developed in this work, silicon nanopillars with 40 nm diameter were successfully fabricated with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching and the aspect ratio reached 16:1. The fabricated mask is suitable for sub-100 nm high aspect ratio silicon structure fabrication.

  1. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  2. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  3. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of SiOx Films Using Electron Beam Generated Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-28

    special relation to the substrate or e-beam. A total flow of 100 sccm was used in all cases . For the gas flows mentioned above, the individual flows...beam generated plasmas. In this case , molecular hydrogen, formed primarily by recombination of atomic hydrogen on system walls, will not be...the films was large (> 130 nm/min), which implied a high porosity for all cases except for low TEOS flow (≤ 2 sccm) at the higher (300 °C) temperature

  4. Microwave ion beam sources for reactive etching and sputter deposition applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, T. W.; Blackborrow, P.

    1990-01-01

    There are important industrial applications for broadbeam microwave ion beam sources which give current densities in the range 0.1-4.0 mA/cm2 at energies between 100 and 1500 eV. These include machines for the production of multilayer optical coatings by means of ion beam sputter deposition, and cassette-to-cassette machines for inert and reactive ion beam etching of semiconductor wafers. In both cases, the ability to run reliably, and at high power for several hundred hours without unscheduled maintenance is most valuable, and may well justify the extra cost of such a source over the conventional Kaufman hot-filament source. The sources discussed in this article use dual high-power grids of pyrolytic graphite, using a self-aligning design, to produce uniform ion beams with diameters of up to l2 cm. Stabilities of better than 1% over several hundred hours of operation are achieved. The design of the discharge chamber and grids enables operation on most inert and reactive gas mixtures. Typical run data and beam profiles obtained when running on argon, oxygen, and chlorine will be presented.

  5. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies of the Reactions of Oxygen and Fluorine Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-09

    Spectroscopy , Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, January 28-30, 1981. 96. Y. T. Lee, Dynamics of Infared ...reverse side If neceasary and Identify by block number) Molecular Beam Dynamics; Photofragmentation Translational Spectroscopy ; Unimolecular Decay...we initiated molecular beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy experiments to study for the dissociation of ozone and other molecules

  6. Understanding the high pressure properties of molecular solids and molecular surfaces deposited on hetrogeneous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Work directed toward understanding the high pressure properties of molecular solids and molecular surfaces deposited on hetrogeneous substrates is reported. The motivation, apart from expanding our basic knowledge about these systems, was to understand and predict the properties of new materials synthesized at high pressure, including pressure induced metallic and superconducting states. As a consequence, information about the states of matter of the Jovian planets and their satellites, which are natural high pressure laboratories was also provided. The work on molecular surfaces and finite two and three dimensional clusters of atoms and molecules was connected with the composition and behavior of planetary atmospheres and on the processes involved in forming surface layers, which is vital to the development of composite materials and microcircuitry.

  7. Investigations of ice nanoparticles and aerosols in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnik, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We have recently set up a versatile experiment which allows for different experiments with molecular clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams. Here we concentrate on the experiments with ice nanoparticles (large water clusters (H2O)N, N ~ 102-103) doped with atmospherically relevant molecules, e.g., hydrogen halides, CFCs, nitric acid, NxOy, etc. Such species are relevant to ozone depletion and other atmospheric processes. We investigate (1) the UV-photochemistry using velocity map imaging techniques, and (2) the uptake cross section for the molecules on the ice nanoparticles from velocity measurements. In addition, we record (3) mass spectra of the particles implementing different ionization methods: electron ionization (EI) at variable electron energies, photoionization, and special method of electron photodetachment after Na-doping (NaPI). The unique combination of all these different methods performed with the same nanoparticles provides detailed molecular level information about the studied species and their (photo)physics and chemistry. In particular, an investigation of mixed water-nitric acid particles by means of EI and NaPI revealed the prominent role of the HNO3 molecule as the condensation nuclei. The uptake of atmospheric molecules by ice nanoparticles has been studied, and the pickup cross sections for some molecules exceed significantly the geometrical sizes of the ice nanoparticles. It has been argued that the large particles composed of several hundred water molecules which grow in the supersonic expansions tend to have highly irregular shapes -nanosnowflakes. Photodissociation of hydrogen halides on ice nanoparticles has been investigated, and shown to proceed via excitation of acidically dissociated ion pair and subsequent biradical generation and H3O dissociation. The photodissociation of CF2Cl2 molecules in clusters leads to efficient Cl-fragment caging caused by formation of halogen bond. Grant agency of the Czech Republic, Grant No.: 14

  8. Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Desorption of Molecular Contaminants Deposited on Quartz Crystal Microbalances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albyn, Keith; Burns, Dewitt

    2006-01-01

    Recent quartz crystal microbalance measurements made in the Marshall Space Flight Center, Photo-Deposition Facility, for several materials, recorded a significant loss of deposited contaminants when the deposition surface of the microbalance was illuminated by a deuterium lamp. These measurements differ from observations made by other investigators in which the rate of deposition increased significantly when the deposition surface was illuminated with vacuum ultraviolet radiation. These observations suggest that the accelerated deposition of molecular contaminants on optically sensitive surfaces is dependant upon the contaminant being deposited and must be addressed during the materials selection process by common material screening techniques.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of the electrical and optical properties of n-type thin film transparent conducting oxides deposited by neutralized ion beam sputtering and pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderford, John D.

    Transparent conducting oxides have become a fundamental electronic material for numerous current technologies and are optimally deposited as a uniform thin film with low electrical resistivity and high optical transmission. The purpose of this study is to characterize the electrical and optical characteristics of three TCO: Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) (95%, 5%), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), and Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) (98%, 2%). The deposition techniques of neutralized ion beam sputtering and pulsed laser deposition will be investigated. ITO will be deposited from commercially available sintered targets whereas ZnO and AZO will be deposited from powder pressed targets. The results have shown that AZO deposit AZO from a powder pressed target with comparable electrical and optical properties to that of ITO deposited from a sintered target.

  10. Thermal conductivity and nanocrystalline structure of platinum deposited by focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaie, Seyedhamidreza; Goettler, Drew F.; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Abbas, Khawar; Ghasemi Baboly, Mohammadhosein; Anjum, D. H.; Chaieb, S.; Leseman, Zayd C.

    2015-02-01

    Pt deposited by focused ion beam (FIB) is a common material used for attachment of nanosamples, repair of integrated circuits, and synthesis of nanostructures. Despite its common use little information is available on its thermal properties. In this work, Pt deposited by FIB is characterized thermally, structurally, and chemically. Its thermal conductivity is found to be substantially lower than the bulk value of Pt, 7.2 W m-1 K-1 versus 71.6 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature. The low thermal conductivity is attributed to the nanostructure of the material and its chemical composition. Pt deposited by FIB is shown, via aberration corrected TEM, to be a segregated mix of nanocrystalline Pt and amorphous C with Ga and O impurities. Ga impurities mainly reside in the Pt while O is homogeneously distributed throughout. The Ga impurity, small grain size of the Pt, and the amorphous carbon between grains are the cause for the low thermal conductivity of this material. Since Pt deposited by FIB is a common material for affixing samples, this information can be used to assess systematic errors in thermal characterization of different nanosamples. This application is also demonstrated by thermal characterization of two carbon nanofibers and a correction using the reported thermal properties of the Pt deposited by FIB.

  11. Electrical characterization of defects introduced in n-Ge during electron beam deposition or exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Nel, J. M.

    2013-11-07

    Schottky barrier diodes prepared by electron beam deposition (EBD) on Sb-doped n-type Ge were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Pt EBD diodes manufactured with forming gas in the chamber had two defects, E{sub 0.28} and E{sub 0.31}, which were not previously observed after EBD. By shielding the samples mechanically during EBD, superior diodes were produced with no measureable deep levels, establishing that energetic ions created in the electron beam path were responsible for the majority of defects observed in the unshielded sample. Ge samples that were first exposed to the conditions of EBD, without metal deposition (called electron beam exposure herein), introduced a number of new defects not seen after EBD with only the E-center being common to both processes. Substantial differences were noted when these DLTS spectra were compared to those obtained using diodes irradiated by MeV electrons or alpha particles indicating that very different defect creation mechanisms are at play when too little energy is available to form Frenkel pairs. These observations suggest that when EBD ions and energetic particles collide with the sample surface, inducing intrinsic non-localised lattice excitations, they modify defects deeper in the semiconductor thus rendering them observable.

  12. Oxygen Interstitial Defects in Sc2O3 Thin Films Deposited with Reactive Ion Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiltz, Drew; Langston, Peter; Krous, Erik; Patel, Dinesh; Markosyan, Ashot; Route, Rodger; Menoni, Carmen; Colorado State University Team; Stanford University Team

    2014-03-01

    Numerous defects may develop when depositing amorphous thin films with reactive ion beam sputtering, including interstitials and vacancies. In many cases, these defects limit the functionality of the film, degrading both the mechanical and optical properties. This study aims to investigate the nature of oxygen interstitial point defects in scandium oxide thin films and characterize the effect on composition, optical absorption and mechanical stress. The films are deposited with argon ion beam sputtering of a scandium metal target. The density of defects is correlated with the oxygen partial pressure, revealing an optimal condition where defects are minimized. Furthermore, the defect density also demonstrates a direct correlation with the main ion beam accelerating voltage. The native oxygen defects behave as shallow levels, with binding energies in the 1-2 eV range. Work supported by the DoD Office of Naval Research and the High Energy Laser Program of the DoD Joint Technology Office. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA.

  13. Characterization and performance of carbon films deposited by plasma and ion beam based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K C; Kung, H; Levine, T

    1994-12-31

    Plasma and ion beam based techniques have been used to deposit carbon-based films. The ion beam based method, a cathodic arc process, used a magnetically mass analyzed beam and is inherently a line-of-sight process. Two hydrocarbon plasma-based, non-line-of-sight techniques were also used and have the advantage of being capable of coating complicated geometries. The self-bias technique can produce hard carbon films, but is dependent on rf power and the surface area of the target. The pulsed-bias technique can also produce hard carbon films but has the additional advantage of being independent of rf power and target surface area. Tribological results indicated the coefficient of friction is nearly the same for carbon films from each deposition process, but the wear rate of the cathodic arc film was five times less than for the self-bias or pulsed-bias films. Although the cathodic arc film was the hardest, contained the highest fraction of sp{sup 3} bonds and exhibited the lowest wear rate, the cathodic arc film also produced the highest wear on the 440C stainless steel counterface during tribological testing. Thus, for tribological applications requiring low wear rates for both counterfaces, coating one surface with a very hard, wear resistant film may detrimentally affect the tribological behavior of the counterface.

  14. Modulated molecular beam scattering of disilane on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. K.; Gates, S. M.; Scott, B. A.; Sawin, H. H.

    1990-12-01

    Decomposition and scattering of disilane on Si(111) has been studied by modulated molecular beam spectrometry over the temperature range of 50-850°C and with beam fluxes from 10 15-10 16 cm -2 s -1. Disilane exhibits a surface residence time as an intact molecule of ˜ 50 micros at room temperature, which we attribute to a molecular precursor (physisorbed) state. The residence time decreases with increasing temperature and cannot be experimentally observed (< 20 micros) above 250 ° C. The reactive sticking coefficient increases with surface temperature ( Ts) from 0% at room temperature on a surface passivated with SiH x species (no reactivity) to 30% at 850 °C. Rapid evolution of monosilane occurs for Ts > 500 °C. Unusually slow desorption of H 2 is observed (time constant ˜ 1 s) at temperatures as high as 850 ° C. The rate of hydrogen evolution increases with the incident disilane flux and the substrate temperature. A model is used to fit the experimental data. The model is based on a surface reaction mechanism developed in the next paper (S.K. Kulkarni et al., Surf. Sci. 239 (1990) 26, ref. [1]). According to this model, adsorbed disilane decomposes producing SiH 4 and chemisorbed SiH. The SiH migrates to active sites on the surface where hydrogen is produced by a second-order mechanism which has an activation energy of about 20 kcal/mol. Si film growth rates are predicted from the proposed model and these agree reasonably well with experimental growth rate data in the literature. The main channel of Si growth from Si 2H 6 at high T s (500-900 °C) is predicted to be by decomposition of disilane emitting SiH 4 and chemisorbing SiH 2, which rapidly decomposes to SiH . The chemisorbed SiH can react with incident disilane emitting SiH 4. This process is more active at H removal from the surface than is the recombination of 2 SiH to desorb H 2. Both SiH species and bare Si sites are proposed to be active sites for Si 2H 6 decomposition.

  15. Electron-beam-assisted oxygen purification at low temperatures for electron-beam-induced pt deposits: towards pure and high-fidelity nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Lewis, Brett B; Rack, Philip D

    2014-01-22

    Nanoscale metal deposits written directly by electron-beam-induced deposition, or EBID, are typically contaminated because of the incomplete removal of the original organometallic precursor. This has greatly limited the applicability of EBID materials synthesis, constraining the otherwise powerful direct-write synthesis paradigm. We demonstrate a low-temperature purification method in which platinum-carbon nanostructures deposited from MeCpPtIVMe3 are purified by the presence of oxygen gas during a post-electron exposure treatment. Deposit thickness, oxygen pressure, and oxygen temperature studies suggest that the dominant mechanism is the electron-stimulated reaction of oxygen molecules adsorbed at the defective deposit surface. Notably, pure platinum deposits with low resistivity and retain the original deposit fidelity were accomplished at an oxygen temperature of only 50 °C.

  16. Controlled growth of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on copper foils using ion beam sputtering deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haolin; Zhang, Xingwang; Meng, Junhua; Yin, Zhigang; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Yajuan; Zhang, Liuqi

    2015-04-01

    Ion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) is used to synthesize high quality few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on copper foils. Compared to the conventional chemical vapor deposition, the IBSD technique avoids the use of unconventional precursors and is much easier to control, which should be very useful for the large-scale production of h-BN in the future.

  17. Intense laser-driven proton beam energy deposition in compressed and uncompressed Cu foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, Christopher; Krauland, C. M.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Habara, H.; Noma, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tsujii, A.; Yahata, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Uematsu, Y.; Nakaguchi, S.; Morace, A.; Yogo, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Tanaka, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated transport of intense proton beams from a petawatt laser in uncompressed or compressed Cu foam. The LFEX laser (1 kJ on target, 1.5 ps, 1053 nm, I >2×1019 W/cm2) irradiated a curved C foil to generate the protons. The foil was in an open cone 500 μm from the tip where the focused proton beam source was delivered to either of two Cu foam sample types: an uncompressed cylinder (1 mm L, 250 µm ϕ) , and a plastic-coated sphere (250 µm ϕ) that was first driven by GXII (9 beams, 330 J/beam, 1.3 ns, 527 nm) to achieve similar ρϕ to the cylinder sample's ρL as predicted by 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Using magnetic spectrometers and a Thomson parabola, the proton spectra were measured with and without the Cu samples. When included, they were observed using Cu K-shell x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. This paper will present comparison of the experimentally measured Cu emission shape and proton spectrum changes due to deposition in the Cu with particle-in-cell simulations incorporating new stopping models. This work was made possible by laser time Awarded by the Japanese NIFS collaboration NIFS16KUGK107 and performed under the auspices of the US AFOSR YIP Award FA9550-14-1-0346.

  18. Review of magnetic nanostructures grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Teresa, J. M.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Córdoba, R.; Serrano-Ramón, L.; Sangiao, S.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    We review the current status of the use of focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) for the growth of magnetic nanostructures. This technique relies on the local dissociation of a precursor gas by means of an electron beam. The most promising results have been obtained using the Co2(CO)8 precursor, where the Co content in the grown nanodeposited material can be tailored up to more than 95 at.%. Functional behaviour of these Co nanodeposits has been observed in applications such as arrays of magnetic dots for information storage and catalytic growth, magnetic tips for scanning probe microscopes, nano-Hall sensors for bead detection, nano-actuated magnetomechanical systems and nanowires for domain-wall manipulation. The review also covers interesting results observed in Fe-based and alloyed nanodeposits. Advantages and disadvantages of FEBID for the growth of magnetic nanostructures are discussed in the article as well as possible future directions in this field.

  19. Uniform and large area deposition of diamond-like carbon using RF source ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.L.C.; Lanter, W.; Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.L.; Bletzinger, P.; Garscadden, A.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have designed and constructed a large area ion beam apparatus to deposit DLC films onto 1,000 cm{sup 2} surfaces with various geometries. The use of an efficient RF excited ion gun (13.56 MHz, 1 kW power, 50--3,000 eV ion energy) with a diameter of 20 cm, enables one to generate various hydrocarbon ions with high ion beam currents, varying ionic species and less maintenance. The use of a four axis (X-Y-{theta}Y-{theta}Z) substrate scanner with computer control can produce uniform DLC films on large areas and curved surfaces. The effects of RF power, ion energy, gaseous composition, and total pressure on the properties of DLC have been systematically investigated.

  20. Growth of Atomically Flat DBCO Films Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, Aaron E.; Oh, Seongshik; Davidson, Bruce A.; O'Donnell, Jim; Eckstein, James N.

    2000-03-01

    We have grown atomically flat a-axis dysprosium barium copper oxide (DBCO) films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a pure ozone source. Such films can be used, for example, to exploit the inherent anisotropy of DBCO in spin injection devices using ferromagnetic polarized electron sources or all-superconducting Josephson junctions. The a-axis films are grown on a strontium titanate (STO) substrate using a low temperature DBCO template to achieve a-axis orientation. During growth, we use reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to observe the emergence of one-third order streaks in the diffraction pattern and a reduction in the surface roughness as we increase the growth temperature. Subsequent x-ray diffraction shows complete a-axis normal orientation with pseudomorphic growth (in-plane lattice constants identical to the substrate) and a slightly larger out of plane lattice constant than bulk crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows an RMS roughness of 4 Å over several millimeters of the film surface, sufficient to construct tunnel junction devices.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of tin oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Gabriel A.

    In an effort to develop a method to utilize SnO in transparent electronic and optoelectronic applications, the molecular beam epitaxy method was used to grow a thin film SnO sample. Five samples were grown and studied using various conventional techniques. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the composition of the samples. The quality and thickness of the samples was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy. This data was used to determine which samples were successful growths of SnO and how the growth conditions of each may have affected the outcomes. From the compiled data, single phase SnO was identified and selected for further study of it electrical properties. Previous studies have not been able to accurately identify the band gap energy of SnO due to its instability as an oxide. A bandgap energy of 2.56 eV was determined by photoluminescence analysis. This is consistent with reported estimates of between 2.5 to 3 eV for SnO.

  2. 'Soft' Au, Pt and Cu contacts for molecular junctions through surface-diffusion-mediated deposition.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Andrew P; McCreery, Richard L

    2010-08-01

    Virtually all types of molecular electronic devices depend on electronically addressing a molecule or molecular layer through the formation of a metallic contact. The introduction of molecular devices into integrated circuits will probably depend on the formation of contacts using a vapour deposition technique, but this approach frequently results in the metal atoms penetrating or damaging the molecular layer. Here, we report a method of forming 'soft' metallic contacts on molecular layers through surface-diffusion-mediated deposition, in which the metal atoms are deposited remotely and then diffuse onto the molecular layer, thus eliminating the problems of penetration and damage. Molecular junctions fabricated by this method exhibit excellent yield (typically >90%) and reproducibility, and allow examination of the effects of molecular-layer structure, thickness and contact work function.

  3. Fabrication of nickel nanocontacts using nanostencils and electron beam assisted SiO2 deposition.

    PubMed

    Langford, R M; Wang, T X

    2006-08-01

    Nickel nanocontacts for studying ballistic magnetoresistance have been fabricated by sputtering through FIB prepared nanostencil masks and by using electron beam assisted deposition of SiO2 to reduce the size of FIB milled pores through silicon nitride membranes. These two methods are discussed in terms of the nanocontact sizes, fabrication, and yield. The smallest size of the nanocontacts prepared using the nanostencil method was 40 nm and by the filling method was 1-2 nm. The maximum magnetoresistance measured was 1% and no evidence of a large ballistic magnetoresistance was observed.

  4. Epitaxial niobium dioxide thin films by reactive-biased target ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuhan; Comes, Ryan B.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lu, Jiwei

    2015-03-01

    Epitaxial NbO2 thin films were synthesized on Al2O3 (0001) substrates via reactive bias target ion beam deposition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra were used to confirm the tetragonal phase of pure NbO2. Through XPS, it was found that there was a ~ 1.3 nm thick Nb2O5 layer on the surface and the bulk of the thin film was NbO2. The epitaxial relationship between NbO2 film and substrate was determined. Electrical transport measurement as a function of temperature showed that the conduction mechanism could be described by variable range hopping mechanism.

  5. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, Alessandro E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it

    2015-12-21

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO{sub 2}) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  6. Investigations of LBMO thin films deposited on different substrates by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshendra Reddy, Ch.; Ashoka Reddy, Ch.; Sivasankar Reddy, A.; Sreedhara Reddy, P.

    2016-04-01

    La0.7Ba0.3MnO3 (LBMO) thin films were prepared on different substrates such as Si, MgO, and c-ZrO2 substrates at substrate temperature 1023 K using electron beam evaporation technique for first time. Through optimizing the preparation condition, the better film uniformity of thickness, composition, and temperature was achieved. To find the influence of substrates, we studied the structural, compositional, morphological, and electrical properties of LBMO thin films. All the LBMO films exhibited a single phase and good crystallinity with no impurity phases. Films deposited on MgO have high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) value with low transition temperature (245 K). Better TCR (4.09 %/K) value at room temperature is observed in LBMO films deposited on Si substrate.

  7. Fundamental tribological properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride (BN) films are reviewed. The BN films are examined in contact with BN metals and other harder materials. For simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. First, the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces are discussed. The effects of surface films, hardness of metals, and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are considered. The second part deals with the abrasion of the BN films. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of the BN films in solid-state contact are discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of BN films deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  8. Fundamental tribological properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and micromechanical properties of ion-beam-deposited boron nitride (BN) films are reviewed. The BN films are examined in contact with BN metals and other harder materials. For simplicity of discussion, the tribological properties of concern in the processes are separated into two parts. First, the pull-off force (adhesion) and the shear force required to break the interfacial junctions between contacting surfaces are discussed. The effects of surface films, hardness of metals, and temperature on tribological response with respect to adhesion and friction are considered. The second part deals with the abrasion of the BN films. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of the BN films in solid-state contact are discussed. The scratch technique of determining the critical load needed to fracture interfacial adhesive bonds of BN films deposited on substrates is also addressed.

  9. Fluoride antireflection coatings for deep ultraviolet optics deposited by ion-beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiya; Nishimoto, Keiji; Sekine, Keiichi; Etoh, Kazuyuki

    2006-03-01

    Optically high quality coatings of fluoride materials are required in deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography. We have applied ion-beam sputtering (IBS) to obtain fluoride films with smooth surfaces. The extinction coefficients were of the order of 10(-4) at the wavelength of 193 nm due to the reduction of their absorption loss. The transmittance of the MgF2/GdF3 antireflection coating was as high as 99.7% at the wavelength of 193 nm. The surfaces of the IBS deposited films were so smooth that the surface roughness of the A1F3/GdF3 film was comparable with that of the CaF2 substrate. The MgF2/GdF3 coating fulfilled the temperature and humidity requirements of military specification. Thus, the IBS deposited fluoride films are promising candidate for use in the DUV lithography optics.

  10. Study And Comparison Of Silver Mirrors Deposited On Different Substrates By Electron-Beam Gun Method

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Jahanbakhsh Mashaiekhy; Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid; Anaraki, Mahdi

    2010-12-23

    Choosing the right substrate is one of the important factors for improving quality parameters of thin films such as adhesion between layers and substrates. The selected substrate should have proper physical and chemical compatibility with deposited thin film. In this paper, we have been investigated four different types of high reflective laser mirrors that were produced in similar conditions on four different kinds of substrates including copper, stainless steel, brass, and nickel. We used electron-beam gun method for deposition of silver layers. At the end we compared theoretical results with practical results that were yielded by laser damage threshold test. It was shown that brass is the best choice for silver metal mirrors as a substrate.

  11. Granular Co-C nano-Hall sensors by focused-beam-induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Gabureac, Mihai; Bernau, Laurent; Utke, Ivo; Boero, Giovanni

    2010-03-19

    We investigated the performance of Hall sensors with different Co-C ratios, deposited directly in nanostructured form, using Co(2)(CO)(8) gas molecules, by focused-electron or ion-beam-induced deposition. Due to the enhanced intergrain scattering in these granular wires, the extraordinary Hall effect can be increased by two orders of magnitude with respect to pure Co, up to a magnetic field sensitivity of 1 Omega T(-1). We show that the best magnetic field resolution at room temperature is obtained for Co ratios between 60% and 70% and is better than 1 microT Hz(-1/2). For an active area of the sensor of 200 x 200 nm(2), the room temperature magnetic flux resolution is phi(min) = 2 x 10(-5)phi(0) in the thermal noise frequency range, i.e. above 100 kHz.

  12. Nanomanufacturing of titania interfaces with controlled structural and functional properties by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, Alessandro; Borghi, Francesca; Indrieri, Marco; Bovio, Simone; Piazzoni, Claudio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Great emphasis is placed on the development of integrated approaches for the synthesis and the characterization of ad hoc nanostructured platforms, to be used as templates with controlled morphology and chemical properties for the investigation of specific phenomena of great relevance in interdisciplinary fields such as biotechnology, medicine, and advanced materials. Here, we discuss the crucial role and the advantages of thin film deposition strategies based on cluster-assembling from supersonic cluster beams. We select cluster-assembled nanostructured titania (ns-TiO2) as a case study to demonstrate that accurate control over morphological parameters can be routinely achieved, and consequently, over several relevant interfacial properties and phenomena, like surface charging in a liquid electrolyte, and proteins and nanoparticles adsorption. In particular, we show that the very good control of nanoscale morphology is obtained by taking advantage of simple scaling laws governing the ballistic deposition regime of low-energy, mass-dispersed clusters with reduced surface mobility.

  13. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Nitin M.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  14. Resistance repeatability study of ion-beam deposited vanadium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, P.; Pearson, D. I. C.; Pochon, S.; Thomas, O.; Cooke, M.; Gunn, R.

    2016-09-01

    Ion Beam Sputter Deposition (IBSD) is a versatile technique particularly suited to applications requiring high quality, high performance layer materials as it allows independent and accurate control of the process parameters. Vanadium oxides, used for example in the fabrication of microbolometers, optical switches or optical storage, exhibit interesting properties such as a high Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR), relatively low 1/f noise and a semiconductormetal phase transition close to room temperature. However, it is very challenging to control the stoichiometry of the deposited film as there are at least 25 different oxidation states of vanadium, few of which display the required electrical characteristics. In the present study, vanadium oxide thin layers were deposited by IBSD using an Oxford Ionfab300+ and analyzed with regard to their electrical properties. The impact of the system parameters on the resistance repeatability, wafer-to-wafer and batch-to-batch, was thoroughly investigated to provide the end user with a clear understanding of the factors affecting film resistivity while ensuring at the same time a steep variation of resistance with temperature, as notably required for uncooled bolometers. These parameters were balanced to also achieve a good deposition rate, throughput and uniformity over large device areas, compatible with the requirements of industrial applications.

  15. Beam steering laser assisted deposition system for high- T sub c superconducting thin film devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, T.T.; Chen, K.W. )

    1991-03-01

    We present the design and construction of a beam steering laser-assisted deposition system (LAD) for high quality epitaxial YBaCuO superconducting thin film production suitable for commercial application. Deposition of single layer or multilayer YBaCuO superconducting thin film on large and complex surfaced substrate is now feasible. Expitaxial and polycrystaline films with onsets at 90 K having 6 K transition widths have been produced. Dome-shaped magnetic shield enclosures, microwave cavity resonant in the TM{sub 010} mode, and short dipole antennas have been fabricated. The advantages of the laser ablation deposition method (J. T. Cheung and D. T. Chueng, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. {bold 21}, 182 (1982)) are its simplicity and cleanliness. Laser ablation deposition is a viable method to produce high quality thin film of the Tl-based compound (S. H. Liou and K. D. Aylesworth, Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 54}, 760 (1989)) by using a small target in a sealed environment which is important in handling toxic material of a Tl-based compounds.

  16. Growth of uniform CaGe2 films by alternating layer molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinsong; Katoch, Jyoti; Ahmed, Adam S.; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Young, Justin R.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelz, Jonathan; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-02-01

    Layered Zintl phase van der Waals (vdW) materials are of interest due to their strong spin-orbit coupling and potential for high mobility. Here, we report the successful growth of large area CaGe2 films, as a model of layered Zintl phase materials, on atomically flat Ge(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an alternating layer growth (ALG) protocol. Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the Ge buffer layer and CaGe2 indicate high quality two dimensional surfaces, which is further confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing atomically flat and uniform CaGe2 films. The appearance of Laue oscillations in X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Kiessig fringes in the X-ray reflectivity (XRR), which are absent in co-deposited CaGe2, confirms the uniformity of the CaGe2 film and the smoothness of the interface. These results demonstrate a novel method of deposition of CaGe2 that could be also applied to other layered Zintl phase vdW materials. Also, the high quality of the CaGe2 film is promising for the exploration of novel properties of germanane.

  17. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  18. Raman spectroscopic study of surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxially grown germanium/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Gregory Nelson

    The epitaxial growth of Ge on Si substrates was carried out using surfactant-mediated epitaxy and standard growth procedures to study the effects of Si surface passivation prior to Ge nucleation. The growth experiments were conducted in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber equipped with reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to monitor the nucleation process. Arsenic was chosen as the surfactant material and Ge nucleation was conducted on both Si(001) and Si(211) orientated substrates. Post-growth experiments were conducted primarily utilizing Raman Spectroscopy, however scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction were also employed to gather information about the grown material. From these experiments, it was determined that passivating the Si surface prior to Ge deposition with a monolayer of As yields higher quality 2-dimensional material. Additionally, As acts as a suppressant to Ge - Si intermixing resulting in a highly ordered epilayer/substrate interface. If Ge is deposited directly on a clean Si substrate without As passivation, the resultant growth follows the theoretically predicted Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. A growth model is suggested that successfully describes the differences between surfactant-mediated and non-surfactant-mediated nucleation through a site-exchange mechanism between Ge and As atoms. Additionally, surfactant-mediated nucleation results as a function of substrate orientation are highlighted and a model for surface reconstruction of the As passivated Si(211) surface is proposed.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy for advanced gate stack materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-03-01

    The material requirements for future CMOS generations - as given by the ITRS roadmap - are very challenging. This includes a high K dielectric without a low K interfacial layer, a high mobility channel and the appropriate metal gate. With the help of two projects INVEST and ET4US, we are building up a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) infrastructure to grow this material set on large area wafers that can be further processed into small scale devices. In the INVEST project, we have developed an MBE system for the growth of complex oxides on semiconductors. The system follows the overall design of a production tool and is equipped with an RF atomic oxygen source, effusion cells, e-beam evaporators and a differential pumping stage. The oxide growth process starts with desorbing the initial surface oxide on the Si wafers in ultra-high vacuum and high temperature to create a clean reconstructed 2x1 surface. Using the atomic oxygen it is possible to oxidize the surface in a well controlled manner at low temperature and to grow very thin and dense SiOx layers, followed by the growth of 2-6 nm amorphous high K dielectrics. The process parameters permit to tune the interface layer from a SiOx rich to a silicide rich interface with a significant impact on the capacitance and the leakage. Initial focus is on developing an optimized growth recipe for high quality amorphous HfO2 and LaHfO3.5 films. This recipe was subsequently used to make wafers for a transistor batch that gave us the first N short channel MBE MOSFET's (100 nm) using an etched gate process flow. Some highlights of the first batch for 3nm HfO2 MOSFET are a high mobility (> 270 cm^2/Vs) with a corresponding low leakage current of 2 mA/cm^2). While there were some process issues for LaHfO3.5, the 3 nm MOSFET showed very low leakage currents below 10-6 A/cm^2. Interestingly all the LaHFO3.5 MOSFETs showed very low threshold voltage instabilities. In collaboration with C. Marchiori, M. Sousa, A.Guiller, H. Siegwart, D

  20. Growth and characterization of GaAs layers on Si substrates by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Liu, John K.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Sakai, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxial (MEMBE) growth and characterization of the GaAs layer on Si substrates (GaAs/Si) are reported. The MEMBE growth method is described, and material properties are compared with those of normal two-step MBE-grown or in situ annealed layers. Micrographs of cross-section view transmission electron microscopy and scanning surface electron microscopy of MEMBE-grown GaAs/Si showed dislocation densities of 10 to the 7th/sq cm. AlGaAs/GaAs double heterostructures have been successfully grown on MEMBE GaAs/Si by both metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and liquid phase epitaxy.

  1. Synthesis of nanowires via helium and neon focused ion beam induced deposition with the gas field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Stern, L A; Chen, J H; Huth, M; Schwalb, C H; Winhold, M; Porrati, F; Gonzalez, C M; Timilsina, R; Rack, P D

    2013-05-03

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of platinum nanowires using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated using helium and neon ion beams in the gas field ion microscope. The He(+) beam induced deposition resembles material deposited by electron beam induced deposition with very small platinum nanocrystallites suspended in a carbonaceous matrix. The He(+) deposited material composition was estimated to be 16% Pt in a matrix of amorphous carbon with a large room-temperature resistivity (∼3.5 × 10(4)-2.2 × 10(5) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent transport behavior consistent with a granular material in the weak intergrain tunnel coupling regime. The Ne(+) deposited material has comparable composition (17%), however a much lower room-temperature resistivity (∼600-3.0 × 10(3) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent electrical behavior representative of strong intergrain coupling. The Ne(+) deposited nanostructure has larger platinum nanoparticles and is rationalized via Monte Carlo ion-solid simulations which show that the neon energy density deposited during growth is much larger due to the smaller ion range and is dominated by nuclear stopping relative to helium which has a larger range and is dominated by electronic stopping.

  2. Time-of-flight velocity analysis of atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagena, O. F.; Varma, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Conditions required for resolving a given beam speed distribution were evaluated by calculating the time-of-flight (TOF) signal for a finite open time of the beam shutter. Design criteria for a beam chopper and detection system are discussed in terms of the resolution, the range of speeds to be measured, and the optimum signal to noise ratio. A TOF system for detection of high intensity molecular beams with large speed ratios, as well as for low intensity scattered beams, is described. Experimental results are presented.

  3. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    A. T. Bollinger; Wu, J.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  4. Effect of molecular weight on the electrophoretic deposition of carbon black nanoparticles in moderately viscous systems.

    PubMed

    Modi, Satyam; Panwar, Artee; Mead, Joey L; Barry, Carol M F

    2013-08-06

    Electrophoretic deposition from viscous media has the potential to produce in-mold assembly of nanoparticles onto three-dimensional parts in high-rate, polymer melt-based processes like injection molding. The effects of the media's molecular weight on deposition behavior were investigated using a model system of carbon black and polystyrene in tetrahydrofuran. Increases in molecular weight reduced the electrophoretic deposition of the carbon black particles due to increases in suspension viscosity and preferential adsorption of the longer polystyrene chains on the carbon black particles. At low deposition times (≤5 s), only carbon black deposited onto the electrodes, but the deposition decreased with increasing molecular weight and the resultant increases in suspension viscosity. For longer deposition times, polystyrene codeposited with the carbon black, with the amount of polystyrene increasing with molecular weight and decreasing with greater charge on the polystyrene molecules. This deposition behavior suggests that use of lower molecular polymers and control of electrical properties will permit electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles from polymer melts for high-rate, one-step fabrication of nano-optical devices, biochemical sensors, and nanoelectronics.

  5. Direct-write deposition and focused-electron-beam-induced purification of gold nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Belić, Domagoj; Shawrav, Mostafa M; Gavagnin, Marco; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2015-02-04

    Three-dimensional gold (Au) nanostructures offer promise in nanoplasmonics, biomedical applications, electrochemical sensing and as contacts for carbon-based electronics. Direct-write techniques such as focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) can provide such precisely patterned nanostructures. Unfortunately, FEBID Au traditionally suffers from a high nonmetallic content and cannot meet the purity requirements for these applications. Here we report exceptionally pure pristine FEBID Au nanostructures comprising submicrometer-large monocrystalline Au sections. On the basis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results and Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories in the deposited nanostructures, we propose a curing mechanism that elucidates the observed phenomena. The in situ focused-electron-beam-induced curing mechanism was supported by postdeposition ex situ curing and, in combination with oxygen plasma cleaning, is utilized as a straightforward purification method for planar FEBID structures. This work paves the way for the application of FEBID Au nanostructures in a new generation of biosensors and plasmonic nanodevices.

  6. Ion beam deposition of DLC and nitrogen doped DLC thin films for enhanced haemocompatibility on PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tang, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2012-08-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and N-doped DLC (DLC:N) thin films have been synthesized on polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) and silicon wafers using ion beam deposition. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the structural and morphological properties of the coated surface. The results show that the ion beam deposited DLC thin films exhibit high hardness and Young's modulus, low coefficient of friction and high adhesion to the substrate. Low concentration of nitrogen doping in DLC improves the mechanical properties and reduces the surface roughness. DLC coating decreases the surface energy and improves the wettability of PTFE. The platelet adhesion results show that the haemocompatibility of DLC coated PTFE, especially DLC:N coated PTFE, has been significantly enhanced as compared with uncoated PTFE. SEM observations show that the platelet reaction on the DLC and DLC:N coated PTFE was minimized as the platelets were much less aggregated and activated.

  7. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties. Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.

  8. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties.more » Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.« less

  9. Biaxial Texture Evolution in MgO Films Fabricated Using Ion Beam-Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhao, Rui-Peng; Zhang, Fei; Lu, Yu-Ming; Cai, Chuan-Bing; Xiong, Jie; Tao, Bo-Wan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of multifunctional thin films on flexible substrates is important technologically, because flexible electronics require such a platform. In this study, we examined the evolution of biaxial texture in MgO films prepared using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on a Hastelloy substrate. Texture and microstructure developments were characterized through in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction monitoring, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, which demonstrated that biaxial texture was developed during the nucleation stage (~2.2 nm). The best biaxial texture was obtained with a thickness of approximately 12 nm. As MgO continued to grow, the influence of surface energy was reduced, and film growth was driven by the attempt to minimize volume free-energy density. Thus the MgO grains were subsequently rotated at the (002) direction toward the ion beam. In addition, an approach was developed for accelerating in-plane texture evolution by pre-depositing an amorphous MgO layer before IBAD.

  10. Laser metal deposition with spatial variable orientation based on hollow-laser beam with internal powder feeding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tuo; Lu, Bingheng; Shi, Shihong; Meng, Weidong; Fu, Geyan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a hollow-laser beam with internal powder feeding (HLB-IPF) head is applied to achieve non-horizontal cladding and deposition of overhanging structure. With the features of this head such as uniform scan energy distribution, thin and straight spraying of the powder beam, the deposition in spatial variable orientation is conducted using a 6-axis robot. During the deposition process the head keeps tangential to the growth direction of the part. In the experiment, a "vase" shaped metal part with overhanging structure is successfully deposited, and the largest overhanging angle achieves 80° to the vertical direction. The "step effect" between cladding layers is completely eliminated with the best surface roughness of Ra=3.864 μm. Cross section of cladding layers with unequal height are deposited for angle change. Test results indicate that the formed part has uniform wall thickness, fine microstructure and high microhardness.

  11. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  12. A new crossed molecular beam apparatus using time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Guorong; Zhang Weiqing; Pan Huilin; Shuai Quan; Jiang Bo; Dai Dongxu; Yang Xueming

    2008-09-15

    A new crossed molecular beam apparatus has been constructed for investigating polyatomic chemical reactions using the time-sliced ion velocity map imaging technique. A unique design is adopted for one of the two beam sources and allows us to set up the molecular beam source either horizontally or vertically. This can be conveniently used to produce versatile atomic or radical beams from photodissociation and as well as electric discharge. Intensive H-atom beam source with high speed ratio was produced by photodissociation of the HI molecule and was reacted with the CD{sub 4} molecule. Vibrational-state resolved HD product distribution was measured by detecting the CD{sub 3} product. Preliminary results were also reported on the F+SiH{sub 4} reaction using the discharged F atom beam. These results demonstrate that this new instrument is a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics of polyatomic reactions.

  13. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  14. Influence of metal co-deposition on silicon nanodot patterning dynamics during ion-beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, R.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Palomares, F. J.; Vázquez, L.

    2014-10-01

    We address the impact of metal co-deposition in the nanodot patterning dynamics of Si(100) surfaces under normal-incidence 1 keV Ar+ ion-beam sputtering (IBS). In particular, the effect of both the metal nature (Fe or Mo) and flux has been studied. Morphological and compositional evolution were followed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, respectively. For the same type of impurity, the dynamics is faster for a higher co-deposition flux, which also drives to larger asymptotic roughness and wavelength. Mo co-deposition yields rougher surfaces for a lower metal coverage than Fe and, remarkably, higher ordered patterns. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals the formation of silicide bonds even before pattern onset, stressing the relevant role of the affinity of the co-deposited metals for silicon. Further, current-sensing AFM performed at the initial and asymptotic stages indicates that the nanodot structures are metal-rich, resulting in coupled compositional and morphological patterns. These results are discussed in terms of phase segregation, morphology-driven local flux variations of impurities and silicide formation. This analysis reveals that the underlying (concurrent) mechanisms of pattern formation are complex since many processes can come into play with a different relative weight depending on the specific patterning conditions. From a practical point of view, it is shown that, by proper selection of the process parameters, IBS with metal co-deposition can be used to tune the dynamics and pattern properties and, interestingly, to produce highly ordered arrays.

  15. Ion-beam-assisted deposition of metal nanocluster thin films with nonlinear optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cotell, C.M.; Carosella, C.A.; Flom, S.R.; Schiestel, S.; Haralampus, N.; Barnett, T.W.; Bartoli, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    Metal nanocluster thin films ({approximately} 200 nm thickness) consisting of noble metal (Au) clusters (5--30 nm) in an active metal oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) matrix were deposited by evaporation or ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). In some cases the films were given a post-deposition anneal. The microstructure of the films was examined by plan view and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The size of the metal nanoclusters was found to depend upon the temperature of the post-deposition anneal as well as the conditions of ion bombardment. Ion bombardment was found to stabilize smaller size particles. The linear optical properties of the films, as measured by VIS/UV spectroscopy, show particle size-dependent surface plasmon resonance effects. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the nanoclusters in oxidized niobium were probed experimentally using degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and nonlinear transmission (NLT). The DFWM measurements yielded signals that showed strong evidence of saturation and give large values of {vert_bar}{chi}{sup (3)}{sub xxxx}{vert_bar}. NLT measurements demonstrated that the nonlinear absorption coefficient and, hence, I{sub m}{chi}{sup (3)}{sub xxxx} was negative. Time resolved DFWM measurements exhibited dynamics that decayed on a several picosecond time scale. The magnitude and the picosecond dynamics of the NLO response were compared to those observed in gold nanoclusters formed by ion implantation in other media. The advantages of the IBAD method for fabricating third order NLO films include the ability to deposit films of arbitrary active region thickness and, more importantly, high cluster densities.

  16. Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material

    DOEpatents

    Petersen, Holly E.; Goward, William D.; Dijaili, Sol P.

    2001-01-01

    Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

  17. Unraveling Cold Molecular Collisions: Stark Decelerators in Crossed-Beam Experiments.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2016-11-18

    In the last two decades, enormous progress has been made in the manipulation of molecular beams. In particular, molecular decelerators have been developed with which advanced control over neutral molecules in a beam can be achieved. By using arrays of inhomogeneous and time-varying electric (or magnetic) fields, bunches of molecules can be produced with a tunable velocity, narrow velocity spreads, and almost perfect quantum-state purity. These monochromatic or "tamed" molecular beams are ideally suited to be used in crossed-molecular-beam scattering experiments. Here, we review the first generation of these "cold and controlled" scattering experiments that have been conducted in the last decade and discuss the prospects for this emerging field of research in the years to come.

  18. Structural transitions in electron beam deposited Co-carbonyl suspended nanowires at high electrical current densities.

    PubMed

    Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Suspended nanowires (SNWs) have been deposited from Co-carbonyl precursor (Co2(CO)8) by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The SNWs dimensions are about 30-50 nm in diameter and 600-850 nm in length. The as-deposited material has a nanogranular structure of mixed face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co phases, and a composition of 80 atom % Co, 15 atom % O and 5 atom % C, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, respectively. Current (I)-voltage (V) measurements with current densities up to 10(7) A/cm(2) determine different structural transitions in the SNWs, depending on the I-V history. A single measurement with a sudden current burst leads to a polycrystalline FCC Co structure extended over the whole wire. Repeated measurements at increasing currents produce wires with a split structure: one half is polycrystalline FCC Co and the other half is graphitized C. The breakdown current density is found at 2.1 × 10(7) A/cm(2). The role played by resistive heating and electromigration in these transitions is discussed.

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    heating. The α-Sn layers were also characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffraction, Hall, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements...ARL-TR-7838 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of...Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin by P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols

  20. Taming molecular beams; towards a gas-phase molecular laboratory on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meek, Samuel A.; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Conrad, Horst; Meijer, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    The manipulation of gas-phase molecules with electric and magnetic fields above a chip is an emerging field of research. Miniaturization of the electric and magnetic field structures allows for the creation of large field gradients and tight traps above the chip. Present-day microelectronics technology enables the integration of complicated tools and devices on a compact surface area. The molecules can be positioned extremely accurately and reproducibly above the chip where they can be held isolated from their environment and where there is excellent access to them. It is expected that several of the gas-phase molecular beam experiments that are currently being done in machines that are up to several meters in length can in the future be performed on a surface area of a few cm2 and that many new experiments will become possible.

  1. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  2. REFLEX: An energy deposition code that models the effects of electron reflection during electron beam heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.A. IV; Croessmann, C.D.; Whitley, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes an energy coupling model that considers electron reflection losses during electron beam heating experiments. This model is embodied on the REFLEX computer code, written in standard FORTRAN 77. REFLEX currently models energy deposition phenomena in three different sample geometries. These configurations include flat, cylindrical shell, and hemispherical shell surfaces. Given the electron beam operating parameters, REFLEX calculates the heat flux profile over a sample's surface, the total amount of energy deposited into a sample, and the percentage of the electron beam energy that is transferred to a sample. This document describes the energy deposition equations used in the REFLEX code; the program is described and detailed instructions are given regarding the input. Results are given for each geometry and possible experimental applications are presented. 3 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy growth methods of wavelength control for InAs/(In)GaAsN/GaAs heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Mamutin, V V; Egorov, A Yu; Kryzhanovskaya, N V

    2008-11-05

    We discuss the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth methods of emission wavelength control and property investigations for different types of InAs/(In)GaAsN/GaAs heterostructures containing InGaAsN quantum-size layers: (1) InGaAsN quantum wells deposited by the conventional mode in a GaAs matrix, (2) InAs quantum dots deposited in a GaAsN matrix or covered by an InGaAs(N) layer, and (3) InAs/InGaAsN/GaAsN strain-compensated superlattices with quantum wells and quantum dots. The structures under investigation have demonstrated photoluminescence emission in a wavelength range of ∼1.3-1.8 µm at room temperature without essential deterioration of the radiative properties.

  4. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  5. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O3 → ClO + O2 reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O3 → ClO + O2 reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O3 reaction. The Br + O3 reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O3 reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO2 → ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO2

  6. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  7. Characterization and growth mechanisms of boron nitride films synthesized by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burat, O.; Bouchier, D.; Stambouli, V.; Gautherin, G.

    1990-09-01

    We have studied boron nitride films deposited at room temperature by ion-beam-assisted deposition in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus, with ion accelerating voltages ranging between 0.25 and 2 kV. By using complementarily in situ Auger electron spectrometry and ex situ nuclear analyses to determine the respective surface and bulk N concentrations in the deposited films, we were able to identify the different phases of the mechanism leading to the nitridation of evaporated boron by nitrogen ions. For low nitrogen/boron flux ratios, the incorporation of nitrogen seems to be only governed by ion implantation, and, with respect to the depth of the deposit, the surface is found largely depleted in nitrogen, while the N-incorporation yield remains close to one whatever the ion energy. Such a behavior is well verified as long as a critical bulk nitrogen concentration close to 5.5×1022 cm-3 has not been achieved. For concentrations greater than this, superstoichiometric material is obtained up to a saturation which corresponds to a bulk N incorporation ranging from 6 to 7×1022 cm-3. Further increase of the N/B flux ratio induces a strong diffusion process from N-rich bulk to N-depleted surface, which results in the nitridation of surface boron atoms and a loss of nitrogen by sputtering or desorption. The density measurements seem to indicate that the synthesized phase is close to h-BN. However, the density of B-rich layers ([N]/[B]≊0.2-0.3) is found to be very close to that calculated for a mixture of pure boron and c-BN. The transparency and microhardness of the synthesized BN have satisfying values for its application as a wear-resistant optical coating, but it is not c-BN.

  8. Quantum Devices and Structures Using Si-Based Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-15

    Torr. The system has electron-beam evaporators for silicon and germanium , and a RHEED for in situ characterization of films. The accelera- tion voltage...The system has two electron beam evaporators for silicon and germanium deposition, and several effusion cells for doping. For this experiment, (100...negative resistance ( NDR ). As the temperature of the sample decreased, the peak- to-valley ratio of the peak at 2.5 V increases and the peak at 1.1 V

  9. Superconductivity and metallic behavior in PbxCyOδ structures prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winhold, M.; Weirich, P. M.; Schwalb, C. H.; Huth, M.

    2014-10-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition as a direct-write approach possesses great potential to meet the demands for superconducting nanostructure fabrication especially regarding its 3D patterning capabilities combined with the high resolution in the nanometer regime. So far, however, it was not possible to fabricate superconducting structures with this technique. In this work, we present a lead-based superconductor prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition by dissociation of the precursor tetraethyllead. The as-grown structures exhibit metallic behavior and a minimum resistivity in the normal state of ρ = 16 μΩcm at T = 9 K followed by a superconducting transition at Tc = 7.2 K.

  10. Processing and characterization of high temperature superconductor thin films deposited by electron beam co-evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jeong-Uk

    Ever since the high temperature superconductors (HTS) were discovered in the late 1980s, there have been enormous efforts to make this into applications such as power transmission cables, transformers, motors and generators. However, many obstacles in performance and high manufacturing cost made this difficult. The first generation HTS wires had low critical current density and were expensive to fabricate. The motivation of this research was to make high performance and low cost second generation HTS coated conductor. Electron beam co-evaporation technique was used to deposit YBCO(YBa2Cu3O7-x ) film at a high rate (10nm/s and higher) on single crystals and metal tapes. The oxygen pressure at the stage of depositing Y, Ba, Cu was 5x10 -5 Torr and the process temperature was 810-840°C. In-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to monitor the optical properties of the YBCO during and after deposition. The deposit transformed to a glassy amorphous mixture of Y, Ba and Cu at 3 mTorr of oxygen. YBCO crystallization occurred after extra oxygen was applied to several Torr. FTIR showed almost the same signature during the formation of YBCO and liquid Ba-Cu-O during deposition, which indicates the liquid played an important role in determining the properties of YBCO in terms of providing epitaxy and fast transport of atoms to nucleate on the film-metal interface. The transformation was very rapid---seconds to minutes, compared to minutes to hours for other post-reaction processes. The oxygen partial pressure and the rate of oxidation (supersaturation) in the liquid region defined in the YBCO phase stability diagram determined the electrical and microstructural properties. In-situ X-ray diffraction heating stage with ambient control was utilized to study this supersaturation effect and explore the temperature-pressure space during YBCO growth. With all the information gathered from FTIR and XRD in-situ experiments and also with nano-engineering during

  11. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating.

    PubMed

    Slifka, A J; Filla, B J

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature.

  12. Epitaxial niobium dioxide thin films by reactive-biased target ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuhan Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Lu, Jiwei; Comes, Ryan B.; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2015-03-15

    Epitaxial NbO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates via reactive bias target ion beam deposition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra were used to confirm the tetragonal phase of pure NbO{sub 2}. Through XPS, it was found that there was a ∼1.3 nm thick Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer on the surface and the bulk of the thin film was NbO{sub 2}. The epitaxial relationship between the NbO{sub 2} film and the substrate was determined. Electrical transport measurement was measured up to 400 K, and the conduction mechanism was discussed.

  13. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ∼6 nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  14. Cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shifeng; Bi, Feng; Wan, Jian-Guo; Han, Min; Song, Fengqi; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guanghou

    2007-07-04

    Cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films were prepared by the low energy cluster beam deposition method. The microstructure, magnetization and magnetostriction were investigated for the films. It is shown that the film is assembled by monodisperse spherical nanoparticles with average diameter of ∼30 nm which are distributed uniformly. The cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films exhibit good magnetization and possess giant magnetostriction with saturation value of ∼1060 × 10(-6), much higher than that of the common Tb-Fe films. The origin of good magnetization and giant magnetostriction for the cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured film was discussed. The present work opens a new avenue to produce the nanostructured magnetostrictive alloy in application of a nano-electro-mechanical system.

  15. Intrinsic magnetic properties of bimetallic nanoparticles elaborated by cluster beam deposition.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, V; Khadra, G; Hillion, A; Tamion, A; Tuaillon-Combes, J; Bardotti, L; Tournus, F

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we present some specific chemical and magnetic order obtained very recently on characteristic bimetallic nanoalloys prepared by mass-selected Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition (LECBD). We study how the competition between d-atom hybridization, complex structure, morphology and chemical affinity affects their intrinsic magnetic properties at the nanoscale. The structural and magnetic properties of these nanoalloys were investigated using various experimental techniques that include High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry, as well as synchrotron techniques such as Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD). Depending on the chemical nature of the nanoalloys we observe different magnetic responses compared to their bulk counterparts. In particular, we show how specific relaxation in nanoalloys impacts their magnetic anisotropy; and how finite size effects (size reduction) inversely enhance their magnetic moment.

  16. Three dimensional magnetic nanowires grown by focused electron-beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Michalik, Jan M.; Ibarra, M. Ricardo; De Teresa, José M.; O'Brien, Liam; Petit, Dorothée; Lee, Jihyun; Cowburn, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Control of the motion of domain walls in magnetic nanowires is at the heart of various recently proposed three-dimensional (3D) memory devices. However, fabricating 3D nanostructures is extremely complicated using standard lithography techniques. Here we show that highly pure 3D magnetic nanowires with aspect-ratios of ~100 can be grown using focused electron-beam-induced-deposition. By combining micromanipulation, Kerr magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy, we determine that the magnetisation reversal of the wires occurs via the nucleation and propagation of domain walls. In addition, we demonstrate that the magnetic switching of individual 3D nanostructures can be directly probed by magneto-optical Kerr effect. PMID:23512183

  17. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, C.; Mehendale, S.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, ‘in situ’ purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for ‘in situ’ Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  18. Closed-Loop Process Control for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Deposition Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor); Martin, Richard E. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A closed-loop control method for an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) process includes detecting a feature of interest during the process using a sensor(s), continuously evaluating the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein, and automatically modifying control parameters to control the EBF(sup 3) process. An apparatus provides closed-loop control method of the process, and includes an electron gun for generating an electron beam, a wire feeder for feeding a wire toward a substrate, wherein the wire is melted and progressively deposited in layers onto the substrate, a sensor(s), and a host machine. The sensor(s) measure the feature of interest during the process, and the host machine continuously evaluates the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein. The host machine automatically modifies control parameters to the EBF(sup 3) apparatus to control the EBF(sup 3) process in a closed-loop manner.

  19. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  20. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  1. Considerations on the Design of a Molecular Frequency Standard Based on the Molecular Beam Electric Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Vernon W.

    1959-01-01

    The use of a rotational state transition as observed by the molecular beam electric resonance method is discussed as a possible frequency standard particularly in the millimeter wavelength range. As a promising example the 100 kMc transition between the J = 0 and J = 1 rotational states of Li 6F19 is considered. The relative insensitivity of the transition frequency to external electric and magnetic fields and the low microwave power requirements appear favorable; the small fraction of the molecular beam that is in a single rotational state is a limiting factor.

  2. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  3. Low-temperature (< 100 C) growth of AlN by ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Karimy, H.; Tobin, E.; Bricault, R.; Cremins-Costa, A.; Colter, P.; Namavar, F.; Perry, D.

    1996-12-31

    During the past few years, there has been growing interest in aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films because of their excellent optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and high-temperature properties. Ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) was used to deposit AlN films on flat and curved substrates, including Si, SIMOX, sapphire, quartz, aluminum, stainless steel, and carbon, at temperatures substantially below 100 C. The objective as to enhance the physical and mechanical properties of AlN film by controlling the crystal size and structures. Experimental results, as obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) show the formation of stoichiometric AlN. Plan-view/cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), clearly demonstrated the formation of a smooth, uniform AlN film. Electron diffraction and dark field TEM studies clearly show the growth of AlN crystallites with cubic and/or hexagonal structures and dimensions of 30 to 100 {angstrom}. The films are transparent and have good adhesion to all substrates. In addition to excellent high temperature (up to 1,050 C measured) and chemical stability (shown through a variety of acid tests), these films have demonstrated extreme hardness, greater than two times that of bulk AlN.

  4. Three-dimensional core-shell ferromagnetic nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; María de Teresa, José

    2016-07-01

    Functional nanostructured materials often rely on the combination of more than one material to confer the desired functionality or an enhanced performance of the device. Here we report the procedure to create nanoscale heterostructured materials in the form of core-shell nanowires by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) technologies. In our case, three-dimensional (3D) nanowires (<100 nm in diameter) with metallic ferromagnetic cores of Co- and Fe-FEBID have been grown and coated with a protective Pt-FEBID shell (ranging 10-20 nm in thickness) aimed to minimize the degradation of magnetic properties caused by the surface oxidation of the core to a non-ferromagnetic material. The structure, chemistry and magnetism of nanowire cores of Co and Fe have been characterized in Pt-coated and uncoated nanostructures to demonstrate that the morphology of the shell is conserved during Pt coating, the surface oxidation is suppressed or confined to the Pt layer, and the average magnetization of the core is strengthened up to 30%. The proposed approach paves the way to the fabrication of 3D FEBID nanostructures based on the smart alternate deposition of two or more materials combining different physical properties or added functionalities.

  5. Structural and magnetic studies of thin Fe57 films formed by ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyadov, N. M.; Bazarov, V. V.; Vagizov, F. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Dulov, E. N.; Kashapov, R. N.; Noskov, A. I.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Shustov, V. A.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thin Fe57 films with the thickness of 120 nm have been prepared on glass substrates by using the ion-beam-assisted deposition technique. X-ray diffraction, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have shown that as-deposited films are in a stressful nanostructured state containing the nanoscaled inclusions of α-phase iron with the size of ∼10 nm. Room temperature in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization measurements confirmed the presence of the magnetic α-phase in the iron film and indicated the strong effect of residual stresses on magnetic properties of the film as well. Subsequent thermal annealing of iron films in vacuum at the temperature of 450 °C stimulates the growth of α-phase Fe crystallites with the size of up to 20 nm. However, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic data have shown the partial oxidation and carbonization of the iron film during annealing. The stress disappeared after annealing of the film. The magnetic behaviour of the annealed samples was characterized by the magnetic hysteresis loop with the coercive field of ∼10 mT and the saturation magnetization decreased slightly in comparison with the α-phase Fe magnetization due to small oxidation of the film.

  6. Three-Dimensional Nanostructure Fabrication by Focused Ion Beam Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Shinji

    In this chapter, we describe three-dimensional nanostructure fabrication using 30 keV Ga+ focused ion beam chemical vapor deposition (FIB-CVD) and a phenanthrene (C14H10) source as a precursor. We also consider microstructure plastic art, which is a new field that has been made possible by microbeam technology, and we present examples of such art, including a "micro wine glass" with an external diameter of 2.75 μm and a height of 12 μm. The film deposited during such processes is diamond-like amorphous carbon, which has a Young's modulus exceeding 600 GPa, appearing to make it highly desirable for various applications. The production of three-dimensional nanostructures is also discussed. The fabrication of microcoils, nanoelectrostatic actuators, and 0.1 μm nanowiring - all potential components of nanomechanical systems - is explained. The chapter ends by describing the realization of nanoinjectors and nanomanipulators, novel nanotools for manipulating and analyzing subcellular organelles.

  7. Chemical tuning of PtC nanostructures fabricated via focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Haber, Thomas; Gspan, Christian; Kothleitner, Gerald; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2013-05-03

    The fundamental dependence between process parameters during focused electron beam induced deposition and the chemistry of functional PtC nanostructures have been studied via a multi-technique approach using SEM, (S)TEM, EELS, AFM, and EFM. The study reveals that the highest Pt contents can only be achieved by an ideal balance between potentially dissociating electrons and available precursor molecules on the surface. For precursor regimes apart from this situation, an unwanted increase of carbon is observed which originates from completely different mechanisms: (1) an excess of electrons leads to polymerization of precursor fragments whereas (2) a lack of electrons leads to incompletely dissociated precursor molecules incorporated into the nanostructures. While the former represents an unwanted class of carbon, the latter condition maximizes the volume growth rates and allows for post-growth curing strategies which can strongly increase the functionality. Furthermore, the study gives an explanation of why growing deposits can dynamically change their chemistry and provides a straightforward guide towards more controlled fabrication conditions.

  8. Compact laser molecular beam epitaxy system using laser heating of substrate for oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Lippmaa, M.; Nakagawa, N.; Nagasawa, H.; Koinuma, H.; Kawasaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    A high-temperature, oxygen compatible, and compact laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE) system has been developed. The 1.06 μm infrared light from a continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to achieve a wide range and rapid control of substrate temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and at up to 1 atm oxygen pressure. The maximum usable temperature was limited to 1453 °C by the melting point of the nickel sample holder. To our knowledge, this is the highest temperature reported for pulsed laser deposition of oxide films. The efficient laser heating combined with temperature monitoring by a pyrometer and feedback control of the Nd:YAG laser power by a personal computer made it possible to regulate the substrate temperature accurately and to achieve high sample heating and cooling rates. The oxygen pressure and ablation laser triggering were also controlled by the computer. The accurate growth parameter control was combined with real-time in situ surface structure monitoring by reflection high energy electron diffraction to investigate oxide thin film growth in detail over a wide range of temperatures, oxygen partial pressures, and deposition rates. We have demonstrated the performance of this system by the fabrication of homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films as well as heteroepitaxial Sr2RuO4, and SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. This temperature was high enough to change the film growth mode from layer by layer to step flow.

  9. Fluoropolymer Films Deposited by Argon Ion-Beam Sputtering of Polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The FT-IR, XPS and UV spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-I) deposited by argon ion-beam sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were obtained and compared with prior corresponding spectra of fluoropolymer films (SPTFE-P) deposited by argon rf plasma sputtering of PTFE. Although the F/C ratios for SPTFE-I and -P (1.63 and 1.51) were similar, their structures were quite different in that there was a much higher concentration of CF2 groups in SPTFE-I than in SPTFE-P, ca. 61 and 33% of the total carbon contents, respectively. The FT-IR spectra reflect that difference, that for SPTFE-I showing a distinct doublet at 1210 and 1150 per centimeter while that for SPTFE-P presents a broad, featureless band at ca. 1250 per centimeter. The absorbance of the 1210-per centimeter band in SPTFE-I was proportional to the thickness of the film, in the range of 50-400 nanometers. The SPTFE-I was more transparent in the UV than SPTFE-P at comparable thickness. The mechanism for SPTFE-I formation likely involves "chopping off" of oligomeric segments of PTFE as an accompaniment to "plasma" polymerization of TFE monomer or other fluorocarbon fragments generated in situ from PTFE on impact with energetic Ar ions. Data are presented for SPTFE-I deposits and the associated Ar(+) bombarded PTFE targets where a fresh target was used for each run or a single target was used for a sequence of runs.

  10. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  11. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-15

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. Transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. It is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  12. Mapping growth windows in quaternary perovskite oxide systems by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Lapano, Jason; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Requisite to growing stoichiometric perovskite thin films of the solid-solution A'1-xAxBO3 by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy is understanding how the growth conditions interpolate between the end members A'BO3 and ABO3, which can be grown in a self-regulated fashion, but under different conditions. Using the example of La1-xSrxVO3, the two-dimensional growth parameter space that is spanned by the flux of the metal-organic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide and composition, x, was mapped out. The evolution of the adsorption-controlled growth window was obtained using a combination of X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is found that the stoichiometric growth conditions can be mapped out quickly with a single calibration sample using RHEED. Once stoichiometric conditions have been identified, the out-of-plane lattice parameter can be utilized to precisely determine the composition x. This strategy enables the identification of growth conditions that allow the deposition of stoichiometric perovskite oxide films with random A-site cation mixing, which is relevant to a large number of perovskite materials with interesting properties, e.g., high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance, that emerge in solid solution A'1-xAxBO3.

  13. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; ...

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density,more » heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.« less

  14. Growth Parameters for Thin Film InBi Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Sallis, S.; Piper, L. J.; McCombe, B.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The alloying of bismuth with III-V semiconductors, in particular GaAs and InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has attracted considerable interest due to the accompanying changes in band structure and lattice constant. Specifically, bismuth incorporation in these compounds results in both a reduction in band gap (through shifting of the valence band) and an increase in the lattice constant of the alloy. To fully understand the composition of these alloys, a better understanding of the binary endpoints is needed. At present, a limited amount of literature exists on the III-Bi family of materials, most of which is theoretical work based on density functional theory calculations. The only III-Bi material known to exist (in bulk crystal form) is InBi, but its electrical properties have not been sufficiently studied and, to date, the material has not been fabricated as a thin film. We have successfully deposited crystalline InBi on (100) GaAs substrates using MBE. Wetting of the substrate is poor, and regions of varying composition exist across the substrate. To obtain InBi, the growth temperature had to be below 100 °C. It was found that film crystallinity improved with reduced Bi flux, into an In-rich regime. Additionally, attempts were made to grow AlBi and GaBi.

  15. Growth of ZnSnN2 by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldberg, N.; Aldous, J. D.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Veal, T. D.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Zn-IV-N2 family of materials represents a potential earth abundant element alternative to conventional compound semiconductor materials that are based on gallium and indium. While both ZnSiN2 and ZnGeN2 have been studied to some degree, very little is known about the narrow-gap member ZnSnN2. Here, we investigate the growth dynamics of crystalline ZnSnN2 through plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. All films exhibit some degree of crystalline order regardless of growth conditions, although significant tin coverage was observed for films grown with low Zn:Sn flux ratio; Zn flux in particular became increasingly problematic at increased substrate temperatures designed to improve crystallinity. Single-crystal material was achieved through careful optimization of growth parameters. Regardless of deposition conditions or substrate choice, however, all films exhibit a monoclinic structure as opposed to the predicted orthorhombic lattice; this can be directly attributed to sublattice disorder.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of Cd3As2 on a III-V substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Timo; Goyal, Manik; Kim, Honggyu; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    Epitaxial, strain-engineered Dirac semimetal heterostructures promise tuning of the unique properties of these materials. In this study, we investigate the growth of thin films of the recently discovered Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that epitaxial Cd3As2 layers can be grown at low temperatures (110 °C-220 °C), in situ, on (111) GaSb buffer layers deposited on (111) GaAs substrates. The orientation relationship is described by ( 112 ) Cd3 As 2 || (111) GaSb and [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] Cd3 As 2 || [ 1 ¯ 01 ] GaSb . The films are shown to grow in the low-temperature, vacancy ordered, tetragonal Dirac semimetal phase. They exhibit high room temperature mobilities of up to 19300 cm2/Vs, despite a three-dimensional surface morphology indicative of island growth and the presence of twin variants. The results indicate that epitaxial growth on more closely lattice matched buffer layers, such as InGaSb or InAlSb, which allow for imposing different degrees of epitaxial coherency strains, should be possible.

  17. Reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography: Ion beam sputter deposition of low defect density Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kearney, P.A.; Levesque, R.A.; Hayes, A.V.; Druz, B.; Osten, E.; Rajan, R.; Hedge, H.

    1996-06-24

    We report on growth of low defect density Mo/Si multilayer (ML) coatings. The coatings were grown in a deposition system designed for EUVL reticle blank fabrication. Complete, 81 layer, high reflectance Mo/Si ML coatings were deposited on 150 mm dia (100) oriented Si wafer substrates using ion beam sputter deposition. Added defects, measured by optical scattering, correspond to defect densities of 2x10{sup -2}/cm{sup 2}. This represents a reduction in defect density of Mo/Si ML coatings by a factor of 10{sup 5}.

  18. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Jordan, C.W.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenik, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating and processing. Measurements of gas flow and pressure indicate that the levitation device operates in the regime of Knudsen's flow. This device is currently being used in the development of future generation laser targets.

  19. Process-Structure-Property Relationships of Micron Thick Gadolinium Oxide Films Deposited by Reactive Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Z39.18 Adebo Professional 7.0 ao\\6^!0(04 The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School College of Earth and Mineral Sciences PROCESS...temperature (650 °C) on different substrates. For evaluation of in-plane texture in the GdiGŗ films, pole figure analysis was performed. Mixed...transformation by ion beam assisted deposition (1BAD).. 117 5.5. Texture evolution in single phase cubic films deposited at low rates 122 5.6. Pole figure

  20. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  1. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-31

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  2. Deposition of PTFE thin films by ion beam sputtering and a study of the ion bombardment effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. L.; Li, W. Z.; Wang, L. D.; Wang, J.; Li, H. D.

    1998-02-01

    Ion beam sputtering technique was employed to prepare thin films of Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE). Simultaneous ion beam bombardment during film growth was also conducted in order to study the bombardment effects. Infrared absorption (IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to evaluate the material's integrity. It was found that PTFE thin films could be grown at room temperature by direct sputtering of a PTFE target. The film's composition and structure were shown to be dependent on the sputtering energy. Films deposited by single sputtering at higher energy (˜1500 eV) were structurally quite similar to the original PTFE material. Simultaneous ion beam bombarding during film growth caused defluorination and structural changes. Mechanism for sputtering deposition of such a polymeric material is also discussed.

  3. Reduced electrical impedance of SiO{sub 2}, deposited through focused ion beam based systems, due to impurity percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-11-28

    The electrical impedance (both the resistive and capacitive aspects) of focused ion beam (FIB) deposited SiO{sub 2} has been correlated to the specific composition of the ion beam, in Ga- and Xe-based FIB systems. The presence of electrically percolating Ga in concert with carbon (inevitably found as the product of the hydrocarbon precursor decomposition) has been isolated as a major cause for the observed decrease in the resistivity of the deposited SiO{sub 2}. Concomitant with the decreased resistivity, an increased capacitance and effective dielectric constant was observed. Our study would be useful to understand the constraints to the deposition of high quality insulator films through FIB based methodologies.

  4. In situ study of e-beam Al and Hf metal deposition on native oxide InP (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; KC, Santosh; Azcatl, A.; Cabrera, W.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-11-28

    The interfacial chemistry of thin Al (∼3 nm) and Hf (∼2 nm) metal films deposited by electron beam (e-beam) evaporation on native oxide InP (100) samples at room temperature and after annealing has been studied by in situ angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The In-oxides are completely scavenged forming In-In/In-(Al/Hf) bonding after Al and Hf metal deposition. The P-oxide concentration is significantly decreased, and the P-oxide chemical states have been changed to more P-rich oxides upon metal deposition. Indium diffusion through these metals before and after annealing at 250 °C has also been characterized. First principles calculation shows that In has lower surface formation energy compared with Al and Hf metals, which is consistent with the observed indium diffusion behavior.

  5. Second order nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide films deposited by low temperature dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Larciprete, M.C.; Passeri, D.; Michelotti, F.; Paoloni, S.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Belardini, A.; Sarto, F.; Somma, F.; Lo Mastro, S.

    2005-01-15

    We investigated second order optical nonlinearity of zinc oxide thin films, grown on glass substrates by the dual ion beam sputtering technique under different deposition conditions. Linear optical characterization of the films was carried out by spectrophotometric optical transmittance and reflectance measurements, giving the complex refractive index dispersion. Resistivity of the films was determined using the four-point probe sheet resistance method. Second harmonic generation measurements were performed by means of the Maker fringes technique where the fundamental beam was originated by nanosecond laser at {lambda}=1064 nm. We found a relatively high nonlinear optical response, and evidence of a dependence of the nonlinear coefficient on the deposition parameters for each sample. Moreover, the crystalline properties of the films were investigated by x-ray diffraction measurements and correlation with second order nonlinearity were analyzed. Finally, we investigated the influence of the oxygen flow rate during the deposition process on both the second order nonlinearity and the structural properties of the samples.

  6. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  7. Tuning the deposition of molecular graphene nanoribbons by surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnerth, R.; Cervetti, C.; Narita, A.; Feng, X.; Müllen, K.; Hoyer, A.; Burghard, M.; Kern, K.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.

    2015-07-01

    We show that individual, isolated graphene nanoribbons, created with a molecular synthetic approach, can be assembled on functionalised wafer surfaces treated with silanes. The use of surface groups with different hydrophobicities allows tuning the density of the ribbons and assessing the products of the polymerisation process.

  8. NanoSQUID magnetometry of individual cobalt nanoparticles grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Müller, B.; Schwebius, D.; Korinski, D.; Kleiner, R.; Sesé, J.; Koelle, D.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the operation of low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on the high critical field and high critical temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) as ultra-sensitive magnetometers for single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanoSQUIDs exploit the Josephson behavior of YBCO grain boundaries and have been patterned by focused ion beam milling. This allows us to precisely define the lateral dimensions of the SQUIDs so as to achieve large magnetic coupling between the nanoloop and individual MNPs. By means of focused electron beam induced deposition, cobalt MNPs with a typical size of several tens of nm have been grown directly on the surface of the sensors with nanometric spatial resolution. Remarkably, the nanoSQUIDs are operative over extremely broad ranges of applied magnetic field (-1 T \\lt {μ }0H\\lt 1 T) and temperature (0.3 K \\lt T\\lt 80 K). All these features together have allowed us to perform magnetization measurements under different ambient conditions and to detect the magnetization reversal of individual Co MNPs with magnetic moments (1-30) × {10}6 {μ }{{B}}. Depending on the dimensions and shape of the particles we have distinguished between two different magnetic states yielding different reversal mechanisms. The magnetization reversal is thermally activated over an energy barrier, which has been quantified for the (quasi) single-domain particles. Our measurements serve to show not only the high sensitivity achievable with YBCO nanoSQUIDs, but also demonstrate that these sensors are exceptional magnetometers for the investigation of the properties of individual nanomagnets.

  9. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Helen Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  10. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  11. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  12. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L; Roy, Ajit K

    2016-05-05

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.

  13. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: A Novel Mirror for Cold Molecules with a Semi-Gaussian Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ya-Ling; Zhou, Qi; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-09-01

    We propose a novel mirror for cold molecules with a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam and study the dynamic reflection process of cold molecules by Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that this mirror can realize a specular reflection of cold iodine molecular beam with a temperature of 30 mK by a reflectivity of 58.2% when the semi-Gaussian laser power is 1.0kW. When a semi-Gaussian CO2 laser beam with a power of 5.8 kW is used, the reflectivity of this mirror can reach about 100%.

  14. Condensed-Phase Mass Fraction in a Supersonic Molecular Beam Containing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Eldon L.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2008-12-01

    For a supersonic molecular beam containing clusters, a relatively general and simple conservation-of-energy procedure for deducing from time-of-flight measurements the fraction of the beam in the condensed phase is developed. The procedure is applied to measurements for 4He beams formed by expansions which approach the two-phase region either near the critical point or to the liquid side of the critical point. The deduced values of the mass fraction are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating mean values of cluster sizes formed via fragmentation in free-jet expansions of liquid 4He.

  15. Method for Simulating the Thickness Distribution of a Cubic Boron Nitride Film Deposited on a Curved Substrate using Ion-beam-assisted Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J. S.; Kanematsu, H.; Morisato, K.

    A method for simulating the thickness distribution of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films deposited on a curved substrate using ion-beam-assisted vapor deposition (IBAD) is established and discussed. The deposition conditions are (i) boron arriving rate is 3.2 Å/s, (ii) ion current density is in the range 600-1600 μA/cm2, and (iii) gas composition fed into the ion source is 36% N2 + Ar. It was found that, due to simultaneous deposition and sputtering, the boron resputtering yield (which depends on the ion incident angle during cBN deposition) estimated from experimental data was higher than that of the boron sputtering yield of the BN films with a density of 3.482 g/cm3 calculated by the TRIM code. Using the above empirical boron resputtering yield, it is estimated that in the case of static coating, cBN films would not be formed when the incident angle is more than 40°. However, with continuous waving, the distribution of film thickness improves and the results are consistent with the experimental results. This estimation also agrees with the experimental results of discrete waving deposition within an allowable margin of error

  16. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-01

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω1 + ω2 laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n0, ω1 laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ0) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n0 or ρ0 breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n0 and ρ0 in a way that scales uniformly with ρe, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  18. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain. PMID:27072999

  19. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain.

  20. Ex Situ Thermal Cycle Annealing of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown HgCdTe/Si Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    during the growth process itself, is an effective means to reduce etch pit den- sity (EPD) and improve overall crystal quality. Subjecting CdTe /Si...results of ex situ thermal cycle annealing (TCA) of molecular beam epitaxy grown mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) on Cd (Se)Te/ Si(211) composite...present the results of ex situ thermal cycle annealing (TCA) of molecular beam epitaxy grown mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) on Cd (Se)Te/ Si(211

  1. Simple Validation of Transient Plume Models Using Molecular Beam-Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, M. S.

    2008-12-31

    A simple effort using molecular beam data to compare the results of two different transient free molecule point source models was performed, motivated by a desire to determine the utility of such formulations for a variety of time-dependent applications. These models are evaluated against effusive molecular beam time-of-flight data, as well as behavior observed in pulsed laser ablation experiments and high-fidelity direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Such comparisons indicate that the physical behavior of these time-dependent expansions require taking a surface-enforced directional bias into account. This bias has been absent in a number of investigative formulations, both historical and current.

  2. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  3. Single-crystal cubic boron nitride thin films grown by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirama, Kazuyuki Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2014-03-03

    We investigated the formation of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) thin films on diamond (001) and (111) substrates by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The metastable c-BN (sp{sup 3}-bonded BN) phase can be epitaxially grown as a result of the interplay between competitive phase formation and selective etching. We show that a proper adjustment of acceleration voltage for N{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions is a key to selectively discriminate non-sp{sup 3} BN phases. At low acceleration voltage values, the sp{sup 2}-bonded BN is dominantly formed, while at high acceleration voltages, etching dominates irrespective of the bonding characteristics of BN.

  4. Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition and Nanoskiving for Fabricating NiTi Alloy Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huilong; Horn, Mark W.; Hamilton, Reginald F.

    2016-12-01

    Nanoskiving is a novel nanofabrication technique to produce shape memory alloy nanowires. Our previous work was the first to successfully fabricate NiTi alloy nanowires using the top-down approach, which leverages thin film technology and ultramicrotomy for ultra-thin sectioning. For this work, we utilized biased target ion beam deposition technology to fabricate nanoscale (i.e., sub-micrometer) NiTi alloy thin films. In contrast to our previous work, rapid thermal annealing was employed for heat treatment, and the B2 austenite to R-phase martensitic transformation was confirmed using stress-temperature and diffraction measurements. The ultramicrotome was programmable and facilitated sectioning the films to produce nanowires with thickness-to-width ratios ranging from 4:1 to 16:1. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis confirmed the elemental Ni and Ti make-up of the wires. The findings exposed the nanowires exhibited a natural ribbon-like curvature, which depended on the thickness-to-width ratio. The results demonstrate nanoskiving is a potential nanofabrication technique for producing NiTi alloy nanowires that are continuous with an unprecedented length on the order of hundreds of micrometers.

  5. Three-dimensional Čerenkov tomography of energy deposition from ionizing radiation beams.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Voigt, William H A; Davis, Scott C; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2013-03-01

    Since its discovery during the 1930s the Čerenkov effect (light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium) has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. The ability of the emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, to our knowledge, all applications of the process to date have focused on the identification of particles themselves, rather than their effect upon the surroundings through which they travel. Here we explore a novel application of the Čerenkov effect for the recovery of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation energy deposition in a medium and apply it to the issue of dose determination in medical physics. By capturing multiple projection images of the Čerenkov light induced by a medical linear accelerator x-ray photon beam, we demonstrate the successful three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of the imparted dose distribution.

  6. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  7. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  8. Molecular weight evaluation of poly-dimethylsiloxane on solid surfaces using silver deposition/TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masae; Murase, Atsushi

    2004-06-01

    Molecular ions include information about end groups, functional groups and molecular weight. A method for directly detecting this in the high-mass region of the spectrum (>1000 amu) from poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on a solid surface was investigated. It was found that a TOF-SIMS analysis of silver-deposited surfaces (silver deposition/TOF-SIMS) is useful for this purpose. Two methods for silver deposition, the diode sputtering method and the vacuum evaporation coating method, were tried. The former required the sample to be cooled so as to prevent the damage of the sample surface due to thermal oxidation; the latter caused no damage to sample surfaces at room temperature. Using silver deposition/TOF-SIMS analysis, silver-cationized quasi-molecular ions were clearly detected from PDMS on solid surfaces and their images were observed without the interference of deposited silver. By applying to the analysis of paint defects, etc., it was confirmed that this technique is useful to analyze practical industrial materials. Silver-cationized ions were detected not only from PDMS, but also from other organic materials, such as some kinds of lubricant additives and fluorine oils on solid surfaces. Therefore, silver deposition/TOF-SIMS was proved to be useful for the analysis of thin substances on solid surfaces.

  9. The Mechanical Robustness of Atomic-Layer- and Molecular-Layer-Deposited Coatings on Polymer Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical robustness of atomic-layer- and molecular-layer-deposited coatings on polymer substrates David C. Miller,1,2,a Ross R. Foster,1,2...00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The mechanical robustness of atomic-layer- and molecular-layer-deposited coatings on polymer ...fracture related to the sharp grip teeth, polymer strips “Flex-o-Pane,” Warp Brothers, Inc. were attached over the grip ends outside of the gage region

  10. Radii broadening due to molecular collision in focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    Point exposures of poly(methyl methacrylate) resist are carried out with focused ion beams of Si++ and Au++ from a liquid AuSi ion source in order to obtain a current density distribution in the probe. All the distributions are composed of a main Gaussian distribution and a long tail dependent on r-3.3 (r means radial distance). The magnitude of this tail increases with the increase in ambient pressure of the ion-drifting space. When the probe is steered at the corner of deflection field, two types of clear ghost patterns appear: (1) circular patterns and (2) lines trailing from the main spot toward the deflection center. It is revealed that they are produced by exposures to ions or energetic neutrals generated with charge transfer collision of the primary ions with residual gas molecules. It is shown that the long tail in the current density distribution is also due to scattering with the residual gas molecules.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SrO buffer layers on graphite and graphene for the integration of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Wen, Hua; Ohta, Taisuke; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Zhu, Tiancong; Beechem, Thomas; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful growth of high-quality SrO films on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while atomic force microscopy measurements show continuous pinhole-free films having rms surface roughness of <1.5 Å. Transport measurements of exfoliated graphene after SrO deposition show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. Subsequently, the SrO is leveraged as a buffer layer for more complex oxide integration via the demonstration of (001) oriented SrTiO3 grown atop a SrO/HOPG stack.

  12. High Growth Rate Metal-Organic Molecular Beam Epitaxy for the Fabrication of GaAs Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freundlich, A.; Newman, F.; Monier, C.; Street, S.; Dargan, P.; Levy, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work it is shown that high quality GaAs photovoltaic devices can be produced by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) with growth rates comparable to metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) through the subsitution of group III solid sources by metal-organic compounds. The influence the III/V flux-ratio and growth temperatures in maintaining a two dimensional layer by layer growth mode and achieving high growth rates with low residual background impurities is investigated. Finally subsequent to the study of the optimization of n- and p doping of such high growth rate epilayers, results from a preliminary attempt in the fabrication of GaAs photovoltaic devices such as tunnel diodes and solar cells using the proposed high growth rate approach are reported.

  13. Misfit dislocation free InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Rieger, T; Grützmacher, D; Lepsa, M I

    2015-01-07

    In this report, we present the growth and structural analyses of broken gap InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy using an Au-free approach. Depending on the shell growth temperature, two distinct growth regimes for the GaSb shells are identified resulting in conformal or tapered shells. Morphological analyses reveal a dodecagonal nanowire cross-section after GaSb shell growth. Detailed transmission electron microscope investigations from different zone axes confirm that the small lattice mismatch of 0.6% allows the deposition of 40 nm thick GaSb shells free of misfit dislocations. Additionally, an abrupt interface from InAs to GaSb is found. These nanowires are suitable for future devices such as TFETs.

  14. Heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots for single photon emitters grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Belyaev, K. G.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Toropov, A. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) with relatively low surface density, which could be used as single-photon emitters. The QDs were formed on the surface of a 3.1- to 4.5-monolayer-thick two-dimensional strained CdTe layer by depositing amorphous Te layer and its fast thermal desorption. Subsequent thermal annealing of the surface with QDs in the absence of external Te flux led to strong broadening and short-wavelength shift of the QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. Measurement of the micro-PL spectra of individual CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots in fabricated mesastructures with a diameter of 200—1000 nm allowed estimation of the QD surface density as 1010 cm-2.

  15. Growth of M-plane MnAs on GaAs(111)B by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Y.; Herrmann, C.; Jenichen, B.; Herfort, J.; Brandt, O.

    2008-03-01

    We describe a growth procedure utilizing molecular beam epitaxy that produces a (11¯00)-oriented MnAs layer on GaAs(111)B despite the incompatible unit mesh symmetry. An amorphous MnAs layer is deposited at a low temperature beyond the critical thickness for coherent growth. When solid-phase epitaxy is initiated by reducing the background As4 pressure, the layer crystalizes in the M-plane orientation with its c axis being along the {112¯} directions of the substrate. The magnetization components associated with the coexisting c-axis orientations are independent of each other, suggesting that the structural domains are much larger in size than the atomic scales.

  16. GaN Schottky diodes with single-crystal aluminum barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, H. Y.; Yang, W. C.; Lee, P. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y.; Hsu, C.-H.

    2016-08-01

    GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with single-crystal Al barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are fabricated. Examined using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffractions, ex-situ high-resolution x-ray diffractions, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it is determined that epitaxial Al grows with its [111] axis coincident with the [0001] axis of the GaN substrate without rotation. In fabricated SBDs, a 0.2 V barrier height enhancement and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in leakage current are observed in single crystal Al/GaN SBDs compared to conventional thermal deposited Al/GaN SBDs. The strain induced piezoelectric field is determined to be the major source of the observed device performance enhancements.

  17. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SrO buffer layers on graphite and graphene for the integration of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Wen, Hua; Ohta, Taisuke; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Zhu, Tiancong; Beechem, Thomas; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-04-27

    Here, we report the successful growth of high-quality SrO films on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while atomic force microscopy measurements show continuous pinhole-free films having rms surface roughness of <1.5 Å. Moreover, transport measurements of exfoliated graphene, after SrO deposition, show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. As a result, the SrO is leveraged as a buffer layer for more complex oxide integration via the demonstration of (001) oriented SrTiO3 grown atop a SrO/HOPG stack.

  18. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-10-01

    Ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (1 1 bar 02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [ 11 2 bar 0 ] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar { 10 1 bar 0 } side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the { 10 1 bar 0 } facets to the { 10 1 bar 1 } and { 10 1 bar 1 } facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an order of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.

  19. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  20. Towards an electro-magnetic field separation of deposited material implemented in an ion beam sputter process

    SciTech Connect

    Malobabic, Sina; Jupe, Marco; Ristau, Detlev

    2013-06-03

    Nowadays, Ion Beam Sputter (IBS) processes are very well optimized on an empirical basis. To achieve further progresses, a modification of the IBS process by guiding the coating material using an axial magnetic field and an additional electrical field has been studied. The electro-magnetic (EM) field leads to a significant change in plasma properties and deposition rate distributions, whereas an increase in deposition rate along the centerline of the axial EM field around 150% was observed. These fundamental studies on the prototype are the basis for the development of an applicable and workable design of a separation device.

  1. Fabrication of layered nanostructures by successive electron beam induced deposition with two precursors: protective capping of metallic iron structures.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Papp, C; Kronast, F; Gray, A X; Balke, B; Cramm, S; Fadley, C S; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-11-25

    We report on the stepwise generation of layered nanostructures via electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using organometallic precursor molecules in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). In a first step a metallic iron line structure was produced using iron pentacarbonyl; in a second step this nanostructure was then locally capped with a 2-3 nm thin titanium oxide-containing film fabricated from titanium tetraisopropoxide. The chemical composition of the deposited layers was analyzed by spatially resolved Auger electron spectroscopy. With spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe L₃ edge, it was demonstrated that the thin capping layer prevents the iron structure from oxidation upon exposure to air.

  2. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Matthias; Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Oates, Thomas W. H.; Luis Endrino, Jose

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  3. Structure and interfacial analysis of nanoscale TiNi thin film prepared by biased target ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Huilong; Hamilton, Reginald F. Horn, Mark W.

    2015-07-15

    Ultrathin, 65 nm thick, TiNi alloy films were fabricated by cosputtering Ti and Ni targets using the recently developed biased target ion beam deposition technique. Preheating the substrate by exposure to a low energy ion source resulted in as-deposited films with a pure B2 atomic crystal structure containing no secondary crystal structures or precipitates. Continuous films were produced with a smooth surface and minimal substrate/film interfacial diffusion. The diffusion layer was a small ratio of film thickness, which is a prerequisite for the B2 phase to undergo the martensitic transformation in ultrathin films.

  4. Computer-controlled ion beam deposition systems for high T c superconductor and other multi-component oxide thin films and layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, A. R.; Auciello, O.; Kingon, A. I.; Ameen, M. S.; Liu, Y. L.; Barr, T.; Graettinger, T. M.; Rou, S. H.; Soble, C. S.; Gruen, D. M.

    1990-12-01

    A single beam, multiple target (SBMT) deposition system which features a rotating target holder with either elemental or simple compound targets has been developed for the production of layered thin film structures and multicomponent oxide, silicade or other compound thin films. We are employing the SBMT ion beam sputtering system for the deposition of high temperature superconducting, electro-optic and ferroelectric thin films and multilayered structures. The beam-target-substrate geometry and ion beam characteristics are designed to minimize scattering of the ion beam from the target (which results in resputtering of, and inert gas incorporation into the film) while maintaining high deposition rates. The amount of energy which is deposited into the film may be controlled by means of a secondary reactive or inert ion beam impacting on the growing film. This secondary beam may provide enough energy to promote activated processes, such as the in-situ formation of oriented crystal structures of high temperature superconducting materials. All parameters necessary to control the film properties are under computer control. A deposition cycle, defined as a number of sequential steps, may be easily modified or added to previously existing deposition cycles, thereby permitting the creation of complicated deposition procedures suitable for the production of films with highly reproducible properties for research purposes, and the in-situ fabrication of complex devices for technological applications. Examples are given of the capabilities of the technique as they apply to the production of high Tc superconducting devices.

  5. Misfit dislocation free InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, T.; Grützmacher, D.; Lepsa, M. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we present the growth and structural analyses of broken gap InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy using an Au-free approach. Depending on the shell growth temperature, two distinct growth regimes for the GaSb shells are identified resulting in conformal or tapered shells. Morphological analyses reveal a dodecagonal nanowire cross-section after GaSb shell growth. Detailed transmission electron microscope investigations from different zone axes confirm that the small lattice mismatch of 0.6% allows the deposition of 40 nm thick GaSb shells free of misfit dislocations. Additionally, an abrupt interface from InAs to GaSb is found. These nanowires are suitable for future devices such as TFETs.In this report, we present the growth and structural analyses of broken gap InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy using an Au-free approach. Depending on the shell growth temperature, two distinct growth regimes for the GaSb shells are identified resulting in conformal or tapered shells. Morphological analyses reveal a dodecagonal nanowire cross-section after GaSb shell growth. Detailed transmission electron microscope investigations from different zone axes confirm that the small lattice mismatch of 0.6% allows the deposition of 40 nm thick GaSb shells free of misfit dislocations. Additionally, an abrupt interface from InAs to GaSb is found. These nanowires are suitable for future devices such as TFETs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cross sectional shape along the nanowire axis, evolution of the cross sectional shape, comparison of the <110> and the <211> zone axis, HRTEM images, evolution of the GaSb platform ad multiple twinning induced defects in the GaSb platform. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05164e

  6. Mn-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy growth (Ga,Mn)As nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, R. R.; Samsonenko, Yu B.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Bouravleuv, A. D.; Werner, P.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2016-11-01

    Arrays of (Ga,Mn)As crystal nanowires on a GaAs (100) substrate were obtained using molecular-beam epitaxy at the substrate temperature 485°C. From the high energy electron diffraction patterns, the crystallographic phase of the nanowires is detected to be cubic which is supporting by ex situ microscopy study.

  7. Growth of (111) GaAs on (111) Si using molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Liu, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Katz, J.; Morkoc, H.

    1988-01-01

    (111) GaAs layers have been grown epitaxially on (111) Si wafers, both on-axis as well as 3-deg off-axis towards the 1 -1 0 direction, using molecular-beam epitaxy. The grown layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Large Area Synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sock Mui; Tan, Sherman J R; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Chen, Zhongxin; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Fu, Deyi; Xu, Hai; Bao, Yang; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-23

    Large area synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 nanoribbons on both insulating and conducting substrates via molecular beam epitaxy is presented. Dimensional controlled growth of 2D, 1D-MoSe2 , and 1D-2D-MoSe2 hybrid heterostructure is achieved by tuning the growth temperature or Mo:Se precursor ratio.

  9. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  10. History of Molecular Beam Research: Personal Reminiscences of the Important Evolutionary Period 1919-1933

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estermann, Immanuel

    1975-01-01

    Describes the early historical period of the molecular beam method, including the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the work of Davisson and Germer, and the magnetic moment determinations for the proton, neutron, and deuteron. Contains some amusing historical sidelights on the research personalities that dominated that period. (MLH)

  11. Molecular-beam heteroepitaxial growth and characterization of wide-band-gap semiconductor films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, Eric Charles

    The thesis consists of two parts. Part I describes work on the molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of GaN, AlN, and AlxGa 1-xN alloys, as well as efforts in the initial technical development and demonstration of nitride-based high power electronic devices. The major issues pertaining to MBE growth are discussed, including special requirements of the growth system, substrates, film nucleation, n - and p-type doping, and the dependence of film quality on growth parameters. The GaN films were characterized by a variety of methods, including high resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Hall effect measurement. It is found that the film polarity and extended defect density as well as quality of photoluminescence and electrical transport properties depend crucially on how the nitride layer is nucleated on the substrate and how the subsequent film surface morphology evolves, which can be controlled by the growth conditions. A technique is proposed and demonstrated that utilizes the control of morphology evolution to reduce defect density and improve the structural quality of MBE GaN films. In addition to growth, the design and processing of high voltage GaN Schottky diodes is presented, as well as an experimental study of sputter-deposited ohmic and rectifying metal contacts to GaN. Simple models for high power devices, based on materials properties such as minority carrier diffusion length and critical electric breakdown field, are used to estimate the voltage standoff capability, current carrying capacity, and maximum operating frequency of unipolar and bipolar GaN power devices. The materials and transport properties of GaN pertinent to high power device design were measured experimentally. High voltage Schottky rectifiers were fabricated which verify the impressive electric breakdown field of GaN (2--5 MV/cm). Electron beam induced current (EBIC) experiments were also conducted to measure the minority carrier diffusion length for both electrons and

  12. Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-12-14

    Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

  13. Synthesis of Large-Sized Single-Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride Domains on Nickel Foils by Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haolin; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Heng; Yin, Zhigang; Meng, Junhua; Xia, Jing; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Jinliang; You, Jingbi

    2015-12-22

    Large-sized single-crystal h-BN domains with a lateral size up to 100 μm are synthesized on Ni foils by ion-beam sputtering deposition. The nucleation density of h-BN is dramatically decreased by reducing the concentrations of both active sites and species on the Ni surface through a brief in situ pretreatment of the substrate and optimization of the growth parameters, enabling the growth of large-sized domains.

  14. Molecular Beam Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Vanadium Monoxide, VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Like almost all astronomical studies, exoplanet investigations are observational endeavors that rely primarily on remote spectroscopic sensing to infer the physical properties of planets. Most exoplanet related information is inferred from to temporal variation of luminosity of the parent star. An effective method of monitoring this variation is via Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), which uses optical polarimetry of paramagnetic molecules or atoms. One promising paramagnetic stellar absorption is the near infrared spectrum of VO. With this in mind, we have begun a project to record and analyze the field-free and Zeeman spectrum of the band. A cold (approx. 20 K) beam of VO was probed with a single frequency laser and detected using laser induced fluorescence. The determined spectral parameters will be discussed and compared to those extracted from the analysis of a hot spectrum. Supported by the National Science Foundation under the Grant No. CHE-1265885. O. Kochukhov, N. Rusomarov, J. A. Valenti, H. C. Stempels, F. Snik, M. Rodenhuis, N. Piskunov, V. Makaganiuk, C. U. Keller and C. M. Johns-Krull, Astron. Astrophys. 574 (Pt. 2), A79/71-A79/12 (2015). S. V. Berdyugina, Astron. Soc. Pac. Conf. Ser. 437 (Solar Polarization 6), 219-235 (2011). S. V. Berdyugina, P. A. Braun, D. M. Fluri and S. K. Solanki, Astron. Astrophys. 444 (3), 947-960 (2005). A. S. C. Cheung, P. G. Hajigeorgiou, G. Huang, S. Z. Huang and A. J. Merer, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 163 (2), 443-458 (1994)

  15. Structural and growth aspects of electron beam physical vapor deposited NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuanr, Sushil Kumar; K, Suresh Babu

    2016-03-15

    Deposition of composite materials as thin film by electron beam physical vapor deposition technique (EB-PVD) still remains as a challenge. Here, the authors report the deposition of NiO-CeO{sub 2} (30/70 wt. %) composites on quartz substrate by EB-PVD. Two NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite targets—one as green compact and the other after sintering at 1250 °C—were used for the deposition. Though the targets varied with respect to physical properties such as crystallite size (11–45 nm) and relative density (44% and 96%), the resultant thin films exhibited a mean crystallite size in the range of 20–25 nm underlining the role of physical nature of deposition. In spite of the crystalline nature of the targets and similar elemental concentration, a transformation from amorphous to crystalline structure was observed in thin films on using sintered target. Postannealing of the as deposited film at 800 °C resulted in a polycrystalline structure consisting of CeO{sub 2} and NiO. Deposition using pure CeO{sub 2} or NiO as target resulted in the preferential orientation toward (111) and (200) planes, respectively, showing the influence of adatoms on the evaporation and growth process of NiO-CeO{sub 2} composite. The results demonstrate the influence of electron beam gun power on the adatom energy for the growth process of composite oxide thin films.

  16. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  17. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, K.; Izumi, H.; Watanabe-Nakayama, T.; Asakawa, H.; Fukuma, T.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  18. In situ analysis of thin film deposition processes using time-of-flight (TOF) ion beam analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Im, J. |; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lin, Y.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.H.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Non-destructive, in situ methods for characterization of thin film growth phenomena is key to understand thin film growth processes and to develop more reliable deposition procedures, especially for complex layered structures involving multi-phase materials. However, surface characterization methods that use either electrons (e.g. AES or XPS) or low energy ions (SIMS) require an UHV environment and utilize instrumentation which obstructs line of sight access to the substrate and are therefore incompatible with line of sight deposition methods and thin film deposition processes which introduce gas, either part of the deposition or in order to produce the desired phase. We have developed a means of differentially pumping both the ion beam source and detectors of a TOF ion beam surface analysis spectrometer that does not interfere with the deposition process and permits compositional and structural analysis of the growing film in the present system, at pressures up to several mTorr. Higher pressures are feasible with modified source-detector geometry. In order to quantify the sensitivity of Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS), we have measured the signal intensity for stabilized clean metals in a variety of gas environments as a function of the ambient gas species and pressure, and ion beam species and kinetic energy. Results are interpreted in terms of collision cross sections which are compared with known gas phase scattering data and provide an apriori basis for the evaluation of time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopies (ToF-ISARS) for various industrial processing environments which involve both inert and reactive cases. The cross section data for primary ion-gas molecule and recoiled atom-gas molecule interactions are also provided. from which the maximum operating pressure in any experimental configuration can be obtained.

  19. Low-Volatility Model Demonstrates Humidity Affects Environmental Toxin Deposition on Plastics at a Molecular Level.

    PubMed

    Hankett, Jeanne M; Collin, William R; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan; Duhaime, Melissa

    2016-02-02

    Despite the ever-increasing prevalence of plastic debris and endocrine disrupting toxins in aquatic ecosystems, few studies describe their interactions in freshwater environments. We present a model system to investigate the deposition/desorption behaviors of low-volatility lake ecosystem toxins on microplastics in situ and in real time. Molecular interactions of gas-phase nonylphenols (NPs) with the surfaces of two common plastics, poly(styrene) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), were studied using quartz crystal microbalance and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. NP point sources were generated under two model environments: plastic on land and plastic on a freshwater surface. We found the headspace above calm water provides an excellent environment for NP deposition and demonstrate significant NP deposition on plastic within minutes at relevant concentrations. Further, NP deposits and orders differently on both plastics under humid versus dry environments. We attributed the unique deposition behaviors to surface energy changes from increased water content during the humid deposition. Lastly, nanograms of NP remained on microplastic surfaces hours after initial NP introduction and agitating conditions, illustrating feasibility for plastic-bound NPs to interact with biota and surrounding matter. Our model studies reveal important interactions between low-volatility environmental toxins and microplastics and hold potential to correlate the environmental fate of endocrine disrupting toxins in the Great Lakes with molecular behaviors.

  20. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  1. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  2. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  3. Control of chemical composition of PZT thin films produced by ion-beam deposition from a multicomponent target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubucek, Jiri; Vapenka, David; Horodyska, Petra; Vaclavik, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is widely used for its ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties, which are conditioned by perovskite structure. Crystallization into this desired phase is determined also by a proper stoichiometry, where the lead concentration is a crucial parameter. The crystallization process takes place during annealing under high temperatures, which is linked to heavy lead losses, so the lead has to be in excess. Therefore, this paper is devoted to the control of chemical composition of PZT thin films deposited via ion beam sputtering (IBS). A commonly used approach for IBS relies on employing a multicomponent target to obtain films with the same composition as that of the target. However, in the case of PZT it is favorable to have the ability to controllably change the chemical composition of thin films in order to acquire high perovskite content. Our study revealed that the determinative lead content in PZT layers prepared by simple and dual ion-beam deposition from a multicomponent target can be easily controlled by the power of primary ion source. At the same time, the composition is also dependent on the substrate temperature and the power of assistant ion source. Thin PZT films with more than 30 % lead excess were acquired from a stoichiometric multicomponent target (i.e. a target without any lead excess). We can therefore propose several possible sets of deposition parameters suitable for the PZT deposition via IBS to obtain high perovskite content.

  4. Atomic layer deposition by reaction of molecular oxygen with tetrakisdimethylamido-metal precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Provine, J Schindler, Peter; Torgersen, Jan; Kim, Hyo Jin; Karnthaler, Hans-Peter; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-01-15

    Tetrakisdimethylamido (TDMA) based precursors are commonly used to deposit metal oxides such as TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and HfO{sub 2} by means of chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) have been demonstrated with TDMA-metal precursors. While the reactions of TDMA-type precursors with water and oxygen plasma have been studied in the past, their reactivity with pure O{sub 2} has been overlooked. This paper reports on experimental evaluation of the reaction of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) and several metal organic precursors based on TDMA ligands. The effect of O{sub 2} exposure duration and substrate temperature on deposition and film morphology is evaluated and compared to thermal reactions with H{sub 2}O and PEALD with O{sub 2} plasma.

  5. On the magnetic properties of iron nanostructures fabricated via focused electron beam induced deposition and autocatalytic growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, F.; Drost, M.; Vollnhals, F.; Späth, A.; Carrasco, E.; Fink, R. H.; Marbach, H.

    2016-09-01

    We employ Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) in combination with autocatalytic growth (AG) processes to fabricate magnetic nanostructures with controllable shapes and thicknesses. Following this route, different Fe deposits were prepared on silicon nitride membranes under ultra-high vacuum conditions and studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy (STXM). The originally deposited Fe nanostructures are composed of pure iron, especially when fabricated via autocatalytic growth processes. Quantitative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to derive information on the thickness dependent composition. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in STXM was used to derive the magnetic properties of the EBID prepared structures. STXM and XMCD analysis evinces the existence of a thin iron oxide layer at the deposit-vacuum interface, which is formed during exposure to ambient conditions. We were able to extract magnetic hysteresis loops for individual deposits from XMCD micrographs with varying external magnetic field. Within the investigated thickness range (2-16 nm), the magnetic coercivity, as evaluated from the width of the hysteresis loops, increases with deposit thickness and reaches a maximum value of ˜160 Oe at around 10 nm. In summary, we present a viable technique to fabricate ferromagnetic nanostructures in a controllable way and gain detailed insight into their chemical and magnetic properties.

  6. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  7. Deposition of polymers on structures with nano-gaps fabricated between carbon nanotubes by focused ion beam etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashkin, A. V.; Emelianov, A. V.; Tsarik, K. A.; Bobrinetskiy, I. I.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and SiO2 etching effects was studied and was found that using different techniques of focused ion beam (FIB) exposure and using two pass etching leads to a significant difference in the etching rate of CNTs relatively of SiO2 and directly individually oxide itself. The parameters annealing of the structures to remove the effects of the charge arising from the etching of CNT on SiO2 was determined and the effect of the charge on the effects of the deposition of organic molecules from solution was studied. Different behavior of deposition of polar and non-polar polymer materials on charged regions with width less than 100 nm was found. Obtained structures was investigated by SEM, AFM methods and for structures with polyaniline deposited CVC was measured and by comparison with literature and experimental data analysis of polyaniline structuring in nano-scale gap formed with FIB was carried out.

  8. Synthesis of atomic layers of hybridized h-BNC by depositing h-BN on graphene via ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Liu, H.; Yin, Z. G.; Wang, D. G.; Wang, Y.; You, J. B.; Wu, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the deposition of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on graphene by ion beam sputtering deposition. Both graphene domains and films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition were used as substrates. In the case of graphene domains, it was found that the h-BN domains were preferentially grown on the baked Cu surface instead of graphene due to the highly catalytic activity of Cu. On the other hand, the higher ejection energy of sputtered particles leads to the mixing of boron/nitrogen atoms and carbon atoms. Consequently, the h-BNC films consisting of the hybrid atomic layers of h-BN and graphene domains were formed when the graphene films were used as substrates. This work provides a promising and accessible route for the synthesis of hybridized h-BNC material.

  9. Fast atom diffraction inside a molecular beam epitaxy chamber, a rich combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, M.; Atkinson, P.; Zugarramurdi, A.; Eddrief, M.; Finocchi, F.; Etgens, V. H.; Momeni, A.; Khemliche, H.; Borisov, A. G.; Roncin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Two aspects of the contribution of grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) to molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are reviewed here: the ability of GIFAD to provide in-situ a precise description of the atomic-scale surface topology, and its ability to follow larger-scale changes in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth. Recent experimental and theoretical results obtained for the He atom beam incident along the highly corrugated [ 1 1 bar 0 ] direction of the β2(2 × 4) reconstructed GaAs(001) surface are summarized. We also discuss the measurements and calculations for the beam incidence along the weakly corrugated [010] direction where a periodicity twice smaller than expected is observed. The combination of the experiment, quantum scattering matrix calculations, and semiclassical analysis allows structural characteristics of the surface to be revealed. For the in situ measurements of GIFAD during molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs on GaAs surface we analyze the change in elastic and inelastic contributions in the scattered beam, and the variation of the diffraction pattern in polar angle scattering. This analysis outlines the robustness, the simplicity and the richness of the GIFAD as a technique to monitor the layer-by-layer epitaxial growth.

  10. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    PubMed Central

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T. P., Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the

  11. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T P, Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2015-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the different

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-29

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω{sub 1} + ω{sub 2} laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n{sub 0}, ω{sub 1} laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ{sub 0}) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n{sub 0} or ρ{sub 0} breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n{sub 0} and ρ{sub 0} in a way that scales uniformly with ρ{sub e}, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  13. Proposed Molecular Beam Determination of Energy Partition in the Photodissociation of Polyatomic Molecules

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zare, P. N.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1964-01-29

    Conventional photochemical experiments give no information about the partitioning of energy between translational recoil and internal excitation of the fragment molecules formed in photodissociation of a polyatomic molecule. In a molecular beam experiment, it becomes possible to determine the energy partition from the form of the laboratory angular distribution of one of the photodissociation products. A general kinematic analysis is worked out in detail, and the uncertainty introduced by the finite angular resolution of the apparatus and the velocity spread in the parent beam is examined. The experimental requirements are evaluated for he photolysis of methyl iodide by the 2537 angstrom Hg line.

  14. Electrical properties of nominally undoped silicon nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jan; Fleischer, Frank; Breitenstein, Otwin; Schubert, Luise; Werner, Peter; Gösele, Ulrich; Zacharias, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Single undoped Si nanowires were electrically characterized. The nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on n+ silicon substrates and were contacted by platinum/iridium tips. I-V curves were measured and electron beam induced current investigations were performed on single nanowires. It was found that the nanowires have an apparent resistivity of 0.85Ωcm, which is much smaller than expected for undoped Si nanowires. The conductance is explained by hopping conductivity at the Si -SiO2 interface of the nanowire surface.

  15. Upgrading the sensitivity of spectroscopy gas analysis with application of supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V.; Domracheva, E.; Sobakinskaya, E.; Chernyaeva, M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose an approach to increase a sensitivity of microwave and THz spectroscopy, that involves application of supersonic molecular beams. The key advantage offered by such an approach is that a gas temperature can be decreased along with an increase in the gas density, which results in a much greater number of molecules interacting with radiation and, hence, in a higher absorption coefficient. This effect has been demonstrated experimentally on supersonic CO and NO beams, using a phase manipulation microwave spectrometer. The absorption coefficient was found to be three orders of magnitude higher than the value of gas absorption coefficient in a standard 1-m long cell at room temperature.

  16. Molecular Beam Optical Study of Gold Sulfide and Gold Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Gold-sulfur and gold-oxygen bonds are key components to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. A major theoretical challenge for describing this bonding is correctly accounting for the large relativistic and electron correlation effects. Such effects are best studied in diatomic, AuX, molecules. Recently, the observed AuS electronic state energy ordering was measured and compared to a simple molecular orbital diagram prediction. Here we more thoroughly investigate the nature of the electronic states of both AuS and AuO from the analysis of high-resolution (FWHM\\cong35MHz) optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the (0,0){B}2Σ--{X}2Π3/2 bands. The determined fine and hyperfine parameters for the {B}2Σ- state of AuO differ from those extracted from the analysis of a hot, Doppler-limited, spectrum. It is demonstrated that the nature of the {B}2Σ- states of AuO and AuS are radically different. The magnetic tuning of AuO and AuS indicates that the {B}2Σ- states are heavily contaminated. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1265885. D. L. Kokkin, R. Zhang, T. C. Steimle, I. A. Wyse, B. W. Pearlman and T. D. Varberg, J. Phys. Chem. A., 119(48), 4412, 2015. L. C. O'Brien, B. A. Borchert, A. Farquhar, S. Shaji, J. J. O'Brien and R. W. Field, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 252(2), 136, 2008

  17. Comparative Study of Solid-Phase Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD, Plasma-Enhanced CVD, and Electron-Beam Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Stradins, P.; Kunz, O.; Young, D. L.; Yan, Y.; Jones, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Reedy, R. C.; Branz, H. M.; Aberle, A. G.; Wang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-phase crystallization (SPC) rates are compared in amorphous silicon films prepared by three different methods: hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and electron-beam physical vapor deposition (e-beam). Random SPC proceeds approximately 5 and 13 times slower in PECVD and e-beam films, respectively, as compared to HWCVD films. Doping accelerates random SPC in e-beam films but has little effect on the SPC rate of HWCVD films. In contrast, the crystalline growth front in solid-phase epitaxy experiments propagates at similar speed in HWCVD, PECVD, and e-beam amorphous Si films. This strongly suggests that the observed large differences in random SPC rates originate from different nucleation rates in these materials while the grain growth rates are relatively similar. The larger grain sizes observed for films that exhibit slower random SPC support this suggestion.

  18. LC-MS with electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Ori; Amirav, Aviv

    2005-06-01

    A new approach is described for the combination of electron ionization and LC-MS based on sample ionization as vibrationally cold molecules in a supersonic molecular beam (Cold EI). Cold EI of sample compounds in liquid solutions (methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc.) is achieved through spray formation, followed by soft thermal vaporization of the sample particles prior to their supersonic expansion and direct electron ionization of the sample compounds while they are contained in a supersonic molecular beam (SMB). Cold EI mass spectra were demonstrated to combine an enhanced molecular ion and improved mass spectral information (in comparison with standard EI), plus all the library searchable fragments. Cold EI enables the ionization of a broad range of compounds, including the full range of non-polar samples. Four orders of magnitude linear dynamic range is demonstrated and a detection limit of 2 pg was achieved for a 774 amu compound in single ion monitoring mode at m/z = 774. The method and apparatus are under continuous development and we feel that it can excel particularly in the analysis of unknown samples, while enabling fast LC-MS analysis through automated mass spectral deconvolution of coeluting LC peaks. In addition, the same MS system can also serve as an advanced GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams.

  19. Organic and inorganic–organic thin film structures by molecular layer deposition: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Summary The possibility to deposit purely organic and hybrid inorganic–organic materials in a way parallel to the state-of-the-art gas-phase deposition method of inorganic thin films, i.e., atomic layer deposition (ALD), is currently experiencing a strongly growing interest. Like ALD in case of the inorganics, the emerging molecular layer deposition (MLD) technique for organic constituents can be employed to fabricate high-quality thin films and coatings with thickness and composition control on the molecular scale, even on complex three-dimensional structures. Moreover, by combining the two techniques, ALD and MLD, fundamentally new types of inorganic–organic hybrid materials can be produced. In this review article, we first describe the basic concepts regarding the MLD and ALD/MLD processes, followed by a comprehensive review of the various precursors and precursor pairs so far employed in these processes. Finally, we discuss the first proof-of-concept experiments in which the newly developed MLD and ALD/MLD processes are exploited to fabricate novel multilayer and nanostructure architectures by combining different inorganic, organic and hybrid material layers into on-demand designed mixtures, superlattices and nanolaminates, and employing new innovative nanotemplates or post-deposition treatments to, e.g., selectively decompose parts of the structure. Such layer-engineered and/or nanostructured hybrid materials with exciting combinations of functional properties hold great promise for high-end technological applications. PMID:25161845

  20. Damage evaluation in metal structures subjected to high energy deposition due to particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapin, Martina; Peroni, Lorenzo; Dallocchio, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    The unprecedented energy intensities of modern hadron accelerators yield special problems with the materials that are placed close to or into the high intensity beams. The energy stored in a single beam of LHC particle accelerator is equivalent to about 80 kg of TNT explosive, stored in a transverse beam area with a typical value of 0.2 mm×0.2 mm. The materials placed close to the beam are used at, or even beyond, their damage limits. However, it is very difficult to predict structural efficiency and robustness accurately: beam-induced damage for high energy and high intensity occurs in a regime where practical experience does not exist. The interaction between high energy particle beams and metals induces a sudden non uniform temperature increase. This provokes a dynamic response of the structure entailing thermal stress waves and thermally induced vibrations or even the failure of the component. This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on a copper component due to the impact with a 7 TeV proton beam generated by LHC. The case study represents an accidental case consequent to an abnormal release of the beam: the energy delivered on the component is calculated using the FLUKA code and then used as input in the numerical simulations, that are carried out via the FEM code LS-DYNA.

  1. Focused neutron beam dose deposition profiles in tissue equivalent materials: a pilot study for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon R.; Welsh, James; Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu H.

    1997-02-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been limited by the inability to direct neutrons toward the therapeutic target and away from sensitive normal tissues. The recently developed Kumakhov lens has focused a broad incident low energy neutron beam in air to a sub-mm spot. This study examines the radiation does distribution of a converging beam passing through tissue equivalent materials. A neutron beam exiting a focusing lens is directed toward a stack of thin radiochromic media sandwiched between plastic sheets. The depth dose and beam profile within the tissue equivalent materials are determined by optical scanning and image processing of the individual radiochromic media sheets, a polymer based dosimetry medium which darkens upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The alpha particle emission from boron is examined by substituting a plastic sheet with a 6Li enriched lithium carbonate sheet positioned at the focal plane. The information will help determine the feasibility of applying the focused neutron beam to BNCT for therapy.

  2. Identification and roles of nonstoichiometric oxygen in amorphous Ta2O5 thin films deposited by electron beam and sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    The morphology and composition of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) thin films prepared by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP) were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectometry (XRR), atomic force microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). GIXRD revealed an amorphous nature for both films, and XRR showed that the density of the Ta2O5-EB films was lower than that of the Ta2O5-SP films; both films have lower density than the bulk value. A larger amount of molecular water and peroxo species were detected for the Ta2O5-EB films by FTIR performed in ambient atmosphere. XPS analyses performed in vacuum confirmed the presence of hydroxyl groups, but no trace of chemisorbed molecular water was detected. In addition, a higher oxygen nonstoichiometry (higher O/Ta ratio) was found for the EB films. From these results, we conclude that the oxygen nonstoichiometry of the EB film accounted for its lower density and higher amount of absorbed molecular water. The results also suggest the importance of understanding the dependence of the structural and chemical properties of thin amorphous oxide films on the deposition process.

  3. Properties of large area ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited by ionized cluster beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levenson, L. L.; Stan, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1991-01-01

    ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) films have been produced by simultaneous deposition of Er, Ba, and Cu from three ionized cluster beam (ICB) sources at acceleration voltages of 0.3 to 0.5 kV. Combining ozone oxidation with ICB deposition at 650 C eliminated any need of post annealing processing. The substrates were rotated at 10 rotations per minute during the deposition which took place at a rate of about 3 to 4 nm. Films with areas up to 70 mm in diameter have been made by ICB deposition. These films, 100 nm thick, were deposited on SrTiO3 (100) substrates at 650 C in a mixture of six percent O3 in O2 at a total pressure of 4 x 10(exp -4) Torr. They had T(sub c) ranging from 84.3 K to 86.8 K over a 70 mm diameter and J(sub c) above 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K. X ray diffraction measurements of the three samples showed preferential c-axis orientation normal to the substrate surface. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of the three samples also show some texture dependence on sample position. For the three samples, there is a correlation between SEM texture, full width at half-maximum of rocking curves and J(sub c) versus temperature curves.

  4. Principles and Design of a Zeeman–Sisyphus Decelerator for Molecular Beams

    PubMed Central

    Tarbutt, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explore a technique for decelerating molecules using a static magnetic field and optical pumping. Molecules travel through a spatially varying magnetic field and are repeatedly pumped into a weak‐field seeking state as they move towards each strong field region, and into a strong‐field seeking state as they move towards weak field. The method is time‐independent and so is suitable for decelerating both pulsed and continuous molecular beams. By using guiding magnets at each weak field region, the beam can be simultaneously guided and decelerated. By tapering the magnetic field strength in the strong field regions, and exploiting the Doppler shift, the velocity distribution can be compressed during deceleration. We develop the principles of this deceleration technique, provide a realistic design, use numerical simulations to evaluate its performance for a beam of CaF, and compare this performance to other deceleration methods. PMID:27629547

  5. Energy deposition of H and He ion beams in hydroxyapatite films: A study with implications for ion-beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limandri, Silvina; de Vera, Pablo; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M.; Mello, Alexandre; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Behar, Moni; Abril, Isabel

    2014-02-01

    Ion-beam cancer therapy is a promising technique to treat deep-seated tumors; however, for an accurate treatment planning, the energy deposition by the ions must be well known both in soft and hard human tissues. Although the energy loss of ions in water and other organic and biological materials is fairly well known, scarce information is available for the hard tissues (i.e., bone), for which the current stopping power information relies on the application of simple additivity rules to atomic data. Especially, more knowledge is needed for the main constituent of human bone, calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), which constitutes 58% of its mass composition. In this work the energy loss of H and He ion beams in HAp films has been obtained experimentally. The experiments have been performed using the Rutherford backscattering technique in an energy range of 450-2000 keV for H and 400-5000 keV for He ions. These measurements are used as a benchmark for theoretical calculations (stopping power and mean excitation energy) based on the dielectric formalism together with the MELF-GOS (Mermin energy loss function-generalized oscillator strength) method to describe the electronic excitation spectrum of HAp. The stopping power calculations are in good agreement with the experiments. Even though these experimental data are obtained for low projectile energies compared with the ones used in hadron therapy, they validate the mean excitation energy obtained theoretically, which is the fundamental quantity to accurately assess energy deposition and depth-dose curves of ion beams at clinically relevant high energies. The effect of the mean excitation energy choice on the depth-dose profile is discussed on the basis of detailed simulations. Finally, implications of the present work on the energy loss of charged particles in human cortical bone are remarked.

  6. Properties of high k gate dielectric gadolinium oxide deposited on Si (1 0 0) by dual ion beam deposition (DIBD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ping; Chai, Chun-Lin; Yang, Shao-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Kai; Song, Shu-Lin; Li, Yan-Li; Chen, Nuo-Fu

    2004-09-01

    Gadolinium oxide thin films have been prepared on silicon (1 0 0) substrates with a low-energy dual ion-beam epitaxial technique. Substrate temperature was an important factor to affect the crystal structures and textures in an ion energy range of 100-500 eV. The films had a monoclinic Gd2O3 structure with preferred orientation (4 bar 0 2) at low substrate temperatures. When the substrate temperature was increased, the orientation turned to (2 0 2), and finally, the cubic structure appeared at the substrate temperature of 700 °C, which disagreed with the previous report because of the ion energy. The AES studies found that Gadolinium oxide shared Gd2O3 structures, although there were a lot of oxygen deficiencies in the films, and the XPS results confirmed this. AFM was also used to investigate the surface images of the samples. Finally, the electrical properties were presented.

  7. All-wurtzite (In,Ga)As-(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Siušys, Aloyzas; Sadowski, Janusz; Sawicki, Maciej; Kret, Sławomir; Wojciechowski, Tomasz; Gas, Katarzyna; Szuszkiewicz, Wojciech; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Story, Tomasz

    2014-08-13

    Structural and magnetic properties of (In,Ga)As-(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(111)B substrate with gold catalyst have been investigated. (In,Ga)As core nanowires were grown at high temperature (500 °C) whereas (Ga,Mn)As shells were deposited on the {11̅00} side facets of the cores at much lower temperature (220 °C). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images and high spectral resolution Raman scattering data show that both the cores and the shells of the nanowires have wurtzite crystalline structure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations show smooth (Ga,Mn)As shells containing 5% of Mn epitaxially deposited on (In,Ga)As cores containing about 10% of In without any misfit dislocations at the core-shell interface. With the In content in the (In,Ga)As cores larger than 5% the (In,Ga)As lattice parameter is higher than that of (Ga,Mn)As and the shell is in the tensile strain state. Elaborated magnetic studies indicate the presence of ferromagnetic coupling in (Ga,Mn)As shells at the temperatures in excess of 33 K. This coupling is maintained only in separated mesoscopic volumes resulting in an overall superparamagnetic behavior which gets blocked below ∼ 17 K.

  8. Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Gas Cluster Ion Beam Prepared GaSb Substrates: Towards Improved Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswami, Kannan; Shivashankar, Vangala; Dauplaise, Helen; Allen, Lisa; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Bliss, David; Goodhue, William

    2008-04-01

    A key problem in producing mid-infrared optoelectronic and low-power electronic devices in the GaSb material system is the lack of substrates with appropriate surfaces for epitaxial growth. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaSb results in surface damage accompanied by tenacious oxides that do not easily desorb. To overcome this, we have developed a process using gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) to remove surface damage and produce engineered surface oxides. In this paper, we present surface modification results on GaSb substrates using O2-, CF4/O2-, and HBr-GCIB processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of GCIB produced surface layers showed the presence of mixed Ga- and Sb-oxides, with mostly Ga-oxides at the interface, desorbing at temperatures ranging 530°C to 560°C. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaSb/AlGaSb layers showed that GCIB surfaces yielded smooth defect free substrate to epi transitions as compared to CMP surfaces. Furthermore, HBr-GCIB surfaces exhibited neither dislocation layers nor discernable interfaces, indicating complete oxide desorbtion prior to epigrowth on a clean single crystal template. Atomic force microscopy of GCIB epilayers exhibited smooth surfaces with characteristic step-terrace formations comprising monatomic steps and wide terraces. The HBr-GCIB process can be easily adapted to a large scale manufacturing process for epi-ready GaSb.

  9. Computer-controlled ion beam deposition systems for high T(sub c) superconductor and other multi-component oxide thin films and layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Auciello, O.; Kingon, A. I.; Ameen, M. S.; Graettinger, T. M.; Rou, C. S.; Soble, C. S.

    A single beam, multiple target (SBMT) deposition system which features a rotating target holder with either elemental or simple compound targets has been developed for the production of layered thin film structures and multicomponent oxide, silicide or other compound thin films. We are employing the SBMT ion beam sputtering system for the deposition of high temperature superconducting films and electro-optical multilayer structures. The beam-target-substrate geometry and ion beam characteristics are designed to minimize beam implantation and secondary sputtering effects, while maintaining high deposition rates. Consequently, the amount of energy which is deposited into the film may be controlled providing enough energy to promote activated processes, such as the in-situ formation of oriented crystal structures of high temperature superconducting materials, while minimizing amorphization and gas incorporation. All parameters necessary to control the film properties are under computer control. A deposition cycle, defined as a number of sequential steps may be easily modified or added to previously existing deposition cycles, thereby permitting the creation of complicated deposition procedures suitable for the production of films with highly reproducible properties for research purposes, and the in-situ fabrication of complex devices for technological applications. Examples are given of the capabilities of the technique as they apply to the production of high T(sub c) superconducting devices.

  10. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Russell, M; Henry, M; Kim, S S; Naik, R R; Voevodin, A A; Jang, S S; Tsukruk, V V; Fedorov, A G

    2015-09-28

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an "n-p-n" junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 10(18) e(-) per cm(2)). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 10(19) e(-) per cm(2) results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, "direct-write" functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.

  11. ZnTe nanowires grown catalytically on GaAs (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, E.; Sadowski, J.; DłuŻewski, P.; Kret, S.; Presz, A.; Baczewski, L. T.; Łusakowska, E.; Wróbel, J.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the first successful growth of ZnTe nanowires and on their basic structural properties. The nanowires were produced by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with the use of mechanism of catalytically enhanced growth. A thin layer of gold layer (3 to 20 Å thick) annealed in high vacuum prior to the nanowires growth was used as a source of catalytic nanoparticles. Annealing of GaAs substrate with gold layer, performed prior to the MBE growth, leads to formation of Au-Ga eutectic droplets. The presence of Au-Ga droplets on GaAs substrate surface induce the ZnTe nanowire growth via vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, in growth conditions differing form those used in the molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnTe layers only in the substrate temperature.

  12. The Utility of Droplet Elimination by Thermal Annealing Technique for Fabrication of GaN/AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Structure by Radio Frequency Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Wataru; Hirayama, Hideki

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the utility of a droplet elimination by thermal annealing (DETA) technique during the radio-frequency molecular beam epitaxy growth of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure. DETA is a method in which droplets deposited on the surface are eliminated by temporarily increasing the substrate temperature. DETA is a useful method which makes it possible not only to increase the number of periods in the QC structure, but also to improve the surface and structural properties of the QC structure. We could successfully increase the radiant intensity from a QCL sample by increasing the number of periods in the stacked QC structure with the DETA method.

  13. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs.

  14. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 1,2-Difluoroethane in a Molecular Beam: A Case Study of Vibrational Mode-Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    Spectroscopy of 1,2- Difluoroethane in a Molecular Beam: A Case Study of Vibrational Mode-Coupling by Steven W. Mork, C. Cameron Miller, and Laura A...and sale; its distribution is unlimited. 92-14657 l9lll l l l , II a HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF 1,2- DIFLUOROETHANE IN A MOLECULAR BEAM: A CASE...14853-1301 Abstract The high resolution infrared spectrum of 1,2- difluoroethane (DFE) in a molecular beam has been obtained over the 2978-2996 cm-1

  15. Molecular Depth Profiling using a C(60) Cluster Beam: the Role of Impact Energy.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Cheng, Juan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2008-10-23

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected C(60) ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of sputter depth profiles acquired for a 300-nm Trehalose film on silicon were studied as a function of the kinetic impact energy of the projectile ions. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple model describing the balance between sputter erosion and ion induced chemical damage. It is shown that the efficiency of the projectile to clean up the fragmentation debris produced by its own impact represents a key parameter governing the success of molecular depth profile analysis.

  16. Gas-phase reactions in extraterrestrial environments: laboratory investigations by crossed molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated gas-phase reactions of N((2)D) with the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Titan by the crossed molecular beam technique. In all cases, molecular products containing a novel CN bond are formed, thus suggesting possible routes of formation of gas-phase nitriles in the atmosphere of Titan and primordial Earth. The same approach has been recently extended to the study of radical-radical reactions, such as the reaction of atomic oxygen with the CH(3) and C(3)H(5) radicals. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified.

  17. Molecular beams entwined with quantum theory: A bouquet for Max Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, D.

    2001-01-01

    In an era when the fledgling quantum theory was uncertain and even gave contradictory answers, Otto Stern undertook to employ molecular beams to test directly fundamental aspects of the theory. During 1921-1935, this led to five decisive experiments reviewed here, resulting in the discovery or demonstration of space quantization, de Broglie matter waves, anomalous magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, recoil of an atom on emission of a photon, and the limitation of scattering cross-sections for molecular collisions imposed by the uncertainty principle.

  18. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  19. Mn2Au: body-centered-tetragonal bimetallic antiferromagnets grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chun; Liao, Zhi-Min; Sofin, R G Sumesh; Feng, Gen; Ma, Xiu-Mei; Shick, Alexander B; Mryasov, Oleg N; Shvets, Igor V

    2012-12-11

    Mn(2)Au, a layered bimetal, is successfully grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The experiments and theoretical calculations presented suggest that Mn(2)Au film is antiferromagnetic with a very low critical temperature. The antiferromagnetic nature is demonstrated by measuring the exchange-bias effect of Mn(2)Au/Fe bilayers. This study establishes a primary basis for further research of this new antiferromagnet in spin-electronic device applications.

  20. Pure electron-electron dephasing in percolative aluminum ultrathin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Wei; Wu, Yue-Han; Chang, Li; Liang, Chi-Te; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully grown ultrathin continuous aluminum film by molecular beam epitaxy. This percolative aluminum film is single crystalline and strain free as characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The weak anti-localization effect is observed in the temperature range of 1.4 to 10 K with this sample, and it reveals that, for the first time, the dephasing is purely caused by electron-electron inelastic scattering in aluminum.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and structural characterization of ZnS on (001) GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, R. G., II; Huang, P. C.; Stock, S. R.; Summers, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of surface nucleation processes on the quality of ZnS layers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Reflection high energy electron diffraction indicated that nucleation at high temperatures produced more planar surfaces than nucleation at low temperatures, but the crystalline quality as assessed by X-ray double crystal diffractometry is relatively independent of nucleation temperature. A critical factor in layer quality was the initial roughness of the GaAs surfaces.

  2. UV ozone cleaning of silicon substrates in silicon molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Michiharu

    1984-11-01

    This letter reports UV ozone cleaning of Si substrates for obtaining defect-free molecular beam epitaxial films by low-temperature in vacuum preheating. By using UV ozone cleaning, the high temperatures above 1200 °C required for removing surface carbon in the conventional method can be significantly lowered to below 1000 °C, since the UV ozone cleaning functions to remove carbon.

  3. Onset of stacking faults in InP nanowires grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, D. M.; Mazzetti, V. G. M.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    InP nanowires (NWs) were grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy on InP (111)B substrates, using Au nanoparticles as a growth catalyst. The rod-shaped NWs exhibited hexagonal sidewall facets oriented along the {-211} family of crystal planes for all NW diameters, indicating minimal sidewall growth. Stacking faults, when present, were concentrated near the NW tips, while NWs with lengths less than 300nm were completely free of stacking faults.

  4. Effects of vacuum annealing and oxygen ion beam bombarding on the electrical and optical properties of ITO films deposited by E-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Hang, Lingxia

    2012-10-01

    Tin doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive thin films with composition of 10 wt% SnO2 and 89.8 wt% In2O3 have been deposited by electron beam evaporation technique on K9 glass substrates at room temperature. The post annealing processes are done in vacuum with different annealing temperature at 100, 200, 300 and 350 ° for 1 hour, respectively. The oxygen ion energy is 800 eV; oxygen ion beam bombarding time is 10,20,30,40 and 50min, respectively. The results show that conductivity of ITO thin films are improved by increasing annealing temperature. The resistivity of the ITO thin films decrease from 5.2×10-3Ω •cm at room temperature to 1.3×10-3Ω •cm(350 °C). The transmittance values of all samples in the visible range have been increased. As the oxygen ion beam bombarding time increases the resistivity reduce from 5.2×10-3Ω •cm to 9×10-4Ω •cm, the transmittance value improve from 66% to 82% at 550nm. Finally, the vacuum annealing and oxygen ion beam bombarding are done simultaneously, at temperature of 350 °C for 1 hours, ion bombardment time for 40 min. The resistivity of obtained ITO thin film is 7×10-4Ω •cm. The maximum transmittance value is above 89% in the visible wavelength region.

  5. Collapse of a composite beam made from ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Thouless, M. D.; Deshpande, V. S.; Fleck, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Hot-pressed laminates with a [0/90]48 lay-up, consisting of 83% by volume of ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres, and 17% by volume of polyurethane (PU) matrix, were cut into cantilever beams and subjected to transverse end-loading. The collapse mechanisms were observed both visually and by X-ray scans. Short beams deform elastically and collapse plastically in longitudinal shear, with a shear strength comparable to that observed in double notch, interlaminar shear tests. In contrast, long cantilever beams deform in bending and collapse via a plastic hinge at the built-in end of the beam. The plastic hinge is formed by two wedge-shaped microbuckle zones that grow in size and in intensity with increasing hinge rotation. This new mode of microbuckling under macroscopic bending involves both elastic bending and shearing of the plies, and plastic shear of the interface between each ply. The double-wedge pattern contrasts with the more usual parallel-sided plastic microbuckle that occurs in uniaxial compression. Finite element simulations and analytical models give additional insight into the dominant material and geometric parameters that dictate the collapse response of the UHMWPE composite beam in bending. Detailed comparisons between the observed and predicted collapse responses are used in order to construct a constitutive model for laminated UHMWPE composites.

  6. A novel gas-vacuum interface for environmental molecular beam studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S.; Pettersson, Jan B. C.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques are commonly used to obtain detailed information about reaction dynamics and kinetics of gas-surface interactions. These experiments are traditionally performed in vacuum and the dynamic state of surfaces under ambient conditions is thereby excluded from detailed studies. Herein we describe the development and demonstration of a new vacuum-gas interface that increases the accessible pressure range in environmental molecular beam (EMB) experiments. The interface consists of a grating close to a macroscopically flat surface, which allows for experiments at pressures above 1 Pa including angularly resolved measurements of the emitted flux. The technique is successfully demonstrated using key molecular beam experiments including elastic helium and inelastic water scattering from graphite, helium and light scattering from condensed adlayers, and water interactions with a liquid 1-butanol surface. The method is concluded to extend the pressure range and flexibility in EMB studies with implications for investigations of high pressure interface phenomena in diverse fields including catalysis, nanotechnology, environmental science, and life science. Potential further improvements of the technique are discussed.

  7. Thermometry of Guided Molecular Beams from a Cryogenic Buffer-Gas Cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-11-18

    A comprehensive characterisation of cold molecular beams from a cryogenic buffer-gas cell, providing insight into the physics of buffer-gas cooling, is presented. Cold molecular beams are extracted from a cryogenic cell by electrostatic guiding, which is also used to measure their velocity distribution. The rotational-state distribution of the molecules is probed by radio-frequency resonant depletion spectroscopy. With the help of complete trajectory simulations, yielding the guiding efficiency for all of the thermally populated states, it is possible to determine both the rotational and the translational temperature of the molecules at the output of the buffer-gas cell. This thermometry method is demonstrated for various regimes of buffer-gas cooling and beam formation as well as for molecular species of different sizes (CH3 F and CF3 CCH). Comparison of the rotational and translational temperatures provides evidence of faster rotational thermalisation for the CH3 F/He system in the limit of low He density. In addition, the relaxation rates for different rotational states appear to be different.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  9. X-ray Diffraction Study on Simple Molecular Glasses Created by Low-Temperature Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yuki; Kofu, Maiko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    The structure of simple molecular glasses has been one of the central issues in the research of glasses. We tried to form the glasses of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen (N2) molecules by slow vapor deposition at 3 K (deposition rate: ca. 10 nm/h). Glassy CO2 was successfully obtained and it crystallized on heating at 25 K, which is lower than the hypothetical glass transition temperature of CO2. The CO2 glass is the simplest molecular glass ever created. The X-ray diffraction patterns and derived pair distribution functions revealed that the glassy CO2 has a structure in which the intermolecular distance is shorter and the intermolecular correlation is much stronger than those of liquid CO2. Orientational glasses, which are positionally ordered and orientationally disordered, of CO and N2 were obtained and they were gradually ordered as the annealing temperature is increased.

  10. The growth of strontium titanate and lutetium ferrite thin films by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Charles M.

    Included in this work is a range of studies on films of homoeptaxial and heteroepitaxial films of SrTiO3 and the first reported phase-pure films of LuFe2O4. We report the structural properties of homoepitaxial (100) SrTiO3 films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). The lattice spacing and x-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curves of stoichiometric MBEgrown SrTiO3 films are indistinguishable from the underlying SrTiO3 substrates. The effect of off-stoichiometry for both strontium-rich and strontium-poor compositions results in lattice expansion with significant changes to the shuttered reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations, XRD, film microstructure, and thermal conductivity. Up to an 80% reduction in Sr(1+x)TiO3 film thermal conductivity is measured for x = -0.1 to 0.5. Significant reduction, from 11.5 to ˜2 W˙m-1K-1, occurs through the formation of Ruddlesden-Popper planar faults. The ability to deposit films with a reduction in thermal conductivity is applicable to thermal barrier coatings and thermoelectrics. Scanning transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the formation of Ruddlesden-Popper planar faults in films with strontium excess. We also show that the band gap of SrTiO3 can be altered by >10% (0.3 eV) by using experimentally realizable biaxial strains providing a new means to accomplish band gap engineering of SrTiO3 and related perovskites. Such band gap manipulation is relevant to applications in solar cells water splitting, transparent conducting oxides, superconductivity, two-dimensional electron liquids, and other emerging oxide electronics. This work also presents the adsorption-controlled growth of single-phase (0001)-oriented epitaxial films of charge ordered multiferroic, LuFe2O4, on (111) MgAl2O4, (111) MgO, and (0001) 6H-SiC substrates in an iron-rich environment at pressures and temperatures where excess iron desorbs from the film surface during growth. Scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals

  11. Molecular Layer Deposition for Surface Modification of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Chunmei; George, Steven M.

    2016-10-21

    Inspired by recent successes in applying molecular layer deposition (MLD) to stabilize lithium-ion (Li-ion) electrodes, this review presents the MLD process and its outstanding attributes for electrochemical applications. The review discusses various MLD materials and their implementation in Li-ion electrodes. The rationale behind these emerging uses of MLD is examined to motivate future efforts on the fundamental understanding of interphase chemistry and the development of new materials for enhanced electrochemical performance.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscope investigations of organic heterostructures prepared by a combination of self-assembly and molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, R.; Toerker, M.; Fritz, T.; Schmitz-Hübsch, T.; Sellam, F.; Leo, K.

    2000-01-01

    We report the realization of organic-organic heteroepitaxy by combining liquid-phase self-assembly with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) gas-phase molecular beam epitaxy. As a model system, we have used self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) prepared by exposing an Au(111)-mica substrate to a dilute solution of decanethiol in ethanol, with subsequent evaporation of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) dye molecules. The well-known (3×3)R30° superstructure of almost upright standing molecules after chemisorption is replaced by the 11.5×3 (33.2 Å) pin-stripe phase with flat lying molecules when the samples are annealed in UHV and coverage decreases. The deposition of PTCDA induces reordering and displacement in the decanethiol SAM. Additional to the 33.2 Å periodicity, the previously reported 22 Å thiol stripe phase can be observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Several PTCDA structures are observed: single and double rows of PTCDA that grow along decanethiol stripes on top of the flat-lying alkane chain groups, as well as densely packed PTCDA monolayer domains embedded into the thiol layer. These exhibit the well-known herringbone structure or a novel square lattice structure. We have also investigated thicker PTCDA islands and observed molecular resolution for a thickness of several monolayers. The structure of the three-dimensional islands can be identified as the α bulk modification.

  13. Transparent oxygen impermeable AlO x thin films on polycarbonate deposited by reactive ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Jin-Wook; Kim, Sang-Mun; Choi, Daiwon; Yoon, K. H.

    2005-08-01

    The AlO x thin films were deposited on the polycarbonate by reactive ion beam sputtering (RIBS) at different oxygen partial pressures where the AlO x thin film with O/Al ratio of 1.5 was formed when oxygen partial pressure increased from 4 × 10 -5 to 2 × 10 -4 Torr. As a result, oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the barrier significantly decreased from 24 cm 3/m 2 day to around 2 cm 3/m 2 day with increase in oxygen partial pressure. Optical transmittances of the films were in the 86-88% range at 550 nm versus 89% for the pure polycarbonate film.

  14. Electron-beam deposition of chromium carbide-based coatings with an ultradispersed structure or a nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletika, I. M.; Ivanov, S. F.; Gnyusov, S. F.; Perovskaya, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Coatings with an ultradispersed structure and a nanostructure, which have a high wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and a satisfactory ductility, are fabricated by electron-beam vacuum-free deposition of a powder mixture of chromium carbide, chromium, and titanium carbide using a relativistic electron accelerator. The increase in the wear resistance and the ductility is shown to be associated with the modifying influence of titanium carbide, which manifests itself in sharp structure refinement the presence of numerous nucleation centers in it in the form of disperse TiC precipitates.

  15. Effect of the working gas of the ion-assisted source on the optical and mechanical properties of SiO2 films deposited by dual ion beam sputtering with Si and SiO2 as the starting materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jean-Yee; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2006-05-20

    Silicon and fused-silica targets are used as the starting materials for depositing silicon oxide (SiO2) films. The SiO2 films are prepared by a dual ion beam sputtering deposition system with a main ion source and an ion-assisted source with different working gases. The films deposited are then examined and compared by using a visible spectrophotometer, a Fourier-transform IR spectrophotometer, an atomic force microscope, and contact angle instruments. A Twyman-Green interferometer is employed to study the film stress by phase-shift interferometry. All the SiO2 films show excellent optical properties with extra-low extinction coefficients (below 2x10(-5)) and have no water absorption. When the working gas is O2 for the ion-assisted source, the deposited SiO2 films show good properties in terms of stress and roughness and with a good molecular bonding structure order for both targets. However, SiO2 films deposited from the fused-silica target had a larger contact angle, while those deposited from the silicon target had 2.5 times the deposition rate.

  16. Characterization of HfO2-SiO2 rugate multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauhut, R.; Nehls, K.; Mechold, L.

    2014-10-01

    Ion beam sputtering (IBS) is a deposition technique being well known for resulting in very dense and damage resistant coatings due to high kinetic energies of the sputtered atoms. While different layers are deposited homogeneously, abrupt interfaces between the materials are the most susceptible part of the stack. Therefore we aim for an improvement of the laser damage threshold by sputtering material mixtures. Using a target with high- and low-index material next to each other, arbitrary refractive indices can be realized by adjusting the target axis. Our material system of choice is HfO2- SiO2, already yielding good results with non-rugate coatings. A comparison in terms of laser damage threshold between these designs and varying refractive index coatings will be shown.

  17. Reversible wettability of electron-beam deposited indium-tin-oxide driven by ns-UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persano, Luana; Del Carro, Pompilio; Pisignano, Dario

    2012-04-09

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely used semiconductor oxides in the field of organic optoelectronics, especially for the realization of anode contacts. Here the authors report on the control of the wettability properties of ITO films deposited by reactive electron beam deposition and irradiated by means of nanosecond-pulsed UV irradiation. The enhancement of the surface water wettability, with a reduction of the water contact angle larger than 50 deg., is achieved by few tens of seconds of irradiation. The analyzed photo-induced wettability change is fully reversible in agreement with a surface-defect model, and it can be exploited to realize optically transparent, conductive surfaces with controllable wetting properties for sensors and microfluidic circuits.

  18. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  19. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  20. Interfacial mixing and internal structure of Pt-containing nanocomposites grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Juntao; Dunn, Kathleen A.; Thiel, Bradley L.; Toth, Milos

    2010-05-15

    Material grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CH{sub 3}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}Pt precursor consists of platinum nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The crystallites are shown to intermix with the amorphous oxide on a Si substrate. The extent of intermixing scales with the electron energy density delivered to the material during growth. Dependencies on electron flux, fluence, and exposure time indicate that the intermixing process is athermal, electron-activated, and rate limited by mass transport inside the solid. Furthermore, the degree of deposit crystallinity is shown to scale with the electron flux and fluence used for EBID. We discuss mechanisms behind the observed changes in nanostructure and implications for the growth of functional materials by EBID.

  1. Interfacial mixing and internal structure of Pt-containing nanocomposites grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Toth, Milos; Dunn, Kathleen A.; Thiel, Bradley L.

    2010-05-01

    Material grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using (CH3)3CH3C5H4Pt precursor consists of platinum nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The crystallites are shown to intermix with the amorphous oxide on a Si substrate. The extent of intermixing scales with the electron energy density delivered to the material during growth. Dependencies on electron flux, fluence, and exposure time indicate that the intermixing process is athermal, electron-activated, and rate limited by mass transport inside the solid. Furthermore, the degree of deposit crystallinity is shown to scale with the electron flux and fluence used for EBID. We discuss mechanisms behind the observed changes in nanostructure and implications for the growth of functional materials by EBID.

  2. Nickel oxide and molybdenum oxide thin films for infrared imaging prepared by biased target ion-beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao; Saint John, David; Jackson, Tom N.; Horn, Mark W.

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium oxide (VOx) thin films have been intensively used as sensing materials for microbolometers. VOx thin films have good bolometric properties such as low resistivity, high negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) and low 1/f noise. However, the processing controllability of VOx fabrication is difficult due to the multiple valence states of vanadium. In this study, metal oxides such as nickel oxide (NiOx) and molybdenum oxide (MoOx) thin films have been investigated as possible new microbolometer sensing materials with improved process controllability. Nickel oxide and molybdenum oxide thin films were prepared by reactive sputtering of nickel and molybdenum metal targets in a biased target ion beam deposition tool. In this deposition system, the Ar+ ion energy (typically lower than 25 eV) and the target bias voltage can be independently controlled since ions are remotely generated. A residual gas analyzer (RGA) is used to precisely control the oxygen partial pressure. A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to monitor the evolution of microstructure and properties of deposited oxides during growth and post-deposition. The properties of deposited oxide thin films depend on processing parameters. The resistivity of the NiOx thin films is in the range of 0.5 to approximately 100 ohm-cm with a TCR from -2%/K to -3.3%/K, where the resistivity of MoOx is between 3 and 2000 ohm-cm with TCR from -2.1%/K to -3.2%/K. We also report on the thermal stability of these deposited oxide thin films.

  3. Optical properties of nanocrystalline Y2O3 thin films grown on quartz substrates by electron beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorczyk, Tadeusz; Biegański, Piotr; Serafińczuk, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    Yttrium oxide thin films of a thickness 221-341 nm were formed onto quartz substrates by reactive physical vapor deposition in an oxygen atmosphere. An electron beam gun was applied as a deposition source. The effect of substrate temperature during film deposition (in the range of 323-673 K) on film structure, surface morphology and optical properties was investigated. The surface morphology studies (with atomic force microscopy and diffuse spectra reflectivity) show that the film surface was relatively smooth with RMS surface roughness in the range of 1.7-3.8 nm. XRD analysis has revealed that all diffraction lines belong to a cubic Y2O3 structure. The films consisted of small nanocrystals. Their average grain size increases from 1.6 nm to 22 nm, with substrate temperature rising from 323 K to 673 K. Optical examinations of transmittance and reflectance were performed in the spectral range of 0.2-2.5 μm. Optical constants and their dispersion curves were determined. Values of the refractive index of the films were in the range of n = 1.79-1.90 (at 0.55 μm) for substrate temperature during film deposition of 323-673 K. The changes in the refractive index upon substrate temperature correspond very well with the increase in the nanocrystals grain diameter and with film porosity.

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy and properties of GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy: effect of thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Makhloufi, Hajer; Boonpeng, Poonyasiri; Mazzucato, Simone; Nicolai, Julien; Arnoult, Alexandre; Hungria, Teresa; Lacoste, Guy; Gatel, Christophe; Ponchet, Anne; Carrère, Hélène; Marie, Xavier; Fontaine, Chantal

    2014-03-17

    We have grown GaAsBi quantum wells by molecular beam epitaxy. We have studied the properties of a 7% Bi GaAsBi quantum well and their variation with thermal annealing. High-resolution X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy have been employed to get some insight into its structural properties. Stationary and time-resolved photoluminescence shows that the quantum well emission, peaking at 1.23 μm at room temperature, can be improved by a rapid annealing at 650°C, while the use of a higher annealing temperature leads to emission degradation and blue-shifting due to the activation of non-radiative centers and bismuth diffusion from the quantum well.

  5. Self-Consistent Simulation of Transport and Energy Deposition of Intense Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams in Solid-Density Matter.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Qiao, B; McGuffey, C; Wei, M S; Grabowski, P E; Beg, F N

    2015-07-31

    The first self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of intense proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter is presented. Both the individual proton slowing-down and the collective beam-plasma interaction effects are taken into account with a new dynamic proton stopping power module that has been added to a hybrid PIC code. In this module, the target local stopping power can be updated at each time step based on its thermodynamic state. For intense proton beams, the reduction of target stopping power from the cold condition due to continuous proton heating eventually leads to broadening of the particle range and energy deposition far beyond the Bragg peak. For tightly focused beams, large magnetic field growth in collective interactions results in self-focusing of the beam and much stronger localized heating of the target.

  6. Tunable molecular orientation and elevated thermal stability of vapor-deposited organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Diane M.; Lyubimov, Ivan; de Pablo, Juan J.; Ediger, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Physical vapor deposition is commonly used to prepare organic glasses that serve as the active layers in light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, and other devices. Recent work has shown that orienting the molecules in such organic semiconductors can significantly enhance device performance. We apply a high-throughput characterization scheme to investigate the effect of the substrate temperature (Tsubstrate) on glasses of three organic molecules used as semiconductors. The optical and material properties are evaluated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. We find that molecular orientation in these glasses is continuously tunable and controlled by Tsubstrate/Tg, where Tg is the glass transition temperature. All three molecules can produce highly anisotropic glasses; the dependence of molecular orientation upon substrate temperature is remarkably similar and nearly independent of molecular length. All three compounds form “stable glasses” with high density and thermal stability, and have properties similar to stable glasses prepared from model glass formers. Simulations reproduce the experimental trends and explain molecular orientation in the deposited glasses in terms of the surface properties of the equilibrium liquid. By showing that organic semiconductors form stable glasses, these results provide an avenue for systematic performance optimization of active layers in organic electronics. PMID:25831545

  7. Industrial ion source technology. [for ion beam etching, surface texturing, and deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma probe surveys were conducted in a 30-cm source to verify that the uniformity in the ion beam is the result of a corresponding uniformity in the discharge-chamber plasma. A 15 cm permanent magnet multipole ion source was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. Procedures were investigated for texturing a variety of seed and surface materials for controlling secondary electron emission, increasing electron absorption of light, and improved attachment of biological tissue for medical implants using argon and tetrafluoromethane as the working gases. The cross section for argon-argon elastic collisions in the ion-beam energy range was calculated from interaction potentials and permits calculation of beam interaction effects that can determine system pumping requirements. The data also indicate that different optimizations of ion-beam machines will be advantageous for long and short runs, with 1 mA-hr/cm being the rough dividing line for run length. The capacity to simultaneously optimize components in an ion-beam machine for a single application, a capacity that is not evident in competitive approaches such as diode sputtering is emphasized.

  8. Direct formation of InAs quantum dots grown on InP (001) by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuster, David; Rivera, Antonio; Alen, Benito; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Luisa

    2009-03-30

    We have developed a growth process that leads to the direct formation of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on InP(001) by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy avoiding the previous formation of quantum wires usually obtained by this technique. The process consists of a periodically alternated deposition of In and As correlated with InAs(4x2){r_reversible}(2x4) surface reconstruction changes. Based on the results obtained by in situ characterization techniques, we propose that the quantum dots formation is possible due to the nucleation of In droplets over the InAs(4x2) surface during the In deposition step and their subsequent crystallization under the As step.

  9. Enhanced catalyst-free nucleation of GaN nanowires on amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobanska, Marta Klosek, Kamil; Borysiuk, Jolanta; Kret, Slawomir; Tchutchulasvili, Giorgi; Gieraltowska, Sylwia; Zytkiewicz, Zbigniew R.

    2014-01-28

    We report on plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrates with a thin amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer deposited by atomic layer deposition. Comparison of nucleation kinetics shows that presence of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer significantly enhances spontaneous nucleation of GaN NWs. Slower nucleation was observed on partially amorphous silicon nitride films. No growth of NWs was found on sapphire substrate under the same growth conditions which we explain by a low density of defects on monocrystalline substrate surface where NWs may nucleate. Our finding shows that tuning of substrate microstructure is an efficient tool to control rate of self-induced nucleation of GaN NWs.

  10. The Cl + O3 reaction: a detailed QCT simulation of molecular beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M; Castillo, J F; Martínez-Haya, B; Aoiz, F J

    2015-10-14

    We have studied in detail the dynamics of the Cl + O3 reaction in the 1-56 kcal mol(-1) collision energy range using quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on a recent potential energy surface (PES) [J. F. Castillo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 8537]. The main goal of this work has been to assess the accuracy of the PES and the reliability of the QCT method by comparison with the existing crossed molecular beam results [J. Zhang and Y. T. Lee J. Phys. Chem. A, 1997, 101, 6485]. For this purpose, we have developed a methodology that allows us to determine the experimental observables in crossed molecular beam experiments (integral and differential cross sections, recoil velocity distributions, scattering angle-recoil velocity polar maps, etc.) as continuous functions of the collision energy. Using these distributions, raw experimental data in the laboratory frame (angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra) have been simulated from first principles with the sole information on the instrumental parameters and taking into account the energy spread. A general good agreement with the experimental data has been found, thereby demonstrating the adequacy of the QCT method and the quality of the PES to describe the dynamics of this reaction at the level of resolution of the existing crossed beam experiments. Some features which are apparent in the differential cross sections have also been analysed in terms of the dynamics of the reaction and its evolution with the collision energy.

  11. Extension of Plasma Source Ion Implantation to Ion Beam Enhanced Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-05

    22, 90 (1989). Nitriding/ Carburizing , Cincinnati, Ohio, Septem- 51. M. A. Lieberman, "Model of Plasma Immersion Ion ber 16-20, 1989. Implantation...TYPE AND OATES COVERED 1990 Final I Feb 89 - 31 Jul 89 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Extension of Plasma Source Ion Implantation to Ion Beam...UL NSN 7540-01.280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) *’@Krab OV ANSI St 139-IS t9-0 Extension of Plasma Source Ion Implantation to Ion Beam Enhanced

  12. Internal transport barrier triggered by non-linear lower hybrid wave deposition under condition of beam-driven toroidal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Q. D.; Budny, R. V.

    2015-03-01

    By using gyro-Landau fluid transport model (GLF23), time-dependent integrated modeling is carried out using TRANSP to explore the dynamic process of internal transport barrier (ITB) formation in the neutral beam heating discharges. When the current profile is controlled by LHCD (lower hybrid current drive), with appropriate neutral beam injection, the nonlinear interplay between the transport determined gradients in the plasma temperature (Ti,e) and toroidal velocity (Vϕ) and the E×B flow shear (including q-profile) produces transport bifurcations, generating spontaneously a stepwise growing ITB. In the discharge, the constraints imposed by the wave propagation condition causes interplay of the LH driven current distribution with the plasma configuration modification, which constitutes non-linearity in the LH wave deposition. The non-linear effects cause bifurcation in LHCD, generating two distinct quasi-stationary reversed magnetic shear configurations. The change of current profile during the transition period between the two quasi-stationary states results in increase of the E×B shearing flow arising from toroidal rotation. The turbulence transport suppression by sheared E×B flow during the ITB development is analysed, and the temporal evolution of some parameters characterized the plasma confinement is examined. Ample evidence shows that onset of the ITB development is correlated with the enhancement of E×B shearing rate caused by the bifurcation in LHCD. It is suggested that the ITB triggering is associated with the non-linear effects of the LH power deposition.

  13. Fabrication of single TiO2 nanotube devices with Pt interconnections using electron- and ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mingun; Cha, Dongkyu; Huang, Jie; Ha, Min-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    Device fabrication using nanostructured materials, such as nanotubes, requires appropriate metal interconnections between nanotubes and electrical probing pads. Here, electron-beam-assisted deposition (EBAD) and ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) techniques for fabrication of Pt interconnections for single TiO2 nanotube devices are investigated. IBAD conditions were optimized to reduce the leakage current as a result of Pt spreading. The resistivity of the IBAD-Pt was about three orders of magnitude less than that of the EBAD-Pt, due to low carbon concentration and Ga doping, as indicated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The total resistances of single TiO2 nanotube devices with EBAD- or IBAD-Pt interconnections were 3.82 × 1010 and 4.76 × 108 Ω, respectively. When the resistivity of a single nanotube is low, the high series resistance of EBAD-Pt cannot be ignored. IBAD is a suitable method for nanotechnology applications, such as photocatalysis and biosensors.

  14. Deposition of Thin Film Copper Nanostructures by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition Technique on SiO2/p-TYPE Si(100) and Study of its Oxidation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh, M.; Saremi, M.

    Electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) is being used in coating components for many applications such as for producing nanostructures and integrated circuits (ICs) coating in electronic industry. In this work, copper was deposited on the SiO2/p-type Si(100). Thin film characteristics are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Then oxidation behavior of deposits was evaluated by Dektak Surface Profiler and weight gain method at 200 and 300°C. Results showed that thin film copper deposited by EBPVD has better oxidation characteristics in comparison with copper foil.

  15. Titanium dioxide fine structures by RF magnetron sputter method deposited on an electron-beam resist mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2013-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been draw attention for wide range of applications from photonic crystals for visible light range by its catalytic characteristics to tera-hertz range by its high refractive index. We present an experimental study of fabrication of fine structures of TiO2 with a ZEP electron beam resist mask followed by Ti sputter deposition techniques. A TiO2 thin layer of 150 nm thick was grown on an FTO glass substrate with a fine patterned ZEP resist mask by a conventional RF magnetron sputter method with Ti target. The deposition was carried out with argon-oxygen gases at a pressure of 5.0 x 10 -1 Pa in a chamber. During the deposition, ratio of Ar-O2 gas was kept to the ratio of 2:1 and the deposition ratio was around 0.5 Å/s to ensure enough oxygen to form TiO2 and low temperature to avoid deformation of fine pattern of the ZPU resist mask. Deposited TiO2 layers are white-transparent, amorphous, and those roughnesses are around 7 nm. Fabricated TiO2 PCs have wider TiO2 slabs of 112 nm width leaving periodic 410 x 410 nm2 air gaps. We also studied transformation of TiO2 layers and TiO2 fine structures by baking at 500 °C. XRD measurement for TiO2 shows that the amorphous TiO2 transforms to rutile and anatase forms by the baking while keeping the same profile of the fine structures. Our fabrication method can be one of a promising technique to optic devices on researches and industrial area.

  16. Molecular layer deposition of functional thin films for advanced lithographic patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Bent, Stacey F

    2011-02-01

    Photoresist materials comprise one of the main challenges faced by lithography to meet the requirements of electronic device size scaling. Here we report for the first time the use of molecular layer deposition (MLD) to produce photoresist materials with controllable placement of functional moieties. Polyurea resists films are deposited by MLD using urea coupling reactions between 1,4-phenylene diisocyanate (PDIC) and ethylenediamine (ED) or 2,2'-(propane-2,2-diylbis(oxy))diethanamine (PDDE) monomers in a layer-by-layer fashion with a linear growth rate, allowing acid-labile groups to be incorporated into the film at well-controlled positions. The films are deposited with stoichiometric compositions and have highly uniform surface morphology as investigated using atomic force microscopy. We show that acid treatment can cleave the backbone of the polyurea film at positions where the acid-labile groups are embedded. We further show that after soaking the polyurea film with photoacid generator (PAG), it acts as a photoresist material and we present several UV patterning demonstrations. This approach presents a new way to make molecularly designed resist films for lithography.

  17. Deposition of metallic gallium on re-crystallized ceramic material during focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz-Tabares, J.A.; Reyes-Gasga, J.

    2013-12-15

    We report a new kind of artifact observed in the preparation of a TEM sample of zirconia by FIB, which consists in the deposition of metallic gallium nano-dots on the TEM sample surface. High resolution TEM images showed a microstructure of fine equiaxed grains of ∼ 5 nm, with some of them possessing two particular characteristics: high contrast and well-defined fast Fourier transform. These grains could not be identified as any phase of zirconia but it was possible to identify them as gallium crystals in the zone axis [110]. Based on HRTEM simulations, the possible orientations between zirconia substrate and deposited gallium are discussed in terms of lattice mismatch and oxygen affinity. - Highlights: • We show a new type of artifact induced during preparation of TEM samples by FIB. • Deposition of Ga occurs due to its high affinity for oxygen. • Materials with small grain size (∼ 5 nm) could promote Ga deposition. • Small grain size permits the elastic accommodation of deposited Ga.

  18. Study of electrical properties of single GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharov, A. M.; Komissarenko, F. E.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Bolshakov, A. D.; Moiseev, E. I.; Mukhin, M. S.; Cirlin, G. E.; Mukhin, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of single GaN nanowires grown by means of molecular beam epitaxy with N-plasma source were studied. Ohmic contacts connected to single n-type GaN wires were produced by the combination of electron beam lithography, metal vacuum evaporation and rapid thermal annealing technique. The optimal annealing temperature to produce ohmic contacts implemented in the form of Ti/Al/Ti/Au stack has been determined. By means of 2-terminal measurement wiring diagram the conductivity of single NW has been obtained for NWs with different growth parameters. The method of MESFET measurement circuit layout of single GaN nanowires (NWs) has been developed. In accordance with performed numerical calculation, free carriers' concentration and mobility of single NWs could be independently estimated using MESFET structure.

  19. Total synthesis of interstellar chemical compounds by high energy molecular beam bombardment on pure graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devienne, F. M.; Teisseire, M.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to show a possibility of forming interstellar molecules detected in the interstellar space by bombarding a carbon target or graphite grains with high energy neutrals. The authors have bombarded pure graphite in the ultra-vacuum with high energy molecular beams (from 2 to 10 keV) obtained by charge exchange from ion beams of hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen. They have observed many organic compounds: binary compounds like hydrogen carbides, ternary compounds containing carbon, nitrogen, oxygen or hydrogen, and finally, quaternary compounds. They also have obtained cyanopolyynes and organic molecules which had previously been observed in the interstellar space. So far, they have identified thirty-two compounds corresponding to molecules observed in the interstellar space and about forty containing only carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen.

  20. An intense, cold, velocity-controlled molecular beam by frequency-chirped laser slowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Fitch, N. J.; Hambach, M.; Wall, T. E.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Using frequency-chirped radiation pressure slowing, we precisely control the velocity of a pulsed CaF molecular beam down to a few m s–1, compressing its velocity spread by a factor of 10 while retaining high intensity: at a velocity of 15 m s–1 the flux, measured 1.3 m from the source, is 7 × 105 molecules per cm2 per shot in a single rovibrational state. The beam is suitable for loading a magneto-optical trap or, when combined with transverse laser cooling, improving the precision of spectroscopic measurements that test fundamental physics. We compare the frequency-chirped slowing method with the more commonly used frequency-broadened slowing method.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdZnS using elemental sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B. J.; Cheng, H.; Guha, S.; Haase, M. A.; De Puydt, J. M.; Meis-Haugen, G.; Qiu, J.

    1993-11-01

    We report on the first molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of CdZnS on (100) GaAs substrates using elemental Zn, Cd, and S sources. Single crystal cubic CdZnS layers lattice matched to GaAs have been successfully prepared. The competition in incorporation between Cd and Zn under different sulfur flux conditions is investigated. Under appropriate growth conditions, the Cd1-xZnxS composition is directly related only to the ratio of the group II beam equivalent pressures. The background sulfur in the MBE growth chamber is found to etch the freshly thermally cleaned GaAs substrates and generate high density of pits on the surfaces. Methods to prevent the sulfur etching are also discussed.

  2. Low temperature Ti-Si-C thin film deposition by ion beam assisted methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowska, Agnieszka; Rajchel, Boguslaw; Jaworska, Lucyna

    2010-11-01

    Thin, multiphase Ti-Si-C coatings were formed by IBSD or by IBAD methods on AISI 316L steel substrates in room temperature, using single Ti3SiC2 target. In those methods the TiXSiCY coatings were formed from the flux of energetic atoms and ions obtained by ion sputtering of the Ti3SiC2 compound sample. As sputtering beam the beam of Ar+ ions at energy of 15keV was applied. In the IBAD method the dynamically formed coatings were additionally bombarded by beam of Ar+ ions at energy of 15keV. The ion beams parameters were obtained by using Monte Carlo computer simulations. The morphology (SEM, TEM), chemical (EDS/EDX) and phase composition (XRD) examinations of formed coatings were provided as well as confocal Raman microspectroscopy. Analyzed coatings were relatively thin (150nm-1μm), flat and dense. XRD analysis indicated in amorphous TiSi, the traces of Ti5Si3 and other phases from Ti-Si-C system (TiSi, TiSi2,Ti3SiC2). For chemical bonds investigation, the laser beam with length of 532nm was used. Those analyses were performed in the low (LR) or in high (HR) resolution modes in room temperature and in 4000C. In the HR mode the spectral resolution was close to 2 cm-1. In Raman spectra peaks at: 152cm-1, 216cm-1, 278cm-1, 311 cm-1, 608cm-1, 691cm-1 were recorded. Nanoindentation tests were done on coated and uncoated substrates with diamond, Berkovich-type indenter. Vickers hardness HIT and reduced elastic modulus EIT were calculated using Olivier& Pharr method. HIT for coated substrates was in the range 2.7 to 5.3 GPa, EIT was 160 GPa.

  3. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  4. Importance of Trimethylaluminum Diffusion in Three-Step ABC Molecular Layer Deposition Using Trimethylaluminum, Ethanolamine, and Maleic Anhydride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    I. Introduction Atomic layer deposition ( ALD ) is a thin film synthesis method for inorganic materials based on sequential, self-limiting surface...reactions.1-3 Because of its accurate control of thickness and high conformality, ALD is useful in nanofabrication and nanostruc- ture engineering.4...Molecular layer deposition (MLD) is an exten- sion of ALD to include films that contain organic molecular components.5,6 Entirely organic MLD systems that

  5. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D. Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Holst, B.; Bracco, G.

    2016-02-15

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  6. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Bracco, G.; Holst, B.

    2016-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  7. Deposition patterns of molecular phase radon progeny (218Po) in lung bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Kinsara, A A; Loyalka, S K; Tompson, R V; Miller, W H; Holub, R F

    1995-03-01

    Indoor air contamination by radon and its decay products is currently the focus of considerable attention and is considered by many to be the greatest potential cause of lung cancer in the human environment next to smoking. The bifurcations of the human respiratory tract are regions in which enhanced local deposition of particles (hot spots) can occur. These hot spots are important in estimating the risk from radon exposure but existing mathematical models do not characterize them accurately. In this study, radon progeny in the molecular size range were sampled through an aluminium model of a lung bifurcation. The parent and secondary tube diameters used correspond to the third and fourth generations in Weibel's lung model. Steady state, nominally laminar flows were used in the study. Deposition was measured along the inside, outside, top, and bottom walls of the secondary tubes. Experimental results indicate that the deposition along the inside wall is noticeably higher than that along the other walls. The results also show that along the inside, top, and bottom walls the deposition has its overall maximum at the carina. Other maxima are also observed along the secondary tubes downstream from the carina.

  8. Solar Ion Sputter Deposition in the Lunar Regolith: Experimental Simulation Using Focused-Ion Beam Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    As regions of the lunar regolith undergo space weathering, their component grains develop compositionally and microstructurally complex outer coatings or "rims" ranging in thickness from a few 10 s to a few 100's of nm. Rims on grains in the finest size fractions (e.g., <20 m) of mature lunar regoliths contain optically-active concentrations of nm size metallic Fe spherules, or "nanophase Fe(sup o)" that redden and attenuate optical reflectance spectral features important in lunar remote sensing. Understanding the mechanisms for rim formation is therefore a key part of connecting the drivers of mineralogical and chemical changes in the lunar regolith with how lunar terrains are observed to become space weathered from a remotely-sensed point of view. As interpreted based on analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies, rims are produced from varying relative contributions from: 1) direct solar ion irradiation effects that amorphize or otherwise modify the outer surface of the original host grain, and 2) nanoscale, layer-like, deposition of extrinsic material processed from the surrounding soil. This extrinsic/deposited material is the dominant physical host for nanophase Fe(sup o) in the rims. An important lingering uncertainty is whether this deposited material condensed from regolith components locally vaporized in micrometeorite or larger impacts, or whether it formed as solar wind ions sputtered exposed soil and re-deposited the sputtered ions on less exposed areas. Deciding which of these mechanisms is dominant, or possibility exclusive, has been hampered because there is an insufficient library of chemical and microstructural "fingerprints" to distinguish deposits produced by the two processes. Experimental sputter deposition / characterization studies relevant to rim formation have particularly lagged since the early post-Apollo experiments of Hapke and others, especially with regard to application of TEM-based characterization techniques. Here

  9. Impact of high temperature and short period annealing on SnS films deposited by E-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy Minnam; Kang, Jeong-yoon; Jeon, Chan-Wook

    2017-04-01

    Thin films of SnS were deposited on Mo-substrate using electron beam evaporation at room temperature. As-deposited SnS films were annealed at a constant high temperaure of 860 K for different short period of times, 1 min, 3 min, and 5 min. The impact of heat treatment period on the physical properties of SnS films was investigated using appropriate characterization tools. XRD analysis revealed that the films were highly oriented along (111) plane with orthorhombic crystal structure. Surface morphology of as-deposited SnS films showed an identical leaf texture where as the annealed films showed large orthorombic slab shape grains in adidition to the leaf shape grains, which indicates the significance of short period annealing at high temperature. The transmission electron microscopy confirmed that those large orthorombic slabs had single-crystalline nature. The results emphasized that the short period annealing treatment at high temperature stimulated the growth of film towards the single crystallinity.

  10. Plasmonic gold helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Höflich, Katja; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.

  11. Plasmonic gold helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Höflich, Katja; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-02-03

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.

  12. Effects of temperature on Cu structure deposited on Si substrate: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Rosikhin, Ahmad; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2016-02-01

    The deposition process of copper onto silicon substrate was studied by the molecular dynamics method. Tersoff, MEAM, and Morse potentials were used to describe the interaction of Si-Si Cu-Cu, and Cu-Si, respectively. Deposition process was performed using NVE ensemble and applying Berendsen thermostat with 0,2 fs timestep for 100 ps. The effect of substrate temperature on the percentage of amorphous structure, radial distribution function (RDF), and coordination number was investigated. The result was indicated that at 300 K, the percentage of amorphous structure was relatively lower compared to another temperature. First peaks of RDF at each temperature were found at radius 3,05 Å and were still relatively wide, indicating short-range order structure.

  13. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  14. Molecular beams studies of the energetics and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.C.

    1982-05-01

    Quantum mechanical effects on the angular distribution of HF products from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight velocity analysis. Measurement of the singlet-triplet splitting of CH/sub 2/ from the recoil velocities of fragments from ketene photodissociation in a molecular beam is also reported. Partial center-of-mass angular distributions, and velocity flux contour maps have been derived for individual vibrational states of the HF product from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction at collision energies of 2 and 3 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass distributions were obtained by analysis of laboratory angular and time-of-flight measurements of the reactive scattering. The results are consistent with recent three dimensional quantum mechanical scattering calculations, which predict that resonance effects should appear in the product angular distributions in this energy range. The photofragmentation of ketene in a molecular beam was used to measure the singlet-triplet splitting in CH/sub 2/. A rare gas halide excimer laser operating at 351 nm (XeF) and 308 nm (XeCl) dissociated the ketene. Time-of-flight measurements of the fragment velocities allowed determination of the energetics of the dissociation. The /sup 1/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/B/sub 1/ splitting in CH/sub 2/ was found to be 8.5 +- 0.8 kcal/mole. This agrees with many experimental results, but not with the value of 19.5 kcal/mole derived from recent photodetachment experiments on CH/sub 2//sup -/.

  15. Growth of layered superconductor β-PdBi2 films using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, N. V.; Matetskiy, A. V.; Tupkalo, A. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    Bulk β-PdBi2 layered material exhibits advanced properties and is supposed to be probable topological superconductor. We present a method based on molecular beam epitaxy that allows us to grow β-PdBi2 films from a single β-PdBi2 triple layer up to the dozens of triple layers, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. The grown films demonstrate structural, electronic and superconducting properties similar to those of bulk β-PdBi2 crystals. Ability to grow the β-PdBi2 films of desired thickness opens the promising possibilities to explore fascinating properties of this advanced material.

  16. Lutetium-doped EuO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Shai, D. E.; Monkman, E. J.; Harter, J. W.; Hollaender, B.; Schubert, J.; Shen, K. M.; Mannhart, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2012-05-28

    The effect of lutetium doping on the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of epitaxial EuO thin films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy is experimentally investigated. The behavior of Lu-doped EuO is contrasted with doping by lanthanum and gadolinium. All three dopants are found to behave similarly despite differences in electronic configuration and ionic size. Andreev reflection measurements on Lu-doped EuO reveal a spin-polarization of 96% in the conduction band, despite non-magnetic carriers introduced by 5% lutetium doping.

  17. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  18. Molecular-Beam Epitaxial Growth and Device Potential of Polar/Nonpolar Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Wlam Doa ntered) ?0. ABSTRACT "echniques for the molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaP and GaAs substrates were...of both GaAs and GaP was found to be the problem of avoiding antiphase domains (APDs) in the growing film, that is, of random domains containing...even better properties. Lattice-mismatched (4%) growth of GaAs on Si was achieved, using the clean Si surface technology and the (211) orientation

  19. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T.; Schroth, P.; Grigoriev, D.; Minkevich, A. A.; Baumbach, T.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2012-10-15

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  20. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, T; Schroth, P; Grigoriev, D; Minkevich, A A; Hu, D Z; Schaadt, D M; Baumbach, T

    2012-10-01

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  1. Crystallographic dependence of photocatalytic activity of WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Chongmin; Chambers, Scott A; Du, Yingge

    2015-06-21

    We investigated the impact of crystallographic orientation on the photocatalytic activity of single crystalline WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). A clear effect is observed, with (111) being the most reactive surface, followed by (110) and (001). Photoreactivity is directly correlated with the surface free energy determined by density functional theory calculations. The RhB photodegradation mechanism is found to involve hydroxyl radicals in solution formed from photo-generated holes and differs from previous studies performed on nanoparticles and composites.

  2. Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Of CrSi2 on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Lin, True-Lon; Jamieson, David N.; Mazur, Jurek H.

    1989-01-01

    Crystalline layers grown in commercial apparatus. Experiments show CrSi2 grown on (111) face of single-crystal Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxial CrSi2 produced thus far not in desired single-crystal form. Because CrSi2 semiconductor with band gap of 0.3 eV, experimental process potential for monolitic integration of microelectronic devices based on CrSi2 (e.g., infrared detectors) with signal-processing circuitry based on Si.

  3. Growth behaviors of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wong, T. L.; Chan, S. K.; Sou, I. K.; Wang, N.; Su, D. S.

    2008-12-08

    Ultrathin ZnSe nanowires grown by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy show an interesting growth behavior of diameter dependence of growth rates. The smaller the nanowire diameter, the faster is its growth rate. This growth behavior is totally different from that of the nanowires with diameters greater than 60 nm and cannot be interpreted by the classical theories of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. For the Au-catalyzed nanowire growth at low temperatures, we found that the surface and interface incorporation and diffusion of the source atoms at the nanowire tips controlled the growth of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires.

  4. Silicon dioxide embedded germanium nanocrystals grown using molecular beam epitaxy for floating gate memory devices.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Singha, R K; Das, K; Dhar, A; Ray, S K

    2009-09-01

    SiO2/Ge nanocrystals/SiO2 trilayer memory structure has been fabricated by oxidizing and subsequent annealing of self assembled SiGe nanoislands grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical and charge storage characteristics of trilayer structures have been studied through Raman spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage measurements, respectively. An anti-clockwise hysteresis in the C-V characteristics indicated the net electron trapping in the floating gate containing Ge nanocrystals. Frequency dependent measurements of device characteristics indicate that neither interface defects nor deep traps are dominant for the charging or discharging processes of nanocrystal floating gates.

  5. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  6. Advanced Techniques to Decrease Defect Density in Molecular Beam Epitaxial Silicon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Toru; Aizaki, Naoaki; Tsuya, Hideki

    1985-04-01

    Defect density dependence on various surface cleaning conditions for molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) silicon films was investigated. Defect-free films were obtained on (100) and (511) wafers, using a combination of ozone cleaning and predeposition process after the usual wet cleaning. On the (111) wafer, the defect density dependence on growth rate was examined. The two-step growth-rate procedure was effective in decreasing stacking faults on the (111) wafer. The difference in defect density between (100) and (111) wafers is also discussed.

  7. Hybrid semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanocrystal structures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk, A.; Hamhuis, G. J.; Nötzel, R.

    2011-05-01

    We report the formation of In nanocrystals and their alignment near dilute InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy. The In nanocrystals exhibit surface plasmon resonances in the near-infrared range, which can be matched with the emission wavelength of In(Ga)As QDs. The alignment of the In nanocrystals near the InAs QDs is due to the strain-driven migration yielding single isolated QD-metal nanocrystal pairs and isolated QD-metal nanocrystal dimer structures, representing the basic hybrid QD-metal nanocrystal plasmonic nanostructures.

  8. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  9. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the new technique of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) are applied to the growth of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Because MBE can provide well controlled doping profiles of any desired arbitrary design, including doping profiles of such complexity as built-in surface fields or tandem junction cells, it would appear to be the ideal method for development of high efficiency solar cells. It was proposed that UCLA grow and characterize silicon films and p-n junctions of MBE to determine whether the high crystal quality needed for solar cells could be achieved.

  10. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights (˜280nm) on Si ⟨111⟩ substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 1015-1019cm-3 by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (1015cm-3) and medium doped (3×1016 and 1×1017cm-3) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (1018 and 1019cm-3) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  11. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  12. Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection Effects on Tokamak Plasma Applied Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; in, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    In KSTAR experiments, the change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations(RMP) that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). When the SMBI is applied, the symptom representing ELM suppression by RMP is disappeared. The SMBI acts as a cold pulse on the plasma keeping the total confinement engergy constant. However, it makes plasma density increase and change the plasama collisionality which can play a role in the edge-pedestal build-up processing. This work was supported by Project PG1201-2 and the KSTAR research project funded by Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

  13. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and optical properties of AlN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landré, O.; Fellmann, V.; Jaffrennou, P.; Bougerol, C.; Renevier, H.; Cros, A.; Daudin, B.

    2010-02-01

    Growth of catalyst-free AlN nanowires has been achieved by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on SiO2/Si (100), by taking advantage of Volmer-Weber growth mode of AlN on amorphous SiO2. Using a combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, it is found that AlN nanowires are completely relaxed, which has been assigned to the compliant character of SiO2. Elastic strain relaxation of AlN nanowires has been further confirmed by photoluminescence experiments, showing in addition that spectra are dominated by near-band edge emission.

  15. Structural and optoelectronic properties of germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraj, L.; Sustersic, N.; Coppinger, M.; Gerlein, L. F.; Kolodzey, J.; Cloutier, S. G.

    2010-03-22

    We report on the structural and optoelectronic properties of self-assembled germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy. Raman, photocurrent, photoluminescence, and transient optical spectroscopy measurements suggest significant built-in strains and a well-defined interface with little intermixing between the islands and the silicon. The shape of these islands depends on the growth conditions and includes pyramid, dome, barn-shaped, and superdome islands. Most importantly, we demonstrate that these germanium-rich islands provide efficient light emission at telecommunication wavelengths on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible platform.

  16. Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J.

    2010-12-13

    Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

  17. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  18. Supersonic molecular beam injection effects on tokamak plasma applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; In, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    The change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying a three-dimensional magnetic perturbation that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). From the time trace of decreasing electron temperature and with increasing plasma density keeping the total confined energy constant, the SMBI seems to act as a cold pulse on the plasma. However, the ELM behaviors were changed drastically (i.e., the symptom of ELM suppression has disappeared). The plasma collisionality in the edge-pedestal region could play a role in the change of the ELM behaviors.

  19. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  20. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2015-06-01

    Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.