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Sample records for molecular cloud-3 region

  1. A search for pre-main-sequence stars in high-latitude molecular clouds. 3: A survey of the Einstein database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Magnani, Loris; Fryer, Chris

    1995-01-01

    In order to discern whether the high-latitude molecular clouds are regions of ongoing star formation, we have used X-ray emission as a tracer of youthful stars. The entire Einstein database yields 18 images which overlap 10 of the clouds mapped partially or completely in the CO (1-0) transition, providing a total of approximately 6 deg squared of overlap. Five previously unidentified X-ray sources were detected: one has an optical counterpart which is a pre-main-sequence (PMS) star, and two have normal main-sequence stellar counterparts, while the other two are probably extragalactic sources. The PMS star is located in a high Galactic latitude Lynds dark cloud, so this result is not too suprising. The translucent clouds, though, have yet to reveal any evidence of star formation.

  2. The Magnetic Field of Cloud 3 in L204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P.

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ~11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P H/A V) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (-0.09% ± 0.03% mag-1 pc-1). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A V for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  3. The magnetic field of cloud 3 in L204

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ∼11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P {sub H}/A {sub V}) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (–0.09% ± 0.03% mag{sup –1} pc{sup –1}). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A {sub V} for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  4. Molecular absorption in transition region spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Innes, D.; Ayres, T.; Peter, H.; Curdt, W.; Jaeggli, S.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We present observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of absorption features from a multitude of cool atomic and molecular lines within the profiles of Si IV transition region lines. Many of these spectral lines have not previously been detected in solar spectra. Methods: We examined spectra taken from deep exposures of plage on 12 October 2013. We observed unique absorption spectra over a magnetic element which is bright in transition region line emission and the ultraviolet continuum. We compared the absorption spectra with emission spectra that is likely related to fluorescence. Results: The absorption features require a population of sub-5000 K plasma to exist above the transition region. This peculiar stratification is an extreme deviation from the canonical structure of the chromosphere-corona boundary. The cool material is not associated with a filament or discernible coronal rain. This suggests that molecules may form in the upper solar atmosphere on small spatial scales and introduces a new complexity into our understanding of solar thermal structure. It lends credence to previous numerical studies that found evidence for elevated pockets of cool gas in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Molecular Outflows in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol

    2015-11-01

    This thesis presents millimetre continuum and molecular line observations exploring the properties of molecular outflows towards massive star forming regions. Massive stars produce some of the most energetic phenomena in the Galaxy, yet we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of how they actually form. Outflows are known to play a key role in this formation process and their properties, particularly how they change depending on the mass, luminosity and evolution of the driving source can shed light on how massive stars actually form. This thesis presents observations at both high (SMA 3 arcsecond) and low (JCMT 15 arcsecond) spatial resolution of the known jet/outflow tracers, SiO and 12CO, towards a sample massive star forming region drawn from the RMS survey. Furthermore, the presence of infall signatures is explored through observations of HCO+ and H13CO+, and the hot core nature of the regions is probed using tracers such as CH3CN, HC3N and CH3OH. SiO is detected towards approximately 50% of the massive young stellar objects and HII regions in the JCMT sample. The detection of SiO appears to be linked to the age of the RMS source, with the likely younger sources showing a stronger dependence with SiO. The presence of SiO also appears to be linked to the CO velocity, with SiO more efficiently tracing sources with higher velocity dispersions. In the MOPRA observations towards a sample of 33 RMS sources, CH3CN is detected towards 66% of the sources, with the redder likely younger sources having the largest rotational temperatures. This thesis presents the first interferometric SiO (5-4) and 12CO (2-1) observations, taken with the SMA, towards the massive star forming region G203.3166/NGC 2264-C. In this intermediate/massive star forming cluster, SiO is again tracing the youngest sources. Both the SiO and 12CO emission trace two bipolar, high velocity outflows towards the mm brightest, IR-dark, likely youngest sources in this reg! ion. In contrast the IR

  6. [Molecular spectral diagnosis of star forming regions].

    PubMed

    Xi, S; Qin, S; Deng, L; Yang, J

    2001-08-01

    Stars are the basic building blocks of our universe, therefore it is one of the most important research topics in astrophysics to understand the origin and the early evolution of these objects. The current picture is that stars are formed during the collapse of a large enough self-gravitating interstellar molecular cloud. The early collapse gives birth to a fetus of a star, which is surrounded by a rotating accretion disk. The proto-star accretes interstellar matter through the disk which in turn transfer the accumulated matter to the central proto-star, then the star gets weight during the process. Observation shows that gorgeous ejection of matter always come along with the accretion process. In the presence of disks, these outflows usually escape from the system along the axis of the disk, forming so called bipolar outflows. Typical tracers of these activities are rich molecules such as CO, SiC2, C3H, C3H2 etc. Observationally, such typical molecular outflows can be detected using Doppler effect by spectroscopic measurements. Using the 13.7 m radio telescope in Delingha station of Purple Mountain Observatory, we performed a survey for 12 low temperature IRAS objects, some of the sources show high velocity properties. Detailed analysis of the Doppler profiles of IRS34 is presented. Star forming activities are clearly seen in this field.

  7. Molecular Lines of 13 Galactic Infrared Bubble Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qing-zeng; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Bo; Lu, Deng-rong; Chen, Xi; Tang, Zheng-hong

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physical properties of molecular clouds and star formation (SF) processes around infrared bubbles, which are essentially expanding H ii regions. We performed observations of 13 galactic infrared bubble fields containing 18 bubbles. We observed five molecular lines—12CO (J=1\\to 0), 13CO (J=1\\to 0), C18O (J=1\\to 0), HCN (J=1\\to 0), and HCO+ (J=1\\to 0)—and several publicly available surveys were used for comparison: Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey, APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey, Multi-Array Galactic Plane Imaging Survey, and NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We find that these bubbles are generally connected with molecular clouds, most of which are giant. Several bubble regions display velocity gradients and broad-shifted profiles, which could be due to the expansion of bubbles. The masses of molecular clouds within bubbles range from 100 to 19,000 M ⊙, and their dynamic ages are about 0.3-3.7 Myr, which takes into account the internal turbulence pressure of surrounding molecular clouds. Clumps are found in the vicinity of all 18 bubbles, and molecular clouds near four of these bubbles with larger angular sizes show shell-like morphologies, indicating that either collect-and-collapse or radiation-driven implosion processes may have occurred. Due to the contamination of adjacent molecular clouds, only six bubble regions are appropriate to search for outflows, and we find that four have outflow activities. Three bubbles display ultra-compact H ii regions at their borders, and one is probably responsible for its outflow. In total, only six bubbles show SF activities in the vicinity, and we suggest that SF processes might have been triggered.

  8. Molecular organization of the vestigial region in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Bell, J B

    1988-05-01

    The vestigial (vg) locus of Drosophila melanogaster is involved in wing margin development. In the absence of a vg+ gene, extensive cell death occurs in third instar imaginal discs which results in a complete loss of adult wing margin structures. P-element tagging was used to obtain a molecular clone of the vg locus, which led to the molecular characterization of approximately 46 kb of DNA from the region. Deficiency analysis and molecular mapping identified sequences, spanning approximately 20 kb of DNA within the larger region, which are necessary for vg function. The molecular map was oriented with respect to a pre-existing genetic fine structure map of the locus. The centromere distal limits of the locus were defined by deficiency analyses while the proximal end has not yet been conclusively established. However, three transcripts, that are apparently unrelated to vg, provide circumstantial evidence for the proximal limits of the vg locus. The nature of the molecular lesions for several extant recessive or lethal vg alleles was determined, and these were placed on the vg molecular map. The characterization of the lesions associated with two dominant vg alleles and one complex vg allele imply interesting regulatory mechanisms for this locus. As well, a revertant of a 412 insertion mutant allele was shown to have resulted from a further insertion of a roo element into the 412 element.

  9. Molecular line tracers of high-mass star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zsofia

    2013-09-01

    High-mass stars influence their environment in different ways including feedback via their far-UV radiation and mechanical feedback via shocks and stellar winds. The penetration of FUV photons into molecular clouds creates Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) with different chemical layers where the mainly ionized medium changes into mainly molecular. Different chemical layers in PDRs are traced by different species observable at sub-mm and far-infrared wavelengths. In this thesis we present results from two molecular line surveys. One of them is the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Spectral Legacy Survey (SLS) toward the luminous (>10^7 L_Sun), massive (~10^6 M_Sun), and distant (11.4 kpc) star-forming region W49A. The SLS images a 2x2 arcminute field around W49A in the 330-373 GHz frequency range. The detected molecular lines reveal a complex chemistry and the importance of FUV-irradiation and shocks in the heating and chemistry of the region. The other line survey presented in this thesis is part of the HEXOS (Herschel observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources) key program using the Herschel Space Observatory and is toward the nearby (~420 pc) prototypical edge-on Orion Bar PDR and the dense molecular condensation Orion S. Reactive ions, such as CH+, SH+, and CO+, detected as a part of this line survey trace the warm (~500-1000 K) surface region of PDRs. Spectroscopic data from the HIFI and PACS instruments of Herschel give constraints on the chemistry and excitation of reactive ions in these regions.

  10. Molecular cloud/HII region interfaces in the star forming region NGC 6357.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Felli, M.

    1997-04-01

    We have performed ^12^CO(1-0), ^12^CO(2-1), ^13^CO(1-0), ^13^CO(2-1), C^18^O(1-0), C^18^O(2-1), HCO^+^(1-0) and H^13^CO^+^(1-0) observations towards two selected areas in the star forming complex NGC 6357 with angular resolutions from 21" to 55". In particular, we have mapped the molecular gas around the two HII regions G353.1+0.6 and G353.2+0.9 in the ^12^CO(1-0) and ^13^CO(1-0) transitions with a resolution of ~43". This improves on the coarser ^12^CO(1-0) observations previously carried out by others. We have also studied the physical properties of gas along strips through the molecular cloud/HII region interfaces. For G353.1+0.6, the observations confirm that an ionization front is eroding a warm, dense molecular cloud located to the north of the optical nebula. The molecular gas appears fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc and not all the components are related to the HII region. There is evidence of a density increase near the front and indications of temperature gradients toward the exciting stars. This is further suggested by the presence of ^12^CO(1-0) self-absorption produced by a cooler external layer. The isotopic ratio X(^13^CO)/X(C^18^O) decreases from the inner part of the clouds towards the front, contrary to what is theoretically predicted and observed in many other regions. This may be due to excitation or optical depths effects. An evolutionary scenario is proposed where the exciting stars form at the edge of a molecular cloud. The morphology of G353.2+0.9 is rather different from what previously believed. Only a weak "bar" of molecular material was found to the south of the sharp ionization front observed optically and in the radio-continuum, and most of the molecular emission arises from regions behind or to the north of the HII region. This indicates that we are viewing a late stage "blister" configuration face-on. This region is fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc, and a warm, dense and compact molecular fragment coincides with the elephant trunk

  11. The Molecular Cloud Associated with the HII Region RCW:34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, L.; Heydari-Malayeri, M.; Castets, A.

    1993-08-01

    We present millimetric multi-line observations of the molecular cloud associated with the H II region RCW 34. We believe we are able to present a coherent description of the cloud: a molecular bar on top of the H II region is divided into three elements: a dense, heated part situated in the post-shock trail, a cold, less dense part besides, left unperturbed and a diffuse component either in front of the dense parts or possibly mixed with them if the dense parts are clumpy. This diffuse component has a density of a few hundreds per cm-3, a temperature in the range 30-60 K and its opacity in 12CO is close to or less than unity. We show that this diffuse component, the existence of which is controversial, is the best explanation to the large 12CO (J: 1 → 0)/(J: 2 → 1) ratio we have observed. A simple-minded model is presented to approach its properties. The cloud is on top and partly in front of the H II region and can explain the 4.2 mag of visual extinction measured by one of us (Heydari-Malayeri 1988). The very high velocity flow detected in Hα by Heydari-Malayeri has no counterpart in radio but could be a direct visualisation of the so-called "Champagne effect" (Tonorio-Tagle 1979).

  12. Regional Development of Uterine Decidualization: Molecular Signaling by Hoxa-10

    PubMed Central

    DAS, SANJOY K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Uterine decidualization, a key event in implantation, is critically controlled by stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the molecular mechanism that controls this event is not well understood, the general consensus is that the factors derived locally at the site of implantation influence aspects of decidualization. Hoxa-10, a developmentally regulated homeobox transcription factor, is highly expressed in decidualizing stromal cells, and targeted deletion of Hoxa-10 in mice shows severe decidualization defects, primarily due to the reduced stromal cell responsiveness to progesterone (P4). While the increased stromal cell proliferation is considered to be an initiator of decidualization, the establishment of a full-grown functional decidua appears to depend on the aspects of regional proliferation and differentiation. In this regard, this article provides an overview of potential signaling mechanisms mediated by Hoxa-10 that can influence a host of genes and cell functions necessary for propagating regional decidual development. PMID:19921737

  13. Regional development of uterine decidualization: molecular signaling by Hoxa-10.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanjoy K

    2010-05-01

    Uterine decidualization, a key event in implantation, is critically controlled by stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the molecular mechanism that controls this event is not well understood, the general consensus is that the factors derived locally at the site of implantation influence aspects of decidualization. Hoxa-10, a developmentally regulated homeobox transcription factor, is highly expressed in decidualizing stromal cells, and targeted deletion of Hoxa-10 in mice shows severe decidualization defects, primarily due to the reduced stromal cell responsiveness to progesterone (P(4)). While the increased stromal cell proliferation is considered to be an initiator of decidualization, the establishment of a full-grown functional decidua appears to depend on the aspects of regional proliferation and differentiation. In this regard, this article provides an overview of potential signaling mechanisms mediated by Hoxa-10 that can influence a host of genes and cell functions necessary for propagating regional decidual development.

  14. Molecular characterization of a strong candidate region for schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Karayiorgou, M. |; Housman, D.E.; Morrow, B.

    1994-09-01

    Two lines of evidence point to a region on chromosome 22 as potentially involved in the etiology of schizophrenia: First, our own linkage data and second, observations that a greater than expected number of cases with the VCF (velo-cardio-facial) syndrome, a developmental syndrome due to microdeletions of the same genetic region, develop psychotic illness during adolescence. On the molecular genetic level, we are testing the hypothesis that the partial phenotypic overlap between schizophrenia and VCF may be due to overlapping genetic abnormalities. To that end, we have generated somatic cell hybrids from an initial group of nine VCF patients over the age of 15 who underwent psychiatric evaluation. Three were assigned a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia. Several hybrid cell lines were generated from each patient carrying either the deleted chromosome, or the intact chromosome, or both. We have analyzed these hybrids and the extent of their chromosome 22 deletions with 41 markers so far (21 polymorphic microsatellite markers and 20 STSs). One of these markers is COMT (catechol-O-methyltransferase) that could be considered a candidate for schizophrenia. We are searching for potential molecular genetic differences between the subgroup of VCF patients that do develop schizophrenia and the subgroup that do not. Our initial efforts concentrate on the possibility of correlation between the extent of the deletion and the schizophrenic phenotype. Results from our analysis so far will be presented. Our goal is to narrow and define more accurately the region potentially involved in the etiology of schizophrenia and successfully identify any gene(s) that may play a role.

  15. The Physics of Molecular Shocks in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Molecular shocks are produced by the impact of the supersonic infall of gas and dust onto protostars and by the interaction of the supersonic outflow from the protostar with the circumstellar material. Infalling gas creates an accretion shock around the circumstellar disk which emits a unique infrared spectrum and which processes the interstellar dust as it enters the disk. The winds and jets from protostars also impact the disk, the infalling material, and the ambient molecular cloud core creating shocks whose spectrum and morphology diagnose the mass loss processes of the protostar and the orientation and structure of the star forming system. We discuss the physics of these shocks, the model spectra derived from theoretical models, and comparisons with observations of H2O masers, H2 emission, as well as other shocks tracers. We show the strong effect of magnetic fields on molecular shock structure, and elucidate the chemical changes induced by the shock heating and compression.

  16. Kinetic temperatures toward X1/X2 orbit interceptions regions and giant molecular loops in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, D.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín, S.; Bronfman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. It is well known that the kinetic temperatures, Tkin, of the molecular clouds in the Galactic center region are higher than in typical disk clouds. However, the Tkin of the molecular complexes found at higher latitudes towards the giant molecular loops in the central region of the Galaxy is so far unknown. The gas of these high-latitude molecular clouds (hereafter referred to as "halo clouds") is located in a region where the gas in the disk may interact with the gas in the halo in the Galactic center region. Aims: To derive Tkin in the molecular clouds at high latitude and understand the physical process responsible for the heating of the molecular gas both in the central molecular zone (the concentration of molecular gas in the inner ~500 pc) and in the giant molecular loops. Methods: We measured the metastable inversion transitions of NH3 from (J,K) = (1,1) to (6,6) toward six positions selected throughout the Galactic central disk and halo. We used rotational diagrams and large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling to estimate the kinetic temperatures toward all the sources. We also observed other molecules like SiO, HNCO, CS, C34S, C18O, and 13CO, to derive the densities and to trace different physical processes (shocks, photodissociation, dense gas) expected to dominate the heating of the molecular gas. Results: We derive for the first time Tkin of the high-latitude clouds interacting with the disk in the Galactic center region. We find high rotational temperatures in all the observed positions. We derive two kinetic temperature components (~150 K and ~40 K) for the positions in the central molecular zone, and only the warm kinetic temperature component for the clouds toward the giant molecular loops. The fractional abundances derived from the different molecules suggest that shocks provide the main heating mechanism throughout the Galactic center, also at high latitudes. Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Molecular population genetics of inversion breakpoint regions in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andre G; Detweiler, Don; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-07-08

    Paracentric inversions in populations can have a profound effect on the pattern and organization of nucleotide variability along a chromosome. Regions near inversion breakpoints are expected to have greater levels of differentiation because of reduced genetic exchange between different gene arrangements whereas central regions in the inverted segments are predicted to have lower levels of nucleotide differentiation due to greater levels of genetic flux among different karyotypes. We used the inversion polymorphism on the third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura to test these predictions with an analysis of nucleotide diversity of 18 genetic markers near and away from inversion breakpoints. We tested hypotheses about how the presence of different chromosomal arrangements affects the pattern and organization of nucleotide variation. Overall, markers in the distal segment of the chromosome had greater levels of nucleotide heterozygosity than markers within the proximal segment of the chromosome. In addition, our results rejected the hypothesis that the breakpoints of derived inversions will have lower levels of nucleotide variability than breakpoints of ancestral inversions, even when strains with gene conversion events were removed. High levels of linkage disequilibrium were observed within all 11 breakpoint regions as well as between the ends of most proximal and distal breakpoints. The central region of the chromosome had the greatest levels of linkage disequilibrium compared with the proximal and distal regions because this is the region that experiences the highest level of recombination suppression. These data do not fully support the idea that genetic exchange is the sole force that influences genetic variation on inverted chromosomes.

  18. Molecular organization of the human Raf-1 promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, T W; Brennscheidt, U; Sithanandam, G; Cleveland, J; Rapp, U R

    1990-01-01

    A genomic DNA fragment containing the Raf-1 promoter region was isolated by using a cDNA extension clone. Nucleotide sequencing of genomic DNA clones, primer extension, and S1 nuclease assays have been used to identify the 5' ends of Raf-1 RNAs. Consistent with its ubiquitous expression, the Raf-1 promoter region had features of a housekeeping gene in that it was GC-rich (HTF-like), lacked TATA and CAAT boxes, and contained heterogeneous RNA start sites and four potential binding sites for the transcription factor SP1. In addition, an octamer motif (ATTTCAT), a potential binding site for the octamer family of transcription factors, was located at -734 base pairs. The Raf-1 promoter region drove reporter gene expression 30-fold over the promoterless reporter in Cos 7 cells. Images PMID:1694010

  19. Giant molecular clouds as regions of particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dogiel, V. A.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Y. N.; Zybin, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most interesting results of investigations carried out on the satellites SAS-II and COS-B is the discovery of unidentified discrete gamma sources. Possibly a considerable part of them may well be giant molecular clouds. Gamma emission from clouds is caused by the processes with participation of cosmic rays. The estimation of the cosmic ray density in clouds has shown that for the energy E approx. = I GeV their density can 10 to 1000 times exceed the one in intercloud space. We have made an attempt to determine the mechanism which could lead to the increase in the cosmic ray density in clouds.

  20. Two γ-ray bursts from dusty regions with little molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Hatsukade, B; Ohta, K; Endo, A; Nakanishi, K; Tamura, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohno, K

    2014-06-12

    Long-duration γ-ray bursts are associated with the explosions of massive stars and are accordingly expected to reside in star-forming regions with molecular gas (the fuel for star formation). Previous searches for carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of molecular gas, in burst host galaxies did not detect any emission. Molecules have been detected as absorption in the spectra of γ-ray burst afterglows, and the molecular gas is similar to the translucent or diffuse molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Absorption lines probe the interstellar medium only along the line of sight, so it is not clear whether the molecular gas represents the general properties of the regions where the bursts occur. Here we report spatially resolved observations of CO line emission and millimetre-wavelength continuum emission in two galaxies hosting γ-ray bursts. The bursts happened in regions rich in dust, but not particularly rich in molecular gas. The ratio of molecular gas to dust (<9-14) is significantly lower than in star-forming regions of the Milky Way and nearby star-forming galaxies, suggesting that much of the dense gas where stars form has been dissipated by other massive stars.

  1. Regional changes in CNS and retinal glycerophospholipid profiles with age: a molecular blueprint.

    PubMed

    Hopiavuori, Blake R; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Brush, Richard S; Sullivan, Michael T; Sonntag, William E; Anderson, Robert E

    2017-04-01

    We present here a quantitative molecular blueprint of the three major glycerophospholipid (GPL) classes, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), in retina and six regions of the brain in C57Bl6 mice at 2, 10, and 26 months of age. We found an age-related increase in molecular species containing saturated and monoenoic FAs and an overall decrease in the longer-chain PUFA molecular species across brain regions, with loss of DHA-containing molecular species as the most consistent and dramatic finding. Although we found very-long-chain PUFAs (VLC-PUFAs) (C28) in PC in the retina, no detectable levels were found in any brain region at any of the ages examined. All brain regions (except hippocampus and retina) showed a significant increase with age in PE plasmalogens. All three retina GPLs had di-PUFA molecular species (predominantly 44:12), which were most abundant in PS (∼30%). In contrast, low levels of di-PUFA GPL (1-2%) were found in all regions of the brain. This study provides a regional and age-related assessment of the brain's lipidome with a level of detail, inclusion, and quantification that has not heretofore been published.

  2. Genetic and Molecular Mapping of Chromosome Region 85a in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. K.; Rawls-Jr., J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome region 85A contains at least 12 genetic complementation groups, including the genes dhod, pink and hunchback. In order to better understand the organization of this chromosomal segment and to permit molecular studies of these genes, we have carried out a genetic analysis coupled with a chromosome walk to isolate the DNA containing these genes. Complementation tests with chromosomal deficiencies permitted unambiguous ordering of most of the complementation groups identified within the 85A region. Recombinant bacteriophage clones were isolated that collectively span over 120 kb of 85A DNA and these were used to produce a molecular map of the region. The breakpoint sites of a number of 85A chromosome rearrangements were localized on the molecular map, thereby delimiting regions of the DNA that contain the various genetic complementation groups. PMID:2852138

  3. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  4. STUDIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS ASSOCIATED WITH H II REGIONS: S175

    SciTech Connect

    Azimlu, Mohaddesseh; Fich, Michel; McCoey, Carolyn

    2009-06-15

    We are studying the impact of H II regions on star formation in their associated molecular clouds. In this paper, we present James Clerk Maxwell Telescope R x A molecular line observations of S175 and environs. This is the first within a sample of 10 H II regions and their surrounding molecular clouds selected for our study. We first make 7' x 7' maps in {sup 12}CO(2-1), which are used to investigate the structure of the cloud and to identify individual clumps. Single point observations were made in {sup 13}CO(2-1) and CS(5-4) at the peak of the {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission within each clump in order to measure the physical properties of the gas. Densities, temperatures, clump masses, peak velocities, and line widths were measured and calculated using these observations. We have identified two condensations (S175A and S175B) in the molecular cloud associated with this H II region. S175A is adjacent to the ionization front and is expected to be affected by the H II region, while S175B is too distant to be disturbed. We compare the structure and gas properties of these two regions to investigate how the molecular gas has been affected by the H II region. S175A has been heated by the H II region and partially compressed by the ionized gas front, but contrary to our expectation it is a quiescent region while S175B is very turbulent and dynamically active. Our investigation for the source of turbulence in S175B resulted in the detection of an outflow within this region.

  5. The identification of molecular surfaces' feature regions based on spherical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiling; Zhang, Jingqiao

    2017-02-01

    As possible active sites, the concave and convex feature regions of the molecule are the locations where the molecular docking will happen more possibly. Then how to search for those regions is valuable to study. In this paper, a new method is proposed for identifying concave and convex regions. Based on the established spherical mapping between molecular surfaces and its bounding-sphere surfaces, the concave and convex vertices of local areas can be determined according to the expansion distance defined by the spherical mapping. Then through mesh growing, a feature region can be firmed by a concave point or a convex point, also called center point, and its neighboring faces, whose normal vector has an angle in a specified range with the center point. After that, areas and volumes of feature regions are calculated. The experimental results indicate that the method can well identify the concave and convex characteristics of the molecule.

  6. Genetic and molecular characterization of genomic regions surrounding specific loci of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations detected by the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) include multilocus deletions as well as intragenic lesions. Genetic analyses have characterized sets of presumed overlapping deletions and have mapped previously unrecognized genes to the regions surrounding each of several specific loci. Molecular entry to one of these regions, d se, was achieved by utilizing a viral integration at, or near, a marker locus. Presumed deletions were shown to be, in fact deleted for DNA sequences, and the physical map was oriented relative to the earlier functional map. Presently, a random-clone approach is being used for initiating molecular characterization of regions, which, in aggregate, span a minimum of 9 cM. Mapping to subregions already identified by functional units will facilitate the generation of comprehensive molecular maps and the identification of numerous structure-function correlations for the regions. Results of the genetic and molecular analyses of multilocus deletions have enhanced the value of the SLT by adding qualitative to quantitative capabilities. Studies of the heterozygous effects of deletions (which are the predominant lesions induced by many mutagens) provide information important to assessment of genetic risk. Long deletions are, further, providing tools for targeted mutagenesis studies that will generate information on the number of loci within segments of defined length that are capable of mutating to detectable alleles, as well as providing new mutations important for strategies of refining molecular and functional maps. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  8. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims: We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods: The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results: We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined 60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5 × 1016 cm, a mass of 2.7 × 10-3M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as

  9. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    PubMed Central

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J=3−2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined ~60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5×1016 cm, a mass of 2.7×10−3 M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as the

  10. Star forming regions towards Gum 31: distribution of the molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with IRAS and 2MASS sources, young stellar objects linked to the Hii region Gum31. We based our studies on observations obtained with the APEX telescope, located in the north of Chile. We used observations of different CO isotopologues, CS(7-6) and HCO(4-3) lines. The sources are located on the edge of the Gum31 Hii region, whose shock front substantially affects the morphology of their molecular environs. The observations revealed that in the surroundings of the sources there is molecular gas associated with the nebula, which is shown by the CO(3-2) emission, with small high density clumps detected in CO(3-2).

  11. Molecular phylogenetics of Haemodoraceae in the Greater Cape and Southwest Australian Floristic Regions.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Stephen D; Smith, Rhian J; Fay, Michael F; Manning, John C; Chase, Mark W

    2009-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies of Haemodoraceae in the Greater Cape and Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) using trnL, trnL-F and matK sequence data affirm the presence of old and young rapidly radiated lineages in both regions. Commencement of tribal and generic divergence in the subfamilies occured in the Eocene in the two regions, but subsequent patterns of radiation differ slightly. The hypothesis of rapid recent speciation in these regions from the late Pliocene as the major explanation for endemic species richness is still repeated by several contemporary authors despite increasing molecular phylogenetic evidence to the contrary. Our estimates of the age of lineages in Haemodoraceae show significant lineage turnover occurring over the last 15 million years, since the mid-Miocene, with divergence of the major clades beginning in the Eocene. The search for independent evidence to date speciation episodes reliably and investigation of molecular analyses across a broad spectrum of these clades must be pursued to advance ideas rigorously concerning origins of species richness. These regions continue to confound attempts to develop theory concerning origins of global species richness, with consequent implications for conservation biology.

  12. Regeneration of reptilian scales after wounding: neogenesis, regional difference, and molecular modules

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Chuong, Cheng‐Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lizard skin can produce scales during embryonic development, tail regeneration, and wound healing; however, underlying molecular signaling and extracellular matrix protein expression remains unknown. We mapped cell proliferation, signaling and extracellular matrix proteins in regenerating and developing lizard scales in different body regions with different wound severity. Following lizard tail autotomy (self‐amputation), de novo scales regenerate from regenerating tail blastema. Despite topological differences between embryonic and adult scale formation, asymmetric cell proliferation produces the newly formed outer scale surface. Regionally different responses to wounding were observed; open wounds induced better scale regeneration from tail skin than trunk skin. Molecular studies suggest that neural cell adhesion molecule enriched dermal regions exhibit higher cell proliferation associated with scale growth. β‐catenin may be involved in epidermal scale differentiation. Dynamic tenascin‐C expression suggests its involvement in regeneration. We conclude that different skin regions exhibit different competence for de novo scale formation. While cellular and morphogenetic paths differ during development and regeneration of lizard scale formation, they share general proliferation patterns, epithelial−mesenchymal interactions and similar molecular modules composed of adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules. PMID:24665362

  13. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR-FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE CENTRAL AND BAR REGIONS OF NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hsi-An; Sorai, Kazuo; Kuno, Nario; Koda, Jin; Hirota, Akihiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-10

    In this work, we investigate the molecular gas and star-formation properties in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 using multiple molecular lines and star-formation tracers. A high-resolution image (100 pc) of {sup 13}CO (1–0) is created for the inner 2 kpc disk by the single-dish Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and interferometer Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, including the central region (nuclear ring and bar) and the offset ridges of the primary bar. Single-dish HCN (1–0) observations were also made to constrain the amount of dense gas. The physical properties of molecular gas are inferred from (1) the large velocity gradient calculations using our observations and archival {sup 12}CO (1–0), {sup 12}CO(2–1) data, (2) the dense gas fraction suggested by the luminosity ratio of HCN to {sup 12}CO (1–0), and (3) the infrared color. The results show that the molecular gas in the central region is warmer and denser than that of the offset ridges. The dense gas fraction of the central region is similar to that of luminous infrared galaxies/ultraluminous infrared galaxies, whereas the offset ridges are close to the global average of normal galaxies. The coolest and least-dense region is found in a spiral-like structure, which was misunderstood to be part of the southern primary bar in previous low-resolution observations. The star-formation efficiency (SFE) changes by about five times in the inner disk. The variation of SFE agrees with the prediction in terms of star formation regulated by the galactic bar. We find a consistency between the star-forming region and the temperature inferred by the infrared color, suggesting that the distribution of subkiloparsec-scale temperature is driven by star formation.

  14. Solvent-Driven Preferential Association of Lignin with Regions of Crystalline Cellulose in Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Schulz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    The precipitation of lignin onto cellulose after pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is an obstacle to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. Here, 750 ns nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are reported of a system of lignin and cellulose in aqueous solution. Lignin is found to strongly associate with itself and the cellulose. However, noncrystalline regions of cellulose are observed to have a lower tendency to associate with lignin than crystalline regions, and this is found to arise from stronger hydration of the noncrystalline chains. The results suggest that the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to hydrolysis arises not only from the inaccessibility of inner fibers but also due to the promotion of lignin adhesion.

  15. The molecular cloud-H II region complexes associated with SH 90 and SH 235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, G.; Baudry, A.; de La Noe, J.; Deharveng, L.

    1983-07-01

    The Sharpless regions Sh 90 and Sh 235 are characterized on the basis of monochromatic photographs (at H-alpha, N III, and O III) and H-alpha photographic interferograms made at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence and of molecular-cloud maps (at 110.201 and 89.189 GHz) made at the Observatoire de Bordeaux. Sh 90, at a distance of 2.4 kpc, is found to have an evolved-H II-region shell structure, with ionized gas flowing both away from and toward a neutral molecular cloud with a mass of about 60,000 solar mass which lies partly in front of the H II region. Sh 235, at 1.6 kpc, has two extended 100,000-300,000-solar-mass neutral clouds which partly overlap. The northern cloud, identified at -20 km/s, is related to the optical nebula; the southern cloud (at -17 km/s) contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and exhibits recent star-formation processes. The 'champagne' model of H II regions proposed by Tenorio-Tagle (1979) is considered applicable to Sh 90 and to Sh 235C.

  16. Tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 and Down syndrome: Molecular definition of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Daumer-Haas, C.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Walther, J.U.; Portsmann, T.; Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    Down syndrome is usually caused by complete trisomy 21. Rarely, it is due to partial trisomy of the segment 21q22. We report on a 33-month-old girl with tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 resulting from an extra chromosome idic(21)(q22.1). She has craniofacial traits typical of Down syndrome, including brachycephaly, third fontanel, upward slanting palpebral fissures, round face, and protruding tongue. Speech development is quite delayed whereas motor development is only mildly retarded. The molecular content of the extra isodicentric chromosome was defined by molecular genetic investigations using 13 single copy probes unique to chromosome 21, and SOD1 expression studies. The child was found to have 4 copies of the region defined by D21S16 (21cen) through D21S93 on 21q22.1 and two copies of the remaining region defined by SOD1 {yields} D21S55 {yields} D21S123. In view of the recent assignment of Down syndrome facial characters to the 21q22 region, defined in part by D21S55, it is significant that this child shows a subset of Down syndrome facial manifestations, without duplication of this region. These results suggest that genes contributing to the facial and some of the hand manifestations of Down syndrome also exist in the chromosomal region proximal to D21S55 in band 21q22.1. 34 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Anatomy of a Photodissociation Region: High angular resolution images of molecular emission in the Orion Bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Jan A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, Margaret; Foldsmith, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of the molecular component of the Orion Bar, a prototypical Photodissociation Region (PDR) illuminated by the Trapezium cluster. The high angular resolution (6 sec-10 sec) that we have achieved by combining single-dish and interferometric observations has allowed us to examine in detail the spatial and kinematic morphology of this region and to estimate the physical characteristics of the molecular gas it contains. Our observations indicate that this PDR can be essentially described as a homogeneously distributed slab of moderately dense material (approximately 5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm), in which are embedded a small number of dense (greater than 10(exp 6)/cu cm) clumps. The latter play little or no role in determining the thickness and kinetic temperature structure of this PDR. This observational picture is largely supported by PDR model calculations for this region, which we describe in detail in this work. We also find our model predictions of the intensities of a variety of atomic and molecular lines to be in good general agreement with a number of previous observations.

  18. Molecular characterization of enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 using the 5' untranslated region and VP1 region.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, Bin; McPhie, Kenneth; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are members of the species Human enterovirus A, and are both major and independent aetiological agents of hand-foot-and-mouth disease. The human enterovirus (HEV) 5' untranslated region (UTR) is fundamentally important for efficient virus replication and for virulence, whilst the VP1 region correlates well with antigenic typing by neutralization, and can be used for virus identification and evolutionary studies. A comparison was undertaken of the 5'UTR and VP1 nucleotide sequences of five EV71 clinical isolates and 10 CVA16 clinical isolates from one laboratory with the 5'UTR and VP1 sequences of 104 EV71 strains and 45 CVA16 strains available in GenBank. The genetic relationships were analysed using standard phylogenetic methods. The EV71 phylogenetic analysis showed that the VP1 sequences were clustered into three genogroups, A, B and C, with genogroups B and C further divided into five subgenogroups, B1-B5 and C1-C5, respectively. All EV71 strains were clustered similarly in the 5'UTR and VP1 trees, except for one Taiwanese strain, which demonstrated different clustering in the two trees, suggesting a recombination event in the phylogeny. The CVA16 phylogenetic analysis showed that the VP1 sequences were clustered into two genogroups, A and B, with genogroup B further divided into B1 (B1a and B1b), B2 and a possible B3; and that a similar pattern and grouping of all strains were displayed in the 5'UTR tree. This study demonstrated that comparing the two regions provides evidence of epidemiological linkage of HEV-A strains, and that mutation in the two regions plays a vital role in the evolution of these viruses. The combination of molecular typing and phylogenetic sequence analysis will be beneficial in both individual patient diagnosis and public health measures.

  19. A Catalog of Methanol Masers in Massive Star-forming Regions. III. The Molecular Outflow Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Loinard, L.

    2016-02-01

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud-cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  20. A CATALOG OF METHANOL MASERS IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. III. THE MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Loinard, L.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.

    2016-02-15

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud–cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  1. Molecular Clouds and OB Association in the Sco-Cen-Lup Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachihara, K.; Neuhäuser, R.; Toyoda, S.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    With the NANTEN radio telescope, we have surveyed more than 500 deg2 around the Scorpius-Centaurus-Lupus region in 12CO, and the molecular gas distribution has been revealed. Total mass of ~ 104 Msolar and ~ 100 of small clouds have been detected as the Lupus cloud complex. There are two subgroups of Sco OB2 association, Upper-Sco and Upper-Cen-Lup (e.g., de Geus 1989), and many star-forming scenarios controlled by the OB association are suggested (e.g., de Geus 1992). In the association, a large number of coexisting T Tauri stars (TTSs) have been found with the ROSAT All Sky Survey (Krautter et al. 1997; Wichmann et al. 1997; Preibisch et al. 1999). On the other hand, active cluster formation is taking place in ρ Oph cloud core and Lupus 3 (Tachihara et al. 1996; 2000). In order to understand the star-formation history and the effect of OB association on cloud formation and dissipation, we investigate the distribution of the TTSs, molecular clouds, and OB stars. The distribution of the OB stars and the molecular clouds show clear anti-correlation. On the other hand, considerable fractions of the TTSs distribute away from the molecular clouds (so-called ``isolated TTSs''). These suggest that molecular clouds have been dissipated quickly due to the OB stars. On the other hand, there is an expanding HI shell centered in Upper-Sco, and the Lupus cloud complex exists between the shell and the Upper-Cen-Lup. The young star clusters are located at the edge of the shell, which suggests triggered star formation. Molecular clouds and star-formation seem to be affected strongly by the present OB stars and the past supernova explosion.

  2. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between HII Regions and Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J O; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Takabe, H

    2006-04-20

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm HI region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regimes does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and in density in HII region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  3. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Atomic Gas Dominated Regions - Results from the HERACLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, A. K.; Walter, F.; HERACLES Team

    2012-01-01

    We perform a sensitive search for faint CO emission and study how it is related to star formation in HI-dominated regions of 45 nearby spiral and dwarf galaxies using observations of CO (HERACLES), HI (THINGS), IR & Halpha (SINGS/LVL), and UV (GALEX NGS). Constraining the molecular gas content in HI-dominated regions is a crucial measurement to distinguish the role of atomic and molecular gas in the star formation process. We apply a novel technique, leveraging HI velocity fields from THINGS and wide area coverage of HERACLES to stack CO spectra and significantly increase the sensitivity. For spiral galaxies, CO (and thus H2) is linearly related to tracers of star formation (IR, Halpha, FUV) and does not depend on gas density. Meanwhile, the H2-to-HI ratio varies by several orders of magnitude with radius and total gas surface density and thus sensitively regulates the supply of star-forming molecular gas. For dwarf galaxies, we determine sensitive upper limits on the CO luminosity both near star-forming peaks and the entire galaxy and find CO emission to be faint both in an absolute sense and normalized by B-band luminosity and star formation rate (SFR). The ratio SFR/CO increases by more than an order of magnitude toward low metallicities which likely indicates a dramatic increase in the CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  4. Molecular typing of isolates of Rickettsia rickettsii by use of DNA sequencing of variable intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Karpathy, Sandor E; Dasch, Gregory A; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-08-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is found throughout the Americas, where it is associated with different animal reservoirs and tick vectors. No molecular typing system currently exists to allow for the robust differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. Analysis of eight completed genome sequences of rickettsial species revealed a high degree of sequence conservation within the coding regions of chromosomes in the genus. Intergenic regions between coding sequences should be under less selective pressure to maintain this conservation and thus should exhibit greater nucleotide polymorphisms. Utilizing these polymorphisms, we developed a molecular typing system that allows for the genetic differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. This typing system was applied to a collection of 38 different isolates collected from humans, animals, and tick vectors from different geographic locations. Serotypes 364D, from Dermacentor occidentalis ticks, and Hlp, from Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks, appear to be distinct genotypes that may not belong to the species R. rickettsii. We were also able to differentiate 36 historical isolates of R. rickettsii into three different phylogenetic clades containing seven different genotypes. This differentiation correlated well, but not perfectly, with the geographic origin and likely tick vectors associated with the isolates. The few apparent typing discrepancies found suggest that the molecular ecology of R. rickettsii needs more investigation.

  5. Molecular Cross-Talk between Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Carrier Proteins and Unstructured Linker Regions.

    PubMed

    Harden, Bradley J; Frueh, Dominique P

    2017-01-24

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) employ multiple domains separated by linker regions to incorporate substrates into natural products. During synthesis, substrates are covalently tethered to carrier proteins that translocate between catalytic partner domains. The molecular parameters that govern translocation and associated linker remodeling remain unknown. Here, we used NMR to characterize the structure, dynamics, and invisible states of a peptidyl carrier protein flanked by its linkers. We showed that the N-terminal linker stabilizes and interacts with the protein core while modulating dynamics at specific sites involved in post-translational modifications and/or domain interactions. The results detail the molecular communication between peptidyl carrier proteins and their linkers and could guide efforts in engineering NRPSs to obtain new pharmaceuticals.

  6. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  7. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  8. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRS) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km s(exp -1) at 60 microns and 1.0 km s(exp -1) at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR.

  9. Molecular characterization of Morchella species from the Western Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Acharya, Karan; Ramesh, G; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2011-04-01

    The molecular diversity of thirty-two different Morchella cultures/fruiting bodies, collected from the Western Himalayan region was studied in this investigation. Considerable taxonomic confusion exists regarding many species of Morchella. Although classical taxonomy is helpful in identification for many ascomycetes, morels exhibit considerable morphological diversity and there is disagreement in the identification of morel species. Phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequences could help in sorting out morel taxonomy which is essential to better define the morel diversity. In this study, sequence analysis revealed that in the Western Himalayan region of India, both yellow (M. crassipes, M. spongiola) and black morels (M. elata, M. angusticeps, and M. gigas) were prominent along with two Verpa species. Phylogenetic analysis by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference revealed two different clades and a clear distinction between yellow and black morels.

  10. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Korenberg, Julie R.; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T.; Ogasawara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manifested by the characteristic facial appearance, endocardial cushion defect, mental retardation, and probably dermatoglyphic changes. Autoradiograms of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from two affected sisters, their carrier father, and a normal control were analyzed after hybridization with two to six unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. These include cDNA probes for the genes for CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mapping in 21q22.1 and for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) mapping in 21q11.2-21.05, in addition to six probes for single-copy sequences: D21S46 in 21q11.2-21.05, D21S47 and SF57 in 21q22.1-22.3, and D21S39, D21S42, and D21S43 in 21q22.3. All sequences located in 21q22.3 were present in three copies in the affected individuals, whereas those located proximal to this region were present in only two copies. In the carrier father, all DNA sequences were present in only two copies. Cytogenetic analysis of affected individuals employing R and G banding of prometaphase preparations combined with in situ hybridization revealed a translocation of the region from very distal 21q22.1 to 21qter to chromosome 4q. Except for a possible phenotypic contribution from the deletion of chromosome band 4q35, these data provide a molecular definition of the minimal region of chromosome 21 which, when duplicated, generates the facial features, heart defect, a component of the mental retardation, and probably several of the dermatoglyphic changes of DS. This region

  11. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro; Ando, Ryo; Taniguchi, Akio; Izumi, Takuma; Tosaki, Tomoka

    In the central regions of active galaxies, dense molecular medium are exposed to various types of radiation and energy injections, such as UV, X-ray, cosmic ray, and shock dissipation. With the rapid progress of chemical models and implementation of new-generation mm/submm interferometry, we are now able to use molecules as powerful diagnostics of the physical and chemical processes in galaxies. Here we give a brief overview on the recent ALMA results to demonstrate how molecules can reveal underlying physical and chemical processes in galaxies. First, new detections of Galactic molecular absorption systems with elevated HCO/H13CO+ column density ratios are reported, indicating that these molecular media are irradiated by intense UV fields. Second, we discuss the spatial distributions of various types of shock tracers including HNCO, CH3OH and SiO in NGC 253 and NGC 1068. Lastly, we provide an overview of proposed diagnostic methods of nuclear energy sources using ALMA, with an emphasis on the synergy with sensitive mid-infrared spectroscopy, which will be implemented by JWST and SPICA to disentangle the complex nature of heavily obscured galaxies across the cosmic time.

  12. Molecular variations related to the regional differences in periosteal growth at the mandibular ramus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongyang; Tee, Boon Ching

    2011-01-01

    Periosteal growth at human mandibular ramus is characterized by bone apposition at the posterior border and resorption at the anterior border. Molecular control of this regional variation is unclear. This study examined the expression of several molecules involved in bone apposition/resorption at these regions in vivo and in vitro. By using growing pigs as a model, the periosteal growth was assessed at the mandibular ramus by vital staining and histological observations. In parallel, periosteal tissues were harvested and pulverized for RNA and protein extraction. Periosteal cells were also isolated, expanded in osteogenic media, and subjected to a single dose of dynamic tensile strain (0, 5, or 10% magnitude at 0.5 Hz) to examine their responses to mechanical loading. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to examine mRNA and protein expression from periosteal tissues and cultured cells. Histological observation confirmed an anterior-resorption/posterior-apposition pattern in the pig mandibular ramus. Both in vivo tissue and in vitro cells demonstrated greater mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) at the anterior region, while OPG expression at the anterior region was lower than the posterior region. In response to the application of a single dose of dynamic tensile strain, cultured periosteal cells appeared to change the expression profile of osteogenic markers but not that of RANKL/OPG and BMP2. These findings suggest that the unique regional variation of periosteal activity at the mandibular ramus is regulated by a differential expression of RANKL/OPG ratio (likely through differential induction of OPG) and BMP2.

  13. Molecular evidence of synaptic pathology in the CA1 region in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matosin, Natalie; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca; Lum, Jeremy S; Engel, Martin; Andrews, Jessica L; Gassen, Nils C; Wagner, Klaus V; Schmidt, Mathias V; Newell, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of postsynaptic density (PSD)95-complex proteins in schizophrenia ostensibly induce deficits in synaptic plasticity, the molecular process underlying cognitive functions. Although some PSD95-complex proteins have been previously examined in the hippocampus in schizophrenia, the status of other equally important molecules is unclear. This is especially true in the cornu ammonis (CA)1 hippocampal subfield, a region that is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the illness. We thus performed a quantitative immunoblot experiment to examine PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region, using post mortem brain samples derived from schizophrenia subjects with age-, sex-, and post mortem interval-matched controls (n=20/group). Our results indicate a substantial reduction in PSD95 protein expression (−61.8%). Further analysis showed additional alterations to the scaffold protein Homer1 (Homer1a: +42.9%, Homer1b/c: −24.6%), with a twofold reduction in the ratio of Homer1b/c:Homer1a isoforms (P=0.011). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) protein levels were significantly reduced (−32.7%), and Preso, a protein that supports interactions between Homer1 or PSD95 with mGluR1, was elevated (+83.3%). Significant reduction in synaptophysin (−27.8%) was also detected, which is a validated marker of synaptic density. These findings support the presence of extensive molecular abnormalities to PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region in schizophrenia, offering a small but significant step toward understanding how proteins in the PSD are altered in the schizophrenia brain, and their relevance to overall hippocampal and cognitive dysfunction in the illness. PMID:27430010

  14. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the “karst group”, in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary. PMID:27667927

  15. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the "karst group", in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary.

  16. Molecular analysis of HBV genotypes and subgenotypes in the Central-East region of Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Tunisia, country of intermediate endemicity for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, most molecular studies on the virus have been carried out in the North of the country and little is known about other regions. The aim of this study was to determine HBV genotype and subgenotypes in Central-East Tunisia. A total of 217 HBs antigen positive patients were enrolled and determination of genotype was investigated in 130 patients with detectable HBV DNA. HBV genotyping methods were: PCR-RFLP on the pre-S region, a PCR using type-specific primers in the S region (TSP-PCR) and partial sequencing in the pre-S region. Results Three genotypes (D, B and A) were detected by the PCR-RFLP method and two (D and A) with the TSP-PCR method, the concordance between the two methods was 93%. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 32 strains, retrieved the same genotype (D and A) for samples with concordant results and genotype D for samples with discordant results. The sequences of discordant genotypes had a restriction site in the pre-S gene which led to erroneous result by the PCR-RFLP method. Thus, prevalence of genotype D and A was 96% and 4%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed the predominance of two subgenotypes D1 (55%) and D7 (41%). Only one strain clustered with D3 subgenotype (3%). Conclusions Predominance of subgenotype D7 appears to occur in northern regions of Africa with transition to subgenotype D1 in the East of the continent. HBV genetic variability may lead to wrong results in rapid genotyping methods and sequence analysis is needed to clarify atypical results. PMID:21050489

  17. MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND INFRARED CLUSTERS IN THE S247, S252, AND BFS52 REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Saito, Hiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Atsushi; Kimura, Kimihiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    We present results of the observations carried out toward the S247, S252, and BFS52 H II regions with various molecular lines using the 1.85 m radio telescope and the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. There are at least 11 young infrared clusters (IR clusters) within the observed region. We found that there are two velocity components in {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1), and also that their spatial distributions show an anti-correlation. The IR clusters are located at their interfaces, suggesting that two distinct clouds with different velocities are colliding with each other, which may have induced the cluster formation. Based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0) and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations, we identified 16 clumps in and around the three H II regions. Eleven of the clumps are associated with the IR clusters and the other five clumps are not associated with any known young stellar objects. We investigated variations in the velocity dispersions of the 16 clumps as a function of the distance from the center of the clusters or the clumps. Clumps with clusters tend to have velocity dispersions that increase with distance from the cluster center, while clumps without clusters show a flat velocity dispersion over the clump extents. A {sup 12}CO outflow has been found in some of the clumps with IR clusters but not in the other clumps, supporting a strong relation of these clumps to the broader velocity dispersion region. We also estimated a mean star formation efficiency of {approx}30% for the clumps with IR clusters in the three H II regions.

  18. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  19. Brain regions and molecular pathways responding to food reward type and value in honey bees.

    PubMed

    McNeill, M S; Kapheim, K M; Brockmann, A; McGill, T A W; Robinson, G E

    2016-03-01

    The ability of honey bees to evaluate differences in food type and value is crucial for colony success, but these assessments are made by individuals who bring food to the hive, eating little, if any, of it themselves. We tested the hypothesis that responses to food type (pollen or nectar) and value involve different subsets of brain regions, and genes responsive to food. mRNA in situ hybridization of c-jun revealed that brain regions responsive to differences in food type were mostly different from regions responsive to differences in food value, except those dorsal and lateral to the mushroom body calyces, which responded to all three. Transcriptomic profiles of the mushroom bodies generated by RNA sequencing gave the following results: (1) responses to differences in food type or value included a subset of molecular pathways involved in the response to food reward; (2) genes responsive to food reward, food type and food value were enriched for (the Gene Ontology categories) mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum activity; (3) genes responsive to only food and food type were enriched for regulation of transcription and translation; and (4) genes responsive to only food and food value were enriched for regulation of neuronal signaling. These results reveal how activities necessary for colony survival are channeled through the reward system of individual honey bees.

  20. Coexistence of Covalent Superdeformation and Molecular Resonances in an Unbound Region of {sup 12}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Sakurai, H.; Ikeda, K.; Itagaki, N.

    2008-05-09

    The generalized two-center cluster model, which can treat static structures and dynamical reactions in excited states, is applied to the light neutron-rich system, {sup 12}Be={alpha}+{alpha}+4N. We discuss the change of the neutrons' configuration around two {alpha} cores from the covalent structure to the ionic one. We show that, in the unbound region above particle-decay thresholds, the ionic configurations appear as the molecular resonances of {alpha}+{sup 8}He, {sup 6}He+{sup 6}He, and {sup 5}He+{sup 7}He. A new type of superdeformation is possible, and we find here a covalent superdeformation with a hybrid configuration of both the covalent and ionic structures. The excitation of these exotic structures through the two-neutron transfer reaction is also discussed.

  1. Molecular rotation-vibration dynamics of low-symmetric hydrate crystal in the terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaojian; Wu, Hongya; Xi, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-16

    The rotational and vibrational dynamics of molecules in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystal are investigated with terahertz dielectric spectra. It is shown that the relaxation-like dielectric dispersion in the low frequency region is related to the reorientation of water molecules under the driving of terahertz electric field, whereas the resonant dispersion can be ascribed to lattice vibration. It is also found that, due to the hydrogen-bond effect, the vibrational mode at about 1.83 THz along [-111] direction softens with decreasing temperature, that is, the crystal expands in this direction when cooled. On the contrary, the mode hardens in the direction perpendicular to [-111] during the cooling process. This contributes to the further understanding of the molecular structure and bonding features of hydrate crystals.

  2. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Genotypes of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Regions of South China.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Lu, Junwan; Zong, Li; Li, Ailing; Pan, Ruowang; Cheng, Cong; Li, Kunpeng; Chen, Liqiang; Ying, Jianchao; Tou, Huifen; Zhu, Chuanxin; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Ni, Liyan; Xu, Zuyuan; Bao, Qiyu; Li, Peizhen

    2016-05-20

    The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of Acinetobacter baumannii. A total of 398 isolates were collected in 7 regions of South China from January to June of 2012. Drug sensitivity was tested toward 15 commonly used antibiotics; thus, 146 multi-drug-resistant strains (resistant to more than 7 drugs) were identified, representing 36.7% of all isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used for molecular subtyping. According to the PFGE results (with a cutoff of 70% similarity for the DNA electrophoretic bands), 146 strains were subdivided into 15 clusters, with cluster A being the largest (33.6%, distributed in all districts except Jiaxing). Cluster B was also widespread and included 14.4% of all strains. In addition, MLST results revealed 11 sequence types (ST), with ST208 being the most prevalent, followed by ST191 and ST729. Furthermore, 4 novel alleles and 6 novel STs were identified. Our results showed that multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii in South China shares the origin with other widespread strains in other countries. The nosocomial infections caused by A. baumannii have been severe in South China. Continuous monitoring and judicious antibiotic use are required.

  4. Molecular formation in the stagnation region of colliding laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Hassan, S. M.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-10-27

    The laser-produced colliding plasmas have numerous attractive applications and stagnation layer formed during collisions between plasmas is a useful system for understanding particle collisions and molecular formation in a controlled way. In this article, we explore carbon dimer formation and its evolutionary paths in a stagnation layer formed during the interaction of two laser-produced plasmas. Colliding laser produced plasmas are generated by splitting a laser beam into two sub-beams and then focus them into either a single flat (laterally colliding plasmas) or a V-shaped graphite targets (orthogonally colliding plasmas). The C2 formation in the stagnation region of both colliding plasma schemes is investigated using optical spectroscopic means and compared with emission features from single seed plasma. Our results show that the collisions among the plasmas followed by the stagnation layer formation lead to rapid cooling causing enhanced carbon dimer formation. In addition, plasma electron temperature, density and C2 molecular temperature were measured for the stagnation zone and compared with seed plasma.

  5. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  6. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer (Betz Boreiko 1993) aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRS) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km/s at 60 microns and 1.0 km/s at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR. The publication resulting from the work reported here is appended. No inventions were made nor was any federally owned property acquired as a result of the activities under this grant.

  7. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer (Betz & Boreiko 1993) aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRs) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km/s at 60 microns and 1.0 km/s at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR. The publication resulting from the work reported here is appended. No inventions were made nor was any federally owned property acquired as a result of the activities under this grant.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus in patients in the Ahwaz region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Ahmad; Makvandi, Manochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Neisi, Niloofar; Moradzadegan, Hamid

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the etiologic agents of acute viral hepatitis, an important public health problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of HAV in Southwest Iran (Ahwaz). A total of 59 sera were collected from acutely ill patients with anti-HAV IgM antibodies during 2009 and 2010 were tested also by RT-PCR targeting the 5' NCR for molecular diagnosis and examined in the VP1-2A and VP3-VP1 regions for genotyping. Twelve (20%) patients were detected VP1-2A by RT-PCR and 10 patients had VP3-VP1. The resulting amplicons were sequenced for genotype identification. All HAV strains were identified as subgenotype IB. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an extensive genetic heterogeneity among the strains. Seven hundred sixty-five S→F and 788 K→R amino acid substitutions in IRI49 isolate were found. It is concluded that subgenotype 1b is the sole genotype HAV in this region.

  9. Diversity and distribution of avian haematozoan parasites in the western Indian Ocean region: a molecular survey.

    PubMed

    Ishtiaq, Farah; Beadell, Jon S; Warren, Ben H; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    The genetic diversity of haematozoan parasites in island avifauna has only recently begun to be explored, despite the potential insight that these data can provide into the history of association between hosts and parasites and the possible threat posed to island endemics. We used mitochondrial DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity of 2 genera of vector-mediated parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) in avian blood samples from the western Indian Ocean region and explored their relationship with parasites from continental Africa. We detected infections in 68 out of 150 (45·3%) individuals and cytochrome b sequences identified 9 genetically distinct lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 7 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. We found considerable heterogeneity in parasite lineage composition across islands, although limited sampling may, in part, be responsible for perceived differences. Two lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 2 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. were shared by hosts in the Indian Ocean and also on mainland Africa, suggesting that these lineages may have arrived relatively recently. Polyphyly of island parasites indicated that these parasites were unlikely to constitute an endemic radiation and instead probably represent multiple colonization events. This study represents the first molecular survey of vector-mediated parasites in the western Indian Ocean, and has uncovered a diversity of parasites. Full understanding of parasite community composition and possible threats to endemic avian hosts will require comprehensive surveys across the avifauna of this region.

  10. Hα emission-line stars in molecular clouds. II. The M 42 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, Bertil; Armond, Tina; Reipurth, Bo

    2014-10-01

    We present a deep survey of Hα emission-line stars in the M 42 region using wide-field objective prism films. A total of 1699 Hα emission-line stars were identified, of which 1025 were previously unknown, within an area of 5.̊5 × 5.̊5 centred on the Trapezium Cluster. We present Hα strength estimates, positions, and JHKs photometry extracted from 2MASS, and comparisons to previous surveys. The spatial distribution of the bulk of the stars follows the molecular cloud as seen in CO and these stars are likely to belong to the very young population of stars associated with the Orion Nebula Cluster. Additionally, there is a scattered population of Hα emission-line stars distributed all over the region surveyed, which may consist partly of foreground stars associated with the young NGC 1980 cluster, as well as some foreground and background dMe or Be stars. The present catalogue adds a large number of candidate low-mass young stars belonging to the Orion population, selected independently of their infrared excess or X-ray emission. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A30

  11. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  13. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuangxi; Yao, Bo; Wang, Hongyang; Dong, Fan; Shi, Qingfeng; Zhou, Liyan; Zhou, Huaigang

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) mole fractions have been continuously measured at the Shangdianzi regional station in China. In this study, we present the atmospheric H2 time series from January 2015 to April 2016, and investigate the diurnal and seasonal cycles, and the impact of meteorological factors on the observed values. Atmospheric H2 mole fractions at Shangdianzi vary from a minimum of 381 ppb (parts per billion, 10-9 dry air mole fraction) to a maximum of 1535 ppb, with a median of 510 ppb and a mean (± standard deviation) of 555 ± 113 ppb during the observation period. The results indicate that H2 mole fractions at Shangdianzi are frequently influenced by local sources and sinks. Regionally representative conditions account for 44.7% of the total records with a mean mole fraction of 488 ± 20 ppb. The highest regionally representative H2 mole fraction is observed in July, while the lowest is observed in October. Peak-to-trough amplitude in the seasonal cycle is 63 ± 3 ppb. H2 mole fractions show nighttime depletion in all seasons, with the lowest values in the morning (7:00-10:00 local time). The H2 mole fractions are also influenced by local surface wind direction at Shangdianzi. Winds from NW-NNW-N-NNE-NE-ENE-E directions are always associated with negative contribution to atmospheric H2 loading, whereas winds from SSW-SW-WSW-W directions generally enhance the H2 values. The results of trajectory clustering analysis demonstrate that air masses from a southerly direction induce high H2 mole fractions. Conversely, mean H2 mole fractions are low when air masses are from the north, northwest, and east directions.

  14. Structural Variation of Molecular Gas in the Sagittarius Arm and Interarm Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Koda, Jin; Handa, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    We have carried out survey observations toward the Galactic plane at l ≈ 38° in the 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 lines using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. A wide area (0fdg8 × 0fdg8) was mapped with high spatial resolution (17''). The line of sight samples the gas in both the Sagittarius arm and the interarm regions. The present observations reveal how the structure and physical conditions vary across a spiral arm. We classify the molecular gas in the line of sight into two distinct components based on its appearance: the bright and compact B component and the fainter and diffuse (i.e., more extended) D component. The B component is predominantly seen at the spiral arm velocities, while the D component dominates at the interarm velocities and is also found at the spiral arm velocities. We introduce the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI, which indicates the dominance of the B component) in order to quantify the map's appearance. The radial velocities of BDI peaks coincide with those of high 12CO J = 3-2/12CO J = 1-0 intensity ratio (i.e., warm gas) and H II regions, and tend to be offset from the line brightness peaks at lower velocities (i.e., presumably downstream side of the arm). Our observations reveal that the gas structure at small scales changes across a spiral arm: bright and spatially confined structures develop in a spiral arm, leading to star formation at the downstream side, while extended emission dominates in the interarm region.

  15. STRUCTURAL VARIATION OF MOLECULAR GAS IN THE SAGITTARIUS ARM AND INTERARM REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Koda, Jin; Handa, Toshihiro

    2012-06-20

    We have carried out survey observations toward the Galactic plane at l Almost-Equal-To 38 Degree-Sign in the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 lines using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. A wide area (0.{sup 0}8 Multiplication-Sign 0.{sup 0}8) was mapped with high spatial resolution (17''). The line of sight samples the gas in both the Sagittarius arm and the interarm regions. The present observations reveal how the structure and physical conditions vary across a spiral arm. We classify the molecular gas in the line of sight into two distinct components based on its appearance: the bright and compact B component and the fainter and diffuse (i.e., more extended) D component. The B component is predominantly seen at the spiral arm velocities, while the D component dominates at the interarm velocities and is also found at the spiral arm velocities. We introduce the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI, which indicates the dominance of the B component) in order to quantify the map's appearance. The radial velocities of BDI peaks coincide with those of high {sup 12}CO J = 3-2/{sup 12}CO J = 1-0 intensity ratio (i.e., warm gas) and H II regions, and tend to be offset from the line brightness peaks at lower velocities (i.e., presumably downstream side of the arm). Our observations reveal that the gas structure at small scales changes across a spiral arm: bright and spatially confined structures develop in a spiral arm, leading to star formation at the downstream side, while extended emission dominates in the interarm region.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 infection in the central region of Taiwan from 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hao; Kuo, Ta-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Ting; Huang, Szu-Wei; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Wang, John; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease can be classified into three genotypes and many subtypes. The objectives of this study were to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of EV71 in the central region of Taiwan from 2002-2012 and to test the hypothesis that whether the alternative appearance of different EV71 subtypes in Taiwan is due to transmission from neighboring countries or from re-emergence of pre-existing local strains. We selected 174 EV71 isolates and used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify their VP1 region for DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. We found that the major subtypes of EV71 in Taiwan were B4 for 2002 epidemic, C4 for 2004-2005 epidemic, B5 for 2008-2009 epidemic, C4 for 2010 epidemic and B5 for 2011-2012 epidemic. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the 2002 and 2008 epidemics were associated with EV71 from Malaysia and Singapore; while both 2010 and 2011-2012 epidemics originated from different regions of mainland China including Shanghai, Henan, Xiamen and Gong-Dong. Furthermore, minor strains have been identified in each epidemic and some of them were correlated with the subsequent outbreaks. Therefore, the EV71 infection in Taiwan may originate from pre-existing minor strains or from other regions in Asia including mainland China. In addition, 101 EV71 isolates were selected for the detection of new recombinant strains using the nucleotide sequences spanning the VP1-2A-2B region. No new recombinant strain was found. Analysis of clinical manifestations showed that patients infected with C4 had significantly higher rates of pharyngeal vesicles or ulcers than patients infected with B5. This is the first study demonstrating that different EV 71 genotypes may have different clinical manifestations and the association of EV71 infections between Taiwan and mainland China.

  17. Molecular profiling of the developing avian telencephalon: regional timing and brain subdivision continuities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Winkler, Candace M; Pfenning, Andreas R; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-11-01

    In our companion study (Jarvis et al. [2013] J Comp Neurol. doi: 10.1002/cne.23404) we used quantitative brain molecular profiling to discover that distinct subdivisions in the avian pallium above and below the ventricle and the associated mesopallium lamina have similar molecular profiles, leading to a hypothesis that they may form as continuous subdivisions around the lateral ventricle. To explore this hypothesis, here we profiled the expression of 16 genes at eight developmental stages. The genes included those that define brain subdivisions in the adult and some that are also involved in brain development. We found that phyletic hierarchical cluster and linear regression network analyses of gene expression profiles implicated single and mixed ancestry of these brain regions at early embryonic stages. Most gene expression-defined pallial subdivisions began as one ventral or dorsal domain that later formed specific folds around the lateral ventricle. Subsequently a clear ventricle boundary formed, partitioning them into dorsal and ventral pallial subdivisions surrounding the mesopallium lamina. These subdivisions each included two parts of the mesopallium, the nidopallium and hyperpallium, and the arcopallium and hippocampus, respectively. Each subdivision expression profile had a different temporal order of appearance, similar in timing to the order of analogous cell types of the mammalian cortex. Furthermore, like the mammalian pallium, expression in the ventral pallial subdivisions became distinct during prehatch development, whereas the dorsal portions did so during posthatch development. These findings support the continuum hypothesis of avian brain subdivision development around the ventricle and influence hypotheses on homologies of the avian pallium with other vertebrates.

  18. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  19. Molecular Analysis of Fungal Populations in Patients with Oral Candidiasis Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection. PMID:24979710

  20. Examining molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region using X-ray reflection spectra simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Terrier, R.; Goldwurm, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the centre of our Galaxy lies a supermassive black hole, identified with the radio source Sagittarius A⋆. This black hole has an estimated mass of around 4 million solar masses. Although Sagittarius A⋆ is quite dim in terms of total radiated energy, having a luminosity that is a factor of 1010 lower than its Eddington luminosity, there is now compelling evidence that this source was far brighter in the past. Evidence derived from the detection of reflected X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region. However, the interpretation of the reflected emission spectra cannot be done correctly without detailed modelling of the reflection process. Attempts to do so can lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. In this paper, we present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation code we developed in order to fully model the complex processes involved in the emerging reflection spectra. The simulated spectra can be compared to real data in order to derive model parameters and constrain the past activity of the black hole. In particular, we apply our code to observations of Sagittarius B2, in order to constrain the position and density of the cloud and the incident luminosity of the central source. The results of the code have been adapted to be used in XSPEC by a large community of astronomers.

  1. Molecular Variation in Chloroplast DNA Regions in Ancestral Species of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N. T.; Mori, N.; Tsunewaki, K.

    1994-01-01

    Restriction map variation in two 5-6-kb chloroplast DNA regions of five diploid Aegilops species in the section Sitopsis and two wild tetraploid wheats, Triticum dicoccoides and Triticum araraticum, was investigated with a battery of four-cutter restriction enzymes. A single accession each of Triticum durum, Triticum timopheevi and Triticum aestivum was included as a reference. More than 250 restriction sites were scored, of which only seven sites were found polymorphic in Aegilops speltoides. No restriction site polymorphisms were detected in all of the other diploid and tetraploid species. In addition, six insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected, but they were mostly unique or species-specific. Estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0006 for A. speltoides, and 0.0000 for all the other investigated species. In A. speltoides, none of Tajima's D values was significant, indicating no clear deviation from the neutrality of molecular polymorphisms. Significant non-random association was detected for three combinations out of 10 possible pairs between polymorphic restriction sites in A. speltoides. Phylogenetic relationship among all the plastotypes (plastid genotype) suggested the diphyletic origin of T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum. A plastotype of one A. speltoides accession was identical to the major type of T. araraticum (T. timopheevi inclusively). Three of the plastotypes found in the Sitopsis species are very similar, but not identical, to that of T. dicoccoides, T. durum and T. aestivum. PMID:7916310

  2. Surveillance of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: Tracking Molecular Epidemiology and Outcomes through a Regional Network

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Rudin, Susan D.; Cober, Eric; Hanrahan, Jennifer; Ziegler, Julie; Webber, Raymond; Fox, Jacqueline; Mason, Pamela; Richter, Sandra S.; Cline, Marianne; Hall, Geraldine S.; Kaye, Keith S.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kalayjian, Robert C.; Salata, Robert A.; Segre, Julia A.; Conlan, Sean; Evans, Scott; Fowler, Vance G.

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is on the rise in the United States. A regional network was established to study microbiological and genetic determinants of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. To this end, predefined clinical characteristics and outcomes were recorded and K. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed for strain typing and resistance mechanism determination. In a 14-month period, 251 patients were included. While most of the patients were admitted from long-term care settings, 28% of them were admitted from home. Hospitalizations were prolonged and complicated. Nonsusceptibility to colistin and tigecycline occurred in isolates from 7 and 45% of the patients, respectively. Most of the CR K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) types A and B (both sequence type 258) and carried either blaKPC-2 (48%) or blaKPC-3 (51%). One isolate tested positive for blaNDM-1, a sentinel discovery in this region. Important differences between strain types were noted; rep-PCR type B strains were associated with blaKPC-3 (odds ratio [OR], 294; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 2,552; P < 0.001), gentamicin nonsusceptibility (OR, 24; 95% CI, 8.39 to 79.38; P < 0.001), amikacin susceptibility (OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 3.21 to 42.42; P < 0.001), tigecycline nonsusceptibility (OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.30 to 36.41; P = 0.018), a shorter length of stay (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P = 0.043), and admission from a skilled-nursing facility (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.26 to 8.08; P = 0.013). Our analysis shows that (i) CR K. pneumoniae is seen primarily in the elderly long-term care population and that (ii) regional monitoring of CR K. pneumoniae reveals insights into molecular characteristics. This work highlights the crucial role of ongoing surveillance of carbapenem resistance determinants. PMID:24798270

  3. Surveillance of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae: tracking molecular epidemiology and outcomes through a regional network.

    PubMed

    van Duin, David; Perez, Federico; Rudin, Susan D; Cober, Eric; Hanrahan, Jennifer; Ziegler, Julie; Webber, Raymond; Fox, Jacqueline; Mason, Pamela; Richter, Sandra S; Cline, Marianne; Hall, Geraldine S; Kaye, Keith S; Jacobs, Michael R; Kalayjian, Robert C; Salata, Robert A; Segre, Julia A; Conlan, Sean; Evans, Scott; Fowler, Vance G; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is on the rise in the United States. A regional network was established to study microbiological and genetic determinants of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with carbapenem-resistant (CR) Klebsiella pneumoniae in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. To this end, predefined clinical characteristics and outcomes were recorded and K. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed for strain typing and resistance mechanism determination. In a 14-month period, 251 patients were included. While most of the patients were admitted from long-term care settings, 28% of them were admitted from home. Hospitalizations were prolonged and complicated. Nonsusceptibility to colistin and tigecycline occurred in isolates from 7 and 45% of the patients, respectively. Most of the CR K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) types A and B (both sequence type 258) and carried either blaKPC-2 (48%) or blaKPC-3 (51%). One isolate tested positive for blaNDM-1, a sentinel discovery in this region. Important differences between strain types were noted; rep-PCR type B strains were associated with blaKPC-3 (odds ratio [OR], 294; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 2,552; P < 0.001), gentamicin nonsusceptibility (OR, 24; 95% CI, 8.39 to 79.38; P < 0.001), amikacin susceptibility (OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 3.21 to 42.42; P < 0.001), tigecycline nonsusceptibility (OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.30 to 36.41; P = 0.018), a shorter length of stay (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P = 0.043), and admission from a skilled-nursing facility (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.26 to 8.08; P = 0.013). Our analysis shows that (i) CR K. pneumoniae is seen primarily in the elderly long-term care population and that (ii) regional monitoring of CR K. pneumoniae reveals insights into molecular characteristics. This work highlights the crucial role of ongoing surveillance of carbapenem resistance determinants.

  4. Molecular Astrophysics from Space: the Physical and Chemical Effects of Star Formation and the Destruction of Planetary Systems around Evolved Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David

    2005-01-01

    The research conducted during the reporting period is grouped into three sections: 1) Warm molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM); 2) Absorption line studies of "cold" molecular clouds; 3) Vaporization of comets around the AGB star IRC+10216.

  5. Molecular fingerprinting reflects different histotypes and brain region in low grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    (MAPK) pathway in LGGs, but still point to an active involvement of TGF-beta signaling pathway in the PA development and pick out some hitherto unreported genes worthy of further investigation for the mixed glial-neuronal tumours. Conclusions The identification of a brain region-specific gene signature suggests that LGGs, with similar pathological features but located at different sites, may be distinguishable on the basis of cancer genetics. Molecular fingerprinting seems to be able to better sub-classify such morphologically heterogeneous tumours and it is remarkable that mixed glial-neuronal tumours are strikingly separated from PAs. PMID:23947815

  6. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  7. Pathology of Camel Tuberculosis and Molecular Characterization of Its Causative Agents in Pastoral Regions of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Gezahegne; Bayleyegn, Gizachew; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Legesse, Mengistu; Medhin, Girmay; Bjune, Gunnar; Abebe, Fekadu; Ameni, Gobena

    2011-01-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted on 906 apparently healthy camels slaughtered at Akaki and Metehara abattoirs to investigate the pathology of camel tuberculosis (TB) and characterize its causative agents using postmortem examination, mycobacteriological culturing, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), region of difference-4 (RD4)-based PCR and spoligotyping. The prevalence of camel TB was 10.04% (91/906) on the basis of pathology and it was significantly higher in females (χ2 = 4.789; P = 0.029). The tropism of TB lesions was significantly different among the lymph nodes (χ2 = 22.697; P = 0.002) and lung lobes (χ2 = 17.901; P = 0.006). Mycobacterial growth was observed in 34% (31/91) of camels with grossly suspicious TB lesions. Upon further molecular characterization using multiplex PCR, 68% (21/31) of the colonies showed a positive signal for the genus Mycobacterium, of which two were confirmed Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) by RD4 deletion typing. Further characterization of the two M. bovis at strains level revealed that one of the strains was SB0133 while the other strain was new and had not been reported to the M. bovis database prior to this study. Hence, it has now been reported to the database, and designated as SB1953. In conclusion, the results of the present study have shown that the majority of camel TB lesions are caused by mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. And hence further identification and characterization of these species would be useful towards the efforts made to control TB in camels. PMID:21283668

  8. Molecular epidemiological survey of haemoglobinopathies in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southern China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, F; Sun, M; Zhang, X; Cai, R; Zhou, Y; Lou, J; Zeng, L; Sun, Q; Xiao, Q; Shang, X; Wei, X; Zhang, T; Chen, P; Xu, X

    2010-08-01

    Accurate and up-to-date data on the frequency of haemoglobinopathies among the populations of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, where haemoglobinopathies are most endemic in China, are required. In our study, a total of 5789 samples obtained from members of the Han, Zhang, and Yao ethnic groups in six geographical areas of Guangxi Province were analysed systematically in terms of both haematological and molecular parameters. The results presented that the total heterozygote frequency of thalassaemias and other haemoglobinopathies was 24.51%, of which 17.55% was due to alpha-thalassaemia, 6.43% to beta-thalassaemia, 0.38% to structural haemoglobin variants, and 0.16% to delta-thalassaemia. The mutational spectrum among the local population for each type of disorder was described, including the first report on the true prevalence of three silent alpha thalassemia defects, -alpha(3.7)/(4.78%), -alpha(4.2)/(1.61%) and Hb Westmead (alpha(WS)alpha/) (1.57%) and of delta-thalassemia resulting from five novel and two rare mutations never before identified in Chinese individuals. Comparison of the frequencies of alpha-globin mutations among the ethnic groups showed that there was a statistically significant difference between the Han (15.71%) and Zhuang (20.12%), and between the Han (15.71%) and Yao (20.84%) ethnic groups. In addition, we have performed the first extensive study of haematological parameters of the Hb Westmead mutation using a group of Chinese subjects with compound heterozygosity for this variant and an alpha-thalassaemia deletion. The knowledge gained in this study will enable us to estimate the health burden in this high-risk population and to elucidate the various genetic alterations that underlie haemoglobinopathies.

  9. Molecular characterization of Wilms tumor from a resource-constrained region of sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Axt, Jason R.; de Caestecker, Christian; Pierce, Janene; Correa, Hernan; Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Newton, Mark W.; de Caestecker, Mark P.; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African children have an increased incidence of Wilms tumor (WT) and experience alarmingly poor outcomes. Although these outcomes are largely due to inadequate therapy, we hypothesized that WT from this region exhibit features of biologic aggressiveness that may warrant broader implementation of high-risk therapeutic protocols. We evaluated 15 Kenyan WT (KWT) for features of aggressive disease (blastemal predominance, Ki67/cellular proliferation) and treatment resistance (anaplasia, p53 immunopositivity). To explore additional biologic features of KWT, we determined the mutational status of the CTNNB1/β-catenin and WT1 genes and performed immunostaining for markers of Wnt pathway activation (β-catenin) and nephronic progenitor cell self-renewal (WT1, CITED1, SIX2). We characterized the proteome of KWT using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Results were compared to histology and age-matched North American WT (NAWT) controls. For KWT patients, blastemal predominance was noted in 53.3% and anaplasia in 13%. We detected increased loss to follow up (p=0.028), disease relapse (p=0.044), mortality (p=0.001), and nuclear unrest (p=0.001) in KWT patients compared to controls. KWT and NAWT showed similar Ki67/cellular proliferation. We detected an increased proportion of epithelial nuclear β-catenin in KWT (p=0.013). All 15 KWT were found to harbor wild-type β-catenin, and 1 contained a WT1 nonsense mutation. WT1 was detected by immunostaining in 100% of KWT, CITED1 in 80%, and SIX2 in 80%. IMS revealed a molecular signature unique to KWT that was distinct from NAWT. African WTs appear to express markers of adverse clinical behavior and treatment resistance and may require alternative therapies or implementation of high-risk treatment protocols. PMID:22437966

  10. The Dynamics of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Bar Region on the Near-Side of the CMZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Smith, Howard Alan; HIGGS Team

    2017-01-01

    The inner Galaxy, the area inside the 3-kpc arms, can be divided into two main regions, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; Morris and Serabyn 1996) and the Galactic Bar region. Gas and dust moves from the end points of the Galactic Bar on dust lanes towards the CMZ, where it merges with the gas and dust forming a 100-pc molecular ring or stream around the central black hole. The stream of gas and dust on the dust lanes is not continuous, but fragmented into irregularly separated clumps of varying sizes and clustering. On the near side of the CMZ the most prominent cloud clusters are the l=1.6o complex, Clump 2, and the molecular clouds around l=5.5o. We are analyzing Herschel, MOPRA, APEx, and other archival observations in order a) to identify molecular clouds that are part of the gas and dust stream in the Galactic Bar region near the CMZ, b) to determine the dynamics of the Galactic Bar clouds, and c) to derive a gas and dust mass flow rate to the CMZ. This poster will present our initial results.

  11. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  12. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  13. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. I. Origin and molecular mapping of radiation- and chemical-induced lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Bell, J A; Hunsicker, P R; Friedman, J M; Jackson, I J; Russell, L B

    1994-07-01

    Over a period of many years, germ-cell mutagenesis experiments using the mouse specific-locus test have generated numerous radiation- and chemical-induced alleles of the brown (b; Tyrp 1) locus in mouse chromosome 4. We describe here the origin, maintenance and initial molecular characterization of 28 b mutations that are prenatally lethal when homozygous. Each of these mutations is deleted for Tyrp 1 sequences, and each of 25 mutations tested further is deleted for at least one other locus defined by molecular clones previously found to be closely linked to b by interspecific backcross analysis. A panel of DNAs from mice carrying a lethal b mutation and a Mus spretus chromosome 4 was used in the fine structure mapping of these molecularly defined loci. The deletional nature of each of these prenatally lethal mutations is consistent with the hypothesis that the null phenotype at b has an effect only on the quality (color) of eumelanin produced in melanocytes. The resulting deletion map provides a framework on which to build future molecular-genetic and biological analyses of this region of mouse chromosome 4.

  14. [The occurrence of fasciola hepatica in chosen regions of Poland based on molecular and serological methods].

    PubMed

    Kozak-Cieszczyk, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by the liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) is an important issue for both human and animal health. The disease evokes economic losses which are a consequence of impaired animal productivity leading to higher costs of meat and milk production, as well as liver condemnation. The goals of this thesis were to: (1) elaborate a molecular method--PCR for the detection of F. hepatica DNA in intermediate and definite hosts; (2) estimate the usefulness of a recombinated cysteine proteinase produced in E. coli in the form of inclusive bodies in serological diagnosis of F. hepatica infection in definite hosts, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); (3) conduct field research on the prevalence of infection among intermediate and definitive hosts (cattle) in chosen regions of Poland, utilizing the elaborated methods. Based on the results obtained in this study, it was established that it is possible to detect F. hepatica DNA in the feces of definite hosts with the elaborated PCR method. The amplification of a 124 base pair tandem repeat allows the detection of fluke larval stages in intermediate hosts within 12 hours of exposure and F. hepatica infection in definite hosts (by the 5th week in rats, 8th week in sheep and 10th week in cattle). Therefore, the PCR test is more sensitive than traditional microscopic methods. Furthermore, it was determined that, the recombinated cysteine proteinase in the form of inclusive bodies, after solubillization exhibits antigenic properties of the native protein and the ELISA method based on this antigen may be useful as a tool for diagnosing fasciolosis in sheep and cattle, in both serum and milk samples. The test achieves a greater sensitivity and specificity than an ELISA based on native excretory-secretory antigens. The results of field research indicate that Fasciola hepatica is a frequent parasite of cattle in central and eastern Poland. The mean prevalence was 34.86% (+/- 16.95) in all studied areas. The

  15. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) region around the tropopause (TP) by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2) mixing ratios (m(H2)) and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD). More than 120 of the analysed samples consisted of air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). These show that m(H2) does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal TP, whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by competing H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D); the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δ D [‰]=-0.35 · m(CH4)[ppb]+768 and δD [‰]=-1.90 · m(N2O)[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally. Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in m(H2), but δD is up to 15‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD lowering is correlated with m(CH4) increase. The significant correlation with m(CH4) and the absence of a perceptible m(H2) increase that accompanies the δD lowering indicates that microbial production of very D-depleted H2 in the wet season may contribute to this phenomenon. Some of the samples have very high m(H2) and very low δD values, which indicates a pollution effect. Aircraft engine exhaust plumes are a suspected cause, since the effect mostly occurs in samples collected close to airports

  16. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-05-01

    More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) region by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2) mixing ratios (χ(H2)) and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD). More than 120 of the analyzed samples contained air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). These show that χ(H2) does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal tropopause (TP), whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D); the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (χ(CH4)) and nitrous oxide (χ(N2O)), as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δD[‰]=-0.35 · χ(CH4)[ppb]+768 and δD[‰]=-1.90· χ(N2O)[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally for the LMS. Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in χ(H2), but δD is up to 12.3‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD decrease is correlated with the χ(CH4) increase in these samples. The significant correlation with χ(CH4) and the absence of a perceptible χ(H2) increase that accompanies the δD decrease indicates that microbial production of very D-depleted H2 in the wet season may contribute to this phenomenon. Some of the samples have very high χ(H2) and very low δD values, which indicates a pollution effect. Aircraft engine exhaust plumes are a suspected cause, since the effect mostly occurs in samples

  17. A Cyanoacetylene Study of the Molecular Disk in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. S.; Osamu, Kameya; Masaki, Morimoto

    1991-12-01

    We have observed dense core around young stellar objects, DR21, S140, Orion-KL, and L1551 using four millimeter-wave transitions of HC3N J = 4-3, J = 5-4, J = 10-9 and J = 12-11. The spatial distribution of HC3N emission closely resembles the morphology of the previous CS observations that trace high density gas. These observations reveal the existence of HC3N dense cores around central IR source, elliptical in shape and almost perpendicular to the CO bipolar outflow axis. Small differences can be explained by that HC3N molecular line is more optically thin and is seen to be more detailed structure in the neighborhood of central IR sources. In S140 and Orion-KL, massive (~10Mo), slowly rotating dense cores lie near at the central IR sources of bipolar outflows. The velocity channel maps of DR21 show that the bipolar outflow gas may have a correlation with the dense core of DR21. We analysed intensities of the four lines to derive physical conditions in dense core from two methods, LTE and LVG. The column density of HC3N, N(HC3N), between LTE and LVG calculations agree well with each other. The abundances of HC3N in each observing source have been estimated using the average values of n(H2) and N(HC3N) and assuming the size of dense core. The fractional HC3N abundances in massive dense cores of DR21, S140, and Orion-KL have a range of (2-7)*10E-10, while that of low mass dense core, L1551, has one order of magnitude greater value of 2*10E-9. This should be considered good agreement with the result my Morris et al.(1976). It may be considered that dense cores of DR21, S140, and Orion-KL may have almost same stage of chemical evolution, and their abundances have a small values relative to that of L1551. The column density N(HC3N) decreases with increasing distance from the densest part of the cloud, the central infrared source, and have the relation of N(HC3N) ~ R^(-alpha), where alpha has a range of 0.65 to 0.89. The values of n(H2) are not varied with increasing

  18. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF G331.5-0.1: THE LUMINOUS CENTRAL REGION OF A GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Merello, Manuel; Bronfman, Leonardo; Garay, Guido; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Evans, Neal J. II; Walmsley, C. Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    We report molecular line and dust continuum observations toward the high-mass star-forming region G331.5-0.1, one of the most luminous regions of massive star formation in the Milky Way, located at the tangent region of the Norma spiral arm, at a distance of 7.5 kpc. Molecular emission was mapped toward the G331.5-0.1 GMC in the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and C{sup 18}O(J = 1 {yields} 0) lines with NANTEN, while its central region was mapped in CS(J = 2 {yields} 1 and J = 5 {yields} 4) with SEST, and in CS(J = 7 {yields} 6) and {sup 13}CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) with ASTE. Continuum emission mapped at 1.2 mm with SIMBA and at 0.87 mm with LABOCA reveal the presence of six compact and luminous dust clumps, making this source one of the most densely populated central regions of a GMC in the Galaxy. The dust clumps are associated with molecular gas and they have the following average properties: size of 1.6 pc, mass of 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }, molecular hydrogen density of 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, dust temperature of 32 K, and integrated luminosity of 5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} L{sub Sun }, consistent with values found toward other massive star-forming dust clumps. The CS and {sup 13}CO spectra show the presence of two velocity components: a high-velocity component at {approx} - 89 km s{sup -1}, seen toward four of the clumps, and a low-velocity component at {approx} - 101 km s{sup -1} seen toward the other two clumps. Radio continuum emission is present toward four of the molecular clumps, with spectral index estimated for two of them of 0.8 {+-} 0.2 and 1.2 {+-} 0.2. A high-velocity molecular outflow is found at the center of the brightest clump, with a line width of 26 km s{sup -1} (FWHM) in CS(J = 7 {yields} 6). Observations of SiO(J = 7 {yields} 6 and J = 8 {yields} 7), and SO(J{sub K} = 8{sub 8} {yields} 7{sub 7} and J{sub K} = 8{sub 7} {yields} 7{sub 6}) lines provide estimates of the gas rotational temperature toward this

  19. Molecular cloning of the gene encoding the bovine brain ribonuclease and its expression in different regions of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, M P; Carsana, A; Confalone, E; Cosi, C; Sorrentino, S; Viola, M; Palmieri, M; Russo, E; Furia, A

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we report the molecular cloning of the gene encoding the bovine brain ribonuclease. The nucleotide sequence determined in this work shows a high degree of identity to the homologous gene encoding the bovine pancreatic ribonuclease. Processing of the primary transcripts of these genes also follows a similar pathway, splicing of the unique intron in the 5' untranslated region occurs at corresponding positions. Expression of the bovine brain ribonuclease gene can be detected both at the transcriptional and translational levels in all the regions of the brain examined. Images PMID:1754384

  20. Molecular characterization of a region of DNA associated with mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Russell, L B; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G A; Woychik, R P

    1991-09-15

    Molecular characterization of a radiation-induced agouti (a)-locus mutation has resulted in the isolation of a segment of DNA that maps at or near the a locus on chromosome 2 in the mouse. This region of DNA is deleted in several radiation- or chemical-induced homozygous-lethal a-locus mutations and is associated with specific DNA structural alterations in two viable a-locus mutations. We propose that DNA probes from this region of chromosome 2 will be useful for ultimately characterizing the individual gene or genes associated with a-locus function.

  1. Schizophrenia-associated methylomic variation: molecular signatures of disease and polygenic risk burden across multiple brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Joana; Hannon, Eilis; Dempster, Emma; Pidsley, Ruth; Macdonald, Ruby; Knox, Olivia; Spiers, Helen; Troakes, Claire; Al-Saraj, Safa; Turecki, Gustavo; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Genetic association studies provide evidence for a substantial polygenic component to schizophrenia, although the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder remain largely undefined. Building on recent studies supporting a role for developmentally regulated epigenetic variation in the molecular aetiology of schizophrenia, this study aimed to identify epigenetic variation associated with both a diagnosis of schizophrenia and elevated polygenic risk burden for the disease across multiple brain regions. Genome-wide DNA methylation was quantified in 262 post-mortem brain samples, representing tissue from four brain regions (prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum) from 41 schizophrenia patients and 47 controls. We identified multiple disease-associated and polygenic risk score-associated differentially methylated positions and regions, which are not enriched in genomic regions identified in genetic studies of schizophrenia and do not reflect direct genetic effects on DNA methylation. Our study represents the first analysis of epigenetic variation associated with schizophrenia across multiple brain regions and highlights the utility of polygenic risk scores for identifying molecular pathways associated with aetiological variation in complex disease. PMID:28011714

  2. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  3. A molecular and structural analysis of the VH and VK regions of monoclonal antibodies bearing the A48 regulatory idiotype.

    PubMed

    Victor-Kobrin, C; Barak, Z T; Bonilla, F A; Kobrin, B; Sanz, I; French, D; Rothe, J; Bona, C

    1990-01-15

    The results presented in this paper explore the molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory Id (RI). A48 RI+ mAb derived from idiotypically manipulated mice molecularly resembled the A48 and UPC 10 prototypes of this system by utilizing a VHX24-Vk10 combination. Id expression by these antibodies was not restricted by a particular D region sequence, JH, or JK segment, but quantitative differences in Id expression were associated with utilization of different members of the VK10 germ-line gene families. The VL sequences of these A48 RI+ mAb has identified amino acid residues lying in four different idiotope-determining regions which may contribute to the structural correlate of this Id. A comparative sequence analysis of the VH regions of these VHX24 utilizing A48 RI+ mAb with several A48 RI+ mAb utilizing VHJ558 or VH7183 VH genes as well as a hybrid transfectoma antibody derived from two A48 RI-, VHJ558 utilizing hybridomas, all suggested that four nonconsecutive positions which lie outside the idiotope-determining regions may contribute structural elements toward expression of this Id. The VH and VL regions of the A48RI+, VHX24-Vk 10+ mAb showed low to moderate levels of somatic mutation which showed different patterns of distribution between the complementary determining region (CDR) and framework regions in the H and L chains. Although the VK sequences contained 50% of the replacement mutations in the CDR, with a replacement/silent mutation ratio of 10, the CDR of the VH sequences contained only 31% of the replacement mutations with a replacement/silent mutation ratio of 0.69.

  4. The Sarcomeric M-Region: A Molecular Command Center for Diverse Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Yen R.; Ackermann, Maegen A.; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-01-01

    The sarcomeric M-region anchors thick filaments and withstands the mechanical stress of contractions by deformation, thus enabling distribution of physiological forces along the length of thick filaments. While the role of the M-region in supporting myofibrillar structure and contractility is well established, its role in mediating additional cellular processes has only recently started to emerge. As such, M-region is the hub of key protein players contributing to cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, mechanosensing, metabolism, and proteasomal degradation. Mutations in genes encoding M-region related proteins lead to development of severe and lethal cardiac and skeletal myopathies affecting mankind. Herein, we describe the main cellular processes taking place at the M-region, other than thick filament assembly, and discuss human myopathies associated with mutant or truncated M-region proteins. PMID:25961035

  5. Transient magnetic tunneling mediated by a molecular bridge in the junction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvová, A.; Špička, V.; Velický, B.

    2014-07-01

    This paper extends our recent theoretical study of transient currents in molecular bridge junctions [1] to magnetic tunneling. Presently, we calculate the excess magnetic tunneling through the molecular bridge shunting the junction. The system is represented by two ferromagnetic electrodes bridged by a molecular size island with one electronic level and a local Hubbard type correlation. The island is linked with the electrodes by tunneling junctions whose coupling strength is assumed to undergo rapid changes affecting the connectivity of the system. We employ the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The numerical solution is obtained solving the real-time Dyson equation in the integro-differential form self-consistently. The switching events controlling the junctions give rise to transient changes of magnetisation of the island. They strongly depend on the static galvanic bias between the electrodes, mutual alignment of their magnetisation and on the time scale of the switching.

  6. RNA sequencing reveals region-specific molecular mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis in a model of classical hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, A. S.; de Matos, A. H.; do Canto, A. M.; Rocha, C. S.; Carvalho, B. S.; Pascoal, V. D. B.; Norwood, B.; Bauer, S.; Rosenow, F.; Gilioli, R.; Cendes, F.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete transcriptome analysis of the dorsal (dDG) and ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) of a rat epilepsy model presenting a hippocampal lesion with a strict resemblance to classical hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We collected the dDG and vDG by laser microdissection 15 days after electrical stimulation and performed high-throughput RNA-sequencing. There were many differentially regulated genes, some of which were specific to either of the two sub-regions in stimulated animals. Gene ontology analysis indicated an enrichment of inflammation-related processes in both sub-regions and of axonal guidance and calcium signaling processes exclusively in the vDG. There was also a differential regulation of genes encoding molecules involved in synaptic function, neural electrical activity and neuropeptides in stimulated rats. The data presented here suggests, in the time point analyzed, a remarkable interaction among several molecular components which takes place in the damaged hippocampi. Furthermore, even though similar mechanisms may function in different regions of the DG, the molecular components involved seem to be region specific. PMID:26935982

  7. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A.; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M.; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A.; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes. PMID:27025950

  8. Russian populations of Puccinia triticina in distant regions are not differentiated for virulence and molecular genotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine whether genetically distinct groups of Puccinia triticina are present in four regions of Russia. Collections of P. triticina were obtained from the Central, North Caucasus, Volga, and West Siberia regions of Russia from 2006 to 2010. Ninety-nine single ur...

  9. Chromosomal and molecular evidence for presence of Polyommatus (Agrodiaetus) poseidon (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) in Caucasus region

    PubMed Central

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.; Tikhonov, Valentin V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We show how combination of chromosomal and molecular markers can be applied for proper species identification in Agrodiaetus Hübner, 1822 blue butterflies. Using this approach we provide first evidence for presence of Polyommatus (Agrodiaetus) poseidon (Herrich-Schäffer, [1851]) in Georgia. PMID:26140166

  10. Chromosomal and molecular evidence for presence of Polyommatus (Agrodiaetus) poseidon (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) in Caucasus region.

    PubMed

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Tikhonov, Valentin V

    2015-01-01

    We show how combination of chromosomal and molecular markers can be applied for proper species identification in Agrodiaetus Hübner, 1822 blue butterflies. Using this approach we provide first evidence for presence of Polyommatus (Agrodiaetus) poseidon (Herrich-Schäffer, [1851]) in Georgia.

  11. Source regions for recruitment of Calanus finmarchicus to Georges Bank: evidence from molecular population genetic analysis of mtDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucklin, Ann; Kocher, Thomas D.

    Molecular population genetic analysis has provided evidence that the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, of the Labrador Current, Gulf of St Lawrence, Scotian Shelf, Gulf of Maine, and Georges Bank constitute a single, interbreeding population. The DNA sequence of a 350 base pair portion of the mitochondrial large subunit (16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene was determined for a total of 72 individuals collected in 1992, and 110 individuals collected in 1993 from these regions. There was significant heterogeneity in haplotype frequencies among the samples collected in 1992, but this heterogeneity did not resolve into regional patterns. The only regional differences seen were between pooled samples of the western N. Atlantic and those of the Norwegian Sea. There were no significant differences in haplotype frequencies among the samples collected in 1993, and fewer haplotypes were observed in these samples. Intraspecific molecular variation was typical of other marine species: there were 29 haplotypes among the 182 individuals sequenced. The frequency distribution of the haplotypes was highly skewed: 128 individuals shared one haplotype and 19 individuals were unique. There were 24 variable sites among the 350 bases sequenced; estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0042. The genetic character of C. finmarchicus populations in the western N. Atlantic was stable over time in that three of the haplotypes (including the most abundant) occurred in both 1992 and 1993. However, haplotype frequencies differed significantly between the two years. The lack of regional structure in the 1992 samples and the genetic homogeneity of samples collected in 1993 across the domain from the Labrador Current to the Gulf of St Lawrence to Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine indicated that there is significant gene flow across this region. The persistent genetic pattern suggests that the Gulf of St Lawrence may be an important source region for recruitment of C. finmarchicus to Georges Bank

  12. Molecular characterization and protein analysis of the cap region, which is essential for encapsulation in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S; Uchida, I; Terakado, N; Sasakawa, C; Yoshikawa, M

    1989-01-01

    By using genetic complementation tests with various in vitro-constructed mutants with mutations in the cap region (which is essential for encapsulation in Bacillus anthracis), we identified three cistrons, capB, capC, and capA, in this order of arrangement. Minicell analysis revealed that these cistrons produce proteins of 44, 16, and 46 kilodaltons, respectively. The complete nucleotide sequence of 3,244 base pairs covering the whole cap region was determined and revealed the existence of the three open reading frames of capB (397 amino acid residues; molecular weight, 44,872), capC (149 amino acid residues; molecular weight, 16,522), and capA (411 amino acid residues; molecular weight, 46,420) arranged in the order predicted by complementation tests. These three cistrons were all transcribed in the same direction from promoters unique to each cistron. Judging from the predicted amino acid sequence of the three proteins and from their localization and their sensitivity to various physicochemical treatments, they appeared to be membrane-associated enzymes mediating the polymerization of D-glutamic acid via the membrane. Capsular peptides immunologically identical to that of B. anthracis were found in B. subtilis, B. megaterium, and B. licheniformis, but no sequence homologous to the cap region was found in any of these bacilli other than B. anthracis. Using strains of B. anthracis with or without insertional inactivation of the cap region, we found that the capsule of B. anthracis conferred strong resistance to phagocytosis upon the bacterial host. Images PMID:2536679

  13. Regional differences in rates of plant speciation and molecular evolution: a comparison between eastern Asia and eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiu-Yun Jenny; Zhang, Wen Heng; Ricklefs, Robert E; Qian, Hong; Chen, Zhi Duan; Wen, Jun; Hua, Jian L

    2004-10-01

    The eastern Asian (EAS)-eastern North American (ENA) floristic disjunction is one of the best-known biogeographic patterns in the Northern Hemisphere. Recent paleontological and molecular analyses have illuminated the origins of the biogeographic pattern, but subsequent diversification and evolution of the disjunct floras in each of the two continents after isolation remains poorly understood. Although similar in climate and floristic composition, EAS has twice as many species as ENA in genera occurring in both regions. Explaining such differences in species diversity between regions with similar environmental conditions (diversity anomalies) is an important goal of the study of the global patterns of biodiversity. We used a phylogenetic approach to compare rates of net speciation and molecular evolution between the two regions. We first identified EAS-ENA disjunct sister clades from ten genera (Asarum, Buckleya, Carpinus, Carya, Cornus, Hamamelis, Illicium, Panax, Stewartia, and Styrax) that represent diverse angiosperm lineages using phylogenetic analyses of ITS (internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA) sequence data. Species richness and substitution rate of ITS between sister clades were compared. The results revealed a pattern of greater species diversity in the EAS counterparts. A positive relationship between species diversity and ITS substitution rate was also documented. These results suggest greater net speciation and accelerated molecular evolution in EAS. The data support the idea that a regional difference in net speciation rate related to topographic heterogeneity contributes to the diversity anomaly between EAS and ENA. The close relationship between rates of ITS evolution and species richness further suggests that species production may be directly linked to rate of nucleotide substitution.

  14. 74 MHz nonthermal emission from molecular clouds: evidence for a cosmic ray dominated region at the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Lis, D; Viti, S; Brogan, C; Chambers, E; Pound, M; Rickert, M

    2013-10-03

    We present 74 MHz radio continuum observations of the Galactic center region. These measurements show nonthermal radio emission arising from molecular clouds that is unaffected by free–free absorption along the line of sight. We focus on one cloud, G0.13-0.13, representative of the population of molecular clouds that are spatially correlated with steep spectrum (α(327MHz)(74MHz) = 1.3 ± 0.3) nonthermal emission from the Galactic center region. This cloud lies adjacent to the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc near l 0.2° and is a strong source of 74 MHz continuum, SiO (2-1), and Fe I Kα 6.4 keV line emission. This three-way correlation provides the most compelling evidence yet that relativistic electrons, here traced by 74 MHz emission, are physically associated with the G0.13-0.13 molecular cloud and that low-energy cosmic ray electrons are responsible for the Fe I Kα line emission. The high cosmic ray ionization rate 10(–1)3 s(–1) H(–1) is responsible for heating the molecular gas to high temperatures and allows the disturbed gas to maintain a high-velocity dispersion. Large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling of multitransition SiO observations of this cloud implies H2 densities 10(4–5) cm(–3) and high temperatures. The lower limit to the temperature of G0.13-0.13 is 100 K, whereas the upper limit is as high as 1000 K. Lastly, we used a time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas to investigate for molecular line diagnostics of cosmic ray heating. When the cloud reaches chemical equilibrium, the abundance ratios of HCN/HNC and N2H+/HCO+ are consistent with measured values. In addition, significant abundance of SiO is predicted in the cosmic ray dominated region of the Galactic center. We discuss different possibilities to account for the origin of widespread SiO emission detected from Galactic center molecular clouds.

  15. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Li, Jin Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  16. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  17. Molecular Identification of Dendrobium Species (Orchidaceae) Based on the DNA Barcode ITS2 Region and Its Application for Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Mengying; Chen, Zhe; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-01-01

    The over-collection and habitat destruction of natural Dendrobium populations for their commercial medicinal value has led to these plants being under severe threat of extinction. In addition, many Dendrobium plants are similarly shaped and easily confused during the absence of flowering stages. In the present study, we examined the application of the ITS2 region in barcoding and phylogenetic analyses of Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae). For barcoding, ITS2 regions of 43 samples in Dendrobium were amplified. In combination with sequences from GenBank, the sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were computed using MEGA V5.1. The success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing was 100%. There was a significant divergence between the inter- and intra-specific genetic distances of ITS2 regions, while the presence of a barcoding gap was obvious. Based on the BLAST1, nearest distance and TaxonGAP methods, our results showed that the ITS2 regions could successfully identify the species of most Dendrobium samples examined; Second, we used ITS2 as a DNA marker to infer phylogenetic relationships of 64 Dendrobium species. The results showed that cluster analysis using the ITS2 region mainly supported the relationship between the species of Dendrobium established by traditional morphological methods and many previous molecular analyses. To sum up, the ITS2 region can not only be used as an efficient barcode to identify Dendrobium species, but also has the potential to contribute to the phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dendrobium. PMID:26378526

  18. Molecular Identification of Dendrobium Species (Orchidaceae) Based on the DNA Barcode ITS2 Region and Its Application for Phylogenetic Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Mengying; Chen, Zhe; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-09-11

    The over-collection and habitat destruction of natural Dendrobium populations for their commercial medicinal value has led to these plants being under severe threat of extinction. In addition, many Dendrobium plants are similarly shaped and easily confused during the absence of flowering stages. In the present study, we examined the application of the ITS2 region in barcoding and phylogenetic analyses of Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae). For barcoding, ITS2 regions of 43 samples in Dendrobium were amplified. In combination with sequences from GenBank, the sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were computed using MEGA V5.1. The success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing was 100%. There was a significant divergence between the inter- and intra-specific genetic distances of ITS2 regions, while the presence of a barcoding gap was obvious. Based on the BLAST1, nearest distance and TaxonGAP methods, our results showed that the ITS2 regions could successfully identify the species of most Dendrobium samples examined; Second, we used ITS2 as a DNA marker to infer phylogenetic relationships of 64 Dendrobium species. The results showed that cluster analysis using the ITS2 region mainly supported the relationship between the species of Dendrobium established by traditional morphological methods and many previous molecular analyses. To sum up, the ITS2 region can not only be used as an efficient barcode to identify Dendrobium species, but also has the potential to contribute to the phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dendrobium.

  19. Molecular analysis of region 1 of the Escherichia coli K5 antigen gene cluster: a region encoding proteins involved in cell surface expression of capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Pazzani, C; Rosenow, C; Boulnois, G J; Bronner, D; Jann, K; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of region 1 of the K5 antigen gene cluster of Escherichia coli was determined. This region is postulated to encode functions which, at least in part, participate in translocation of polysaccharide across the periplasmic space and onto the cell surface. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed five genes that encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 75.7, 60.5, 44, 43, and 27 kDa. The 27-kDa protein was 70.7% homologous to the CMP-2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid synthetase enzyme encoded by the E. coli kdsB gene, indicating the presence of a structural gene for a similar enzyme within the region 1 operon. The 43-kDa protein was homologous to both the Ctrb and BexC proteins encoded by the Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae capsule gene clusters, respectively, indicating common stages in the expression of capsules in these gram-negative bacteria. However, no homology was detected between the 75.7, 60.5-, and 44-kDa proteins and any of the proteins so far described for the H. influenzae and N. meningitidis capsule gene clusters. Images PMID:8397187

  20. Modeling radiative transfer in molecular clouds. 1: HCO(+) in the star-forming region W49A North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, Helene R.; Auer, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    A new general multilevel, non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) radiative transfer code, valid for any velocity field, is applied to HCO(+) observations of W49A North. Three classes of collapse models are considered: free-fall collapse (v proportional to 1/sq. root of r), rho proportional to r(exp -3/2) throughout the molecular cloud, successfully reproduces the features of the observations and gives the best fit to the J = 1-0 and J = 3-2 profiles both toward the prominent H II component G of W49A North and off the center. In addition to a slow radial fall-off of density, the theoretical modeling implies the following for the molecular cloud: the large line widths result from motions occurring within the inner 1 pc, and there are probably one or more fragments with peculiar velocities within this same region.

  1. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the DiGeorge syndrome region using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A. Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London ); Halford, S.; Wadey, R.; Scambler, P.J. ); Baldini, A. )

    1993-08-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect characterized by cardiac defects, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Several studies have described a critical region for DGS at 22q11, within which the majority of DGS patients have deletions. The authors have isolated nine cosmid and three YAC clones using previously described and newly isolated probes that have been shown to be deleted in many DGS patients. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging, they have mapped and ordered these clones relative to the breakpoints of two balanced translocations at 22q11 (one in a DGS patient and one in the unaffected parent of a DGS child). The data indicate that the breakpoint in the unaffected individual distally limits the DGS critical region (defined as the smallest region of overlap), while proximally the region is limited by repeat-rich DNA. The critical region includes the balanced translocation breakpoint of the DGS patient that presumably disrupts the gene causing this syndrome.

  2. Practical Aspects of Molecular Spectroscopy in Plasmas 4. The Role of Molecular Spectroscopy in the Vacuum Ultraviolet Region for the Development of a Negative Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Masaki

    Fundamental plasma processes of negative ions in a low pressure region (a gas pressure Pg < 1.5 Pa) have been studied using the photodetachment technique and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopic measurements in the spectral range from 100 to 180 nm. Understanding the behavior of a plasma with negative ions, in particular, the correlation between H- density and vibrationally excited H2 density, is of great interest in the field of atomic-molecular physics and ion source developments. The volume and the surface effects of negative ions are discussed taking into account the e-V, the E-V, and the RD processes, and the measured VUV spectrum is compared with the synthetic one. The cascade transition to the B1Σ+u state by the electron excitation contributes to the production of the highly vibrationally excited levels of the X1Σ+g ground electronic state.

  3. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary.

  4. SUBMILLIMETER AND MOLECULAR VIEWS OF THREE GALACTIC RING-LIKE H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidsson, K.; Kerton, C. R. E-mail: kerton@iastate.edu

    2011-05-15

    We use SCUBA 850 {mu}m and CO observations to analyze the surroundings of three Galactic ring-like H II regions, KR 7, KR 81, and KR 120 (Sh 2-124, Sh 2-165, and Sh 2-187), with the aim of finding sites of triggered star formation. We find one prominent submillimeter (sub-mm) source for each region, located at the interface between the H II region and its neutral surroundings. Using Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we find that the prominent sub-mm source for KR 120 probably contains an embedded cluster of young stellar objects (YSOs), making it a likely site for triggered star formation. The KR 7 sub-mm source could possibly contain embedded YSOs, while the KR 81 sub-mm source likely does not. The mass column densities for these dominant sub-mm sources fall in the {approx}0.1-0.6 g cm{sup -2} range. The mass of the cold, dense material (clumps) seen as the three dominant sub-mm sources falls around {approx}100 M{sub sun}. We use the SCUBA Legacy catalog to characterize the populations of sub-mm sources around the H II regions, and compare them to the sources found around a previously studied similar ring-like H II region (KR 140) and near a massive star-forming region (W3). Finally, we estimate the IR luminosities of the prominent newly detected sub-mm sources and find that they are correlated with the clump mass, consistent with a previously known luminosity-mass relationship which this study shows to be valid over four orders of magnitude in mass.

  5. Gravity Binding and Pressure Bounding of Hii regions and Molecular Clouds in Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Beckman, J.; Font, J.; Camps-Fariña, A.; Garcìa-Lorenzo, B.; Serrano-Borlaff, A.

    We have observed 3 pairs of interacting galaxies (the Antennae, Arp 236, and NGC 1614) using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We have extracted the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosity and velocity dispersion) of Hii regions. We have combined also these observations with ALMA archival observations of these interacting galaxies, finding that there is a set of brighter and denser star forming regions. We have been able to compare these properties with those of two SMGs at redshift ~ 2.

  6. Ehrlichia canis in dogs in a semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil: serology, molecular detection and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, A; Labruna, M B; Costa, A; Aguiar, D M; Justiniano, S V; Mendes, R S; Melo, A L T; Alves, C J; Azevedo, S S

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated infection by Ehrlichia spp. agents by PCR, immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT), and by Giemsa-stained blood smears in 108 dogs from a semiarid region of the state of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. Seventy-five (69.4%) of the 108 dogs were found to be seropositive to Ehrlichia canis, while only four dogs (3.7%) were positive in real-time PCR for E. canis. In six dogs (5.6%) E. canis-like morulae were observed in monocytes. Animals that stayed in environment whose floor was dried dirt, and dogs whose owners reported low frequency of cleaning the dog environment had higher (P<0.05) PCR positivity for E. canis. Increasing seropositivity was found in older dogs (P=0.012). This study provides the first molecular detection of E. canis in the semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil.

  7. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Molecular genetic aetiology of general cognitive function is enriched in evolutionarily conserved regions

    PubMed Central

    Hill, W D; Davies, G; Harris, S E; Hagenaars, S P; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stephanie; Verbaas, Carla I; Bressler, Jan; Schuur, Maaike; Smith, Albert V; Bis, Joshua C; Bennett, David A; Ikram, M Arfan; Launer, Lenore J; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Seshadri, Sudha; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mosley Jr, Thomas H; Liewald, D C; Penke, L; Gale, C R; Deary, I J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in general cognitive function have been shown to be partly heritable and to show genetic correlations with several psychiatric and physical disease states. However, to date, few single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have demonstrated genome-wide significance, hampering efforts aimed at determining which genetic variants are most important for cognitive function and which regions drive the genetic associations between cognitive function and disease states. Here, we combine multiple large genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets, from the CHARGE cognitive consortium (n=53 949) and UK Biobank (n=36 035), to partition the genome into 52 functional annotations and an additional 10 annotations describing tissue-specific histone marks. Using stratified linkage disequilibrium score regression we show that, in two measures of cognitive function, SNPs associated with cognitive function cluster in regions of the genome that are under evolutionary negative selective pressure. These conserved regions contained ~2.6% of the SNPs from each GWAS but accounted for ~40% of the SNP-based heritability. The results suggest that the search for causal variants associated with cognitive function, and those variants that exert a pleiotropic effect between cognitive function and health, will be facilitated by examining these enriched regions. PMID:27959336

  9. Molecular characterization of a genomic region associated with virulence in Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M E; Strugnell, R A; Rood, J I

    1992-01-01

    The major pathogen implicated in footrot, a highly contagious disease of sheep, is the strict anaerobe Dichelobacter nodosus (formerly Bacteroides nodosus). Sequence analysis of a 2,262-bp segment of the D. nodosus genome which is more prevalent in virulent isolates than in other isolates showed the presence of four open reading frames which appeared to have consensus transcriptional and translational start signals. These virulence-associated genes have been designated vapABCD. Two of the three copies of the vap region in the genome of the reference strain D. nodosus A198 were shown to carry all of the vap genes, whereas one copy contained only the vapD gene. The VapD protein was gel purified, shown to contain the predicted amino-terminal sequence, and used to raise rabbit antibodies. Western blots (immunoblots) showed that all of the D. nodosus strains tested that contained the vap region produced the VapD protein. The VapD protein had significant amino acid sequence identity with open reading frame 5 from the cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the vapBC operon had sequence similarity with the trbH region of the Escherichia coli F plasmid. It is proposed that these gene regions evolved from the integration of a conjugative plasmid from another bacterial species into the D. nodosus chromosome. Images PMID:1398971

  10. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Zoonotic Poxviruses Circulating in the Amazon Region of Colombia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Ciro, Jose A.; Paredes, Andrea; Walteros, Diana M.; Tolosa-Pérez, Erica Natalia; Laiton-Donato, Katherine; Pinzón, Maria del Carmen; Petersen, Brett W.; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F.; Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly; Davidson, Whitni; Gao, Jinxin; Patel, Nishi; Nakazawa, Yoshinori; Reynolds, Mary G.; Satheshkumar, P. S.; Emerson, Ginny L.

    2017-01-01

    During 2014, cutaneous lesions were reported in dairy cattle and farmworkers in the Amazon Region of western Colombia. Samples from 6 patients were analyzed by serologic and PCR testing, and results demonstrated the presence of vaccinia virus and pseudocowpox virus. These findings highlight the need for increased poxvirus surveillance in Colombia. PMID:28322708

  11. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  12. A low molecular weight artificial RNA of unique size with multiple probe target regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitulle, C.; Dsouza, L.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Artificial RNAs (aRNAs) containing novel sequence segments embedded in a deletion mutant of Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA have previously been shown to be expressed from a plasmid borne growth rate regulated promoter in E. coli. These aRNAs accumulate to high levels and their detection is a promising tool for studies in molecular microbial ecology and in environmental monitoring. Herein a new construct is described which illustrates the versatility of detection that is possible with aRNAs. This 3xPen aRNA construct carries a 72 nucleotide insert with three copies of a unique 17 base probe target sequence. This aRNA is 160 nucleotides in length and again accumulates to high levels in the E. coli cytoplasm without incorporating into ribosomes. The 3xPen aRNA illustrates two improvements in detection. First, by appropriate selection of insert size, we obtained an aRNA which provides a unique and hence, easily quantifiable peak, on a high resolution gel profile of low molecular weight RNAs. Second, the existence of multiple probe targets results in a nearly commensurate increase in signal when detection is by hybridization. These aRNAs are naturally amplified and carry sequence segments that are not found in known rRNA sequences. It thus may be possible to detect them directly. An experimental step involving RT-PCR or PCR amplification of the gene could therefore be avoided.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Isolated from Regional Hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Akpaka, Patrick E.; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Jayaratne, Padman

    2016-01-01

    Geographic spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) clones in cities, countries, or even continents has been identified by molecular techniques. This study aimed at characterizing virulent genes and determining genetic relatedness of 45 VRE isolates from Trinidad and Tobago using molecular tools, including polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and Random Amplification Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The majority (84%) of the isolates were Enterococcus faecium possessing vanA gene while the rest (16%) were Enterococcus faecalis possessing vanB. The esp gene was found in all 45 VRE isolates while hyl genes were found only in E. faecium species. The E. faecium species expressed five distinct PFGE patterns. The predominant clones with similar or common patterns belonged to clones one and three, and each had 11 (29%) of the VRE isolates. Plasmid content was identified in representative isolates from each clonal group. By contrast, the E. faecalis species had one PFGE pattern suggesting the presence of an occult and limited clonal spread. The emergence of VRE in the country seems to be related to intra/interhospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element. Therefore, infection control measures will be warranted to prevent any potential outbreak and spread of VRE in the country. PMID:27299153

  14. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the north region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; André, Marcos Rogério; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; de Albuquerque Lopes, Cinthia Távora; da Silva Lima, Danillo Henrique; de Andrade, Stefano Juliano Tavares; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2013-11-08

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused mainly by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina, which are associated to considerable economic losses in cattle herds worldwide. Approximately 60% of buffalo herds in South America are located in Northern Brazil. Little is known about the impact of babesiosis on buffalo herds in Brazil. The present work aimed to verify the occurrence of B. bovis and B. bigemina in 542 water buffaloes in the state of Pará, Northern Brazil, using molecular and serological techniques. The percentage of seropositive animals for B. bovis and B. bigemina was 41.2% and 19.0%, respectively, by ELISA. B. bovis and B. bigemina DNA were detected in 15 and 16% of sampled buffaloes, respectively. A high correlation (Kappa index of 0.9) between serological and molecular tests suggests that the combination of the utilized techniques in the present study is suitable for babesiosis diagnosis in an endemic unstable area. Significantly difference of positivity for serological and molecular assays was verified to localities and reproductive status of sampled animals, but not between buffalo breeds. The immune status of sampled buffaloes associated to the circulation of babesiosis agents in sampled population suggests that the studied area is at risk to clinical babesiosis outbreaks. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that this region can be classified as endemically unstable.

  15. A molecular dynamics study of Fe2S2 putidaredoxin: multiple conformations of the C-terminal region.

    PubMed Central

    Roitberg, A E

    1997-01-01

    Putidaredoxin (Pdx) plays an essential role as an electron donor and effector in the biochemical cycle involving cytochrome P450cam. Only recently has an NMR-derived structure for this protein been published, but because of the presence of a paramagnetic Fe2S2 center, the NMR assignment could not be completed for residues within a region of 8 A around the active site. That region was modeled by homology with a related protein. The structural refinement for those experiments was done in vacuum, without the use of electrostatic terms in the force field. The present manuscript will describe and discuss a series of long-time, unrestrained, solution molecular dynamic runs for this system. Results will be presented that construct a molecular-level picture that rationalizes experimental results concerning the conformation and mobility of the C-terminal residue Trp106. At least two different conformers are found for this residue during the simulations. The time scale for interconversion between them is found to be in the subnanosecond regime. The results presented here open the possibility for studying binding and electron transfer between Pdx and P450cam, in a framework that allows for dynamical information to be used during the computational process, instead of the single structures deposited on the protein data base. PMID:9336209

  16. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  17. Sarcocystis neurona: molecular characterization of enolase domain I region and a comparison to other protozoa.

    PubMed

    Bolten, K E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Dubey, J P; Toribio, R E; Saville, W J A

    2008-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes protozoal myeloencephalitis and has the ability to infect a wide host range in contrast to other Sarcocystis species. In the current study, five S. neurona isolates from a variety of sources, three Sarcocystis falcatula, one Sarcocystis dasypi/S. neurona-like isolate, and one Besnoitia darlingi isolate were used to compare the enolase 2 gene segment containing the domain I region to previously sequenced enolase genes from Neospora caninum, Neospora hughesi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, and Trypanosoma cruzi; enolase 2 segment containing domain I region is highly conserved amongst these parasites of veterinary and medical importance. Immunohistochemistry results indicates reactivity of T. gondii enolase 1 and 2 antibodies to S. neurona merozoites and metrocytes, but no reactivity of anti-enolase 1 to the S. neurona bradyzoite stage despite reactivity to T. gondii bradyzoites, suggesting expression differences between organisms.

  18. The early history of the polarizing region: from classical embryology to molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Cheryll

    2002-01-01

    The polarizing region of the developing limb bud is one of the best known examples of a cell-cell signalling centre that mediates patterning in vertebrate embryos. This article traces some highlights in the history of the polarizing region from its discovery by John Saunders and early work that defined polarizing activity through a period in which modelling was pre-eminent, right up to the discovery of defined molecules with polarizing activity. There is a particular focus on the discovery that retinoic acid could mimic signalling of the polarizing activity and this finding is then set in the context of more recent work which implicates Shh and BMPs in mediating polarizing activity.

  19. Gonadoblastoma: Molecular definition of the susceptibility region on the Y chromosome and role of TSPY

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Sultana, R.; Donlan, M.

    1994-09-01

    Gonadoblastomas are gonadal neoplasms that arise almost exclusively in the dysgenetic gonads of 46,XY sex-reversed females. The frequency of gonadoblastoma in patients who have dysgenetic gonads and a Y chromosome is at least 30%. In contrast 45,X Turner females who also have dysgenetic gonads do not develop this tumor. The high frequency of gonadoblastoma in sex-reversed females compared to Turner females has led to the hypothesis that there is a gene on the Y chromosome that is involved in the development of the tumor. This gene has been called the gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome, or GBY. Deletion mapping of sex-reversed females with gonadoblastoma and partial Y chromosomes has previously localized the GBY gene to a region near the centromere. Using sequence-tagged sites, we have further sublocalized GBY in a patient with gonadoblastoma and a minute Y-derived marker chromosome. This region includes parts of intervals 3 and 4 of the Y chromosome. Based on the overlapping YAC contig map of the Y chromosome, this critical region is approximately 3 Mb. Using sex-reversed females with different deletions of Yp we have also localized the testis-specific protein, Y-encoded (TSPY) gene to interval 3D, which is within the gonadoblastoma critical region. TSPY consists of a repetitive gene family that is part of the DYZ5 locus. Expression of this gene has previously been shown to be limited to the testis. We have found expression of TSPY by RT-PCR in gonadoblastomas from two different individuals. In one of these patients, expression was observed in a unilateral gonadoblastoma, but not in the contralateral streak gonad. These findings suggest that TSPY may play a role in the development of gonadoblastomas.

  20. Cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis in an inhospitable Amazonian region by means of telemedicine and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Angel, Diana I; Alfonso, Rosalba; Faizal, Michel; Ricaurte, Orlando; Baez, Julio A; Rojas, Andres; Barato, Paola; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 13-year-old boy who displayed a chronic granulomatous inflammatory reaction of 5 years duration. The lesion was resistant to different antibiotic schemes; his routine laboratory tests and chest radiographs were normal. Teledermatologic consultation and histopathologic study of skin biopsy suggested scrofulodermal tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA extracted from lymph node biopsy was taken as starting material for dot-blot hybridization using Mtp-40 and IS 6110 as probes for detecting either Mycobacterium tuberculosis or any mycobacteria belonging to the M tuberculosis complex, respectively. Positive results in both hybridizations were further confirmed by culturing in BACTEC MGIT 960 system. The lesion greatly diminished following isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol treatment. Telemedicine allowed a cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis to be made of a patient living in a remote town located in the Amazon jungle by using molecular biology techniques.

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial control region in Merlucciidae: sequence variation and molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Crous, Marta; Roldán, María I

    2015-06-12

    In order to describe the structure and evolution of Merlucciidae and related Gadiformes mitochondrial control region we analysed 470 bp of 31 taxa belonging to 28 different species. The general structure and conserved sequence blocks observed in Gadiformes mitochondrial control region are similar to those present in other teleost fishes. The length of this segment is variable among related species due to the presence of numerous indels at domain I. Domain II is the most conserved region with a high G content. The GTGGG-box is absent in all Merluccius and seven other Gadidae species. Several methods of phylogenetic analyses has revealed the monophyly of Gadiformes, Gadinae and Merlucciidae. Merlucciidae is most closely related to Gadidae. Within Merlucciidae, American and Euroafrican clades show similar levels of differentiation to those within Gadinae where Trisopterus and Micromesistius are sister taxa. Genetic distance values for Merluccius subspecies pairs are less than half of those between species, comparable to intra specific differentiation levels in marine fish species.

  2. Molecular characterization of the Pb recombination hotspot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex class II region.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Taku; Yoshino, Masayasu; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Lindahl, Kirsten Fischer; Koide, Tsuyoshi; Gaudieri, Silvana; Gojobori, Takashi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2002-08-01

    In the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region, meiotic recombination breakpoints are clustered in four specific sites known as hotspots. Here we reveal the primary structure of a hotspot near the Pb gene. A total of 12 crossover points were found to be confined to a 15-kb DNA segment of the Pb pseudogene. Moreover, the crossover points are concentrated in a 341-bp segment, which includes a part of exon 4 and intron 4 of the Pb gene. All four MHC hotspots appear to be located within genes or at the 3' end of genes, contrasting with characterized hotspots in budding yeast, which are mostly located at the 5'-promoter regions of genes. The Pb hotspot has several consensus motifs, an octamer transcription factor-binding sequence, the B-motif-like transcription factor-binding sequence, and tandem repeats of tetramer sequence-all of which are shared by the other three hotspots. Systematic analysis of the public database demonstrated that the full motif set occurs rarely in the nucleotide sequence of the entire MHC class II region. All results suggest that the motif set has an indispensable role in determining their site specificity.

  3. Irradiation of ices inside molecular clouds in cosmic ray dominated regions of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikyan, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    Complex chemical species are easier formed in a solid phase, for example in a mixture of ices of water, carbon oxides, methane, ammonia, methanole. Ultraviolet photons in the range 5-13.6 eV and the charged particles with MeV-GeV energies serve as an energy source of reactions. In this work doses of irradiation of ices are calculated when fluxes of cosmic rays on 2-3 order exceed modern values in the Galactic disk. Such fluxes are inherent in active galaxies with cosmic ray dominated regions. Results of presented calculations show that originated complex species may get overdoses and be completely destroyed under such conditions.

  4. The Molecular H2 Emission and the Stellar Kinematics in the Nuclear Region of the Sombrero Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the molecular H2 emission and the stellar kinematics in a data cube of the nuclear region of M104, the Sombrero galaxy, obtained with NIFS on the Gemini-north telescope. After a careful subtraction of the stellar continuum, the only emission line we detected in the data cube was {{{H}}}2λ 21218. An analysis of this emission revealed the existence of a rotating molecular torus/disk, aproximately co-planar with a dusty structure detected by us in a previous work. We interpret these two structures as being associated with the same obscuring torus/disk. The kinematic maps provided by the Penalized Pixel Fitting method revealed that the stellar kinematics in the nuclear region of M104 appears to be the result of the superposition of a “cold” rotating disk and a “hot” bulge. Using a model of a thin eccentric disk, we reproduced the main properties of the maps of the stellar radial velocity and of the stellar velocity dispersion, especially within a distance of 0\\prime\\prime .2 from the kinematic axis (in regions at larger distances, the limitations of a model of a thin rotating disk become more visible). The general behavior of the h3 map, which is significantly noisier than the other maps, was also reproduced by our model (although the discrepancies, in this case, are considerably higher). With our model, we obtained a mass of (9.0+/- 2.0)× {10}8{M}⊙ for the supermassive black hole of M104, which is compatible, at 1σ or 2σ levels, with the values obtained by previous studies.

  5. Molecular detection of bovine immunodeficiency virus in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Tatiane Teles; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Reis, Jenner Karlison Pimenta; de Sousa Rodrigues, Ana Paula; da Cunha Kassar, Telissa; Resende, Claudia Fideles; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Silva, Rafaela das Mercês; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-12-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency is a chronic progressive disease caused by a lentivirus that affects cattle and buffaloes. Although the infection has been described in cattle in some countries, including in Brazil, there are only two reports of infection in buffaloes: one in Pakistan and one in Cambodia. The aim of the present study was to survey the occurrence of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) in water buffaloes from the Amazon region, Pará state, Brazil. BIV proviral DNA was surveyed in 607 whole blood samples of water buffaloes from 10 farms located in the state of Pará using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (PCR-SN) to amplify the pol region of the viral genome. Of the 607 samples tested, 27 (4.4 %) were positive for BIV proviral DNA. The amplified fragments were confirmed by sequence analysis after cloning and nucleotide sequencing. The sequence obtained had 99 % similarity to the reference strain (R-29). The present study provides important epidemiological data because BIV was detected for the first time in water buffaloes in Brazil. Further, the results suggest the possibility of the virus being a risk factor for herd health because it may be a potential causal agent of chronic disease and, also may be associated to other infectious diseases.

  6. Molecular structure and translocation of a multiple antibiotic resistance region of a Psychrobacter psychrophilus permafrost strain.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mayya; Gorlenko, Zhosephine; Mindlin, Sofia

    2009-06-01

    A Psychrobacter psychrophilus strain resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin was isolated from a 15,000-35,000-year-old permafrost subsoil sediment sampled from the coast of the Eastern-Siberian Sea. The genes conferring antibiotic resistance were localized on an c. 30-kb pKLH80 plasmid. It was shown that the antibiotic resistance region of this plasmid has a mosaic structure and contains closely linked streptomycin resistance (strA-strB) and tetracycline resistance [tetR-tet(H)] genes, followed by a novel IS element (ISPpy1) belonging to the IS3 family. Both the strA-strB and tetR-tet(H) genes of pKLH80 were highly similar to those found in modern clinical bacterial isolates. It was shown that the ISPpy1 element of pKLH80 can direct translocation of the adjacent antibiotic resistance genes to different target plasmids, either by one-ended transposition or by formation of a composite transposon resulting from the insertion of the ISPpy1 second copy at the other side of the antibiotic resistance region. Thus, our data demonstrate that clinically important antibiotic resistance genes originated long before the introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice and confirm an important role of horizontal gene transfer in the distribution of these genes in natural bacterial populations.

  7. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  8. Molecular insights into the binding of phosphoinositides to the TH domain region of TIPE proteins.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Baby, Bincy; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-11-01

    Phosphatidylinositols and their phosphorylated derivatives, phosphoinositides, play a central role in regulating diverse cellular functions. These phospholipids have been shown to interact with the hydrophobic TH domain of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) family of proteins. However, the precise mechanism of interaction of these lipids is unclear. Here we report the binding mode and interactions of these phospholipids in the TH domain, as elucidated using molecular docking and simulations. Results indicate that phosphoinositides bind to the TH domain in a similar way by inserting their lipid tails in the hydrophobic cavity. The exposed head group is stabilized by interactions with critical positively charged residues on the surface of these proteins. Further MD simulations confirmed the dynamic stability of these lipids in the TH domain. This computational analysis thus provides insight into the binding mode of phospholipids in the TH domain of the TIPE family of proteins. Graphical abstract A phosphoinositide (phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate; PtdIns4P) docked to TIPE2.

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  10. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  11. Interstellar reddening from the HIPPARCOS and TYCHO catalogues. I. Distances to nearby molecular clouds and star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knude, J.; Hog, E.

    1998-10-01

    The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues offer an interesting possibility to study the local distribution of interstellar reddening from the combination of data contained in the catalogues: Hipparcos parallaxes, Tycho B - V and spectral and luminosity classification compiled from the literature. Parallactic distances may be derived for known absorbing features such as local molecular clouds and for large scale features such as sheets dividing bubbles. The stellar luminosity classes V and III offer more than 30.000 lines of sight for study, mostly for negative declinations where most classifications are available. We present some examples of this approach to derive information on the local interstellar medium. First we estimate the distance to the Southern Coalsack. Secondly, distances to the four nearby southern star forming clouds in the Chamaeleon region, the Lupus region, Corona Australis and finally the rho Ophiuchi are estimated. We find that these clouds are at 150 (Cha), 100 pc (Lup), i.e. about 50 pc closer than previously estimated, and that a feature with E_{B - V} ~ 0.15 (or A_V ~ 0.5) appears at 50 pc in this region. A distance of 170 pc is found for CrA compared to the previous estimate of 129 pc, and finally 120 pc for rho Oph compared to the previous 160 pc, strictly speaking the 120 pc are only measured for extinction values typical for the off core region in rho Ophiuchus. These distance changes are of some importance since these four regions show different stages of the star forming activity, as judged from the relative distribution of Class 0 - Class III YSOs (young stellar objects) in the Lbol - Tbol diagram. Precise calibrations of the YSOs' bolometric luminosities, applied in the definition of the bsf parameter (bsf: bright star fraction), require accurate distances of their parental clouds unless they are based on individual distances of the pre main sequence stars/protostellar sources.

  12. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Title: Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions of P AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures.

    Abstract:
    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a cl...

  13. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions ofP AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures

    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a class of chemicals associated with ...

  14. Molecular structure and spatial expression of a homeobox gene from the labial region of the Antennapedia-complex.

    PubMed Central

    Mlodzik, M; Fjose, A; Gehring, W J

    1988-01-01

    We report the molecular characterization of a homeobox-containing gene that maps at 84A in the proximal region of the Antennapedia-complex. The structure and complete sequence are presented. Deletion analysis indicates that the cloned gene, F24, most likely corresponds to the labial (lab) gene. Northern blot experiments show a single approximately 3-kb transcript that is expressed at all embryonic stages from cellular blastoderm onwards and during larval development. The homeobox is split by an intron in the region which encodes the putative DNA-binding helix, a splicing position for homeobox-containing genes which is unique so far. The 5' part of the gene contains four M-repeat sequences (CAA/G repeats) in the protein-coding region. In situ hybridization to the transcripts during embryogenesis reveals two domains of expression. The anterior one is located in parts of the developing head, mainly in the hypopharyngeal organ and in anterior parts of the mandibular lobe, and is restricted to the ectoderm. The posterior domain is part of the posterior midgut primordium (endoderm), that invaginates and later contacts the endoderm cells from the anterior midgut invagination. Images PMID:2461299

  15. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeast region of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Huyen, Nguyen Xuan; Shinuo, Cao; Inpankaew, Tawin; Maklon, Khuanwalai; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Ueno, Akio; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2011-06-10

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan disease that is mainly caused by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina and is characterized by significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The disease is widespread in the northeastern region of Thailand, where an increasingly large part of the livestock is composed of water buffaloes. The present study was therefore conducted to investigate the epidemiological distribution of B. bovis and B. bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand. A total of 305 buffalo blood samples were randomly collected from five provinces and simultaneously analyzed by the nested PCR (nPCR) assay, ELISA, and IFAT techniques. The overall prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 11.2% and 3.6% by nPCR, 14.7% and 5.9% by ELISA, and 16.8% and 5.6% by IFAT, respectively. The high concordance between the molecular and the serological detection tests revealed the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic assays used for the detection of infection as well as the endemic stability status of the parasites in the surveyed areas. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and location but not gender. Our data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bovis and B. bigemina infection in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand which will likely be very beneficial for management and control programs of this disease.

  16. Molecular and Phenotypic Data Support the Recognition of the Wakatobi Flowerpecker (Dicaeum kuehni) from the Unique and Understudied Sulawesi Region

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Seán B. A.; Kelly, David J.; Cooper, Natalie; Bahrun, Andi; Analuddin, Kangkuso; Marples, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are essential to macroecological and macroevolutionary research, as well as to the effective management and conservation of biodiversity. The resolution of taxonomic relationships is therefore of vital importance. While molecular methods have revolutionised taxonomy, contemporary species delimitation requires an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach. Despite boasting a remarkably high level of endemism, the avifauna of the Sulawesi region of Indonesia remains poorly studied. Previous studies of avian diversity in Sulawesi have focussed predominantly on phenotypic characteristics, thus potentially overlooking any genetically distinct lineages. Grey-sided Flowerpecker Dicaeum celebicum populations from the Wakatobi archipelago were originally described as a separate species from those on nearby mainland Sulawesi. However, for reasons that remain unknown, the Wakatobi populations were reclassified as a subspecies of the mainland form. Combining estimates of genetic divergence with phylogenetic and morphological analyses, we reassessed the status of Wakatobi populations. Our results describe the Wakatobi populations as a separate species to those on mainland Sulawesi; reproductively isolated, genetically and morphologically distinct. We therefore recommend the reclassification of these populations to their original status of Dicaeum kuehni and propose the vernacular name ‘Wakatobi Flowerpecker’. In consideration of our findings and the lack of integrative ornithological research within the Sulawesi region, we believe species richness and avian endemism within the region are underestimated. PMID:24896822

  17. Biomechanical and molecular characteristics of hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia in Quarter Horses.

    PubMed

    Grady, Jesse G; Elder, Steven H; Ryan, Peter L; Swiderski, Cyprianna E; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M

    2009-10-01

    Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder that has yet to be fully characterized. HERDA is predominately expressed in Quarter Horses, with the majority of these disseminating from elite cutting horse bloodlines, leading to the increased incidence of HERDA in recent years. Affected horses have loose, hyper-extensible, fragile skin and are frequently euthanized due to poor wound healing and disfiguring scars. This study sought to better characterize HERDA by analysis of the biomechanical parameters of tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, energy to failure and thickness of skin from 10 affected and 6 unaffected horses using an Instron Universal Testing Instrument. In addition, total soluble collagen and glycosaminoglycan concentrations of skin were analysed from 13 affected and 12 unaffected horses using Sircol Soluble Collagen and Blyscan Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan assays respectively. Affected horses exhibited a two to threefold reduction in tensile strength versus unaffected horses with statistically significant differences at six of seven sample locations (P < or = 0.05). The modulus of elasticity proved to be significantly different at six of seven sample locations, energy to failure at six of seven sample locations, and skin thickness at one of seven sample locations (P < or = 0.05). Affected horses exhibited significantly higher amounts of total soluble collagen than unaffected horses (P < or = 0.05). No significant difference was demonstrated between groups for glycosaminoglycan concentration. Affected horses demonstrated uniformly weaker skin across sample locations, indicating the biomechanical properties of HERDA are not regionally confined to specific areas of the horses' skin.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Human and Animal Isolates of Echinococcus granulosus in the Thrace Region, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Eryıldız, Canan; Şakru, Nermin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of cystic echinococcosis in humans and many domestic animals, and remains an important global health problem. The aim of this study was to genotype E. granulosus isolates obtained from humans and animals in the Thrace Region of Turkey. Material and Methods: A total of 58 isolates were obtained from patients who underwent surgery at several hospitals and from animals at a slaughterhouse in the province of Edirne. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 fragments, and polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) of the partial mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) gene, was used to characterize human and animal E. granulosus isolates. To investigate the genetic characteristics of isolates, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) and ND1 genes was performed. Results: Fifty-eight E. granulosus isolates, including 42 from human, 13 from cattle and 3 from sheep were, analyzed. The results indicated two distinct genotypes: the G1 (sheep strain) and G7 (pig strain) genotypes. The sheep strain was shown to be the most common genotype of E. granulosus affecting humans, sheep and cattle. Among the concatenated partial CO1 and ND1 sequence data, eight haplotypes of Echinococcus species were identified in the present study. Conclusion: This is the first report indicating that the E. granulosus pig strain is present in humans in this region. We suggest that new strategies be designed for E. granulosus control programs in Turkey. PMID:25207011

  19. Molecular and morphological systematics of Elysia Risso, 1818 (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa) from the Caribbean region.

    PubMed

    Krug, Patrick J; Vendetti, Jann E; Valdés, Ángel

    2016-08-09

    The Caribbean is a biodiversity hotspot for photosynthetic sea slugs, with about 27 described species in the genus Elysia Risso, 1818. However, many species are poorly known or have complex taxonomic histories, complicating assessments of regional biodiversity and impeding studies of plastid symbiosis, speciation, and larval biology. Using an integrative approach, we address the taxonomy and systematics of Caribbean elysiids by performing robust tests of existing species hypotheses, and describe six new species. Species delimitation included DNA barcoding of up to 189 nominal conspecific specimens; nuclear gene sequences were then used to confirm that divergent lineages were genetically distinct candidate species. New synonymies and species descriptions are based on external anatomy, penial and radular morphology, developmental characters, and host ecology of all species described from the region, plus a critical review of the literature. We synonymized three species (Elysia annedupontae Ortea, Espinosa & Caballer in Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005, Elysia clarki Pierce et al. 2006, and Elysia leeanneae Caballer, Ortea & Espinosa in Ortea, Espinosa, Buske & Caballer, 2013), transfered one species from Bosellia (Elysia marcusi), and described six new species (Elysia pawliki n. sp., Elysia zemi n. sp., Elysia christinae n. sp., Elysia hamanni n. sp., Elysia taino n. sp., and Elysia buonoi n. sp.). We resurrected the name Elysia velutinus Pruvot-Fol, 1947, a senior synonym of Elysia tuca Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1967. Based on a four-gene phylogeny of 76 Elysia spp., we identified shifts in host use and penial armature that may explain patterns of endemic diversification in Elysia, invoking both ecological and non-ecological mechanisms. Non-monophyly of stylet-bearing species rejects previous attempts to classify species based on presence of a stylet (i.e., the genus Checholysia Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005). Our findings show how integrative

  20. A regional study of the seasonal variation in the molecular composition of rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Barbara A.; Gonsior, Michael; Isabelle, Lorne M.; Luo, W.; Perraud, Véronique; McIntire, Theresa M.; Pankow, James F.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Cooper, William J.; Simpson, André J.

    2013-10-01

    Rainwater is not only a critical source of drinking and agricultural water but it plays a key role in the fate and transport of contaminants through their removal by wet deposition. Rainwater is a complex mixture of organic compounds yet despite its importance its spatial and temporal variability are not well understood and less than 50% of the organic matter has been characterized. In-depth analytical approaches were used in this study to characterize the seasonal variation in rainwater composition. Rainwater samples were collected over a one-year period in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. The seasonal variation of atmospheric organic carbon (AOC) in rainwater was analyzed by excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs), 1D and 2D NMR with compound identification by spectral database matching, GC-MS, FT-ICR-MS, and GC × GC-TOFMS. This combination of techniques provided four complementary datasets, with less than 10% overlap, of anthropogenic and biogenic AOC. NMR with database matching identified over 100 compounds, primarily carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, and nitrogen-containing compounds. GC × GC-TOFMS analysis identified 344 compounds in two rain events with 33% of the compounds common to both events. FT-ICR-MS generated a seasonally dependent profile of 1226-1575 molecular ions of CHO, CHOS, and CHON elemental composition. FT-ICR-MS and GC × GC-TOFMS datasets were compared using van Krevelen diagrams (H/C vs. O/C), the H/C ratio vs. mass/charge (m/z), and the carbon oxidation state/carbon number matrix. Fluorescence patterns were correlated with NMR results resulting in the identification one seasonally-dependent component of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). This study demonstrated the importance of using of an integrated analytical approach to monitor the compositional variation of AOC.

  1. Molecular detection of Leishmania spp. isolated from cutaneous lesions of patients referred to Herat regional hospital, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Mosawi, S H; Dalimi, A

    2016-03-15

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the main public health problems in Afghanistan, particularly in Herat. To identify Leishmania spp., molecular techniques were applied to samples from 64 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients referred to Herat regional hospital during 2013. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) was used. Most of the patients demonstrated dry type single lesions on the head. The results of direct microscopy detection using Giemsastained skin scrapings were compared with that of ITS PCR-RFLP for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Light microscopy examination showed 37/64 positive cases (58%). PCR revealed 50 positive cases (78%), from which ITS PCR-RFLP identified 48 cases (96%) as L. tropica and 2 cases (4%) as L. major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Herat appears to be endemic and of the clinically dry type, caused mainly by L. tropica and occasionally by L. major.

  2. Stratospheric observations of the attenuated solar irradiance in the Schumann-Runge band absorption region of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Hudson, R. D.; Mentall, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A spectrometer flown on the first Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-1) observed the attenuated solar irradiance between 184 and 202 nm from an altitude near 40 km. These measurements provide a check on the absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen in the spectral region of the Schumann-Runge bands. Comparison of the measurements with calculations based on cross sections derived from laboratory data shows a general agreement although the irradiance measurements have large error bars near the centers of the absorption bands. The results imply that the 184-200 nm solar irradiance that penetrates to the stratosphere can be computed to an accuracy of + or - 30% or better by using presently available cross sections.

  3. Molecular maser flares in the high-mass star-forming region IRAS18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbe, Daniel M.

    We report results of a long-termmonitoring study of 6cmformaldehyde (H 2CO), 6.035GHz hydroxyl (OH), and 6.7GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers in the young high-mass protostellar object IRAS18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20). This is the only high-mass star-forming region where correlated variability of three different maser species has been reported. The observations were conducted with the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope, and together with data from the literature, we present H2CO flux density measurements from 2002 to 2014, CH3OH data from 2006 to 2013, and discuss OH observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. Our extended monitoring observations of the H2CO maser agree with the quasi-periodic flare phenomenon and exponential decrease in quiescent and flare flux densities proposed by Araya and collaborators in 2010. We also confirm the occurrence of 6.035GHz OH flares and a time delay with respect to the H2CO flares. An analysis between the variability behavior of different CH3OH maser components and the H2CO maser suggests that multiple variability mechanisms are responsible for CH3OH flux density changes.

  4. Molecular definition of the shortest region of deletion overlap in the Langer-Giedion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Johnson, Carey; Wagner, Michael J.; Wells, Dan E.; Turleau, Catherine; Tommerup, Niels; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Sandig, Klaus-Rainer; Meinecke, Peter; Zabel, Bernhard; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    1991-01-01

    The Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS), which is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by a genetic defect in 8q24.1. We have used 13 anonymous DNA markers from an 8q24.1-specific microdissection library, as well as c-myc and thyroglobulin gene probes, to map the deletion breakpoints in 16 patients with LGS. Twelve patients had a cytogenetically visible deletion, two patients had an apparently balanced translocation, and two patients had an apparently normal karyotype. In all cases except one translocation patient, loss of genetic material was detected. The DNA markers fall into 10 deletion intervals. Clone L48 (D8S51) defines the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO), which is estimated to be less than 2 Mbp. Three clones–pl7-2.3EE (D8S43), L24 (D8S45), and L40 (D8S49)–which flank the SRO recognize evolutionarily conserved sequences. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1836105

  5. First Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Theileria lestoquardi in Sheep of the Maghreb Region.

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, M R; Darghouth, M A; Rekik, M; Amor, B; Sassi, L; Gharbi, M

    2016-06-01

    Theileria lestoquardi is the most prominent Theileria species in small ruminants that causes malignant theileriosis of sheep in Africa and Asia. In the present survey, blood samples and ticks were collected in Kebili (southern Tunisia) from 166 Queue Fine de l'Ouest sheep. Giemsa-stained blood smears, immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and PCR were performed. The DNA was extracted from blood and analysed by PCR targeting 18S rRNA gene of Theileria spp. and then sequenced. A total number of 140 ticks were collected from a total number of 166 sheep during the four seasons. The ticks belonged to two genera and 4 species; the most frequent tick was Hyalomma excavatum 84.3% (118/140) and then Rhipicephalus spp. 15.7% (22/140). Only two animals had positive Giemsa-stained blood smears, and they were also positive by IFAT. The amplicons had 99.3 and 99.6% homology with the BLAST published T. lestoquardi amplicons. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. lestoquardi in small ruminants within the Maghreb region.

  6. Molecular phylogenetics of subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA regions, including a new taxonomic arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Azorín, Mario; Crespo, Manuel B.; Juan, Ana; Fay, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic arrangement within subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) has been a matter of controversy in recent decades: several new taxonomic treatments have been proposed, based exclusively on plastid DNA sequences, and these have resulted in classifications which are to a great extent contradictory. Some authors have recognized only a single genus Ornithogalum for the whole subfamily, including 250–300 species of variable morphology, whereas others have recognized many genera. In the latter case, the genera are inevitably much smaller and they are better defined morphologically. However, some are not monophyletic as circumscribed. Methods Phylogenetic analyses of Ornithogaloideae were based on nucleotide sequences of four plastid regions (trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, rbcL and matK) and a nuclear region (ITS). Eighty species covering all relevant taxonomic groups previously recognized in the subfamily were sampled. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses were performed. The molecular data were compared with a matrix of 34 morphological characters. Key Results Combinations of plastid and nuclear data yielded phylogenetic trees which are better resolved than those obtained with any plastid region alone or plastid regions in combination. Three main clades are found, corresponding to the previously recognized tribes Albuceae, Dipcadieae and Ornithogaleae. In these, up to 19 clades are described which are definable by morphology and biogeography. These mostly correspond to previously described taxa, though some need recircumscription. Morphological characters are assessed for their diagnostic value for taxonomy in the subfamily. Conclusions On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, 19 monophyletic genera are accepted within Ornithogaloideae: Albuca, Avonsera, Battandiera, Cathissa, Coilonox, Dipcadi, Eliokarmos, Elsiea, Ethesia, Galtonia, Honorius, Loncomelos, Melomphis, Neopatersonia, Nicipe, Ornithogalum, Pseudogaltonia, Stellarioides and

  7. Validation of a novel secretion modification region (SMR) of HIV-1 Nef using cohort sequence analysis and molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Patrick E.; Isayev, Olexandr; Ali, Syed A.; Roth, William W.; Huang, Ming-Bo; Powell, Michael D.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Nef plays an active role in the pathogenesis of AIDS by its numerous cellular interactions that facilitate the release of virus particles. This 27 kDa protein is required for maintenance of the viral replication in HIV, and is also known to contribute to immune evasion, blocking of apoptosis in virus-infected cells and enhancement of virus infectivity. Nef has been shown to be secreted and is present on the surface of virus-infected cells. Recent studies from our laboratory have shown that the Nef protein is secreted from nef-transfected and HIV-1-infected cells in small exosome-like vesicles (40–100 nm diam.) that do not contain virions. We have identified three amino-terminal domains of Nef as necessary for secretion: (i) the four arginine residues (17,19,21, 22) comprising the basic region; (ii) the phosphofurin acidic cluster sequence (PACS) composed of four glutamic acid residues (61–64); (iii) a previously unknown motif spanning amino acid residues 65–69 (VGFPV) which we named the secretion modification region (SMR). In this study, we have used population-based phylogeny data and sequence analysis to characterize the conservation of the Nef SMR domain that regulates vesicle secretion. We have performed in silico computational chemistry analysis involving molecular dynamic structure modeling of mutations in the SMR motif. Sequence analysis of Nef from HIV-1-infected patients, including slow progressors (SP), long term progressors (LTP) and long term non-progressors (LTNP) demonstrated 99 % conservation of the Nef SMR motif. Computational analysis including modeling of wild-type HIV-1 Nef and V66A Nef SMR mutant using structural homology and molecular dynamics of ligand-associated interactions indicated significant structural changes in the Nef mutant, thus supporting the importance of the SMR domain for mediating Nef vesicle secretion. PMID:22643973

  8. Internal transcribed spacer region sequence heterogeneity in Rhizopus microsporus: implications for molecular diagnosis in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Leung, Shui-Yee; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Although internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequence heterogeneity has been reported in a few fungal species, it has very rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi and has never been described in Mucorales, causes of the highly fatal mucormycosis. In a recent outbreak investigation of intestinal mucormycosis due to Rhizopus microsporus infection in patients with hematological malignancies, PCR of the ITS of four of the 28 R. microsporus strains, P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, showed thick bands at about 700 bp. Direct sequencing of the purified bands showed frequent double peaks along all of the sequence traces and occasional triple peaks for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. The thick bands of the four R. microsporus strains were purified and cloned. Sequencing of 10 clones for each strain revealed two different ITS sequences for P11 and three different ITS sequences for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. Variations in ITS sequence among the different ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operons in the same strain were observed in only ITS1 and ITS2 and not the 5.8S rDNA region. One copy of P11, P12, and D4-1, respectively, and one copy of P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, respectively, showed identical sequences. This represents the first evidence of ITS sequence heterogeneity in Mucorales. ITS sequence heterogeneity is an obstacle to molecular identification and genotyping of fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories. When thick bands and double peaks are observed during PCR sequencing of a gene target, such a strain should be sent to reference laboratories proficient in molecular technologies for further identification and/or genotyping.

  9. Communication: Phase diagram of C{sub 36} by atomistic molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration through coexistence regions

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C. Costa, D.; Munaò, G.

    2014-09-07

    We report an atomistic molecular dynamics determination of the phase diagram of a rigid-cage model of C{sub 36}. We first show that free energies obtained via thermodynamic integrations along isotherms displaying “van der Waals loops,” are fully reproduced by those obtained via isothermal-isochoric integration encompassing only stable states. We find that a similar result also holds for isochoric paths crossing van der Waals regions of the isotherms, and for integrations extending to rather high densities where liquid-solid coexistence can be expected to occur. On such a basis we are able to map the whole phase diagram of C{sub 36}, with resulting triple point and critical temperatures about 1770 K and 2370 K, respectively. We thus predict a 600 K window of existence of a stable liquid phase. Also, at the triple point density, we find that the structural functions and the diffusion coefficient maintain a liquid-like character down to 1400–1300 K, this indicating a wide region of possible supercooling. We discuss why all these features might render possible the observation of the melting of C{sub 36} fullerite and of its liquid state, at variance with what previously experienced for C{sub 60}.

  10. Using singlet molecular oxygen to probe the solute and temperature dependence of liquid-like regions in/on ice.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jonathan P; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-08-01

    Liquid-like regions (LLRs) are found at the surfaces and grain boundaries of ice and as inclusions within ice. These regions contain most of the solutes in ice and can be (photo)chemically active hotspots in natural snow and ice systems. If we assume all solutes partition into LLRs as a solution freezes, freezing-point depression predicts that the concentration of a solute in LLRs is higher than its concentration in the prefrozen (or melted) solution by the freeze-concentration factor (F). Here we use singlet molecular oxygen production to explore the effects of total solute concentration ([TS]) and temperature on experimentally determined values of F. For ice above its eutectic temperature, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression when [TS] is above ∼1 mmol/kg; at lower [TS] values, measurements of F are lower than predicted from freezing-point depression. For ice below its eutectic temperature, the influence of freezing-point depression on F is damped; the extreme case is with Na2SO4 as the solute, where F shows essentially no agreement with freezing-point depression. In contrast, for ice containing 3 mmol/kg NaCl, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression over a range of temperatures, including below the eutectic. Our experiments also reveal that the photon flux in LLRs increases in the presence of salts, which has implications for ice photochemistry in the lab and, perhaps, in the environment.

  11. Identification and molecular analysis of infectious bursal disease in broiler farms in the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oumed Gerjis M; Jackwood, Daral J

    2014-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize field isolates of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). The identification was done using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial sequencing of the VP2 gene. Pooled bursal samples were collected from commercial broiler farms located in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) of Iraq. The genetic material of the IBDV was detected in 10 out of 29 field samples. Sequences of the hypervariable VP2 region were determined for 10 of these viruses. Molecular analysis of the VP2 gene of five IBDVs showed amino acid sequences consistent with the very virulent (vv) IBDV. Two samples were identified as classic vaccine viruses, and three samples were classic vaccine viruses that appear to have mutated during replication in the field. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all five field IBDV strains of the present study were closely related to each other. On the basis of nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, it is very likely that IBD-causing viruses in this part of Iraq are of the very virulent type. These IBDVs appear to be evolving relative to their type strains.

  12. Two Novel Y-Type High Molecular Weight Glutenin Genes in Chinese Wheat Landraces of the Yangtze-River Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujuan; Islam, Shahidul; Sun, Dongfa; Ma, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) are key determinants for the end-use quality of wheat. Chinese wheat landraces are an important resource for exploring novel HMW-GS genes to improve the wheat baking quality. Two novel Glu-1Dy HMW-GSs (designated as 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7) were identified and cloned from two Chinese wheat landraces Huazhong830 and Luosimai. The 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunits were deposited as the NCBInr Acc. No KR262518, and KR262519, respectively. The full open reading frames (ORFs) of 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were 2022 bp and 1977 bp, encoding for proteins of 673 and 658 amino acid residues, respectively. Each contains four typical primary regions of HMW-GSs (a signal peptide, N- and C-terminal regions, and a central repetitive region). Their deduced molecular masses (70,165 Da and 68,400 Da) were strikingly consistent with those identified by MALDI-TOF-MS (69,985Da and 68,407 Da). The 1Dy12.6 is the largest 1Dy glutenin subunits cloned in common wheat up to date, containing longer repetitive central domains than other 1Dy encoded proteins. In comparison with the most similar active 1Dy alleles previously reported, the newly discovered alleles contained a total of 20 SNPs and 3 indels. The secondary structure prediction indicated that 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 have similar proportion of α-helix, β-turn, and β-bend to those of 1Dy10 (X12929). The phylogenetic analysis illustrated that the x- and y-type subunits of glutenins were well separated, but both 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were clustered with the other Glu-1Dy alleles. Our results revealed that the 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunit have potential to strengthen gluten polymer interactions, and are valuable genetic resources for wheat quality improvement. PMID:26540300

  13. Two Novel Y-Type High Molecular Weight Glutenin Genes in Chinese Wheat Landraces of the Yangtze-River Region.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanchun; Yu, Kan; Zhang, Yujuan; Islam, Shahidul; Sun, Dongfa; Ma, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) are key determinants for the end-use quality of wheat. Chinese wheat landraces are an important resource for exploring novel HMW-GS genes to improve the wheat baking quality. Two novel Glu-1Dy HMW-GSs (designated as 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7) were identified and cloned from two Chinese wheat landraces Huazhong830 and Luosimai. The 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunits were deposited as the NCBInr Acc. No KR262518, and KR262519, respectively. The full open reading frames (ORFs) of 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were 2022 bp and 1977 bp, encoding for proteins of 673 and 658 amino acid residues, respectively. Each contains four typical primary regions of HMW-GSs (a signal peptide, N- and C-terminal regions, and a central repetitive region). Their deduced molecular masses (70,165 Da and 68,400 Da) were strikingly consistent with those identified by MALDI-TOF-MS (69,985Da and 68,407 Da). The 1Dy12.6 is the largest 1Dy glutenin subunits cloned in common wheat up to date, containing longer repetitive central domains than other 1Dy encoded proteins. In comparison with the most similar active 1Dy alleles previously reported, the newly discovered alleles contained a total of 20 SNPs and 3 indels. The secondary structure prediction indicated that 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 have similar proportion of α-helix, β-turn, and β-bend to those of 1Dy10 (X12929). The phylogenetic analysis illustrated that the x- and y-type subunits of glutenins were well separated, but both 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were clustered with the other Glu-1Dy alleles. Our results revealed that the 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunit have potential to strengthen gluten polymer interactions, and are valuable genetic resources for wheat quality improvement.

  14. Molecular diversity analysis of Rhizoctonia solani isolates infecting various pulse crops in different agro-ecological regions of India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunil C; Tripathi, Aradhika; Upadhyay, B K

    2012-11-01

    Genetic diversity of 89 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from different pulse crops representing 21 states from 16 agro-ecological regions of India, 49 morphological, and 7 anastomosis groups (AGs) was analyzed using 12 universal rice primers (URPs), 22 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and 23 inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. Both URPs and RAPD markers provided 100 % polymorphism with the bands ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size, whereas ISSR markers gave 99.7 % polymorphism with the bands sizes ranging from 0.1 to 3 kb. The marker URP 38F followed by URP13R, URP25F, and URP30F, RAPD marker R1 followed by OPM6, A3 and OPA12 and ISSR3 followed by ISSR1, ISSR4, and ISSR20 produced the highest number of amplicons. R. solani isolates showed a high level of genetic diversity. Unweighted pair group method with an arithmetic average (UPGMA) analysis grouped the isolates into 7 major clusters at 35 % genetic similarity using the three sets of markers evaluated. In spite of using three different types of markers, about 95 % isolates shared common grouping patterns. The majority of the isolates representing various AGs were grouped together into different sub-clusters using all three types of markers. Molecular groups of the isolates did not correspond to agro-ecological regions or states and crops of the origin. An attempt was made for the first time in the present study to determine the genetic diversity of R. solani populations isolated from different pulse crops representing various AGs and agro-ecological regions.

  15. A study of dynamical processes in the Orion KL region using ALMA—probing molecular outflow and inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2014-08-20

    This work reports high spatial resolution observations toward the Orion KL region with high critical density lines of CH{sub 3}CN (12{sub 4}-11{sub 4}) and CH{sub 3}OH (8{sub –1,8}-7{sub 0,7}), as well as a continuum at ∼1.3 mm band. The observations were made using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array with a spatial resolution of ∼1.''5 and sensitivity of about 0.07 K and ∼0.18 K for continuum and line, respectively. The observational results showed that the gas in the Orion KL region consists of jet-propelled cores at the ridge and dense cores east and south of the region that are shaped like a wedge ring. The outflow has multiple lobes, which may originate from an explosive ejection, and is not driven by young stellar objects. Four infrared bubbles were found in the Spitzer/IRAC emissions. These bubbles, the distributions of the previously found H{sub 2} jets, the young stellar objects, and molecular gas suggest that BN is the explosive center. The burst time was estimated to be ≤1300 yr. At the same time, signatures of gravitational collapse toward Source I and the hot core were detected with material infall velocities of 1.5 km s{sup –1} and ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to mass accretion rates of 1.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}/yr and 8.0 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}/yr, respectively. These observations may support the belief that high-mass stars form via the accretion model, similar to their low-mass counterparts.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of 17 rob(13q14q) Robertsonian translocations by FISH, narrowing the region containing the breakpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J. Y.; Choo, K. H.; Shaffer, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized 17 rob(13q14q) Robertsonian translocations, using six molecular probes that hybridize to the repetitive sequences of the centromeric and shortarm regions of the five acrocentric chromosomes by FISH. The rearrangements include six de novo rearrangements and the chromosomally normal parents, five maternally and three paternally inherited translocations, and three translocations of unknown origin. The D21Z1/D13Z1 and D14Z1/D22Z1 centromeric alpha-satellite DNA probes showed all rob(13q14q) chromosomes to be dicentric. The rDNA probes did not show hybridization on any of the 17 cases studied. The pTRS-47 satellite III DNA probe specific for chromosomes 14 and 22 was retained around the breakpoints in all cases. However, the pTRS-63 satellite III DNA probe specific for chromosome 14 did not show any signals on the translocation chromosomes examined. In 16 of 17 translocations studied, strong hybridization signals on the translocations were detected with the pTRI-6 satellite I DNA probe specific for chromosome 13. All parents of the six de novo rob(13q14q), including one whose pTRI-6 sequence was lost, showed strong positive hybridization signals on each pair of chromosomes 14 and 13, with pTRS-47, pTRS-63, and pTRI-6. Therefore, the translocation breakpoints in the majority of rob(13q14q) are between the pTRS-47 and pTRS-63 sequences in the p11 region of chromosome 14 and between the pTRI-6 and rDNA sequences within the p11 region of chromosome 13. Images p[962]-a Figure 2 PMID:7977359

  17. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  18. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani Region, Nunavut, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asma; Goldfarb, David M.; Slinger, Robert; Dixon, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the prevalences of infection with the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in humans appear to be relatively high in the Canadian North, their transmission patterns are poorly understood. Objective To determine the detection rate and the molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani (Baffin Island) Region of Nunavut, Canada, in order to better understand the burden of illness and the potential mechanisms of transmission. Study design/methods Diarrhoeal stool specimens (n=108) submitted to the Qikiqtani General Hospital for clinical testing were also tested for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis using epifluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed on PCR-positive specimens to determine the species, genotypes and sub-genotypes of the parasites. Results Cryptosporidium was detected in 15.7% of the diarrhoeic patients, while Giardia was detected in 4.6%. DNA sequencing of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene indicated that all of the Cryptosporidium amplicons had a 100% homology to C. parvum, and a gp60 assay showed that all aligned with C. parvum sub-genotype IIa. Microsatellite analysis revealed 3 cases of sub-genotype IIaA15G2R1, 2 of IIaA15G1R and 1 case each of sub-genotypes IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA15R1. For Giardia, results based on the amplification of both the 16S rRNA gene and the gdh gene were generally in agreement, and both DNA sequencing and RFLP demonstrated the presence of the G. duodenalis Assemblage B genotype. Conclusions Both C. parvum and G. duodenalis Assemblage B were present in human diarrhoeal stool specimens from Nunavut, which was suggestive of zoonotic transmission, although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out. To fully understand the public health significance of the different

  19. CH(+) Destruction by Reaction with H: Computing Quantum Rates To Model Different Molecular Regions in the Interstellar Medium.

    PubMed

    Bovino, S; Grassi, T; Gianturco, F A

    2015-12-17

    A detailed analysis of an ionic reaction that plays a crucial role in the carbon chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) is carried out by computing ab initio reactive cross sections with a quantum method and by further obtaining the corresponding CH(+) destruction rates over a range of temperatures that shows good overall agreement with existing experiments. The differences found between all existing calculations and the very-low-T experiments are discussed and explored via a simple numerical model that links these cross section reductions to collinear approaches where nonadiabatic crossing is expected to dominate. The new rates are further linked to a complex chemical network that models the evolution of the CH(+) abundance in the photodissociation region (PDR) and molecular cloud (MC) environments of the ISM. The abundances of CH(+) are given by numerical solutions of a large set of coupled, first-order kinetics equations that employs our new chemical package krome. The analysis that we carry out reveals that the important region for CH(+) destruction is that above 100 K, hence showing that, at least for this reaction, the differences with the existing laboratory low-T experiments are of essentially no importance within the astrochemical environments discussed here because, at those temperatures, other chemical processes involving the title molecule are taking over. A detailed analysis of the chemical network involving CH(+) also shows that a slight decrease in the initial oxygen abundance might lead to higher CH(+) abundances because the main chemical carbon ion destruction channel is reduced in efficiency. This might provide an alternative chemical route to understand the reason why general astrochemical models fail when the observed CH(+) abundances are matched with the outcomes of their calculations.

  20. Molecular genetics of the brown (b)-locus region of mouse chromosome 4. II. Complementation analyses of lethal brown deletions.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1994-07-01

    Numerous new mutations at the brown (b) locus in mouse chromosome 4 have been recovered over the years in germ-cell mutagenesis experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A large series of radiation- and chemical-induced b mutations known to be chromosomal deletions, and also known to be prenatally lethal when homozygous, were analyzed by pairwise complementation crosses as well as by pseudodominance tests involving flanking loci defined by externally visible phenotypes. These crosses were designed to determine the extent of each deletion on the genetic and phenotype map of the chromosomal region surrounding the b locus; the crosses also provided basic data that assigned deletions to complementation groups and defined four new loci associated with aberrancies in normal development. Specifically, the pseudodominance tests identified deletions that include the proximally mapping whirler (wi) and the distally mapping depilated (dep) genes, thereby bracketing these loci defined by visible developmental abnormalities with landmarks (deletion breakpoints) that are easily identified on the physical map. Furthermore, the complementation crosses, which were supplemented with additional crosses that allowed determination of the gross time of lethality of selected deletions, defined four new loci required for normal development. Homozygous deletion of one of these loci (b-associated fitness, baf) results in a runting syndrome evident during postnatal development; deletion of one locus [l(4)2Rn] causes death in the late gestation/neonatal period; and deletion of either of two loci [l(4)1Rn or l(4)3Rn] results in embryonic death, most likely in pre-, peri- or postimplantation stages. The placement of these new functionally defined loci on the evolving molecular map of the b region should be useful for continuing the analysis of the roles played in development by genes in this segment of chromosome 4.

  1. Characterization of the 5' flanking region of lipase gene from Penicillium expansum and its application in molecular breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Peng, Ying; Yu, Qingsheng; Wang, Jieliang; Tang, Kexuan

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for further promotion of lipase productivity in Penicillium expansum PE-12 is to find a suitable promoter that can function efficiently in this industrial strain. In this study, the 5' flanking region of P. expansum lipase (Ppel) containing a putative novel promoter sequence was characterized by fusing to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and subsequently introducing into P. expansum. As a result, all the transformants showed blue color quickly after incubation in GUS detection buffer, suggesting a strong promoter activity of this fragment. Glucose repression was identified for the promoter, whereas olive oil acted as a positive regulator. Facilitated by this novel promoter, P. expansum PE-12 was genetically modified, with an improved lipase yield, via a recombinant plasmid with P. expansum lipase gene (PEL) under the control of Ppel promoter and TtrpC terminator. The highest lipase yield among the modified strains could attain 2,100 U/mL, which is more than twofold of the previous industrial strain (900 U/mL). The engineered strain through molecular breeding method as well as this new promoter has great value in lipase industry.

  2. Molecular evolution analysis of WUSCHEL-related homeobox transcription factor family reveals functional divergence among clades in the homeobox region.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ana Lúcia A; Thompson, Claudia E; Freitas, Loreta B

    2016-07-01

    Gene families have been shown to play important roles in plant evolution and are associated with diversification and speciation. Genes of WUSCHEL-related homeobox family of transcription factors have important functions in plant development and are correlated with the appearance of evolutionary novelties. There are several published studies related to this family, but little is known about the relationships among the main clades in the phylogeny and the molecular evolution of the family. In this study, we obtained a well-resolved Bayesian phylogenetic tree establishing the relationships among the main clades and determining the position of Selaginella moellendorffii WOX genes. Moreover, a correlation was identified between the number of genes in the genomes and the events of whole-genome duplications. The intron-exon structure is more consistent across the modern clade, which appeared more recently in the WOX evolutionary history, and coincides with the development of higher complexity in plant species. No positive selection was detected among sites through the branches in the tree. However, with regard to the main clades, functional divergence among certain amino acids in the homeodomain region was found. Relaxed purifying selection could be the main driving force in the evolution of these genes and in agreement with some genes have been demonstrated to be functionally redundant.

  3. Humanization of an anti-human TNF-alpha antibody by variable region resurfacing with the aid of molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Guo, Ning; Shen, Beifen

    2005-08-01

    The murine monoclonal antibody Z12 is of therapeutic interest for its neutralizing biological activity against human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (hTNF-alpha). We attempted to humanize Z12 with variable domain resurfacing guided by computer modeling. First, the genes of heavy and light chain variable region (VH, VL) of Z12 were cloned and the whole three-dimensional structure of Fv fragment was constructed by using homology-based modeling and molecular docking methods. Then the complex model of Fv interacting with hTNF-alpha whose crystal structure derived from PDB database was gained with computer-guided docking program. Based on this model, a humanized version was designed. The humanized Fab antibody was constructed, expressed and purified in the pComb3H vector system and it showed unaltered binding affinity to the antigen as determined by ELISA and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The method described here can be used to humanize other anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies.

  4. Comprehensive Characterization of HIV-1 Molecular Epidemiology and Demographic History in the Brazilian Region Most Heavily Affected by AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Machado Fritsch, Hegger; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Maletich Junqueira, Dennis; Esteves de Matos Almeida, Sabrina; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high incidence of AIDS cases and the dominance of HIV-1 subtype C infections are two features that distinguish the HIV-1 epidemic in the two southernmost Brazilian states (Rio Grande do Sul [RS] and Santa Catarina [SC]) from the epidemic in other parts of the country. Nevertheless, previous studies on HIV molecular epidemiology were conducted mainly in capital cities, and a more comprehensive understanding of factors driving this unique epidemic in Brazil is necessary. Blood samples were collected from individuals in 13 municipalities in the Brazilian southern region. HIV-1 env and pol genes were submitted to phylogenetic analyses for assignment of subtype, and viral population phylodynamics were reconstructed by applying Skygrid and logistic coalescent models in a Bayesian analysis. A high prevalence of subtype C was observed in all sampled locations; however, an increased frequency of recombinant strains was found in RS, with evidence for new circulating forms (CRFs). In the SC state, subtype B and C epidemics were associated with distinct exposure groups. Although logistic models estimated similar growth rates for HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) and HIV-1B, a Skygrid plot reveals that the former epidemic has been expanding for a longer time. Our results highlight a consistent expansion of HIV-1C in south Brazil, and we also discuss how heterosexual and men who have sex with men (MSM) transmission chains might have impacted the current prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes in this region. IMPORTANCE The AIDS epidemic in south Brazil is expanding rapidly, but the circumstances driving this condition are not well known. A high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C was reported in the capital cities of this region, in contrast to the subtype B dominance in the rest of the country. This study sought to comparatively investigate the HIV-1 subtype B and C epidemics by sampling individuals from several cities in the two states with the highest AIDS incidences in Brazil. Our

  5. A 10,400-molecular-weight membrane protein is coded by region E3 of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Krajcsi, P; Yei, S P; Carlin, C R; Wold, W S

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies with adenovirus mutants have indicated that a 10,400-molecular-weight (10.4K) protein predicted to be coded by an open reading frame in region E3 of adenovirus functions to down regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor (C. R. Carlin, A. E. Tollefson, H. A. Brady, B. L. Hoffman, and W. S. M. Wold, Cell 57:135-144, 1989). We now demonstrate that the 10.4K protein is in fact synthesized in cells infected by group C adenoviruses. This was done by immunoprecipitation of 10.4K from cells infected by a variety of E3 mutants, using antisera against three different synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted 10.4K sequence. The 10.4K protein was translated primarily from E3 mRNA f, as indicated by cell-free translation of mRNA purified by hybridization from cells infected with an RNA processing mutant that synthesizes predominantly mRNA f. The 10.4K protein was overproduced or underproduced in vivo, respectively, by mutants that overproduce or underproduce E3 mRNA f, also indicating that the 10.4K protein is translated primarily from mRNA f. The 10.4K protein migrated as two bands with apparent molecular weights of 16,000 and 11,000 (10 to 18% gradient gels); both bands contained 10.4K epitopes, as shown by Western blot (immunoblot). Only the 16K band was obtained by cell-free translation, suggesting that the 16K protein is the precursor to the 11K protein. The 10.4K protein is a membrane protein, as shown by cell fractionation experiments and as predicted from its sequence. The predicted 10.4K sequence as well as a putative N-terminal signal sequence and 30-residue transmembrane domain are conserved in adenovirus types 2 and 5 (group C) and in types 3, 7, and 35 (group B). Images PMID:2296083

  6. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  7. The Study of Cellular and Molecular Physiological Characteristics of Sperm in Men Living in the Aral Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Kultanov, Berikbay Z.; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S.; Ivasenko, Svetlana A.; Tatina, Yelena S.; Kelmyalene, Assel A.; Assenova, Lyazzat H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extreme environmental situation in the Aral crisis has caused a massive chemical pollution of the territory for decades with high doses of pesticides, herbicides. Discharge of industrial waste into the rivers that feed the Aral Sea has lead to the development of various pathological processes in the human body, as well as disruption of reproductive function in young men. AIM: To evaluate the performance of molecular cellular changes in the sperm of men under the influence of dust and salt aerosols in Aral Sea region. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical and laboratory studies were conducted in men 5 settlements (Aralsk-city, v. Aiteke-Bi, v. Zhalagash, v. Zhusaly, v. Shieli). We have studied male ejaculate obtained after 4-5 days of abstinence, and placed it in a warm tube with a glass stopper. On the investigation proceeded ejaculate within 20-30 minutes after its preparation, during which time he was subjected to liquefaction. Isolation and quantification of ASF, RNA, DNA, and determining the fraction of histones in sperm was performed by the method of Markusheva and Savina. RESULTS: It was found that the value of ASF in the semen of men living in the zone of ecological disaster higher compared with the values of parameters in men living in the area of environmental crisis, and this trend is observed in all age groups. The study of circulating extracellular DNA and RNA in the sperm of men registered their decline with a corresponding increase of acid precursors that can be attributed to the degradation of nucleic acids under the influence of negative factors in the complex area of ecological trouble. Also, according to a study in men residing in the areas of environmental catastrophe at the age of 18-29 years, found an increased content of the H1 histone H2A lower total fraction, H3, H4 - and a sharp increase in histone H2B content - histones. CONCLUSIONS: Men living in environmentally disadvantaged areas of Kyzylorda region under the influence of dust and

  8. Insights into the unfolding pathway and identification of thermally sensitive regions of phytase from Aspergillus niger by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kapil; Patel, Krunal; Agrawal, D C; Khire, J M

    2015-06-01

    Thermal stability is of great importance in the application of commercial phytases. Phytase A (PhyA) is a monomeric protein comprising twelve α-helices and ten β-sheets. Comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (at 310, 350, 400, and 500 K) revealed that the thermal stability of PhyA from Aspergillus niger (A. niger) is associated with its conformational rigidity. The most thermally sensitive regions were identified as loops 8 (residues 83-106), 10 (161-174), 14 (224-230), 17 (306-331), and 24 (442-444), which are present on the surface of the protein. It was observed that solvent-exposed loops denature before or show higher flexibility than buried residues. We observed that PhyA begins to unfold at loops 8 and 14, which further extends to loop 24 at the C-terminus. The intense movement of loop 8 causes the helix H2 and beta-sheet B3 to fluctuate at high temperature. The high flexibility of the H2, H10, and H12 helices at high temperature resulted in complete denaturation. The high mobility of loop 14 easily transfers to the adjacent helices H7, H8, and H9, which fluctuate and partially unfold at high temperature (500 K). It was also observed that the salt bridges Asp110-Lys149, Asp205-Lys277, Asp335-Arg136, Asp416-Arg420, and Glu387-Arg400 are important influences on the structural stability but not the thermostability, as the lengths of these salt bridges did not increase with rising temperature. The salt bridges Glu125-Arg163, Asp299-Arg136, Asp266-Arg219, Asp339-Lys278, Asp335-Arg136, and Asp424-Arg428 are all important for thermostability, as the lengths of these bridges increased dramatically with increasing temperature. Here, for the first time, we have computationally identified the thermolabile regions of PhyA, and this information could be used to engineer novel thermostable phytases. Numerous homologous phytases of fungal as well as bacterial origin are known, and these homologs show high sequence similarity. Our findings could prove useful in

  9. Molecular detection of Acinetobacter species in lice and keds of domestic animals in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Acinetobacter and Rickettsia species DNA in lice and Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) of animals from Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia. From September through November 2011, a total of 207 cattle, 85 sheep, 47 dogs and 16 cats were examined for ectoparasites. Results of morphological identification revealed several species of ectoparasites: Linognathus vituli (L. vituli), Bovicola bovis (B. bovis) and Solenopotes capillatus (S. capillatus) on cattle; B. ovis and Melophagus ovinus (M. ovinus) on sheep; and Heterodoxus spiniger (H. spiniger) on dogs. There was a significantly (p≤0.0001) higher prevalence of L. vituli observed in cattle than both S. capillatus and B. bovis. Molecular identification of lice using an 18S rRNA gene analysis confirms the identified lice species by morphological methods. We detected different Acinetobacter species among lice (11.1%) and keds (86.4%) including A. soli in L. vituli of cattle, A. lowffii in M. ovinus of sheep, A. pittii in H. spiniger of dogs, 1 new Acinetobacter spp. in M. ovinus and 2 new Acinetobacter spp. in H. spiniger of dogs using partial rpoB gene sequence analysis. There was a significantly higher prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. in keds than in lice (p≤0.00001). Higher percentage of Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in H. spiniger than in both B. ovis and L. vituli (p≤0.00001). Carbapenemase resistance encoding genes for blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-51 were not found in any lice and keds. These findings suggest that synanthropic animals and their ectoparasites might increase the risk of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens and could be a source for Acinetobacter spp. infections in humans. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine whether ectoparasites of animals can act as environmental reservoirs and play a role in spreading these bacteria to both animal and human hosts.

  10. Molecular Detection of Acinetobacter Species in Lice and Keds of Domestic Animals in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Acinetobacter and Rickettsia species DNA in lice and Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) of animals from Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia. From September through November 2011, a total of 207 cattle, 85 sheep, 47 dogs and 16 cats were examined for ectoparasites. Results of morphological identification revealed several species of ectoparasites: Linognathus vituli (L. vituli), Bovicola bovis (B. bovis) and Solenopotes capillatus (S. capillatus) on cattle; B. ovis and Melophagus ovinus (M. ovinus) on sheep; and Heterodoxus spiniger (H. spiniger) on dogs. There was a significantly (p≤0.0001) higher prevalence of L. vituli observed in cattle than both S. capillatus and B. bovis. Molecular identification of lice using an 18S rRNA gene analysis confirms the identified lice species by morphological methods. We detected different Acinetobacter species among lice (11.1%) and keds (86.4%) including A. soli in L. vituli of cattle, A. lowffii in M. ovinus of sheep, A. pittii in H. spiniger of dogs, 1 new Acinetobacter spp. in M. ovinus and 2 new Acinetobacter spp. in H. spiniger of dogs using partial rpoB gene sequence analysis. There was a significantly higher prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. in keds than in lice (p≤0.00001). Higher percentage of Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in H. spiniger than in both B. ovis and L. vituli (p≤0.00001). Carbapenemase resistance encoding genes for blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-51 were not found in any lice and keds. These findings suggest that synanthropic animals and their ectoparasites might increase the risk of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens and could be a source for Acinetobacter spp. infections in humans. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine whether ectoparasites of animals can act as environmental reservoirs and play a role in spreading these bacteria to both animal and human hosts. PMID:23285015

  11. Excitation of Molecular Hydrogen in the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region from a Deep Near-infrared IGRINS Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle F.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Oh, Heeyoung; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Pavel, Michael D.; Lee, Sungho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Chan; Sok Oh, Jae; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2017-04-01

    We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R∼ {{45,000}}) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45–2.45 μm), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them excellent probes of the excitation mechanisms of H2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50{--}250 K, {n}H={10}5{--}{10}7 cm‑3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250{--}1000 K, {n}H={10}4{--}{10}5 cm‑3). We fit a grid of constant temperature and density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600–650 K and the density to {n}H=2.5× {10}3{--}{10}4 cm‑3. The best-fit model gives T = 625 K and {n}H=5× {10}3 cm‑3. This well-constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar’s lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.

  12. Taxonomic Notes on Nasutitermes and Bulbitermes (Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) from the Sunda region of Southeast Asia based on morphological and molecular characters

    PubMed Central

    Syaukani; Thompson, Graham J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Sunda region of Southeastern Asia is rich in termite fauna, but termites from this region have been poorly described. In this study, we described eight species from two diverse genera from this region, and from the family Termitidae. We describe Bulbitermes 4 spp. and Nasutitermes 4 spp. from new field collections. Where possible we examine original holotype specimens, and describe the essential morphological characters for soldier and worker castes. We devise two new bifurcating keys to guide the field identification of each species. In addition, we develop a nucleotide sequence profile for the COI gene. From this molecular character matrix, we use Neighbour-Joining analysis to test the monophyly of each morphospecies and genus. We find that the morphological and molecular characters are highly concordant, whereby all taxa appear to represent distinct molecular clades. For termites, there is therefore agreement between the morphological taxonomic characters used to sort species from a bifurcating key and the molecular taxonomic characters used to sort species on a bifurcating tree. This joint analysis suggests that DNA barcoding holds considerable promise for termite taxonomy, especially for diverse clades like Bulbitermes and Nasutitermes for which a global morphological key would be intractable. PMID:22287894

  13. Molecular epidemiology and BH4-responsiveness in patients with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency from Galicia region of Spain.

    PubMed

    Couce, M L; Bóveda, M D; Fernández-Marmiesse, A; Mirás, A; Pérez, B; Desviat, L R; Fraga, J M

    2013-05-25

    Knowledge of hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) mutational spectrum in a population allows in many cases an accurate prediction of the phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) responsiveness, thus selecting an adequate treatment. In this work, we have performed the molecular characterization of 105 HPA patients from Galicia, in the northwest region of Spain, evaluating their phenotype and BH4 response. The mutational spectrum analysis showed 47 distinct mutations in 89 families, 37 of them (78.7%) corresponding to missense mutations. Six mutations account for 47.2% of all the investigated alleles, each one with a frequency ≥ 5% (IVS10-11G>A, p.R261Q, p.V388M, p.R176L, p.E280K, p.A300S). The most prevalent HPA mutations in Galicia are the common Mediterranean mutation IVS10-11G>A and p.R261Q, with frequencies of 13.8% and 10.5%, respectively. One novel mutation (p.K361Q; c.1081A>C) was also reported. Although a good genotype-phenotype correlation is observed, there is no exact correlation for some genotypes involving mutations p.R261Q, p.I65T or IVS10-11G>A. Forty seven patients were monitored for post-challenge BH4, establishing genotype-based predictions of BH4-responsiveness in all of them. All phenylketonuric patients with 2 nonresponsive mutations were unresponsive to BH4 and patients with mutations previously associated with BH4 responsiveness in the two alleles had a clear positive response to the test, with the exception of 5 patients with mutations p.R261Q, p.I65T and p.R68S. Our study supports a similar degree of heterogeneity of the HPA mutation spectrum in Galicia compared to reported data from Southern Europe. Patients carrying null mutations in both alleles showed the highest degree of concordance with the most severe phenotypes. Genotype is a good predictor of BH4 response.

  14. New evidence on tick-borne rickettsioses in the Altai region of Russia using primary lesions, serum and blood clots of molecular and serological study.

    PubMed

    Granitov, Vladimir; Shpynov, Stanislav; Beshlebova, Olga; Arsenjeva, Irina; Dedkov, Vladimir; Safonova, Marina; Stukolova, Olga; Pantjukhina, Anna; Tarasevich, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne rickettsioses (TBRs) have similar clinical symptoms and can give serological cross-reaction. We firstly found that in the natural foci of North Asian tick typhus (NATT) in the Altai region of Russia, TBRs can be caused by two Rickettsia species: Rickettsia sibirica subsp. sibirica (causative agent of NATT) and Rickettsia heilongjiangensis. Rickettsial DNA was detected in primary lesions, serum samples and blood clots using real-time PCR. Therefore, each case of TBRs should be verified by using molecular typing. TBR caused by R. sibirica subsp. sibirica - NATT dominates on the territory of Altai region.

  15. A molecular-cytogenetic method for locating genes to pericentromeric regions facilitates a genomewide comparison of synteny between the centromeric regions of wheat and rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lili; Friebe, Bernd; Zhang, Peng; Gill, Bikram S

    2009-12-01

    Centromeres, because of their repeat structure and lack of sequence conservation, are difficult to assemble and compare across organisms. It was recently discovered that rice centromeres often contain genes. This suggested a method for studying centromere homologies between wheat and rice chromosomes by mapping rice centromeric genes onto wheat aneuploid stocks. Three of the seven cDNA clones of centromeric genes from rice centromere 8 (Cen8), 6729.t09, 6729.t10, and 6730.t11 which lie in the Cen8 kinetochore region, and three wheat ESTs, BJ301191, BJ305475, and BJ280500, with similarity to sequences of rice centromeric genes, were mapped to the centromeric regions of the wheat group-7 (W7) chromosomes. A possible pericentric inversion in chromosome 7D was detected. Genomewide comparison of wheat ESTs that mapped to centromeric regions against rice genome sequences revealed high conservation and a one-to-one correspondence of centromeric regions between wheat and rice chromosome pairs W1-R5, W2-R7, W3-R1, W5-R12, W6-R2, and W7-R8. The W4 centromere may share homology with R3 only or with R3 + R11. Wheat ESTs that mapped to the pericentromeric region of the group-5 long arm anchored to the rice BACs located in the recently duplicated region at the distal ends of the short arms of rice chromosomes 11 and 12. A pericentric inversion specific to the rice lineage was detected. The depicted framework provides a working model for further studies on the structure and evolution of cereal chromosome centromeres.

  16. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon.

  17. Abundant molecular gas and inefficient star formation in intracluster regions: ram pressure stripped tail of the Norma galaxy ESO137-001

    SciTech Connect

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large 'intracluster' distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ∼1.5 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H{sub 2} factor could overestimate the H{sub 2} content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τ{sub dep} > 10{sup 10} yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H{sub 2} in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase.

  18. Abundant Molecular Gas and Inefficient Star Formation in Intracluster Regions: Ram Pressure Stripped Tail of the Norma Galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large "intracluster" distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected 12CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 109 M ⊙ of H2 in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ~1.5 × 108 M ⊙ of H2 found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H2 factor could overestimate the H2 content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τdep > 1010 yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H2 in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.B-0934.

  19. Galactic massive star forming regions near and far: a (sub)millimeter study of the Orion Molecular Cloud 1 and W49A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tzu-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Massive stars play an important role in shaping the structure of galaxies due to the large energy output during their lifetime. However, because of the short evolutionary time scales, the large extinction toward their birth places, and the large distance of massive stars, our understanding of their formation is still sketchy. Hence, the observations of two well-known massive star forming regions in our Galaxy (W49A at 11.4 kpc and Orion Molecular Cloud 1 at 414 pc) were carried out using the IRAM 30 m and APEX telescopes, including large-scale mappings of various molecular line emission, such as CO isotopologues, HCN, HCO+, and SiO. The results of W49A show that its starburst was triggered by expanding shells, causing fragmentation that lead to the formation of massive stars. The cause of the shell expansion is not clear, but likely due to the stellar feedbacks from a first generation of young massive stars by strong stellar winds and ultraviolet radiation, or the interaction between stars in a cluster, which is possibly related to the large-scale gas ejections found in the W49 complex with a total kinetic energy of few times 1050 erg. Apart from W49A, the study in Orion Molecular Cloud 1 reveals a more detailed picture of young massive stars strongly interacting with their local environment. The highly excited CO emission in Orion Molecular Cloud 1 shows two main components: one is the north-south dense ridge where two active star-forming regions (Orion BN/KL and Orion South) are located, and the other one consists of photon-dominated regions (e.g., the Orion Bar and Orion East) spread over the whole area, where gas and dust are heated by ultraviolet photons from the Trapezium cluster. In addition, several outflows are detected in the higher-J transitions of CO, which indicates the important role of shock heating associated with star-forming activities.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J. ); Jenkins, L. ); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. ); Sheppard, L. ); Flejter, W.L. ); Zackowski, J. ); Tsien, F. ); Schwartz, S. )

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Using Molecular Models To Show Steric Clash in Peptides: An Illustration of Two Disallowed Regions in the Ramachandran Diagram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkides, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity, students manipulate three-dimensional molecular models of the Ala-Ala-Ala tripeptide, where Ala is alanine. They rotate bonds to show that the pairs of dihedral angles phi = 0 degrees, psi = 180 degrees, and phi = 0 degrees, psi = 0 degrees lead to unfavorable interactions among the main chain atoms of the tripeptide. This…

  2. Comparison of orthologous and paralogous DNA flanking the wheat high molecular weight glutenin genes: sequence conservation and divergence, transposon distribution, and matrix-attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D; Larka, L; Christoffers, M J; McCue, K F; Gustafson, J P

    2002-04-01

    Extended flanking DNA sequences were characterized for five members of the wheat high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin gene family to understand more of the structure, control, and evolution of these genes. Analysis revealed more sequence conservation among orthologous regions than between paralogous regions, with differences mainly owing to transposition events involving putative retrotransposons and several miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs). Both gyspy-like long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon sequences are represented in the flanking DNAs. One of the MITEs is a novel class, but another MITE is related to the maize Stowaway family and is widely represented in Triticeae express sequence tags (ESTs). Flanking DNA of the longest sequence, a 20 425-bp fragment including and surrounding the HMW-glutenin Bx7 gene, showed additional cereal gene-like sequences both immediately 5' and 3' to the HMW-glutenin coding region. The transcriptional activities of sequences related to these flanking putative genes and the retrotransposon-related regions were indicated by matches to wheat and other Triticeae ESTs. Predictive analysis of matrix-attachment regions (MARs) of the HMW glutenin and several alpha-, gamma-, and omega-gliadin flanking DNAs indicate potential MARs immediately flanking each of the genes. Matrix binding activity in the predicted regions was confirmed for two of the HMW-glutenin genes.

  3. Evaluation of genetic variability of wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) in Canada and the Caucasus region by chemical and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Nesvadba, Vladimír; Krofta, Karel; Henychova, Alena; Marzoev, Arkady Inalovic; Richards, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are potential new germplasms to expand the variability of genetic resources for hop breeding. We evaluated Canadian (62 plants) and Caucasian (58 plants) wild hops by their chemical characteristics and with molecular genetic analyses using sequence-tagged site and simple sequence repeat markers, in comparison with European (104 plants) and North American (27 plants) wild hops. The contents of alpha and beta acids varied from 0.36% to 5.11% and from 0.43% to 6.66% in Canadian wild hops, and from 0.85% to 3.65% and from 1.22% to 4.81% in Caucasian wild hops, respectively. The contents of cohumulone and colupulone distinctly differed between European and North American wild hops: the cohumulone level in alpha acids was in the range 46.1%-68.4% among North American wild hops and in the range 13.6%-30.6% among European wild hops. The high content of myrcene and the low contents of humulene, farnesene, and selinenes were typical for wild hops from Canada, in contrast to wild hops from the Caucasus region. We compared the chemical characteristics with molecular genetic data. Chemical characteristics differentiated wild hops into North American and Eurasian groups. Molecular genetic analysis was able to separate Caucasian wild hops from European wild hops. We proved a hop phylogeny by means of wide molecular analysis.

  4. Patterns of Molecular Evolution Associated With Two Selective Sweeps in the Tb1–Dwarf8 Region in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Camus-Kulandaivelu, Letizia; Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Tollon-Cordet, Christine; Charcosset, Alain; Manicacci, Domenica; Tenaillon, Maud I.

    2008-01-01

    We focused on a region encompassing a major maize domestication locus, Tb1, and a locus involved in the flowering time variation, Dwarf8 (D8), to investigate the consequences of two closely linked selective sweeps on nucleotide variation and gain some insights into maize geographical diffusion, through climate adaptation. First, we physically mapped D8 at ∼300 kb 3′ of Tb1. Second, we analyzed patterns of nucleotide variation at Tb1, D8, and seven short regions (400–700 bp) located in the Tb1–D8 region sequenced on a 40 maize inbred lines panel encompassing early-flowering temperate and late-flowering tropical lines. The pattern of polymorphism along the region is characterized by two valleys of depleted polymorphism while the region in between exhibits an appreciable amount of diversity. Our results reveal that a region ∼100 kb upstream of the D8 gene exhibits hallmarks of divergent selection between temperate and tropical lines and is likely closer than the D8 gene to the target of selection for climate adaptation. Selection in the tropical lines appears more recent than in the temperate lines, suggesting an initial domestication of early-flowering maize. Simulation results indicate that the polymorphism pattern is consistent with two interfering selective sweeps at Tb1 and D8. PMID:18780751

  5. A MOLECULARLY CHARACTERIZED INTERSTITIAL DELETION ENCOMPASSING THE 11q14.1-q23.3 REGION IN A CASE WITH MULTIPLE CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Altiok-Clark, O; Yakut, S; Guzel-Nur, B; Mihci, E; Berker-Karauzum, S

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 long arm is a rare event. In most of the interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome 11 both the position and the size of these deletions are heterogeneous making a precise karyotype-phenotype correlation. In only a few of the reported cases has the deletion been molecularly characterized. Our patient was a 13-year-old male presented; mental motor retardation, strabismus, myopia, retinopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, a long and triangular face, a broad forehead, hypotelorism, nasal septal deviation, a beaked nose, hypoplastic ala nasie, bilateral low-set ears, a high arched palate, crowded teeth, retrognathia, thin lips, a long neck, and sloping shoulders, hyperactive behavior, pulmonary stenosis and lumbar scoliosis. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q14.1-q23.3) karyotype in the patient. Array-CGH analysis of the patient's DNA revealed an interstitial deletion encompassing 33.2 Mb in the 11q14.1-q23.3 genomic region (chr11: 83,161,443-116,401,751 ; Hg19). In this report, we present a patient with an interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 11 that encompassed the 11q14.1-q23.3 region; and, using array-CGH analysis, we molecularly characterized the deleted region.

  6. Molecular and morphological data support recognition of a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Anura: Terrarana) from an under-sampled region of South America.

    PubMed

    Heinicke, Matthew P; Barrio-Amorós, César L; Hedges, S Blair

    2015-07-16

    We describe a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Terrarana) from the northern Andes of Venezuela and adjacent Colombia. Tachiramantis gen. nov. includes three species formerly placed in the large genus Pristimantis. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of data from five nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that Tachiramantis is not part of Pristimantis or any other named genus in its family (Craugastoridae or Strabomantidae). Morphological evidence further supports the distinctiveness of Tachiramantis, which has several aspects of skull morphology that are rare or absent in Pristimantis and synapomorphic for Tachiramantis, including frontoparietal-prootic fusion and degree of vomer development. The terminal phalanges, which narrow greatly before expanding at the tips, may represent an additional morphological synapomorphy. One species, T. prolixodiscus, also displays a fenestra between the posterior portions of the frontoparietals, a character state otherwise present in only 1 of 98 other sampled terraranan species. We use mapped ranges of most New World direct-developing frogs to show that Tachiramantis occurs in a geographic region that had been under-sampled in previous molecular studies of New World direct-developing frogs. Other under-sampled regions are identified in western Peru, Colombia, and northern Central America; these regions should provide fruitful target taxa for future phylogenetic studies.

  7. A comparison of the VP1, VP2, and VP4 regions for molecular typing of human enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiromu; Tu, Phan Van; Ishiko, Hiroaki; McMinn, Peter C; Cardosa, Mary J

    2010-04-01

    The VP4, VP2, and VP1 gene regions were evaluated for their usefulness in typing human enteroviruses. Three published RT-PCR primers sets targeting separately these three gene regions were used. Initially, from a total of 86 field isolates (36 HEV-A, 40 HEV-B, and 10 HEV-C) tested, 100% concordance in HEV-A was identified from all three gene regions (VP4, VP2, and VP1). However, for HEV-B and HEV-C viruses, only the VP2 and VP1 regions, and not VP4, showed 100% concordance in typing these viruses. To evaluate further the usefulness of VP4 in typing HEV-A enteroviruses, 55 Japanese and 203 published paired VP4 and VP1 nucleotide sequences were also examined. In each case, typing by VP4 was 100% in concordance with typing using VP1. Given these results, it is proposed that for HEV-A enteroviruses, all three gene regions (VP4, VP2, and VP1), would be useful for typing these viruses. These options would enhance the capability of laboratories in identifying these viruses and would greatly help in outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease.

  8. Isolation and molecular identification of free-living amoebae of the genus Naegleria from Arctic and sub-Antarctic regions.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, Johan F

    2006-07-01

    Twenty-three freshwater samples with sediment taken from two regions in the Arctic, Spitzbergen and Greenland, and one region in sub-Antarctica, Ile de la Possession, were cultured for amoebae at 37 degrees C and room temperature (RT). Only two samples yielded amoebae at 37 degrees C and the two isolates were identified from their morphological features to belong to the genus Acanthamoeba. Vahlkampfiid amoebae were isolated from 11 samples at RT. Morphological analysis of the cysts identified all 11 isolates as belonging to the genus Naegleria, although only about half of them (45%) transformed into flagellates. Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that these isolates represent novel species and that N. antarctica, N. dobsoni and N. chilensis are their closest relatives. Not surprisingly, these three species also grow at lower temperatures (<37 degrees C) than the majority of described Naegleria spp. Two of the eight new species were found in both Arctic and sub-Antarctic regions, and other new species from the Arctic are closely related to new species from the sub-Antarctic. Therefore, it seems the Naegleria gene pool present in the polar regions is different from that found in temperate and tropical regions.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Molecular fingerprint-region spectroscopy from 5 to 12 μm using an orientation-patterned gallium phosphide optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, Luke; Schunemann, Peter G.; Reid, Derryck T.

    2016-09-01

    We report a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the new semiconductor gain material orientation patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which enables the production of high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses spanning 5-12 \\mu m with average powers in the few to tens of milliwatts range. This is the first example of a broadband OPO operating across the molecular fingerprint region, and we demonstrate its potential by conducting broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy using water vapor and a polystyrene reference standard.

  11. Molecular fingerprint-region spectroscopy from 5 to 12  μm using an orientation-patterned gallium phosphide optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Luke; Schunemann, Peter G; Reid, Derryck T

    2016-09-15

    We report a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the new semiconductor gain material orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which enables the production of high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses spanning 5-12 μm with average powers in the few to tens of milliwatts range. This is the first example of a broadband OPO operating across the molecular fingerprint region, and we demonstrate its potential by conducting broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy using water vapor and a polystyrene reference standard.

  12. Morphological and molecular observations on the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi from the Volga and South Ural regions of Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2010-2012, a survey was conducted to determine the distribution and species diversity of the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi within the Volga and South Ural regions of the Russian Federation. A total of 270 soil samples were collected. Seven populations of CCN were found in the rhiz...

  13. EST mining for structure and expression of genes in the region of the wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin loci.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D

    2009-08-01

    An in-depth analysis was carried out with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for genes in and near the HMW-GS loci. Considerations for using ESTs are discussed, including the occurrence of chimeric and aberrant HMW-GS ESTs. Complete gene sequences demonstrated the feasibility of constructing accurate full-length coding regions from EST assemblies and found, or supported, errors in several previously reported HMW-GS gene sequences. New complete HMW-GS gene sequences are reported for the cultivars Chinese Spring and Glenlea. The Ay subunit gene, which is considered null in cultivated wheats, was shown to transcribe in at least two germplasms. Analyses support the conclusion that of the five known genes within this genomic region, the two HMW-GS genes and the globulin gene are highly expressed. The other two genes, encoding a receptor kinase and a protein kinase, have one and no identifiable wheat EST, respectively, although ESTs are found for the orthologous genes in barley. The ESTs of all five genes within the HMW-GS region are either definitely associated with the endosperm or possibly originate from imbibed seed, suggesting the four distinct gene classes in this region are part of a seed or endosperm chromatin domain. EST resources were also used to determine relative abundance of ESTs for all classes of wheat prolamines and indicated differential levels of expression both among germplasms and among the three genomes of hexaploid wheats.

  14. Deletion 2q37.3 and autism: molecular cytogenetic mapping of the candidate region for autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lukusa, T; Vermeesch, J R; Holvoet, M; Fryns, J P; Devriendt, K

    2004-01-01

    Fine mapping of deletion regions in autistic patients represents a valuable screening tool for identifying candidate genes for autism. A number of studies have ascertained associations between autism and terminal 2q deletion with the breakpoint within 2q37. Here we describe a 12-year-old female patient with terminal 2q37.3 cryptic deletion and autistic behaviour. Her clinical features included hypotonia and feeding difficulties during infancy, coarse face with notably prominent forehead, prominent eyebrows, broad flat nasal bridge and round cheeks, small hands and feet with bilateral brachymetaphalangism, proximal implantation of the thumbs and short toenails, mild mental retardation and autistic behaviour. Recorded autistic features included early lack of eye contact and, during infancy, little social interactions, propensity to be stereotypically busy and to get anxious. In order to more closely delineate the linkage region for autism within 2q37, the findings in this patient were combined to those in 2 previously reported siblings with a well documented 2q37.3 deletion, but without autistic disorder. The exact size of the deleted segment was determined by mapping the deleted region in each group with a series of specific BAC clones linearly ordered on the 2q37 region. The deletion in the autistic patient appeared to be larger [breakpoint flanked by more centromeric clones RP11-680016 (236.9 Mb) and 201F21 (237.4 Mb)] than in the non autistic siblings [more telomeric clones RP11-205L13 (237.8 Mb) and 346114 (238.2 Mb)], revealing a distance of maximum 1.3 Mb between the breakpoints. Accordingly, the extent of the candidate region for susceptibility genes for autism on distal 2q is reduced to maximum 1.3 Mb. Comparison with another well documented autistic patient from the literature results in the same conclusion. These findings represent thus a further step towards identifying genes predisposing to autism.

  15. Molecular topography of the secondary constriction region (qh) of human chromosome 9 with an unusual euchromatic band

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.S.; Luk, S.; Brennan, J.P.; Mathews, T.; Conte, R.A.; Macera, M.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Heterochromatin confined to pericentromeric (c) and secondary constriction (qh) regions plays a major role in morphological variation of chromosome 9, because of its size and affinity for pericentric inversion. Consequently, pairing at pachytene may lead to some disturbances between homologous chromosomes having such extreme variations and may result in abnormalities involving bands adjacent to the qh region. The authors encountered such a case, where a G-positive band has originated de nova, suggesting a maternal origin from the chromosome 9 that has had a complete pericentric inversion. In previously reported cases, the presence of an extra G-positive band within the 9qh region has been familial, and in the majority of those cases it was not associated with any clinical consequences. Therefore, this anomaly has been referred to as a [open quotes]rare[close quotes] variant. The qh region consists of a mixture of various tandemly repeated DNA sequences, and routine banding techniques have failed to characterize the origin of this extra genetic material. By the chromosome in situ suppression hybridization technique using whole chromosome paint, the probe annealed with the extra G-band, suggesting a euchromatic origin from chromosome 9, presumably band p12. By the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique using alpha- and beta-satellite probes, the dicentric nature was further revealed, supporting the concept of unequal crossing-over during maternal meiosis I, which could account for a duplication of the h region. The G-positive band most likely became genetically inert when it was sandwiched between two blocks of heterochromatin, resulting in a phenotypically normal child. Therefore, an earlier hypothesis, suggesting its origin from heterochromatin through so-called euchromatinization, is refuted here. If the proband's progeny inherit this chromosome, it shall be envisaged as a rare familial variant whose clinical consequences remain obscure. 52 refs., 3 figs.

  16. SCUBA-Diving In Nearby Molecular Clouds: Large-Area Mapping of Star-Forming Regions at Sub-millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.

    Wide area sub-millimeter mapping of nearby molecular clouds allows for the study of large scale structures such as the Integral Shaped Filament in the Orion A cloud. Examination of these regions suggests that they are not equilibrium isothermal structures but rather require significant, and radially dependent, non-thermal support such as produced by helical magnetic fields Also observed in the large area maps are dense condensations with masses typical for stars. The mass distribution of these clumps is similar to the stellar initial mass function; however, the clumps appear stable against collapse. The clumps are clustered within the cores of molecular clouds and restricted to those locations where the molecular cloud column density is high (A_v > 4). As well, the typical sub-millimeter clump reveals little or no emission from isotopes of CO, likely indicating that the combination of high density and low temperatures within the clumps provides an environment in which these molecules freeze-out onto dust grain surfaces.

  17. Chloroplast DNA analysis of Tunisian cork oak populations (Quercus suber L.): sequence variations and molecular evolution of the trnL (UAA)-trnF (GAA) region.

    PubMed

    Abdessamad, A; Baraket, G; Sakka, H; Ammari, Y; Ksontini, M; Hannachi, A Salhi

    2016-10-24

    Sequences of the trnL-trnF spacer and combined trnL-trnF region in chloroplast DNA of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) were analyzed to detect polymorphisms and to elucidate molecular evolution and demographic history. The aligned sequences varied in length and nucleotide composition. The overall ratio of transition/transversion (ti/tv) of 0.724 for the intergenic spacer and 0.258 for the pooled sequences were estimated, and indicated that transversions are more frequent than transitions. The molecular evolution and demographic history of Q. suber were investigated. Neutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu and Li) ruled out the null hypothesis of a strictly neutral model, and Fu's Fs and Ramos-Onsins and Rozas' R2 confirmed the recent expansion of cork oak trees, validating its persistency in North Africa since the last glaciation during the Quaternary. The observed uni-modal mismatch distribution and the Harpending's raggedness index confirmed the demographic history model for cork oak. A phylogenetic dendrogram showed that the distribution of Q. suber trees occurs independently of geographical origin, the relief of the population site, and the bioclimatic stages. The molecular history and cytoplasmic diversity suggest that in situ and ex situ conservation strategies can be recommended for preserving landscape value and facing predictable future climatic changes.

  18. Bilirubin calculi crushing by laser irradiation at a molecular oscillating region wavelength based on infrared absorption spectrum analysis using a free-electron laser: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kajiwara, H; Awazu, K; Aizawa, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a new laser technique of crushing bilirubin calculi, our aim being to crush calculi in isolation using a minimally invasive procedure. Infrared absorption spectrum analysis of the bilirubin calculi was conducted, revealing maximum absorption spectrum at a wavelength of the C=O stretching vibration of ester binding that exists within the molecular structure of bilirubin calcium. As an experiment to crush calculi using the free-electron laser, we set the laser at the effective irradiation wavelength of ester binding, and conducted noncontact irradiation of the bilirubin calculi. The calculi began to slowly ablate until the irradiated site had been completely obliterated after 20s of irradiation. Moreover, absorption spectrum analysis of the irradiated site, from a comparison of absorption peak ratios, revealed that absorption peak intensities decreased over time at the absorption wavelength of ester binding. These findings suggest that irradiation of molecular oscillating region wavelengths peculiar to calculi based on infrared absorption spectrum analysis results in the gradual crushing of calculi in isolation by breaking down their molecular structure.

  19. Metabolic and Molecular Changes of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Lines Carrying Different Solanum pennellii Wild Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Docimo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Valentino; Calafiore, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Ferracane, Rosalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important dietary source of bioactive compounds including the antioxidants flavonoids and phenolic acids. We previously identified two genotypes (IL7-3 and IL12-4) carrying loci from the wild species Solanum pennellii, which increased antioxidants in the fruit. Successively, these lines were crossed and two genotypes carrying both introgressions at the homozygous condition (DHO88 and DHO88-SL) were selected. The amount of total antioxidant compounds was increased in DHOs compared to both ILs and the control genotype M82. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the positive interaction between the two wild regions pyramided in DHO genotypes, detailed analyses of the metabolites accumulated in the fruit were carried out by colorimetric methods and LC/MS/MS. These analyses evidenced a lower content of flavonoids in DHOs and in ILs, compared to M82. By contrast, in the DHOs the relative content of phenolic acids increased, particularly the fraction of hexoses, thus evidencing a redirection of the phenylpropanoid flux toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acid glycosides in these genotypes. In addition, the line DHO88 exhibited a lower content of free phenolic acids compared to M82. Interestingly, the two DHOs analyzed differ in the size of the wild region on chromosome 12. Genes mapping in the introgression regions were further investigated. Several genes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, such as one 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and two UDP-glycosyltransferases in the region 12-4 and one chalcone isomerase and one UDP-glycosyltransferase in the region 7-3. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated a different expression of the detected genes in the ILs and in the DHOs compared to M82. These analyses, combined with biochemical analyses, suggested a central role of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in redirecting the phenylpropanoid pathways toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acids in the pyramided lines

  20. Stability, orientation and position preference of the stem region (residues 689-703) in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Jusoh, Siti Azma

    2013-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) play an important role in the virus assembly and initial entry into host cells. Conserved charged residues of the E2 transmembrane (TM) domain were shown to be responsible for the heterodimerization with envelope glycoprotein E1. Despite intensive research on both envelope glycoproteins, the structural information is still not fully understood. Recent findings have revealed that the stem (ST) region of E2 also functions in the initial stage of the viral life cycle. We have previously shown the effect of the conserved charged residues on the TM helix monomer of E2. Here, we extended the model of the TM domain by adding the adjacent ST segment. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were performed for the E2 amphiphilic segment of the ST region connected to the putative TM domain (residues 683-746). Structural conformation and behavior are studied and compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-derived segment of E2 ( 2KQZ.pdb). We observed that the central helix of the ST region (residues 689 - 703) remained stable as a helix in-plane to the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the TM domain appeared to provide minimal contribution to the structural stability of the amphipathic region. This study also provides insight into the orientation and positional preferences of the ST segment with respect to the membrane lipid-water interface. PMID:24555044

  1. Molecular dissection of the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, discloses regions important for membrane association and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, M; Kozyraki, R; Jacobsen, C; Nexø, E; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-07-16

    Cubilin, the receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12, is a novel type of high molecular weight receptor consisting of a 27 CUB (complement components C1r/C1s, Uegf, and bone morphogenic protein-1) domain cluster preceded by 8 epidermal growth factor repeats and a short N-terminal sequence. In addition to binding the vitamin B12-carrier complex, cubilin also binds receptor-associated protein. To delineate the structures for membrane association and ligand binding we established a panel of stable transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing overlapping segments of rat cubilin. Analysis of conditioned media and cell extracts of transfected cells revealed that the N-terminal cubilin region conveys membrane association. Helical plotting of this region demonstrated a conserved amphipathic helix pattern (Lys74-Glu109) as a candidate site for hydrophobic interactions. Ligand affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analysis of the secreted cubilin fragments showed ligand binding in the CUB domain region. Further dissection of binding-active fragments localized the binding site for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 to CUB domains 5-8 and a receptor-associated protein-binding site to CUB domains 13-14. In conclusion, the N-terminal cubilin region seems crucial for membrane association, whereas the CUB domain cluster harbors distinct sites for ligand binding.

  2. emm and C-repeat region molecular typing of beta-hemolytic Streptococci in a tropical country: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C; Magor, Graham; Jenney, Adam W J; Kado, Joseph; Good, Michael F; McMillan, David; Batzloff, Michael; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-08-01

    We designed a study to investigate the molecular epidemiology of group A streptococcal (GAS) and group C and G streptococcal (GCS and GGS) disease in Fiji, a country which is known to have a high burden of streptococcal disease. Molecular typing of the N-terminal portion (emm typing) of the M protein was performed with 817 isolates (535 GAS and 282 GCS/GGS). We also performed genotyping of the C-repeat region in 769 of these isolates to identify J14 sequence types. The profile of emm types for Fiji was very different from that found for the United States and Europe. There were no dominant emm types and a large number of overlapping types among clinical disease states. Commonly found GAS emm types in industrialized countries, including emm1, emm12, and emm28, were not found among GAS isolates from Fiji. Over 93% of GAS isolates and over 99% of GCS/GGS isolates that underwent J14 sequence typing contained either J14.0 or J14.1. Our data have implications for GAS vaccine development in developing countries and suggest that a vaccine based upon the conserved region of the M protein may be a feasible option for Fiji and potentially for other tropical developing countries.

  3. Diagnosis and predictive molecular analysis of non-small-cell lung cancer in the Africa-Middle East region: challenges and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Slavik, Tomas; Asselah, Fatima; Fakhruddin, Najla; El Khodary, Ahmed; Torjman, Fairouz; Anis, Elia; Quinn, Martin; Khankan, Azzam; Kerr, Keith M

    2014-11-01

    The identification of tumor biomarkers provides information on the prognosis and guides the implementation of appropriate treatment in patients with many different cancer types. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), targeted treatment plans based on biomarker identification have already been used in the clinic. However, such predictive molecular testing is not currently a universally used practice. This is the case, in particular, in developing countries where lung cancer is increasingly prevalent. In September 2012 and November 2013, a committee of 16 lung cancer experts from Africa and the Middle East met to discuss key issues related to diagnosis and biomarker testing in NSCLC and the implementation of personalized medicine in the region. The committee identified current challenges for effective diagnosis and predictive analysis in Africa and the Middle East. Moreover, strategies to encourage the implementation of biomarker testing were discussed. A practical approach for the effective diagnosis and predictive molecular testing of NSCLC in these regions was derived. We present the key issues and recommendations arising from the meetings.

  4. Molecular characterization of the Indian poultry nodular tapeworm, Raillietina echinobothrida (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Davaineidae) based on rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 region.

    PubMed

    Ramnath; Jyrwa, D B; Dutta, A K; Das, B; Tandon, V

    2014-03-01

    The nodular tapeworm, Raillietina echinobothrida is a well studied avian gastrointestinal parasite of family Davaineidae (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea). It is reported to be the largest in size and second most prevalent species infecting chicken in north-east India. In the present study, morphometrical methods coupled with the molecular analysis of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA were employed for precise identification of the parasite. The annotated ITS2 region was found to be 446 bp long and further utilized to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships and its species-interrelationships at the molecular level. In phylogenetic analysis similar topology was observed among the trees obtained by distance-based neighbor-joining as well as character-based maximum parsimony tree building methods. The query sequence R. echinobothrida is well aligned and placed within the Davaineidae group, with all Raillietina species well separated from the other cyclophyllidean (taeniid and hymenolepid) cestodes, while Diphyllobothrium latum (Pseudophyllidea: Diphyllobothriidae) was rooted as an out-group. Sequence similarities indeed confirmed our hypothesis that Raillietina spp. are neighboring the position with other studied species of order Cyclophyllidea against the out-group order Pseudophyllidea. The present study strengthens the potential of ITS2 as a reliable marker for phylogenetic reconstructions.

  5. Regional endemism and cryptic species revealed by molecular and morphological analysis of a widespread species of Neotropical catfish.

    PubMed

    Martin, A P; Bermingham, E

    2000-06-07

    The lower Central American landscape was fully emergent approximately three million years ago, an event which marked the beginning of the Great American biotic interchange. Freshwater fishes participated in the biotic interchange. Because primary freshwater fishes are restricted to freshwater, they provide an excellent system for investigating the interplay of historical and recent processes on the assembly, structure and diversity of the regions' aquatic ecosystems. We focused on examining the history of diversification for a species of catfish (Pimelodella chagresi) whose distribution spans multiple, isolated drainage basins across the Isthmian landscape and into north-western South America. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and morphological traits indicated that P. chagresi, as currently recognized, comprises a species complex. In addition, along the Pacific slope of Panama, repeated dispersion, diversification, extinction and possibly hybridization are thought to underlie a complex distribution of haplotypes. Overall, the results underscore the tremendous importance of historical processes on regional biodiversity.

  6. Molecular and epidemiologic study of Clostridium difficile reveals unusual heterogeneity in clinical strains circulating in different regions in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Isidro, J; Silva, C; Boaventura, L; Diogo, J; Faustino, A; Toscano, C; Oleastro, M

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a great healthcare burden in developed countries. The emergence of the epidemic PCR ribotype (RT) 027 and its acquired fluoroquinolones resistance have accentuated the need for an active surveillance of CDI. Here we report the first countrywide study of CDI in Portugal with the characterization of 498 C. difficile clinical isolates from 20 hospitals in four regions in Portugal regarding RT, virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility. We identified 96 RTs with marked variations between and within regions, as only six RTs appeared in all four regions. RT027 was the most frequent RT overall (18.5%) and among healthcare facility-associated isolates (19.6%), while RT014 was the most common among community-associated isolates (12%). The north showed a high RT diversity among isolates and a low moxifloxacin (MXF) resistance rate (11.9%), being the only region in which RT027 was not predominant. In contrast, the isolates from the centre presented the highest RT027 frequency, and 53.4% were resistant to MXF. Overall, MXF resistance (33.2%) was associated (p <0.001) with the presence of binary toxin genes and mutations in tcdC regardless of the RT. Both traits appeared in almost 30% of the strains. RT027 showed a reduced susceptibility to metronidazole (p <0.01), and RT126 had higher minimum inhibitory concentrations to vancomycin (p = 0.03) compared to other RTs. The present study highlights an unusual heterogeneity of RTs in Portugal, with a high frequency of hypervirulent RTs and the emergence of virulence factors in non-027 RTs, emphasizing the need for a surveillance system for CDI in Portugal.

  7. Hydration, structure, and molecular interactions in the headgroup region of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: an electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H

    2003-12-01

    The relationship between bilayer hydration and the dynamic structure of headgroups and interbilayer water in multilamellar vesicles is investigated by electron spin resonance methods. Temperature variations of the order parameter of a headgroup spin label DPP-Tempo in DOPC in excess water and partially dehydrated (10 wt % water) show a cusp-like pattern around the main phase transition, Tc. This pattern is similar to those of temperature variations of the quadrupolar splitting of interbilayer D2O in PC and PE bilayers previously measured by 2H NMR, indicating that the ordering of the headgroup and the interbilayer water are correlated. The cusp-like pattern of these and other physical properties around Tc are suggestive of quasicritical fluctuations. Also, an increase (a decrease) in ordering of DPP-Tempo is correlated with water moving out of (into) interbilayer region into (from) the bulk water phase near the freezing point, Tf. Addition of cholesterol lowers Tf, which remains the point of increasing headgroup ordering. Using the small water-soluble spin probe 4-PT, it is shown that the ordering of interbilayer water increases with bilayer dehydration. It is suggested that increased ordering in the interbilayer region, implying a lowering of entropy, will itself lead to further dehydration of the interbilayer region until its lowered pressure resists further flow, i.e., an osmotic phenomenon.

  8. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chd3 and Polytene Chromosome Region 76B-D in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Monica T.; Conant, Alexander W.; Kennison, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Chd3 gene encodes a member of the CHD group of SNF2/RAD54 ATPases. CHD proteins are conserved from yeast to man and many are subunits of chromatin-remodeling complexes that facilitate transcription. Drosophila CHD3 proteins are not found in protein complexes, but as monomers that remodel chromatin in vitro. CHD3 colocalize with elongating RNA polymerase II on salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Since the role of Chd3 in development was unknown, we isolated and characterized the essential genes within the 640-kb region of the third chromosome (polytene chromosome region 76B-D) that includes Chd3. We recovered mutations in 24 genes that are essential for zygotic viability. We found that transposon-insertion mutants for 46% of the essential genes are included in the Drosophila Gene Disruption Project collection. None of the essential genes that we identified are in a 200-kb region that includes Chd3. We generated a deletion of Chd3 by targeted gene replacement. This deletion had no effect on either viability or fertility. PMID:20439780

  9. Population Genetics of Jaguars (Panthera onca) in the Brazilian Pantanal: Molecular Evidence for Demographic Connectivity on a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Fernanda Pedone; Haag, Taiana; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Silveira, Leandro; Cavalcanti, Sandra M C; Salzano, Francisco M; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are important threats to carnivores worldwide, and can be especially intense for large predators. Jaguars have already been extirpated from over half of their original area of distribution, and few regions still maintain large populations. For these, detailed understanding is crucial for setting appropriate recovery targets in impacted areas. The Pantanal is among the best examples of a region with a large jaguar population in a healthy environment. Here, we analyzed 12 microsatellite loci to characterize genetic diversity and population structure of 52 jaguars sampled in 4 localities of the southern Pantanal, and compared them with prior studies of heavily fragmented populations of the Atlantic Forest. Although we observed some internal structure among the Pantanal localities, our results indicated that this area comprises a single population with high genetic variability. Moreover, our comparative analyses supported the hypothesis that the strong population structure observed in the Atlantic Forest derives from recent, anthropogenic fragmentation. We also observed significant but low levels of genetic differentiation between the Pantanal and Atlantic Forest populations, indicating recent connectivity between jaguars occurring in these biomes. Evidence for admixture between the Pantanal and a population on the western boundary of the Atlantic Forest corroborates the transitional nature of the latter area, where the jaguar population has already been extirpated. Our results can be used to understand jaguar population dynamics in a region that is less disturbed than the Atlantic forest, and to support the design of conservation strategies that maintain and restore natural connectivity among currently isolated areas.

  10. Morphology and Kinematics of Warm Molecular Gas in the Nuclear Region of Arp 220 as Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Wilson, Christine D.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Spinoglio, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle-0 observations of the CO J = 6-5 line in the advanced galaxy merger Arp 220. This line traces warm molecular gas, which dominates the total CO luminosity. The CO emission from the two nuclei is well resolved by the 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 39× 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 22 beam and the exceptional sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution reveal new complex features in the morphology and kinematics of the warm gas. The line profiles are asymmetric between the red and blue sides of the nuclear disks and the peak of the line emission is offset from the peak of the continuum emission in both nuclei by about 100 pc in the same direction. CO self-absorption is detected at the centers of both nuclei but it is much deeper in the eastern nucleus. We also clearly detect strong, highly redshifted CO absorption located near the southwest side of each nucleus. For the eastern nucleus, we reproduce the major line profile features with a simple kinematic model of a highly turbulent, rotating disk with a substantial line center optical depth and a large gradient in the excitation temperature. The red/blue asymmetries and line-to-continuum offset are likely produced by absorption of the blue (SW) sides of the two nuclei by blueshifted, foreground molecular gas; the mass of the absorber is comparable to the nuclear warm gas mass (˜{{10}8} {{M}⊙ }). We measure an unusually high {{L}CO}/{{L}FIR} ratio in the eastern nucleus, suggesting there is an additional energy source, such as mechanical energy from shocks, present in this nucleus.

  11. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  12. Spatiotemporal Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterisation of Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses Based on the VP2 Hyper-Variable Region

    PubMed Central

    Dolz, Roser; Valle, Rosa; Perera, Carmen L.; Bertran, Kateri; Frías, Maria T.; Majó, Natàlia; Ganges, Llilianne; Pérez, Lester J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious and acute viral disease caused by the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV); it affects all major poultry producing areas of the world. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the global phylogeographic dynamics of IBDV strains to gain insight into viral population expansion as well as the emergence, spread and pattern of the geographical structure of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences of the hyper-variable region of the VP2 (HVR-VP2) gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. All sequences were analysed by Bayesian phylogeographic analysis, implemented in the Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis Sampling Trees (BEAST), Bayesian Tip-association Significance testing (BaTS) and Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics (SPREAD) software packages. Selection pressure on the HVR-VP2 was also assessed. The phylogeographic association-trait analysis showed that viruses sampled from individual countries tend to cluster together, suggesting a geographic pattern for IBDV strains. Spatial analysis from this study revealed that strains carrying sequences that were linked to increased virulence of IBDV appeared in Iran in 1981 and spread to Western Europe (Belgium) in 1987, Africa (Egypt) around 1990, East Asia (China and Japan) in 1993, the Caribbean Region (Cuba) by 1995 and South America (Brazil) around 2000. Selection pressure analysis showed that several codons in the HVR-VP2 region were under purifying selection. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this work is the first study applying the Bayesian phylogeographic reconstruction approach to analyse the emergence and spread of vvIBDV strains worldwide. PMID:23805195

  13. Refinement of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor using mid-region photolabile probes and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence J; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C-H; Pinon, Delia I; Sexton, Patrick M; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-05-06

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7-36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu(141) above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp(297) within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region.

  14. Molecular characterization of Orientia tsutsugamushi serotypes causing scrub typhus outbreak in southern region of Andhra Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Usha, K.; Kumar, E.; Kalawat, Usha; Kumar, B. Siddhartha; Chaudhury, A.; Gopal, D. V. R. Sai

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Scrub typhus is a vector-borne zoonotic infection caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Local epidemiology of the circulating serotypes of scrub typhus is not available from most parts of India. We conducted this study for the diagnosis of scrub typhus using IgM ELISA and to detect O. tsutsugamushi serotypes circulating in southern Andhra Pradesh, India. Methods: Samples were collected from patients clinically suspected to have scrub typhus and were subjected to IgM ELISA to measure IgM antibodies against O. tsutsugamushi. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed targeting strain-specific regions in ELISA-positive samples. Results: Of a total of 663 samples, 258 (38.91%) were found to be positive by IgM ELISA. Serotypes could be detected in 230 (34.69%) samples only. Only two serotypes, Karp and Kawasaki, were found in the serum samples, with the former being predominant. The dual infection of Karp and Kawasaki serotypes was found in seven patients. Other serotypes such as Gilliam, Kuroki and Kato were not detected in the samples. Interpretation & conclusion: The nested PCR products proved useful in presumptively identifying the endemic O. tsutsugamushi serotypes. The present study could be significant in understanding scrub typhus epidemiology in this region. PMID:28256470

  15. Molecular analysis of fungal diversity associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-09-01

    The fungal communities associated with three bryophytes species (the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata) in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, were studied using clone library analysis. Fungal communities showed low diversity; the 680 clones belonged to 93 OTUs. Of these, 78 belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, 13 to the phylum Basidiomycota, 1 to the phylum Zygomycota, and 1 to an unknown phylum. Among the OTUs, the most common orders in the Ascomycota were Helotiales (42 OTUs) and Chaetothyriales (14 OTUs) and the most common orders in the Basidiomycota were Sebacinales (3 OTUs) and Platygloeales (3 OTUs). Most OTUs clustered within clades that contained phylotypes identified from samples in Antarctic or Arctic ecosystems or from bryophytes in other ecosystems. In addition, we found that host-related factor may shape the fungal communities associated with bryophytes in this region. This is the first systematic study of the fungal community in Antarctic bryophytes to be performed using culture-independent method and the results may improve understanding of the endophytic fungal evolution and ecology in the Antarctic ecosystem.

  16. Molecular and pathogenic characterization of new Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains from the coastline region of Fangchenggang city in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Shu-Yan; Zhao, Shuai; Yu, Yan-Hua; Li, Rong-Bai; Duan, Cheng-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2013-04-01

    Virulence assays and DNA polymorphism analyses were used to characterize 33 Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) strains collected from the coastline region of Fangchenggang city in China. Two new pathogenic races (FXP1 and FXP2), were determined by leaf-clipping inoculation of 12 near-isogenic International Rice-Bacterial Blight (IRBB) rice lines, each containing a single resistance gene. Race FXP1 consisted of twenty-eight strains that were incompatible on IRBB5 and IRBB7, while race FXP2 included five strains that were incompatible on IRBB5 and IRBB7 and moderately virulent on IRBB8 containing the xa8 gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis revealed that each probe of avrXa10 and IS1112 resolved two haplotypes. In a dendrogram generated from the combined RFLP data, the 33 Xoo strains were resolved into two clusters. There was a weak correlation (r = 0.53) between race and haplotype. All of the rice cultivars planted in the coastline region of Fangchenggang city were susceptible to the representative Xoo strains tested above. However, we found that four rice cultivars used as breeding materials in the laboratory could fully resist infection by the Xoo strains, suggesting that the isolated Xoo strains could be used to detect resistant rice cultivars suitable for planting in the local rice field.

  17. Molecular identification of poisonous mushrooms using nuclear ITS region and peptide toxins: a retrospective study on fatal cases in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Parnmen, Sittiporn; Sikaphan, Sujitra; Leudang, Siriwan; Boonpratuang, Thitiya; Rangsiruji, Achariya; Naksuwankul, Khwanruan

    2016-02-01

    Cases of mushroom poisoning in Thailand have increased annually. During 2008 to 2014, the cases reported to the National Institute of Health included 57 deaths; at least 15 died after ingestion of amanitas, the most common lethal wild mushrooms inhabited. Hence, the aims of this study were to identify mushroom samples from nine clinically reported cases during the 7-year study period based on nuclear ITS sequence data and diagnose lethal peptide toxins using a reversed phase LC-MS method. Nucleotide similarity was identified using BLAST search of the NCBI database and the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). Clade characterization was performed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. Based on BLAST and BOLD reference databases our results yielded high nucleotide similarities of poisonous mushroom samples to A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. Detailed phylogenetic analyses showed that all mushroom samples fall into their current classification. Detection of the peptide toxins revealed the presence of amatoxins and phallotoxins in A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. In addition, toxic α-amanitin was identified in a new provisional species, Amanita sp.1, with the highest toxin quantity. Molecular identification confirmed that the mushrooms ingested by the patients were members of the lethal amanitas in the sections Amanita and Phalloideae. In Thailand, the presence of A. exitialis was reported here for the first time and all three poisonous mushroom species provided new and informative data for clinical studies.

  18. The Nucleotide Capture Region of Alpha Hemolysin: Insights into Nanopore Design for DNA Sequencing from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Manara, Richard M A; Tomasio, Susana; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-27

    Nanopore technology for DNA sequencing is constantly being refined and improved. In strand sequencing a single strand of DNA is fed through a nanopore and subsequent fluctuations in the current are measured. A major hurdle is that the DNA is translocated through the pore at a rate that is too fast for the current measurement systems. An alternative approach is "exonuclease sequencing", in which an exonuclease is attached to the nanopore that is able to process the strand, cleaving off one base at a time. The bases then flow through the nanopore and the current is measured. This method has the advantage of potentially solving the translocation rate problem, as the speed is controlled by the exonuclease. Here we consider the practical details of exonuclease attachment to the protein alpha hemolysin. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to determine the ideal (a) distance from alpha-hemolysin, and (b) the orientation of the monophosphate nucleotides upon release from the exonuclease such that they will enter the protein. Our results indicate an almost linear decrease in the probability of entry into the protein with increasing distance of nucleotide release. The nucleotide orientation is less significant for entry into the protein.

  19. The Nucleotide Capture Region of Alpha Hemolysin: Insights into Nanopore Design for DNA Sequencing from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Richard M. A.; Tomasio, Susana; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore technology for DNA sequencing is constantly being refined and improved. In strand sequencing a single strand of DNA is fed through a nanopore and subsequent fluctuations in the current are measured. A major hurdle is that the DNA is translocated through the pore at a rate that is too fast for the current measurement systems. An alternative approach is “exonuclease sequencing”, in which an exonuclease is attached to the nanopore that is able to process the strand, cleaving off one base at a time. The bases then flow through the nanopore and the current is measured. This method has the advantage of potentially solving the translocation rate problem, as the speed is controlled by the exonuclease. Here we consider the practical details of exonuclease attachment to the protein alpha hemolysin. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to determine the ideal (a) distance from alpha-hemolysin, and (b) the orientation of the monophosphate nucleotides upon release from the exonuclease such that they will enter the protein. Our results indicate an almost linear decrease in the probability of entry into the protein with increasing distance of nucleotide release. The nucleotide orientation is less significant for entry into the protein.

  20. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  1. Molecular characterization of Leishmania infantum in domestic cats in a region of Brazil endemic for human and canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Metzdorf, Isabel Parizotto; da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; de Fatima Cepa Matos, Maria; de Souza Filho, Antonio Francisco; de Souza Tsujisaki, Rosianne A; Franco, Karina Garcia; Shapiro, Julie Teresa; de Almeida Borges, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a "neglected tropical disease" and serious public health issue in Brazil. While dogs are recognized as particularly important reservoirs, recent reports of domestic cats infected with Leishmania sp. in urban areas suggest their participation in the epidemiological chain of the parasite in endemic areas. The aim of this study was to screen domestic cats for Leishmania sp. infection in an area where human and canine visceral leishmaniasis are endemic, followed by the identification of the species circulating in cats. We collected peripheral blood, lymph-node aspirates and bone marrow from 100 adult animals, both male and female, and analyzed the samples using cytological and molecular (PCR) detection techniques. We detected Leishmania in 6% of animals, which were then analyzed by RFLP-PCR to identify the species. Leishmania infantum (synonym: L. chagasi), a species responsible for visceral leishmaniasis in humans and other animals, was identified from all six samples. Amastigotes were observed in the peripheral blood, bone marrow and lymph-node aspirates in 4 of the 6 PCR-positive animals. The presence of infected cats in endemic areas should not be neglected, because it demonstrates the potential role of these animals in the biological cycle of the pathogen.

  2. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  3. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolated from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) crias with diarrhea in the Andean Region of Cusco, Peru.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Antonio E; Lopez, Wellington; Ortega, Nastassja; Chamorro, Marycris J

    2015-10-22

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos), a species of South American camelids (SAC), suffer high morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of alpaca cria mortality in Peru and elsewhere. In order to develop appropriate control and/or treatment, it is necessary to identify infectious pathogens that cause diarrhea in crias. Rotavirus was isolated in cell culture from feces collected from crias with acute diarrhea that tested positive to rotaviral antigen by rapid immunochromatographic methods in an earlier study. The isolates were identified as rotaviruses by RT-PCR run with specific primers for human rotavirus VP7 coding sequences using total RNA extracted from cells displaying cytopathic effects as template. These alpaca isolates were further identified as group A rotaviruses by means of a VP6-specific PCR and were designated as ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3368-10 and ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3386-10. Molecular G and P typing, placed the former as G3/P11 and the latter as G3/P?. Sequence analysis of two genome segments (coding for VP4 and VP7) from the alpaca isolates revealed partial homologies to swine and human rotaviruses, respectively. These results demonstrate that rotaviruses are associated with a proportion of cases of diarrhea in crias, although prevalence and impact remain to be determined. The isolation of rotaviruses from alpaca crias with diarrhea will contribute positively to further understand the pathogen and its role in the diarrhea complex.

  4. Molecular and isotopic compositions and origin of natural gases from Cambrian and Carboniferous-Lower Permian reservoirs of the onshore Polish Baltic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, Maciej J.; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Natural gases from Middle Cambrian and Carboniferous-Lower Permian reservoirs of the onshore Polish Baltic region were studied for their molecular and stable isotope compositions. The following gas species were analysed: 12,13C in CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10 and CO2, 1,2H in CH4, 14,15N in N2, and stable isotopes of all noble gases. Due to significantly different geological settings and genetic types of source rocks of Eastern and Western Pomerania, the molecular and isotopic compositions of natural gases of these two regions exhibit distinct differences. Hydrocarbon gases associated with oil accumulated in the Middle Cambrian reservoir of Eastern Pomerania were generated during low-temperature thermogenic processes from a single source rock containing Type-II kerogen at one phase of petroleum generation. Non-associated hydrocarbon gases accumulated in the Carboniferous (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian)-Lower Permian (Rotliegend) reservoirs of Western Pomerania originated during at least two phases of gas generation by thermogenic processes from mainly Type-III kerogen and a small component of mixed Type-III/II kerogen. Noble gases are in general heavily enriched in radiogenic and nucleogenic isotopes such as 4He, 40Ar and 21Ne accumulated in the reservoirs. Weak contributions of mantle-derived He and Ne are observed. Radiogenic 4He/40Ar ratios are higher than the average production rate ratio of about 5 for radiogenic 4He/40Ar in crustal materials, which might have been caused by a selective supply of 4He that is lighter than 40Ar from crustal rocks, or (U + Th)/K ratio might be higher than the average in crustal block. Carbon dioxide from gases of both the Western and Eastern Pomerania were mainly generated during thermogenic processes of transformation of organic matter, although gases of Western Pomerania can contain an endogenic component. Molecular nitrogen from the Eastern Pomeranian natural gases was mainly generated during low-temperature thermal

  5. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses circulating in the Western Amazon region, North Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) represent important public health problems in the Western Amazon region with reported cases of fulminant hepatitis. This cross sectional study describes HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods HBsAg positive individuals (n = 224) were recruited in Manaus/Amazonas State (130 blood donors from the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation from Amazonas/HEMOAM; 60 subjects from outpatient clinic) and in Eirunepe city (n = 34) from 2003–2009. Most participants (n = 153) lived in Manaus, 63 were from 20 remote isolated municipalities, 8 lived outside Amazonas State. Genotyping was based on PCR products: HBV genotype A-F specific primers, restricted length polymorphism for HDV. HDV isolates were directly sequenced (delta antigen 405 nucleotide fragment) and phylogenetic analysis performed (MEGA; neighbor-joining, Kimura’s two parameter). Results Most participants were young adult males and HBV mono-infection predominated (70.5%, 158/224). Among blood donors, outpatient subjects and individuals from Eirunepe, HBV/A prevailed followed by HBV/D and F (p > 0.05). HBV/A was more frequent in blood donors (p < 0.05). HBV-HDV coinfection rate was 8.5% in blood donors (11/130), 65.0% (39/60) in outpatient subjects and 47.0% (16/34) in individuals from Eirunepe. Compared to blood donors, coinfection was higher in outpatient subjects (65.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.0; CI 3.4-7.9; p < 0.0001) and in subjects from Eirunepe (47.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.5; CI 3.0-9.9; p < 0.0001). HBV-HDV coinfection rates were higher in patients from highly endemic remote cities. Only HDV genotype 3 was detected, HBV/F-HDV/3 predominated (20/38; 52.7%), followed by HBV/A-HDV/3 (31.6%; 12/38) and HBV/D-HDV/3 (15.8%; 6/38). Conclusions The description of HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the western Amazon can contribute to a better understanding of their relevance on the

  6. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Molecular analysis of 24 Alagille syndrome families identifies a single submicroscopic deletion and further localizes the Alagille region within 20p12

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, E.B.; Piccoli, D.A.; Spinner, N.B.

    1995-11-01

    Alagille syndrome (AGS) is a clinically defined disorder characterized by cholestatic liver disease with bile duct paucity, peculiar facies, structural heart defects, vertebral anomalies, and ocular abnormalities. Multiple patients with various cytogenetic abnormalities involving 20p12 have been identified, allowing the assignment of AGS to this region. The presence of interstitial deletions of varying size led to the hypothesis that AGS is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. This molecular analysis of cytogenetically normal AGS patients was performed in order to test this hypothesis and to refine the localization of the known AGS region. Investigation of inheritance of simple tandem repeat polymorphism alleles in 67 members of 24 cytogenetically normal Alagille families led to the identification of a single submicroscopic deletion. The deletion included loci D20S61, D20S41, D20S186, and D20S188 and presumably intervening uninformative loci D20S189 and D20S27. The six deleted loci are contained in a single YAC of 1.9 Mb. The additional finding of multiple unrelated probands who are heterozygous at each locus demonstrates that microdeletions at known loci within the AGS region are rare in cytogenetically normal patients with this disorder. This suggests that the majority of cases of AGS may be the result of a single gene defect rather than a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Molecular archaeology of Flaviviridae untranslated regions: duplicated RNA structures in the replication enhancer of flaviviruses and pestiviruses emerged via convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, Dmitri J; Jones, Ian M; Gould, Ernest A; Gritsun, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3'UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3'UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3'UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3'UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3'UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs.

  9. Molecular Archaeology of Flaviviridae Untranslated Regions: Duplicated RNA Structures in the Replication Enhancer of Flaviviruses and Pestiviruses Emerged via Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gritsun, Dmitri J.; Jones, Ian M.; Gould, Ernest A.; Gritsun, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3′untranslated regions (3′UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3′UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3′UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3′UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3′UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3′UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs. PMID:24647143

  10. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster.

  11. Molecular clonality and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Infantis from broilers in three Northern regions of Iran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Salmonella strains are frequently encountered problems worldwide with considerable increased occurrences in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and frequency of antimicrobial resistance and associated resistance genes in Salmonella isolates from broiler farms in different regions of Iran covering a time period of four years. Results From 2007 to 2011, 36 Salmonella strains were isolated from broiler farms located in three northern provinces of Iran. The isolates were serotyped, antimicrobial susceptibility tested, and characterized for antimicrobial resistance genes associated to the phenotype. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied for comparison of genetic relatedness. Two serovars were detected among the isolates; Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis (75%) and S. Enteritidis (25%). Thirty-four (94%) of the isolates exhibited resistance to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin caused by a single mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA. For all strains this mutation occurred in the codon of Asp87 leading to a Asp87-Tyr, Asp87-Gly or Asp87-Asn substitutions. All S. Infantis (n = 27) were resistant to tetracycline, spectinomycin, streptomycin, and sulfamethoxazole and harbored the associated resistance genes; tetA, dfrA14, aadA1, and sulI together with class 1 integrons. The isolates revealed highly similar PFGE patterns indicating clonal relatedness across different geographical locations. Conclusion The data provided fundamental information applicable when launching future control programs for broilers in Iran with the aim to conserve the effectiveness of important antimicrobials for treatment in humans. PMID:23561048

  12. Molecular analysis of the beta-glucuronidase gene: novel mutations in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII and heterogeneity of the polyadenylation region.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Buist, N R; Kleijer, W J; Wevers, R; Fryns, J P; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1997-04-01

    We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing of the coding region of the beta-glucuronidase cDNA and gene to detect mutations causing beta-glucuronidase enzyme deficiency in five MPS VII patients. Four patients presented with hydrops fetalis, one with an early infantile form of the disease. Genetic heterogeneity of MPS VII alleles was further confirmed in this study. Recurrent mutations were observed in patients of related origin. Previously unknown alleles detected were RII0X, F361delta9, 1270 + 1G-->A, S52F and 1480delta4. Reverse transcription/PCR analysis of the 1270 + 1G-->A messenger showed aberrant splicing: inclusion of intron 7 or skipping of exons 6-7 and 9. Messenger RNA transcribed from the R110X and 1480delta4 alleles was unstable. We detected a 2154A/G change in the 3' non-coding region of the gene, in the neighbourhood of the two consensus polyadenylation sites. 3'-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends/PCR of fibroblast cDNA revealed equal usage of two alternative polyadenylation sites. The 2154A/G substitution did not influence adenylation-site choice, nor the amount of stable messenger produced. The finding that 2 out of 30 normal controls carried the 2154G allele indicated that the 2154A/G substitution is a harmless polymorphism. The S52F and F361delta9 cDNAs were constructed in vitro and used to transfect COS cells transiently. Both mutations completely abolished enzyme activity.

  13. Characterizing Molecular Mechanisms of Imidacloprid Resistance in Select Populations of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in the Central Sands Region of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest in the Central Sands region of Wisconsin. Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has commonly been used for control of L. decemlineata since its registration in 1995. In the last 10 years, many field populations of L. decemlineata have begun to show increasing imidacloprid resistance. We studied resistance phenotype as a phenomenon that reduces neonicotinoid efficacy and has practical consequences for potato pest management. Although we have not observed complete field failure following the use of these products, multiple studies have demonstrated that the lethal concentration to kill 50% of the test organisms (LC50) in different field populations of L. decemlineata varies greatly which may suggest that resistance of L. decemlineata is heritable and involves genetic changes. An important challenge in understanding resistance is assessing the genetic mechanisms associated with resistance and classifying up-regulated genes that may be involved in combating an insecticide insult. In this study we uncovered trends in imidacloprid phenotypic response that have developed in the region by estimating the LC50 values among different field populations against a range of imidacloprid doses. The LC50 values collected in 2008-2011, and more recently in 2013 and 2014, show that some field locations remain susceptible to imidacloprid, while nearby fields (<100km) have developed high levels of resistance. We also sought to uncover potential mechanisms of resistance at each field location. We compiled a transcriptome for populations, characterized as phenotypically 'susceptible' and 'resistant', by isolating mRNA from adult beetles and analyzing gene expression level differences. Strong differences were observed in constituently up and down-regulated genes among different field populations. Most significantly, the up-regulation of 3 cytochrome p450s and a glutathione synthetase related

  14. Characterizing Molecular Mechanisms of Imidacloprid Resistance in Select Populations of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in the Central Sands Region of Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest in the Central Sands region of Wisconsin. Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has commonly been used for control of L. decemlineata since its registration in 1995. In the last 10 years, many field populations of L. decemlineata have begun to show increasing imidacloprid resistance. We studied resistance phenotype as a phenomenon that reduces neonicotinoid efficacy and has practical consequences for potato pest management. Although we have not observed complete field failure following the use of these products, multiple studies have demonstrated that the lethal concentration to kill 50% of the test organisms (LC50) in different field populations of L. decemlineata varies greatly which may suggest that resistance of L. decemlineata is heritable and involves genetic changes. An important challenge in understanding resistance is assessing the genetic mechanisms associated with resistance and classifying up-regulated genes that may be involved in combating an insecticide insult. In this study we uncovered trends in imidacloprid phenotypic response that have developed in the region by estimating the LC50 values among different field populations against a range of imidacloprid doses. The LC50 values collected in 2008–2011, and more recently in 2013 and 2014, show that some field locations remain susceptible to imidacloprid, while nearby fields (<100km) have developed high levels of resistance. We also sought to uncover potential mechanisms of resistance at each field location. We compiled a transcriptome for populations, characterized as phenotypically ‘susceptible’ and ‘resistant’, by isolating mRNA from adult beetles and analyzing gene expression level differences. Strong differences were observed in constituently up and down-regulated genes among different field populations. Most significantly, the up-regulation of 3 cytochrome p450s and a glutathione synthetase

  15. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance in local isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from urinary tract infections in Faisalabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farid, Anam; Naz, Iram; Ashraf, Asma; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Asad-Ur; Sarwar, Yasra; Haque, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are one of the foremost causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) among Staphylococci poses serious challenges in antimicrobial therapy for UTIs. Most work has been done on S. aureus while coagulase negative Staphylococci (mainly S. epidermidis) are often neglected. This study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of drug resistance in local S. epidermidis isolates from UTIs. Eighty urine samples were collected from suspected UTIs cases and screened for S. epidermidis. Twenty isolates were suspected as S. epidermidis based on colony morphology and Gram staining. Molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 13 isolates as S. epidermidis. Using disc diffusion method, phenotypic drug resistance of the isolates was observed towards erythromycin (100 %), gentamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline (92.3 %), ampicillin and oxytetracyclin (84.6 %), amikacin and srteptomycin (76.9 %), methicillin (69.2 %), cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin (53.8 %) and vancomycin (15.3 %). Eighteen most commonly reported genes responsible for conferring resistance towards these drugs were targeted by PCR: among these tetM gene was found most prevalent (46.1 %) followed by tetK (30.7 %), aac(6')/aph(2") (30.7 %), aacA-aphD (23 %), ermA (23 %), blaZ (23 %), mecA (23 %) blaTEM-1 (23 %), MeccA (23 %) and mecA (15.3 %). No gene fragment for vancomycin resistance was detected. The salient finding was that all S. epidermidis isolates were multiple drugs resistant as they showed resistance against at least three structurally different antimicrobial agents. It is concluded that in addition to the mostly used antimicrobial agent vancomycin, the cephalosporins including cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin are also the drugs of choice against UTIs caused by S. epidermidis.

  16. Chagas' disease in Aboriginal and Creole communities from the Gran Chaco Region of Argentina: Seroprevalence and molecular parasitological characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucero, R H; Brusés, B L; Cura, C I; Formichelli, L B; Juiz, N; Fernández, G J; Bisio, M; Deluca, G D; Besuschio, S; Hernández, D O; Schijman, A G

    2016-07-01

    Most indigenous ethnias from Northern Argentina live in rural areas of "the Gran Chaco" region, where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. Serological and parasitological features have been poorly characterized in Aboriginal populations and scarce information exist regarding relevant T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU) and parasitic loads. This study was focused to characterize T. cruzi infection in Qom, Mocoit, Pit'laxá and Wichi ethnias (N=604) and Creole communities (N=257) inhabiting rural villages from two highly endemic provinces of the Argentinean Gran Chaco. DNA extracted using Hexadecyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide reagent from peripheral blood samples was used for conventional PCR targeted to parasite kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA) and identification of DTUs using nuclear genomic markers. In kDNA-PCR positive samples from three rural Aboriginal communities of "Monte Impenetrable Chaqueño", minicircle signatures were characterized by Low stringency single primer-PCR and parasitic loads calculated using Real-Time PCR. Seroprevalence was higher in Aboriginal (47.98%) than in Creole (27.23%) rural communities (Chi square, p=4.e(-8)). A low seroprevalence (4.3%) was detected in a Qom settlement at the suburbs of Resistencia city (Fisher Exact test, p=2.e(-21)).The kDNA-PCR positivity was 42.15% in Aboriginal communities and 65.71% in Creole populations (Chi square, p=5.e(-4)). Among Aboriginal communities kDNA-PCR positivity was heterogeneous (Chi square, p=1.e(-4)). Highest kDNA-PCR positivity (79%) was detected in the Qom community of Colonia Aborigen and the lowest PCR positivity in two different surveys at the Wichi community of Misión Nueva Pompeya (33.3% in 2010 and 20.8% in 2014). TcV (or TcII/V/VI) was predominant in both Aboriginal and Creole communities, in agreement with DTU distribution reported for the region. Besides, two subjects were infected with TcVI, one with TcI and four presented mixed infections of TcV plus TcII/VI. Most minicircle signatures

  17. Molecular authentication of 21 Korean artemisia species (Compositae) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism based on trnL-F region of chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Jei Wan; Sung, Jung Sook; Bang, Kyong Hwan; Moon, Sung Gi

    2009-11-01

    The present study describes the molecular authentication of 21 Korean Artemisia species using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) technique based on the trnL-F sequences in chloroplast DNA. Five different banding patterns were generated from 21 Artemisia species using HinfI restriction enzyme. A. apiacea, A. keiskeana and A. sieversiana have specific banding patterns. The remaining 18 species had shared two banding patterns. Phylogenetic analysis based on trnL-F sequence variations showed results similar to PCR-RFLP banding patterns. It suggested that the trnL-F region does not have sufficient variations to identify the 21 Artemisia species. However, the specific banding patterns for A. apiacea, A. keiskeana and A. sieversiana can be utilized as a DNA marker for discriminating them from other Artemisia species. These markers will be also useful for developing A. apiacea, A. keiskeana and A. sieversiana into new medicine and food based on their efficacy.

  18. Molecular evolution and variability of ITS1 -ITS2 in populations of Deschampsia antarctica from two regions of the maritime Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, R. A.; Kozeretska, I. A.; Kyryachenko, S. S.; Andreev, I. O.; Maidanyuk, D. N.; Parnikoza, I. Yu.; Kunakh, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Only two vascular plants, Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) and Colobanthus quitensis Kunth. Bartl. (Caryophyllaceae), inhabit the Antarctic. To clarify the taxonomic position, phylogeographic origin, genetic heterogeneity, and population dynamics of D. antarctica, we comparatively analyzed the ITS1 and ITS2 sequences for several populations from two geographically distant regions of the maritime Antarctic (the South Shetland Islands and the Argentine archipelago). All accessions of D. antarctica formed a strongly supported clade in the phylogenetic dendrograms constructed. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity at ITS1 -ITS2 (97%-100%), the populations of D. antarctica in Tierra del Fuego, Falkland Islands and Antarctic can be discriminated at the molecular level. Our data indicate that the majority of D. antarctica populations originated from South America. Different populations may have invaded Antarctic at different times. Genetically distinct plants may coexist within the same or adjacent populations on Antarctic islands.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Gyrodactylus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) inferred from rDNA ITS region: subgenera versus species groups.

    PubMed

    Matejusová, I; Gelnar, M; Verneau, O; Cunningham, C O; Littlewood, D T J

    2003-12-01

    Analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of representatives of major taxa of Monopisthocotylea were performed to identify the sister group of Gyrodactylus. Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences from the complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were used to infer phylogeny of 37 Gyrodactylus species and Gyrodactyloides bychowskii, Macrogyrodactylus polypteri and Gyrdicotylus gallieni, using maximum likelihood, parsimony and Bayesian inference. The genus Gyrodactylus appeared to be a monophyletic group in all analyses, based on the present data set. Within the genus, there were 3 major groups recognized by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities. None of the 6 subgenera appeared to be monophyletic, and the most basal subgenus G. (Gyrodactylus) was paraphyletic. Characteristics of the excretory system of Gyrodactylus do not seem to be conservative enough to reveal subgenera within Gyrodactylus and we suggest abandoning existing subgenera as indicators of phylogeny. The grouping of species based on the morphology of the ventral bar and marginal hooks seems to have sufficient power to infer relationships between the Gyrodactylus species.

  20. Human monoclonal antibodies targeting carbonic anhydrase IX for the molecular imaging of hypoxic regions in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ahlskog, J K J; Schliemann, C; Mårlind, J; Qureshi, U; Ammar, A; Pedley, R B; Neri, D

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia, which is commonly observed in areas of primary tumours and of metastases, influences response to treatment. However, its characterisation has so far mainly been restricted to the ex vivo analysis of tumour sections using monoclonal antibodies specific to carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) or by pimonidazole staining, after the intravenous administration of this 2-nitroimidazole compound in experimental animal models. Methods: In this study, we describe the generation of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies (A3 and CC7) specific to human CA IX, using phage technology. Results: These antibodies were able to stain CA IX ex vivo and to target the cognate antigen in vivo. In one of the two animal models of colorectal cancer studied (LS174T), CA IX imaging closely matched pimonidazole staining, with a preferential staining of tumour areas characterised by little vascularity and low perfusion. In contrast, in a second animal model (SW1222), distinct staining patterns were observed for pimonidazole and CA IX targeting. We observed a complementary pattern of tumour regions targeted in vivo by the clinical-stage vascular-targeting antibody L19 and the anti-CA IX antibody A3, indicating that a homogenous pattern of in vivo tumour targeting could be achieved by a combination of the two antibodies. Conclusion: The new human anti-CA IX antibodies are expected to be non-immunogenic in patients with cancer and may serve as broadly applicable reagents for the non-invasive imaging of hypoxia and for pharmacodelivery applications. PMID:19623173

  1. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a novel gene DGCR8 located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Aiko; Sasaki, Takashi; Noda, Setsuko; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2003-04-25

    We have identified and cloned a novel gene (DGCR8) from the human chromosome 22q11.2. This gene is located in the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region (DGCR). It consists of 14 exons spanning over 35kb and produces transcripts with ORF of 2322bp, encoding a protein of 773 amino acids. We also isolated a mouse ortholog Dgcr8 and found it has 95.3% identity with human DGCR8 at the amino acid sequence level. Northern blot analysis of human and mouse tissues from adult and fetus showed rather ubiquitous expression. However, the in situ hybridization of mouse embryos revealed that mouse Dgcr8 transcripts are localized in neuroepithelium of primary brain, limb bud, vessels, thymus, and around the palate during the developmental stages of embryos. The expression profile of Dgcr8 in developing mouse embryos is consistent with the clinical phenotypes including congenital heart defects and palate clefts associated with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS)/conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CAFS)/velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), which are caused by monoallelic microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2.

  2. Molecular tracking of mountain lions in the Yosemite valley region in California: genetic analysis using microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ernest, H B; Penedo, M C; May, B P; Syvanen, M; Boyce, W M

    2000-04-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were characterized in California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and sufficient polymorphism was found to uniquely genotype 62 animals sampled at necropsy. Microsatellite genotypes obtained using mountain lion faecal DNA matched those from muscle for all of 15 individuals examined. DNA from potential prey species and animals whose faeces could be misidentified as mountain lion faeces were reliably distinguished from mountain lions using this microsatellite panel. In a field application of this technique, 32 faecal samples were collected from hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley region where seven mountain lions previously had been captured, sampled, and released. Twelve samples yielded characteristic mountain lion genotypes, three displayed bobcat-type genotypes, and 17 did not amplify. The genotype of one of the 12 mountain lion faecal samples was identical to one of the mountain lions that previously had been captured. Three of the 12 faecal samples yielded identical genotypes, and eight new genotypes were detected in the remaining samples. This analysis provided a minimum estimate of 16 mountain lions (seven identified by capture and nine identified by faecal DNA) living in or travelling through Yosemite Valley from March 1997 to August 1998. Match probabilities (probabilities that identical DNA genotypes would be drawn at random a second time from the population) indicated that the samples with identical genotypes probably came from the same mountain lion. Our results demonstrate that faecal DNA analysis is an effective method for detecting and identifying individual mountain lions.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii in French livestock reveals the existence of three main genotype clusters and suggests species-specific associations as well as regional stability.

    PubMed

    Joulié, Aurelien; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Bailly, Xavier; Gasqui, Patrick; Barry, Séverine; Jaffrelo, Lydia; Poncet, Charles; Abrial, David; Yang, Elise; Leblond, Agnès; Rousset, Elodie; Jourdain, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. In domestic ruminants, Q fever main clinical manifestations are abortions. Although the clinical signs may differ between ruminant species, C. burnetii's genetic diversity remains understudied in enzootic areas. Here, we focused on France, where Q fever is enzootic, with the aims to (a) identify potential associations between C. burnetii genotypes and ruminant host species; (b) assess the distribution of C. burnetii genotypes both within French farms and across France's major livestock-farming regions; and (c) suggest a subset of markers for future genotypic studies. We used DNA samples collected between 2006 and 2015 from 301 females (160 cows, 76 ewes, 65 goats) aborted of Q fever within 7 different farming regions. C. burnetii diversity was determined using a multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) considering 17 markers. Using a phylogenetic approach, we identified 3 main genotypic clusters divided into 12 sub-clusters. These clusters were significantly associated with ruminant species: almost all the cattle genotypes were found in a "cattle-specific" cluster whereas small ruminants genotypes essentially grouped into the two other clusters. The clusters also proved stable over space and time, some genotypes being more specifically observed in certain farming regions. We also observed some within-farm diversity but this diversity was restricted to a same genotypic cluster. Finally, we identified 6 MLVA markers that maximized the representativeness of the diversity described. Overall, we highlighted that molecular epidemiology is a relevant approach to assess C. burnetii's genetic diversity and to reveal the existence of species-specific associations and regional stability. These results will be valuable in the field to trace genotype circulation among ruminants and from ruminants to humans. Ultimately, the potential links between genotypes and virulence traits need

  4. New structural insight of C-terminal region of Syntenin-1, enhancing the molecular dimerization and inhibitory function related on Syndecan-4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngsil; Yun, Ji-Hye; Yoo, Jiho; Lee, Inhwan; Kim, Heeyoun; Son, Hye-Nam; Kim, In-San; Yoon, Ho Sup; Zimmermann, Pascale; Couchman, John R.; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Oh, Eok-Soo; Lee, Weontae

    2016-01-01

    The PDZ domain-containing scaffold protein, syntenin-1, binds to the transmembrane proteoglycan, syndecan-4, but the molecular mechanism/function of this interaction are unknown. Crystal structure analysis of syntenin-1/syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domains revealed that syntenin-1 forms a symmetrical pair of dimers anchored by a syndecan-4 dimer. The syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain is a compact intertwined dimer with a symmetrical clamp shape and two antiparallel strands forming a cavity within the dimeric twist. The PDZ2 domain of syntenin-1 forms a direct antiparallel interaction with the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain, inhibiting the functions of syndecan-4 such as focal adhesion formation. Moreover, C-terminal region of syntenin-1 reveals an essential role for enhancing the molecular homodimerization. Mutation of key syntenin-1 residues involved in the syndecan-4 interaction or homodimer formation abolishes the inhibitory function of syntenin-1, as does deletion of the homodimerization-related syntenin-1 C-terminal domain. Syntenin-1, but not dimer-formation-incompetent mutants, rescued the syndecan-4-mediated inhibition of migration and pulmonary metastasis by B16F10 cells. Therefore, we conclude that syntenin-1 negatively regulates syndecan-4 function via oligomerization and/or syndecan-4 interaction, impacting cytoskeletal organization and cell migration. PMID:27830760

  5. Molecular cloning, expression and identification of the promoter regulatory region for the neuropeptide trissin in the nervous system of the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Roller, Ladislav; Čižmár, Daniel; Gáliková, Zuzana; Bednár, Branislav; Daubnerová, Ivana; Žitňan, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    Trissin has recently been identified as a conserved insect neuropeptide, but its cellular expression and function is unknown. We detected the presence of this neuropeptide in the silkworm Bombyx mori using in silico search and molecular cloning. In situ hybridisation was used to examine trissin expression in the entire central nervous system (CNS) and gut of larvae, pupae and adults. Surprisingly, its expression is restricted to only two pairs of small protocerebral interneurons and four to five large neurons in the frontal ganglion (FG). These neurons were further characterised by subsequent multiple staining with selected antibodies against insect neuropeptides. The brain interneurons innervate edges of the mushroom bodies and co-express trissin with myoinhibitory peptides (MIP) and CRF-like diuretic hormones (CRF-DH). In the FG, one pair of neurons co-express trissin with calcitonin-like diuretic hormone (CT-DH), short neuropeptide F (sNPF) and MIP. These neurons innervate the brain tritocerebrum and musculature of the anterior midgut. The other pair of trissin neurons in the FG co-express sNPF and project axons to the tritocerebrum and midgut. We also used the baculovirus expression system to identify the promoter regulatory region of the trissin gene for targeted expression of various molecular markers in these neurons. Dominant expression of trissin in the FG indicates its possible role in the regulation of foregut-midgut contractions and food intake.

  6. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  7. Molecular topography of the MED12-deleted region in smooth muscle tumors: a possible link between non-B DNA structures and hypermutability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deletions of the gene encoding mediator subcomplex 12 (MED12) in human smooth muscle tumors rank among the most frequent genomic alterations in human tumors at all. In a minority of these cases, small deletions are found. In an attempt to delineate key features of the deletions aimed at a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of uterine smooth muscle tumors we have analyzed 70 MED12 deletions including 46 cases from the literature and 24 own unpublished cases. Results The average length of the deletions was 18.7 bp ranging between 2 bp and 43 bp. While in general multitudes of 3 clearly dominated leaving the transcript in frame, deletions of 21, 24, 30, and 33 nucleotides were clearly underrepresented. Within the DNA segment affected deletion breakpoints were not randomly distributed. Most breakpoints clustered within the center of the segment where two peaks of breakpoint clusters could be distinguished. Interestingly, one of these clusters coincides with the loop of a putative folded non-B DNA structure whereas a much lower number of breaks noted in the 5′ and 3′ stem of the structure forming an intramolecular B-helix. The second cluster mainly consisting of 3′ breaks was located in a region downstream adjacent to the stem. Conclusion The present study describes for the first time main characteristics of MED12 deletions occurring in smooth muscle tumors. Interestingly, the non-random distribution of breakpoints within the deletion hotspot region may point to a role of non-canonical DNA structures for the occurrence of these mutations and the molecular pathogenesis of uterine smooth muscle tumors, respectively. PMID:23738817

  8. Molecular Basis of Interactions Between SH3 Domain-Containing Proteins and the Proline-Rich Region of the Ubiquitin Ligase Itch.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Guillaume; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Ton, Anh-Tien; Ayoubi, Riham; Serohijos, Adrian; Omichinski, James G; Angers, Annie

    2017-02-24

    The ligase Itch plays major roles in signalling pathways by inducing ubiquitylation-dependent degradation of several substrates. Substrate recognition and binding is critical for the regulation of this reaction. Like closely related ligases, Itch can interact with proteins containing a PPxY motif via its WW domains. In addition to these WW domains, Itch possesses a proline-rich region (PRR) that has been shown to interact with several Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins. We have previously established that despite the apparent surface uniformity and conserved fold of SH3 domains, they display different binding mechanisms and affinities for their interaction with the PRR of Itch. Here, we attempt to determine the molecular bases underlying the wide range of binding properties of the Itch PRR. Using pull-down assays combined with mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the Itch PRR preferentially forms complexes with Endophilins, Amphyphisins and Pacsins, but can also target a variety of other SH3 domain-containing proteins. In addition, we map the binding sites of these proteins using a combination of PRR sub-sequences and mutants. We find that different SH3 domains target distinct proline-rich sequences overlapping significantly. We also structurally analyze these protein complexes using crystallography and molecular modelling. These structures depict the position of Itch PRR engaged in a 1:2 protein complex with β-PIX and a 1:1 complex with the other SH3 domain-containing proteins. Taken together, these results reveal the binding preferences of the Itch PRR towards its most common SH3 domain-containing partners, and demonstrate that the PRR region is sufficient for binding.

  9. Construction of confidence regions for isotopic abundance patterns in LC/MS data sets for rigorous determination of molecular formulas.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, Andreas; Want, Elizabeth J; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2010-09-01

    It has long been recognized that estimates of isotopic abundance patterns may be instrumental in identifying the many unknown compounds encountered when conducting untargeted metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. While numerous methods have been developed for assigning heuristic scores to rank the degree of fit of the observed abundance patterns with theoretical ones, little work has been done to quantify the errors that are associated with the measurements made. Thus, it is generally not possible to determine, in a statistically meaningful manner, whether a given chemical formula would likely be capable of producing the observed data. In this paper, we present a method for constructing confidence regions for the isotopic abundance patterns based on the fundamental distribution of the ion arrivals. Moreover, we develop a method for doing so that makes use of the information pooled together from the measurements obtained across an entire chromatographic peak, as well as from any adducts, dimers, and fragments observed in the mass spectra. This greatly increases the statistical power, thus enabling the analyst to rule out a potentially much larger number of candidate formulas while explicitly guarding against false positives. In practice, small departures from the model assumptions are possible due to detector saturation and interferences between adjacent isotopologues. While these factors form impediments to statistical rigor, they can to a large extent be overcome by restricting the analysis to moderate ion counts and by applying robust statistical methods. Using real metabolic data, we demonstrate that the method is capable of reducing the number of candidate formulas by a substantial amount, even when no bromine or chlorine atoms are present. We argue that further developments in our ability to characterize the data mathematically could enable much more powerful statistical analyses.

  10. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment--EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  11. A molecular analysis of quinolone-resistant Haemophilus influenzae: validation of the mutations in Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hisashi; Shirakura, Tetsuro; Fukuchi, Kunihiko; Takuma, Takahiro; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Niki, Yoshihito

    2014-04-01

    The mechanism of quinolone-resistance is considered to be amino acid mutations in the type II topoisomerase. We validated the genetic mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Haemophilus influenzae. We obtained 29 H. influenzae strains from a nationwide surveillance program in Japan (including 11 quinolone-resistant strains [moxifloxacin: MFLX or levofloxacin MIC ≥2 μg/ml]). We analyzed the sequences of the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions (QRDRs) in GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE. Furthermore, we induced resistance in susceptible strains by exposing them to quinolone, and investigated the relationship between mutations in the QRDRs and the MICs. Five amino acid substitutions in GyrA (at Ser84 and Asp88) and ParC (at Gly82, Ser84 and Glu88) were found to be closely related to the MICs. The strains with a MFLX MIC of 0.125-1 and 2-4 μg/ml had one and two mutations, respectively. The strains with a MFLX MIC of ≥8 μg/ml had three or more mutations. The strains with induced resistance with MFLX MICs of 0.5-1 and ≥2 μg/ml also had one and two mutations, respectively. We confirmed that these five mutations strongly contribute to quinolone resistance and found that the degree of resistance is related to the number of the mutations. In addition, the three strains of 18 susceptible strains (16.7%) also had a single mutation. These strains may therefore be in the initial stage of quinolone resistance. Currently, the frequency of quinolone-resistant H. influenzae is still low. However, as has occurred with β-lactams, an increase in quinolone use may lead to more quinolone-resistant strains.

  12. Molecular mapping of genomic regions harbouring QTLs for root and yield traits in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Rajkumar; Fakrudin, B; Kavil, S P; Girma, Y; Arun, S S; Dadakhalandar, D; Gurusiddesh, B H; Patil, A M; Thudi, M; Bhairappanavar, S B; Narayana, Y D; Krishnaraj, P U; Khadi, B M; Kamatar, M Y

    2013-07-01

    Root system is a vital part of plants for absorbing soil moisture and nutrients and it influences the drought tolerance. Identification of the genomic regions harbouring quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root and yield traits, and the linked markers can facilitate sorghum improvement through marker-assisted selection (MAS) besides the deeper understanding of the plant response to drought stress. A population of 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from E36-1 × SPV570, along with parents were phenotyped for component traits of yield in field and root traits in an above ground rhizotron. High estimates of heritability and genetic advance for all the root traits and for most of the yield traits, presents high scope for improvement of these traits by simple selection. A linkage map constructed with 104 marker loci comprising 50 EST-SSRs, 34 non-genic nuclear SSRs and 20 SNPs, and QTL analysis was performed using composite interval mapping (CIM) approach. A total of eight and 20 QTLs were mapped for root and yield related traits respectively. The QTLs for root volume, root fresh weight and root dry weight were found co-localized on SBI-04, supported by a positive correlation among these traits. Hence, these traits can be improved using the same linked markers. The lack of overlap between the QTLs of component traits of root and yield suggested that these two sets of parameters are independent in their influence and the possibility of combining these two traits might enhance productivity of sorghum under receding moisture condition.

  13. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment—EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  14. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  15. Transitions and molecular packing in highly purified 1,2-dipalmitoyl- phosphatidylcholine-water phases. I. Transitions, improved phase diagrams, method of packing analysis, molecular structures of diglyceride, and polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albon, Norman

    1983-04-01

    Results of extensive studies of phases prepared from highly purified 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn -glycerol are presented. The methods used included x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis and both temperature and water content were varied. Details of the many well-defined phases obtained, all with bilayer structures, are given in tables. An improved phase diagram was obtained from thermal data which showed well-defined transitions, and from discontinuities in a plot of bilayer repeat spacings with water content. For analysis of molecular packing the bilayer was divided into diglyceride and phosphorylcholine regions. The properties of the diglyceride regions of both compounds are discussed. Estimates of the size and shape of the polar groups are made and the general principles involved in their packing and the influence of water are discussed. Among new features reported, are the existence of the 0⊥ close chain packing for the crystalline dipalmitoyl glycerol but not in any lecithin phase. Three single crystal lecithin phases with different water contents were prepared which are more stable than the hexagonal chain phases usually reported in the same regions. These hexagonal phases slowly recrystallize to more stable forms, but are usually obtained on cooling melts or higher temperature phases. However, the single crystal phases only exist over restricted composition ranges while phases with hexagonal, square, and disordered chain packing can accommodate a variation in water content by a tilt of the chain axes and changes in bilayer thickness. Transition widths vary and are extremely sensitive to impurities.

  16. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, Lukáš; Petrtýl, Miloslav; Chaloupková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The headwaters of five large African river basins flow through the Bié Plateau in Angola and still remain faunistically largely unexplored. We investigated fish fauna from the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi river systems from central Angola. We reconstructed molecular phylogenies of the most common cichlid species from the region, Tilapia sparrmanii and Serranochromis macrocephalus, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We found evidence for ichthyofaunal contact and gene flow between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi watersheds in the Bié Plateau in central Angola. Waterfalls and rapids also appeared to restrict genetic exchange among populations within the Cuanza basin. Further, we found that the Angolan Serranochromis cichlid fishes represent a monophyletic lineage with respect to other haplochromines, including the serranochromines from the Congo and Zambezi rivers. This study represents an important initial step in a biodiversity survey of this extremely poorly explored region, as well as giving further understanding to species distributions and gene flow both between and within river basins.

  17. Mid-infrared supercontinuum covering the 1.4-13.3 μm molecular fingerprint region using ultra-high NA chalcogenide step-index fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Møller, Uffe; Kubat, Irnis; Zhou, Binbin; Dupont, Sune; Ramsay, Jacob; Benson, Trevor; Sujecki, Slawomir; Abdel-Moneim, Nabil; Tang, Zhuoqi; Furniss, David; Seddon, Angela; Bang, Ole

    2014-11-01

    The mid-infrared spectral region is of great technical and scientific interest because most molecules display fundamental vibrational absorptions in this region, leaving distinctive spectral fingerprints. To date, the limitations of mid-infrared light sources such as thermal emitters, low-power laser diodes, quantum cascade lasers and synchrotron radiation have precluded mid-infrared applications where the spatial coherence, broad bandwidth, high brightness and portability of a supercontinuum laser are all required. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that launching intense ultra-short pulses with a central wavelength of either 4.5 μm or 6.3 μm into short pieces of ultra-high numerical-aperture step-index chalcogenide glass optical fibre generates a mid-infrared supercontinuum spanning 1.5 μm to 11.7 μm and 1.4 μm to 13.3 μm, respectively. This is the first experimental demonstration to truly reveal the potential of fibres to emit across the mid-infrared molecular ‘fingerprint region’, which is of key importance for applications such as early cancer diagnostics, gas sensing and food quality control.

  18. Frequency Dependent Non- Thermal Effects of Oscillating Electric Fields in the Microwave Region on the Properties of a Solvated Lysozyme System: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Stelios; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Karatasos, Kostas

    2017-01-01

    The use of microwaves in every day’s applications raises issues regarding the non thermal biological effects of microwaves. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations to advance further the dielectric studies of protein solutions in the case of lysozyme, taking into consideration possible frequency dependent changes in the structural and dynamic properties of the system upon application of electric field in the microwave region. The obtained dielectric spectra are identical with those derived in our previous work using the Fröhlich-Kirkwood approach in the framework of the linear response theory. Noticeable structural changes in the protein have been observed only at frequencies near its absorption maximum. Concerning Cα position fluctuations, different frequencies affected different regions of the protein sequence. Furthermore, the influence of the field on the kinetics of protein-water as well as on the water-water hydrogen bonds in the first hydration shell has been studied; an extension of the Luzar-Chandler kinetic model was deemed necessary for a better fit of the applied field results and for the estimation of more accurate hydrogen bond lifetime values. PMID:28129348

  19. In situ mask designed for selective growth of InAs quantum dots in narrow regions developed for molecular beam epitaxy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yusui; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Asakawa, Kiyoshi

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an in situ mask that enables the selective formation of molecular beam epitaxially grown layers in narrow regions. This mask can be fitted to a sample holder and removed in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment; thus, device structures can be fabricated without exposing the sample surfaces to air. Moreover, this mask enables the observation of reflection high-energy electron diffraction during growth with the mask positioned on the sample holder and provides for the formation of marker layers for ensuring alignment in the processes following the selective growth. To explore the effectiveness of the proposed in situ mask, we used it to grow quantum dot (QD) structures in narrow regions and verified the perfect selectivity of the QD growth. The grown QDs exhibited high optical quality with a photoluminescence peak at approximately 1.30μm and a linewidth of 30meV at room temperature. The proposed technique can be applied for the integration of microstructures into optoelectronic functional devices.

  20. Molecular-based estimate of species number, phylogenetic relationships and divergence times for the genus Stenotaenia (Chilopoda, Geophilomorpha) in the Italian region

    PubMed Central

    Del Latte, Laura; Bortolin, Francesca; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Fusco, Giuseppe; Bonato, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stenotaenia is one of the largest and most widespread genera of geophilid centipedes in the Western Palearctic, with a very uniform morphology and about fifteen species provisionally recognized. For a better understanding of Stenotaenia species-level taxonomy, we have explored the possibility of using molecular data. As a preliminary assay, we sampled twelve populations, mainly from the Italian region, and analyzed partial sequences of the two genes COI and 28S. We employed a DNA-barcoding approach, complemented by a phylogenetic analysis coupled with divergence time estimation. Assuming a barcoding gap of 10–16% K2P pairwise distances, we found evidence for the presence of at least six Stenotaenia species in the Italian region, which started diverging about 50 million years ago, only partially matching with previously recognized species. We found that small-sized oligopodous species belong to a single clade that originated about 33 million years ago, and obtained some preliminary evidence of the related genus Tuoba being nested within Stenotaenia. PMID:26257533

  1. Humanization of an anti-CD34 monoclonal antibody by complementarity-determining region grafting based on computer-assisted molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng; Li, Bohua; Wang, Ling; Qian, Weizhu; Zhang, Dapeng; Hong, Xueyu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2008-07-01

    4C8 is a new mouse anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibody (mAb), which recognizes class II CD34 epitopes and can be used for clinical hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell selection. In an attempt to improve its safety profiles, we have developed a humanized antibody of 4C8 by complementarity-determining region (CDR) grafting method in this study. Using a molecular model of 4C8 built by computer-assisted homology modelling, framework region (FR) residues of potential importance to the antigen binding were identified. A humanized version of 4C8, denoted as h4C8, was generated by transferring these key murine FR residues onto a human antibody framework that was selected based on homology to the mouse antibody framework, together with the mouse CDR residues. The resultant humanized antibody was shown to possess antigen-binding affinity and specificity similar to that of the original murine antibody, suggesting that it might be an alternative to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used clinically.

  2. Molecular evidence that the genes for dioecism and monoecism in Spinacia oleracea L. are located at different loci in a chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Oda, Y; Haseda, A; Fujito, S; Mikami, T; Onodera, Y

    2014-03-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely known to be dioecious. However, monoecious plants can also occur in this species. Sex expression in dioecious spinach plants is controlled by a single gene pair termed X and Y. Our previous study showed that a single, incompletely dominant gene, which controls the monoecious condition in spinach line 03-336, should be allelic or linked to X/Y. Here, we developed 19 AFLP markers closely linked to the monoecious gene. The AFLP markers were mapped to a 38.2-cM chromosomal region that included the monoecious gene, which is bracketed between flanking markers with a distance of 7.1 cM. The four AFLP markers developed in our studies were converted into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which are linked to both the monoecious gene and Y and are common to both populations segregating for the genes. Linkage analysis using the SCAR markers suggested that the monoecious gene (M) and Y are located in different intervals, between different marker pairs. Analysis of populations segregating for both M and Y also directly demonstrates linkage of the genes at a distance of ~12 cM. The data presented in this study may be useful for breeding dioecious and highly male monoecious lines utilized as the pollen parents for hybrid seed production, as well as for studies of the evolutionary history of sexual systems in this species, and can provide a molecular basis for positional cloning of the sex-determining genes.

  3. A comparison of the molecular organization of genomic regions associated with resistance to common bacterial blight in two Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Gregory; Dinatale, Claudia; Xie, Weilong; Navabi, Alireza; Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Crosby, William; Yu, Kangfu; Shi, Chun; Pauls, K Peter

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, in Phaseolus vulgaris is conditioned by several loci on different chromosomes. Previous studies with OAC-Rex, a CBB-resistant, white bean variety of Mesoamerican origin, identified two resistance loci associated with the molecular markers Pv-CTT001 and SU91, on chromosome 4 and 8, respectively. Resistance to CBB is assumed to be derived from an interspecific cross with Phaseolus acutifolius in the pedigree of OAC-Rex. Our current whole genome sequencing effort with OAC-Rex provided the opportunity to compare its genome in the regions associated with CBB resistance with the v1.0 release of the P. vulgaris line G19833, which is a large seeded bean of Andean origin, and (assumed to be) CBB susceptible. In addition, the genomic regions containing SAP6, a marker associated with P. vulgaris-derived CBB-resistance on chromosome 10, were compared. These analyses indicated that gene content was highly conserved between G19833 and OAC-Rex across the regions examined (>80%). However, fifty-nine genes unique to OAC Rex were identified, with resistance gene homologues making up the largest category (10 genes identified). Two unique genes in OAC-Rex located within the SU91 resistance QTL have homology to P. acutifolius ESTs and may be potential sources of CBB resistance. As the genomic sequence assembly of OAC-Rex is completed, we expect that further comparisons between it and the G19833 genome will lead to a greater understanding of CBB resistance in bean.

  4. Molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome in subjects with intellectual disability of unknown origin: implications of its prevalence in regional Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Madiha; Alyas, Saadia; Afzal, Muhammad; Mansoor, Atika; Abbasi, Rashda; Tassone, Flora; Malik, Sajid; Mazhar, Kehkashan

    2015-01-01

    Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and affects 0.7-3.0% of intellectually compromised population of unknown etiology worldwide. It is mostly caused by repeat expansion mutations in the FMR1 at chromosome Xq27.3. The present study aimed to develop molecular diagnostic tools for a better detection of FXS, to assess implementation of diagnostic protocols in a developing country and to estimate the prevalence of FXS in a cohort of intellectually disabled subjects from Pakistan. From a large pool of individuals with below normal IQ range, 395 subjects with intellectual disability of unknown etiology belonging to different regions of the country were recruited. Conventional-PCR, modified-PCR and Southern blot analysis methods were employed for the detection of CGG repeat polymorphisms in the FMR1 gene. Initial screening with conventional-PCR identified 13 suspected patients. Subsequent investigations through modified PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the FMR1 mutation, suggesting a prevalence of 3.5% and 2.8% (mean 3.3%) among the male and female ID patients, respectively. These diagnostic methods were further customized with the in-house conditions to offer robust screening of referral patients/families for diagnostics and genetic counseling. Prescreening and early diagnosis are crucial for designing a prudent strategy for the management of subjects with ID. Outcome of the study recommends health practitioners for implementation of molecular based FXS diagnosis in routine clinical practice to give a better care for patients similar to the ones included in the study.

  5. Molecular Diagnosis of Fragile X Syndrome in Subjects with Intellectual Disability of Unknown Origin: Implications of Its Prevalence in Regional Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Alyas, Saadia; Afzal, Muhammad; Mansoor, Atika; Abbasi, Rashda; Tassone, Flora; Malik, Sajid; Mazhar, Kehkashan

    2015-01-01

    Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and affects 0.7–3.0% of intellectually compromised population of unknown etiology worldwide. It is mostly caused by repeat expansion mutations in the FMR1 at chromosome Xq27.3. The present study aimed to develop molecular diagnostic tools for a better detection of FXS, to assess implementation of diagnostic protocols in a developing country and to estimate the prevalence of FXS in a cohort of intellectually disabled subjects from Pakistan. From a large pool of individuals with below normal IQ range, 395 subjects with intellectual disability of unknown etiology belonging to different regions of the country were recruited. Conventional-PCR, modified-PCR and Southern blot analysis methods were employed for the detection of CGG repeat polymorphisms in the FMR1 gene. Initial screening with conventional-PCR identified 13 suspected patients. Subsequent investigations through modified PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the FMR1 mutation, suggesting a prevalence of 3.5% and 2.8% (mean 3.3%) among the male and female ID patients, respectively. These diagnostic methods were further customized with the in-house conditions to offer robust screening of referral patients/families for diagnostics and genetic counseling. Prescreening and early diagnosis are crucial for designing a prudent strategy for the management of subjects with ID. Outcome of the study recommends health practitioners for implementation of molecular based FXS diagnosis in routine clinical practice to give a better care for patients similar to the ones included in the study. PMID:25875842

  6. Cloning of the rice seed alpha-globulin-encoding gene: sequence similarity of the 5'-flanking region to those of the genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin and barley D hordein.

    PubMed

    Nakase, M; Hotta, H; Adachi, T; Aoki, N; Nakamura, R; Masumura, T; Tanaka, K; Matsuda, T

    1996-05-08

    A genomic clone encoding the rice endosperm major globulin (alpha-globulin) with an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa was isolated, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence and transcription start point (tsp) were determined. The tsp was identical to that of the gene encoding the wheat high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin subunit. The consensus '-300 element' and an A + T-rich sequence exist upstream from the TATA box in the 5'-flanking region. A nt sequence of about 130 bp in the 5'-flanking region was found to be markedly homologous to those of the genes encoding the wheat HMW glutenin subunit and barley D hordein.

  7. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. III. CHARACTERIZING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE GEMINI OB1 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Merello, Manuel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Cyganowski, Claudia J.; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bradley, Eric Todd; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2010-07-10

    We present the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted NH{sub 3} observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures, and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5{sigma} = 0.37 Jy beam{sup -1} with corresponding 5{sigma} detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc and a mean gas kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources with detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line. The observed NH{sub 3} line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120'' aperture of 230 {+-} 180 M{sub sun}. We find a total mass of 8400 M{sub sun} for all BGPS sources in the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud, representing 6.5% of the cloud mass. By comparing the millimeter isothermal mass to the virial mass calculated from the NH{sub 3} line widths within a radius equal to the millimeter source size, we find a mean virial parameter (M{sub vir}/M {sub iso}) of 1.0 {+-} 0.9 for the sample. We find mean values for the distributions of column densities of 1.0 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} for H{sub 2}, and 3.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for NH{sub 3}, giving a mean NH{sub 3} abundance of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} relative to H{sub 2}. We find volume-averaged densities on the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The sizes and densities suggest that in the Gem OB1 region the BGPS is detecting the clumps from which stellar clusters form, rather than smaller, higher density cores where single stars or small multiple systems

  8. Probing the conditions within Photo-dissociation Regions with high resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of UV-excited molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-01-01

    UV radiation regulates the energetics, ionization, and chemistry in much of the ISM. Regions between hot ionized and cool molecular gas where non-ionizing far-UV radiation dominates the state of the gas are called Photo-Dissociation or Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs). PDRs are found in regions of high-mass star formation, planetary nebulae, and other environments that contain strong far-UV radiation fields. Hydrogen molecules (H2) are pumped by far-UV photons into excited rotational-vibrational levels of the ground electronic state, which give rise to a rich array of transitions in the near to mid-infrared. These transitions make an excellent probe of the physical conditions within a PDR. I will present near-IR spectra taken with the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS; Park et al. 2014, Proc. SPIE, 9147), a novel, sensitive spectrometer with high spectral resolving power (R~45000) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm). Using IGRINS, I obtained deep spectra and measured up to 100 H2 rotational-vibrational transitions in the well-studied Orion Bar PDR, four other star formation complexes, and over a dozen planetary nebulae. Measurements of many lines from a wide range of vibrational states (v=1 to 13), rotational states (J=1 to 13), and excitation energies provides leverage for constraining the overall level populations and discerning the state of and physical processes within the gas. This combination of high spectral and spatial resolution enables us to distinguish previously unresolved spatio-kinematical components with distinct intrinsic spectra and excitation mechanisms (e.g. shocks vs. radiative excitation) within some individual planetary nebulae. I use the plasma simulation code Cloudy (Ferland et al. 2013, ApJ, 757, 79) as a tool for interpreting the observed H2 line ratios. Some sources are well fit by models with a single temperature and density, consistent with emission from a narrow region of the overall PDR structure

  9. Molecular Mechanism for Hypertensive Renal Disease: Differential Regulation of Chromogranin A Expression at 3'-Untranslated Region Polymorphism C+87T by MicroRNA-107.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuixing; Mir, Saiful A; Hightower, C Makena; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Maihofer, Adam X; Chen, Yuqing; Mahata, Sushil K; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Schork, Nicholas J; Freedman, Barry I; Vaingankar, Sucheta M; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2015-08-01

    Chromogranin A (CHGA) is coreleased with catecholamines from secretory vesicles in adrenal medulla and sympathetic axons. Genetic variation in the CHGA 3'-region has been associated with autonomic control of circulation, hypertension, and hypertensive nephropathy, and the CHGA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) variant C+87T (rs7610) displayed peak associations with these traits in humans. Here, we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations. C+87T occurred in a microRNA-107 (miR-107) motif (match: T>C), and CHGA mRNA expression varied inversely with miR-107 abundance. In cells transfected with chimeric luciferase/CHGA 3'-UTR reporters encoding either the T allele or the C allele, changes in miR-107 expression levels had much greater effects on expression of the T allele. Cotransfection experiments with hsa-miR-107 oligonucleotides and eukaryotic CHGA plasmids produced similar results. Notably, an in vitro CHGA transcription/translation experiment revealed that changes in hsa-miR-107 expression altered expression of the T allele variant only. Mice with targeted ablation of Chga exhibited greater eGFR. Using BAC transgenesis, we created a mouse model with a humanized CHGA locus (T/T genotype at C+87T), in which treatment with a hsa-miR-107 inhibitor yielded prolonged falls in SBP/DBP compared with wild-type mice. We conclude that the CHGA 3'-UTR C+87T disrupts an miR-107 motif, with differential effects on CHGA expression, and that a cis:trans (mRNA:miR) interaction regulates the association of CHGA with BP and hypertensive nephropathy. These results indicate new strategies for probing autonomic circulatory control and ultimately, susceptibility to hypertensive renal sequelae.

  10. Molecular Detection of Equine Herpesvirus Types 1 and 4 Infection in Healthy Horses in Isfahan Central and Shahrekord Southwest Regions, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taktaz Hafshejani, Taghi; Nekoei, Shahin; Vazirian, Behnam; Doosti, Abbas; Khamesipour, Faham; Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate molecularly the occurrence of EHV-1 and EHV-4 infection among equine population in regions, Iran. Blood samples from 53 and 37 randomly selected horses settled in Isfahan and Shahrekord, Iran, respectively, were collected. Detection of EHV-1 and EHV-4 genes in the blood samples was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of 53 and 37 samples from Isfahan and Shahrekord, 4 (18.18%) and 3 (8.10%) were positive for PCR of EHV-1, respectively. Nine (16.98%) and 6 (16.21%) were positive for PCR of EHV-4, while 6 (11.32%) and 3 (8.10%) were positive for PCR of both EHV-1 and EHV-4, in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. Of the 7 blood samples positive for EHV-1, 4 (16.66%) and 3 (8.10%) were from horses >3 years old while 2 (18.18%) and 1 (16.66%) were from 2-3 years old horses, in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. Out of the 7 and 3 samples positive for PCR of EHV-1 in Isfahan and Shahrekord, 4 (22.2%) and 1 (7.69%) were Standardbred, while 3 (14.28%) and 2 (13.33%) were Thoroughbreds, respectively. EHV-4 was detected in blood of 4 (22.22%) and 2 (15.83%) Standardbreds and from 4 (19.04%) and 4 (26.66%) Thoroughbred horses in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. This study has shown that horses settled in Isfahan central and Shahrekord southwest regions, Iran, are infected by EHV-1 and EHV-4 and thus serve as potential reservoirs and disseminators of the viruses. PMID:26421307

  11. Molecular characteristics and evolution of the mitochondrial control region in three genera (Hipposideridae: Hipposideros Aselliscus and Coelops) of leaf-nosed bats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Keping; Luo, Li; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Sen; Feng, Jiang

    2013-08-01

    The mitochondrial control region (CR) was sequenced for three genera of Hipposideridae to give a detailed overview of its features. The CR of leaf-nosed bats (1288-1560 bp) was divided into three domains like that of other mammals. In addition to the common conserved blocks (ETAS1, ETAS2, F-B boxes, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3) found in all species, a CSB1-like element was also detected in the conserved sequence blocks (CSB). Repeated motifs were examined in the ETAS of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (26 bp) and Hipposideros bicolor (80 bp) and were present in the CSB of all individuals (6, 8, 16, and 20 bp). Phylogenetic reconstructions using the CR sequences indicated that the phylogenetic relationships among Hipposideros species were consistent with the results of other molecular and phenetic analyses. Aselliscus and Coelops had a closer relationship. But the central domain could not be used for phylogenetic analyses at family and genus levels due to its high conservation.

  12. Binding hotspots on K-ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-05-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in nonpocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu.

  13. Binding hotspots on K-Ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F.; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in non-pocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu. PMID:25740554

  14. Molecular evolution of the hypervariable region of the attachment glycoprotein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B genotypes BA9 and BA10.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Koo; Hirano, Eiko; Kobayashi, Miho; Ryo, Akihide; Oishi, Kazunori; Obuchi, Masatsugu; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Noda, Masahiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimojo, Naoki; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the C-terminal 3rd hypervariable region in the attachment glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B (HRSV-B) genotypes BA9 and BA10. We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We also performed a genetic distance analysis (p-distance analysis), positive and negative selection analyses, and a Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) analysis. We found that genotype BA9 diverged from the common ancestor of genotypes BA7, BA8, and BA10, while genotype BA10 diverged from the ancestor of genotypes BA7 and BA8. Strains of both genotypes were distributed worldwide. BA9 and BA10 diverged between 1999 and 2001. Both BA9 and BA10 evolved rapidly (about 4.8×10(-3)substitutions/site/year) and formed three distinct lineages in a 10-year period. BA10 strains belonging to lineage 3 had large genetic distances (p-distance>0.07). Thus, it may be possible to classify these strains as a new genotype, BA11. No positive selection site was detected in either genotype. Phylodynamic analyses showed that the effective population size of BA10 decreased gradually since 2010 and BA9 slightly decreased since 2009. The results suggested that the recently prevalent HRSV-B genotypes BA9 and BA10 evolved uniquely, leading to epidemics of HRSV-B worldwide over a 15-year period.

  15. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Sean A.; Ueltschi, Tyler W.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Mifflin, Amanda L.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Hongfei; Cramer, Christopher J.; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-03-03

    Carbon-hydrogen (C-H) vibration modes serve as key probes in the chemical iden- tication of hydrocarbons and in vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spec- *troscopy of hydrocarbons at the liquid/gas interface. Their assignments pose a chal- lenge from a theoretical viewpoint. In this work, we present a detailed study of the C-H stretching region of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using a new Gaussian basis set- based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) module that we have implemented in the NWChem computational chemistry program. By combining AIMD simulations and static normal mode analysis, we interpret experimental infrared and Raman spectra and explore the role of anharmonic effects in this system. Our anharmonic normal mode analysis of the in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric C-H stretching modes chal- lenges the previous experimental assignment of the shoulder in the symmetric C-H stretching peak as an overtone or Fermi resonance. In addition, our AIMD simulations also show signicant broadening of the in-phase symmetric C-H stretching resonance, which suggests that the experimentally observed shoulder is due to thermal broadening of the symmetric stretching resonance.

  16. Identification and gene mapping of a 14,700-molecular-weight protein encoded by region E3 of group C adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Wold, W S

    1988-01-01

    Early region E3 of adenovirus type 5 should encode at least nine proteins as judged by the DNA sequence and the spliced structures of the known mRNAs. Only two E3 proteins have been proved to exist, a glycoprotein (gp19K) and an 11,600-molecular-weight protein (11.6K protein). Here we describe an abundant 14.7K protein coded by a gene in the extreme 3' portion of E3. To identify this 14.7K protein, we constructed a bacterial vector which synthesized a TrpE-14.7K fusion protein, then we prepared antiserum against the fusion protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated the 14.7K protein from cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 2, as well as with a variety of E3 deletion mutants. Synthesis of the 14.7K protein correlated precisely with the presence or absence of the 14.7K gene and with the synthesis of the mRNA (mRNA h) which encodes the 14.7K protein. The 14.7K protein appeared as a triplet on immunoprecipitation gels and Western blots (immunoblots). Images PMID:3275435

  17. Conformational choreography of a molecular switch region in myelin basic protein--molecular dynamics shows induced folding and secondary structure type conversion upon threonyl phosphorylation in both aqueous and membrane-associated environments.

    PubMed

    Polverini, Eugenia; Coll, Eoin P; Tieleman, D Peter; Harauz, George

    2011-03-01

    The 18.5 kDa isoform of myelin basic protein is essential to maintaining the close apposition of myelin membranes in central nervous system myelin, but its intrinsic disorder (conformational dependence on environment), a variety of post-translational modifications, and a diversity of protein ligands (e.g., actin and tubulin) all indicate it to be multifunctional. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a conserved central segment of 18.5 kDa myelin basic protein (residues Glu80-Gly103, murine sequence numbering) in aqueous and membrane-associated environments to ascertain the stability of constituent secondary structure elements (α-helix from Glu80-Val91 and extended poly-proline type II from Thr92-Gly103) and the effects of phosphorylation of residues Thr92 and Thr95, individually and together. In aqueous solution, all four forms of the peptide bent in the middle to form a hydrophobic cluster. The phosphorylated variants were stabilized further by electrostatic interactions and formation of β-structures, in agreement with previous spectroscopic data. In simulations performed with the peptide in association with a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, the amphipathic α-helical segment remained stable and membrane-associated, although the degree of penetration was less in the phosphorylated variants, and the tilt of the α-helix with respect to the plane of the membrane also changed significantly with the modifications. The extended segment adjacent to this α-helix represents a putative SH3-ligand and remained exposed to the cytoplasm (and thus accessible to binding partners). The results of these simulations demonstrate how this segment of the protein can act as a molecular switch: an amphipathic α-helical segment of the protein is membrane-associated and presents a subsequent proline-rich segment to the cytoplasm for interaction with other proteins. Phosphorylation of threonyl residues alters the degree of membrane penetration of the

  18. The Molecular Structures of the Local Arm and Perseus Arm in the Galactic Region of l = [139.°75, 149.°75], b = [‑5.°25, 5.°25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinyu; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji; Sun, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Using the Purple Mountain Observatory Delingha (PMODLH) 13.7 m telescope, we report a 96 deg2 12CO/13CO/C18O mapping observation toward the Galactic region of l = [139.°75,149.°75], b = [‑5.°25, 5.°25]. The molecular structures of the Local Arm and Perseus Arm are presented. Combining H i data and part of the Outer Arm results, we obtain that the warp structure of both atomic and molecular gas is obvious, while the flare structure only exists in atomic gas in this observing region. In addition, five filamentary giant molecular clouds on the Perseus Arm are identified. Among them, four are newly identified. Their relations with the Milky Way large-scale structure are discussed.

  19. DNA and RNA studies for molecular characterization of a gross deletion detected in homozygosity in the NH2-terminal region of the ATP7B gene in a Wilson disease patient.

    PubMed

    Incollu, Simona; Lepori, Maria Barbara; Zappu, Antonietta; Dessì, Valentina; Noli, Maria Cristina; Mameli, Eva; Iorio, Raffaele; Ranucci, Giusy; Cao, Antonio; Loudianos, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective function of the copper transporting protein ATP7B. Approximately 520 Wilson disease-causing mutations have been described to date. In this study we report the use of DNA and RNA analysis for molecular characterization of a gross deletion of the ATP7B gene detected in homozygosity in a Wilson disease patient. The c.51+384_1708-953del mutation spans an 8798 bp region of the ATP7B gene from exon 2 to intron 4. The results obtained suggest that the combination of DNA and RNA analyses can be used for molecular characterization of gross ATP7B deletions, thus improving genetic counselling and diagnosis of Wilson disease. Moreover these studies, help to better establish the molecular mechanisms producing Wilson disease.

  20. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN): molecular confirmation of a Turkish patient with a rare frameshift mutation in the coding region of the PANK2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cangül, Hakan; Ozdemir, Ozlem; Yakut, Tahsin; Okan, Mehmet; Morgan, Neil V; Baytan, Birol; Kurian, Manju A; Spiegel, Ronald; Maher, Eamonn R

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the clinical, neuroimaging, and molecular findings of a classic pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) patient of Turkish origin. Our patient is the first reported case of PKAN in Turkey with molecular genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. The frameshift mutation c.821_822delCT of the PANK2 gene detected in our patient has only been described in such classic patients to date, and our case provides further evidence of the association of this mutation with the classic PKAN phenotype. Since this mutation is a rare disease-causing mutation in other populations, further studies of more Turkish PKAN patients will show if it is the result of a founder effect in this population. In our case, molecular diagnosis allowed accurate prenatal genetic testing and counseling for this family. This case report highlights the importance of magnetic resonance imaging and molecular investigation in children who have progressive neurodegenerative symptoms of parkinsonism, dystonia, pyramidal features, and dementia.

  1. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  2. Novel "omics" approach for study of low-abundance, low-molecular-weight components of a complex biological tissue: regional differences between chorionic and basal plates of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Komal; Nichols, Caitlin A; Thulin, Craig D; Graves, Steven W

    2015-11-01

    Tissue proteomics has relied heavily on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, for protein separation and quantification, then single protein isolation, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometric protein identification. Such methods are predominantly used for study of high-abundance, full-length proteins. Tissue peptidomics has recently been developed but is still used to study the most highly abundant species, often resulting in observation and identification of dozens of peptides only. Tissue lipidomics is likewise new, and reported studies are limited. We have developed an "omics" approach that enables over 7,000 low-molecular-weight, low-abundance species to be surveyed and have applied this to human placental tissue. Because the placenta is believed to be involved in complications of pregnancy, its proteomic evaluation is of substantial interest. In previous research on the placental proteome, abundant, high-molecular-weight proteins have been studied. Application of large-scale, global proteomics or peptidomics to the placenta have been limited, and would be challenging owing to the anatomic complexity and broad concentration range of proteins in this tissue. In our approach, involving protein depletion, capillary liquid chromatography, and tandem mass spectrometry, we attempted to identify molecular differences between two regions of the same placenta with only slightly different cellular composition. Our analysis revealed 16 species with statistically significant differences between the two regions. Tandem mass spectrometry enabled successful sequencing, or otherwise enabled chemical characterization, of twelve of these. The successful discovery and identification of regional differences between the expression of low-abundance, low-molecular weight biomolecules reveals the potential of our approach.

  3. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Virulence and molecular diversity of the Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici population in Xinjiang in relation to other regions of western China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, wheat stripe rust caused severe yield losses in western China, especially the Xinjiang Autonomous Region. The population of the stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), in the vast region had not been well studied. To determine the population structure and comp...

  5. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  6. B- AND A-TYPE STARS IN THE TAURUS-AURIGA STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-07-10

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), {tau} Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  7. Molecular dynamics exploration of the binding mechanism and properties of single-walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant VP35 FBP region of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Ding, Jing-Na; Zhong, Hui; Sun, Chang-Ping; Han, Ju-Guang

    2017-03-01

    VP35 of Ebola viruses (EBOVs) is an attractive potential target because of its multifunction. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) energy calculations are performed to investigate the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild-type (WT) VP35 as well as in three primary mutants (K248A, I295A, and K248A/I295A) through docking the SWCNT in the first basic patch (FBP) of VP35. The SWCNTs of all the four systems effectively bind to the FBP. Interestingly, the sites and orientations of the SWCNT binding to the I295A mutant and K248A/I295A double mutants change significantly to accommodate the variation of the VP35 conformation. Moreover, the VDW can provide the major forces for affinity binding in all four systems.

  8. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of pH1N1 2009 Influenza Virus in Reunion Island, South West Indian Ocean Region: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Magali; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dellagi, Koussay

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives Molecular epidemiology is a powerful tool to decipher the dynamics of viral transmission, quasispecies temporal evolution and origins. Little is known about the pH1N1 molecular dynamics in general population. A prospective study (CoPanFlu-RUN) was carried out in Reunion Island to characterize pH1N1 genetic variability and molecular evolution occurring in population during the pH1N1 Influenza pandemic in 2009. Methodology We directly amplified pH1N1 genomes from 28 different nasal swabs (26 individuals from 21 households). Fifteen strains were fully sequenced and 13 partially. This includes pairs of sequences from different members of 5 separate households; and two pairs from individuals, collected at different times. We assessed the molecular evolution of pH1N1 by genetic variability and phylogenetic analyses. Principal Findings We found that i) Reunion pH1N1 sequences stemmed from global “clade 7” but shaped two phylogenetic sub-clades; ii) D239E mutation was identified in the hemagglutinin protein of all Reunion sequences, a mutation which has been associated elsewhere with mild-, upper-respiratory tract pH1N1 infecting strains; iii) Date estimates from molecular phylogenies predicted clade emergence some time before the first detection of pH1N1 by the epidemiological surveillance system; iv) Phylogenetic relatedness was observed between Reunion pH1N1 viruses and those from other countries in South-western Indian Ocean area; v) Quasispecies populations were observed within households and individuals of the cohort-study. Conclusions Surveillance and/or prevention systems presently based on Influenza virus sequence variation should take into account that the majority of studies of pH1N1 Influenza generate genetic data for the HA/NA viral segments obtained from hospitalized-patients, which is potentially non-representative of the overall viral diversity within whole populations. Our observations highlight the importance of collecting

  9. Specific binding of the regulatory protein ExpG to promoter regions of the galactoglucan biosynthesis gene cluster of Sinorhizobium meliloti--a combined molecular biology and force spectroscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Frank Wilco; Baumgarth, Birgit; Anselmetti, Dario; Ros, Robert; Becker, Anke

    2003-08-01

    Specific protein-DNA interaction is fundamental for all aspects of gene transcription. We focus on a regulatory DNA-binding protein in the Gram-negative soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011, which is capable of fixing molecular nitrogen in a symbiotic interaction with alfalfa plants. The ExpG protein plays a central role in regulation of the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharide galactoglucan, which promotes the establishment of symbiosis. ExpG is a transcriptional activator of exp gene expression. We investigated the molecular mechanism of binding of ExpG to three associated target sequences in the exp gene cluster with standard biochemical methods and single molecule force spectroscopy based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). Binding of ExpG to expA1, expG-expD1, and expE1 promoter fragments in a sequence specific manner was demonstrated, and a 28 bp conserved region was found. AFM force spectroscopy experiments confirmed the specific binding of ExpG to the promoter regions, with unbinding forces ranging from 50 to 165 pN in a logarithmic dependence from the loading rates of 70-79000 pN/s. Two different regimes of loading rate-dependent behaviour were identified. Thermal off-rates in the range of k(off)=(1.2+/-1.0) x 10(-3)s(-1) were derived from the lower loading rate regime for all promoter regions. In the upper loading rate regime, however, these fragments exhibited distinct differences which are attributed to the molecular binding mechanism.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Pre-Core/Core and S Region of Hepatitis B Virus in Hemodialysis Patients With Occult Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarvand, Nasrin; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Rasti, Mojtaba; Neisi, Niloofar; Pouremamali, Amir; Teimoori, Ali; Shabani, Abdolnabi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is a major public health problem worldwide, which harbors potential risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion and transplantation. OBI is characterized by the presence of HBV-DNA in the blood or liver tissue without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in the serum. An important cause of OBI is the occurrence of mutations in the HBV genome, especially in the S region. Objectives: The study aims to analyze mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: Sera of 216 hemodialysis patients were tested for HBsAg and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) by ELISA. Sera of patients that tested negative for HBsAg were evaluated by PCR for the detection of HBV-DNA in the S and pre-core/core regions. In total, six PCR products were sequenced, aligned, and compared with the HBV reference sequence. Amino acid deletion and nucleotide substitution were considered mutations in S and pre-core/core regions of HBV-DNA. Results: Among 216 patients, 203 (93.98%) and 175 (81.01%) sera samples tested negative for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively. Among all HBsAg-negative samples, six (2.9%) tested positive for HBV-DNA, including four (1.97%) for S and two (0.98%) for pre-core regions. All four (1.97%) samples that tested positive for the S region belonged to HBV-subtype awy. The amino acid sequence of all four samples showed the YMDD motif in position 204 (rtM204). There were three amino acid substitutions in the S region (T127P, P153L, and F170S) and one substitution in the RT region (Y135S). Moreover, two (0.98%) pre-core/core positive patients had an unexpected stop codon in position 1896. Conclusions: This study indicates that 2.9% of hemodialysis patients had OBI, which is considered as a major public health problem worldwide. Moreover, we observed three mutations in S region, including T127P, P153L, and F170S, which caused OBI. This study is first to

  11. SEARCHING FOR THE DRIVING SOURCE OF THE CO MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN THE HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION G240.31+0.07

    SciTech Connect

    Trinidad, M. A.

    2011-11-15

    We present low and high angular resolution observations at 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm obtained from the Very Large Array archive toward the high-mass star formation region G240.31+0.07. We detected, at least, two continuum sources toward G240.31+0.07 at 1.3 cm, which are spatially associated with the millimeter sources MM1 and MM3 reported in the region. Two continuum sources are also detected in the region at 3.6 and 6 cm, spatially coinciding with the millimeter sources MM1 and MM2. We find that the sources MM2 and MM3 seem to be consistent with ultracompact H II regions, harboring B1-0.5 spectral-type zero-age main-sequence stars. Based on the flux density at 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm, we also find that the spectral index of MM1 is about -0.4, suggesting a combination of thermal and nonthermal emission. In order to search the nature of MM1, we present a detailed comparison of the high angular resolution 6 cm observations of the epochs 1990.3 and 1995.5. The difference image of the two epochs shows variability toward MM1; its flux density and morphology are changing with time. Moreover, a condensation, possibly ejected by MM1 and oriented in the same direction of the CO outflow observed in the region, is also detected. We propose that MM1 is a radio jet and the best candidate to be the driving source of the CO outflow observed in the region.

  12. Molecular genetics analysis for co-infection of Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi in cat reservoirs based on internal transcribed spacer region 1.

    PubMed

    Areekit, Supatra; Khuchareontaworn, Sintawee; Kanjanavas, Pornpimon; Sriyapai, Thayat; Pakpitchareon, Arda; Khawsak, Paisarn; Chansiri, Kosum

    2009-01-01

    This study described the diagnosis of a mixed infection of Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi in a single domestic cat using the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region. Following polymerase chain reaction amplification of the ITS1 region, the 580 bp amplicon was cloned, and 29 white colonies were randomly selected for DNA sequencing and phylogenetic tree construction. A DNA parsimony tree generated two groups of Brugia spp with one group containing 6 clones corresponding to B. pahangi and the other 23 clones corresponding to B. malayi. This indicated that mixed infection of the two Brugia spp, B. pahangi and B. malayi, had occurred in a single host.

  13. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates obtained from two Dutch regions using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, M; Friedrich, A W; Grundmann, H; de Boer, R F; Croughs, P D; Islam, M A; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, M F Q; Kooistra-Smid, A M D; Rossen, J W A

    2016-07-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the major causes of human gastrointestinal disease and has been implicated in sporadic cases and outbreaks of diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome worldwide. In this study, we determined the molecular characteristics and phylogenetic relationship of STEC isolates, and their genetic diversity was compared to that of other E. coli populations. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 132 clinical STEC isolates obtained from the faeces of 129 Dutch patients with gastrointestinal complaints. STEC isolates of this study belonged to 44 different sequence types (STs), 42 serogenotypes and 14 stx subtype combinations. Antibiotic resistance genes were more frequently present in stx1-positive isolates compared to stx2 and stx1 + stx2-positive isolates. The iha, mchB, mchC, mchF, subA, ireA, senB, saa and sigA genes were significantly more frequently present in eae-negative than in eae-positive STEC isolates. Presence of virulence genes encoding type III secretion proteins and adhesins was associated with isolates obtained from patients with bloody diarrhoea. Core genome phylogenetic analysis showed that isolates clustered according to their ST or serogenotypes irrespective of stx subtypes. Isolates obtained from patients with bloody diarrhoea were from diverse phylogenetic backgrounds. Some STEC isolates shared common ancestors with non-STEC isolates. Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool for clinical microbiology, allowing high-resolution molecular typing, population structure analysis and detailed molecular characterization of strains. STEC isolates of a substantial genetic diversity and of distinct phylogenetic groups were observed in this study.

  14. Involvement of the glucose moiety in the molecular recognition of methyl beta-lactoside by ricin: synthesis, conformational analysis, and binding studies of different derivatives at the C-3 region.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M; Solís, D; Díaz-Mauriño, T

    1994-04-01

    Syntheses of the 3-aminodeoxy (4), 3-deoxy-3-methyl (5), and 3-epi (6) derivatives of methyl beta-lactoside (1) have been achieved from 1 in a straightforward way, and their solution conformations in water and dimethyl sulfoxide analysed through molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance data. The overall shape of all the compounds studied is fairly similar and may be described by conformers included in a low energy region with phi = 15 +/- 45 degrees and psi = -25 +/- 30 degrees, that is ca. 5% of the total potential energy surface for the glycosidic linkages of the disaccharides. The binding of the different compounds to ricin, the galactose-specific toxin from Ricinus communis, has been investigated. The results confirm the involvement of the C-3 region in a nonpolar interaction with the protein at the periphery of the combining site.

  15. Molecular Dissection of the 5' Region of no-on-transientA of Drosophila melanogaster Reveals cis-Regulation by Adjacent dGpi1 Sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrelli, F; Campesan, S; Rossetto, M; Benna, C; Zieger, E; Megighian, A; Couchman, M; Kyriacou, C; Costa, R

    2001-01-01

    The nonA gene of Drosophila melanogaster is important for normal vision, courtship song, and viability and lies approximately 350 bp downstream of the dGpi1 gene. Full rescue of nonA mutant phenotypes can be achieved by transformation with a genomic clone that carries approximately 2 kb of 5' regulatory material and that encodes most of the coding sequence of dGpi1. We have analyzed this 5' region by making a series of deleted fragments, fusing them to yeast GAL4 sequences, and driving UAS-nonA expression in a mutant nonA background. Regions that both silence and enhance developmental tissue-specific expression of nonA and that are necessary for generating optomotor visual responses are identified. Some of these overlap the dGpi1 sequences, revealing cis-regulation by neighboring gene sequences. The largest 5' fragment was unable to rescue the normal electroretinogram (ERG) consistently, and no rescue at all was observed for the courtship song phenotype. We suggest that sequences within the nonA introns that were missing in the UAS-nonA cDNA may carry enhancer elements for these two phenotypes. Finally, we speculate on the striking observation that some of the cis-regulatory regions of nonA appear to be embedded within the coding regions of dGpi1. PMID:11156995

  16. Molecular characterization of the U.S. Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray collection using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) and Targeted Region Amplification Polymorphism (TRAP) markers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray), a truly Native American crop, is a short life-cycle annual desert legume indigenous to northwestern Mexico and the southwestern USA and is considered drought and heat tolerant. The Western Regional Plant Introduction Station currently maintains 211 acce...

  17. Molecular and functional analysis of the large 5' promoter region of CFTR gene revealed pathogenic mutations in CF and CFTR-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Sonia; Amato, Felice; Elce, Ausilia; Monti, Maria; Iannone, Carla; Pucci, Pietro; Seia, Manuela; Angioni, Adriano; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) manifest a multisystemic disease due to mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); despite extensive testing of coding regions, a proportion of CF alleles remains unidentified. We studied 118 patients with CF and CFTR-related disorders, most with one or both unknown mutations after the scanning of CFTR coding regions, and a non-CF control group (n = 75) by sequencing the 6000-bp region at the 5' of the CFTR gene. We identified 23 mutations, of which 9 were novel. We expressed such mutations in vitro using four cell systems to explore their functional effect, relating the data to the clinical expression of each patient. Some mutations reduced expression of the gene reporter firefly luciferase in various cell lines and may act as disease-causing mutations. Other mutations caused an increase in luciferase expression in some cell lines. One mutation had a different effect in different cells. For other mutations, the expression assay excluded a functional role. Gene variants in the large 5' region may cause altered regulation of CFTR gene expression, acting as disease-causing mutations or modifiers of its clinical phenotype. Studies of in vitro expression in different cell systems may help reveal the effect of such mutations.

  18. Molecular Genetic Variation in the Centromeric Region of the X Chromosome in Three Drosophila Ananassae Populations. I. Contrasts between the Vermilion and Forked Loci

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, W.; Langley, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    We have surveyed three natural populations of Drosophila ananassae for restriction map variation at the forked (f) and vermilion (v) loci, using 6-cutter restriction enzymes. Both loci are located in the centromeric region of the X chromosome. Two major conclusions can be drawn from the data. First, we found strong evidence for population subdivision, i.e., significant differences in the frequency distributions of polymorphisms and/or haplotypes between the Burma, India, and Brazil populations. Secondly, the pattern of DNA sequence variation between the two loci is unexpectedly different. The level of nucleotide variation in the v locus region is reduced (relative to f), especially in the Burma population. Furthermore, in contrast to v, we found no insertions/deletions larger than 700 bp and no significant linkage disequilibrium at f. The genetic differentiation among subpopulations can readily be attributed to restricted migration as the predominant evolutionary force. According to population genetics theory, the differences in DNA polymorphisms between the two loci are in qualitative agreement with the hypothesis that recombination is reduced in the v locus region (``centromere effect'') but not at f. In order to test this hypothesis directly, we determined the cytogenetic positions of several loci in the centromeric region by in situ hybridization and found by comparison with the genetic map that recombination at v is indeed very low, much lower than at f. PMID:2563714

  19. The molecular cascades of long-term potentiation underlie memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, but not in the basolateral amygdala or the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Rossato, Janine I; da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Data accumulated through the past 15 years showed that memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance learning relies on a sequence of molecular events in the CA1 region of the hippocampus that is practically identical to that of long-term potentiation (LTP) in that area. Recent findings have indeed described CA1 LTP concomitant to the consolidation of this and other tasks. However, abundant evidence suggests that, in addition, other molecular events, involving some of the same steps but with different timing and in different sequence in the basolateral amygdala, entorhinal, parietal and cingulate cortex are as important as those of the hippocampus for memory consolidation. Here we review the hippocampal mechanisms involved and the possible interconnections between all these processes. Overall, the findings indicate that memory consolidation of even a task as deceivingly simple as one-trial avoidance relies on hippocampal LTP but also requires the concomitant participation of other brain systems and molecular events. Further, they point to the mechanisms that account for the enhanced consolidation usually seen for emotion-laden memories.

  20. Ionic photofragmentation and photoionization of dimethyl ether in the VUV and soft X-ray regions (8.5 80 eV) absolute oscillator strengths for molecular and dissociative photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Renfei; Cooper, Glyn; Brion, C. E.

    2001-08-01

    The branching ratios for molecular and dissociative photoionization of dimethyl ether (CH 3OCH 3, DME) have been measured in the VUV and soft X-ray regions using dipole (e,e+ion) coincidence spectroscopy (˜1 eV FWHM) at equivalent photon energies from the first ionization threshold up to 80 eV. The absolute partial oscillator strengths (cross-sections) for molecular and dissociative photoionization have been determined from recently published absolute photoabsorption oscillator strength data [R. Feng, G. Cooper, C.E. Brion, Chem. Phys. 260 (2000) 391] together with the photoionization branching ratios and the (multi-dissociative-corrected) photoionization efficiency obtained from time-of-flight mass spectra reported in the present work. No stable multiply charged molecular ion(s) from DME have been found in the present work. However, the fact that the photoionization efficiency has been measured as greater than unity above ˜30 eV indicates the existence of multi-dissociative products from Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ions. Appearance potentials of all ion products from DME are also reported. The presently reported results are compared with the previously published data where possible.

  1. A naturally occurring mutation within the probe-binding region compromises a molecular-based West Nile virus surveillance assay for mosquito pools (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Brault, Aaron C; Fang, Ying; Dannen, Maureen; Anishchenko, Michael; Reisen, William K

    2012-07-01

    A naturally occurring mutation was detected within the probe binding region targeting the envelope gene sequence of West Nile virus used in real-time polymerase chain reaction assays to test mosquito pools and other samples. A single C-->T transition 6nt from the 5' end of the 16mer in the envelope gene probe-binding region at genomic position 1,194 reduced assay sensitivity. The mutation first was detected in 2009 and persisted at a low prevalence into 2011. The mutation caused a 0.4% false negative error rate during 2011. These data emphasized the importance of confirmational testing and redundancy in surveillance systems relying on highly specific nucleic acid detection platforms.

  2. Molecular Identification of Veterinary Yeast Isolates by Use of Sequence-Based Analysis of the D1/D2 Region of the Large Ribosomal Subunit▿

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Cherilyn D.; Starr, Jennifer K.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Altier, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods—traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit—showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population. PMID:20392917

  3. Molecular identification of veterinary yeast isolates by use of sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Garner, Cherilyn D; Starr, Jennifer K; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig

    2010-06-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods-traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit-showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population.

  4. [Molecular characterization of extended-spectrum ss-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in hospitals of the Caribean Region, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gaitán C, Sandra L; Espinal M, Paula A

    2009-06-01

    ESBL-producing in Enterobacteriaceae, is the main resistance mechanism to extended spectrum cephalosporin and monobactams. Seventy isolates collected of hospitals in four cities of the Colombian Caribean, were characterized to ESBL production and metalo-beta-lactamases by microbiological test. The ss-lactamases characterization were performed by IEF and RPC; genotyping by PFGE. Results evidenced the ESBL production at four cities with more frequency in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from UCI. The ss-lactamases present in Escherichia coli and in K. pneumoniae contributed co-resistance to different antibiotic families. Enzymes were detected with resistance to cephalosporin and carbapenems, suggesting presence of carbapenemases. Polyclonal isolates noticed, neither demonstrated presence of endemic strains nor association with epidemic outbreak. It is evident the importance to combine clinical, microbiological and molecular information to surveillance the prevalence and evolution of these enzymes in these hospitals.

  5. Molecular markers for X-ray-insensitive differentiated cells in the Inner and outer regions of the mesenchymal space in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Machiko; Kudome-Takamatsu, Tomomi; Nishimura, Osamu; An, Yang; Kashima, Makoto; Shibata, Norito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-09-01

    Planarian's strong regenerative ability is dependent on stem cells (called neoblasts) that are X-ray-sensitive and proliferative stem cells. In addition to neoblasts, another type of X-ray-sensitive cells was newly identified by recent research. Thus, planarian's X-ray-sensitive cells can be divided into at least two populations, Type 1 and Type 2, the latter corresponding to planarian's classically defined "neoblasts". Here, we show that Type 1 cells were distributed in the outer region (OR) immediately underneath the muscle layer at all axial levels from head to tail, while the Type 2 cells were distributed in a more internal region (IR) of the mesenchymal space at the axial levels from neck to tail. To elucidate the biological significance of these two regions, we searched for genes expressed in differentiated cells that were locate close to these X-ray-sensitive cell populations in the mesenchymal space, and identified six genes mainly expressed in the OR or IR, named OR1, OR2, OR3, IR1, IR2 and IR3. The predicted amino acid sequences of these genes suggested that differentiated cells expressing OR1, OR3, IR1, or IR2 provide Type 1 and Type 2 cells with specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments.

  6. Plant molecular phylogeography in China and adjacent regions: Tracing the genetic imprints of Quaternary climate and environmental change in the world's most diverse temperate flora.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Fu, Cheng-Xing; Comes, Hans Peter

    2011-04-01

    The Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) of East Asia harbors the most diverse of the world's temperate flora, and was the most important glacial refuge for its Tertiary representatives ('relics') throughout Quaternary ice-age cycles. A steadily increasing number of phylogeographic studies in the SJFR of mainland China and adjacent areas, including the Qinghai-Tibetan-Plateau (QTP) and Sino-Himalayan region, have documented the population histories of temperate plant species in these regions. Here we review this current literature that challenges the oft-stated view of the SJFR as a glacial sanctuary for temperate plants, instead revealing profound effects of Quaternary changes in climate, topography, and/or sea level on the current genetic structure of such organisms. There are three recurrent phylogeographic scenarios identified by different case studies that broadly agree with longstanding biogeographic or palaeo-ecological hypotheses: (i) postglacial re-colonization of the QTP from (south-)eastern glacial refugia; (ii) population isolation and endemic species formation in Southwest China due to tectonic shifts and river course dynamics; and (iii) long-term isolation and species survival in multiple localized refugia of (warm-)temperate deciduous forest habitats in subtropical (Central/East/South) China. However, in four additional instances, phylogeographic findings seem to conflict with a priori predictions raised by palaeo-data, suggesting instead: (iv) glacial in situ survival of some hardy alpine herbs and forest trees on the QTP platform itself; (v) long-term refugial isolation of (warm-)temperate evergreen taxa in subtropical China; (vi) 'cryptic' glacial survival of (cool-)temperate deciduous forest trees in North China; and (vii) unexpectedly deep (Late Tertiary/early-to-mid Pleistocene) allopatric-vicariant differentiation of disjunct lineages in the East China-Japan-Korea region due to past sea transgressions. We discuss these and other consequences

  7. Molecular Basis of β-Thalassemia in the Population of the Aegean Region of Turkey: Identification of A Novel Deletion Mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozkinay, Ferda; Onay, Huseyin; Karaca, Emin; Arslan, Esra; Erturk, Biray; Ece Solmaz, Asli; Tekin, Ismihan Merve; Cogulu, Ozgur; Aydinok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is the most common monogenic disorder in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectrum of β-thal mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey. The data was derived from 1171 unrelated β-thal subjects, detected in a regional reference hospital between November 2004 and December 2013. Screening for the 22 common mutations was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse dot-blot method, and direct automated DNA sequencing for the unknown samples. Thirty-one different β-thal alleles were identified. Seven mutations, namely IVS-I-110 (G > A) (41.7%), IVS-I-1 (G > A) (8.9%), IVS-II-745 (C > G) (8.6%), codon 8 (-AA) (7.7%), IVS-II-1 (G > A) (7.2%), IVS-I-6 (T > C) (6.6%), codon 39 (C > T) (4.6%) accounted for 85.3% of the mutated alleles. Frequencies of the remaining 24 β-thal mutations were less than 2.2%; these included one novel mutation [HBB: c.206_212del (p.Leu69Profs*19)], and four others [-56 (G > C), codon 16 (-C), IVS-I (-3) (C > T) (codon 29), codon 76 (-C)] found in Turkey for the first time. The results will help to prevent severe β-thal through genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis (PND) in the Aegean region of Turkey.

  8. Molecular characterization of severe hemophilia A suggests that about half the mutations are not within the coding regions and splice junctions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Miyoko; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Kasch, L.; Warren, T.C.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R. ); Kasper, C. )

    1991-08-15

    Hemophilia A is an X chromosome-linked disorder resulting from deficiency of factor VIII, an important protein in blood coagulation. A large number of disease-producing mutations have been reported in the factor VIII gene. However, a comprehensive analysis of the mutations has been difficult because of the larger gene size, its many scattered exons, and the high frequency of de novo mutations. Recently, the authors have shown that nearly all mutations resulting in mild-to-moderate hemophilia A can be detected by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In this study, they attempted to discover the mutations causing severe hemophilia A by analyzing 47 unselected patients, 30 of whom had severe hemophilia and 17 of whom had mild-to-moderate disease. Using DGGE as a screening method, they analyzed 99% of the coding region, 94% of the splice junctions, the promoter region, and the polyadenylylation site of the gene. They found the mutation in 16 of 17 (94%) patients with mild-to-moderate disease but in only 16 of 30 (53%) patients with severe hemophilia A.

  9. Molecular Cloning of Spergen-4, Encoding a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Protein Associated with Sperm Flagella and the Acrosome Region in Rat Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howida, Ali; Salaheldeen, Elsaid; Iida, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We used a differential display in combination with complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning approach to isolate a novel rat gene LOC690919 with an open reading frame of 1227-length nucleotides encoding a protein of 409 amino acids. This gene was designated as Spergen-4 (a spermatogenic cell-specific gene-4). Spergen-4 mRNA was highly expressed in testis, and its expression was detected in rat testis starting at three weeks of postnatal development and persisting up to adulthood. Mouse and human orthologs, which lack N-terminal 77 amino acid residues of rat Spegen-4, were found in the database. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Spergen-4 was not expressed in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids, but was restrictedly detected at sperm head, cytoplasm, and developing flagella of elongated spermatids in rat testis. In mature spermatozoa, Spergen-4 was detected at the acrosome region as well as the principal piece of flagella. Spergen-4 immunosignal disappeared from sperm heads on acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. These data suggest that Spergen-4 integrated into elongated spermatids during spermiogenesis serves as a constituent for acrosome region and flagella of rat spermatozoa.

  10. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections samples and healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region.

    PubMed

    Svent-Kucina, Natasa; Pirs, Mateja; Kofol, Romina; Blagus, Rok; Smrke, Dragica Maja; Bilban, Marjan; Seme, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the most important human pathogens. It is associated with different infections and is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The aim of our study was to compare S. aureus isolates associated with SSTIs with isolates obtained from healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, genetic diversity by clonal complex (CC)/sequence type, spa type, and by toxin gene profiling. In total, 274 S. aureus isolates were collected prospectively by culturing wound samples from 461 SSTI patients and nasal samples from 451 healthy carriers. We have demonstrated high heterogeneity in terms of CCs and spa type in both groups of isolates. The main clone among SSTI strains was Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (pvl) positive CC121, whereas the main clone among carrier strains was CC45 carrying a large range of toxin genes. The main spa type in both groups was t091. Pvl was more frequently present in SSTI strains (31.2% SSTI vs 3.6% carrier strains) and staphylococcal enterotoxin C was more frequently present in carrier strains (1.6% SSTI vs 17.0% carrier strains). We have also demonstrated that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was a rare cause (2.8%) of SSTIs in our region.

  12. Molecular screening for P-element insertions in a large genomic region of Drosophila melanogaster using polymerase chain reaction mediated by the vectorette.

    PubMed Central

    Eggert, H; Bergemann, K; Saumweber, H

    1998-01-01

    As an alternative to existing methods for the detection of new insertions during a transposon mutagenesis, we adapted the method of vectorette ligation to genomic restriction fragments followed by PCR to obtain genomic sequences flanking the transposon. By combining flies containing a defined genomic transposon with an excess of flies containing unrelated insertion sites, we demonstrate the specificity and sensitivity of the procedure in the detection of integration events. This method was applied in a transposon-tagging screen for BJ1, the Drosophila homolog of the vertebrate gene Regulator of Chromosome Condensation (RCCI). Genetic mobilization of a single genomic P element was used to generate preferentially new local insertions from which integrations into a genomic region surrounding the BJ1 gene were screened. Flies harboring new insertions were phenotypically selected on the basis of the zeste1-dependent transvection of white. We detected a single transposition to a 13-kb region close to the BJ1 gene among 6650 progeny that were analyzed. Southern analysis of the homozygous line confirmed the integration 3 kb downstream of BJ1. PMID:9649531

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of the 17p11.2 region in patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Timmerman, V; Löfgren, A; Le Guern, E; Liang, P; De Jonghe, P; Martin, J J; Verhalle, D; Robberecht, W; Gouider, R; Brice, A; Van Broeckhoven, C

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is in most cases associated with an interstitial deletion of the same 1.5-Mb region at 17p11.2 that is duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) patients. Unequal crossing-over following misalignment at flanking repeat sequences (CMT1A-REP), either leads to tandem duplication in CMT1A patients or deletion in HNPP patients. With the use of polymorphic DNA markers located within the CMT1A/HNPP duplication/deletion region we detected the HNPP deletion in 16 unrelated HNPP patients, 11 of Belgian and 5 of French origin. In all cases, the 1.5-Mb size of the HNPP deletion was confirmed by EcoRI dosage analysis using a CMT1A-REP probe. In the 16 HNPP patients, the same 370/320-kb EagI deletion-junction fragments were detected with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), while in CMT1A patients, a 150-kb EagI duplication-junction fragment was seen. Thus, PFGE analysis of EagI-digested DNA with a CMT1A-REP probe allows direct detection of the HNPP deletion or the CMT1A duplication for DNA diagnostic purposes.

  14. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Virus in Two Italian Regions during 2010-2015: The Experience of Sicily and Liguria.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Orsi, Andrea; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Costantino, Claudio; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Vitale, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo

    2016-04-13

    Molecular epidemiology of influenza B virus remained poorly studied in Italy, despite representing a major contributor to seasonal epidemics. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin gene sequences of 197 influenza B strains circulating in both Southern (Sicily) and Northern (Liguria) Italy between 2010 and 2015. Upper respiratory tract specimens of patients displaying symptoms of influenza-like illness were screened by real-time RT-PCR assay for the presence of influenza B virus. PCR-positive influenza B samples were further analyzed by sequencing. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees were constructed and the amino-acid alignments were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed clusters in B/Victoria clade 1A/1B (n = 29, 14.7%), and B/Yamagata clades 2 (n = 112, 56.8%) and 3 (n = 56, 28.4%). Both influenza B lineages were found to co-circulate during the study period, although a lineage swap from B/Victoria to B/Yamagata occurred in Italy between January 2011 and January 2013. The most represented amino-acid substitutions were N116K in the 120-loop (83.9% of B/Yamagata clade 3 strains) and I146V in the 150-loop (89.6% of B/Victoria clade 1 strains). D197N in 190-helix was found in almost all viruses collected. Our findings provide further evidence to support the adoption of quadrivalent influenza vaccines in our country.

  15. Molecular and Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Organic Compounds from Particles Sampled from the Lower Fraser Valley, BC Urban and Regional Air Shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Gray, S. L.

    2001-12-01

    This study examines the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (N-VOCs) extracted from total suspended particulates. Aerosols are collected on filters by HiVol samplers on monthly intervals, at well-characterized meteorological sites throughout the Lower Fraser Valley. Filters are solvent-extracted , then separated into different compound classes by Silica-gel Chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon isotope ratio. The purpose is to identify spatial and temporal variations in N-VOCs, with the long-term goal of understanding their sources, transport processes and atmospheric chemistry. This Health Canada, Toxic Substance Research Initiative offers insights into the levels and signatures of N-VOCs exposed to humans in congested urban settings. The program is also part of the Pacific 2001 field study. This paper presents the initial year's results on our N-VOCs, including alkanes, organic acids, in comparison with bulk isotope analyses.

  16. Untypical even-to-odd predominance in the low-molecular n-alkanes of water, suspended matter, and bottom sediments in some regions of the Arctic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdova, Anastasia; Belyaev, Nikolay; Ponyaev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, several studies have shown an unusual predominance of even-carbon number n-alkanes in dissolved and particulate phase samples and sediment samples from various regions of the World Ocean [Nachman, 1985; Nishimura and Baker, 1985; Elias et al., 1997]. Different possible sources were proposed such as diagenesis (diagenetic origin from co-occurring fatty acids and alcohols), direct microbial input, microbial degradation of algal detritus, etc. Some researchers, however, are incredulous about this phenomenon and consider relatively high content of even-carbon number n-alkanes as contamination during the experiments. We report here the results of GC and GC-MS analysis of water, suspended particulate matter and sediment samples collected during 7 marine and coastal scientific expeditions to the White and Kara Seas, and to the central Arctic Basin (2004-2013). Many of the above samples (more than 30) present n-alkane distribution with a strong even-carbon number predominance of n-C14H30, and n-C16H34. Maximum enrichment was observed in some suspended matter samples with predominance of n-C16H34. The origin of even-carbon number n-alkanes in marine ecosystems is still not clear. In Antarctic region n-C16 and n-C18 and other even chain n-alkanes were reported to be dominant in the samples of the sea-ice algae, zooplankton and fish [Green et al. 1997] however in the Arctic region this phenomenon has not been demonstrated yet. Increasing of bacteria number and δ13C values observed in course of the accompanying studies [Lein et al., 2013] suggest existence of mechanism of phytoplankton bacterial destruction in the Arctic ecosystems, leading to formation of even-carbon number n-alkanes. R.J. Nachman - Lipids, Vol. 20, No 9, pp. 629-633 (1985). M. Nishimura, E.W. Baker - Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta, Vol. 50, pp. 299-305 (1986). V.O. Elias, B.R.T. Simoneit, J.N. Cardoso - Naturwissenschaften, Vol. 84, pp. 415-420 (1997). G. Green et al. - Marine Pollution

  17. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  18. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-02-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed.

  19. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-01-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed. PMID:9016583

  20. [Molecular characterisation and phenotypic description of two patients with reciprocal chromosomal aberrations in the region of the 3q29 microdeletion/microduplication syndromes].

    PubMed

    Quintela, I; Barros-Angueira, F; Perez-Gay, L; Dacruz, D; Castro-Gago, M; Carracedo, A; Eiris-Punal, J

    2015-09-16

    Introduccion. Los sindromes de microdelecion y microduplicacion 3q29 se caracterizan por una marcada heterogeneidad fenotipica, y el retraso del desarrollo y la discapacidad intelectual de grado leve-moderado son las manifestaciones clinicas mas frecuentes. Casos clinicos. Dos pacientes con aberraciones cromosomicas reciprocas en la region 3q29. La paciente con la microdelecion 3q29 presenta dificultades de aprendizaje, microcefalia limite, dismorfismo facial leve, deficit atencional e impulsividad, y rasgos ansiosos y obsesivos. El paciente con la microduplicacion 3q29 reciproca presenta dificultades de aprendizaje, dismorfismo facial leve y un perfil conductual disruptivo no asociado previamente con esta duplicacion. Conclusion. Se comparan los fenotipos de estos pacientes y se revisa la bibliografia de pacientes pediatricos con microdeleciones y microduplicaciones 3q29.

  1. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequence region in the Musaceae: structure, diversity and use in molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hřibová, Eva; Čížková, Jana; Christelová, Pavla; Taudien, Stefan; de Langhe, Edmond; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-03-22

    Genes coding for 45S ribosomal RNA are organized in tandem arrays of up to several thousand copies and contain 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA units separated by internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2. While the rRNA units are evolutionary conserved, ITS show high level of interspecific divergence and have been used frequently in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. In this work we report on the structure and diversity of the ITS region in 87 representatives of the family Musaceae. We provide the first detailed information on ITS sequence diversity in the genus Musa and describe the presence of more than one type of ITS sequence within individual species. Both Sanger sequencing of amplified ITS regions and whole genome 454 sequencing lead to similar phylogenetic inferences. We show that it is necessary to identify putative pseudogenic ITS sequences, which may have negative effect on phylogenetic reconstruction at lower taxonomic levels. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on ITS sequence showed that the genus Musa is divided into two distinct clades--Callimusa and Australimusa and Eumusa and Rhodochlamys. Most of the intraspecific banana hybrids analyzed contain conserved parental ITS sequences, indicating incomplete concerted evolution of rDNA loci. Independent evolution of parental rDNA in hybrids enables determination of genomic constitution of hybrids using ITS. The observation of only one type of ITS sequence in some of the presumed interspecific hybrid clones warrants further study to confirm their hybrid origin and to unravel processes leading to evolution of their genomes.

  2. Molecular analysis of red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a reclaimed mining region in Northern Ontario (Canada): soil metal accumulation and translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Narendrula, R; Michael, P; Omri, A

    2015-04-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum) species is one of the most widespread deciduous (hardwood) trees of eastern North America. It is among the dominant tree species in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. To date, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood. The main objectives of the present study are (1) to determine the level of phytoavailable metal in soil and accumulation in A. rubrum, and (2) to compare the levels of genetic variation among and within A. rubrum populations from areas with different metal contents in a Northern Ontario region. The total heavy metal levels were found to be high but the availability of these metals were much lower. We found that red maple does not accumulate heavy metals in their leaves as other hardwood species. The translocation factors were 0.05, 0.21, 0.38, 0.90, and 2.8 for Cu, Ni, Fe, Zn, and Mg, respectively. The levels of genetic variation in red maple populations from reclaimed lands in Northern Ontario were moderate to high since the percentage of polymorphic loci varied between 51 and 67%. The mean values for observed number of alleles (Na), effective number of alleles (Ne), Nei's gene diversity (h), and Shannon's information index (I) were 1.60, 1.24, 0.15 and 0.24, respectively. The population differentiation (GST) among the fragmented populations was high (0.28) despite a high level of gene flow (Nm = 1.28). Nevertheless, all the populations within the targeted region were genetically closely related. A specific ISSR marker that was identified in all the samples from the reference sites was absent in most samples from metal contaminated. This specific band was cloned and sequenced. Overall, the present study confirms that red maple populations in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable despite the high level of total metal content in soil.

  3. DNA polymorphisms in the controlling region of the human haptoglobin genes: a molecular explanation for the haptoglobin 2-1 modified phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, N

    1991-01-01

    A haptoglobin 2-1 modified (Hp2-1mod) phenotype results when the amount of Hp2 polypeptide synthesized in Hp2/Hp1 heterozygotes is less than that of Hp1 polypeptide. Cloned Hp2 DNA from an individual with the Hp2-1mod phenotype is here shown to have a C in place of the normal A at nucleotide position -61 in one of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) responsive elements of the haptoglobin promoter region. Direct sequencing of the haptoglobin promoter region, amplified by PCR, from DNA from unrelated American blacks showed a C at -61 in all of 10 individuals with the Hp2-1mod phenotype, in two of four with a "possible Hp2-1mod" phenotype, but in none of 15 with the Hp2-1 phenotype. Thus the -61C mutation in the Hp2-61C allele is strongly associated with the Hp2-1mod phenotype. Sequencing results also show that there are three other promoter sequences in the population studied; each can be associated with either Hp2 or Hp1. The variability seen in the Hp2-1mod phenotype, a variability which ranges from close to Hp2-1 to close to Hp1-1, can be explained, in part, by the existence of several Hp2 alleles differing in their promoters--and possibly, in part, by differences in the promoters of the accompanying Hp1 allele. A further part of the variability may be the consequence of differences in the way that the Hp2-61C and the Hp2 alleles respond to the IL-6-dependent factor during an acute-phase response. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2063867

  4. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of the Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus genomic region encoding the regulatory genes pkip, p47, lef-12, and gta.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Back, D W; Ding, Q; Carstens, E B

    2000-05-25

    Choristoneura fumiferana multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) is a baculovirus pathogenic to spruce budworm, the most damaging insect pest in Canadian forestry. CfMNPV is less virulent to its host insect and its replication cycle is slower than the baculovirus type species Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) but the basis of these characteristics is not known. We have now identified, localized, and determined the sequence of the region of CfMNPV carrying potentially important regulatory genes including p47, lef-12, gta, and pkip. DNA database searches revealed that this region of CfMNPV is most closely related to the homologous OpMNPV genes. Transcription analysis demonstrated that CfMNPV P47 is encoded by a 1.6-kb transcript, LEF-12 is encoded by a 2.6-kb transcript, and GTA is encoded by a 2.1-kb transcript. Transcripts for these genes were detectable at 6 h postinfection but all of them showed a burst in expression levels between 12 and 24 h postinfection corresponding to the time of initiation of CfMNPV DNA replication. A polyclonal antibody, raised against CfMNPV P47, detected a nuclear 43-kDa polypeptide from 12 to 72 h postinfection, demonstrating that the CfMNPV p47 gene product is first expressed at a time corresponding to the burst of transcriptional activity between the early and the late phases. Both AcMNPV and CfMNPV P47 translocate to the nucleus of infected cells.

  6. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population–diagnostic molecular marker

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-01-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population–diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  7. Molecular Scanning of β-Thalassemia in the Southern Region of Central Java, Indonesia; a Step Towards a Local Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Rujito, Lantip; Basalamah, Muhammad; Mulatsih, Sri; Sofro, Abdul Salam M

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic blood disorder worldwide, and particularly prevalent in Indonesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of β-thalassemia (β-thal) mutations found in the southern region of Central Java, Indonesia. The subjects of the study included 209 β-thal Javanese patients from Banyumas Residency, a southwest region of Central Java Province. DNA analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and the direct sequencing method. The results showed that 14 alleles were found in the following order: IVS-I-5 (G > C) (HBB: c.92 + 5G > C) 43.5%, codon 26 (Hb E; HBB: c.79G > A) 28.2%, IVS-I-1 (G > A) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > A) 5.0%, codon 15 (TGG > TAG) (HBB: c.47G > A) 3.8%, IVS-I-1 (G > T) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > T) 3.1%, codon 35 (-C) (HBB: c.110delC) 2.4%. The rest, including codons 41/42 (-TTCT) (HBB: c.126_129delCTTT), codons 8/9 (+G) (HBB: c.27_28insG), codon 19 (AAC > AGC) (HBB: c.59A > G), codon 17 (AAG > TAG) (HBB: c.52A > T), IVS-I-2 (T > C) (HBB: c.92 + 2T > C), codons 123/124/125 (-ACCCCACC) (HBB: c.370_378delACCCCACCA), codon 40 (-G) (HBB: c.123delG) and Cap +1 (A > C) (HBB: c.-50A > C), accounted for up to 1.0% each. The most prevalent alleles would be recommended to be used as part of β-thal screening for the Javanese, one of the major ethnic groups in the country.

  8. Molecular Scanning of β-Thalassemia in the Southern Region of Central Java, Indonesia; a Step Towards a Local Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Rujito, Lantip; Basalamah, Muhammad; Mulatsih, Sri; Sofro, Abdul Salam M

    2015-08-03

    Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic blood disorder worldwide, and particularly prevalent in Indonesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of β-thalassemia (β-thal) mutations found in the southern region of Central Java, Indonesia. The subjects of the study included 209 β-thal Javanese patients from Banyumas Residency, a southwest region of Central Java Province. DNA analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and the direct sequencing method. The results showed that 14 alleles were found in the following order: IVS-I-5 (G > C) (HBB: c.92 + 5G > C) 43.5%, codon 26 (Hb E; HBB: c.79G > A) 28.2%, IVS-I-1 (G > A) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > A) 5.0%, codon 15 (TGG > TAG) (HBB: c.47G > A) 3.8%, IVS-I-1 (G > T) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > T) 3.1%, codon 35 (-C) (HBB: c.110delC) 2.4%. The rest, including codons 41/42 (-TTCT) (HBB: c.126_129delCTTT), codons 8/9 (+G) (HBB: c.27_28insG), codon 19 (AAC > AGC) (HBB: c.59A > G), codon 17 (AAG > TAG) (HBB: c.52A > T), IVS-I-2 (T > C) (HBB: c.92 + 2T > C), codons 123/124/125 (-ACCCCACC) (HBB: c.370_378delACCCCACCA), codon 40 (-G) (HBB: c.123delG) and Cap +1 (A > C) (HBB: c.-50A > C), accounted for up to 1.0% each. The most prevalent alleles would be recommended to be used as part of β-thal screening for the Javanese, one of the major ethnic groups in the country.

  9. Molecular and Isotopic Analysis of Earthworm Fecal Matter as a Tool for Determining Carbon Cycling Dynamics in two Great Lakes Region Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.; Zurn-Birkhimer, S.

    2009-12-01

    Earthworms are frequently referred to as soil ecosystem engineers, reflecting their role as a potential major factor in controlling the dynamics of litter and soil organic matter transformations. Their significance is magnified when considering they are exotic in northern North American forests, humans acting as the main vector with transport of soil and recreational fishing. As a result of earthworm activity, forests can undergo significant changes to forest floor chemistry and soil structure, possibly increasing nutrient loss from both soil and leaf litter. The impact of earthworms on overall soil carbon stabilization/destabilization is largely unknown but likely a function of both species composition and edaphic soil properties. We are investigating the impacts of exotic earthworms on soils within two Great Lakes region forests; the Aspen free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) site, Rhinelander, WI, and forests in Red Lake Indian Reservation, MN. Aspen FACE provides an opportunity to document the changes that occur to forest chemistry and earthworm activity are a result of increased CO2, while the sites on the Red Lake Reservation are significant because of they contain a gradient of earthworm influence. At both sites earthworm populations were amassed from small pits and isolated to collect gut contents for isotopic and plant biopolymer chemistry analysis. Analysis are ongoing and will eventually include alkaline CuO extraction and isotopic analyses on the fecal matter, leaf litter, and soil to determine how plant biopolymers are vertically transported and mixed with soil from deeper horizons.

  10. Molecular determinants of enterovirus 71 viral entry: cleft around GLN-172 on VP1 protein interacts with variable region on scavenge receptor B 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Song, Zilin; Qi, Yonghe; Feng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Naiqing; Sun, Yinyan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Mao, Qunyin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Wenjuan; Wan, Xiaobo; Huang, Niu; Shen, Xinliang; Liang, Zhenglun; Li, Wenhui

    2012-02-24

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major pathogens that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease outbreaks in young children in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. Human scavenger receptor class B 2 (SCARB2) is the main cellular receptor for EV71 on target cells. The requirements of the EV71-SCARB2 interaction have not been fully characterized, and it has not been determined whether SCARB2 serves as an uncoating receptor for EV71. Here we compared the efficiency of the receptor from different species including human, horseshoe bat, mouse, and hamster and demonstrated that the residues between 144 and 151 are critical for SCARB2 binding to viral capsid protein VP1 of EV71 and seven residues from the human receptor could convert murine SCARB2, an otherwise inefficient receptor, to an efficient receptor for EV71 viral infection. We also identified that EV71 binds to SCARB2 via a canyon of VP1 around residue Gln-172. Soluble SCARB2 could convert the EV71 virions from 160 S to 135 S particles, indicating that SCARB2 is an uncoating receptor of the virus. The uncoating efficiency of SCARB2 significantly increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.6). These studies elucidated the viral capsid and receptor determinants of enterovirus 71 infection and revealed a possible target for antiviral interventions.

  11. Molecular analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) and truncated tRNA(Ala) gene segments in Campylobacter lari.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Tazumi, A; Nakanishi, S; Nakajima, T; Matsubara, K; Ueno, H; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M

    2012-06-01

    Following PCR amplification and sequencing, nucleotide sequence alignment analyses demonstrated the presence of two kinds of 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer regions (ISRs), namely, long length ISRs of 837-844 base pair (bp) [n = six for urease-negative (UN) Campylobacter lari isolates, UN C. lari JCM2530(T), RM2100, 176, 293, 299 and 448] and short length ISRs of 679-725 bp [n = six for UN C. lari: n = 14 for urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) isolates]. The analyses also indicated that the short length ISRs mainly lacked the 156 bp sequence from the nucleotide positions 122-277 bp in long length ISRs for UN C. lari JCM2530(T). The 156 bp sequences shared 94.9-96.8 % sequence similarity among six isolates. Surprisingly, atypical tRNA(Ala) gene segment (5' end 35 bp), which was extremely truncated, occurred within the 156 bp sequences in the long length ISRs, as an unexpected tRNA(Ala) pseudogene. An order of the intercistronic tRNA genes within the short nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ala)-tRNA(Ile)-23S rDNA-3' occurred in all the C. lari isolates examined.

  12. Double differential cross sections for proton induced electron emission from molecular analogues of DNA constituents for energies in the Bragg peak region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; Bug, Marion U.; Wang, Mingjie; Baek, Woon Yong; Buhr, Ticia; Hilgers, Gerhard; Champion, Christophe; Rabus, Hans

    2016-09-01

    For track structure simulations in the Bragg peak region, measured electron emission cross sections of DNA constituents are required as input for developing parameterized model functions representing the scattering probabilities. In the present work, double differential cross sections were measured for the electron emission from vapor-phase pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran, and trimethyl phosphate that are structural analogues to the base, the sugar, and the phosphate residue of the DNA, respectively. The range of proton energies was from 75 keV to 135 keV, the angles ranged from 15° to 135°, and the electron energies were measured from 10 eV to 200 eV. Single differential and total electron emission cross sections are derived by integration over angle and electron energy and compared to the semi-empirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht (HKS) model and a quantum mechanical calculation employing the first Born approximation with corrected boundary conditions (CB1). The CB1 provides the best prediction of double and single differential cross section, while total cross sections can be fitted with semi-empirical models. The cross sections of the three samples are proportional to their total number of valence electrons.

  13. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance-determining regions and their correlation with serotypes and genotypes among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan.

    PubMed

    Osawa, M; Ito, Y; Ishida, T; Imai, S; Ichiyama, S; Mishima, M

    2010-02-01

    We established the distribution of amino acid alterations in quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan and described the correlation of these alterations with serotypes determined by multilocus sequencing typing. Among 141 S. pneumoniae isolates, five levofloxacin-resistant isolates harbored mutations in both gyrA and parC and/or parE and were clonally unrelated. Among 136 levofloxacin-susceptible isolates, one isolate (MIC = 2 mg/l) had a first-step parC mutation at Asp78. Twenty isolates had Lys137Asp in parC and Ile460Val in parE and contained nine serotypes and eight clonal complexes (CCs), including all eight Colombia(23F)-26 (CC138) isolates. Eighty-one isolates had Ile460Val in parE alone and contained 14 serotypes and 16 CCs, including 36 of 37 Netherlands(3)-31 (CC180) isolates and all 22 Taiwan(19F)-14 (CC271) isolates. In contrast, seven of ten Taiwan(23F)-15 (CC242) isolates were wild-type. Although each QRDR genotype contained various serotypes and CCs, prevalent clones were mostly associated with a single QRDR genotype.

  14. Molecular analysis of aspermic Fasciola flukes from Korea on the basis of the nuclear ITS1 region and mitochondrial DNA markers and comparison with Japanese aspermic Fasciola flukes.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2012-07-01

    It has been speculated that populations of aspermic Fasciola flukes in Korea and Japan have a close phylogenetic relationship. To evaluate this, we analyzed 33 Korean aspermic Fasciola flukes on the basis of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) and cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) sequences. Fh, Fg, and Fh/Fg types were detected in the ITS1 region and displayed the fragment patterns of F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and both species, respectively by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Additionally, three concatenated haplotypes of nad1 and cox1(nad1/cox1) were detected, and 2 of these, Kor1/Kor1 (Fsp1/Fsp1) haplotype and Kor2a/Kor2 (Fsp2/Fsp2) haplotype, were shared by Korean and Japanese aspermic flukes. The Fst value (0.019), calculated using the concatenated sequences, indicated that Korean and Japanese aspermic Fasciola populations were genetically undifferentiated. Interestingly, a combination of the Fh/Fg type and Kor1/Kor1 haplotype was found at the highest frequency in Korean aspermic flukes, whereas the Fg type and Fsp2/Fsp2 haplotype combination was found at a conspicuously high frequency in Japanese aspermic flukes. This indicates that a founder effect caused by the introduction of infected hosts may have played a key role in the introduction of aspermic Fasciola flukes from Korea into Japan.

  15. Genetic Structure of Earthworm Populations at a Regional Scale: Inferences from Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Molecular Markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations. PMID:25003795

  16. [Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of enteroviruses inducing the outbreaks and seasonal rises of morbidity in different regions of the Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Amvros'eva, T V; Poklonskaia, N V; Bezruchko, A A; Fisenko, E G

    2006-01-01

    As shown by the results of the analysis, viruses ECHO 30 circulating over the period of the last 8 years in Belarus, belonged to 3 different genetic subtypes which earlier or simultaneously circulated in other European states. The outbreaks of enterovirus infections (EVI) were facilitated by the appearance of a genetic viral subtype, relatively "new" for human population, and which had not earlier circulated on this territory. Thus, the development of outbreak morbidity in 2003 was caused by a change in the dominating subtype of virus ECHO 30, which caused the outbreak of 1997. The relatively "soft" rise of morbidity in 2004 was due to the continued circulation of the same subtype of virus ECHO 30, that in 2003. The largest outbreaks of EVI in the Republic of Belarus had a number of considerable differences: the outbreak of 1997 in Gomel was characterized by the genetic heterogeneity of infective agents, being simultaneously geographically localized within the limits of one city. However, during the outbreaks of 2003 the circulation of genetically closely related viruses of the one subtype among the population of geographically remote regions of the country was registered.

  17. Molecular phylogenetics of the species-rich angiosperm genus Goniothalamus (Annonaceae) inferred from nine chloroplast DNA regions: Synapomorphies and putative correlated evolutionary changes in fruit and seed morphology.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chin Cheung; Thomas, Daniel C; Saunders, Richard M K

    2015-11-01

    A phylogenetic study of the genus Goniothalamus (Annonaceae) is presented using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, with 65 species sampled (48.5% of the genus) based on sequences of nine chloroplast DNA regions (11,214 aligned positions). The resultant phylogeny clearly indicates that Goniothalamus is monophyletic. Preliminary research initially focused on identifying synapomorphies and estimating the phylogenetic signal of selected morphological characters based on parsimony and likelihood ancestral character state reconstructions. This prescreening of characters enabled 40 to be selected for further study, and of these 15 are shown here to demonstrate significant phylogenetic signal and to provide clear synapomorphies for several infrageneric clades. Although floral structure in Goniothalamus is comparatively uniform, suggesting a common basic pattern of pollination ecology, fruit and seed morphology in the genus is very diverse and is presumably associated with different patterns of frugivory. The present study assesses correlations amongst fruit and seed characters which are putatively of functional importance with regard to frugivory and dispersal. One-way phylogenetic ANOVA indicates significant phylogenetically independent correlation between the following fruit and seed characters: fruits borne on older branches and/or on the main trunk have larger monocarps than fruits borne on young branches; and monocarps that contain seeds with a hairy testa are larger than those with glabrous seeds. We discuss fruit morphologies and potential explanations for the inferred correlations, and suggest that they may be the result of adaptation to different frugivores (birds, larger non-volant animal and primate seed dispersers, respectively).

  18. Genetic structure of earthworm populations at a regional scale: inferences from mitochondrial and microsatellite molecular markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826).

    PubMed

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations.

  19. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-09

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  20. Molecular Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cunfeng; van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Jansen, Paul; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Wall, Thomas E.; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2016-12-01

    The resolution of any spectroscopic or interferometric experiment is ultimately limited by the total time a particle is interrogated. Here we demonstrate the first molecular fountain, a development which permits hitherto unattainably long interrogation times with molecules. In our experiments, ammonia molecules are decelerated and cooled using electric fields, launched upwards with a velocity between 1.4 and 1.9 m/s and observed as they fall back under gravity. A combination of quadrupole lenses and bunching elements is used to shape the beam such that it has a large position spread and a small velocity spread (corresponding to a transverse temperature of <10 μ K and a longitudinal temperature of <1 μ K ) when the molecules are in free fall, while being strongly focused at the detection region. The molecules are in free fall for up to 266 ms, making it possible, in principle, to perform sub-Hz measurements in molecular systems and paving the way for stringent tests of fundamental physics theories.

  1. Precise molecular weight determination of PCR products of the rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus, closely related species of bacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Y A; Nagpal, M; Krahmer, M T; Fox, K F; Fox, A

    2000-05-01

    Assessment of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequence variability is an important supplement to 16S rRNA sequencing for differentiating closely related bacterial species. Species differentiation can also be achieved by determination of approximate size of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) products of ISRs, based on their relative electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Closely-related species can have ISR PCR products that are similar in size. More precise molecular weight (M.W.) determination of these products might allow improved discrimination of such species. Electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-MS) has the potential to provide such precision. For ESI-Q-MS analysis, size limitation of PCR products is currently limited to around 130 base pairs (bp). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus atrophaeus are two closely related species with few distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. B. subtilis has recently been sub-divided into two subgroups, W23 (type strain, W23) and 168 (type strain, 168). PCR products amplified from the ISR including the 5' terminal end of the 23S rRNA and a conserved portion of the ISR were analyzed by ESI-Q-MS. A 119 or 120 bp PCR product was produced for B. atrophaeus strains. However, strains of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 each produced 114 bp products. In summary, a mass spectrometry method was developed for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus. Also, the genetic similarity of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 was confirmed. Accurate determination of the molecular weight of PCR products from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry has great potential as a general technique for characterizing closely related bacterial species.

  2. Molecular detection of human noroviruses in influent and effluent samples from two biological sewage treatment plants in the region of Monastir, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hassine-Zaafrane, Mouna; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Kaplon, Jérôme; Ben Salem, Imen; Pothier, Pierre; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia

    2014-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are responsible for numerous cases of waterborne and foodborne gastroenteritis every year. They are released in the sewage and their detection in this environment can reflect the epidemiology of the viral strains circulating in the community. A three-year (2007-2010) survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of human NoVs using RT-PCR in 518 sewage samples collected at the entrance and exit of two biological sewage treatment plants located in Monastir region, Tunisia. In this study, we aimed to genetically characterize the most prevalent GI and GII NoV strains, in order to obtain a rough estimate of the efficacy of disinfection treatments and to compare the results with clinical data documented in the same area during the same period. This work confirms the wide circulation and the genetic diversity of NoVs in Tunisia and the widespread distribution of NoV variants in both raw and treated wastewater. Indeed, NoV was detected in 192 (37.1%) sewage samples, among them mixed infections with group A rotavirus were detected in 125 (65.1%) cases. The genotypes of the GI NoVs were GI.1, GI.2, GI.4, GI.5, and GI of unassigned genotype (GI.UA), and the genotypes of the GII NoVs were all GII.12. This study enhances the currently poor environmental virological data gathered in Tunisia, demonstrates the benefit of environmental surveillance as a tool to determine the epidemiology of NoVs circulating in a given community, and underlines the need for the design and support of similar long-term studies in our country, in order to compensate for the absence of a national surveillance system for gastroenteric viruses.

  3. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5’- and 3’-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  4. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species.

  5. An asynchronous unfolding among molecular different regions of lobster D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and maltotetraose-forming amylase from an Alcaligenes sp. during guanidine denaturation.

    PubMed

    He, R Q; Zhao, K Y; Yan, Z Z; Li, M

    1993-06-04

    Changes in ultraviolet absorbance and intrinsic protein fluorescence of 1,4-alpha-D-glucan maltotetrahydrolase (EC 3.2.1.60) from an Alcaligenes sp. (Gram-negative bacteria 537.1) and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12) have been compared with their inactivation during denaturation in guanidinium-Cl solutions. The two enzymes were completely inactivated at GuHCl concentrations less than 0.6 M and this was accompanied by marked absorbance and intrinsic fluorescence changes suggesting exposure of aromatic residues. The changes of the intrinsic fluorescence of the amylase have a relatively constant plateau in emission intensities and maxima at GuHCl concentrations from 0.8-2.0 M, similar to that of muscle GAPDH. The relative activity of the enzyme increased markedly in dilute GuHCl solutions accompanied by very little change of its intrinsic fluorescence at 8 degrees C. The kinetic decrease in emission intensities, excited respectively by 230 nm and 292 nm, was different for the two enzymes. The inactivation was a biphasic process with a fast phase faster than the unfolding rate as measured by fluorescence changes in 0.5 M GuHCl solution. Similar to the inactivation process, changes in intensity of 410 nm NAD fluorescent derivative of GAPDH which is in situ at the active site is also a biphasic process under the same condition. It appears that there may be an unfolding intermediate state of the enzymes and an asynchronous unfolding process among the different regions in the molecules during GuHCl denaturation, this may be due to differences in their flexibility.

  6. Molecular characterization and second-line antituberculosis drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the northern region of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Said, Halima M; Kock, Marleen M; Ismail, Nazir A; Mphahlele, Matsie; Baba, Kamaldeen; Omar, Shaheed V; Osman, Ayman G; Hoosen, Anwar A; Ehlers, Marthie M

    2012-09-01

    Despite South Africa being one of the high-burden multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) countries, information regarding the population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains is limited from many regions of South Africa. This study investigated the population structure and transmission patterns of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in a high-burden setting of South Africa as well as the possible association of genotypes with drug resistance and demographic characteristics. A total of 336 consecutive MDR-TB isolates from four provinces of South Africa were genotyped using spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Drug susceptibility testing for ofloxacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was performed using the agar proportion method. The results showed that 4.8% of MDR-TB isolates were resistant to ofloxacin, 2.7% were resistant to kanamycin, and 4.5% were resistant to capreomycin, while 7.1% were extensively drug resistant (XDR), and the remaining 83.6% were susceptible to all of the second-line drugs tested. Spoligotyping grouped 90.8% of the isolates into 25 clusters, while 9.2% isolates were unclustered. Ninety-one percent of the 336 isolates were assigned to 21 previously described shared types, with the Beijing family being the predominant genotype in the North-West and Limpopo Provinces, while the EAI1_SOM family was the predominant genotype in the Gauteng and Mpumalanga Provinces. No association was found between genotypes and specific drug resistance patterns or demographic information. The high level of diversity and the geographical distribution of the drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in this study suggest that the transmission of TB in the study settings is not caused by the clonal spread of a specific M. tuberculosis strain.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of the subgenus Ceratotropis (genus Vigna, Leguminosae) reveals three eco-geographical groups and Late Pliocene–Pleistocene diversification: evidence from four plastid DNA region sequences

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Firouzeh; Tun, Ye Tun; Kawase, Makoto; Guan, Kaiyun; Yamaguchi, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The subgenus Ceratotropis in the genus Vigna is widely distributed from the Himalayan highlands to South, Southeast and East Asia. However, the interspecific and geographical relationships of its members are poorly understood. This study investigates the phylogeny and biogeography of the subgenus Ceratotropis using chloroplast DNA sequence data. Methods Sequence data from four intergenic spacer regions (petA-psbJ, psbD-trnT, trnT-trnE and trnT-trnL) of chloroplast DNA, alone and in combination, were analysed using Bayesian and parsimony methods. Divergence times for major clades were estimated with penalized likelihood. Character evolution was examined by means of parsimony optimization and MacClade. Key Results Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on the combined data demonstrated well-resolved species relationships in which 18 Vigna species were divided into two major geographical clades: the East Asia–Southeast Asian clade and the Indian subcontinent clade. Within these two clades, three well-supported eco-geographical groups, temperate and subtropical (the East Asia–Southeast Asian clade) and tropical (the Indian subcontinent clade), are recognized. The temperate group consists of V. minima, V. nepalensis and V. angularis. The subtropical group comprises the V. nakashimae–V. riukiuensis–V. minima subgroup and the V. hirtella–V. exilis–V. umbellata subgroup. The tropical group contains two subgroups: the V. trinervia–V. reflexo-pilosa–V. trilobata subgroup and the V. mungo–V. grandiflora subgroup. An evolutionary rate analysis estimated the divergence time between the East Asia–Southeast Asia clade and the Indian subcontinent clade as 3·62 ± 0·3 million years, and that between the temperate and subtropical groups as 2·0 ± 0·2 million years. Conclusions The findings provide an improved understanding of the interspecific relationships, and ecological and geographical phylogenetic structure of the subgenus

  8. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus (L) from north-east India as revealed by meiosis, and molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hynniewta, Marlykynti; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2014-12-01

    The north-eastern region of India is reported to be the center of origin and rich in diversity of Citrus (L.) species, where some wild and endangered species namely Citrus indica, Citrus macroptera, Citrus latipes, Citrus ichagensis and Citrus assamensis exist in their natural and undisturbed habitat. In order to have comprehensive information about the extent of genetic variability and the occurrence of cryptic genomic hybridity between and within various Citrus species, a combined approach involving morphological, cytogenetical and molecular approaches were adopted in the present study. Cytogenetic approaches are known to resolve taxonomic riddles in a more efficient manner, by clearly delineating taxa at species and sub species levels. Male meiotic studies revealed a gametic chromosome number of n = 9, without any evidence of numerical variations. Bivalents outnumbered all other types of associations in pollen mother cells (PMCs) analyzed at diplotene, diakinesis and metaphase I. Univalents were frequently encountered in nine species presently studied, though their presence appropriately did not influence the distributional pattern of the chromosomes at anaphases I and II. The molecular approaches for phylogenetic analysis based on sequence data related to ITS 1, ITS 2 and ITS 1 + 5.8 s + ITS 2 of rDNA using maximum parsimony method and Bayesian inference have thrown light on species inter-relationship and evolution of Citrus species confirming our cytogenetical interpretations. The three true basic species i.e. Citrus medica, Citrus maxima and Citrus reticulata with their unique status have been resolved into distinct clades with molecular approaches as well. C. indica which occupies a unique position in the phylogenetic ladder of the genus Citrus has been resolved as a distinct clade and almost behaving as an out-group. The presences of quadrivalents in C. indica also echo and support its unique position. From our study it is amply clear that C

  9. Isolation of Microsporum gypseum in soil samples from different geographical regions of brazil, evaluation of the extracellular proteolytic enzymes activities (keratinase and elastase) and molecular sequencing of selected strains

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Mauro Cintra; Reis-Menezes, Adriana Araújo; Rittner, Glauce Mary Gomes; Mota, Adolfo José; Gambale, Walderez

    2012-01-01

    A survey of Microsporum gypseum was conducted in soil samples in different geographical regions of Brazil. The isolation of dermatophyte from soil samples was performed by hair baiting technique and the species were identified by morphology studies. We analyzed 692 soil samples and the recuperating rate was 19.2%. The activities of keratinase and elastase were quantitatively performed in 138 samples. The sequencing of the ITS region of rDNA was performed in representatives samples. M. gypseum isolates showed significant quantitative differences in the expression of both keratinase and elastase, but no significant correlation was observed between these enzymes. The sequencing of the representative samples revealed the presence of two teleomorphic species of M. gypseum (Arthroderma gypseum and A. incurvatum). The enzymatic activities may play an important role in the pathogenicity and a probable adaptation of this fungus to the animal parasitism. Using the phenotypical and molecular analysis, the Microsporum identification and their teleomorphic states will provide a useful and reliable identification system. PMID:24031904

  10. Microsatellite mapping of the deletion in patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP): new molecular tools for the study of the region 17p12 --> p11 and for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    LeGuern, E; Ravise, N; Gouider, R; Gugenheim, M; Lopes, J; Bouche, P; Agid, Y; Brice, A

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by recurrent episodes of nerve palsies. We have analyzed 11 microsatellite markers from chromosome 17p12 --> p11 in nine French families with HNPP. The three microsatellites D17S839 (afm200yb12), D17S955 (afm317ygl), and D17S921 (afm191xh12) were localized in the deleted region. In allele segregation analyses, the microsatellite D17S793 (afm165zd4) detected two chromosome 17-linked loci, one of which was deleted in HNPP patients. Using these STR markers, we found that the deletion coincided with the CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit in eight of the nine families. In the remaining pedigree, the deletion lay between the centromeric microsatellite D17S805 (afm234tal) and the telomeric marker D17S922 (afm197xh6), which flank the CMT1A monomer unit. Comparison of these data with the available genetic and physical maps of 17p12 --> p11 shows that this region, which is frequently subject to rearrangement-inducing diseases, such as Smith-Magenis syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A, and HNPP, presents recombination hot spots. Finally, this study demonstrates the usefulness of the D17S122 (RM11GT) and D17S921 (afm191xh12) microsatellites as tools for the molecular diagnosis of HNPP.

  11. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  12. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  13. Molecular breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of molecular and genomic tools to assist selection of parents or progeny has become an integral part of modern cotton breeding. In this chapter, the basic components of molecular cotton breeding are described. These components include: molecular marker development, genetic and physical map const...

  14. Identification of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using a simple set of biochemical tests correlating with 16S-23S interspace region molecular weight patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Martison; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus spp. not only as human pathogens, but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants, requires the development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification in medically important samples. The aim of this study was to compare three phenotypic methods for the identification of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using the PCR of the 16S-23S interspace region generating molecular weight patterns (ITR-PCR) as reference. All 57 S. saprophyticus studied were correctly identified using only the novobiocin disk. A rate of agreement of 98.0% was obtained for the simplified battery of biochemical tests in relation to ITR-PCR, whereas the Vitek I system and novobiocin disk showed 81.2% and 89.1% agreement, respectively. No other novobiocin-resistant non-S. saprophyticus strain was identified. Thus, the novobiocin disk is a feasible alternative for the identification of S. saprophyticus in urine samples in laboratories with limited resources. ITR-PCR and the simplified battery of biochemical tests were more reliable than the commercial systems currently available. This study confirms that automated systems are still unable to correctly differentiate CoNS species and that simple, reliable and inexpensive methods can be used for routine identification.

  15. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  16. Warm and Dense Molecular Gas in the N 159 Region: 12CO J = 4-3 and 13CO J = 3-2 Observations with NANTEN2 and ASTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoji; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Muller, Erik; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mizuno, Akira; Stutzki, Jürgen; Pineda, Jorge L.; Klein, Uli; Bertoldi, Frank; Koo, Bon-Chul; Rubio, Monica; Burton, Michael; Benz, Arnold; Ezawa, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Ott, Jürgen; Wong, Tony; Hughes, Annie; Meixner, Margaret; Indebetouw, Remy; Gordon, Karl D.; Whitney, Barbara; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Fukui, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    New 12CO J = 4-3 and 13CO J = 3-2 observations of the N 159 region, an active site of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud, have been made with the NANTEN2 and ASTE submillimeter telescopes, respectively. The 12CO J = 4-3 distribution is separated into three clumps, each associated with N 159 W, N 159 E, and N 159 S. These new measurements toward the three clumps are used in coupled calculations of molecular rotational excitation and line radiation transfer, along with other transitions of the 12CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, J = 3-2, and J = 7-6 as well as the isotope transitions of 13CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, J = 3-2, and J = 4-3. The 13CO J = 3-2 data were newly taken for the present work. The temperatures and densities were found to be ˜70-80 K and ˜3 × 10³ cm-3 in N 159 W and N 159 E, and ˜30 K and ˜1.6 × 10³ cm-3 in N 159 S. These results were compared with the star-formation activity based on data of young stellar clusters and HII regions as well as midinfrared emission obtained with the Spitzer MIPS. The N 159 E clump is associated with cluster(s) embedded, as observed at 24μm by the Spitzer MIPS, and the derived high temperature, 80 K, is interpreted as being heated by these sources. The N 159 E clump is likely to be responsible for a dark lane in a large HII region by dust extinction. On the other hand, the N 159 W clump is associated with clusters embedded mainly toward the eastern edge of the clump only. These clusters show offsets of 20''-40'' from the 12CO J = 4-3 peak, and are probably responsible for heating indicated by the derived high temperature, 70 K. The N 159 W clump exhibits no sign of star formation toward the 12CO J = 4-3 peak position and its western region that shows enhanced R4-3/1-0 and R3-2/1-0 ratios. We therefore suggest that the N 159 W peak represents a pre-star-cluster core of ˜105Modot which deserves further detailed studies. The N 159 S clump shows little sign of star formation, as is consistent with the lower

  17. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  18. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  19. MUSCLE W49: A multi-scale continuum and line exploration of the most luminous star formation region in the Milky Way. I. Data and the mass structure of the giant molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Pineda, J. E.; Peng, T.-C.; Liu, H. B.; Ho, P. T. P.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E. R.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Zapata, L.; Peters, T.; De Pree, C. G.

    2013-12-20

    The Multi-scale Continuum and Line Exploration of W49 is a comprehensive gas and dust survey of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) of W49A, the most luminous star-formation region in the Milky Way. The project covers, for the first time, the entire GMC at different scales and angular resolutions. In this paper, we present (1) an all-configuration Submillimeter Array mosaic in the 230 GHz (1.3 mm) band covering the central ∼3' × 3' (∼10 pc, known as W49N), where most of the embedded massive stars reside and (2) Purple Mountain Observatory 14 m telescope observations in the 90 GHz band, covering the entire GMC with maps of up to ∼35' × 35' in size, or ∼113 pc. We also make use of archival data from the Very Large Array, JCMT-SCUBA, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory BOLOCAM Galactic Plane Survey. We derive the basic physical parameters of the GMC at all scales. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The W49 GMC is one of the most massive in the Galaxy, with a total mass M {sub gas} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} within a radius of 60 pc. Within a radius of 6 pc, the total gas mass is M {sub gas} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. At these scales, only ∼1% of the material is photoionized. The mass reservoir is sufficient to form several young massive clusters (YMCs) as massive as a globular cluster. (2) The mass of the GMC is distributed in a hierarchical network of filaments. At scales <10 pc, a triple, centrally condensed structure peaks toward the ring of HC H II regions in W49N. This structure extends to scales from ∼10 to 100 pc through filaments that radially converge toward W49N and its less-prominent neighbor W49S. The W49A starburst most likely formed from global gravitational contraction with localized collapse in a 'hub-filament' geometry. (3) Currently, feedback from the central YMCs (with a present mass M {sub cl} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) is still not enough to entirely disrupt the GMC, but further stellar

  20. MUSCLE W49: A Multi-Scale Continuum and Line Exploration of the Most Luminous Star Formation Region in the Milky Way. I. Data and the Mass Structure of the Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Pineda, J. E.; Peng, T.-C.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E. R.; Ho, P. T. P.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Zapata, L.; Peters, T.; De Pree, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Multi-scale Continuum and Line Exploration of W49 is a comprehensive gas and dust survey of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) of W49A, the most luminous star-formation region in the Milky Way. The project covers, for the first time, the entire GMC at different scales and angular resolutions. In this paper, we present (1) an all-configuration Submillimeter Array mosaic in the 230 GHz (1.3 mm) band covering the central ~3' × 3' (~10 pc, known as W49N), where most of the embedded massive stars reside and (2) Purple Mountain Observatory 14 m telescope observations in the 90 GHz band, covering the entire GMC with maps of up to ~35' × 35' in size, or ~113 pc. We also make use of archival data from the Very Large Array, JCMT-SCUBA, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory BOLOCAM Galactic Plane Survey. We derive the basic physical parameters of the GMC at all scales. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The W49 GMC is one of the most massive in the Galaxy, with a total mass M gas ~ 1.1 × 106 M ⊙ within a radius of 60 pc. Within a radius of 6 pc, the total gas mass is M gas ~ 2 × 105 M ⊙. At these scales, only ~1% of the material is photoionized. The mass reservoir is sufficient to form several young massive clusters (YMCs) as massive as a globular cluster. (2) The mass of the GMC is distributed in a hierarchical network of filaments. At scales <10 pc, a triple, centrally condensed structure peaks toward the ring of HC H II regions in W49N. This structure extends to scales from ~10 to 100 pc through filaments that radially converge toward W49N and its less-prominent neighbor W49S. The W49A starburst most likely formed from global gravitational contraction with localized collapse in a "hub-filament" geometry. (3) Currently, feedback from the central YMCs (with a present mass M cl >~ 5 × 104 M ⊙) is still not enough to entirely disrupt the GMC, but further stellar mass growth could be enough to allow radiation pressure to clear the

  1. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  2. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  3. W3 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Thronson, H.A.,JR.; Lada, C.J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-10-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots. 31 references.

  4. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  5. Effect of dark, hard, and vitreous kernel content on protein molecular weight distribution and on milling and breadmaking quality characteristics for hard spring wheat samples from diverse growing regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kernel vitreousness is an important grading characteristic for segregation of sub-classes of hard red spring (HRS) wheat in the U.S. This research investigated the protein molecular weight distribution (MWD), and flour and baking quality characteristics of different HRS wheat market sub-classes. T...

  6. The molecular universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2013-07-01

    Molecular absorption and emission bands dominate the visible, infrared, and submillimeter spectra of most objects with associated gas. These observations reveal a surprisingly rich array of molecular species and attest to a complex chemistry taking place in the harsh environment of the interstellar medium of galaxies. Molecules are truly everywhere and an important component of interstellar gas. This review surveys molecular observations in the various spectral windows and summarizes the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of interstellar molecules. The rich organic inventory of space reflects the multitude of chemical processes involved that, on the one hand, build up molecules an atom at a time and, on the other hand, break down large molecules injected by stars to smaller fragments. Both this bottom-up and the trickle-down chemistry are reviewed. The emphasis is on understanding the characteristics of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and fullerenes and their role in chemistry as well as the intricate interaction of gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions and the chemistry taking place on grain surfaces in dense clouds in setting the organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation and their implications for the chemical history of the Solar System. Many aspects of molecular astrophysics are illustrated with recent observations of the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory.

  7. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  8. Molecular Thermometry

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kevin M.; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients’ temperatures could be measured, recorded and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nano-scale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even sub-cellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers. PMID:20139796

  9. Molecular Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaud, V.; Bonneviot, L.

    Our senses of smell and taste are able to recognise molecules selectively, to the point where they can even discriminate between different chiral states. This property, called molecular recognition, is essential to all forms of life [1]. It is based on the principle of a specific interaction between a receptor or host and a target molecule, which will be identified among a multitude of others, then selectively adsorbed. If the host is endowed with reactive functions, the attached molecule may be transported or transformed. Enzymes are the archetypal host molecules exploiting the idea of molecular recognition. Their complexation sites comprise a hydrophobic pocket with definite shape within which amino acid residues are located in a precisely defined way. The combined effect of these different characteristics underlies not only the affinity for some specific substrate, but also the transformation of this substrate into the desired product [2]. In fact, the phenomena actually brought into play are much more involved, being made up of an ensemble of physicochemical events that act together in a cooperative way, either simultaneously or sequentially, and in which the molecular processes are difficult to follow in detail.

  10. [CII] dynamics in the S140 region

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, C.; Röllig, M.; Okada, Y.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Collaboration: WADI Team

    2015-01-22

    We report the observation of [C II] emission in a cut through the S140 region together with single pointing observations of several molecular tracers, including hydrides, in key regions of the photon-dominated region (PDR) and molecular cloud [1]. At a distance of 910 pc, a BOV star ionizes the edge of the molecular cloud L1204, creating S140. In addition, the dense molecular cloud hosts a cluster of embedded massive young stellar objects only 75' from the H II region [e.g. 2, 3]. We used HIFI on Herschel to observe [CII] in a strip following the direction of the impinging radiation across the ionisation front and through the cluster of embedded YSOs. With [C II], we can trace the ionising radiation and, together with the molecular tracers such as CO isotopologues and HCO{sup +}, study the dynamical processes in the region. Combining HIFIs high spectral resolution data with ground based molecular data allows us to study the dynamics and excitation conditions both in the ionization front and the dense molecular star forming region and model their physical conditions [4].

  11. Molecular characterization of tat gene and long terminal repeat region of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 detected among the injecting drug users (IDUs) of Manipur, India: identification of BC recombinants.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2010-02-01

    The tat gene of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is responsible for the initiation and elongation of viral transcription through the LTR (long terminal repeat) transactivation process. Our study included structural and functional analyses of the tat gene and LTR region of 35 injecting drug users (IDUs) from Manipur (a north-eastern state in India and a potential source of HIV-1 recombinants) in order to search for the recombinants and variation in the transactivation process if any due to recombination. Analysis showed prevalence of subtype C with few BC recombinants for the tat gene showing identical recombination breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR region of those IDU strains showed strong resemblance to Indian subtype C forming a completely separate cluster from the other global C LTR sequences. The TAR element (transactivator response region) in all the LTR sequences was fairly conserved. Further study of the transactivation rate of the C and BC tat for the Manipur C LTR showed almost equal transactivity in both the cases. This is the first report of characterisation of tat gene and LTR region of HIV-1 samples among IDUs from north-eastern India.

  12. Molecular population genetics of the OBP83 genomic region in Drosophila subobscura and D. guanche: contrasting the effects of natural selection and gene arrangement expansion in the patterns of nucleotide variation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gracia, A; Rozas, J

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal inversion polymorphism play a major role in the evolutionary dynamics of populations and species because of their effects on the patterns of genetic variability in the genomic regions within inversions. Though there is compelling evidence for the adaptive character of chromosomal polymorphisms, the mechanisms responsible for their maintenance in natural populations is not fully understood. For this type of analysis, Drosophila subobscura is a good model species as it has a rich and extensively studied chromosomal inversion polymorphism system. Here, we examine the patterns of DNA variation in two natural populations segregating for chromosomal arrangements that differentially affect the surveyed genomic region; in particular, we analyse both nucleotide substitutions and insertion/deletion variations in the genomic region encompassing the odorant-binding protein genes Obp83a and Obp83b (Obp83 region). We show that the two main gene arrangements are genetically differentiated, but are consistent with a monophyletic origin of inversions. Nevertheless, these arrangements interchange some genetic information, likely by gene conversion. We also find that the frequency spectrum-based tests indicate that the pattern of nucleotide variation is not at equilibrium; this feature probably reflects the rapid increase in the frequency of the new gene arrangement promoted by positive selection (that is an adaptive change). Furthermore, a comparative analysis of polymorphism and divergence patterns reveals a relaxation of the functional constraints at the Obp83b gene, which might be associated with particular ecological or demographic features of the Canary island endemic species D. guanche PMID:20332808

  13. Genetic and molecular analysis of region 88E9;88F2 in Drosophila melanogaster, including the ear gene related to human factors involved in lineage-specific leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Zraly, Claudia B; Feng, Yun; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2002-01-01

    We identified and characterized the Drosophila gene ear (ENL/AF9-related), which is closely related to mammalian genes that have been implicated in the onset of acute lymphoblastic and myelogenous leukemias when their products are fused as chimeras with those of human HRX, a homolog of Drosophila trithorax. The ear gene product is present in all early embryonic cells, but becomes restricted to specific tissues in late embryogenesis. We mapped the ear gene to cytological region 88E11-13, near easter, and showed that it is deleted by Df(3R)ea(5022rx1), a small, cytologically invisible deletion. Annotation of the completed Drosophila genome sequence suggests that this region might contain as many as 26 genes, most of which, including ear, are not represented by mutant alleles. We carried out a large-scale noncomplementation screen using Df(3R)ea(5022rx1) and chemical (EMS) mutagenesis from which we identified seven novel multi-allele recessive lethal complementation groups in this region. An overlapping deficiency, Df(3R)Po(4), allowed us to map several of these groups to either the proximal or the distal regions of Df(3R)ea(5022rx1). One of these complementation groups likely corresponds to the ear gene as judged by map location, terminal phenotype, and reduction of EAR protein levels. PMID:11901121

  14. Molecular spintronics.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The electron spin made its debut in the device world only two decades ago but today our ability of detecting the spin state of a moving electron underpins the entire magnetic data storage industry. This technological revolution has been driven by a constant improvement in our understanding on how spins can be injected, manipulated and detected in the solid state, a field which is collectively named Spintronics. Recently a number of pioneering experiments and theoretical works suggest that organic materials can offer similar and perhaps superior performances in making spin-devices than the more conventional inorganic metals and semiconductors. Furthermore they can pave the way for radically new device concepts. This is Molecular Spintronics, a blossoming research area aimed at exploring how the unique properties of the organic world can marry the requirements of spin-devices. Importantly, after a first phase, where most of the research was focussed on exporting the concepts of inorganic spintronics to organic materials, the field has moved to a more mature age, where the exploitation of the unique properties of molecules has begun to emerge. Molecular spintronics now collects a diverse and interdisciplinary community ranging from device physicists to synthetic chemists to surface scientists. In this critical review, I will survey this fascinating, rapidly evolving, field with a particular eye on new directions and opportunities. The main differences and challenges with respect to standard spintronics will be discussed and so will be the potential cross-fertilization with other fields (177 references).

  15. Molecular paleontology.

    PubMed

    Marota, I; Rollo, F

    2002-01-01

    Molecular paleontology, i.e., the recovery of DNA from ancient human, animal, and plant remains is an innovative research field that has received progressively more attention from the scientific community since the 1980s. In the last decade, the field was punctuated by claims which aroused great interest but eventually turned out to be fakes--the most famous being the sequence of dinosaur DNA later shown to be of human origin. At present, the discipline is characterized by some certainties and many doubts. We know, for example, that we have reasonable chances to recover authentic DNA from a mammoth carcass, while our chances are negligible (or nonexistent) in the case of a dynastic mummy from Egypt. On the other hand, though we are developing convincing models of DNA decay in bone, we are not yet able to predict whether a certain paleontological or archeological site will yield material amenable to DNA analysis. This article reviews some of the most important and promising investigations using molecular paleontology approaches, such as studies on the conservation of DNA in human bone, the quest for ancient DNA in permafrost-frozen fauna, the Tyrolean iceman, and the Neandertals.

  16. Star Formation Regions in LDN 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2015-09-01

    A group of three star formation regions in the dark cloud LDN 1667 is examined. All three of these regions contain Trapezium type systems. 12C(1-0) observations are made of the part of the molecular cloud LDN 1667 associated with one of the star formation regions. Three molecular clouds were detected, one of which (the main cloud) has a red and a blue outflow. Three stars from the star formation regions are found to have annular nebulae and one star has a conical nebula. The dark cloud LDN 1667 is associated with a radial system of dark globules which is formed by the star HD 57061.

  17. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  18. Molecular Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, Roger E.; Albrecht, Pierre; McDonald, Gene; Moldowan, J. Michael

    2008-03-01

    Life, as we know it, is based on carbon chemistry operating in an aqueous environment. Living organisms process chemicals, make copies of themselves, are autonomous and evolve in concert with the environment. All these characteristics are driven by, and operate through, carbon chemistry. The carbon chemistry of living systems is an exact branch of science and we have detailed knowledge of the basic metabolic and reproductive machinery of living organisms. We can recognise the residual biochemicals long after life has expired and otherwise lost most life-defining features. Carbon chemistry provides a tool for identifying extant and extinct life on Earth and, potentially, throughout the Universe. In recognizing that certain distinctive compounds isolable from living systems had related fossil derivatives, organic geochemists coined the term biological marker compound or biomarker (e.g. Eglinton et al. in Science 145:263-264, 1964) to describe them. In this terminology, biomarkers are metabolites or biochemicals by which we can identify particular kinds of living organisms as well as the molecular fossil derivatives by which we identify defunct counterparts. The terms biomarker and molecular biosignature are synonymous. A defining characteristic of terrestrial life is its metabolic versatility and adaptability and it is reasonable to expect that this is universal. Different physiologies operate for carbon acquisition, the garnering of energy and the storage and processing of information. As well as having a range of metabolisms, organisms build biomass suited to specific physical environments, habitats and their ecological imperatives. This overall ‘metabolic diversity’ manifests itself in an enormous variety of accompanying product molecules (i.e. natural products). The whole field of organic chemistry grew from their study and now provides tools to link metabolism (i.e. physiology) to the occurrence of biomarkers specific to, and diagnostic for, particular kinds

  19. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  20. Molecular genetic studies on 167 pediatric ALL patients from different areas of Pakistan confirm a low frequency of the favorable prognosis fusion oncogene TEL-AML1 (t 12; 21) in underdeveloped countries of the region.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    TEL-AML1 fusion oncogene (t 12; 21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This translocation is associated with a good prognosis and rarely shows chemotherapeutic resistance to 3-drug based remission induction phase of treatment as well as overall treatment. Thus, the higher the frequency of this fusion oncogene, the easier to manage childhood ALL in a given region with less intensive chemotherapy. Although global frequency of TEL-AML1 has been reported to be 20-30%, a very low frequency has been found in some geographical regions, including one study from Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan and others from India. The objective of present study was to investigate if this low frequency of TEL- AML1 in pediatric ALL is only in Lahore region or similar situation exists at other representative oncology centers of Pakistan. A total of 167 pediatric ALL patients were recruited from major pediatric oncology centers situated in Lahore, Faisalabad, Peshawar and Islamabad. Patients were tested for TEL-AML1 using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Only 17 out of 167 (10.2%) patients were found to be TEL-AML1 positive. TEL-AML1+ALL patients had favorable prognosis, most of them (82.4%, 14/17) showing early remission and good overall survival. Thus, our findings indicate an overall low frequency of TEL-AML1 in Pakistan pediatric ALL patients, in accordance with lower representation of this prognostically important genetic abnormality in other less developed countries, specifically in south Asia, thus associating it with poor living standards in these ethnic groups. It also indicates ethnic and geographical differences in the distribution of this prognostically important genetic abnormality among childhood ALL patients, which may have a significant bearing on ALL management strategies in different parts of the world.

  1. H.E.S.S. detection of TeV emission from the interaction region between the supernova remnant G349.7+0.2 and a molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2015-01-01

    G349.7+0.2 is a young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) located at the distance of 11.5 kpc and observed across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio to high energy (HE; 0.1 GeV molecular cloud. In this paper, the detection of very high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) γ-ray emission coincident with this SNR with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is reported. This makes it one of the farthest Galactic SNR ever detected in this domain. An integral flux F(E> 400 GeV) = (6.5 ± 1.1stat ± 1.3syst) × 10-13 ph cm-2 s-1 corresponding to ~0.7% of that of the Crab Nebula and to a luminosity of ~1034 erg s-1 above the same energy threshold, and a steep photon index ΓVHE = 2.8 ± 0.27stat ± 0.20syst are measured. The analysis of more than 5 yr of Fermi-LAT data towards this source shows a power-law like spectrum with a best-fit photon index ΓHE = 2.2 ± 0.04stat+0.13-0.31 sys. The combined γ-ray spectrum of G349.7+0.2 can be described by either a broken power-law (BPL) or a power-law with exponential (or sub-exponential) cutoff (PLC). In the former case, the photon break energy is found at Ebr,γ = 55+70-30 GeV, slightly higher than what is usually observed in the HE/VHE γ-ray emitting middle-aged SNRs known to be interacting with molecular clouds. In the latter case, the exponential (respectively sub-exponential) cutoff energy is measured at Ecut,γ = 1.4+1.6-0.55 (respectively 0.35+0.75-0.21) TeV. A pion-decay process resulting from the interaction of the accelerated protons and nuclei with the dense surrounding medium is clearly the preferred scenario to explain the γ-ray emission. The BPL with a spectral steepening of 0.5-1 and the PLC provide equally good fits to the data. The product of the average gas density and the total energy content of accelerated protons and nuclei amounts to nHWp ~ 5 × 1051 erg cm-3.

  2. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  3. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on the uptake of (226)Ra by corn (Zea mays L.) in a region of high natural radioactivity in Ramsar-Iran.

    PubMed

    Nezami, Sareh; Malakouti, Mohammad Jafar; Bahrami Samani, Ali; Ghannadi Maragheh, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    To study the benefit of including citric and oxalic acid treatments for phytoremediation of (226)Ra contaminated soils a greenhouse experiment with corn was conducted. A soil was sampled from a region of high natural (226)Ra radioactivity in Ramsar, Iran. After cultivation of corn seed and using organic acid treatments at 1, 10 and 100 mM concentrations, plants (shoots and roots) were harvested, digested and prepared to measure (226)Ra activity. Simultaneously, sequential selective extraction were performed to estimate the partitioning of (226)Ra among geochemical extraction. Results showed that the maximum uptake of (226)Ra in plants was observed in citric acid (6.3%) and then oxalic acid (6%) at 100 mM concentration. These treatments increased radium uptake by a factor of 1.5 than the control. Enhancement of radium uptake by plants was related to soil pH reduction of organic acids in comparison to control. Also, the maximum uptake of this radionuclide in all treatments was obtained in roots compared to shoots. (226)Ra fractionations results revealed that 91.8% of radium was in the residual phase of the soil and the available fractions were less than 2%. As the main percent of (226)Ra was in the residual phase of the soil in this region, it seems that organic acids had not significant effect on the uptake of (226)Ra for phytoremediation by corn in this condition.

  4. Role of the 2 adenine (g.11293_11294insAA) insertion polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the factor VII (FVII) gene: molecular characterization of a patient with severe FVII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Garagiola, I; Palla, R; Marziliano, N; Mannucci, P M

    2005-11-01

    Polymorphic variants in the gene encoding factor VII (F7) affect the plasma levels of this coagulation protein and modify the clinical phenotype of FVII deficiency in some patients. In this study we report the in vitro functional analysis of a novel polymorphic variant located in the 3' untranslated region of F7: g.11293_11294insAA. To determine whether this variant regulates FVII expression, we initially compared an expression vector containing FVII cDNA with g.11293_11294insAA with the FVII wild-type (WT) construct. The kinetics of mRNA production showed that the insertion decreases the steady-state FVII mRNA levels. To assess whether the insertion influences the phenotype of FVII-deficient patients, we evaluated its effect on the expression of FVII in a patient with severe FVII deficiency (undetectable FVII activity and antigen) carrying two additional homozygous missense variations (p.Arg277Cys and p.Arg353Gln). The two substitutions alone reduced the expression of FVII activity and antigen in vitro, but with the insertion polymorphism in our expression vector the patient's phenotype of undetectable plasma FVII was recapitulated. The insertion polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of F7 is another modifier of FVII expression that might explain the poor genotype-phenotype correlation in some FVII-deficient patients.

  5. Unveiling the pan-genome of the SXT/R391 family of ICEs: molecular characterisation of new variable regions of SXT/R391-like ICEs detected in Pseudoalteromonas sp. and Vibrio scophthalmi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2016-08-01

    Integrating conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family have been identified in fish-isolated bacterial strains collected from marine aquaculture environments of the northwestern Iberian Peninsula. Here we analysed the variable regions of two ICEs, one preliminarily characterised in a previous study (ICEVscSpa3) and one newly identified (ICEPspSpa1). Bacterial strains harboring these ICEs were phylogenetically assigned to Vibrio scophthalmi and Pseudoalteromonas sp., thus constituting the first evidence of SXT/R391-like ICEs in the genus Pseudoalteromonas to date. Variable DNA regions, which confer element-specific properties to ICEs of this family, were characterised. Interestingly, the two ICEs contained 29 genes not found in variable DNA insertions of previously described ICEs. Most notably, variable gene content for ICEVscSpa3 showed similarity to genes potentially involved in housekeeping functions of replication, nucleotide metabolism and transcription. For these genes, closest homologues were found clustered in the genome of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19, suggesting a transfer as a block to ICEVscSpa3. Genes encoding antibiotic resistance, restriction modification systems and toxin/antitoxin systems were absent from hotspots of ICEVscSpa3. In contrast, the variable gene content of ICEPspSpa1 included genes involved in restriction/modification functions in two different hotspots and genes related to ICE maintenance. The present study unveils a relatively large number of novel genes in SXT/R391-ICEs, and demonstrates the major role of ICE elements as contributors to horizontal gene transfer.

  6. Molecular evolution and the latitudinal biodiversity gradient

    PubMed Central

    Dowle, E J; Morgan-Richards, M; Trewick, S A

    2013-01-01

    Species density is higher in the tropics (low latitude) than in temperate regions (high latitude) resulting in a latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG). The LBG must be generated by differential rates of speciation and/or extinction and/or immigration among regions, but the role of each of these processes is still unclear. Recent studies examining differences in rates of molecular evolution have inferred a direct link between rate of molecular evolution and rate of speciation, and postulated these as important drivers of the LBG. Here we review the molecular genetic evidence and examine the factors that might be responsible for differences in rates of molecular evolution. Critical to this is the directionality of the relationship between speciation rates and rates of molecular evolution. PMID:23486082

  7. Saddle Point Localization of Molecular Wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellau, Georg Ch.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra; Polyansky, Oleg; Zobov, Nikolay Fedorovich; Field, Robert W.

    2016-06-01

    The quantum mechanical description of isomerization is based on bound eigenstates of the molecular potential energy surface. For the near-minimum regions there is a textbook-based relationship between the potential and eigenenergies. Here we show how the saddle point region that connects the two minima is encoded in the energy levels and wave functions of the potential energy surface.

  8. Molecular Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    In organic molecules and molecular solids the weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions result in extremely long spin-lifetimes reaching up to the second mark. However the same are characterized by a generally poor mobility, so that the spin-diffusion lengths are rather short. These peculiar characteristics position organic molecules in a unique space within Spintronics and one should envision applications where the spins are manipulated close to where they are injected [1]. In this contribution I will review the current state of the art of the theory of spin-transport and manipulation in organic molecules. I will start the discussion by presenting a new mechanism, the electrostatic spin crossover effect, for manipulating electrically the magnetic state of a molecules without calling for current-driven spin-transfer torques [2]. This is based on the fact that the different spin states of a molecule Stark-shift differently and it is mostly effective when inversion symmetry is broken. Then I will move to discuss the consequences of such an effect on the transport properties of a molecule presenting two magnetic centers and demonstrate that there exist a critical voltage at which the current becomes temperature-independent [3]. Finally I will present results for spin-transport in Mn12 and demonstrate that the magnetic state of the molecule can be read electrically with a single I-V read-out obtained by using non-magnetic electrodes [4]. [4pt] [1] G. Szulczewski, S. Sanvito and J.M.D. Coey, Nature Materials 8, 693 (2009).[0pt] [2] N. Baadji, M. Piacenza, T. Tugsuz, F. Della Sala, G. Maruccio and S. Sanvito, Nature Materials 8, 813 (2009).[0pt] [3] S.K. Shukla and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B, in press; also at arXiv:0905.1607.[0pt] [4] C.D. Pemmaraju, I. Rungger and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B 80, 104422 (2009).

  9. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  10. Physical conditions in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments have complicated the picture of the physical conditions in molecular clouds. The discoveries of widespread emission from high-J lines of CD and 12-micron IRAS emission have revealed the presence of considerably hotter gas and dust near the surfaces of molecular clouds. These components can complicate interpretation of the bulk of the cloud gas. Commonly assumed relations between column density or mean density and cloud size are called into question by conflicting results and by consideration of selection effects. Analysis of density and density structure through molecular excitation has shown that very high densities exist in star formation regions, but unresolved structure and possible chemical effects complicate the interpretation. High resolution far-IR and submillimeter observations offer a complementary approach and are beginning to test theoretical predictions of density gradients in clouds.

  11. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the zeta isoform of the 14-3-3 protein: homologous sequences in the 3'-untranslated region of frog and human zeta isoforms.

    PubMed

    Miura, I; Nakajima, T; Ohtani, H; Kashiwagi, A; Nakamura, M

    1997-10-01

    14-3-3 proteins constitute a family of well-conserved eukaryotic proteins that possess diverse biochemical activities such as regulation of gene transcription, cell proliferation and activation of protein kinase C. At least 7 subtypes (alpha to theta) of 14-3-3 protein are known, but the zeta subtype of this protein has been cloned only in mammals. We cloned the zeta subtype of 14-3-3 protein (14-3-3 zeta) from the frog, Rana rugosa. The sequence encoded 245 amino acids that share 92% identity with rat and bovine 14-3-3 zeta s, and 92% with human phospholipase A2 (PLA2; 14-3-3 zeta). Northern blot analysis revealed a single band of about 1.8 kb in tadpoles at stage 25. The 14-3-3 zeta mRNA level was high in the brain, lung, spleen and kidney, and low in the heart and testis, as opposed to the mRNA level, which was only faintly detected in the liver, pancreas, ovary and muscle. Furthermore, high similarity in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) was observed between frog and human 14-3-3 zeta cDNA. The results suggest that 14-3-3 zeta is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, and that the homologous sequence in the 3'-UTR of 14-3-3 zeta cDNA may be conserved in frogs and humans.

  12. Molecular characterization and identification of a novel polymorphism of 200 bp indel associated with age at first egg of the promoter region in chicken follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene.

    PubMed

    Kang, Li; Zhang, Ningbo; Zhang, Yujie; Yan, Huaxiang; Tang, Hui; Yang, Changsuo; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Yunliang

    2012-03-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) plays an important role in animal follicular development. Polymorphisms in FSHR promoter region likely impact transcription and follicle growth and maturation. In this study, a fragment of ~1.9 kb of cFSHR promoter for Zang, Xianju, Lohmann Brown, Jining Bairi and Wenchang breeds (line) was obtained. Totally 49 variations were revealed, of which 39 are single nucleotide substitutions, one is nucleotide substitution of (TTG) to (CAC) and nine are indels. Polymorphism at -874 site (a 200 bp indel mutation) was identified, and their effects on egg production traits as well as gene expression were analyzed. At this site, allele I(+) was dominant in Lohmann Brown and Xinyang Brown (a synthetic egg-laying line) lines, but very rare in three Chinese indigenous chicken breeds, namely Jining Bairi, Wenchang, Zang and one synthetic boiler line (Luqin). In Xinyang Brown population, the polymorphism was associated with age at first egg (AFE) (P < 0.05) and its effect on egg number at 37 weeks of age (E37) and egg number at 57 weeks of age (E57) was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The cFSHR mRNA level was not significantly different between three genotypes in small white and small yellow follicles of Xinyang Brown hens, however, allele I(+) tends to increase cFSHR transcription.

  13. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: mlombard@eso.or

    2009-09-20

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 +- 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A{sub K} > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} a few x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}.

  14. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  15. Recombination hot spot in 3.2-kb region of the Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A repeat sequences: New tools for molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J.; LeGuern, E.; Gouider, R.; Tardieu, S.; Abbas, N.

    1996-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restriction sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who were unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints located in a 3.2-kb region accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. On molecular graph comparison.

    PubMed

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  17. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  18. Molecular clouds. [significance in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand star formation in the context of the dense interstellar molecular gas from which stars are made. Attention is given to how molecular observations (e.g., UV spectroscopy and radio 21-cm and recombination line observations) provide data on the physical state of the dense interstellar gas; observations of H II regions, stellar associations, and dark nebulae are discussed. CO clouds are studied with reference to radial velocity, temperature, density, ionization, magnetic field.

  19. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andy; Johnstone, D. I.; Kaufman, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular clouds exhibit large linewidths, which are usually interpreted as being due to supersonic turbulence. This turbulence plays a key role in many theories of star formation, as it is believed to help support and fragment molecular clouds. Current numerical MHD simulations show that the turbulent energy of a molecular cloud dissipates on the order of a crossing time, but do not explicitly follow how this energy is released. We have run models of C-type shocks, based on Kaufman & Neufeld (1996), propagating into gas with densities near 1000 cm3 at velocities of a few km/s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with the dissipation of turbulent energy in shocks within molecular clouds. Combining these shock models and estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation (Basu & Murali 2001), we produce synthetic CO spectra and predict those line emissions that will be observable with current and upcoming observational facilities, such as Herschel, SOFIA, ALMA, and CCAT. We compare our synthetic shock spectra to the photodissociation region (PDR) models of Kaufman et al. (1999) and show that mid-J CO lines (e.g., CO J = 7 to 6) from molecular clouds illuminated by standard interstellar radiation fields are dominated by emission from shocked gas. We also present Herschel observations of these shock tracing lines. References: Basu, S. & Murali, C. 2001, ApJ, 551, 743 Kaufman, M. J. & Neufeld, D. A. 1996, ApJ, 456, 250 Kaufman, M. J., Wolfire, M. G., Hollenbach, D. J., & Luhman, M. L. 1999, ApJ, 527, 795

  20. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  1. The W3 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Lada, C. J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots.

  2. Returning "Region" to World Regional Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Peter W.; Legates, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    World regional geography textbooks rarely focus on the process of region formation, despite frequent calls to reincorporate a regional approach to teaching global geography. An instructional strategy using problem-based learning in a small honors section of a large world regional geography course is described. Using a hypothetical scenario…

  3. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Cunningham, V.

    2015-12-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions contains ˜2000 H ii region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic H ii region mid-infrared morphology of WISE 12 μ {{m}} emission surrounding 22 μ {{m}} emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope hydrogen radio recombination line and radio continuum detections in the X-band (9 GHz; 3 cm) of 302 WISE H ii region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone 225^\\circ ≥slant {\\ell }≥slant -20^\\circ , | {\\text{}}b| ≤slant 6^\\circ . Here we extend the sky coverage of our H ii region Discovery Survey, which now contains nearly 800 H ii regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, 5 have ({\\ell },{\\text{}}b,v) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to the Galactic warp, these nebulae are found at Galactic latitudes >1° in the first Galactic quadrant, and therefore were missed in previous surveys of the Galactic plane. One additional region has a longitude and velocity consistent with the OSC but lies at a negative Galactic latitude (G039.183-01.422 -54.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1). With Heliocentric distances >22 kpc and Galactocentric distances >16 kpc, the OSC H ii regions are the most distant known in the Galaxy. We detect an additional three H ii regions near {\\ell }≃ 150^\\circ whose LSR velocities place them at Galactocentric radii >19 kpc. If their distances are correct, these nebulae may represent the limit to Galactic massive star formation.

  4. Ionospheric research. [E region, F region, D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: D-region theory; E and F-region; wave propagation; mass spectrometer measurements; and atmospheric reactions. Various supporting operations are included: design and construction of instrumentation; and programming.

  5. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disc with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scaleheight z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that an SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  6. Sarcoidosis, cancer and molecular mimicry.

    PubMed

    Tchernev, G; Wollina, U

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mimicry seems to be the most important factor for the heterogeneous clinical presentation and the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Molecular mimicry may occur as a result of altered activity of oncogenes. This can lead to crossed-type mediated body reactions targeting structurally similar sections or regions from the tissue homeostasis. Available data suggest that structural analogy between tissue and foreign or de novo-appearing peptides is not always reliable. Nevertheless, lack of amino acid identity between the tissue and the de novo-generated tumour antigens does not exclude the phenomenon of molecular mimicry as the major generator of sarcoidosis. There is growing evidence of the mimicry phenomena, caused not only by the similarity between the amino acids but also between the elements which connect segments in the immunological cascade and which may also be affected by external factors. Molecular mimicry may occur between two identified peptides having similar antigenic surfaces (transitory or not), in the absence of a primary homology in amino acid sequence. As far as tumour antigens are concerned, a structural analogy to the de novo-appearing tumour antigens is more likely than transitory imitation resulting from the additional interference of other physical forces. Further research should be performed to confirm, or reject, the transitory imitation thesis or hypothesis.

  7. Molecular characterization of MHC class II region in guinea fowl.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Mathew, J; Gupta, J; Mehra, S; Goyal, G; Sharma, D

    2010-12-01

    1. The MHC class II gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced in guinea fowl. 2. The NumeMHC II sequence of 754 nucleotides included complete exon 1 (91 nt), exon 2 (270 nt), exon 3 (282 nt) and exon 4 (110 nt). 3. The size of β(1) and β(2), domains were 89 and 93 amino acids, respectively in guinea fowl. 4. High amino acid variability (38·2%) was observed within guinea fowl in β(1) domain, while in β(2) domain, amino acid variability (6·3%) was low. 5. Among poultry species, the percent amino acid identity between guinea fowl and chicken, quail, pheasant and duck was 38·8, 42·2, 44·4 and 58·8 in β(1) domain; and 13·8, 17·0, 13·8 and 27·6 in β(2) domain, respectively. 6. Sequence alignment with mammalian and avian MHC showed that many of the conserved features of MHC class II glycoprotein was conserved in guinea fowl. 7. Within-species genetic distances (Poisson correction) based on cumulative amino acid variability in β(1) domain and β(2) domains was 0·141 in guinea fowl. 8. Guinea fowl showed low and similar genetic distances with all the poultry species (0·255-0·268) except duck (0·456). 9. Guinea fowl made separate branch within the major cluster having chicken, quail and pheasant, showing equal distance from these poultry species, whereas duck MHC II clustered separately.

  8. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  9. [Molecular variability in the commom shrew Sorex araneus L. from European Russia and Siberia inferred from the length polymorphism of DNA regions flanked by short interspersed elements (Inter-SINE PCR) and the relationships between the Moscow and Seliger chromosome races].

    PubMed

    Bannikova, A A; Bulatova, N Sh; Kramerov, D A

    2006-06-01

    Genetic exchange among chromosomal races of the common shrew Sorex araneus and the problem of reproductive barriers have been extensively studied by means of such molecular markers as mtDNA, microsatellites, and allozymes. In the present study, the interpopulation and interracial polymorphism in the common shrew was derived, using fingerprints generated by amplified DNA regions flanked by short interspersed repeats (SINEs)-interSINE PCR (IS-PCR). We used primers, complementary to consensus sequences of two short retroposons: mammalian element MIR and the SOR element from the genome of Sorex araneus. Genetic differentiation among eleven populations of the common shrew from eight chromosome races was estimated. The NP and MJ analyses, as well as multidimensional scaling showed that all samples examined grouped into two main clusters, corresponding to European Russia and Siberia. The bootstrap support of the European Russia cluster in the NJ and MP analyses was respectively 76 and 61%. The bootstrap index for the Siberian cluster was 100% in both analyses; the Tomsk race, included into this cluster, was separated with the bootstrap support of NJ/MP 92/95%.

  10. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  11. Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Patricia D.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) computer program developed to aid in design of single- and double-junction cascade cells made of silicon. Cascade cell has efficiency 1 or 2 percent higher than single cell, with twice the open-circuit voltage. Input parameters include doping density, diffusion lengths, thicknesses of regions, solar spectrum, absorption coefficients of silicon (data included for 101 wavelengths), and surface recombination velocities. Results include maximum power, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  12. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  13. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of a chemistry space. Although all three concepts molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemistry space are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations, that is, representations of the same mathematical form, into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another.

  14. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  15. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  16. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  17. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters.

  18. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  19. W3 North: Far-infrared and radio molecular observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Schwartz, P. R.; Smith, H. A.; Lada, C. J.; Glaccum, W.; Harper, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The W3 North (G133.8 + 1.4) source is the northernmost member of a string of active star forming regions that marks the western boundary of the giant HII region W4. Far infrared and radio observations of molecular CO were made of the W3 star forming region. The W3 North object shows extended dust and gas emission which suggests a fairly advanced disruption of a molecular cloud. An estimate of the age of the embedded HII region is given, and emission maps of the W3 object are presented. The W3 North source may be the oldest object among the W3 complex of sources.

  20. Molecular phylogenetics: testing evolutionary hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Sharma, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    A common approach for investigating evolutionary relationships between genes and organisms is to compare extant DNA or protein sequences and infer an evolutionary tree. This methodology is known as molecular phylogenetics and may be the most informative means for exploring phage evolution, since there are few morphological features that can be used to differentiate between these tiny biological entities. In addition, phage genomes can be mosaic, meaning different genes or genomic regions can exhibit conflicting evolutionary histories due to lateral gene transfer or homologous recombination between different phage genomes. Molecular phylogenetics can be used to identify and study such genome mosaicism. This chapter provides a general introduction to the theory and methodology used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships from molecular data. Also included is a discussion on how the evolutionary history of different genes within the same set of genomes can be compared, using a collection of T4-type phage genomes as an example. A compilation of programs and packages that are available for conducting phylogenetic analyses is supplied as an accompanying appendix.

  1. Regional Sustainable Environmental Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional sustainable environmental management is an interdisciplinary effort to develop a sufficient understanding of the interactions between ecosystems, the economy, law, and technology to formulate effective long-term management strategies on a regional scale. Regional sustai...

  2. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  3. Exercises in Molecular Computing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus The successes of electronic digital logic have transformed every aspect of human life over the last half-century. The word “computer” now signifies a ubiquitous electronic device, rather than a human occupation. Yet evidently humans, large assemblies of molecules, can compute, and it has been a thrilling challenge to develop smaller, simpler, synthetic assemblies of molecules that can do useful computation. When we say that molecules compute, what we usually mean is that such molecules respond to certain inputs, for example, the presence or absence of other molecules, in a precisely defined but potentially complex fashion. The simplest way for a chemist to think about computing molecules is as sensors that can integrate the presence or absence of multiple analytes into a change in a single reporting property. Here we review several forms of molecular computing developed in our laboratories. When we began our work, combinatorial approaches to using DNA for computing were used to search for solutions to constraint satisfaction problems. We chose to work instead on logic circuits, building bottom-up from units based on catalytic nucleic acids, focusing on DNA secondary structures in the design of individual circuit elements, and reserving the combinatorial opportunities of DNA for the representation of multiple signals propagating in a large circuit. Such circuit design directly corresponds to the intuition about sensors transforming the detection of analytes into reporting properties. While this approach was unusual at the time, it has been adopted since by other groups working on biomolecular computing with different nucleic acid chemistries. We created logic gates by modularly combining deoxyribozymes (DNA-based enzymes cleaving or combining other oligonucleotides), in the role of reporting elements, with stem–loops as input detection elements. For instance, a deoxyribozyme that normally exhibits an oligonucleotide substrate recognition region is

  4. Exercises in molecular computing.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Milan N; Stefanovic, Darko; Rudchenko, Sergei

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The successes of electronic digital logic have transformed every aspect of human life over the last half-century. The word "computer" now signifies a ubiquitous electronic device, rather than a human occupation. Yet evidently humans, large assemblies of molecules, can compute, and it has been a thrilling challenge to develop smaller, simpler, synthetic assemblies of molecules that can do useful computation. When we say that molecules compute, what we usually mean is that such molecules respond to certain inputs, for example, the presence or absence of other molecules, in a precisely defined but potentially complex fashion. The simplest way for a chemist to think about computing molecules is as sensors that can integrate the presence or absence of multiple analytes into a change in a single reporting property. Here we review several forms of molecular computing developed in our laboratories. When we began our work, combinatorial approaches to using DNA for computing were used to search for solutions to constraint satisfaction problems. We chose to work instead on logic circuits, building bottom-up from units based on catalytic nucleic acids, focusing on DNA secondary structures in the design of individual circuit elements, and reserving the combinatorial opportunities of DNA for the representation of multiple signals propagating in a large circuit. Such circuit design directly corresponds to the intuition about sensors transforming the detection of analytes into reporting properties. While this approach was unusual at the time, it has been adopted since by other groups working on biomolecular computing with different nucleic acid chemistries. We created logic gates by modularly combining deoxyribozymes (DNA-based enzymes cleaving or combining other oligonucleotides), in the role of reporting elements, with stem-loops as input detection elements. For instance, a deoxyribozyme that normally exhibits an oligonucleotide substrate recognition region is

  5. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  6. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  7. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  8. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level. PMID:27845398

  9. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A.; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-11-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level.

  10. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  11. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  12. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  13. Structure and kinematics of molecular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, R. L.

    1986-04-01

    Observational studies of the structure and kinematics of the supersonic molecular gas in star-forming regions are reviewed. These studies have suggested that the bulk of the high-velocity gas may be ambient-cloud material swept up by a collimated stellar wind. The actual structures of these outflows, however, are poorly understood. One source that may provide a better understanding of molecular outflows is that in the nearby dark cloud LDN 1551. New observations of this outflow are presented and discussed in context of the models proposed by Snell and Schloerb.

  14. Molecular imaging in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoetker, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging focuses on the molecular signature of cells rather than morphological changes in the tissue. The need for this novel type of imaging arises from the often difficult detection and characterization especially of small and/or premalignant lesions. Molecular imaging specifically visualizes biological properties of a lesion and might thereby be able to close diagnostic gaps, e.g. when differentiating hyperplastic from neoplastic polyps or detecting the margins of intraepithelial neoplastic spread. Additionally, not only the detection and discrimination of lesions could be improved: based on the molecular features identified using molecular imaging, therapy regimens could be adjusted on the day of diagnosis to allow for personalized medicine and optimized care for each individual patient. PMID:24917945

  15. Multifunctionality in molecular magnetism.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Czarnecki, Bernard; Reczyński, Mateusz; Arczyński, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetism draws from the fundamental ideas of structural chemistry and combines them with experimental physics resulting in one of the highest profile current topics, namely molecular materials that exhibit multifunctionality. Recent advances in the design of new generations of multifunctional molecular magnets that retain the functions of the building blocks and exhibit non-trivial magnetic properties at higher temperatures provide promising evidence that they may be useful for the future construction of nanoscale devices. This article is not a complete review but is rather an introduction into thefascinating world of multifunctional solids with magnetism as the leitmotif. We provide a subjective selection and discussion of the most inspiring examples of