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Sample records for molecular cloud-3 region

  1. EVOLUTIONARY STATUS OF BRIGHTEST AND YOUNGEST SOURCE IN THE ORION MOLECULAR CLOUD -3 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Kawabe, Ryohei; Saito, Masao

    2009-10-20

    The brightest continuum source in the Orion molecular cloud-3 region (OMC-3), MMS 6, was observed with the Very Large Array (VLA), the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA), and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Our data were supplemented by near- to mid-infrared archival data taken by Spitzer Space Telescope. The compact continuum source, MMS 6-main, was detected with an H{sub 2} mass of 3.0 M {sub sun} with a size of 510 AU. Despite its compact and well-condensed appearance, neither clear CO outflow, radio jet, nor infrared sources (at a wavelength shorter than 8 mum) were detected at MMS 6-main even with the present high angular resolution and high-sensitivity observations. The derived H{sub 2} column density, 2.6 x 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, corresponds to a visual extinction of A{sub v} approx 15, 000 mag, and the derived number density is at least two orders of magnitude higher than for the other OMC-2/3 continuum sources. The volume density profile of the source was estimated to have a power-law index of 2 or steeper down to a radius of approx450 AU. The timescale to form a protostar at the center or the timescale elapsed after its formation is estimated to be 830 to 7600 yr. This is much shorter than the typical lifetime of the Class 0/I protostars, which is approx10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr, suggesting that MMS 6-main is probably in either the earliest stage of the protostellar core or in the latest stage of the prestellar phase.

  2. A search for pre-main-sequence stars in high-latitude molecular clouds. 3: A survey of the Einstein database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Magnani, Loris; Fryer, Chris

    1995-01-01

    In order to discern whether the high-latitude molecular clouds are regions of ongoing star formation, we have used X-ray emission as a tracer of youthful stars. The entire Einstein database yields 18 images which overlap 10 of the clouds mapped partially or completely in the CO (1-0) transition, providing a total of approximately 6 deg squared of overlap. Five previously unidentified X-ray sources were detected: one has an optical counterpart which is a pre-main-sequence (PMS) star, and two have normal main-sequence stellar counterparts, while the other two are probably extragalactic sources. The PMS star is located in a high Galactic latitude Lynds dark cloud, so this result is not too suprising. The translucent clouds, though, have yet to reveal any evidence of star formation.

  3. The magnetic field of cloud 3 in L204

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ∼11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P {sub H}/A {sub V}) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (–0.09% ± 0.03% mag{sup –1} pc{sup –1}). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A {sub V} for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  4. Molecular absorption in transition region spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Innes, D.; Ayres, T.; Peter, H.; Curdt, W.; Jaeggli, S.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We present observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of absorption features from a multitude of cool atomic and molecular lines within the profiles of Si IV transition region lines. Many of these spectral lines have not previously been detected in solar spectra. Methods: We examined spectra taken from deep exposures of plage on 12 October 2013. We observed unique absorption spectra over a magnetic element which is bright in transition region line emission and the ultraviolet continuum. We compared the absorption spectra with emission spectra that is likely related to fluorescence. Results: The absorption features require a population of sub-5000 K plasma to exist above the transition region. This peculiar stratification is an extreme deviation from the canonical structure of the chromosphere-corona boundary. The cool material is not associated with a filament or discernible coronal rain. This suggests that molecules may form in the upper solar atmosphere on small spatial scales and introduces a new complexity into our understanding of solar thermal structure. It lends credence to previous numerical studies that found evidence for elevated pockets of cool gas in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. [Molecular spectral diagnosis of star forming regions].

    PubMed

    Xi, S; Qin, S; Deng, L; Yang, J

    2001-08-01

    Stars are the basic building blocks of our universe, therefore it is one of the most important research topics in astrophysics to understand the origin and the early evolution of these objects. The current picture is that stars are formed during the collapse of a large enough self-gravitating interstellar molecular cloud. The early collapse gives birth to a fetus of a star, which is surrounded by a rotating accretion disk. The proto-star accretes interstellar matter through the disk which in turn transfer the accumulated matter to the central proto-star, then the star gets weight during the process. Observation shows that gorgeous ejection of matter always come along with the accretion process. In the presence of disks, these outflows usually escape from the system along the axis of the disk, forming so called bipolar outflows. Typical tracers of these activities are rich molecules such as CO, SiC2, C3H, C3H2 etc. Observationally, such typical molecular outflows can be detected using Doppler effect by spectroscopic measurements. Using the 13.7 m radio telescope in Delingha station of Purple Mountain Observatory, we performed a survey for 12 low temperature IRAS objects, some of the sources show high velocity properties. Detailed analysis of the Doppler profiles of IRS34 is presented. Star forming activities are clearly seen in this field. PMID:12945260

  6. New Molecular Views of Southern Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.

    1999-10-01

    I will present new molecular views of southern sky based on the CO survey for star forming regions conducted by Nagoya University with the NANTEN 4-m millimeter wave telescope. The NANTEN telescope is installed at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile under a mutual agreement between Nagoya University and the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Through the survey, molecular gas distribution and the physical properties of cluster forming regions in the Magellanic Clouds, Galactic star forming GMCs, dark clouds, high latitude clouds, and interacting clouds with HII regions and/or SNRs are studied at a beam size of 2.'7 in the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (J=1-0) molecular emission. I will review the expected contribution of the southern CO survey to the ALMA project, and discuss the scientific targets related with star formation at the time the ALMA becomes available.

  7. Molecular Lines of 13 Galactic Infrared Bubble Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qing-zeng; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Bo; Lu, Deng-rong; Chen, Xi; Tang, Zheng-hong

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physical properties of molecular clouds and star formation (SF) processes around infrared bubbles, which are essentially expanding H ii regions. We performed observations of 13 galactic infrared bubble fields containing 18 bubbles. We observed five molecular lines—12CO (J=1\\to 0), 13CO (J=1\\to 0), C18O (J=1\\to 0), HCN (J=1\\to 0), and HCO+ (J=1\\to 0)—and several publicly available surveys were used for comparison: Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer Galactic Plane Survey, APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey, Multi-Array Galactic Plane Imaging Survey, and NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We find that these bubbles are generally connected with molecular clouds, most of which are giant. Several bubble regions display velocity gradients and broad-shifted profiles, which could be due to the expansion of bubbles. The masses of molecular clouds within bubbles range from 100 to 19,000 M ⊙, and their dynamic ages are about 0.3–3.7 Myr, which takes into account the internal turbulence pressure of surrounding molecular clouds. Clumps are found in the vicinity of all 18 bubbles, and molecular clouds near four of these bubbles with larger angular sizes show shell-like morphologies, indicating that either collect-and-collapse or radiation-driven implosion processes may have occurred. Due to the contamination of adjacent molecular clouds, only six bubble regions are appropriate to search for outflows, and we find that four have outflow activities. Three bubbles display ultra-compact H ii regions at their borders, and one is probably responsible for its outflow. In total, only six bubbles show SF activities in the vicinity, and we suggest that SF processes might have been triggered.

  8. Molecular line observations of the S235B region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Makoto; Yoshida, Shigeomi

    The core of the molecular cloud associated with the young stellar object S235B has been observed in molecular lines of CS, CO, and CH3OH with high angular resolution by the 45-m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The core is 0.6 x 1.0 pc in extent. The number density of molecular hydrogen and the fractional abundance of CS relative to molecular hydrogen are estimated to be 300,000/cu cm and 5 x 10 to the -10th, respectively. The CO observations show evidence of bipolar flow. This suggests that S235B is not a compact H II region but an expanding ionized envelope around a young star. The mass-loss rate from S235B is estimated as 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr. CH3OH emission shows a very compact distribution and a narrow line width, suggesting that the methanol lines are weakly masing.

  9. HCO emission from H II-molecular cloud interface regions.

    PubMed

    Schenewerk, M S; Snyder, L E; Hollis, J M; Jewell, P R; Ziurys, L M

    1988-05-15

    A survey of well-known molecular clouds in the four strongest HCO NK-,K+ = 1(01)-0(00) hyperfine transitions has been carried out to determine the prevalence of HCO and to study its chemistry. HCO emission was observed in seven molecular clouds. Three of these, NGC 2264, W49, and NGC 7538, were not previously known sources of HCO. In addition, NGC 2024 and Sgr B2 were mapped and shown to have extensive HCO emission. The survey results show the HCO abundance to be enhanced in H II-molecular cloud interface regions and support a correlation between C+ and HCO emission. The strength of the HCO emission in NGC 2024 is interpreted in terms of this enhancement and the source structure and proximity to Earth.

  10. Molecular cloud/HII region interfaces in the star forming region NGC 6357.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Felli, M.

    1997-04-01

    We have performed ^12^CO(1-0), ^12^CO(2-1), ^13^CO(1-0), ^13^CO(2-1), C^18^O(1-0), C^18^O(2-1), HCO^+^(1-0) and H^13^CO^+^(1-0) observations towards two selected areas in the star forming complex NGC 6357 with angular resolutions from 21" to 55". In particular, we have mapped the molecular gas around the two HII regions G353.1+0.6 and G353.2+0.9 in the ^12^CO(1-0) and ^13^CO(1-0) transitions with a resolution of ~43". This improves on the coarser ^12^CO(1-0) observations previously carried out by others. We have also studied the physical properties of gas along strips through the molecular cloud/HII region interfaces. For G353.1+0.6, the observations confirm that an ionization front is eroding a warm, dense molecular cloud located to the north of the optical nebula. The molecular gas appears fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc and not all the components are related to the HII region. There is evidence of a density increase near the front and indications of temperature gradients toward the exciting stars. This is further suggested by the presence of ^12^CO(1-0) self-absorption produced by a cooler external layer. The isotopic ratio X(^13^CO)/X(C^18^O) decreases from the inner part of the clouds towards the front, contrary to what is theoretically predicted and observed in many other regions. This may be due to excitation or optical depths effects. An evolutionary scenario is proposed where the exciting stars form at the edge of a molecular cloud. The morphology of G353.2+0.9 is rather different from what previously believed. Only a weak "bar" of molecular material was found to the south of the sharp ionization front observed optically and in the radio-continuum, and most of the molecular emission arises from regions behind or to the north of the HII region. This indicates that we are viewing a late stage "blister" configuration face-on. This region is fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc, and a warm, dense and compact molecular fragment coincides with the elephant trunk

  11. From the H II Region to the Molecular Cloud: Determining Physical Conditions in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, N. P.

    2004-12-01

    Infrared missions such as Spitzer offer new insights into the chemical evolution and star formation history of the universe. Although objects such as starburst galaxies, which are among the most luminous objects in the universe, are the primary focus, OMC-1, a lower luminosity region with superb spatial resolution, serves as a benchmark to test the physics of newly formed O stars interacting with the surrounding molecular environment. The classical approach in determining conditions in the ionized, photodissociated, and molecular regions is to treat each problem separately. In actuality, however, this is a single continuous phenomenon, linked through the transport of gas and radiation. Here we self-consistently calculate the physical conditions and emission from the hot HII region to the cold, molecular gas as a continuous hydrostatic layer. The ion states of the first 30 elements, along with the abundances of 70 molecules, are determined with the temperature and electron density. The grain physics is treated self-consistently, with grain charge transfer, single photon heating, and PAH effects all included. Additionally, level populations of all the rotational/vibrational levels of the ground electronic state of molecular hydrogen are determined (see the dissertation talk of Gargi Shaw). As a benchmark, we consider the physical conditions through OMC-1 1' west of the Trapezium, where emission-line observations of the HII region and the PDR/molecular cloud all exist. Accurately interpreting this spectrum will give us confidence that we can apply our calculations to more luminous and distant starburst galaxies. We predict the sometimes significant contribution of the HII region to important PDR emission-line diagnostics. This has consequences for the interpretation of IR observations, the deduced values of n(H) and G0 in PDRs, and hence the overall conditions in star forming regions. All calculations were developed with the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, which is

  12. Investigating Molecular Hydrogen in Active Regions with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Saar, Steven H.; Daw, Adrian N.; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen should be the most abundant molecular species in sunspots, but recent observations with IRIS show that its florescent signature is absent from above the sunspot umbra, but appears brightly during flares. In this poster we continue the analysis of FUV observations of H2 in active regions, examining the correlation between the intensity of the H2 lines and the lines of C II and Si IV which are responsible for their excitation. We particularly focus on differentiating places where H2 is abundant, holes in the chromospheric opacity where FUV photons can enter more deeply into the solar atmosphere, and places where the FUV radiation field is intense, as in flares.

  13. Undiscovered regions on the molecular landscape of flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a motility structure and one of the most complicated motors in the biosphere. A flagellum consists of several dozens of building blocks in different stoichiometries and extends from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space. Flagellar biogenesis follows a strict spatio-temporal regime that is guided by a plethora of flagellar assembly factors and chaperones. The goal of this review is to summarize our current structural and mechanistic knowledge of this intricate process and to identify the undiscovered regions on the molecular landscape of flagellar assembly. PMID:26490009

  14. Molecular characterization of a strong candidate region for schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Karayiorgou, M. |; Housman, D.E.; Morrow, B.

    1994-09-01

    Two lines of evidence point to a region on chromosome 22 as potentially involved in the etiology of schizophrenia: First, our own linkage data and second, observations that a greater than expected number of cases with the VCF (velo-cardio-facial) syndrome, a developmental syndrome due to microdeletions of the same genetic region, develop psychotic illness during adolescence. On the molecular genetic level, we are testing the hypothesis that the partial phenotypic overlap between schizophrenia and VCF may be due to overlapping genetic abnormalities. To that end, we have generated somatic cell hybrids from an initial group of nine VCF patients over the age of 15 who underwent psychiatric evaluation. Three were assigned a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia. Several hybrid cell lines were generated from each patient carrying either the deleted chromosome, or the intact chromosome, or both. We have analyzed these hybrids and the extent of their chromosome 22 deletions with 41 markers so far (21 polymorphic microsatellite markers and 20 STSs). One of these markers is COMT (catechol-O-methyltransferase) that could be considered a candidate for schizophrenia. We are searching for potential molecular genetic differences between the subgroup of VCF patients that do develop schizophrenia and the subgroup that do not. Our initial efforts concentrate on the possibility of correlation between the extent of the deletion and the schizophrenic phenotype. Results from our analysis so far will be presented. Our goal is to narrow and define more accurately the region potentially involved in the etiology of schizophrenia and successfully identify any gene(s) that may play a role.

  15. Molecular gas in the Galactic center region. III. Probing shocks in molecular cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettemeister, S.; Dahmen, G.; Mauersberger, R.; Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Martin-Pintado, J.

    1998-06-01

    Multiline observations of C(18) O and SiO isotopomers toward 33 molecular peaks in the Galactic center region, taken at the SEST, JCMT and HHT telescopes, are presented. The C(18) O presumably traces the total H_2 column density, while the SiO traces gas affected by shocks and high temperature chemistry. The J =2-> 1 line of SiO is seen only in few regions of the Galactic disk. This line is easily detected in all Galactic center sources observed. A comparison of the strength of the rare isotopomers (29) SiO and (30) SiO to the strength of the main isotopomer (28) SiO implies that the J = 2 -> 1 transition of (28) SiO is optically thick. The (29) Si/(30) Si isotope ratio of 1.6 in the Galactic center clouds is consistent with the terrestrial value. Large Velocity Gradient models show that the dense component (n_H_2 >= 10(4) \\percc) in typical molecular cores in the Galactic center is cool (\\TKIN ~ 25 K), contrary to what is usually found in Giant Molecular Clouds in the disk, where the densest cores are the hottest. High kinetic temperatures, > 100 K, known to exist from NH_3 studies, are only present at lower gas densities of a few 10(3) cm(-3) , where SiO is highly subthermally excited. Assuming that \\CEIO\\ traces all of the molecular gas, it is found that in all cases but one, SiO emission is compatible with arising in gas at higher density that is (presently) relatively cool. The relative abundance of SiO is typically 10(-9) , but differs significantly between individual sources. It shows a dependence on the position of the source within the Galactic center region. High abundances are found in those regions for which bar potential models predict a high likelihood for cloud-cloud collisions. These results can be used to relate the amount of gas that has encountered shocks within the last ~ 10(6) years to the large scale kinematics in the inner ~ 500 pc of the Galaxy. Based on observations obtained at the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST, Project C

  16. Papillary Tumor of the Pineal Region: A Distinct Molecular Entity.

    PubMed

    Heim, Stephanie; Sill, Martin; Jones, David T W; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Jouvet, Anne; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Wesseling, Pieter; Beschorner, Rudi; Mittelbronn, Michel; Kohlhof, Patricia; Hovestadt, Volker; Johann, Pascal; Kool, Marcel; Pajtler, Kristian W; Korshunov, Andrey; Ruland, Vincent; Sperveslage, Jan; Thomas, Christian; Witt, Hendrik; von Deimling, Andreas; Paulus, Werner; Pfister, Stefan M; Capper, David; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Papillary tumor of the pineal region (PTPR) is a neuroepithelial brain tumor, which might pose diagnostic difficulties and recurs often. Little is known about underlying molecular alterations. We therefore investigated chromosomal copy number alterations, DNA methylation patterns and mRNA expression profiles in a series of 24 PTPRs. Losses of chromosome 10 were identified in all 13 PTPRs examined. Losses of chromosomes 3 and 22q (54%) as well as gains of chromosomes 8p (62%) and 12 (46%) were also common. DNA methylation profiling using Illumina 450k arrays reliably distinguished PTPR from ependymomas and pineal parenchymal tumors of intermediate differentiation. PTPR could be divided into two subgroups based on methylation pattern, PTPR group 2 showing higher global methylation and a tendency toward shorter progression-free survival (P = 0.06). Genes overexpressed in PTPR as compared with ependymal tumors included SPDEF, known to be expressed in the rodent subcommissural organ. Notable SPDEF protein expression was encountered in 15/19 PTPRs as compared with only 2/36 ependymal tumors, 2/19 choroid plexus tumors and 0/23 samples of other central nervous system (CNS) tumor entities. In conclusion, PTPRs show typical chromosomal alterations as well as distinct DNA methylation and expression profiles, which might serve as useful diagnostic tools.

  17. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    I will present recent ALMA results on the dense molecular gas in the central regions of local active galaxies, including NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 7469, hosting both AGN and circumnuclear starburst regions. Impact of X-ray radiation, outflows, and shocks from active nuclei on the physical and chemical properties of the surrouding dense molecular medium will be discussed.

  18. Kinetic temperatures toward X1/X2 orbit interceptions regions and giant molecular loops in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, D.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín, S.; Bronfman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. It is well known that the kinetic temperatures, Tkin, of the molecular clouds in the Galactic center region are higher than in typical disk clouds. However, the Tkin of the molecular complexes found at higher latitudes towards the giant molecular loops in the central region of the Galaxy is so far unknown. The gas of these high-latitude molecular clouds (hereafter referred to as "halo clouds") is located in a region where the gas in the disk may interact with the gas in the halo in the Galactic center region. Aims: To derive Tkin in the molecular clouds at high latitude and understand the physical process responsible for the heating of the molecular gas both in the central molecular zone (the concentration of molecular gas in the inner ~500 pc) and in the giant molecular loops. Methods: We measured the metastable inversion transitions of NH3 from (J,K) = (1,1) to (6,6) toward six positions selected throughout the Galactic central disk and halo. We used rotational diagrams and large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling to estimate the kinetic temperatures toward all the sources. We also observed other molecules like SiO, HNCO, CS, C34S, C18O, and 13CO, to derive the densities and to trace different physical processes (shocks, photodissociation, dense gas) expected to dominate the heating of the molecular gas. Results: We derive for the first time Tkin of the high-latitude clouds interacting with the disk in the Galactic center region. We find high rotational temperatures in all the observed positions. We derive two kinetic temperature components (~150 K and ~40 K) for the positions in the central molecular zone, and only the warm kinetic temperature component for the clouds toward the giant molecular loops. The fractional abundances derived from the different molecules suggest that shocks provide the main heating mechanism throughout the Galactic center, also at high latitudes. Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Molecular population genetics of inversion breakpoint regions in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andre G; Detweiler, Don; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-07-08

    Paracentric inversions in populations can have a profound effect on the pattern and organization of nucleotide variability along a chromosome. Regions near inversion breakpoints are expected to have greater levels of differentiation because of reduced genetic exchange between different gene arrangements whereas central regions in the inverted segments are predicted to have lower levels of nucleotide differentiation due to greater levels of genetic flux among different karyotypes. We used the inversion polymorphism on the third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura to test these predictions with an analysis of nucleotide diversity of 18 genetic markers near and away from inversion breakpoints. We tested hypotheses about how the presence of different chromosomal arrangements affects the pattern and organization of nucleotide variation. Overall, markers in the distal segment of the chromosome had greater levels of nucleotide heterozygosity than markers within the proximal segment of the chromosome. In addition, our results rejected the hypothesis that the breakpoints of derived inversions will have lower levels of nucleotide variability than breakpoints of ancestral inversions, even when strains with gene conversion events were removed. High levels of linkage disequilibrium were observed within all 11 breakpoint regions as well as between the ends of most proximal and distal breakpoints. The central region of the chromosome had the greatest levels of linkage disequilibrium compared with the proximal and distal regions because this is the region that experiences the highest level of recombination suppression. These data do not fully support the idea that genetic exchange is the sole force that influences genetic variation on inverted chromosomes.

  20. ROTATION OF THE WARM MOLECULAR GAS SURROUNDING ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, P. D.; Wilson, C. D.; Keto, E. R.; Zhang, Q.

    2009-10-01

    We present molecular line and 1.4 mm continuum observations toward five massive star-forming regions at arcsecond resolution using the Submillimeter Array. We find that the warm molecular gas surrounding each H II region (as traced by SO{sub 2} and OCS) appears to be undergoing bulk rotation. From the molecular line emission and thermal component of the continuum emission, we independently derived gas masses for each region which are consistent with each other. From the free-free component of the continuum emission, we estimate the minimum stellar mass required to power the H II region and find that this mass, when added to the derived gas mass, is a significant fraction of the dynamical mass for that region.

  1. Two γ-ray bursts from dusty regions with little molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Hatsukade, B; Ohta, K; Endo, A; Nakanishi, K; Tamura, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohno, K

    2014-06-12

    Long-duration γ-ray bursts are associated with the explosions of massive stars and are accordingly expected to reside in star-forming regions with molecular gas (the fuel for star formation). Previous searches for carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of molecular gas, in burst host galaxies did not detect any emission. Molecules have been detected as absorption in the spectra of γ-ray burst afterglows, and the molecular gas is similar to the translucent or diffuse molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Absorption lines probe the interstellar medium only along the line of sight, so it is not clear whether the molecular gas represents the general properties of the regions where the bursts occur. Here we report spatially resolved observations of CO line emission and millimetre-wavelength continuum emission in two galaxies hosting γ-ray bursts. The bursts happened in regions rich in dust, but not particularly rich in molecular gas. The ratio of molecular gas to dust (<9-14) is significantly lower than in star-forming regions of the Milky Way and nearby star-forming galaxies, suggesting that much of the dense gas where stars form has been dissipated by other massive stars.

  2. Two γ-ray bursts from dusty regions with little molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Hatsukade, B; Ohta, K; Endo, A; Nakanishi, K; Tamura, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohno, K

    2014-06-12

    Long-duration γ-ray bursts are associated with the explosions of massive stars and are accordingly expected to reside in star-forming regions with molecular gas (the fuel for star formation). Previous searches for carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of molecular gas, in burst host galaxies did not detect any emission. Molecules have been detected as absorption in the spectra of γ-ray burst afterglows, and the molecular gas is similar to the translucent or diffuse molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Absorption lines probe the interstellar medium only along the line of sight, so it is not clear whether the molecular gas represents the general properties of the regions where the bursts occur. Here we report spatially resolved observations of CO line emission and millimetre-wavelength continuum emission in two galaxies hosting γ-ray bursts. The bursts happened in regions rich in dust, but not particularly rich in molecular gas. The ratio of molecular gas to dust (<9-14) is significantly lower than in star-forming regions of the Milky Way and nearby star-forming galaxies, suggesting that much of the dense gas where stars form has been dissipated by other massive stars. PMID:24919918

  3. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldaño, Hugo P.; Vásquez, J.; Cappa, C. E.; Gómez, M.; Duronea, N.; Rubio, M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. Methods: We observed the 12CO(3 -2), 13CO(3 -2), C18O(3 -2), HCO+(3 -2), and HCN(3 -2) molecular lines in a region of 150''× 150'', centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H2 volume density are 310 M⊙ and 1.2 × 104 cm-3, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows. Final reduced APEX data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A115

  4. Genetic and Molecular Mapping of Chromosome Region 85a in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. K.; Rawls-Jr., J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome region 85A contains at least 12 genetic complementation groups, including the genes dhod, pink and hunchback. In order to better understand the organization of this chromosomal segment and to permit molecular studies of these genes, we have carried out a genetic analysis coupled with a chromosome walk to isolate the DNA containing these genes. Complementation tests with chromosomal deficiencies permitted unambiguous ordering of most of the complementation groups identified within the 85A region. Recombinant bacteriophage clones were isolated that collectively span over 120 kb of 85A DNA and these were used to produce a molecular map of the region. The breakpoint sites of a number of 85A chromosome rearrangements were localized on the molecular map, thereby delimiting regions of the DNA that contain the various genetic complementation groups. PMID:2852138

  5. Disk-Halo interaction: The molecular clouds in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, D.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín, S.; Bronfman, L.

    2012-07-01

    From a large-scale study of the Galactic center (GC) region in SiO(2 - 1), HCO+(1 - 0), and H13CO+(1 - 0), we identify shock regions as traced by the enhancement of SiO emission. We selected 9 positions called by us as "interaction regions", because they mark the places where gas in the GC could be interacting with gas coming from higher latitude ("disk-halo interaction") or from larger galactocentric radius. These positions were studied using the 12C/13C isotopic ratio to trace gas accretion/ejection. We found a systematically higher 12C/13C isotopic ratio (> 40) toward the interaction regions than for the GC "standard" molecular clouds (20 - 25). These high isotopic ratios are consistent with the accretion of the gas from higher galactic latitudes or from larger galactocentric distances. There are two kinetic temperature regimes (one warm at ~ 200 K and one cold at ~ 40 K) for all the positions, except for the positions associated to the giant molecular loops where only the warm component is present. Relative molecular abundances suggest that the heating mechanism in the GC is related to shocks. We mapped one molecular cloud placed at the foot points of the giant molecular loops in 3-mm molecular lines to reveal the morphology, chemical composition and the kinematics of the shocked gas.

  6. STUDIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS ASSOCIATED WITH H II REGIONS: S175

    SciTech Connect

    Azimlu, Mohaddesseh; Fich, Michel; McCoey, Carolyn

    2009-06-15

    We are studying the impact of H II regions on star formation in their associated molecular clouds. In this paper, we present James Clerk Maxwell Telescope R x A molecular line observations of S175 and environs. This is the first within a sample of 10 H II regions and their surrounding molecular clouds selected for our study. We first make 7' x 7' maps in {sup 12}CO(2-1), which are used to investigate the structure of the cloud and to identify individual clumps. Single point observations were made in {sup 13}CO(2-1) and CS(5-4) at the peak of the {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission within each clump in order to measure the physical properties of the gas. Densities, temperatures, clump masses, peak velocities, and line widths were measured and calculated using these observations. We have identified two condensations (S175A and S175B) in the molecular cloud associated with this H II region. S175A is adjacent to the ionization front and is expected to be affected by the H II region, while S175B is too distant to be disturbed. We compare the structure and gas properties of these two regions to investigate how the molecular gas has been affected by the H II region. S175A has been heated by the H II region and partially compressed by the ionized gas front, but contrary to our expectation it is a quiescent region while S175B is very turbulent and dynamically active. Our investigation for the source of turbulence in S175B resulted in the detection of an outflow within this region.

  7. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  8. Molecular emission in dense massive clumps from the star-forming regions S231-S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Kirsanova, M. S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the study of the star-forming regions S231-S235 in radio lines of molecules of the interstellar medium—carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), in maser lines—methanol (CH3OH) and water vapor (H2O). The regions S231-S235 belong to the giant molecular cloudG174+2.5. The goal of this paper is to search for new sources of emission toward molecular clumps and to estimate their physical parameters from CO and NH3 molecular lines. We obtained new detections ofNH3 andHC3Nlines in the sources WB89673 and WB89 668 which indicates the presence of high-density gas. From the CO line, we derived sizes, column densities, and masses of molecular clumps. From the NH3 line, we derived gas kinetic temperatures and number densities in molecular clumps. We determined that kinetic temperatures and number densities of molecular gas are within the limits 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2 × 103 cm-3 respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH3OH molecule at a frequency of 36.2 GHz was detected in WB89 673 for the first time.

  9. Star forming regions towards Gum 31: distribution of the molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with IRAS and 2MASS sources, young stellar objects linked to the Hii region Gum31. We based our studies on observations obtained with the APEX telescope, located in the north of Chile. We used observations of different CO isotopologues, CS(7-6) and HCO(4-3) lines. The sources are located on the edge of the Gum31 Hii region, whose shock front substantially affects the morphology of their molecular environs. The observations revealed that in the surroundings of the sources there is molecular gas associated with the nebula, which is shown by the CO(3-2) emission, with small high density clumps detected in CO(3-2).

  10. SCIENCE RESULTS INTEGRATION. BRINGING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES TO REGIONAL WATER MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) develops innovative methods for use in environmental monitoring and assessment by scientists in Regions, states, and Tribes. Molecular-biology-based methods are not yet established in the environmental monitoring "tool box". SRI (Sci...

  11. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR-FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE CENTRAL AND BAR REGIONS OF NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hsi-An; Sorai, Kazuo; Kuno, Nario; Koda, Jin; Hirota, Akihiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-10

    In this work, we investigate the molecular gas and star-formation properties in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 using multiple molecular lines and star-formation tracers. A high-resolution image (100 pc) of {sup 13}CO (1–0) is created for the inner 2 kpc disk by the single-dish Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and interferometer Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, including the central region (nuclear ring and bar) and the offset ridges of the primary bar. Single-dish HCN (1–0) observations were also made to constrain the amount of dense gas. The physical properties of molecular gas are inferred from (1) the large velocity gradient calculations using our observations and archival {sup 12}CO (1–0), {sup 12}CO(2–1) data, (2) the dense gas fraction suggested by the luminosity ratio of HCN to {sup 12}CO (1–0), and (3) the infrared color. The results show that the molecular gas in the central region is warmer and denser than that of the offset ridges. The dense gas fraction of the central region is similar to that of luminous infrared galaxies/ultraluminous infrared galaxies, whereas the offset ridges are close to the global average of normal galaxies. The coolest and least-dense region is found in a spiral-like structure, which was misunderstood to be part of the southern primary bar in previous low-resolution observations. The star-formation efficiency (SFE) changes by about five times in the inner disk. The variation of SFE agrees with the prediction in terms of star formation regulated by the galactic bar. We find a consistency between the star-forming region and the temperature inferred by the infrared color, suggesting that the distribution of subkiloparsec-scale temperature is driven by star formation.

  12. Molecular Gas and Star-formation Properties in the Central and Bar Regions of NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hsi-An; Kuno, Nario; Koda, Jin; Hirota, Akihiko; Sorai, Kazuo; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the molecular gas and star-formation properties in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 using multiple molecular lines and star-formation tracers. A high-resolution image (100 pc) of 13CO (1-0) is created for the inner 2 kpc disk by the single-dish Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and interferometer Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, including the central region (nuclear ring and bar) and the offset ridges of the primary bar. Single-dish HCN (1-0) observations were also made to constrain the amount of dense gas. The physical properties of molecular gas are inferred from (1) the large velocity gradient calculations using our observations and archival 12CO (1-0), 12CO(2-1) data, (2) the dense gas fraction suggested by the luminosity ratio of HCN to 12CO (1-0), and (3) the infrared color. The results show that the molecular gas in the central region is warmer and denser than that of the offset ridges. The dense gas fraction of the central region is similar to that of luminous infrared galaxies/ultraluminous infrared galaxies, whereas the offset ridges are close to the global average of normal galaxies. The coolest and least-dense region is found in a spiral-like structure, which was misunderstood to be part of the southern primary bar in previous low-resolution observations. The star-formation efficiency (SFE) changes by about five times in the inner disk. The variation of SFE agrees with the prediction in terms of star formation regulated by the galactic bar. We find a consistency between the star-forming region and the temperature inferred by the infrared color, suggesting that the distribution of subkiloparsec-scale temperature is driven by star formation.

  13. Solvent-Driven Preferential Association of Lignin with Regions of Crystalline Cellulose in Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Schulz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    The precipitation of lignin onto cellulose after pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is an obstacle to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. Here, 750 ns nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are reported of a system of lignin and cellulose in aqueous solution. Lignin is found to strongly associate with itself and the cellulose. However, noncrystalline regions of cellulose are observed to have a lower tendency to associate with lignin than crystalline regions, and this is found to arise from stronger hydration of the noncrystalline chains. The results suggest that the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to hydrolysis arises not only from the inaccessibility of inner fibers but also due to the promotion of lignin adhesion.

  14. Tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 and Down syndrome: Molecular definition of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Daumer-Haas, C.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Walther, J.U.; Portsmann, T.; Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    Down syndrome is usually caused by complete trisomy 21. Rarely, it is due to partial trisomy of the segment 21q22. We report on a 33-month-old girl with tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 resulting from an extra chromosome idic(21)(q22.1). She has craniofacial traits typical of Down syndrome, including brachycephaly, third fontanel, upward slanting palpebral fissures, round face, and protruding tongue. Speech development is quite delayed whereas motor development is only mildly retarded. The molecular content of the extra isodicentric chromosome was defined by molecular genetic investigations using 13 single copy probes unique to chromosome 21, and SOD1 expression studies. The child was found to have 4 copies of the region defined by D21S16 (21cen) through D21S93 on 21q22.1 and two copies of the remaining region defined by SOD1 {yields} D21S55 {yields} D21S123. In view of the recent assignment of Down syndrome facial characters to the 21q22 region, defined in part by D21S55, it is significant that this child shows a subset of Down syndrome facial manifestations, without duplication of this region. These results suggest that genes contributing to the facial and some of the hand manifestations of Down syndrome also exist in the chromosomal region proximal to D21S55 in band 21q22.1. 34 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Anatomy of a Photodissociation Region: High angular resolution images of molecular emission in the Orion Bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Jan A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, Margaret; Foldsmith, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of the molecular component of the Orion Bar, a prototypical Photodissociation Region (PDR) illuminated by the Trapezium cluster. The high angular resolution (6 sec-10 sec) that we have achieved by combining single-dish and interferometric observations has allowed us to examine in detail the spatial and kinematic morphology of this region and to estimate the physical characteristics of the molecular gas it contains. Our observations indicate that this PDR can be essentially described as a homogeneously distributed slab of moderately dense material (approximately 5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm), in which are embedded a small number of dense (greater than 10(exp 6)/cu cm) clumps. The latter play little or no role in determining the thickness and kinetic temperature structure of this PDR. This observational picture is largely supported by PDR model calculations for this region, which we describe in detail in this work. We also find our model predictions of the intensities of a variety of atomic and molecular lines to be in good general agreement with a number of previous observations.

  16. Gravity Binding and Pressure Bounding of HII Regions and Molecular Clouds in Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckman, John Etienne; Zaragoz-Cardiel, Javier; Font, Joan; Amram, Philippe; Camps-Fariña, Artemi

    2015-08-01

    We have observed a sample of 12 interacting galaxies using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, deriving maps in Hα surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion. We extracted the physical parameters (Hα luminosities, velocity dispersions, and effective radii) of 1300 HII regions for the full sample with techniques for which velocity tagging is an essential step. We found two populations of HII regions, with a break at a gas mass of 106.5 solar masses. The mean density of the regions falls with radius for smaller masses, but rises with radius for larger masses. This is because in the lower mass range the HII regions are pressure bounded while in the upper range they are gravitationally bound. This analysis is underscored by using the turbulent velocity dispersion to show that the virial parameter for the regions shows values consistent with gravitational equilibrium in the upper range only. We were able to use ALMA observations of the molecular clouds in one of our objects, the Antennae galaxies, showing that for clouds with masses above 106.5 solar masses their densities increase with mass. The mass functions of the molecular clouds and HII regions in the Antennae show bimodal distributions, with the break at 106.5 solar masses clearly in evidence. We draw two conclusions of interest. Firstly the classical Larson scaling relation between surface density and mass does not operate in the upper mass range, implying higher star formation efficiency there. Secondly the similarity in the mass functions and density radius relations for the GMC’s and HII regions suggests that, at least in the upper mass range, the former remain gravitationally bound even after massive star formation has occurred.

  17. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between H II Regions and Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Akira; Kane, Jave O.; Pound, Marc W.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2006-08-01

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly, the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm H I region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regime does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and of the density in the H II region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  18. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between HII Regions and Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J O; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Takabe, H

    2006-04-20

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm HI region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regimes does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and in density in HII region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  19. The molecular gas content of the nuclear region of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christine D.; Scoville, Nick

    1989-12-01

    The nearby Sc galaxy M33 has been mapped at half-beamwidth spacing out to a 3.5 arcmin radius in the CO J = 1-0 line using the NRAO 12 m telescope. The map reveals seven large-scale features with sizes of 200-400 pc, and in several cases they are associated with spiral arms. The masses of these structures are insufficient to gravitationally or tidally bind them given their measured sizes and velocity dispersions, and distances from the center of M33. The total mass of molecular hydrogen in the region mapped is 3.4 x 10 to the 7th solar, roughly twice the mass in atomic hydrogen. Within a radius of 800 pc, no evidence is seen for an exponential decrease in the azimuthally averaged molecular hydrogen column density. The rotation curve obtained from the molecular gas agrees well with previous observations, yielding a disk mass of 5 x 10 to the 8th solar, out to a radius of 800 pc and a molecular gas mass total mass ratio of 4 percent.

  20. Statistical properties of dense molecular clouds in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Tsuboi, M.

    We report physical properties of molecular clouds from the Galactic center r egion survey in CS J = 1-0 with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (Tsuboi, Handa, an d Ukita, 1996). We identified over 70 molecular cloud cores in the region. We determined the statistical properties such as size-line width and LTE mass -virial theorem mass relations for the clouds. The size-line width relation is obscure in this survey data because of narrow in the radius range of the observed clouds. But the line width of the Galactic center cloud is about fi ve times larger than that of the disk clouds (Solomon et al.1987). Virial th eorem masses of the Galactic center clouds are 1-2 order of magnitude larger than the LTE masses. These are consistent with the results for larger size c louds around the Galactic center from CO J = 2-1 (Oka 1996).

  1. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  2. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRS) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km s(exp -1) at 60 microns and 1.0 km s(exp -1) at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR.

  3. Molecular characterization of Morchella species from the Western Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Acharya, Karan; Ramesh, G; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2011-04-01

    The molecular diversity of thirty-two different Morchella cultures/fruiting bodies, collected from the Western Himalayan region was studied in this investigation. Considerable taxonomic confusion exists regarding many species of Morchella. Although classical taxonomy is helpful in identification for many ascomycetes, morels exhibit considerable morphological diversity and there is disagreement in the identification of morel species. Phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequences could help in sorting out morel taxonomy which is essential to better define the morel diversity. In this study, sequence analysis revealed that in the Western Himalayan region of India, both yellow (M. crassipes, M. spongiola) and black morels (M. elata, M. angusticeps, and M. gigas) were prominent along with two Verpa species. Phylogenetic analysis by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference revealed two different clades and a clear distinction between yellow and black morels. PMID:21188589

  4. Disruption of Molecular Clouds by Expansion of Dusty H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamical expansion of H II regions around star clusters plays a key role in dispersing the surrounding dense gas and therefore in limiting the efficiency of star formation in molecular clouds. We use a semianalytic method and numerical simulations to explore expansion of spherical dusty H II regions and surrounding neutral shells and the resulting cloud disruption. Our model for shell expansion adopts the static solutions of Draine for dusty H II regions and considers the contact outward forces on the shell due to radiation and thermal pressures, as well as the inward gravity from the central star and the shell itself. We show that the internal structure we adopt and the shell evolution from the semianalytic approach are in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations. Strong radiation pressure in the interior controls the shell expansion indirectly by enhancing the density and pressure at the ionization front. We calculate the minimum star formation efficiency ɛmin required for cloud disruption as a function of the cloud's total mass and mean surface density. Within the adopted spherical geometry, we find that typical giant molecular clouds in normal disk galaxies have ɛmin ≲ 10%, with comparable gas and radiation pressure effects on shell expansion. Massive cluster-forming clumps require a significantly higher efficiency of ɛmin ≳ 50% for disruption, produced mainly by radiation-driven expansion. The disruption time is typically of the order of a free-fall timescale, suggesting that the cloud disruption occurs rapidly once a sufficiently luminous H II region is formed. We also discuss limitations of the spherical idealization.

  5. Metastable region of phase diagram: optimum parameter range for processing ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Gai, Jing-Gang; Zuo, Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Numerous studies suggest that two-phase morphology and thick interface are separately beneficial to the viscosity reduction and mechanical property maintainence of the matrix when normal molecular weight polymer (NMWP) is used for modification of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Nevertheless, it is very difficult to obtain a UHMWPE/NMWP blend which may demonstrate both two-phase morphology and thick interface. In this work, dissipative particle dynamics simulations and Flory-Huggins theory are applied in predicting the optimum NMWP and the corresponding conditions, wherein the melt flowability of UHMWPE can be improved while its mechanical properties can also be retained. As is indicated by dissipative particle dynamics simulations and phase diagram calculated from Flory-Huggins theory, too small Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ) and molecular chain length of NMWP (N(NMWP)) may lead to the formation of a homogeneous phase, whereas very large interfacial tension and thin interfaces might also appear when parameters N(NMWP) and χ are too large. When these parameters are located in the metastable region of the phase diagram, however, two-phase morphology occurs and interfaces of the blends are extremely thick. Therefore, metastable state is found to be advisable for both the viscosity reduction and mechanical property improvement of the UHMWPE/NMWP blends.

  6. Identification of significantly mutated regions across cancer types highlights a rich landscape of functional molecular alterations

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Carlos L.; Cenik, Can; Reuter, Jason A.; Kiss, Gert; Pande, Vijay S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Greenleaf, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer sequencing studies have primarily identified cancer-driver genes by the accumulation of protein-altering mutations. An improved method would be annotation-independent, sensitive to unknown distributions of functions within proteins, and inclusive of non-coding drivers. We employed density-based clustering methods in 21 tumor types to detect variably-sized significantly mutated regions (SMRs). SMRs reveal recurrent alterations across a spectrum of coding and non-coding elements, including transcription factor binding sites and untranslated regions mutated in up to ∼15% of specific tumor types. SMRs reveal spatial clustering of mutations at molecular domains and interfaces, often with associated changes in signaling. Mutation frequencies in SMRs demonstrate that distinct protein regions are differentially mutated among tumor types, as exemplified by a linker region of PIK3CA in which biophysical simulations suggest mutations affect regulatory interactions. The functional diversity of SMRs underscores both the varied mechanisms of oncogenic misregulation and the advantage of functionally-agnostic driver identification. PMID:26691984

  7. Molecular evidence of synaptic pathology in the CA1 region in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matosin, Natalie; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca; Lum, Jeremy S; Engel, Martin; Andrews, Jessica L; Gassen, Nils C; Wagner, Klaus V; Schmidt, Mathias V; Newell, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of postsynaptic density (PSD)95-complex proteins in schizophrenia ostensibly induce deficits in synaptic plasticity, the molecular process underlying cognitive functions. Although some PSD95-complex proteins have been previously examined in the hippocampus in schizophrenia, the status of other equally important molecules is unclear. This is especially true in the cornu ammonis (CA)1 hippocampal subfield, a region that is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the illness. We thus performed a quantitative immunoblot experiment to examine PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region, using post mortem brain samples derived from schizophrenia subjects with age-, sex-, and post mortem interval-matched controls (n=20/group). Our results indicate a substantial reduction in PSD95 protein expression (−61.8%). Further analysis showed additional alterations to the scaffold protein Homer1 (Homer1a: +42.9%, Homer1b/c: −24.6%), with a twofold reduction in the ratio of Homer1b/c:Homer1a isoforms (P=0.011). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) protein levels were significantly reduced (−32.7%), and Preso, a protein that supports interactions between Homer1 or PSD95 with mGluR1, was elevated (+83.3%). Significant reduction in synaptophysin (−27.8%) was also detected, which is a validated marker of synaptic density. These findings support the presence of extensive molecular abnormalities to PSD95 and several of its associated proteins in the CA1 region in schizophrenia, offering a small but significant step toward understanding how proteins in the PSD are altered in the schizophrenia brain, and their relevance to overall hippocampal and cognitive dysfunction in the illness. PMID:27430010

  8. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the "karst group", in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary. PMID:27667927

  9. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the "karst group", in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary.

  10. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the “karst group”, in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary. PMID:27667927

  11. Molecular Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit Acetylcholinesterase by Targeting the Peripheral Site and Backdoor Region

    PubMed Central

    Essono, Sosthène; Mondielli, Grégoire; Lamourette, Patricia; Boquet, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Marchot, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition properties and target sites of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Elec403, Elec408 and Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (AChE), have been defined previously using biochemical and mutagenesis approaches. Elec403 and Elec410, which bind competitively with each other and with the peptidic toxin inhibitor fasciculin, are directed toward distinctive albeit overlapping epitopes located at the AChE peripheral anionic site, which surrounds the entrance of the active site gorge. Elec408, which is not competitive with the other two mAbs nor fasciculin, targets a second epitope located in the backdoor region, distant from the gorge entrance. To characterize the molecular determinants dictating their binding site specificity, we cloned and sequenced the mAbs; generated antigen-binding fragments (Fab) retaining the parental inhibition properties; and explored their structure-function relationships using complementary x-ray crystallography, homology modeling and flexible docking approaches. Hypermutation of one Elec403 complementarity-determining region suggests occurrence of antigen-driven selection towards recognition of the AChE peripheral site. Comparative analysis of the 1.9Å-resolution structure of Fab408 and of theoretical models of its Fab403 and Fab410 congeners evidences distinctive surface topographies and anisotropic repartitions of charges, consistent with their respective target sites and inhibition properties. Finally, a validated, data-driven docking model of the Fab403-AChE complex suggests a mode of binding at the PAS that fully correlates with the functional data. This comprehensive study documents the molecular peculiarities of Fab403 and Fab410, as the largest peptidic inhibitors directed towards the peripheral site, and those of Fab408, as the first inhibitor directed toward the backdoor region of an AChE and a unique template for the design of new, specific modulators of AChE catalysis. PMID:24146971

  12. Molecular systematics of the Labeonini inhabiting the karst regions in southwest China (Teleostei, Cypriniformes)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The major phylogenetic pattern of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini has been revealed by previous molecular studies; however, the relationships within a clade that mainly inhabits the karst regions, which we refer to as the “karst group”, in southwest China remain unresolved due to the low taxon sampling. This group includes more than 50% of the genera and species of Labeonini in China. Moreover, more than 90% of the genera of this group are endemic to China. In addition, some new genera and species of Labeonini have been discovered from these karst regions, but their taxonomic validity and phylogenetic position have not been examined. In this contribution, partial sequences of four nuclear (exon 3 of recombination activating protein 1, rhodopsin, early growth response protein 2B gene and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein gene) and three mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) from 36 ingroup taxa and 25 outgroup taxa were analyzed to provide a hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the labeonins of the karst regions in China. We propose that the monophyly of Parasinilabeo, Ptychidio, Rectoris and Semilabeo are supported. A new genus, Prolixicheilus, is erected for Pseudogyrinocheilus longisulcus. Cophecheilus bamen is the sister to Prolixicheilus longisulcus. Ptychidio, Pseudocrossocheilus, Semilabeo, Rectoris and Stenorynchoacrum are closely related with high support values. Sinocrossocheilus, Pseudogyrinocheilus, Paraqianlabeo, Hongshuia, Discogobio and Discocheilus form a clade together with high support. Considering molecular results and morphological differences, Parasinilabeo longicorpus and Ptychidio macrops might be the synonyms of Parasinilabeo assimilis and Ptychidio jordani respectively. Comprehensive taxonomic revisions of the two genera Parasinilabeo and Ptychidio may be necessary.

  13. Molecular Epidemiological Characterization and Health Burden of Thalassemias in the Chaoshan Region, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangbin; Lin, Min; Yang, Hui; Pan, Mei-Chen; Cai, Ying-Mu; Wu, Jiao-Ren; Lin, Fen; Zhan, Xiao-Fen; Luo, Zhao-Yun; Yang, Hui-Tian; Yang, Li-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Thalassemia is one of the most prevalent inherited disease in southern China. However, there have been only a few epidemiological studies of thalassemia in the Chaoshan region of Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China (PRC). A total of 6231 unrelated subjects in two main geographical cities of the Chaoshan region was analyzed for thalassemia. Seven hundred and thirty-six cases of suspected thalassemia carriers with microcytosis [mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <82.0 fL] were found by complete blood cell (CBC) count, and were tested by reverse dot-blot gene chip to reveal a total of 331 mutant chromosomes, including 278 α-thalassemia (α-thal) alleles and 53 β-thalassemia (β-thal) alleles. The most common α-thal mutations were the Southeast Asian (- -(SEA)), followed by the -α(3.7) (rightward) and -α(4.2) (leftward) deletions. The two most common β-thal mutations were HBB: c.316-197C>T and HBB: c.126_129delCTTT, accounting for 69.81% of the β-thal defects in the studied individuals. In addition, a rare mutation, Cap +1 (A>C) (HBB: c.-50A>C) was described for the first time in the Chaoshan region. Our results gave a heterozygote frequency of 5.31% for common α- and β-thal in the Chaoshan region, and also indicated a higher prevalence of thalassemia with a heterozygote frequency of 6.29% in Chaozhou, followed by Shantou (3.37%). This study provided a detailed prevalence and molecular characterization of thalassemia in the Chaoshan region, and will be valuable for developing a strategy for prevention of thalassemia and reducing excessive health care costs in this area. PMID:26865073

  14. MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND INFRARED CLUSTERS IN THE S247, S252, AND BFS52 REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Saito, Hiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Atsushi; Kimura, Kimihiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    We present results of the observations carried out toward the S247, S252, and BFS52 H II regions with various molecular lines using the 1.85 m radio telescope and the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. There are at least 11 young infrared clusters (IR clusters) within the observed region. We found that there are two velocity components in {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1), and also that their spatial distributions show an anti-correlation. The IR clusters are located at their interfaces, suggesting that two distinct clouds with different velocities are colliding with each other, which may have induced the cluster formation. Based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0) and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations, we identified 16 clumps in and around the three H II regions. Eleven of the clumps are associated with the IR clusters and the other five clumps are not associated with any known young stellar objects. We investigated variations in the velocity dispersions of the 16 clumps as a function of the distance from the center of the clusters or the clumps. Clumps with clusters tend to have velocity dispersions that increase with distance from the cluster center, while clumps without clusters show a flat velocity dispersion over the clump extents. A {sup 12}CO outflow has been found in some of the clumps with IR clusters but not in the other clumps, supporting a strong relation of these clumps to the broader velocity dispersion region. We also estimated a mean star formation efficiency of {approx}30% for the clumps with IR clusters in the three H II regions.

  15. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  16. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  17. Molecular rotation-vibration dynamics of low-symmetric hydrate crystal in the terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaojian; Wu, Hongya; Xi, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-16

    The rotational and vibrational dynamics of molecules in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystal are investigated with terahertz dielectric spectra. It is shown that the relaxation-like dielectric dispersion in the low frequency region is related to the reorientation of water molecules under the driving of terahertz electric field, whereas the resonant dispersion can be ascribed to lattice vibration. It is also found that, due to the hydrogen-bond effect, the vibrational mode at about 1.83 THz along [-111] direction softens with decreasing temperature, that is, the crystal expands in this direction when cooled. On the contrary, the mode hardens in the direction perpendicular to [-111] during the cooling process. This contributes to the further understanding of the molecular structure and bonding features of hydrate crystals. PMID:24359294

  18. Molecular organization of the nodal region is not altered in spontaneously diabetic BB-Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, A A; Xu, T; Arroyo, E J; Levinson, S R; Brophy, P J; Peles, E; Scherer, S S

    2001-07-15

    We examined the organization of the molecular components of the nodal region in spontaneously diabetic BB-Wistar rats. Frozen sections and teased fibers from the sciatic nerves were immunostained for nodal (voltage-gated Na(+) channels, ankyrin(G), and ezrin), paranodal (contactin, Caspr, and neurofascin 155 kDa), and juxtaparanodal (Caspr2, the Shaker-type K(+) channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2, and their associated subunit Kvbeta2) proteins. All of these proteins were properly localized in myelinated fibers from rats that had been diabetic for 15-44 days, compared to age-matched, nondiabetic animals. These results demonstrate that the axonal membrane is not reorganized, so nodal reorganization is not likely to be the cause of nerve conduction slowing in this animal model of acute diabetes. PMID:11438983

  19. Atomic carbon near the molecular cloud/H II region interface in S 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernichel, J.; Krause, D.; Roehrig, R.; Stutzki, J.; Winnewisser, G.

    1992-06-01

    We have observed the (CI) 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line of atomic carbon at 492 GHz in the edge-on interface between the molecular cloud L 1204 and the S 140 H II region with the KOSMA telescope on Gornergrat, Switzerland. We find that the (CI)-emission near the interface consists of a narrow velocity component with position and line width similar to that of the ambient molecular cloud material, superimposed on a wider component (FWHM is approximately equal to 15 km/s) exhibiting a line profile similar to that of the higher velocity material visible in CO and carrying most of the CI column density. The velocity integrated (CI) emission peaks near the edge of the cloud facing the exciting star. This finding is in contrast to earlier results by Keene et al. (1985) who missed the wide velocity component in their observations. The relative CI/CO abundance is strongly enhanced in the high velocity material (100 percent) relative to the ambient cloud material (11 percent).

  20. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  1. The molecular composition of the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks across the luminosity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Catherine; Nomura, Hideko; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-10-01

    Context. Near- to mid-infrared observations of molecular emission from protoplanetary disks show that the inner regions are rich in small organic volatiles (e.g., C2H2 and HCN). Trends in the data suggest that disks around cooler stars (Teff ≈ 3000 K) are potentially (i) more carbon-rich; and (ii) more molecule-rich than their hotter counterparts (Teff ≳ 4000 K). Aims: We explore the chemical composition of the planet-forming region (<10 AU) of protoplanetary disks around stars over a range of spectral types (from M dwarf to Herbig Ae) and compare with the observed trends. Methods: Self-consistent models of the physical structure of a protoplanetary disk around stars of different spectral types are coupled with a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network to map the molecular abundances in the planet-forming zone. The effects of (i) N2 self shielding; (ii) X-ray-induced chemistry; and (iii) initial abundances, are investigated. The chemical composition in the "observable" atmosphere is compared with that in the disk midplane where the bulk of the planet-building reservoir resides. Results: M dwarf disk atmospheres are relatively more molecule rich than those for T Tauri or Herbig Ae disks. The weak far-UV flux helps retain this complexity which is enhanced by X-ray-induced ion-molecule chemistry. N2 self shielding has only a small effect in the disk molecular layer and does not explain the higher C2H2/HCN ratios observed towards cooler stars. The models underproduce the OH/H2O column density ratios constrained in Herbig Ae disks, despite reproducing (within an order of magnitude) the absolute value for OH: the inclusion of self shielding for H2O photodissociation only increases this discrepancy. One possible explanation is the adopted disk structure. Alternatively, the "hot" H2O (T ≳ 300 K) chemistry may be more complex than assumed. The results for the atmosphere are independent of the assumed initial abundances; however, the composition of the disk midplane

  2. Diversity and distribution of avian haematozoan parasites in the western Indian Ocean region: a molecular survey.

    PubMed

    Ishtiaq, Farah; Beadell, Jon S; Warren, Ben H; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    The genetic diversity of haematozoan parasites in island avifauna has only recently begun to be explored, despite the potential insight that these data can provide into the history of association between hosts and parasites and the possible threat posed to island endemics. We used mitochondrial DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity of 2 genera of vector-mediated parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) in avian blood samples from the western Indian Ocean region and explored their relationship with parasites from continental Africa. We detected infections in 68 out of 150 (45·3%) individuals and cytochrome b sequences identified 9 genetically distinct lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 7 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. We found considerable heterogeneity in parasite lineage composition across islands, although limited sampling may, in part, be responsible for perceived differences. Two lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 2 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. were shared by hosts in the Indian Ocean and also on mainland Africa, suggesting that these lineages may have arrived relatively recently. Polyphyly of island parasites indicated that these parasites were unlikely to constitute an endemic radiation and instead probably represent multiple colonization events. This study represents the first molecular survey of vector-mediated parasites in the western Indian Ocean, and has uncovered a diversity of parasites. Full understanding of parasite community composition and possible threats to endemic avian hosts will require comprehensive surveys across the avifauna of this region.

  3. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer (Betz & Boreiko 1993) aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRs) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km/s at 60 microns and 1.0 km/s at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR. The publication resulting from the work reported here is appended. No inventions were made nor was any federally owned property acquired as a result of the activities under this grant.

  4. Far Infrared Line Profiles from Photodissociation Regions and Warm Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1056 awarded to the University of Colorado. The aim of the project was to analyze data obtained over the past several years with the University of Colorado far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer (Betz Boreiko 1993) aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Of particular interest were observations of CO and ionized carbon (C II) in photodissociation regions (PDRS) at the interface between UV-ionized H II regions and the neutral molecular clouds supporting star formation. These data, obtained with a heterodyne spectrometer having a resolution of 3.2 MHz, which is equivalent to a velocity resolution of 0.2 km/s at 60 microns and 1.0 km/s at 300 microns, were analyzed to obtain physical parameters such as density and temperature in the observed PDR. The publication resulting from the work reported here is appended. No inventions were made nor was any federally owned property acquired as a result of the activities under this grant.

  5. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  6. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases which are serious neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals occur in various of species. Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases affected by amyloid, prion diseases can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in many species. In humans, prion diseases include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Kuru etc. In animals, prion diseases are related to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) found in deer and elk, and scrapie seen in sheep and goats, etc. More seriously, the fact that transmission of the prion diseases across the species barrier to other species such as humans has caused a major public health concern worldwide. For example, the BSE in Europe, the CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK. Fortunately, it is discovered that the hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions (PrP(Sc)), which provide some clues in control of such diseases. This article provides a detailed survey of recent studies with respect to the PrP hydrophobic region of human PrP(110-136) using molecular dynamics studies. PMID:25373387

  7. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  8. Molecular cloning of the white locus region of Drosophila melanogaster using a large transposable element

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, M.L.; Paro, R.; Gehring, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a chromosome segment including the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster. This region was isolated using a deficiency extending from the previously cloned heat-shock puff sequences at 87A7 to a large transposable element containing the loci white and roughest.FB-NOF, a 7.5 kb element with partial homology to a family of inverted repeat sequences (Potter et al., 1980), is found very near the deficiency breakpoint, and is followed by DNA originating from the white locus region. Sequences totalling ˜60 kb surrounding this initial entry point were obtained by the cloning of successively overlapping fragments from a wild-type strain. Several rearrangement breakpoints have been mapped relative to the cloned DNA; these define the limits of the white locus and further differentiate the “white proximal region”, thought to function in gene regulation, from the remainder of the locus. Insertion of the dispersed repetitive element copia into the white locus is observed in strains carrying the white-apricot allele. Analysis of several white-apricot revertants suggests that copia insertion is responsible for the apricot eye color phenotype. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:16453411

  9. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous “spindle envelope” confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function. PMID:26304726

  10. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  11. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    PubMed

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  12. Molecular profiling of the developing avian telencephalon: regional timing and brain subdivision continuities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Winkler, Candace M; Pfenning, Andreas R; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-11-01

    In our companion study (Jarvis et al. [2013] J Comp Neurol. doi: 10.1002/cne.23404) we used quantitative brain molecular profiling to discover that distinct subdivisions in the avian pallium above and below the ventricle and the associated mesopallium lamina have similar molecular profiles, leading to a hypothesis that they may form as continuous subdivisions around the lateral ventricle. To explore this hypothesis, here we profiled the expression of 16 genes at eight developmental stages. The genes included those that define brain subdivisions in the adult and some that are also involved in brain development. We found that phyletic hierarchical cluster and linear regression network analyses of gene expression profiles implicated single and mixed ancestry of these brain regions at early embryonic stages. Most gene expression-defined pallial subdivisions began as one ventral or dorsal domain that later formed specific folds around the lateral ventricle. Subsequently a clear ventricle boundary formed, partitioning them into dorsal and ventral pallial subdivisions surrounding the mesopallium lamina. These subdivisions each included two parts of the mesopallium, the nidopallium and hyperpallium, and the arcopallium and hippocampus, respectively. Each subdivision expression profile had a different temporal order of appearance, similar in timing to the order of analogous cell types of the mammalian cortex. Furthermore, like the mammalian pallium, expression in the ventral pallial subdivisions became distinct during prehatch development, whereas the dorsal portions did so during posthatch development. These findings support the continuum hypothesis of avian brain subdivision development around the ventricle and influence hypotheses on homologies of the avian pallium with other vertebrates. PMID:23818174

  13. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  14. A GMRT survey of regions towards the Taurus molecular cloud at 323 and 608 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, Rachael E.; Coughlan, Colm P.; Green, David A.; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Ray, Tom P.

    2016-11-01

    We present observations of three active sites of star formation in the Taurus molecular cloud complex taken at 323 and 608 MHz (90 and 50 cm, respectively) with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Three pointings were observed as part of a pathfinder project, targeted at the young stellar objects (YSOs) L1551 IRS 5, T Tau and DG Tau (the results for these target sources were presented in a previous paper). In this paper, we search for other YSOs and present a survey comprising of all three fields; a by-product of the large instantaneous field of view of the GMRT. The resolution of the survey is of order 10 arcsec and the best rms noise at the centre of each pointing is of order 100 μJy beam-1 at 323 MHz and 50 μJy beam-1 at 608 MHz. We present a catalogue of 1815 and 687 field sources detected above 5σrms at 323 and 608 MHz, respectively. A total of 440 sources were detected at both frequencies, corresponding to a total unique source count of 2062 sources. We compare the results with previous surveys and showcase a sample of extended extragalactic objects. Although no further YSOs were detected in addition to the target YSOs based on our source-finding criteria, these data can be useful for targeted manual searches, studies of radio galaxies or to assist in the calibration of future observations with the Low-Frequency Array towards these regions.

  15. A somatic cell hybrid panel for pig regional gene mapping characterized by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yerle, M; Echard, G; Robic, A; Mairal, A; Dubut-Fontana, C; Riquet, J; Pinton, P; Milan, D; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Gellin, J

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 27 pig x rodent somatic cell hybrids was produced and characterized cytogenetically. The first step of this study consisted of hybridizing a SINE probe to GTG-banded metaphases of each hybrid clone in order to count and identify the normal pig chromosomes and to detect rearranged ones. The second step consisted of using the DNA of each clone as a probe after pIRS-PCR (porcine interspersed repetitive sequence-polymerase chain reaction) amplification to highly enrich it in pig sequences. These probes, hybridized to normal pig metaphase chromosomes, enabled the identification of the complete porcine complement in the hybrid lines. Whole chromosomes and fragments were characterized quickly and precisely, and results were compared. In addition to this cytogenetic characterization, molecular verification was also carried out by using primers specific to six microsatellites and to one gene previously mapped to pig chromosomes. The results obtained allow us to conclude that we have produced a panel that is informative for all porcine chromosomes. This panel constitutes a highly efficient tool to establish not only assignments of genes and markers but also regional localizations on pig chromosomes. PMID:8697807

  16. Molecular fingerprinting of lacustrian cyanobacterial communities: regional patterns in summer diversity.

    PubMed

    Touzet, Nicolas; McCarthy, David; Fleming, Gerard T A

    2013-12-01

    The assessment of lacustrian water quality is necessary to comply with environmental regulations. At the regional scale, difficulties reside in the selection of representative lakes. Given the risks towards water quality associated with phytoplankton blooms, a mesoscale survey was carried out in Irish lakes to identify patterns in the distribution and diversity of planktonic cyanobacteria. A stratified sampling strategy was carried out via geographic information systems (GIS) analysis of river catchment attributes due to the range of hydrogeomorphological features and the high number of lakes within the study area. 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis showed variation between the cyanobacterial communities sampled, with lower occurrence of cyanobacteria in August concomitant to increased wind and precipitation regimes. Multivariate analysis delineated three ecoregions based on land cover typology and revealed significant patterns in the distribution of cyanobacterial diversity. A majority of filamentous cyanobacteria genotypes occurred in larger lakes contained river catchments with substantial forest cover. In contrast, higher diversity of spherical cyanobacteria genotypes was observed in lakes of lesser trophic state. In the context of aquatic resource management, the combined use of GIS-based sampling strategy and molecular methods offers promising prospects for assessing microbial community structure at varying scales of space and time. PMID:23802655

  17. Excitation of the molecular gas in the nuclear region of M 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loenen, A. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Güsten, R.; Meijerink, R.; Israel, F. P.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; García-Burillo, S.; Harris, A. I.; Klein, T.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Röllig, M.; Stutzki, J.; Szczerba, R.; Weiß, A.; Philipp-May, S.; Yorke, H.; Caux, E.; Delforge, B.; Helmich, F.; Lorenzani, A.; Morris, P.; Philips, T. G.; Risacher, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-10-01

    We present high-resolution HIFI spectroscopy of the nucleus of the archetypical starburst galaxy M 82. Six 12CO lines, 2 13CO lines and 4 fine-structure lines have been detected. Besides showing the effects of the overall velocity structure of the nuclear region, the line profiles also indicate the presence of multiple components with different optical depths, temperatures, and densities in the observing beam. The data have been interpreted using a grid of PDR models. It is found that the majority of the molecular gas is in low density (n = 103.5 cm-3) clouds, with column densities of NH = 1021.5 cm-2 and a relatively low UV radiation field (G0 = 102). The remaining gas is predominantly found in clouds with higher densities (n = 105 cm-3) and radiation fields (G0 = 102.75), but somewhat lower column densities (NH = 1021.2 cm-2). The highest J CO lines are dominated by a small (1% relative surface filling) component, with an even higher density (n = 106 cm-3) and UV field (G0 = 103.25). These results show the strength of multi-component modelling for interpretating the integrated properties of galaxies.

  18. Examining molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region using X-ray reflection spectra simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Terrier, R.; Goldwurm, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the centre of our galaxy lies a super-massive black hole, identified with the radio source Sagittarius A⋆. This black hole has an estimated mass of around 4 million solar masses. Although Sagittarius A⋆ is quite dim in terms of total radiated energy, having a luminosity that is a factor of 1010 lower than its Eddington luminosity, there is now compelling evidence that this source was far brighter in the past. Evidence derived from the detection of reflected X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the galactic centre region. However, the interpretation of the reflected emission spectra cannot be done correctly without detailed modelling of the reflection process. Attempts to do so can lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. In this paper we present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation code we developed in order to fully model the complex processes involved in the emerging reflection spectra. The simulated spectra can be compared to real data in order to derive model parameters and constrain the past activity of the black hole. In particular we apply our code to observations of Sgr B2, in order to constrain the position and density of the cloud and the incident luminosity of the central source. The results of the code have been adapted to be used in Xspec by a large community of astronomers.

  19. Molecular Astrophysics from Space: the Physical and Chemical Effects of Star Formation and the Destruction of Planetary Systems around Evolved Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David

    2005-01-01

    The research conducted during the reporting period is grouped into three sections: 1) Warm molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM); 2) Absorption line studies of "cold" molecular clouds; 3) Vaporization of comets around the AGB star IRC+10216.

  20. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  1. Analysis of the properties of the molecular-cluster xenon mixture in the mesoscopic phase transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlapov, L. I.; Kassymov, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results of calculation of the concentrations of cluster subcomponents in a molecular-cluster xenon mixture at temperatures and pressures at which the gas experiences a mesoscopic phase transition. The existence of such a transition follows from singularities of the temperature dependence of viscosity, from the behavior of the cluster thermodiffusion coefficient, and from the features of the distributions of cluster subcomponents in the centrifuge. The mesoscopic phase transition is manifested in the intermediate position of the molecular-cluster mixture between the gas and the liquid judging from its properties in the transition region.

  2. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  3. The High-velocity Molecular Outflows in Massive Cluster-forming Region G10.6-0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2010-12-01

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the 12CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity 12CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH3OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, ~105 years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 1047 erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  4. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  5. Small-scale structure and chemical differentiation in the central region of the Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, P.F.; Snell, R.L.; Hasegawa, T.; Ukita, N.

    1987-03-01

    Fifteen arcsec angular resolution observations of a number of molecular species in the center of the Sgr B2 molecular cloud, including HC3N in the ground and v7 = 1 vibrational states, SO, OCS,l and HNCO, have been performed. Emission from HC3N is fairly uniformly distributed over the region studied; SO and OCS have a spatially extended component but are strongly centrally peaked. HNCO and vibrationally excited HC/sub 3/N emission are essentially restricted to a very small region around the center of activity in the north. The difference between the spatial distributions are attributed to variation in the chemical abundances of the various clumps. The excitation requirements of the vibrationally excited HC/sub 3/N imply the presence of dust and gas at high temperatures. The results further heighten the apparent contradiction presented by the lack of infrared emission from this source. 53 references.

  6. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  7. The Sarcomeric M-Region: A Molecular Command Center for Diverse Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Yen R.; Ackermann, Maegen A.; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-01-01

    The sarcomeric M-region anchors thick filaments and withstands the mechanical stress of contractions by deformation, thus enabling distribution of physiological forces along the length of thick filaments. While the role of the M-region in supporting myofibrillar structure and contractility is well established, its role in mediating additional cellular processes has only recently started to emerge. As such, M-region is the hub of key protein players contributing to cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, mechanosensing, metabolism, and proteasomal degradation. Mutations in genes encoding M-region related proteins lead to development of severe and lethal cardiac and skeletal myopathies affecting mankind. Herein, we describe the main cellular processes taking place at the M-region, other than thick filament assembly, and discuss human myopathies associated with mutant or truncated M-region proteins. PMID:25961035

  8. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes. PMID:27025950

  9. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-03-30

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes.

  10. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A.; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M.; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A.; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes. PMID:27025950

  11. RNA sequencing reveals region-specific molecular mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis in a model of classical hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, A. S.; de Matos, A. H.; do Canto, A. M.; Rocha, C. S.; Carvalho, B. S.; Pascoal, V. D. B.; Norwood, B.; Bauer, S.; Rosenow, F.; Gilioli, R.; Cendes, F.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete transcriptome analysis of the dorsal (dDG) and ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) of a rat epilepsy model presenting a hippocampal lesion with a strict resemblance to classical hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We collected the dDG and vDG by laser microdissection 15 days after electrical stimulation and performed high-throughput RNA-sequencing. There were many differentially regulated genes, some of which were specific to either of the two sub-regions in stimulated animals. Gene ontology analysis indicated an enrichment of inflammation-related processes in both sub-regions and of axonal guidance and calcium signaling processes exclusively in the vDG. There was also a differential regulation of genes encoding molecules involved in synaptic function, neural electrical activity and neuropeptides in stimulated rats. The data presented here suggests, in the time point analyzed, a remarkable interaction among several molecular components which takes place in the damaged hippocampi. Furthermore, even though similar mechanisms may function in different regions of the DG, the molecular components involved seem to be region specific. PMID:26935982

  12. 74 MHz nonthermal emission from molecular clouds: evidence for a cosmic ray dominated region at the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Lis, D; Viti, S; Brogan, C; Chambers, E; Pound, M; Rickert, M

    2013-10-01

    We present 74 MHz radio continuum observations of the Galactic center region. These measurements show nonthermal radio emission arising from molecular clouds that is unaffected by free–free absorption along the line of sight. We focus on one cloud, G0.13-0.13, representative of the population of molecular clouds that are spatially correlated with steep spectrum (α(327MHz)(74MHz) = 1.3 ± 0.3) nonthermal emission from the Galactic center region. This cloud lies adjacent to the nonthermal radio filaments of the Arc near l 0.2° and is a strong source of 74 MHz continuum, SiO (2-1), and Fe I Kα 6.4 keV line emission. This three-way correlation provides the most compelling evidence yet that relativistic electrons, here traced by 74 MHz emission, are physically associated with the G0.13-0.13 molecular cloud and that low-energy cosmic ray electrons are responsible for the Fe I Kα line emission. The high cosmic ray ionization rate 10(–1)3 s(–1) H(–1) is responsible for heating the molecular gas to high temperatures and allows the disturbed gas to maintain a high-velocity dispersion. Large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling of multitransition SiO observations of this cloud implies H2 densities 10(4–5) cm(–3) and high temperatures. The lower limit to the temperature of G0.13-0.13 is 100 K, whereas the upper limit is as high as 1000 K. Lastly, we used a time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas to investigate for molecular line diagnostics of cosmic ray heating. When the cloud reaches chemical equilibrium, the abundance ratios of HCN/HNC and N2H+/HCO+ are consistent with measured values. In addition, significant abundance of SiO is predicted in the cosmic ray dominated region of the Galactic center. We discuss different possibilities to account for the origin of widespread SiO emission detected from Galactic center molecular clouds.

  13. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  14. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Li, Jin Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  15. Molecular Identification of Dendrobium Species (Orchidaceae) Based on the DNA Barcode ITS2 Region and Its Application for Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Mengying; Chen, Zhe; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-01-01

    The over-collection and habitat destruction of natural Dendrobium populations for their commercial medicinal value has led to these plants being under severe threat of extinction. In addition, many Dendrobium plants are similarly shaped and easily confused during the absence of flowering stages. In the present study, we examined the application of the ITS2 region in barcoding and phylogenetic analyses of Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae). For barcoding, ITS2 regions of 43 samples in Dendrobium were amplified. In combination with sequences from GenBank, the sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were computed using MEGA V5.1. The success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing was 100%. There was a significant divergence between the inter- and intra-specific genetic distances of ITS2 regions, while the presence of a barcoding gap was obvious. Based on the BLAST1, nearest distance and TaxonGAP methods, our results showed that the ITS2 regions could successfully identify the species of most Dendrobium samples examined; Second, we used ITS2 as a DNA marker to infer phylogenetic relationships of 64 Dendrobium species. The results showed that cluster analysis using the ITS2 region mainly supported the relationship between the species of Dendrobium established by traditional morphological methods and many previous molecular analyses. To sum up, the ITS2 region can not only be used as an efficient barcode to identify Dendrobium species, but also has the potential to contribute to the phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dendrobium. PMID:26378526

  16. Molecular hydrogen emission from the Cepheus A star-formation region

    SciTech Connect

    Doyon, R.; Nadeau, D.

    1988-11-01

    Fabry-Perot spectrometry of H2 emission lines in the Cepheus A star-formation region is presented. It is found that the H2 emission in Cep A(E) is associated with dense condensations of NH3 and CS, while the emission in Cep A(W) is associated with Herbig-Haro objects and reflection nebulae. The data support the hypothesis that the two lobes of emission are produced by a single outflow originating from the region of maser and compact H II regions at the western edge of Cep A(E). 49 references.

  17. Deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution in regions of interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.; Levy, M.

    1976-01-01

    The deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution caused by excitation of the J = 2 rotational level of parahydrogen (followed by radiative decay) in a molecular hydrogen gas is investigated. It is noted that inelastic collisions deplete the high-velocity tail of the distribution, while elastic collisions tend to refill it; the resulting steady-state distribution has a small depletion in the tail which slightly reduces the cooling rate of the gas. The elastic-collision transport is approximated by a continuous process, a simplified expression is obtained for the inelastic-collision operator, and the Boltzmann equation is then solved analytically. A correction to the inelastic-collision rate is evaluated, and it is found that the relative magnitude of the effect of tail depletion on the inelastic-collision rate is strongly temperature-dependent. The critical molecular density above which the J = 2 level deexcites by superelastic collisions is shown to be a weak function of temperature.

  18. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of actin genic regions from Achlya bisexualis (Oomycota) and Costaria costata (Chromophyta).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Stickel, S K; Sogin, M L

    1991-12-01

    Actin genic regions were isolated and characterized from the heterokont-flagellated protists, Achlya bisexualis (Oomycota) and Costaria costata (Chromophyta). Restriction enzyme and cloning experiments suggested that the genes are present in a single copy and sequence determinations revealed the existence of two introns in the C. costata actin genic region. Phylogenetic analyses of actin genic regions using distance matrix and maximum parsimony methods confirmed the close evolutionary relationship of A. bisexualis and C. costata suggested by ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence comparisons and reproductive cell ultrastructure. The higher fungi, green plants, and animals were seen as monophyletic groups; however, a precise order of branching for these assemblages could not be determined. Phylogentic frameworks inferred from comparisons of rRNAs were used to assess rates of evolution in actin genic regions of diverse eukaryotes. Actin genic regions had nonuniform rates of nucleotide substitution in different lineages. Comparison of rates of actin and rDNA sequence divergence indicated that actin genic regions evolve 2.0 and 5.3 times faster in higher fungi and flowering plants, respectively, than their rDNA sequences. Conversely, animal actins evolve at approximately one-fifth the rate of their rDNA sequences.

  19. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  20. Using Morphological, Molecular and Climatic Data to Delimitate Yews along the Hindu Kush-Himalaya and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ram C.; Möller, Michael; Gao, Lian-Ming; Ahrends, Antje; Baral, Sushim R.; Liu, Jie; Thomas, Philip; Li, De-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of several studies to clarify taxonomic problems on the highly threatened yews of the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) and adjacent regions, the total number of species and their exact distribution ranges remains controversial. We explored the use of comprehensive sets of morphological, molecular and climatic data to clarify taxonomy and distributions of yews in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 743 samples from 46 populations of wild yew and 47 representative herbarium specimens were analyzed. Principle component analyses on 27 morphological characters and 15 bioclimatic variables plus altitude and maximum parsimony analysis on molecular ITS and trnL-F sequences indicated the existence of three distinct species occurring in different ecological (climatic) and altitudinal gradients along the HKH and adjacent regions Taxus contorta from eastern Afghanistan to the eastern end of Central Nepal, T. wallichiana from the western end of Central Nepal to Northwest China, and the first report of the South China low to mid-elevation species T. mairei in Nepal, Bhutan, Northeast India, Myanmar and South Vietnam. Conclusion/Significance The detailed sampling and combination of different data sets allowed us to identify three clearly delineated species and their precise distribution ranges in the HKH and adjacent regions, which showed no overlap or no distinct hybrid zone. This might be due to differences in the ecological (climatic) requirements of the species. The analyses further provided the selection of diagnostic morphological characters for the identification of yews occurring in the HKH and adjacent regions. Our work demonstrates that extensive sampling combined with the analysis of diverse data sets can reliably address the taxonomy of morphologically challenging plant taxa. PMID:23056501

  1. Molecular evolution of the Escherichia coli chromosome. VI. Two regions of high effective recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, Roger; Jaeger, Erich; McBride, Ryan D

    2003-01-01

    Two 6- to 8-min regions, centered respectively near 45 min (O-antigen region) and 99 min (restriction-modification region) on the Escherichia coli chromosome, display unusually high variability among 11 otherwise very similar strains. This variation, revealed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and nucleotide sequence comparisons, appears to be due to a great local increase in the retention frequency of recombinant replacements. We infer a two-step mechanism. The first step is the acquisition of a small stretch of DNA from a phylogenetically distant source. The second is the successful retransmission of the imported DNA, together with flanking native DNA, to other strains of E. coli. Each cell containing the newly transferred DNA has a very high selective advantage until it reaches a high frequency and (in the O-antigen case) is recognized by the new host's immune system. A high selective advantage increases the probability of retention greatly; the effective recombination rate is the product of the basic recombination rate and the probability of retention. Nearby nucleotide sequences clockwise from the O-antigen (rfb) region are correlated with specific O antigens, confirming local hitchhiking. Comparable selection involving imported restriction endonuclease genes is proposed for the region near 99 min. PMID:12618387

  2. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary.

  3. Molecular Analysis of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Isolated from Regional Hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Akpaka, Patrick E.; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Jayaratne, Padman

    2016-01-01

    Geographic spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) clones in cities, countries, or even continents has been identified by molecular techniques. This study aimed at characterizing virulent genes and determining genetic relatedness of 45 VRE isolates from Trinidad and Tobago using molecular tools, including polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and Random Amplification Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The majority (84%) of the isolates were Enterococcus faecium possessing vanA gene while the rest (16%) were Enterococcus faecalis possessing vanB. The esp gene was found in all 45 VRE isolates while hyl genes were found only in E. faecium species. The E. faecium species expressed five distinct PFGE patterns. The predominant clones with similar or common patterns belonged to clones one and three, and each had 11 (29%) of the VRE isolates. Plasmid content was identified in representative isolates from each clonal group. By contrast, the E. faecalis species had one PFGE pattern suggesting the presence of an occult and limited clonal spread. The emergence of VRE in the country seems to be related to intra/interhospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element. Therefore, infection control measures will be warranted to prevent any potential outbreak and spread of VRE in the country. PMID:27299153

  4. A low molecular weight artificial RNA of unique size with multiple probe target regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitulle, C.; Dsouza, L.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Artificial RNAs (aRNAs) containing novel sequence segments embedded in a deletion mutant of Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA have previously been shown to be expressed from a plasmid borne growth rate regulated promoter in E. coli. These aRNAs accumulate to high levels and their detection is a promising tool for studies in molecular microbial ecology and in environmental monitoring. Herein a new construct is described which illustrates the versatility of detection that is possible with aRNAs. This 3xPen aRNA construct carries a 72 nucleotide insert with three copies of a unique 17 base probe target sequence. This aRNA is 160 nucleotides in length and again accumulates to high levels in the E. coli cytoplasm without incorporating into ribosomes. The 3xPen aRNA illustrates two improvements in detection. First, by appropriate selection of insert size, we obtained an aRNA which provides a unique and hence, easily quantifiable peak, on a high resolution gel profile of low molecular weight RNAs. Second, the existence of multiple probe targets results in a nearly commensurate increase in signal when detection is by hybridization. These aRNAs are naturally amplified and carry sequence segments that are not found in known rRNA sequences. It thus may be possible to detect them directly. An experimental step involving RT-PCR or PCR amplification of the gene could therefore be avoided.

  5. Molecular Analysis of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Isolated from Regional Hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Akpaka, Patrick E; Kissoon, Shivnarine; Jayaratne, Padman

    2016-01-01

    Geographic spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) clones in cities, countries, or even continents has been identified by molecular techniques. This study aimed at characterizing virulent genes and determining genetic relatedness of 45 VRE isolates from Trinidad and Tobago using molecular tools, including polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and Random Amplification Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The majority (84%) of the isolates were Enterococcus faecium possessing vanA gene while the rest (16%) were Enterococcus faecalis possessing vanB. The esp gene was found in all 45 VRE isolates while hyl genes were found only in E. faecium species. The E. faecium species expressed five distinct PFGE patterns. The predominant clones with similar or common patterns belonged to clones one and three, and each had 11 (29%) of the VRE isolates. Plasmid content was identified in representative isolates from each clonal group. By contrast, the E. faecalis species had one PFGE pattern suggesting the presence of an occult and limited clonal spread. The emergence of VRE in the country seems to be related to intra/interhospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element. Therefore, infection control measures will be warranted to prevent any potential outbreak and spread of VRE in the country. PMID:27299153

  6. Loops Adjacent to Catalytic Region and Molecular Stability of Man1312.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiyan; Yong, Jie; Gao, Han; Yuan, Zhihui; Yang, Wenjiao; Tian, Yun; Wu, Yongyao

    2016-09-01

    Hemicelluloses are the second major polysaccharides in nature and can be converted to ethanol product by a variety of enzymes including mannanases. Mannanase is an important enzyme that hydrolyses mannose-containing polysaccharides which are abundant in plants. An optimized mannanase could help to improve conversion process and make the technology efficiently and competitively. In this work, the effects of loops adjacent to active region on enzymic properties of Man1312 were investigated. Loop 6 and 10 are two loops neighboring to Man1312 catalytic region, and deletion mutagenesis and residue substitution were performed on both loops. Deletion on sites S145, Q148, N244, and S255 and substitution on sites N146, S147, S156, and T157 gave significant increased stability to enzyme. The quadruplet mutant ManD4I4 combined all the mutations and had higher optimal temperature and T m value by 5 and 4 °C than Man1312, respectively. From our data, we are able to conclude the loops of enzymes are important to design mutagenesis and obtain improved properties, especially the loops neighboring to catalytic region from tertiary structure. In our experiment, residue deletion and substitution on loops neighboring to catalytic region made significant improvement on enzyme properties.

  7. Molecular characterization of a genomic region associated with virulence in Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M E; Strugnell, R A; Rood, J I

    1992-01-01

    The major pathogen implicated in footrot, a highly contagious disease of sheep, is the strict anaerobe Dichelobacter nodosus (formerly Bacteroides nodosus). Sequence analysis of a 2,262-bp segment of the D. nodosus genome which is more prevalent in virulent isolates than in other isolates showed the presence of four open reading frames which appeared to have consensus transcriptional and translational start signals. These virulence-associated genes have been designated vapABCD. Two of the three copies of the vap region in the genome of the reference strain D. nodosus A198 were shown to carry all of the vap genes, whereas one copy contained only the vapD gene. The VapD protein was gel purified, shown to contain the predicted amino-terminal sequence, and used to raise rabbit antibodies. Western blots (immunoblots) showed that all of the D. nodosus strains tested that contained the vap region produced the VapD protein. The VapD protein had significant amino acid sequence identity with open reading frame 5 from the cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the vapBC operon had sequence similarity with the trbH region of the Escherichia coli F plasmid. It is proposed that these gene regions evolved from the integration of a conjugative plasmid from another bacterial species into the D. nodosus chromosome. Images PMID:1398971

  8. A millimeter survey of ultra-compact HII-regions and associated molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchwell, E.; Sievers, A.; Thum, C.

    2010-04-01

    We report observations, using the IRAM 30 m telescope, of 30 ultracompact and hypercompact HII regions in the lines of HCO+(3-2) and/or HCO+(1-0) and H30α and/or H39α. Images are presented in both HCO+(3-2) and H30α toward a subset of regions (16 in HCO+(3-2), 14 in H30α) with a resolution of 12”. In addition, H13CO+(3-2) observations are reported toward 13 HII regions where HCO+(3-2) displays complex profiles. It is shown that the absorption dips in the HCO+ profiles are due to HCO+ self-absorption, not absorption of the HII free-free emission or warm dust emission surrounding the HII region or two velocity components along the line of sight. It was found that among the sources with self-absorbed profiles, 8 are contracting and 5 are expanding. Mass fluxes are found to be typically a few times 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1, implying time scales for massive star formation <105 yrs. HCO+ and H2 column densities are estimated for a subset of the sources from which masses of the dense central cloud cores were estimated. Implications of the derived column densities, masses, flow velocities, and mass fluxes are discussed. Maps are available in electronic form from the authors (e-mail: sievers@iram.es).

  9. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  10. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the north region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; André, Marcos Rogério; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; de Albuquerque Lopes, Cinthia Távora; da Silva Lima, Danillo Henrique; de Andrade, Stefano Juliano Tavares; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2013-11-01

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused mainly by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina, which are associated to considerable economic losses in cattle herds worldwide. Approximately 60% of buffalo herds in South America are located in Northern Brazil. Little is known about the impact of babesiosis on buffalo herds in Brazil. The present work aimed to verify the occurrence of B. bovis and B. bigemina in 542 water buffaloes in the state of Pará, Northern Brazil, using molecular and serological techniques. The percentage of seropositive animals for B. bovis and B. bigemina was 41.2% and 19.0%, respectively, by ELISA. B. bovis and B. bigemina DNA were detected in 15 and 16% of sampled buffaloes, respectively. A high correlation (Kappa index of 0.9) between serological and molecular tests suggests that the combination of the utilized techniques in the present study is suitable for babesiosis diagnosis in an endemic unstable area. Significantly difference of positivity for serological and molecular assays was verified to localities and reproductive status of sampled animals, but not between buffalo breeds. The immune status of sampled buffaloes associated to the circulation of babesiosis agents in sampled population suggests that the studied area is at risk to clinical babesiosis outbreaks. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that this region can be classified as endemically unstable.

  11. Cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis in an inhospitable Amazonian region by means of telemedicine and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Angel, Diana I; Alfonso, Rosalba; Faizal, Michel; Ricaurte, Orlando; Baez, Julio A; Rojas, Andres; Barato, Paola; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 13-year-old boy who displayed a chronic granulomatous inflammatory reaction of 5 years duration. The lesion was resistant to different antibiotic schemes; his routine laboratory tests and chest radiographs were normal. Teledermatologic consultation and histopathologic study of skin biopsy suggested scrofulodermal tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA extracted from lymph node biopsy was taken as starting material for dot-blot hybridization using Mtp-40 and IS 6110 as probes for detecting either Mycobacterium tuberculosis or any mycobacteria belonging to the M tuberculosis complex, respectively. Positive results in both hybridizations were further confirmed by culturing in BACTEC MGIT 960 system. The lesion greatly diminished following isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol treatment. Telemedicine allowed a cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis to be made of a patient living in a remote town located in the Amazon jungle by using molecular biology techniques.

  12. The C-terminal region of E1A: a molecular tool for cellular cartography.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ahmed F; Fonseca, Gregory J; Cohen, Michael J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2012-04-01

    The adenovirus E1A proteins function via protein-protein interactions. By making many connections with the cellular protein network, individual modules of this virally encoded hub reprogram numerous aspects of cell function and behavior. Although many of these interactions have been thoroughly studied, those mediated by the C-terminal region of E1A are less well understood. This review focuses on how this region of E1A affects cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, transformation, and conversion of cells to an epithelial state through interactions with CTBP1/2, DYRK1A/B, FOXK1/2, and importin-α. Furthermore, novel potential pathways that the C-terminus of E1A influences through these connections with the cellular interaction network are discussed.

  13. Molecular detection and characterization of Theileria infection in cattle and yaks from Tibet Plateau Region, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Gege; Li, Youquan; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Guangyuan; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Theileriosis continues to threaten the livestock industry worldwide, but comprehensive epidemiological surveys for this disease have not been conducted in the Tibet Plateau Region, China. In this study, we screened 154 cattle blood samples from the Tibet Plateau Region (Lhasa, Lhoka, and Tianzhu), China, for detection of Theileria pathogens by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with species-specific primers. The results revealed that the prevalence was 6.9 % (2/29) for Theileria orientalis and 27.6 % (8/29) for Theileria sinensis in Lhasa, 0 % (0/30) for T. orientalis and 26.7 % (8/30) for T. sinensis in Lhoka, and 0 % (0/95) for T. orientalis and 30.5 % (29/95) for T. sinensis in Tianzhu. Interestingly, Theileria luwenshuni, which was a previously reported pathogenic Theileria sp. in sheep and goats, was detected in blood samples from cattle and yaks for the first time, with a prevalence of 10 % (3/30) in Lhoka and 1.1 % (1/95) in Tianzhu. No other Theileria sp. was detected in these samples. T. sinensis and T. orientalis infections were detected in cattle and yaks, and T. luwenshuni was discovered for the first time in cattle and yaks in the Tibet Plateau Region, China. PMID:27000088

  14. Molecular definition of the smallest region of deletion overlap in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, K.Y.; Gibson, L.; Meyn, M.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1992-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), associated with a deletion of chromosome 4p, is characterized by mental and growth retardation and typical dysmorphism. A girl with clinical features of WHS was found to carry a subtle deletion of chromosome 4p. Initially suggested by high-resolution chromosome analysis, her deletion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes, E13, and Y2, of D4S113. To delineate this 4p deletion, the authors performed a series of FISH and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis by using probes from 4p16.3. A deletion of [approximately]2.5 Mb with the breakpoint at [approximately]80 kb distal to D4S43 was defined in this patient and appears to be the smallest WHS deletion so far identified. To further refine the WHS critical region, they have studied three unrelated patients with presumptive 4p deletions, two resulting from unbalanced segregations of parental chromosomal translocations and one resulting from an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation. Larger deletions were identified in two patients with WHS. One patient who did not clinically present with WHS had a smaller deletion that thus eliminates the distal 100-300 kb from the telomere as being part of the WHS region. This study has localized the WHS region to [approximately]2 MB between D4S43 and D4S142. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Molecular characterization of an acidic region deletion mutant of Cockayne syndrome group B protein.

    PubMed

    Sunesen, M; Selzer, R R; Brosh, R M; Balajee, A S; Stevnsner, T; Bohr, V A

    2000-08-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human genetic disorder characterized by post-natal growth failure, neurological abnormalities and premature aging. CS cells exhibit high sensitivity to UV light, delayed RNA synthesis recovery after UV irradiation and defective transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Two genetic complementation groups of CS have been identified, designated CS-A and CS-B. The CSB gene encodes a helicase domain and a highly acidic region N-terminal to the helicase domain. This study describes the genetic characterization of a CSB mutant allele encoding a full deletion of the acidic region. We have tested its ability to complement the sensitivity of UV61, the hamster homolog of human CS-B cells, to UV and the genotoxic agent N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF). Deleting 39 consecutive amino acids, of which approximately 60% are negatively charged, did not impact on the ability of the protein to complement the sensitive phenotype of UV61 cells to either UV or NA-AAF. Our data indicate that the highly acidic region of CSB is not essential for the TCR and general genome repair pathways of UV- and NA-AAF-induced DNA lesions. PMID:10931931

  16. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment. PMID:26994789

  17. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment.

  18. The Molecular H2 Emission and the Stellar Kinematics in the Nuclear Region of the Sombrero Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the molecular H2 emission and the stellar kinematics in a data cube of the nuclear region of M104, the Sombrero galaxy, obtained with NIFS on the Gemini-north telescope. After a careful subtraction of the stellar continuum, the only emission line we detected in the data cube was {{{H}}}2λ 21218. An analysis of this emission revealed the existence of a rotating molecular torus/disk, aproximately co-planar with a dusty structure detected by us in a previous work. We interpret these two structures as being associated with the same obscuring torus/disk. The kinematic maps provided by the Penalized Pixel Fitting method revealed that the stellar kinematics in the nuclear region of M104 appears to be the result of the superposition of a “cold” rotating disk and a “hot” bulge. Using a model of a thin eccentric disk, we reproduced the main properties of the maps of the stellar radial velocity and of the stellar velocity dispersion, especially within a distance of 0\\prime\\prime .2 from the kinematic axis (in regions at larger distances, the limitations of a model of a thin rotating disk become more visible). The general behavior of the h3 map, which is significantly noisier than the other maps, was also reproduced by our model (although the discrepancies, in this case, are considerably higher). With our model, we obtained a mass of (9.0+/- 2.0)× {10}8{M}⊙ for the supermassive black hole of M104, which is compatible, at 1σ or 2σ levels, with the values obtained by previous studies.

  19. Investigating Molecular Inheritance of Carbon in Star-forming Regions along a Galactic Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rachel L.; Blake, Geoffrey; Boogert, Adwin; Pontoppidan, Klaus Martin; Lockwood, Alexandra C.

    2015-08-01

    Observations of CO isotopologues taken at high spectral resolution toward young stellar objects (YSOs) are valuable tools for investigating protoplanetary chemical reservoirs, and enable robust comparisons between YSOs and solar system material (meteorites and the Sun). Investigating a range of YSO environments also helps parameterize variations in the distribution and evolution of carbon-based molecules, furthering an understanding of prebiotic chemistry. We have begun a wide survey of massive YSOs using Keck-NIRSPEC at high spectral resolution (R=25,000). Fundamental and first-overtone near-IR CO rovibrational absorption spectra have thus far been obtained toward 14 massive, luminous YSOs at Galactocentric radii (RGC) ranging from ~4.5 to 9.7 kpc. From these data we can obtain precise [12CO]/[13CO] gas-phase abundance ratios along a Galactic gradient, and [12CO]/[13CO]Gas can be further evaluated against published [12CO2]/[13CO2]Ice and [12CO]/[13CO]Ice because all observations are in absorption, a robust study of molecular inheritance is possible by virtue of comparing 12C/13C along the same lines-of-sight. Initial results for cold CO gas at RGC ~ 6.1 kpc and 9.4 kpc reveal [12C16O]/[13C16O] of 59+/-8 and 74+/-3, respectively, roughly following an expected 12C/13C Galactic gradient. Thus far, we find [12CO]/[13CO] in the cold CO gas to be lower than [12CO2]/[13CO2]Ice, suggesting that CO2 may not originate from CO reservoirs as often assumed. While very high-resolution observations of CO gas toward low-mass YSOs observed with VLT-CRIRES show significant heterogeneity in [12CO]/[13CO] at RGC ~ 8 kpc, this dispersion is not found for the massive YSOs. Both the low-mass and massive YSOs have higher [12CO]/[13CO] in warm vs. cold gas, and both show signatures suggesting possible interplay between CO ice and gas reservoirs. Overall, our results indicate that carbon isotopic evolution in massive YSO environments may follow different paths compared to low-mass YSOs

  20. Irradiation of ices inside molecular clouds in cosmic ray dominated regions of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikyan, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    Complex chemical species are easier formed in a solid phase, for example in a mixture of ices of water, carbon oxides, methane, ammonia, methanole. Ultraviolet photons in the range 5-13.6 eV and the charged particles with MeV-GeV energies serve as an energy source of reactions. In this work doses of irradiation of ices are calculated when fluxes of cosmic rays on 2-3 order exceed modern values in the Galactic disk. Such fluxes are inherent in active galaxies with cosmic ray dominated regions. Results of presented calculations show that originated complex species may get overdoses and be completely destroyed under such conditions.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from different regions of Italy and Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, L A; Zanetti, S; Delogu, G; Montinaro, B; Sanna, A; Fadda, G

    1996-01-01

    The use of the (GTG)5 oligonucleotide, a repetitive marker in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis chromosome, as a primer in association with an IS6110 outlooking primer has been successfully applied to a PCR-based fingerprinting method. This method classified 62 strains of M. tuberculosis, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and -seronegative patients in different regions of Italy and Pakistan, as having 53 different patterns. The results were compared with traditional IS6110 fingerprinting, by which 47 distinct patterns were observed. PMID:8784602

  2. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  3. Molecular detection of bovine immunodeficiency virus in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Tatiane Teles; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Reis, Jenner Karlison Pimenta; de Sousa Rodrigues, Ana Paula; da Cunha Kassar, Telissa; Resende, Claudia Fideles; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Silva, Rafaela das Mercês; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-12-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency is a chronic progressive disease caused by a lentivirus that affects cattle and buffaloes. Although the infection has been described in cattle in some countries, including in Brazil, there are only two reports of infection in buffaloes: one in Pakistan and one in Cambodia. The aim of the present study was to survey the occurrence of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) in water buffaloes from the Amazon region, Pará state, Brazil. BIV proviral DNA was surveyed in 607 whole blood samples of water buffaloes from 10 farms located in the state of Pará using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (PCR-SN) to amplify the pol region of the viral genome. Of the 607 samples tested, 27 (4.4 %) were positive for BIV proviral DNA. The amplified fragments were confirmed by sequence analysis after cloning and nucleotide sequencing. The sequence obtained had 99 % similarity to the reference strain (R-29). The present study provides important epidemiological data because BIV was detected for the first time in water buffaloes in Brazil. Further, the results suggest the possibility of the virus being a risk factor for herd health because it may be a potential causal agent of chronic disease and, also may be associated to other infectious diseases.

  4. Molecular variability of the 16p13.3 region in Amerindians and its anthropological significance.

    PubMed

    Battilana, J; Cardoso-Silva, L; Barrantes, R; Hill, K; Hurtado, A M; Salzano, F M; Bonatto, S L

    2007-01-01

    A total of 1558 base pairs in the 16p13.3 region were investigated in 98 individuals of Mongolian, Northern Arctic and Amerindian affiliation, and the results compared with those obtained in a previous worldwide study of the same genomic region. Fifty-five polymorphic sites could be classified into thirty-five haplotypes from the total data. A median joining network based on the haplotypes revealed two distinct clusters: one with low diversity, with haplotypes found in all five geographic-ethnic categories; while the other, with the most divergent haplotypes, was composed mainly of Africans and a few Amerindians. Almost all neutrality parameters yielded significantly negative values. Demographic simulations with the exclusively Amerindian dataset rejected all scenarios, including a bottleneck beginning more than 12,000 years ago. The demographic scenarios tested considering population growth were similar among the Amerindian and worldwide or Eurasian data sets. The results suggest that Amerindians are a representative sample of Eurasian populations, preserving the signal of demographic growth from the out of Africa exodus and, together with data from uniparental markers, support a scenario of a bottleneck of moderate intensity during the peopling of the New World.

  5. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I.

  6. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  7. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  8. A molecular phylogeny of aquatic gastropods provides a new perspective on biogeographic history of the Snake River Region.

    PubMed

    Hershler, Robert; Liu, Hsiu-Ping

    2004-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of aquatic gastropods of the subgenus Pyrgulopsis (Natricola) were analyzed to test a commonly accepted hypothesis concerning the early history of the Snake River in the northwestern US. Distributions of Natricola and other regional biota were previously used to infer that the Snake River flowed to the Pacific through southeastern Oregon and northern California during the Neogene prior to its capture by the Columbia River in the late Pliocene (2 Ma). A molecular phylogeny based on partial sequences of COI and NDI (1149 bp) indicates that the Natricola clade is restricted to the modern Snake-Columbia River Basin and the Oregon Lakes region whereas northern California populations previously assigned to this subgenus belong to other lineages. The Natricola clade is not deeply subdivided into Oregon Lakes and Snake River Basin units consistent with late Pliocene fragmentation of the hypothesized paleodrainage, but instead is shallowly structured and contains multiple transitions among these two geographic areas. The strongly supported sister relationship between Natricola and a species from northwest Nevada (P. imperialis) is consistent with a recent proposal that the ancestral Snake River did not flow through southeast Oregon but instead flowed south to the Humboldt River. Within the context of this hypothesis, the multiple transitions between the Snake River Basin and the Oregon Lakes region that occurred within Natricola may be attributed to a late Pleistocene connection between these areas that was unrelated to the early course of the Snake River.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of water and Na+ ions in models of the pore region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G R; Sansom, M S

    1997-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an integral membrane protein that forms ligand-gated and cation-selective channels. The central pore is lined by a bundle of five approximately parallel M2 helices, one from each subunit. Candidate model structures of the solvated pore region of a homopentameric (alpha7)5 nAChR channel in the open state, and in two possible forms of the closed state, have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations with restraining potentials. It is found that the mobility of the water is substantially lower within the pore than in bulk, and the water molecules become aligned with the M2 helix dipoles. Hydrogen-bonding patterns in the pore, especially around pore-lining charged and hydrophilic residues, and around exposed regions of the helix backbone, have been determined. Initial studies of systems containing both water and sodium ions together within the pore region have also been conducted. A sodium ion has been introduced into the solvated models at various points along the pore axis and its energy profile evaluated. It is found that the ion causes only a local perturbation of the water structure. The results of these calculations have been used to examine the effectiveness of the central ring of leucines as a component of a gate in the closed-channel model. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9284304

  10. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeast region of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Huyen, Nguyen Xuan; Shinuo, Cao; Inpankaew, Tawin; Maklon, Khuanwalai; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Ueno, Akio; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2011-06-10

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan disease that is mainly caused by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina and is characterized by significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The disease is widespread in the northeastern region of Thailand, where an increasingly large part of the livestock is composed of water buffaloes. The present study was therefore conducted to investigate the epidemiological distribution of B. bovis and B. bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand. A total of 305 buffalo blood samples were randomly collected from five provinces and simultaneously analyzed by the nested PCR (nPCR) assay, ELISA, and IFAT techniques. The overall prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 11.2% and 3.6% by nPCR, 14.7% and 5.9% by ELISA, and 16.8% and 5.6% by IFAT, respectively. The high concordance between the molecular and the serological detection tests revealed the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic assays used for the detection of infection as well as the endemic stability status of the parasites in the surveyed areas. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and location but not gender. Our data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bovis and B. bigemina infection in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand which will likely be very beneficial for management and control programs of this disease.

  11. Molecular and phenotypic data support the recognition of the Wakatobi Flowerpecker (Dicaeum kuehni) from the unique and understudied Sulawesi region.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Seán B A; Kelly, David J; Cooper, Natalie; Bahrun, Andi; Analuddin, Kangkuso; Marples, Nicola M

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are essential to macroecological and macroevolutionary research, as well as to the effective management and conservation of biodiversity. The resolution of taxonomic relationships is therefore of vital importance. While molecular methods have revolutionised taxonomy, contemporary species delimitation requires an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach. Despite boasting a remarkably high level of endemism, the avifauna of the Sulawesi region of Indonesia remains poorly studied. Previous studies of avian diversity in Sulawesi have focussed predominantly on phenotypic characteristics, thus potentially overlooking any genetically distinct lineages. Grey-sided Flowerpecker Dicaeum celebicum populations from the Wakatobi archipelago were originally described as a separate species from those on nearby mainland Sulawesi. However, for reasons that remain unknown, the Wakatobi populations were reclassified as a subspecies of the mainland form. Combining estimates of genetic divergence with phylogenetic and morphological analyses, we reassessed the status of Wakatobi populations. Our results describe the Wakatobi populations as a separate species to those on mainland Sulawesi; reproductively isolated, genetically and morphologically distinct. We therefore recommend the reclassification of these populations to their original status of Dicaeum kuehni and propose the vernacular name 'Wakatobi Flowerpecker'. In consideration of our findings and the lack of integrative ornithological research within the Sulawesi region, we believe species richness and avian endemism within the region are underestimated. PMID:24896822

  12. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Title: Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions of P AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures.

    Abstract:
    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a cl...

  13. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions ofP AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures

    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a class of chemicals associated with ...

  14. Molecular analysis of the F plasmid traVR region: traV encodes a lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, T J; Loh, S M; Firth, N; Skurray, R A

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the conjugative F plasmid transfer region genes, traV and traR, have been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of TraV indicated that it may be a lipoprotein; this was confirmed by examining the effect of globomycin on traV-encoded polypeptides synthesized in minicells. An open reading frame that may represent a previously undetected transfer gene, now designated trbG, was identified immediately upstream of traV. The deduced product of traR was found to share amino acid similarity with proteins from the bacteriophages 186 and P2 and with the dosage-dependent dnaK suppressor DksA. Images PMID:8021201

  15. A regional study of the seasonal variation in the molecular composition of rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Barbara A.; Gonsior, Michael; Isabelle, Lorne M.; Luo, W.; Perraud, Véronique; McIntire, Theresa M.; Pankow, James F.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Cooper, William J.; Simpson, André J.

    2013-10-01

    Rainwater is not only a critical source of drinking and agricultural water but it plays a key role in the fate and transport of contaminants through their removal by wet deposition. Rainwater is a complex mixture of organic compounds yet despite its importance its spatial and temporal variability are not well understood and less than 50% of the organic matter has been characterized. In-depth analytical approaches were used in this study to characterize the seasonal variation in rainwater composition. Rainwater samples were collected over a one-year period in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. The seasonal variation of atmospheric organic carbon (AOC) in rainwater was analyzed by excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs), 1D and 2D NMR with compound identification by spectral database matching, GC-MS, FT-ICR-MS, and GC × GC-TOFMS. This combination of techniques provided four complementary datasets, with less than 10% overlap, of anthropogenic and biogenic AOC. NMR with database matching identified over 100 compounds, primarily carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, and nitrogen-containing compounds. GC × GC-TOFMS analysis identified 344 compounds in two rain events with 33% of the compounds common to both events. FT-ICR-MS generated a seasonally dependent profile of 1226-1575 molecular ions of CHO, CHOS, and CHON elemental composition. FT-ICR-MS and GC × GC-TOFMS datasets were compared using van Krevelen diagrams (H/C vs. O/C), the H/C ratio vs. mass/charge (m/z), and the carbon oxidation state/carbon number matrix. Fluorescence patterns were correlated with NMR results resulting in the identification one seasonally-dependent component of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). This study demonstrated the importance of using of an integrated analytical approach to monitor the compositional variation of AOC.

  16. Molecular analysis of the Adh region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chia, W; Karp, R; McGill, S; Ashburner, M

    1985-12-20

    A small region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been cloned in a series of overlapping phage. A length of 165 X 10(3) base-pairs of contiguous DNA that spans polytene chromosome region 35A4 to 35B1 and includes the structural gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) as well as at least two other genes, outspread (osp) and no-ocelli (noc), has been characterized by mapping chromosome aberrations to the DNA. The relationship between osp and Adh is surprising: of nine osp alleles associated with chromosome breakpoints, five map distal (i.e. 5') to Adh and four map proximal (i.e. 3') to this gene. None affects the expression of Adh. As defined by these and other breakpoints, the osp gene spans at least 52 X 10(3) base-pairs and overlaps the Adh gene. The noc gene, as defined by the mapping of nearly 30 breakpoints, is at least 50 X 10(3) base-pairs in size. Alleles of noc and noc- deletions show either of two kinds of interaction with the recessive lethality of l(2)br29ScoR+1, a lethal that maps immediately distal to noc. One class of noc allele is viable when heterozygous with ScoR+1, while the other class is lethal or semi-lethal. Both classes, however, are homozygous or hemizygous viable. The locations of these two classes of noc allele on the DNA fall into two clusters, with those that are viable with ScoR+1 located proximal to those that are not. The physical boundary between these classes lies at a site just distal to that of the breakpoint of the inversion associated with ScoR+1 itself.

  17. Molecular and morphological systematics of Elysia Risso, 1818 (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa) from the Caribbean region.

    PubMed

    Krug, Patrick J; Vendetti, Jann E; Valdés, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The Caribbean is a biodiversity hotspot for photosynthetic sea slugs, with about 27 described species in the genus Elysia Risso, 1818. However, many species are poorly known or have complex taxonomic histories, complicating assessments of regional biodiversity and impeding studies of plastid symbiosis, speciation, and larval biology. Using an integrative approach, we address the taxonomy and systematics of Caribbean elysiids by performing robust tests of existing species hypotheses, and describe six new species. Species delimitation included DNA barcoding of up to 189 nominal conspecific specimens; nuclear gene sequences were then used to confirm that divergent lineages were genetically distinct candidate species. New synonymies and species descriptions are based on external anatomy, penial and radular morphology, developmental characters, and host ecology of all species described from the region, plus a critical review of the literature. We synonymized three species (Elysia annedupontae Ortea, Espinosa & Caballer in Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005, Elysia clarki Pierce et al. 2006, and Elysia leeanneae Caballer, Ortea & Espinosa in Ortea, Espinosa, Buske & Caballer, 2013), transfered one species from Bosellia (Elysia marcusi), and described six new species (Elysia pawliki n. sp., Elysia zemi n. sp., Elysia christinae n. sp., Elysia hamanni n. sp., Elysia taino n. sp., and Elysia buonoi n. sp.). We resurrected the name Elysia velutinus Pruvot-Fol, 1947, a senior synonym of Elysia tuca Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1967. Based on a four-gene phylogeny of 76 Elysia spp., we identified shifts in host use and penial armature that may explain patterns of endemic diversification in Elysia, invoking both ecological and non-ecological mechanisms. Non-monophyly of stylet-bearing species rejects previous attempts to classify species based on presence of a stylet (i.e., the genus Checholysia Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005). Our findings show how integrative

  18. Molecular and morphological systematics of Elysia Risso, 1818 (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa) from the Caribbean region.

    PubMed

    Krug, Patrick J; Vendetti, Jann E; Valdés, Ángel

    2016-08-09

    The Caribbean is a biodiversity hotspot for photosynthetic sea slugs, with about 27 described species in the genus Elysia Risso, 1818. However, many species are poorly known or have complex taxonomic histories, complicating assessments of regional biodiversity and impeding studies of plastid symbiosis, speciation, and larval biology. Using an integrative approach, we address the taxonomy and systematics of Caribbean elysiids by performing robust tests of existing species hypotheses, and describe six new species. Species delimitation included DNA barcoding of up to 189 nominal conspecific specimens; nuclear gene sequences were then used to confirm that divergent lineages were genetically distinct candidate species. New synonymies and species descriptions are based on external anatomy, penial and radular morphology, developmental characters, and host ecology of all species described from the region, plus a critical review of the literature. We synonymized three species (Elysia annedupontae Ortea, Espinosa & Caballer in Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005, Elysia clarki Pierce et al. 2006, and Elysia leeanneae Caballer, Ortea & Espinosa in Ortea, Espinosa, Buske & Caballer, 2013), transfered one species from Bosellia (Elysia marcusi), and described six new species (Elysia pawliki n. sp., Elysia zemi n. sp., Elysia christinae n. sp., Elysia hamanni n. sp., Elysia taino n. sp., and Elysia buonoi n. sp.). We resurrected the name Elysia velutinus Pruvot-Fol, 1947, a senior synonym of Elysia tuca Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1967. Based on a four-gene phylogeny of 76 Elysia spp., we identified shifts in host use and penial armature that may explain patterns of endemic diversification in Elysia, invoking both ecological and non-ecological mechanisms. Non-monophyly of stylet-bearing species rejects previous attempts to classify species based on presence of a stylet (i.e., the genus Checholysia Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005). Our findings show how integrative

  19. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.C. ); McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283{r arrow} T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5{prime} 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus.

  20. FOUR HIGHLY LUMINOUS MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE NORMA SPIRAL ARM. I. MOLECULAR GAS AND DUST OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Guido; Mardones, Diego; Bronfman, Leonardo; May, Jorge; Chavarria, Luis; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2010-02-10

    We report molecular line and dust continuum observations, made with the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope, toward four young high-mass star-forming regions associated with highly luminous (L>6x10{sup 5}L{sub odot}) Infrared Astronomical Satellite sources (15290-5546, 15502-5302, 15567-5236, and 16060-5146). Molecular emission was mapped in three lines of CS (J = 2 -> 1, 3 -> 2, and 5 -> 4), two lines of SiO (J = 2 -> 1 and 3 -> 2), two rotational transitions of CH{sub 3}OH (J{sub k} = 3{sub k} -> 2{sub k} and 2{sub k} -> 1{sub k}), and in the C{sup 34}S(J = 3 -> 2) line. In addition, single spectra at the peak position were taken in the CO(J = 1 -> 0), {sup 13}CO(J = 1 -> 0), and C{sup 18}O(J = 1 -> 0) lines. We find that the luminous star-forming regions are associated with molecular gas and dust structures with radii of typically 0.5 pc, masses of {approx}5 x 10{sup 3} M{sub sun}, column densities of {approx}5 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, molecular hydrogen densities of typically {approx}2 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and dust temperatures of {approx}40 K. The 1.2 mm dust continuum observations further indicate that the cores are centrally condensed, having radial density profiles with power-law indices in the range 1.9-2.3. We find that under these conditions dynamical friction by the gas plays an important role in the migration of high-mass stars toward the central core region, providing an explanation for the observed stellar mass segregation within the cores. The CS profiles show two distinct emission components: a bright component, with line widths of typically 5 km s{sup -1} (FWHM), and a weaker and wider velocity component, which typically extends up to +-13 km s{sup -1} from the ambient cloud velocity. The SiO profiles also show emission from both components, but the intensity of the pedestal feature relative to that of the bright component is stronger than for CS. The narrow SiO component is likely to trace warm ambient gas close to the recently formed massive

  1. Molecular detection of Leishmania spp. isolated from cutaneous lesions of patients referred to Herat regional hospital, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Mosawi, S H; Dalimi, A

    2016-03-15

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the main public health problems in Afghanistan, particularly in Herat. To identify Leishmania spp., molecular techniques were applied to samples from 64 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients referred to Herat regional hospital during 2013. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) was used. Most of the patients demonstrated dry type single lesions on the head. The results of direct microscopy detection using Giemsastained skin scrapings were compared with that of ITS PCR-RFLP for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Light microscopy examination showed 37/64 positive cases (58%). PCR revealed 50 positive cases (78%), from which ITS PCR-RFLP identified 48 cases (96%) as L. tropica and 2 cases (4%) as L. major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Herat appears to be endemic and of the clinically dry type, caused mainly by L. tropica and occasionally by L. major.

  2. DNA hybridization analysis of the nif region of two methylotrophs and molecular cloning of nif-specific DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Toukdarian, A E; Lidstrom, M E

    1984-01-01

    DNA isolated from two diazotrophic methylotrophs, the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus sp. strain 6 and the methanol autotroph Xanthobacter sp. H4-14, hybridized to DNA fragments encoding nitrogen fixation (nif) genes from Klebsiella pneumoniae. This interspecific nif homology was limited to DNA fragments encoding the nitrogenase structural proteins (nifH, nifD, and nifK) and specific methylotroph DNA sequences. The hybridization patterns obtained with the two methylotrophs were dissimilar, indicating that the nif region of methylotrophs is not physically conserved. By using the K. pneumoniae nif structural genes as a probe, a fragment of nif DNA from each methylotroph was cloned and characterized. The DNA fragment from Methylosinus sp. 6 encoded two polypeptides of 57,000 and 34,000 molecular weight. Images PMID:6321444

  3. Assessing the regional impact of Indonesian biomass burning emissions based on organic molecular tracers and chemical mass balance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engling, G.; He, J.; Betha, R.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass burning activities commonly occur in Southeast Asia (SEA), and are particularly intense in Indonesia during dry seasons. The effect of biomass smoke emissions on air quality in the city state of Singapore was investigated during a haze episode in October 2006. Substantially increased levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) and associated chemical species were observed during the haze period. Specifically, the enhancement in the concentration of molecular tracers for biomass combustion such as levoglucosan by as much as two orders of magnitude and diagnostic ratios of individual organic compounds indicated that biomass burning emissions caused a regional smoke haze episode due to their long-range transport by prevailing winds. With the aid of air mass back trajectories and chemical mass balance modeling, large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were identified as the sources of the smoke aerosol, exerting a significant impact on air quality in downwind areas, such as Singapore.

  4. Assessing the regional impact of indonesian biomass burning emissions based on organic molecular tracers and chemical mass balance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engling, G.; He, J.; Betha, R.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2014-08-01

    Biomass burning activities commonly occur in Southeast Asia (SEA), and are particularly intense in Indonesia during the dry seasons. The effect of biomass smoke emissions on air quality in the city state of Singapore was investigated during a haze episode in October 2006. Substantially increased levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) and associated chemical species were observed during the haze period. Specifically, the enhancement in the concentration of molecular tracers for biomass combustion such as levoglucosan by as much as two orders of magnitude and the diagnostic ratios of individual organic compounds indicated that biomass burning emissions caused a regional smoke haze episode due to their long-range transport by prevailing winds. With the aid of air mass backward trajectories and chemical mass balance modeling, large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were identified as the sources of the smoke aerosol, exerting a significant impact on air quality in downwind areas, such as Singapore.

  5. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary. PMID:25072995

  6. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  7. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A; Amer, Mahmoud A

    2013-12-01

    In 2011-2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  8. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region

    PubMed Central

    AL-Saleh, Mohammed A.; Amer, Mahmoud A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011–2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  9. Molecular phylogenetics of subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA regions, including a new taxonomic arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Azorín, Mario; Crespo, Manuel B.; Juan, Ana; Fay, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic arrangement within subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) has been a matter of controversy in recent decades: several new taxonomic treatments have been proposed, based exclusively on plastid DNA sequences, and these have resulted in classifications which are to a great extent contradictory. Some authors have recognized only a single genus Ornithogalum for the whole subfamily, including 250–300 species of variable morphology, whereas others have recognized many genera. In the latter case, the genera are inevitably much smaller and they are better defined morphologically. However, some are not monophyletic as circumscribed. Methods Phylogenetic analyses of Ornithogaloideae were based on nucleotide sequences of four plastid regions (trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, rbcL and matK) and a nuclear region (ITS). Eighty species covering all relevant taxonomic groups previously recognized in the subfamily were sampled. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses were performed. The molecular data were compared with a matrix of 34 morphological characters. Key Results Combinations of plastid and nuclear data yielded phylogenetic trees which are better resolved than those obtained with any plastid region alone or plastid regions in combination. Three main clades are found, corresponding to the previously recognized tribes Albuceae, Dipcadieae and Ornithogaleae. In these, up to 19 clades are described which are definable by morphology and biogeography. These mostly correspond to previously described taxa, though some need recircumscription. Morphological characters are assessed for their diagnostic value for taxonomy in the subfamily. Conclusions On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, 19 monophyletic genera are accepted within Ornithogaloideae: Albuca, Avonsera, Battandiera, Cathissa, Coilonox, Dipcadi, Eliokarmos, Elsiea, Ethesia, Galtonia, Honorius, Loncomelos, Melomphis, Neopatersonia, Nicipe, Ornithogalum, Pseudogaltonia, Stellarioides and

  10. Molecular identification of Theileria and Babesia in sheep and goats in the Black Sea Region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Fatih; Aktas, Munir; Dumanli, Nazir

    2013-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate presence and distribution of Theileria and Babesia species via microscopic examination and reverse line blotting (RLB) techniques in sheep and goats in the Black Sea region of Turkey. For this purpose, 1,128 blood samples (869 sheep and 259 goats) were collected by active surveillance from sheep and goats in different provinces of various cities in the region in the years 2010 and 2011. Smears were prepared from the blood samples, stained with Giemsa, and examined under the light microscope for Theileria and Babesia piroplasms. The genomic DNAs were extracted from blood samples. The length of 360-430-bp fragment in the variable V4 region of 18S SSU rRNA gene of Theileria and Babesia species was amplified using the gDNAs. The polymerase chain reaction products were hybridized to the membrane-connected species-specific probes. A total of 38 animals (3.37%) including 34 sheep (3.91%) and 4 goats (1.54%) were found to be positive for Theileria spp. piroplasms in microscopic examination of smears while Babesia spp. piroplasm could not detected. Infection rates were 34.64% in sheep, 10.04% in goats, and totally 28.99% for Theileria ovis while 0.58% in sheep and totally 0.44% for Babesia ovis. However, Theileria sp. OT3 was detected in 2.65% of sheep and 2.04% of all animals; besides Theileria sp., MK had 0.58% prevalence in sheep and 0.77% in goats, with a total 0.62% with RLB. Although T. ovis and Theileria sp. MK were determined in both sheep and goats, B. ovis and Theileria sp. OT3 were observed only in the sheep. These results provide the first detailed molecular data for sheep and goat theileriosis and babesiosis in the region.

  11. Communication: Phase diagram of C{sub 36} by atomistic molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration through coexistence regions

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C. Costa, D.; Munaò, G.

    2014-09-07

    We report an atomistic molecular dynamics determination of the phase diagram of a rigid-cage model of C{sub 36}. We first show that free energies obtained via thermodynamic integrations along isotherms displaying “van der Waals loops,” are fully reproduced by those obtained via isothermal-isochoric integration encompassing only stable states. We find that a similar result also holds for isochoric paths crossing van der Waals regions of the isotherms, and for integrations extending to rather high densities where liquid-solid coexistence can be expected to occur. On such a basis we are able to map the whole phase diagram of C{sub 36}, with resulting triple point and critical temperatures about 1770 K and 2370 K, respectively. We thus predict a 600 K window of existence of a stable liquid phase. Also, at the triple point density, we find that the structural functions and the diffusion coefficient maintain a liquid-like character down to 1400–1300 K, this indicating a wide region of possible supercooling. We discuss why all these features might render possible the observation of the melting of C{sub 36} fullerite and of its liquid state, at variance with what previously experienced for C{sub 60}.

  12. Using singlet molecular oxygen to probe the solute and temperature dependence of liquid-like regions in/on ice.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jonathan P; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-08-01

    Liquid-like regions (LLRs) are found at the surfaces and grain boundaries of ice and as inclusions within ice. These regions contain most of the solutes in ice and can be (photo)chemically active hotspots in natural snow and ice systems. If we assume all solutes partition into LLRs as a solution freezes, freezing-point depression predicts that the concentration of a solute in LLRs is higher than its concentration in the prefrozen (or melted) solution by the freeze-concentration factor (F). Here we use singlet molecular oxygen production to explore the effects of total solute concentration ([TS]) and temperature on experimentally determined values of F. For ice above its eutectic temperature, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression when [TS] is above ∼1 mmol/kg; at lower [TS] values, measurements of F are lower than predicted from freezing-point depression. For ice below its eutectic temperature, the influence of freezing-point depression on F is damped; the extreme case is with Na2SO4 as the solute, where F shows essentially no agreement with freezing-point depression. In contrast, for ice containing 3 mmol/kg NaCl, measured values of F agree well with freezing-point depression over a range of temperatures, including below the eutectic. Our experiments also reveal that the photon flux in LLRs increases in the presence of salts, which has implications for ice photochemistry in the lab and, perhaps, in the environment. PMID:23841666

  13. Identification and molecular analysis of infectious bursal disease in broiler farms in the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oumed Gerjis M; Jackwood, Daral J

    2014-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize field isolates of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). The identification was done using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial sequencing of the VP2 gene. Pooled bursal samples were collected from commercial broiler farms located in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) of Iraq. The genetic material of the IBDV was detected in 10 out of 29 field samples. Sequences of the hypervariable VP2 region were determined for 10 of these viruses. Molecular analysis of the VP2 gene of five IBDVs showed amino acid sequences consistent with the very virulent (vv) IBDV. Two samples were identified as classic vaccine viruses, and three samples were classic vaccine viruses that appear to have mutated during replication in the field. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all five field IBDV strains of the present study were closely related to each other. On the basis of nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, it is very likely that IBD-causing viruses in this part of Iraq are of the very virulent type. These IBDVs appear to be evolving relative to their type strains.

  14. Two Novel Y-Type High Molecular Weight Glutenin Genes in Chinese Wheat Landraces of the Yangtze-River Region.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanchun; Yu, Kan; Zhang, Yujuan; Islam, Shahidul; Sun, Dongfa; Ma, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) are key determinants for the end-use quality of wheat. Chinese wheat landraces are an important resource for exploring novel HMW-GS genes to improve the wheat baking quality. Two novel Glu-1Dy HMW-GSs (designated as 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7) were identified and cloned from two Chinese wheat landraces Huazhong830 and Luosimai. The 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunits were deposited as the NCBInr Acc. No KR262518, and KR262519, respectively. The full open reading frames (ORFs) of 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were 2022 bp and 1977 bp, encoding for proteins of 673 and 658 amino acid residues, respectively. Each contains four typical primary regions of HMW-GSs (a signal peptide, N- and C-terminal regions, and a central repetitive region). Their deduced molecular masses (70,165 Da and 68,400 Da) were strikingly consistent with those identified by MALDI-TOF-MS (69,985Da and 68,407 Da). The 1Dy12.6 is the largest 1Dy glutenin subunits cloned in common wheat up to date, containing longer repetitive central domains than other 1Dy encoded proteins. In comparison with the most similar active 1Dy alleles previously reported, the newly discovered alleles contained a total of 20 SNPs and 3 indels. The secondary structure prediction indicated that 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 have similar proportion of α-helix, β-turn, and β-bend to those of 1Dy10 (X12929). The phylogenetic analysis illustrated that the x- and y-type subunits of glutenins were well separated, but both 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 were clustered with the other Glu-1Dy alleles. Our results revealed that the 1Dy12.6 and 1Dy12.7 subunit have potential to strengthen gluten polymer interactions, and are valuable genetic resources for wheat quality improvement.

  15. Molecular diversity analysis of Rhizoctonia solani isolates infecting various pulse crops in different agro-ecological regions of India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunil C; Tripathi, Aradhika; Upadhyay, B K

    2012-11-01

    Genetic diversity of 89 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from different pulse crops representing 21 states from 16 agro-ecological regions of India, 49 morphological, and 7 anastomosis groups (AGs) was analyzed using 12 universal rice primers (URPs), 22 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and 23 inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. Both URPs and RAPD markers provided 100 % polymorphism with the bands ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size, whereas ISSR markers gave 99.7 % polymorphism with the bands sizes ranging from 0.1 to 3 kb. The marker URP 38F followed by URP13R, URP25F, and URP30F, RAPD marker R1 followed by OPM6, A3 and OPA12 and ISSR3 followed by ISSR1, ISSR4, and ISSR20 produced the highest number of amplicons. R. solani isolates showed a high level of genetic diversity. Unweighted pair group method with an arithmetic average (UPGMA) analysis grouped the isolates into 7 major clusters at 35 % genetic similarity using the three sets of markers evaluated. In spite of using three different types of markers, about 95 % isolates shared common grouping patterns. The majority of the isolates representing various AGs were grouped together into different sub-clusters using all three types of markers. Molecular groups of the isolates did not correspond to agro-ecological regions or states and crops of the origin. An attempt was made for the first time in the present study to determine the genetic diversity of R. solani populations isolated from different pulse crops representing various AGs and agro-ecological regions.

  16. A study of dynamical processes in the Orion KL region using ALMA—probing molecular outflow and inflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2014-08-20

    This work reports high spatial resolution observations toward the Orion KL region with high critical density lines of CH{sub 3}CN (12{sub 4}-11{sub 4}) and CH{sub 3}OH (8{sub –1,8}-7{sub 0,7}), as well as a continuum at ∼1.3 mm band. The observations were made using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array with a spatial resolution of ∼1.''5 and sensitivity of about 0.07 K and ∼0.18 K for continuum and line, respectively. The observational results showed that the gas in the Orion KL region consists of jet-propelled cores at the ridge and dense cores east and south of the region that are shaped like a wedge ring. The outflow has multiple lobes, which may originate from an explosive ejection, and is not driven by young stellar objects. Four infrared bubbles were found in the Spitzer/IRAC emissions. These bubbles, the distributions of the previously found H{sub 2} jets, the young stellar objects, and molecular gas suggest that BN is the explosive center. The burst time was estimated to be ≤1300 yr. At the same time, signatures of gravitational collapse toward Source I and the hot core were detected with material infall velocities of 1.5 km s{sup –1} and ∼0.6 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to mass accretion rates of 1.2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}/yr and 8.0 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}/yr, respectively. These observations may support the belief that high-mass stars form via the accretion model, similar to their low-mass counterparts.

  17. Cryptosporidium hominis Is a Newly Recognized Pathogen in the Arctic Region of Nunavik, Canada: Molecular Characterization of an Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brent; Dion, Réjean; Levesque, Benoît; Cantin, Philippe; Cédilotte, Lyne; Ndao, Momar; Proulx, Jean-François; Yansouni, Cedric P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of childhood diarrhea in low-resource settings, and has been repeatedly associated with impaired physical and cognitive development. In May 2013, an outbreak of diarrhea caused by Cryptosporidium hominis was identified in the Arctic region of Nunavik, Quebec. Human cryptosporidiosis transmission was previously unknown in this region, and very few previous studies have reported it elsewhere in the Arctic. We report clinical, molecular, and epidemiologic details of a multi-village Cryptosporidium outbreak in the Canadian Arctic. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the occurrence of cryptosporidiosis using a descriptive study of cases with onset between April 2013 and April 2014. Cases were defined as Nunavik inhabitants of any age presenting with diarrhea of any duration, in whom Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected by stool microscopy in a specialised reference laboratory. Cryptosporidium was identified in stool from 51 of 283 individuals. The overall annual incidence rate (IR) was 420 / 100,000 inhabitants. The IR was highest among children aged less than 5 years (1290 /100,000 persons). Genetic subtyping for stool specimens from 14/51 cases was determined by DNA sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Sequences aligned with C. hominis subtype Id in all cases. No common food or water source of infection was identified. Conclusions/Significance In this first observed outbreak of human cryptosporidiosis in this Arctic region, the high IR seen is cause for concern about the possible long-term effects on growth and development of children in Inuit communities, who face myriad other challenges such as overcrowding and food-insecurity. The temporal and geographic distribution of cases, as well as the identification of C. hominis subtype Id, suggest anthroponotic rather than zoonotic transmission. Barriers to timely diagnosis delayed the recognition of human cryptosporidiosis in this remote

  18. The 5′ Untranslated Region of a Novel Infectious Molecular Clone of the Dicistrovirus Cricket Paralysis Virus Modulates Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Craig H.; Wang, Qing S.; Keatings, Kathleen; Khong, Anthony; Allan, Douglas; Yip, Calvin K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dicistroviridae are a family of RNA viruses that possesses a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome containing two distinct open reading frames (ORFs), each preceded by an internal ribosome entry site that drives translation of the viral structural and nonstructural proteins, respectively. The type species, Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has served as a model for studying host-virus interactions; however, investigations into the molecular mechanisms of CrPV and other dicistroviruses have been limited as an established infectious clone was elusive. Here, we report the construction of an infectious molecular clone of CrPV. Transfection of in vitro-transcribed RNA from the CrPV clone into Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells resulted in cytopathic effects, viral RNA accumulation, detection of negative-sense viral RNA, and expression of viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy, viral titers, and immunofluorescence-coupled transwell assays demonstrated that infectious viral particles are released from transfected cells. In contrast, mutant clones containing stop codons in either ORF decreased virus infectivity. Injection of adult Drosophila flies with virus derived from CrPV clones but not UV-inactivated clones resulted in mortality. Molecular analysis of the CrPV clone revealed a 196-nucleotide duplication within its 5′ untranslated region (UTR) that stimulated translation of reporter constructs. In cells infected with the CrPV clone, the duplication inhibited viral infectivity yet did not affect viral translation or RNA accumulation, suggesting an effect on viral packaging or entry. The generation of the CrPV infectious clone provides a powerful tool for investigating the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of dicistroviruses and may further understanding of fundamental host-virus interactions in insect cells. IMPORTANCE Dicistroviridae, which are RNA viruses that infect arthropods, have served as a model to gain insights into fundamental host

  19. Molecular identification of Theileria and Babesia in ticks collected from sheep and goats in the Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Fatih; Aktas, Munir; Dumanli, Nazir

    2015-01-01

    A molecular survey was undertaken in the Black Sea region of Turkey to determine the presence of Theileria and Babesia species of medical and veterinary importance. The ticks were removed from sheep and goats, pooled according to species and locations, and analyzed by PCR-based reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing. A total of 2241 ixodid ticks belonging to 5 genus and 12 species were collected and divided into 310 pools. Infection rates were calculated as the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Of the 310 pools tested, 46 (14.83%) were found to be infected with Theileria or Babesia species, and the overall MLE of the infection rate was calculated as 2.27% (CI 1.67-2.99). The MLE of the infection rates were calculated as 0.691% (CI 0.171-1.78) in Haemaphysalis parva, 1.47% (CI 0.081-6.37) in Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 1.84% (CI 0.101-7.87) in Ixodes ricinus, 2.86% (CI 1.68-4.48) in Rhipicephalus turanicus, 5.57% (CI 0.941-16.3) in Hyalomma marginatum, and 6.2% (CI 4.02-9.02) in Rhipicephalus bursa. Pathogens identified in ticks included Theileria ovis, Babesia ovis, Babesia bigemina, and Babesia microti. Most tick pools were infected with a single pathogen. However, five pools displayed mixed infections with T. ovis and B. ovis. This study provides the first molecular evidence for the presence of B. microti in ticks in Turkey.

  20. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  1. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani Region, Nunavut, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asma; Goldfarb, David M.; Slinger, Robert; Dixon, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the prevalences of infection with the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in humans appear to be relatively high in the Canadian North, their transmission patterns are poorly understood. Objective To determine the detection rate and the molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani (Baffin Island) Region of Nunavut, Canada, in order to better understand the burden of illness and the potential mechanisms of transmission. Study design/methods Diarrhoeal stool specimens (n=108) submitted to the Qikiqtani General Hospital for clinical testing were also tested for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis using epifluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed on PCR-positive specimens to determine the species, genotypes and sub-genotypes of the parasites. Results Cryptosporidium was detected in 15.7% of the diarrhoeic patients, while Giardia was detected in 4.6%. DNA sequencing of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene indicated that all of the Cryptosporidium amplicons had a 100% homology to C. parvum, and a gp60 assay showed that all aligned with C. parvum sub-genotype IIa. Microsatellite analysis revealed 3 cases of sub-genotype IIaA15G2R1, 2 of IIaA15G1R and 1 case each of sub-genotypes IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA15R1. For Giardia, results based on the amplification of both the 16S rRNA gene and the gdh gene were generally in agreement, and both DNA sequencing and RFLP demonstrated the presence of the G. duodenalis Assemblage B genotype. Conclusions Both C. parvum and G. duodenalis Assemblage B were present in human diarrhoeal stool specimens from Nunavut, which was suggestive of zoonotic transmission, although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out. To fully understand the public health significance of the different

  2. CH(+) Destruction by Reaction with H: Computing Quantum Rates To Model Different Molecular Regions in the Interstellar Medium.

    PubMed

    Bovino, S; Grassi, T; Gianturco, F A

    2015-12-17

    A detailed analysis of an ionic reaction that plays a crucial role in the carbon chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) is carried out by computing ab initio reactive cross sections with a quantum method and by further obtaining the corresponding CH(+) destruction rates over a range of temperatures that shows good overall agreement with existing experiments. The differences found between all existing calculations and the very-low-T experiments are discussed and explored via a simple numerical model that links these cross section reductions to collinear approaches where nonadiabatic crossing is expected to dominate. The new rates are further linked to a complex chemical network that models the evolution of the CH(+) abundance in the photodissociation region (PDR) and molecular cloud (MC) environments of the ISM. The abundances of CH(+) are given by numerical solutions of a large set of coupled, first-order kinetics equations that employs our new chemical package krome. The analysis that we carry out reveals that the important region for CH(+) destruction is that above 100 K, hence showing that, at least for this reaction, the differences with the existing laboratory low-T experiments are of essentially no importance within the astrochemical environments discussed here because, at those temperatures, other chemical processes involving the title molecule are taking over. A detailed analysis of the chemical network involving CH(+) also shows that a slight decrease in the initial oxygen abundance might lead to higher CH(+) abundances because the main chemical carbon ion destruction channel is reduced in efficiency. This might provide an alternative chemical route to understand the reason why general astrochemical models fail when the observed CH(+) abundances are matched with the outcomes of their calculations.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of rabies from Maranhão and surrounding states in the northeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sato, G; Kobayashi, Y; Shoji, Y; Sato, T; Itou, T; Ito, F H; Santos, H P; Brito, C J C; Sakai, T

    2006-11-01

    Although many outbreaks of rabies have been reported in northern Brazil, few epidemiological studies of these outbreaks have been undertaken. In this study, molecular epidemiological analyses were performed using 41 rabies virus samples isolated in the Maranhão (MA), Pará (PA), and Tocantins (TO) states of northeastern Brazil. A 599-bp region of the glycoprotein (G) gene was first amplified from each sample by RT-PCR, then sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. A phylogenetic tree divided the 41 isolates into two clades: Clade I was associated with terrestrial carnivores and Clade II was associated with vampire bats. The Clade I isolates were further sub-divided into two groups. The first group was closer to carnivore isolates that predominate in central Brazil, whereas the second group more closely resembled wild fox isolates from the northeastern coastal state of Paraíba (PB). MA isolates of Clade II formed an entirely separate group. These results demonstrate that bat- and dog-transmitted rabies occur in northwestern Brazil. PMID:16773238

  4. Electron Momentum Distributions for 4a1 Orbitals of CFxCl4-x in Low Momentum Region: a Possible Evidence of Molecular Geometry Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xu; Xu, Chun-kai; Yin, Xiao-feng; Zhou, Li-xia; Xu, Ke-zun; Chen, Xiang-jun

    2009-12-01

    Electron momentum distributions for 4a1 orbitals of serial freon molecules CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 (CFxCl4-x, x = 1-3) have been reanalyzed due to the severe discrepancies between theory and experiment in low momentum region. The tentative calculations using equilibrium geometries of molecular ions have exhibited a great improvement in agreement with the experimental data, which suggests that the molecular geometry distortion may be responsible for the observed high intensities at p < 0.5 a.u. Further analyses show that the severe discrepancies at low momentum region mainly arise from the influence of molecular geometry distortion on C-Cl bonding electron density distributions.

  5. Far-infrared molecular lines from low- to high-mass star forming regions observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karska, A.; Herpin, F.; Bruderer, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; San José-García, I.; Contursi, A.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Fedele, D.; Baudry, A.; Braine, J.; Chavarría, L.; Cernicharo, J.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Wyrowski, F.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: Our aim is to study the response of the gas-to-energetic processes associated with high-mass star formation and compare it with previously published studies on low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) using the same methods. The quantified far-IR line emission and absorption of CO, H2O, OH, and [O i] reveals the excitation and the relative contribution of different atomic and molecular species to the gas cooling budget. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectra covering 55-190 μm are analyzed for ten high-mass star forming regions of luminosities Lbol ~ 104-106 L⊙ and various evolutionary stages on spatial scales of ~104 AU. Radiative transfer models are used to determine the contribution of the quiescent envelope to the far-IR CO emission. Results: The close environments of high-mass protostars show strong far-IR emission from molecules, atoms, and ions. Water is detected in all 10 objects even up to high excitation lines, often in absorption at the shorter wavelengths and in emission at the longer wavelengths. CO transitions from J = 14 - 13 up to typically 29 - 28 (Eu/kB ~ 580-2400 K) show a single temperature component with a rotational temperature of Trot ~ 300 K. Typical H2O excitation temperatures are Trot ~250 K, while OH has Trot ~ 80 K. Far-IR line cooling is dominated by CO (~75%) and, to a smaller extent, by [O i] (~20%), which becomes more important for the most evolved sources. H2O is less important as a coolant for high-mass sources because many lines are in absorption. Conclusions: Emission from the quiescent envelope is responsible for ~45-85% of the total CO luminosity in high-mass sources compared with only ~10% for low-mass YSOs. The highest- J lines (Jup ≥ 20) originate most likely in shocks, based on the strong correlation of CO and H2O with physical parameters (Lbol, Menv) of the sources from low- to high-mass YSOs. The excitation of warm CO described by Trot ~ 300 K is very similar for all mass regimes, whereas H2O

  6. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  7. The Study of Cellular and Molecular Physiological Characteristics of Sperm in Men Living in the Aral Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Kultanov, Berikbay Z.; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S.; Ivasenko, Svetlana A.; Tatina, Yelena S.; Kelmyalene, Assel A.; Assenova, Lyazzat H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extreme environmental situation in the Aral crisis has caused a massive chemical pollution of the territory for decades with high doses of pesticides, herbicides. Discharge of industrial waste into the rivers that feed the Aral Sea has lead to the development of various pathological processes in the human body, as well as disruption of reproductive function in young men. AIM: To evaluate the performance of molecular cellular changes in the sperm of men under the influence of dust and salt aerosols in Aral Sea region. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical and laboratory studies were conducted in men 5 settlements (Aralsk-city, v. Aiteke-Bi, v. Zhalagash, v. Zhusaly, v. Shieli). We have studied male ejaculate obtained after 4-5 days of abstinence, and placed it in a warm tube with a glass stopper. On the investigation proceeded ejaculate within 20-30 minutes after its preparation, during which time he was subjected to liquefaction. Isolation and quantification of ASF, RNA, DNA, and determining the fraction of histones in sperm was performed by the method of Markusheva and Savina. RESULTS: It was found that the value of ASF in the semen of men living in the zone of ecological disaster higher compared with the values of parameters in men living in the area of environmental crisis, and this trend is observed in all age groups. The study of circulating extracellular DNA and RNA in the sperm of men registered their decline with a corresponding increase of acid precursors that can be attributed to the degradation of nucleic acids under the influence of negative factors in the complex area of ecological trouble. Also, according to a study in men residing in the areas of environmental catastrophe at the age of 18-29 years, found an increased content of the H1 histone H2A lower total fraction, H3, H4 - and a sharp increase in histone H2B content - histones. CONCLUSIONS: Men living in environmentally disadvantaged areas of Kyzylorda region under the influence of dust and

  8. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  9. Molecular detection of Acinetobacter species in lice and keds of domestic animals in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Parola, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Acinetobacter and Rickettsia species DNA in lice and Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) of animals from Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia. From September through November 2011, a total of 207 cattle, 85 sheep, 47 dogs and 16 cats were examined for ectoparasites. Results of morphological identification revealed several species of ectoparasites: Linognathus vituli (L. vituli), Bovicola bovis (B. bovis) and Solenopotes capillatus (S. capillatus) on cattle; B. ovis and Melophagus ovinus (M. ovinus) on sheep; and Heterodoxus spiniger (H. spiniger) on dogs. There was a significantly (p≤0.0001) higher prevalence of L. vituli observed in cattle than both S. capillatus and B. bovis. Molecular identification of lice using an 18S rRNA gene analysis confirms the identified lice species by morphological methods. We detected different Acinetobacter species among lice (11.1%) and keds (86.4%) including A. soli in L. vituli of cattle, A. lowffii in M. ovinus of sheep, A. pittii in H. spiniger of dogs, 1 new Acinetobacter spp. in M. ovinus and 2 new Acinetobacter spp. in H. spiniger of dogs using partial rpoB gene sequence analysis. There was a significantly higher prevalence of Acinetobacter spp. in keds than in lice (p≤0.00001). Higher percentage of Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in H. spiniger than in both B. ovis and L. vituli (p≤0.00001). Carbapenemase resistance encoding genes for blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-51 were not found in any lice and keds. These findings suggest that synanthropic animals and their ectoparasites might increase the risk of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens and could be a source for Acinetobacter spp. infections in humans. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine whether ectoparasites of animals can act as environmental reservoirs and play a role in spreading these bacteria to both animal and human hosts.

  10. Susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease: molecular analysis of HLA-D region genes identifies new markers for goitrous Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Badenhoop, K; Schwarz, G; Walfish, P G; Drummond, V; Usadel, K H; Bottazzo, G F

    1990-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been shown to be associated with the HLA-specificities DR4 and DR5. Since former association studies yielded variable results, we used novel molecular typing methods to assess predisposing immunogenetic factors. Gene analysis of the HLA-DR-DQ and tumor necrosis factor region was performed in a group of Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and randomly chosen controls using standards and nomenclature of the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop. Genomic DNA of patients and controls was analyzed using a cDNA probe of the DQB1 gene. The resulting restriction fragment patterns allowed the determination of newly defined DQw-types 1-9. We find the strongest relative risk conferred by DQw7 (RR = 4.7), that is observed in 36 of 64 patients (56%) and only 21 of 98 controls (21%) (P corr less than 0.002). Comparison of DNA sequence variation in the DQB1 gene, that is found predominantly in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients, indicates that codons 45 and 57 are critical features in DQw7 which distinguish it from other DQw specificities. The adjacent DQA1 genes also display a significant association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (DQA1*0201/*0301 heterozygotes were found in 37% of patients and 15% controls, P less than 0.03). No significant association could be found with polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor gene. These results provide a new basis for the concept of genetic susceptibility in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and will help to elucidate the underlying autoimmune mechanisms that lead to disease at the functional level. PMID:1977755

  11. The effect of various atomic partial charge schemes to elucidate consensus activity-correlating molecular regions: a test case of diverse QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jha, Prakash C; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of atomic partial charges of the small molecules to calculate molecular interaction fields (MIFs) is an important process in field-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). Several studies showed the influence of partial charge schemes that drastically affects the prediction accuracy of the QSAR model and focused on the selection of appropriate charge models that provide highest cross-validated correlation coefficient ([Formula: see text] or q(2)) to explain the variation in chemical structures against biological endpoints. This study shift this focus in a direction to understand the molecular regions deemed to explain SAR in various charge models and recognize a consensus picture of activity-correlating molecular regions. We selected eleven diverse dataset and developed MIF-based QSAR models using various charge schemes including Gasteiger-Marsili, Del Re, Merck Molecular Force Field, Hückel, Gasteiger-Hückel, and Pullman. The generalized resultant QSAR models were then compared with Open3DQSAR model to interpret the MIF descriptors decisively. We suggest the regions of activity contribution or optimization can be effectively determined by studying various charge-based models to understand SAR precisely.

  12. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  13. New evidence on tick-borne rickettsioses in the Altai region of Russia using primary lesions, serum and blood clots of molecular and serological study.

    PubMed

    Granitov, Vladimir; Shpynov, Stanislav; Beshlebova, Olga; Arsenjeva, Irina; Dedkov, Vladimir; Safonova, Marina; Stukolova, Olga; Pantjukhina, Anna; Tarasevich, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne rickettsioses (TBRs) have similar clinical symptoms and can give serological cross-reaction. We firstly found that in the natural foci of North Asian tick typhus (NATT) in the Altai region of Russia, TBRs can be caused by two Rickettsia species: Rickettsia sibirica subsp. sibirica (causative agent of NATT) and Rickettsia heilongjiangensis. Rickettsial DNA was detected in primary lesions, serum samples and blood clots using real-time PCR. Therefore, each case of TBRs should be verified by using molecular typing. TBR caused by R. sibirica subsp. sibirica - NATT dominates on the territory of Altai region.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level.

  15. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. PMID:24571598

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of the promoter region of the mouse LDH/C gene: enhancer-assisted, Sp1-mediated transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Thomas, K

    1997-01-01

    Molecular and functional studies of the LDH/C 5' upstream promoter elements were undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in temporal activation of LDH/C gene expression in differentiating germ cells. Ligation mediated-PCR (LM-PCR) gene walking techniques were exploited to isolate a 2.1 kb fragment of the mouse LDH/C 5' promoter region. DNA sequence analysis of this isolated genomic fragment indicated that the mouse LDH/C promoter contained TATA and CCAT boxes as well as a GC-box (Sp1-binding site) situated upstream from the transcription start site. PCR-based in vivo DNase I footprinting analysis of a 600 bp fragment of the proximal LDH/C promoter region (-524/+38) in isolated mouse pachytene spermatocytes identified a single footprint over the GC-box motif. Three DNase I hypersensitive sites were also detectable in vivo, in a region containing (CT)n(GA)n repeats upstream from the CCAT box domain. Functional characterization of the promoter region was carried out in a rat C6 glioma cell line and an SV40 transformed germ cell line (GC-1 spg) using wild-type and mutated LDH/C promoter CAT reporter constructs. These studies provide experimental evidence suggesting that transcriptional activation of the LDH/C promoter is regulated by enhancer-mediated coactivation of the Sp1 proteins bound to the GC-box motif footprinted in vivo in pachytene spermatocytes. PMID:9153323

  17. Abundant molecular gas and inefficient star formation in intracluster regions: ram pressure stripped tail of the Norma galaxy ESO137-001

    SciTech Connect

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large 'intracluster' distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ∼1.5 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H{sub 2} factor could overestimate the H{sub 2} content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τ{sub dep} > 10{sup 10} yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H{sub 2} in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J. ); Jenkins, L. ); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. ); Sheppard, L. ); Flejter, W.L. ); Zackowski, J. ); Tsien, F. ); Schwartz, S. )

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Using Molecular Models To Show Steric Clash in Peptides: An Illustration of Two Disallowed Regions in the Ramachandran Diagram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkides, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity, students manipulate three-dimensional molecular models of the Ala-Ala-Ala tripeptide, where Ala is alanine. They rotate bonds to show that the pairs of dihedral angles phi = 0 degrees, psi = 180 degrees, and phi = 0 degrees, psi = 0 degrees lead to unfavorable interactions among the main chain atoms of the tripeptide. This…

  20. Comparison of orthologous and paralogous DNA flanking the wheat high molecular weight glutenin genes: sequence conservation and divergence, transposon distribution, and matrix-attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D; Larka, L; Christoffers, M J; McCue, K F; Gustafson, J P

    2002-04-01

    Extended flanking DNA sequences were characterized for five members of the wheat high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin gene family to understand more of the structure, control, and evolution of these genes. Analysis revealed more sequence conservation among orthologous regions than between paralogous regions, with differences mainly owing to transposition events involving putative retrotransposons and several miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs). Both gyspy-like long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon sequences are represented in the flanking DNAs. One of the MITEs is a novel class, but another MITE is related to the maize Stowaway family and is widely represented in Triticeae express sequence tags (ESTs). Flanking DNA of the longest sequence, a 20 425-bp fragment including and surrounding the HMW-glutenin Bx7 gene, showed additional cereal gene-like sequences both immediately 5' and 3' to the HMW-glutenin coding region. The transcriptional activities of sequences related to these flanking putative genes and the retrotransposon-related regions were indicated by matches to wheat and other Triticeae ESTs. Predictive analysis of matrix-attachment regions (MARs) of the HMW glutenin and several alpha-, gamma-, and omega-gliadin flanking DNAs indicate potential MARs immediately flanking each of the genes. Matrix binding activity in the predicted regions was confirmed for two of the HMW-glutenin genes.

  1. Evaluation of genetic variability of wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) in Canada and the Caucasus region by chemical and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Josef; Nesvadba, Vladimír; Krofta, Karel; Henychova, Alena; Marzoev, Arkady Inalovic; Richards, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Wild hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are potential new germplasms to expand the variability of genetic resources for hop breeding. We evaluated Canadian (62 plants) and Caucasian (58 plants) wild hops by their chemical characteristics and with molecular genetic analyses using sequence-tagged site and simple sequence repeat markers, in comparison with European (104 plants) and North American (27 plants) wild hops. The contents of alpha and beta acids varied from 0.36% to 5.11% and from 0.43% to 6.66% in Canadian wild hops, and from 0.85% to 3.65% and from 1.22% to 4.81% in Caucasian wild hops, respectively. The contents of cohumulone and colupulone distinctly differed between European and North American wild hops: the cohumulone level in alpha acids was in the range 46.1%-68.4% among North American wild hops and in the range 13.6%-30.6% among European wild hops. The high content of myrcene and the low contents of humulene, farnesene, and selinenes were typical for wild hops from Canada, in contrast to wild hops from the Caucasus region. We compared the chemical characteristics with molecular genetic data. Chemical characteristics differentiated wild hops into North American and Eurasian groups. Molecular genetic analysis was able to separate Caucasian wild hops from European wild hops. We proved a hop phylogeny by means of wide molecular analysis. PMID:20616876

  2. High-resolution CO-laser sideband spectrometer for molecular-beam optothermal spectroscopy in the 5-6.6 μm wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, U.; Engels, P.; Madeja, F.; Havenith, M.; Urban, W.

    1999-04-01

    We have set up a new CO-laser sideband spectrometer for high-resolution molecular-beam optothermal spectroscopy in the mid infrared. By mixing CO-laser lines with tunable microwave radiation, a spectral coverage of about 50% is achieved. Using a microwave resonator, a typical output power of 3 mW is realized in the region of 5-6.6 μm (1500-2000 cm-1). The resolution in our molecular-beam apparatus with optothermal detection is 2.8 MHz (full width at half maximum). The new setup allowed the observation of the first high-resolution rotationally resolved spectrum of formic acid dimer (HCOOH)2.

  3. A MOLECULARLY CHARACTERIZED INTERSTITIAL DELETION ENCOMPASSING THE 11q14.1-q23.3 REGION IN A CASE WITH MULTIPLE CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Altiok-Clark, O; Yakut, S; Guzel-Nur, B; Mihci, E; Berker-Karauzum, S

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 long arm is a rare event. In most of the interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome 11 both the position and the size of these deletions are heterogeneous making a precise karyotype-phenotype correlation. In only a few of the reported cases has the deletion been molecularly characterized. Our patient was a 13-year-old male presented; mental motor retardation, strabismus, myopia, retinopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, a long and triangular face, a broad forehead, hypotelorism, nasal septal deviation, a beaked nose, hypoplastic ala nasie, bilateral low-set ears, a high arched palate, crowded teeth, retrognathia, thin lips, a long neck, and sloping shoulders, hyperactive behavior, pulmonary stenosis and lumbar scoliosis. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q14.1-q23.3) karyotype in the patient. Array-CGH analysis of the patient's DNA revealed an interstitial deletion encompassing 33.2 Mb in the 11q14.1-q23.3 genomic region (chr11: 83,161,443-116,401,751 ; Hg19). In this report, we present a patient with an interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 11 that encompassed the 11q14.1-q23.3 region; and, using array-CGH analysis, we molecularly characterized the deleted region.

  4. Molecular and morphological data support recognition of a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Anura: Terrarana) from an under-sampled region of South America.

    PubMed

    Heinicke, Matthew P; Barrio-Amorós, César L; Hedges, S Blair

    2015-07-16

    We describe a new genus of New World direct-developing frog (Terrarana) from the northern Andes of Venezuela and adjacent Colombia. Tachiramantis gen. nov. includes three species formerly placed in the large genus Pristimantis. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of data from five nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that Tachiramantis is not part of Pristimantis or any other named genus in its family (Craugastoridae or Strabomantidae). Morphological evidence further supports the distinctiveness of Tachiramantis, which has several aspects of skull morphology that are rare or absent in Pristimantis and synapomorphic for Tachiramantis, including frontoparietal-prootic fusion and degree of vomer development. The terminal phalanges, which narrow greatly before expanding at the tips, may represent an additional morphological synapomorphy. One species, T. prolixodiscus, also displays a fenestra between the posterior portions of the frontoparietals, a character state otherwise present in only 1 of 98 other sampled terraranan species. We use mapped ranges of most New World direct-developing frogs to show that Tachiramantis occurs in a geographic region that had been under-sampled in previous molecular studies of New World direct-developing frogs. Other under-sampled regions are identified in western Peru, Colombia, and northern Central America; these regions should provide fruitful target taxa for future phylogenetic studies.

  5. The molecular organization of the beta-sheet region in Corneous beta-proteins (beta-keratins) of sauropsids explains its stability and polymerization into filaments.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Eckhart, Leopold; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The hard corneous material of avian and reptilian scales, claws, beak and feathers is mainly derived from the presence of proteins formerly known as beta-keratins but now termed Corneous beta-proteins of sauropsids to distinguish them from keratins, which are members of the intermediate filament protein family. The modeling of the conserved 34 amino acid residues long central beta-sheet region of Corneous beta-proteins using an ab initio protein folding and structure prediction algorithm indicates that this region is formed by four antiparallel beta-sheets. Molecular dynamic simulations and Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) analysis showed that the disposition of polar and apolar amino acids within the beta-region gives rise to an amphipathic core whose stability is further increased, especially in an aqueous environment, by the association into a dimer due to apolar interactions and specific amino-acid interactions. The dimers in turn polymerize into a 3nm thick linear beta-filament due to van der Waals and hydrogen-bond interactions. It is suggested that once this nuclear core of anti-parallel sheets evolved in the genome of a reptilian ancestor of the extant reptiles and birds about 300 millions years ago, new properties emerged in the corneous material forming scales, claws, beaks and feathers in these amniotes based on the tendency of these unique corneous proteins to form stable filaments different from keratin intermediate filaments or sterical structures formed by other corneous proteins so far known.

  6. A MOLECULARLY CHARACTERIZED INTERSTITIAL DELETION ENCOMPASSING THE 11q14.1-q23.3 REGION IN A CASE WITH MULTIPLE CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Z; Altiok-Clark, O; Yakut, S; Guzel-Nur, B; Mihci, E; Berker-Karauzum, S

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 11 long arm is a rare event. In most of the interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome 11 both the position and the size of these deletions are heterogeneous making a precise karyotype-phenotype correlation. In only a few of the reported cases has the deletion been molecularly characterized. Our patient was a 13-year-old male presented; mental motor retardation, strabismus, myopia, retinopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, a long and triangular face, a broad forehead, hypotelorism, nasal septal deviation, a beaked nose, hypoplastic ala nasie, bilateral low-set ears, a high arched palate, crowded teeth, retrognathia, thin lips, a long neck, and sloping shoulders, hyperactive behavior, pulmonary stenosis and lumbar scoliosis. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q14.1-q23.3) karyotype in the patient. Array-CGH analysis of the patient's DNA revealed an interstitial deletion encompassing 33.2 Mb in the 11q14.1-q23.3 genomic region (chr11: 83,161,443-116,401,751 ; Hg19). In this report, we present a patient with an interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 11 that encompassed the 11q14.1-q23.3 region; and, using array-CGH analysis, we molecularly characterized the deleted region. PMID:27192892

  7. Sequence analysis of the 3’-untranslated region of HSP70 (type I) genes in the genus Leishmania: its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Leishmaniases are a group of clinically diverse diseases caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. To distinguish between species is crucial for correct diagnosis and prognosis as well as for treatment decisions. Recently, sequencing of the HSP70 coding region has been applied in phylogenetic studies and for identifying of Leishmania species with excellent results. Methods In the present study, we analyzed the 3’-untranslated region (UTR) of Leishmania HSP70-type I gene from 24 strains representing eleven Leishmania species in the belief that this non-coding region would have a better discriminatory capacity for species typing than coding regions. Results It was observed that there was a remarkable degree of sequence conservation in this region, even between species of the subgenus Leishmania and Viannia. In addition, the presence of many microsatellites was a common feature of the 3´-UTR of HSP70-I genes in the Leishmania genus. Finally, we constructed dendrograms based on global sequence alignments of the analyzed Leishmania species and strains, the results indicated that this particular region of HSP70 genes might be useful for species (or species complex) typing, improving for particular species the discrimination capacity of phylogenetic trees based on HSP70 coding sequences. Given the large size variation of the analyzed region between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera, direct visualization of the PCR amplification product would allow discrimination between subgenera, and a HaeIII-PCR-RFLP analysis might be used for differentiating some species within each subgenera. Conclusions Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that this region, which is readily amplified using a single pair of primers from both Old and New World Leishmania species, might be useful as a molecular marker for species discrimination. PMID:22541251

  8. THE DISCOVERY OF THE YOUNGEST MOLECULAR OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTELLAR CORE, MMS-6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-01-20

    We present subarcsecond resolution HCN (4-3) and CO (3-2) observations made with the Submillimeter Array, toward an extremely young intermediate-mass protostellar core, MMS 6-main, located in the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 region (OMC-3). We have successfully imaged a compact molecular outflow lobe ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 AU) associated with MMS 6-main, which is also the smallest molecular outflow ever found in the intermediate-mass protostellar cores. The dynamical timescale of this outflow is estimated to be {<=}100 yr. The line width dramatically increases downstream at the end of the molecular outflow ({Delta}v {approx} 25 km s{sup -1}) and clearly shows the bow-shock-type velocity structure. The estimated outflow mass ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }) and outflow size are approximately two to four orders and one to three orders of magnitude smaller, respectively, while the outflow force ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) is similar, compared to the other molecular outflows studied in OMC-2/3. These results show that MMS 6-main is a protostellar core at the earliest evolutionary stage, most likely shortly after the second core formation.

  9. Clinical characteristics and molecular genetic analysis of 22 patients with neonatal diabetes from the South-Eastern region of Turkey: predominance of non-KATP channel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Huseyin; Arya, Ved Bhushan; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Houghton, Jayne A L; Baran, Riza Taner; Akar, Melek; Tekes, Selahattin; Tuzun, Heybet; Mackay, Deborah J; Flanagan, Sarah E; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare form of monogenic diabetes and usually presents in the first 6 months of life. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and molecular genetics of a large Turkish cohort of NDM patients from a single centre and estimate an annual incidence rate of NDM in South-Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey. Design and methods NDM patients presenting to Diyarbakir Children State Hospital between 2010 and 2013, and patients under follow-up with presumed type 1 diabetes mellitus, with onset before 6 months of age were recruited. Molecular genetic analysis was performed. Results Twenty-two patients (59% males) were diagnosed with NDM (TNDM-5; PNDM-17). Molecular genetic analysis identified a mutation in 20 (95%) patients who had undergone a mutation analysis. In transient neonatal diabetes (TNDM) patients, the genetic cause included chromosome 6q24 abnormalities (n=3), ABCC8 (n=1) and homozygous INS (n=1). In permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) patients, homozygous GCK (n=6), EIF2AK3 (n=3), PTF1A (n=3), and INS (n=1) and heterozygous KCNJ11 (n=2) mutations were identified. Pancreatic exocrine dysfunction was observed in patients with mutations in the distal PTF1A enhancer. Both patients with a KCNJ11 mutation responded to oral sulphonylurea. A variable phenotype was associated with the homozygous c.-331C>A INS mutation, which was identified in both a PNDM and TNDM patient. The annual incidence of PNDM in South-East Anatolian region of Turkey was one in 48 000 live births. Conclusions Homozygous mutations in GCK, EIF2AK3 and the distal enhancer region of PTF1A were the commonest causes of NDM in our cohort. The high rate of detection of a mutation likely reflects the contribution of new genetic techniques (targeted next-generation sequencing) and increased consanguinity within our cohort. PMID:25755231

  10. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design.

  11. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design. PMID:26833485

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Molecular fingerprint-region spectroscopy from 5 to 12  μm using an orientation-patterned gallium phosphide optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Luke; Schunemann, Peter G; Reid, Derryck T

    2016-09-15

    We report a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the new semiconductor gain material orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which enables the production of high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses spanning 5-12 μm with average powers in the few to tens of milliwatts range. This is the first example of a broadband OPO operating across the molecular fingerprint region, and we demonstrate its potential by conducting broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy using water vapor and a polystyrene reference standard.

  14. Molecular fingerprint-region spectroscopy from 5 to 12  μm using an orientation-patterned gallium phosphide optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Luke; Schunemann, Peter G; Reid, Derryck T

    2016-09-15

    We report a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the new semiconductor gain material orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which enables the production of high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses spanning 5-12 μm with average powers in the few to tens of milliwatts range. This is the first example of a broadband OPO operating across the molecular fingerprint region, and we demonstrate its potential by conducting broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy using water vapor and a polystyrene reference standard. PMID:27628372

  15. Molecular fingerprint-region spectroscopy from 5 to 12 μm using an orientation-patterned gallium phosphide optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, Luke; Schunemann, Peter G.; Reid, Derryck T.

    2016-09-01

    We report a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the new semiconductor gain material orientation patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP), which enables the production of high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulses spanning 5-12 \\mu m with average powers in the few to tens of milliwatts range. This is the first example of a broadband OPO operating across the molecular fingerprint region, and we demonstrate its potential by conducting broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy using water vapor and a polystyrene reference standard.

  16. [Nucleotide polymorphism and molecular evolution of the LRR region in potato late blight resistance gene Rpi-blb2].

    PubMed

    You, Lu-Peng; Miao, Jing; Zou, Ai-Lan; Qi, Jin-Liang; Yang, Yong-Hua

    2012-04-01

    Rpi-blb2, which is originally derived from Solanum bulbocastanum, is a broad-spectrum potato late blight resistance gene and belongs to the NBS-LRR family. Here, the LRR homologues of Rpi-blb2 were cloned with PCR method from 40 potato cultivars (including 20 resistant potato cultivars and 20 susceptible ones) and 7 wild potato populations. Then, the similarities of the sequences, polymorphic (segregating) sites, and nucleotide diversities were estimated by bioinformatic methods. The results showed that high nucleotide polymorphism and some hot-spot mutations existed in the LRR region of Rpi-blb2. The test of Ka/Ks ratio showed that the function of LRR was conserved because of the purifying selection, although different positions of the Rpi-blb2 LRR region were under different selection pressures. Moreover, the LRR region of Rpi-blb2 had no clear differentiation between the cultivated and wild potatoes. PMID:22522166

  17. Serological and molecular survey of toxoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients and hemodialysis patients in Kashan and Qom regions, central Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasti, Sima; Hassanzadeh, Malihe; Soliemani, Alireza; Hooshyar, Hossein; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Abdoli, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the important opportunistic pathogen among solid-organ transplant recipients and hemodialysis patients (HD). This study was aimed to detect toxoplasmosis among 50 renal transplant recipients (RTR), 135 HD and 120 healthy individuals in two cities (Kashan and Qom) that located in the center of Iran, from 2014 to 2015. Serological detection (IgG and IgM antibodies) was performed among all individuals in case and control groups. Molecular detection was performed on all IgM positive individuals or IgG positive with moderate to high (>51 IU/mL) antibody titers in HD (n = 42) and control groups (n = 21). In RTR patients, molecular detection was conducted among all seropositive or seronegative individuals (n = 50). IgG seropositivity was detected in 52% (26/50) of RTR, 63% (85/135) of HD and 33.3% (40/120) of the control group. The rate of anti-T. gondii IgG antibody was significantly elevated in RTR and HD patients than the control group (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively). IgM seropositivity was only detected in one HD patient. T. gondii DNA was detected in 12% (6/50) of RTR and 7.1% (3/42) of HD patients. The results of this study suggested that the screening of toxoplasmosis should be given greater consideration among RTR and hemodialysis patients.

  18. Molecular cloning of the breakpoints of a complex Philadelphia chromosome translocation: identification of a repeated region on chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    McKeithan, T W; Warshawsky, L; Espinosa, R; LeBeau, M M

    1992-01-01

    Complex translocations in chronic myelogenous leukemia involve various chromosomes, in addition to chromosomes 9 and 22, in a nonrandom fashion. We have analyzed the DNA from leukemia cells characterized by a complex translocation, t(9;22;10;17)(q34;q11;p13;q21), by using the techniques of Southern blot hybridization, in situ hybridization, and molecular cloning; one of the breakpoints is at 17q21, a band that is frequently involved in complex 9;22 translocations. All of the breakpoint junctions and the corresponding normal sequences from the four involved chromosomes have been molecularly cloned. Restriction mapping is consistent with a simple concerted exchange of chromosomal material among the four chromosomes, except that additional changes appeared to have occurred within the chromosome 17 sequences. The cloned sequences on chromosome 17 at band q21 were found to be repeated in normal cells. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, a strong signal is seen at 17q21, but a weaker signal is also present at 17q23. By comparison with other primate species, an inversion in chromosome 17 during evolution appears to be responsible for the splitting of the cluster of repeat units in normal human cells. Images PMID:1594595

  19. Molecular cloning and sequence determination of the genomic regions encoding protease and genome-linked protein of three picornaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, G; Rosenwirth, B; Bauer, E; Seifert, J M; Werner, F J; Besemer, J

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the degree of similarity between picornavirus proteases, we cloned the genomic cDNAs of an enterovirus, echovirus 9 (strain Barty), and two rhinoviruses, serotypes 1A and 14LP, and determined the nucleotide sequence of the region which, by analogy to poliovirus, encodes the protease. The nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the genome-linked protein VPg, immediately adjacent to the protease, was also determined. Comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences with other available picornavirus sequences showed remarkable homology in proteases and among VPgs. Three highly conserved peptide regions were identified in the protease; one of these is specific for human picornaviruses and has no obvious counterpart in encephalomyocarditis virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, or cowpea mosaic virus proteases. Within the other two peptide regions two conserved amino acids, Cys 147 and His 161, could be the reactive residues of the active site. We used a statistical method to predict certain features of the secondary structures, such as alpha helices, beta sheets, and turns, and found many of these conformations to be conserved. The hydropathy profiles of the compared proteases were also strikingly similar. Thus, the proteases of human picornaviruses very probably have a similar three-dimensional structure. Images PMID:3512851

  20. A novel mRNA and a low molecular weight polypeptide encoded in the transforming region of adenovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Katze, M G; Persson, H; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation was used to identify adenovirus type 2 (ad2) tumor antigens synthesized in vivo. The antisera, prepared from tumor-bearing animals, reacted with a wide spectrum of ad2 early proteins including a 11 000-dalton (11 K) polypeptide. The gene for this polypeptide was mapped to the transforming region of the viral genome by hybridization selection followed by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. Hybrid arrest translation revealed that the 11 K RNA was transcribed from the leftward reading strand (1-strand) in contrast to other mRNAs from this region. Sucrose gradient analysis of the selected 11 K mRNA revealed that the size of the mRNA was 20S corresponding to approximately 2000 nucleotides. Novel 1-strand transcripts of this length from the transforming region were identified by S1 endonuclease analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that both strands of the transforming region of ad2 DNA are actively transcribed into functional mRNA early after viral infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6985356

  1. Morphological and molecular observations on the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi from the Volga and South Ural regions of Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2010-2012, a survey was conducted to determine the distribution and species diversity of the cereal cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi within the Volga and South Ural regions of the Russian Federation. A total of 270 soil samples were collected. Seven populations of CCN were found in the rhiz...

  2. Classical Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome confirmed molecularly despite normal results using commercially available probes: Redefinition of critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Zackai, E.H.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Spinner, N.

    1994-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome, WHS, (4p-) is a clinically recognized entity where the deletion ranges from one half of the short arm of 4p to being subtle and cytogenetically undetectable. Because such variations do not result in significant differences in the WMS phenotype it has been suggested that them is a critical region involved in the distal portion of chromosome 4, within 4p16.3. This has been recently localized to a 2.5 Mb segment 100-300 kb from the telomere. A cosmid probe, pC847.351, that maps to distal 4p16.3 (locus D4F26) is commercially available for diagnostic use. We present a child with classical feature of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome whose chromosome analyses, including high resolution banding, looking specifically at the 4p region, were normal, and in whom FISH using the commercially available cosmid probe for the 4p16.3 region did not demonstrate a deletion. Insistence on the clinician`s part that the child`s features were classic for WHS prompted further investigation. Four additional cosmid clones distal to the HD gene were tested by FISH on metaphase chromosomes from the proband. Cosmids representing the loci D4S95 and D4S43, which are {approximately}3.5 and 2.5 Mb, Respectively, proximal to D4F26 were present. However, cosmids for the loci D4S98 and FGFR3, which are within 100 kb of each other and {approximately}300 kb distal to D4S43 were deleted. This deletion is the smallest reported to date in a patient with typical WHS. Previous studies of patients both lacking the WHS phenotype and deleted using cosmid probe pC847.351 have suggested that the most distal region (150 kb) of 4p16.3 is not part of the WHS critical region. This is confirmed by our study. Estabrooks` report, together with our case, suggests redefinition of the WHS critical region proximal to D4F26 and distal to D4S43. We caution against ruling out WHS with the above probe since there may be other cases where the most distal region is intact.

  3. Deletion 2q37.3 and autism: molecular cytogenetic mapping of the candidate region for autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lukusa, T; Vermeesch, J R; Holvoet, M; Fryns, J P; Devriendt, K

    2004-01-01

    Fine mapping of deletion regions in autistic patients represents a valuable screening tool for identifying candidate genes for autism. A number of studies have ascertained associations between autism and terminal 2q deletion with the breakpoint within 2q37. Here we describe a 12-year-old female patient with terminal 2q37.3 cryptic deletion and autistic behaviour. Her clinical features included hypotonia and feeding difficulties during infancy, coarse face with notably prominent forehead, prominent eyebrows, broad flat nasal bridge and round cheeks, small hands and feet with bilateral brachymetaphalangism, proximal implantation of the thumbs and short toenails, mild mental retardation and autistic behaviour. Recorded autistic features included early lack of eye contact and, during infancy, little social interactions, propensity to be stereotypically busy and to get anxious. In order to more closely delineate the linkage region for autism within 2q37, the findings in this patient were combined to those in 2 previously reported siblings with a well documented 2q37.3 deletion, but without autistic disorder. The exact size of the deleted segment was determined by mapping the deleted region in each group with a series of specific BAC clones linearly ordered on the 2q37 region. The deletion in the autistic patient appeared to be larger [breakpoint flanked by more centromeric clones RP11-680016 (236.9 Mb) and 201F21 (237.4 Mb)] than in the non autistic siblings [more telomeric clones RP11-205L13 (237.8 Mb) and 346114 (238.2 Mb)], revealing a distance of maximum 1.3 Mb between the breakpoints. Accordingly, the extent of the candidate region for susceptibility genes for autism on distal 2q is reduced to maximum 1.3 Mb. Comparison with another well documented autistic patient from the literature results in the same conclusion. These findings represent thus a further step towards identifying genes predisposing to autism.

  4. Molecular topography of the secondary constriction region (qh) of human chromosome 9 with an unusual euchromatic band

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.S.; Luk, S.; Brennan, J.P.; Mathews, T.; Conte, R.A.; Macera, M.J. )

    1993-05-01

    Heterochromatin confined to pericentromeric (c) and secondary constriction (qh) regions plays a major role in morphological variation of chromosome 9, because of its size and affinity for pericentric inversion. Consequently, pairing at pachytene may lead to some disturbances between homologous chromosomes having such extreme variations and may result in abnormalities involving bands adjacent to the qh region. The authors encountered such a case, where a G-positive band has originated de nova, suggesting a maternal origin from the chromosome 9 that has had a complete pericentric inversion. In previously reported cases, the presence of an extra G-positive band within the 9qh region has been familial, and in the majority of those cases it was not associated with any clinical consequences. Therefore, this anomaly has been referred to as a [open quotes]rare[close quotes] variant. The qh region consists of a mixture of various tandemly repeated DNA sequences, and routine banding techniques have failed to characterize the origin of this extra genetic material. By the chromosome in situ suppression hybridization technique using whole chromosome paint, the probe annealed with the extra G-band, suggesting a euchromatic origin from chromosome 9, presumably band p12. By the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique using alpha- and beta-satellite probes, the dicentric nature was further revealed, supporting the concept of unequal crossing-over during maternal meiosis I, which could account for a duplication of the h region. The G-positive band most likely became genetically inert when it was sandwiched between two blocks of heterochromatin, resulting in a phenotypically normal child. Therefore, an earlier hypothesis, suggesting its origin from heterochromatin through so-called euchromatinization, is refuted here. If the proband's progeny inherit this chromosome, it shall be envisaged as a rare familial variant whose clinical consequences remain obscure. 52 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Molecular clouds in the Carina arm - The largest objects, associated regions of star formation, and the Carina arm in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabelsky, D. A.; Cohen, R. S.; Bronfman, L.; Thaddeus, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Columbia CO survey of the southern Galactic plane is used to identify giant molecular clouds and cloud complexes in the Vela-Carina-Centaurus section of the Galaxy. Twenty-seven giant molecular clouds between l = 270 and 300 deg are catalogued and their heliocentric distances given. In addition, 16 clouds at l greater than 300 deg beyond the solar circle extend the catalog to include the very distant portion of the Carina arm. The most massive clouds in the catalog trace the Carina arm over 23 kpc in the plane of the Galaxy. The average mass of these objects is 1.4 x 10 to the 6th solar, and their average spacing along the arm is 700 pc. The composite distribution projected onto the Galactic plane of the largest molecular clouds in the Carina arm and of similarly massive clouds in the first and second quadrants strongly suggests that the Carina and Sagittarius arms form a single spiral arm about 40 kpc in length wrapping two-thirds of the way around the Galaxy. Descriptions of each cloud, including identification of associated star-forming regions, are presented in an appendix.

  6. SCUBA-Diving In Nearby Molecular Clouds: Large-Area Mapping of Star-Forming Regions at Sub-millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.

    Wide area sub-millimeter mapping of nearby molecular clouds allows for the study of large scale structures such as the Integral Shaped Filament in the Orion A cloud. Examination of these regions suggests that they are not equilibrium isothermal structures but rather require significant, and radially dependent, non-thermal support such as produced by helical magnetic fields Also observed in the large area maps are dense condensations with masses typical for stars. The mass distribution of these clumps is similar to the stellar initial mass function; however, the clumps appear stable against collapse. The clumps are clustered within the cores of molecular clouds and restricted to those locations where the molecular cloud column density is high (A_v > 4). As well, the typical sub-millimeter clump reveals little or no emission from isotopes of CO, likely indicating that the combination of high density and low temperatures within the clumps provides an environment in which these molecules freeze-out onto dust grain surfaces.

  7. [Morphologic and molecular characterization of Phomopsis longicolla(teleomorph unknown: Diaporthales) from tempered and subtropical regions of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Facundo E; Pioli, Rosanna N; Peruzzo, Alejandra M; Formento, Ángela N; Pratta, Guillermo R

    2015-09-01

    Diaporthe (teleomorpho)-Phomopsis - (anamorph) (DP) is a fungal group of great genetic diversity with over 900 species associated to a wide host range that includes cultivated and uncultivated species, forest, fruit trees and weeds. DP isolates are hemibiotrophs and have different sources of primary inoculum as stubble and seeds to restart cycles of parasitism - saprophytism. They colonize host tissues from early plant stages and establish different nutritional relationships, acting as endophytic and necrotrophic fungi. The plasticity of the Phomopsis genus has favored its expansion to different agro-ecosystems and various hosts constituting an epidemiological risk. The objective was to validate the identity and evaluate the biological relationships among 12 isolates of P longicolla and D. phaseolorum var. sojae (anamorph P phaseoli var. sojae) obtained in different tempered and subtropical agro-environments of Argentina, in order to analyze the variability and strategies for preserving fungal biodiversity. Macromorphological attributes (such as texture and color of colonies, stroma shape and distribution, pycnidia and perythecia shape and distribution) and micro-morphological characteristics (such as size and shape of conidia, asci and ascospores) allowed identifying three new isolates as P longicolla. A complementary molecular analysis was also made to overcome the limitations derived from the morphological analysis, thus the AFP.8413 isolate was finally identified as P longicolla. The molecular characterization was useful to identify the evaluated isolates and to group them in four taxa of the Diaporthe-Phomopsis complex: ten isolates were included in P. longicolla, one isolate was included in D. phaseolorum var. sojae (anamorph P. phaseoli var. sojae), one isolate was identified as D. phaseolorum var. caulivora and two isolates were included in D. phaseolorum var. meridionalis. The use of phenotipic and molecular tools have contributed to an accurate

  8. Metabolic and Molecular Changes of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Lines Carrying Different Solanum pennellii Wild Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Maria Manuela; Raiola, Assunta; Docimo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Valentino; Calafiore, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Ferracane, Rosalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum represents an important dietary source of bioactive compounds including the antioxidants flavonoids and phenolic acids. We previously identified two genotypes (IL7-3 and IL12-4) carrying loci from the wild species Solanum pennellii, which increased antioxidants in the fruit. Successively, these lines were crossed and two genotypes carrying both introgressions at the homozygous condition (DHO88 and DHO88-SL) were selected. The amount of total antioxidant compounds was increased in DHOs compared to both ILs and the control genotype M82. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the positive interaction between the two wild regions pyramided in DHO genotypes, detailed analyses of the metabolites accumulated in the fruit were carried out by colorimetric methods and LC/MS/MS. These analyses evidenced a lower content of flavonoids in DHOs and in ILs, compared to M82. By contrast, in the DHOs the relative content of phenolic acids increased, particularly the fraction of hexoses, thus evidencing a redirection of the phenylpropanoid flux toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acid glycosides in these genotypes. In addition, the line DHO88 exhibited a lower content of free phenolic acids compared to M82. Interestingly, the two DHOs analyzed differ in the size of the wild region on chromosome 12. Genes mapping in the introgression regions were further investigated. Several genes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, such as one 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and two UDP-glycosyltransferases in the region 12-4 and one chalcone isomerase and one UDP-glycosyltransferase in the region 7-3. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated a different expression of the detected genes in the ILs and in the DHOs compared to M82. These analyses, combined with biochemical analyses, suggested a central role of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in redirecting the phenylpropanoid pathways toward the biosynthesis of phenolic acids in the pyramided lines

  9. THE ORIGIN OF THE 6.4 keV LINE EMISSION AND H{sub 2} IONIZATION IN THE DIFFUSE MOLECULAR GAS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dogiel, V. A.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Tatischeff, V.; Terrier, R.

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the origin of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission recently detected by Suzaku and the source of H{sub 2} ionization in the diffuse molecular gas of the Galactic center (GC) region. We show that Fe atoms and H{sub 2} molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium of the GC are not ionized by the same particles. The Fe atoms are most likely ionized by X-ray photons emitted by Sgr A* during a previous period of flaring activity of the supermassive black hole. The measured longitudinal intensity distribution of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is best explained if the past activity of Sgr A* lasted at least several hundred years and released a mean 2-100 keV luminosity {approx}> 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. The H{sub 2} molecules of the diffuse gas cannot be ionized by photons from Sgr A*, because soft photons are strongly absorbed in the interstellar gas around the central black hole. The molecular hydrogen in the GC region is most likely ionized by low-energy cosmic rays, probably protons rather than electrons, whose contribution into the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is negligible.

  10. Molecular spectrum of α-globin gene mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey: first observation of three α-globin gene mutations in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Onay, Hüseyin; Aykut, Ayça; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Asude; Solmaz, Aslı Ece; Çoğulu, Özgür; Aydınok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan; Özkınay, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Molecular test results of 231 individuals referred to our molecular genetics laboratory for analysis of α-globin gene mutations between the years 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Analysis of α-thalassemia gene mutations was performed using reverse dot-blot hybridisation, which includes 21 common mutations. Twelve distinct α-thalassemia mutations and 23 different genotypes have been detected in the Aegean region of Turkey. The most frequent mutations were -α3.7 (52.28 %), -(α)20.5 (14.74 %), --MED (10.53 %), and αPA-1α (8.77 %). Three α-thalassemia mutations (αcd142α, --SEA, and αICα), which are more prevalent in Southeast Asia, are identified for the first time in Turkey in this study. We find that a broad spectrum of α-thalassemia mutations is present in the Aegean region of Turkey. The results obtained in this study may help inform decisions in the design and implementation of prevention strategies and diagnostic approaches.

  11. Population Genetics of Jaguars (Panthera onca) in the Brazilian Pantanal: Molecular Evidence for Demographic Connectivity on a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Fernanda Pedone; Haag, Taiana; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Silveira, Leandro; Cavalcanti, Sandra M C; Salzano, Francisco M; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are important threats to carnivores worldwide, and can be especially intense for large predators. Jaguars have already been extirpated from over half of their original area of distribution, and few regions still maintain large populations. For these, detailed understanding is crucial for setting appropriate recovery targets in impacted areas. The Pantanal is among the best examples of a region with a large jaguar population in a healthy environment. Here, we analyzed 12 microsatellite loci to characterize genetic diversity and population structure of 52 jaguars sampled in 4 localities of the southern Pantanal, and compared them with prior studies of heavily fragmented populations of the Atlantic Forest. Although we observed some internal structure among the Pantanal localities, our results indicated that this area comprises a single population with high genetic variability. Moreover, our comparative analyses supported the hypothesis that the strong population structure observed in the Atlantic Forest derives from recent, anthropogenic fragmentation. We also observed significant but low levels of genetic differentiation between the Pantanal and Atlantic Forest populations, indicating recent connectivity between jaguars occurring in these biomes. Evidence for admixture between the Pantanal and a population on the western boundary of the Atlantic Forest corroborates the transitional nature of the latter area, where the jaguar population has already been extirpated. Our results can be used to understand jaguar population dynamics in a region that is less disturbed than the Atlantic forest, and to support the design of conservation strategies that maintain and restore natural connectivity among currently isolated areas.

  12. Molecular characterization of hepatitis A virus isolated from acute gastroenteritis patients in the Seoul region of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, S-H; Kim, E-J; Lee, J-H; Choi, S-S; Kim, M-S; Jung, S-S; Han, G-Y; Yun, H-S; Chun, D-S; Oh, S-S; Kim, H-S

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a major public health problem throughout the world. As a result of declining HAV endemic in Korea, an increasing number of children and adolescents have become susceptible to HAV infection. HAV is related with sanitation conditions of the environment and is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, either through person-to-person contact or by contaminated water and food. The present study has been carried out to determine the phylogenetic analysis and circulating patterns of HAV strains detected from hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the Seoul region of Korea. In total, 2,782 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with AGE collected in October 2006 to September 2007 in Seoul were tested for HAV. A pair comparison of the nucleic acid sequence of a 159-bp base region at the putative VP1/2A junction of 85 Seoul isolates revealed that the most common HAV strain circulating in the region during 2006-2007 was subgenotype IA. HAV phylogenetic studies can provide important information on the genetic characteristics of HAV from AGE patients who may subsequently become the source of infection in Korea.

  13. Population Genetics of Jaguars (Panthera onca) in the Brazilian Pantanal: Molecular Evidence for Demographic Connectivity on a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Fernanda Pedone; Haag, Taiana; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Silveira, Leandro; Cavalcanti, Sandra M C; Salzano, Francisco M; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are important threats to carnivores worldwide, and can be especially intense for large predators. Jaguars have already been extirpated from over half of their original area of distribution, and few regions still maintain large populations. For these, detailed understanding is crucial for setting appropriate recovery targets in impacted areas. The Pantanal is among the best examples of a region with a large jaguar population in a healthy environment. Here, we analyzed 12 microsatellite loci to characterize genetic diversity and population structure of 52 jaguars sampled in 4 localities of the southern Pantanal, and compared them with prior studies of heavily fragmented populations of the Atlantic Forest. Although we observed some internal structure among the Pantanal localities, our results indicated that this area comprises a single population with high genetic variability. Moreover, our comparative analyses supported the hypothesis that the strong population structure observed in the Atlantic Forest derives from recent, anthropogenic fragmentation. We also observed significant but low levels of genetic differentiation between the Pantanal and Atlantic Forest populations, indicating recent connectivity between jaguars occurring in these biomes. Evidence for admixture between the Pantanal and a population on the western boundary of the Atlantic Forest corroborates the transitional nature of the latter area, where the jaguar population has already been extirpated. Our results can be used to understand jaguar population dynamics in a region that is less disturbed than the Atlantic forest, and to support the design of conservation strategies that maintain and restore natural connectivity among currently isolated areas. PMID:26245785

  14. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  15. Molecular dissection of cis-acting regulatory elements from 5'-proximal regions of a vaccinia virus late gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Miner, J N; Weinrich, S L; Hruby, D E

    1988-01-01

    Promoter elements responsible for directing the transcription of six tightly clustered vaccinia virus (VV) late genes (open reading frames [ORFs] D11, D12, D13, A1, A2, and A3) from the HindIII D/A region of the viral genome were identified within the upstream sequences proximal to each individual locus. These regions were identified as promoters by excising them from the VV genome, abutting them to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene, and demonstrating their ability to drive expression of the reporter gene in transient-expression assays in an orientation-specific manner. To delineate the 5' boundary of the upstream elements, two of the VV late gene (A1 and D13) promoter: CAT constructs were subjected to deletion mutagenesis procedures. A series of 5' deletions of the ORF A1 promoter from -114 to -24 showed no reduction in promoter activity, whereas additional deletion of the sequences from -24 to +2 resulted in the complete loss of activity. Deletion of the ORF A1 fragment from -114 to -104 resulted in a 24% increase in activity, suggesting the presence of a negative regulatory region. In marked contrast to previous 5' deletion analyses which have identified VV late promoters as 20- to 30-base-pair cap-proximal sequences, 5' deletions to define the upstream boundary of the ORF D13 promoter identified two positive regulatory regions, the first between -235 and -170 and the second between -123 and -106. Background levels of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression were obtained with deletions past -88. Significantly, this places the ORF D13 regulatory regions within the upstream coding sequences of the ORF A1. A high-stringency computer search for homologies between VV late promoters that have been thus far characterized was carried out. Several potential consensus sequences were found just upstream from RNA start sites of temporally related promoter elements. Three major conclusions are drawn from these experiments. (i) The presence of

  16. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bessonov, Kyrylo; De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence -T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99-) containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90) upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72-S107) with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012). Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the global structure

  17. Molecular cloning and construction of the coding region for human acetylcholinesterase reveals a G + C-rich attenuating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soreq, H.; Ben-Aziz, R.; Prody, C.A.; Seidman, S.; Gnatt, A.; Neville, L.; Lieman-Hurwitz, J.; Lev-Lehman, E.; Ginzberg, D. ); Lapidot-Lifson, Y. Tel Aviv Univ. ); Zakut, H. )

    1990-12-01

    To study the primary structure of human acetylcholinesterase and its gene expression and amplification, cDNA libraries from human tissues expressing oocyte-translatable AcChoEase mRNA were constructed and screened with labeled oligodeoxynucleotide probes. Several cDNA clones were isolated that encoded a polypeptide with {ge}50% identically aligned amino acids to Torpedo AcChoEase and human butyrylcholinesterase. However, these cDNA clones were all truncated within a 300-nucleotide-long G + C-rich region with a predicted pattern of secondary structure having a high Gibbs free energy downstream from the expected 5{prime} end of the coding region. Screening of a genomic DNA library revealed the missing 5{prime} domain. When ligated to the cDNA and constructed into a transcription vector, this sequence encoded a synthetic mRNA translated in microinjected oocytes into catalytically active AcChoEase with marked preference for acetylthiocholine over butyrylthiocholine as a substrate, susceptibility to inhibition by the AcChoEase inhibitor BW284C51, and resistance to the AcChoEase inhibitor tetraisopropylpyrophosphoramide. Blot hybridization of genomic DNA from different individuals carrying amplified AcChoEase genes revealed variable intensities and restriction patterns with probes from the regions upstream and downstream from the predicted G + C-rich structure. Thus, the human AcChoEase gene includes a putative G + C-rich attenuator domain and is subject to structural alterations in cases of AcChoEase gene amplification.

  18. Molecular cloning, SNP detection and association analysis of 5' flanking region of the goat IGF1 gene with prolificacy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Naicy; Venkatachalapathy, Thirupathy; Aravindakshan, Thazhathuveettil; Raghavan, K C

    2016-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 has an important role in reproduction, foetal development and growth. It regulates the secretion of gonadotrophin releasing hormone, stimulates ovarian function and steroidogenesis. The present study was conducted to characterise the 5' flanking region of goat IGF 1 gene, ascertain ovarian expression of the IGF1 gene, detect SNPs and assess the association with prolificacy in the two indigenous goat breeds of South India viz., low prolific Attappady Black and high prolific Malabari. The 5' flanking region of IGF1 gene was PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced from both breeds. Genotyping was performed in 277 goats from the two genetic groups using the PCR-Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP) and the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovary was analysed by quantitative real time PCR. The 5' flanking region of the IGF1 gene was 601 bp long and located at 450 bp upstream of the start codon. Sequence exhibited 97-99% similarity with that of the sheep, cattle and sika deer IGF1 genes. Three genotypes, PP, PQ and QR were observed at this locus with the frequency of 0.62, 0.30 and 0.08, respectively. Sequencing of the representative PCR products from each genotype revealed two SNPs, g.224A>G and g.227C>T. The population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at both loci. Statistical results indicated that these loci were associated with litter size (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant difference was found in the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovaries of the two goat breeds. These results suggest the significant influence of the IGF1 gene on prolificacy in goats and identified SNPs would benefit the selection of prolific animals in future breeding programs. PMID:26852275

  19. Spatiotemporal Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterisation of Infectious Bursal Disease Viruses Based on the VP2 Hyper-Variable Region

    PubMed Central

    Dolz, Roser; Valle, Rosa; Perera, Carmen L.; Bertran, Kateri; Frías, Maria T.; Majó, Natàlia; Ganges, Llilianne; Pérez, Lester J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious and acute viral disease caused by the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV); it affects all major poultry producing areas of the world. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the global phylogeographic dynamics of IBDV strains to gain insight into viral population expansion as well as the emergence, spread and pattern of the geographical structure of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences of the hyper-variable region of the VP2 (HVR-VP2) gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. All sequences were analysed by Bayesian phylogeographic analysis, implemented in the Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis Sampling Trees (BEAST), Bayesian Tip-association Significance testing (BaTS) and Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics (SPREAD) software packages. Selection pressure on the HVR-VP2 was also assessed. The phylogeographic association-trait analysis showed that viruses sampled from individual countries tend to cluster together, suggesting a geographic pattern for IBDV strains. Spatial analysis from this study revealed that strains carrying sequences that were linked to increased virulence of IBDV appeared in Iran in 1981 and spread to Western Europe (Belgium) in 1987, Africa (Egypt) around 1990, East Asia (China and Japan) in 1993, the Caribbean Region (Cuba) by 1995 and South America (Brazil) around 2000. Selection pressure analysis showed that several codons in the HVR-VP2 region were under purifying selection. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this work is the first study applying the Bayesian phylogeographic reconstruction approach to analyse the emergence and spread of vvIBDV strains worldwide. PMID:23805195

  20. Refinement of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Docking to Its Intact Receptor Using Mid-region Photolabile Probes and Molecular Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence J.; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7–36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu141 above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp297 within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region. PMID:21454562

  1. Molecular identification of poisonous mushrooms using nuclear ITS region and peptide toxins: a retrospective study on fatal cases in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Parnmen, Sittiporn; Sikaphan, Sujitra; Leudang, Siriwan; Boonpratuang, Thitiya; Rangsiruji, Achariya; Naksuwankul, Khwanruan

    2016-02-01

    Cases of mushroom poisoning in Thailand have increased annually. During 2008 to 2014, the cases reported to the National Institute of Health included 57 deaths; at least 15 died after ingestion of amanitas, the most common lethal wild mushrooms inhabited. Hence, the aims of this study were to identify mushroom samples from nine clinically reported cases during the 7-year study period based on nuclear ITS sequence data and diagnose lethal peptide toxins using a reversed phase LC-MS method. Nucleotide similarity was identified using BLAST search of the NCBI database and the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). Clade characterization was performed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. Based on BLAST and BOLD reference databases our results yielded high nucleotide similarities of poisonous mushroom samples to A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. Detailed phylogenetic analyses showed that all mushroom samples fall into their current classification. Detection of the peptide toxins revealed the presence of amatoxins and phallotoxins in A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. In addition, toxic α-amanitin was identified in a new provisional species, Amanita sp.1, with the highest toxin quantity. Molecular identification confirmed that the mushrooms ingested by the patients were members of the lethal amanitas in the sections Amanita and Phalloideae. In Thailand, the presence of A. exitialis was reported here for the first time and all three poisonous mushroom species provided new and informative data for clinical studies.

  2. Comparison of Prestellar Core Elongations and Large-scale Molecular Cloud Structures in the Lupus I Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angile, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-08-01

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  3. Comparison of prestellar core elongations and large-scale molecular cloud structures in the Lupus I region

    SciTech Connect

    Poidevin, Frédérick; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angile, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-08-10

    Turbulence and magnetic fields are expected to be important for regulating molecular cloud formation and evolution. However, their effects on sub-parsec to 100 parsec scales, leading to the formation of starless cores, are not well understood. We investigate the prestellar core structure morphologies obtained from analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE 350 μm maps of the Lupus I cloud. This distribution is first compared on a statistical basis to the large-scale shape of the main filament. We find the distribution of the elongation position angle of the cores to be consistent with a random distribution, which means no specific orientation of the morphology of the cores is observed with respect to the mean orientation of the large-scale filament in Lupus I, nor relative to a large-scale bent filament model. This distribution is also compared to the mean orientation of the large-scale magnetic fields probed at 350 μm with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Telescope for Polarimetry during its 2010 campaign. Here again we do not find any correlation between the core morphology distribution and the average orientation of the magnetic fields on parsec scales. Our main conclusion is that the local filament dynamics—including secondary filaments that often run orthogonally to the primary filament—and possibly small-scale variations in the local magnetic field direction, could be the dominant factors for explaining the final orientation of each core.

  4. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  5. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolated from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) crias with diarrhea in the Andean Region of Cusco, Peru.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Antonio E; Lopez, Wellington; Ortega, Nastassja; Chamorro, Marycris J

    2015-10-22

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos), a species of South American camelids (SAC), suffer high morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of alpaca cria mortality in Peru and elsewhere. In order to develop appropriate control and/or treatment, it is necessary to identify infectious pathogens that cause diarrhea in crias. Rotavirus was isolated in cell culture from feces collected from crias with acute diarrhea that tested positive to rotaviral antigen by rapid immunochromatographic methods in an earlier study. The isolates were identified as rotaviruses by RT-PCR run with specific primers for human rotavirus VP7 coding sequences using total RNA extracted from cells displaying cytopathic effects as template. These alpaca isolates were further identified as group A rotaviruses by means of a VP6-specific PCR and were designated as ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3368-10 and ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3386-10. Molecular G and P typing, placed the former as G3/P11 and the latter as G3/P?. Sequence analysis of two genome segments (coding for VP4 and VP7) from the alpaca isolates revealed partial homologies to swine and human rotaviruses, respectively. These results demonstrate that rotaviruses are associated with a proportion of cases of diarrhea in crias, although prevalence and impact remain to be determined. The isolation of rotaviruses from alpaca crias with diarrhea will contribute positively to further understand the pathogen and its role in the diarrhea complex.

  6. Molecular and pathogenic characterization of new Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strains from the coastline region of Fangchenggang city in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Shu-Yan; Zhao, Shuai; Yu, Yan-Hua; Li, Rong-Bai; Duan, Cheng-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2013-04-01

    Virulence assays and DNA polymorphism analyses were used to characterize 33 Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) strains collected from the coastline region of Fangchenggang city in China. Two new pathogenic races (FXP1 and FXP2), were determined by leaf-clipping inoculation of 12 near-isogenic International Rice-Bacterial Blight (IRBB) rice lines, each containing a single resistance gene. Race FXP1 consisted of twenty-eight strains that were incompatible on IRBB5 and IRBB7, while race FXP2 included five strains that were incompatible on IRBB5 and IRBB7 and moderately virulent on IRBB8 containing the xa8 gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis revealed that each probe of avrXa10 and IS1112 resolved two haplotypes. In a dendrogram generated from the combined RFLP data, the 33 Xoo strains were resolved into two clusters. There was a weak correlation (r = 0.53) between race and haplotype. All of the rice cultivars planted in the coastline region of Fangchenggang city were susceptible to the representative Xoo strains tested above. However, we found that four rice cultivars used as breeding materials in the laboratory could fully resist infection by the Xoo strains, suggesting that the isolated Xoo strains could be used to detect resistant rice cultivars suitable for planting in the local rice field.

  7. Molecular analysis of fungal diversity associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-09-01

    The fungal communities associated with three bryophytes species (the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata) in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, were studied using clone library analysis. Fungal communities showed low diversity; the 680 clones belonged to 93 OTUs. Of these, 78 belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, 13 to the phylum Basidiomycota, 1 to the phylum Zygomycota, and 1 to an unknown phylum. Among the OTUs, the most common orders in the Ascomycota were Helotiales (42 OTUs) and Chaetothyriales (14 OTUs) and the most common orders in the Basidiomycota were Sebacinales (3 OTUs) and Platygloeales (3 OTUs). Most OTUs clustered within clades that contained phylotypes identified from samples in Antarctic or Arctic ecosystems or from bryophytes in other ecosystems. In addition, we found that host-related factor may shape the fungal communities associated with bryophytes in this region. This is the first systematic study of the fungal community in Antarctic bryophytes to be performed using culture-independent method and the results may improve understanding of the endophytic fungal evolution and ecology in the Antarctic ecosystem.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies on 3D structures of the hydrophobic region PrP(109-136).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Zhang, Yuanli

    2013-06-01

    Prion diseases, traditionally referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species, manifesting as scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Kulu in humans, etc. These neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (PrP(Sc)). The hydrophobic region PrP(109-136) controls the formation of diseased prions: the normal PrP(113-120) AGAAAAGA palindrome is an inhibitor/blocker of prion diseases and the highly conserved glycine-xxx-glycine motif PrP(119-131) can inhibit the formation of infectious prion proteins in cells. This article gives detailed reviews on the PrP(109-136) region and presents the studies of its three-dimensional structures and structural dynamics. PMID:23563221

  9. Molecular and isotopic compositions and origin of natural gases from Cambrian and Carboniferous-Lower Permian reservoirs of the onshore Polish Baltic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, Maciej J.; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Natural gases from Middle Cambrian and Carboniferous-Lower Permian reservoirs of the onshore Polish Baltic region were studied for their molecular and stable isotope compositions. The following gas species were analysed: 12,13C in CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10 and CO2, 1,2H in CH4, 14,15N in N2, and stable isotopes of all noble gases. Due to significantly different geological settings and genetic types of source rocks of Eastern and Western Pomerania, the molecular and isotopic compositions of natural gases of these two regions exhibit distinct differences. Hydrocarbon gases associated with oil accumulated in the Middle Cambrian reservoir of Eastern Pomerania were generated during low-temperature thermogenic processes from a single source rock containing Type-II kerogen at one phase of petroleum generation. Non-associated hydrocarbon gases accumulated in the Carboniferous (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian)-Lower Permian (Rotliegend) reservoirs of Western Pomerania originated during at least two phases of gas generation by thermogenic processes from mainly Type-III kerogen and a small component of mixed Type-III/II kerogen. Noble gases are in general heavily enriched in radiogenic and nucleogenic isotopes such as 4He, 40Ar and 21Ne accumulated in the reservoirs. Weak contributions of mantle-derived He and Ne are observed. Radiogenic 4He/40Ar ratios are higher than the average production rate ratio of about 5 for radiogenic 4He/40Ar in crustal materials, which might have been caused by a selective supply of 4He that is lighter than 40Ar from crustal rocks, or (U + Th)/K ratio might be higher than the average in crustal block. Carbon dioxide from gases of both the Western and Eastern Pomerania were mainly generated during thermogenic processes of transformation of organic matter, although gases of Western Pomerania can contain an endogenic component. Molecular nitrogen from the Eastern Pomeranian natural gases was mainly generated during low-temperature thermal

  10. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H.

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis delta viruses circulating in the Western Amazon region, North Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) represent important public health problems in the Western Amazon region with reported cases of fulminant hepatitis. This cross sectional study describes HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods HBsAg positive individuals (n = 224) were recruited in Manaus/Amazonas State (130 blood donors from the Hematology and Hemotherapy Foundation from Amazonas/HEMOAM; 60 subjects from outpatient clinic) and in Eirunepe city (n = 34) from 2003–2009. Most participants (n = 153) lived in Manaus, 63 were from 20 remote isolated municipalities, 8 lived outside Amazonas State. Genotyping was based on PCR products: HBV genotype A-F specific primers, restricted length polymorphism for HDV. HDV isolates were directly sequenced (delta antigen 405 nucleotide fragment) and phylogenetic analysis performed (MEGA; neighbor-joining, Kimura’s two parameter). Results Most participants were young adult males and HBV mono-infection predominated (70.5%, 158/224). Among blood donors, outpatient subjects and individuals from Eirunepe, HBV/A prevailed followed by HBV/D and F (p > 0.05). HBV/A was more frequent in blood donors (p < 0.05). HBV-HDV coinfection rate was 8.5% in blood donors (11/130), 65.0% (39/60) in outpatient subjects and 47.0% (16/34) in individuals from Eirunepe. Compared to blood donors, coinfection was higher in outpatient subjects (65.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.0; CI 3.4-7.9; p < 0.0001) and in subjects from Eirunepe (47.0% versus 8.5%; RR = 5.5; CI 3.0-9.9; p < 0.0001). HBV-HDV coinfection rates were higher in patients from highly endemic remote cities. Only HDV genotype 3 was detected, HBV/F-HDV/3 predominated (20/38; 52.7%), followed by HBV/A-HDV/3 (31.6%; 12/38) and HBV/D-HDV/3 (15.8%; 6/38). Conclusions The description of HBV and HDV genotypes circulating in the western Amazon can contribute to a better understanding of their relevance on the

  12. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.; Summers, K.M.; Robinson, T.J.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Wolff, R.; White, R.; Barker, D.F.; Wallace, M.R.; Collins, F.S.; Dobyns, W.B. )

    1989-07-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be <15 kb apart. Three overlapping cosmids spanning >100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region.

  13. Molecular archaeology of Flaviviridae untranslated regions: duplicated RNA structures in the replication enhancer of flaviviruses and pestiviruses emerged via convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, Dmitri J; Jones, Ian M; Gould, Ernest A; Gritsun, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3'UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3'UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3'UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3'UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3'UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs.

  14. Deletion of the gene encoding the adenovirus 5 early region 1b 21,000-molecular-weight polypeptide leads to degradation of viral and host cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Pilder, S; Logan, J; Shenk, T

    1984-01-01

    The adenovirus 5 mutant H5dl337 lacks 146 base pairs within early region 1B. The deletion removes a portion of the region encoding the E1B 21,000-molecular-weight (21K) polypeptide, but does not disturb the E1B-55K/17K coding region. The virus is slightly defective for growth in cultured HeLa cells, in which its final yield is reduced ca. 10-fold compared with wild-type virus. The mutant displays a striking phenotype in HeLa cells. The onset of cytopathic effect is dramatically accelerated, and both host cell and viral DNAs are extensively degraded late after infection. This defect has been described previously for a variety of adenovirus mutants and has been termed a cytocidal (cyt) phenotype. H5dl337 serves to map this defect to the loss of E1B-21K polypeptide function. In addition to its defect in the productive growth cycle, H5dl337 is unable to transform rat cells at normal efficiency. Images PMID:6492257

  15. Molecular Archaeology of Flaviviridae Untranslated Regions: Duplicated RNA Structures in the Replication Enhancer of Flaviviruses and Pestiviruses Emerged via Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gritsun, Dmitri J.; Jones, Ian M.; Gould, Ernest A.; Gritsun, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3′untranslated regions (3′UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3′UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3′UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3′UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3′UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3′UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs. PMID:24647143

  16. Molecular analysis of 24 Alagille syndrome families identifies a single submicroscopic deletion and further localizes the Alagille region within 20p12

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, E.B.; Piccoli, D.A.; Spinner, N.B.

    1995-11-01

    Alagille syndrome (AGS) is a clinically defined disorder characterized by cholestatic liver disease with bile duct paucity, peculiar facies, structural heart defects, vertebral anomalies, and ocular abnormalities. Multiple patients with various cytogenetic abnormalities involving 20p12 have been identified, allowing the assignment of AGS to this region. The presence of interstitial deletions of varying size led to the hypothesis that AGS is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. This molecular analysis of cytogenetically normal AGS patients was performed in order to test this hypothesis and to refine the localization of the known AGS region. Investigation of inheritance of simple tandem repeat polymorphism alleles in 67 members of 24 cytogenetically normal Alagille families led to the identification of a single submicroscopic deletion. The deletion included loci D20S61, D20S41, D20S186, and D20S188 and presumably intervening uninformative loci D20S189 and D20S27. The six deleted loci are contained in a single YAC of 1.9 Mb. The additional finding of multiple unrelated probands who are heterozygous at each locus demonstrates that microdeletions at known loci within the AGS region are rare in cytogenetically normal patients with this disorder. This suggests that the majority of cases of AGS may be the result of a single gene defect rather than a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance in local isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from urinary tract infections in Faisalabad region of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Anam; Naz, Iram; Ashraf, Asma; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Asad-ur; Sarwar, Yasra; Haque, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are one of the foremost causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) among Staphylococci poses serious challenges in antimicrobial therapy for UTIs. Most work has been done on S. aureus while coagulase negative Staphylococci (mainly S. epidermidis) are often neglected. This study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of drug resistance in local S. epidermidis isolates from UTIs. Eighty urine samples were collected from suspected UTIs cases and screened for S. epidermidis. Twenty isolates were suspected as S. epidermidis based on colony morphology and Gram staining. Molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 13 isolates as S. epidermidis. Using disc diffusion method, phenotypic drug resistance of the isolates was observed towards erythromycin (100 %), gentamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline (92.3 %), ampicillin and oxytetracyclin (84.6 %), amikacin and srteptomycin (76.9 %), methicillin (69.2 %), cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin (53.8 %) and vancomycin (15.3 %). Eighteen most commonly reported genes responsible for conferring resistance towards these drugs were targeted by PCR: among these tetM gene was found most prevalent (46.1 %) followed by tetK (30.7 %), aac(6')/aph(2”) (30.7 %), aacA-aphD (23 %), ermA (23 %), blaZ (23 %), mecA (23 %) blaTEM-1 (23 %), MeccA (23 %) and mecA (15.3 %). No gene fragment for vancomycin resistance was detected. The salient finding was that all S. epidermidis isolates were multiple drugs resistant as they showed resistance against at least three structurally different antimicrobial agents. It is concluded that in addition to the mostly used antimicrobial agent vancomycin, the cephalosporins including cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin are also the drugs of choice against UTIs caused by S. epidermidis. PMID:26648821

  18. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance in local isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from urinary tract infections in Faisalabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farid, Anam; Naz, Iram; Ashraf, Asma; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Asad-Ur; Sarwar, Yasra; Haque, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are one of the foremost causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) among Staphylococci poses serious challenges in antimicrobial therapy for UTIs. Most work has been done on S. aureus while coagulase negative Staphylococci (mainly S. epidermidis) are often neglected. This study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of drug resistance in local S. epidermidis isolates from UTIs. Eighty urine samples were collected from suspected UTIs cases and screened for S. epidermidis. Twenty isolates were suspected as S. epidermidis based on colony morphology and Gram staining. Molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 13 isolates as S. epidermidis. Using disc diffusion method, phenotypic drug resistance of the isolates was observed towards erythromycin (100 %), gentamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline (92.3 %), ampicillin and oxytetracyclin (84.6 %), amikacin and srteptomycin (76.9 %), methicillin (69.2 %), cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin (53.8 %) and vancomycin (15.3 %). Eighteen most commonly reported genes responsible for conferring resistance towards these drugs were targeted by PCR: among these tetM gene was found most prevalent (46.1 %) followed by tetK (30.7 %), aac(6')/aph(2") (30.7 %), aacA-aphD (23 %), ermA (23 %), blaZ (23 %), mecA (23 %) blaTEM-1 (23 %), MeccA (23 %) and mecA (15.3 %). No gene fragment for vancomycin resistance was detected. The salient finding was that all S. epidermidis isolates were multiple drugs resistant as they showed resistance against at least three structurally different antimicrobial agents. It is concluded that in addition to the mostly used antimicrobial agent vancomycin, the cephalosporins including cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin are also the drugs of choice against UTIs caused by S. epidermidis.

  19. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance in local isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from urinary tract infections in Faisalabad region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farid, Anam; Naz, Iram; Ashraf, Asma; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Asad-Ur; Sarwar, Yasra; Haque, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are one of the foremost causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans. The emergence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) among Staphylococci poses serious challenges in antimicrobial therapy for UTIs. Most work has been done on S. aureus while coagulase negative Staphylococci (mainly S. epidermidis) are often neglected. This study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of drug resistance in local S. epidermidis isolates from UTIs. Eighty urine samples were collected from suspected UTIs cases and screened for S. epidermidis. Twenty isolates were suspected as S. epidermidis based on colony morphology and Gram staining. Molecular detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 13 isolates as S. epidermidis. Using disc diffusion method, phenotypic drug resistance of the isolates was observed towards erythromycin (100 %), gentamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline (92.3 %), ampicillin and oxytetracyclin (84.6 %), amikacin and srteptomycin (76.9 %), methicillin (69.2 %), cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin (53.8 %) and vancomycin (15.3 %). Eighteen most commonly reported genes responsible for conferring resistance towards these drugs were targeted by PCR: among these tetM gene was found most prevalent (46.1 %) followed by tetK (30.7 %), aac(6')/aph(2") (30.7 %), aacA-aphD (23 %), ermA (23 %), blaZ (23 %), mecA (23 %) blaTEM-1 (23 %), MeccA (23 %) and mecA (15.3 %). No gene fragment for vancomycin resistance was detected. The salient finding was that all S. epidermidis isolates were multiple drugs resistant as they showed resistance against at least three structurally different antimicrobial agents. It is concluded that in addition to the mostly used antimicrobial agent vancomycin, the cephalosporins including cephradine, cefaclor and cefazolin are also the drugs of choice against UTIs caused by S. epidermidis. PMID:26648821

  20. Characterizing Molecular Mechanisms of Imidacloprid Resistance in Select Populations of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in the Central Sands Region of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest in the Central Sands region of Wisconsin. Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has commonly been used for control of L. decemlineata since its registration in 1995. In the last 10 years, many field populations of L. decemlineata have begun to show increasing imidacloprid resistance. We studied resistance phenotype as a phenomenon that reduces neonicotinoid efficacy and has practical consequences for potato pest management. Although we have not observed complete field failure following the use of these products, multiple studies have demonstrated that the lethal concentration to kill 50% of the test organisms (LC50) in different field populations of L. decemlineata varies greatly which may suggest that resistance of L. decemlineata is heritable and involves genetic changes. An important challenge in understanding resistance is assessing the genetic mechanisms associated with resistance and classifying up-regulated genes that may be involved in combating an insecticide insult. In this study we uncovered trends in imidacloprid phenotypic response that have developed in the region by estimating the LC50 values among different field populations against a range of imidacloprid doses. The LC50 values collected in 2008-2011, and more recently in 2013 and 2014, show that some field locations remain susceptible to imidacloprid, while nearby fields (<100km) have developed high levels of resistance. We also sought to uncover potential mechanisms of resistance at each field location. We compiled a transcriptome for populations, characterized as phenotypically 'susceptible' and 'resistant', by isolating mRNA from adult beetles and analyzing gene expression level differences. Strong differences were observed in constituently up and down-regulated genes among different field populations. Most significantly, the up-regulation of 3 cytochrome p450s and a glutathione synthetase related

  1. Characterizing Molecular Mechanisms of Imidacloprid Resistance in Select Populations of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in the Central Sands Region of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest in the Central Sands region of Wisconsin. Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has commonly been used for control of L. decemlineata since its registration in 1995. In the last 10 years, many field populations of L. decemlineata have begun to show increasing imidacloprid resistance. We studied resistance phenotype as a phenomenon that reduces neonicotinoid efficacy and has practical consequences for potato pest management. Although we have not observed complete field failure following the use of these products, multiple studies have demonstrated that the lethal concentration to kill 50% of the test organisms (LC50) in different field populations of L. decemlineata varies greatly which may suggest that resistance of L. decemlineata is heritable and involves genetic changes. An important challenge in understanding resistance is assessing the genetic mechanisms associated with resistance and classifying up-regulated genes that may be involved in combating an insecticide insult. In this study we uncovered trends in imidacloprid phenotypic response that have developed in the region by estimating the LC50 values among different field populations against a range of imidacloprid doses. The LC50 values collected in 2008-2011, and more recently in 2013 and 2014, show that some field locations remain susceptible to imidacloprid, while nearby fields (<100km) have developed high levels of resistance. We also sought to uncover potential mechanisms of resistance at each field location. We compiled a transcriptome for populations, characterized as phenotypically 'susceptible' and 'resistant', by isolating mRNA from adult beetles and analyzing gene expression level differences. Strong differences were observed in constituently up and down-regulated genes among different field populations. Most significantly, the up-regulation of 3 cytochrome p450s and a glutathione synthetase related

  2. Characterizing Molecular Mechanisms of Imidacloprid Resistance in Select Populations of Leptinotarsa decemlineata in the Central Sands Region of Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest in the Central Sands region of Wisconsin. Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, has commonly been used for control of L. decemlineata since its registration in 1995. In the last 10 years, many field populations of L. decemlineata have begun to show increasing imidacloprid resistance. We studied resistance phenotype as a phenomenon that reduces neonicotinoid efficacy and has practical consequences for potato pest management. Although we have not observed complete field failure following the use of these products, multiple studies have demonstrated that the lethal concentration to kill 50% of the test organisms (LC50) in different field populations of L. decemlineata varies greatly which may suggest that resistance of L. decemlineata is heritable and involves genetic changes. An important challenge in understanding resistance is assessing the genetic mechanisms associated with resistance and classifying up-regulated genes that may be involved in combating an insecticide insult. In this study we uncovered trends in imidacloprid phenotypic response that have developed in the region by estimating the LC50 values among different field populations against a range of imidacloprid doses. The LC50 values collected in 2008–2011, and more recently in 2013 and 2014, show that some field locations remain susceptible to imidacloprid, while nearby fields (<100km) have developed high levels of resistance. We also sought to uncover potential mechanisms of resistance at each field location. We compiled a transcriptome for populations, characterized as phenotypically ‘susceptible’ and ‘resistant’, by isolating mRNA from adult beetles and analyzing gene expression level differences. Strong differences were observed in constituently up and down-regulated genes among different field populations. Most significantly, the up-regulation of 3 cytochrome p450s and a glutathione synthetase

  3. Chagas' disease in Aboriginal and Creole communities from the Gran Chaco Region of Argentina: Seroprevalence and molecular parasitological characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucero, R H; Brusés, B L; Cura, C I; Formichelli, L B; Juiz, N; Fernández, G J; Bisio, M; Deluca, G D; Besuschio, S; Hernández, D O; Schijman, A G

    2016-07-01

    Most indigenous ethnias from Northern Argentina live in rural areas of "the Gran Chaco" region, where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. Serological and parasitological features have been poorly characterized in Aboriginal populations and scarce information exist regarding relevant T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU) and parasitic loads. This study was focused to characterize T. cruzi infection in Qom, Mocoit, Pit'laxá and Wichi ethnias (N=604) and Creole communities (N=257) inhabiting rural villages from two highly endemic provinces of the Argentinean Gran Chaco. DNA extracted using Hexadecyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide reagent from peripheral blood samples was used for conventional PCR targeted to parasite kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA) and identification of DTUs using nuclear genomic markers. In kDNA-PCR positive samples from three rural Aboriginal communities of "Monte Impenetrable Chaqueño", minicircle signatures were characterized by Low stringency single primer-PCR and parasitic loads calculated using Real-Time PCR. Seroprevalence was higher in Aboriginal (47.98%) than in Creole (27.23%) rural communities (Chi square, p=4.e(-8)). A low seroprevalence (4.3%) was detected in a Qom settlement at the suburbs of Resistencia city (Fisher Exact test, p=2.e(-21)).The kDNA-PCR positivity was 42.15% in Aboriginal communities and 65.71% in Creole populations (Chi square, p=5.e(-4)). Among Aboriginal communities kDNA-PCR positivity was heterogeneous (Chi square, p=1.e(-4)). Highest kDNA-PCR positivity (79%) was detected in the Qom community of Colonia Aborigen and the lowest PCR positivity in two different surveys at the Wichi community of Misión Nueva Pompeya (33.3% in 2010 and 20.8% in 2014). TcV (or TcII/V/VI) was predominant in both Aboriginal and Creole communities, in agreement with DTU distribution reported for the region. Besides, two subjects were infected with TcVI, one with TcI and four presented mixed infections of TcV plus TcII/VI. Most minicircle signatures

  4. Loss of the Y chromosome PAR2 region and additional rearrangements in two familial cases of satellited Y chromosomes: cytogenetic and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Velissariou, V; Sismani, C; Christopoulou, S; Kaminopetros, P; Hatzaki, A; Evangelidou, P; Koumbaris, G; Bartsocas, C S; Stylianidou, G; Skordis, N; Diakoumakos, A; Patsalis, P C

    2007-01-01

    Two cases of rare structural aberrations of the Y chromosome were detected: a del(Y) (q12) chromosome in a child with mild dysmorphic features, obesity and psychomotor delay, and two identical satellited Y chromosomes (Yqs) in a normal twin, which were originally observed during routine prenatal diagnosis. In both cases a Yqs chromosome was detected in the father which had arisen from a reciprocal translocation involving the short arm of chromosome 15 and the heterochromatin of the long arm of the Y chromosome (Yqh). Cytogenetic and molecular studies demonstrated that in the reciprocal product of chromosomes 15 and Y PAR2 could not be detected, showing that PAR2 had been deleted. It is discussed whether the translocation of the short arm of an acrocentric chromosome to the heterochromatin of the long arm of the Y chromosome causes instability of this region which results either in loss of genetic material or interference with the normal mechanism of disjunction.

  5. Clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii complex in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Yang, Chih-Man; Lin, Chung-Hui; Huang, Mei-Luan; Tu, Chi-Chao; Liou, Ming-Li

    2009-11-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan to investigate the clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii (MDR Acb) complex. Case patients had higher mortality than controls did. MDR Acb complex acquisition risk factors include longer hospital stays, higher ratio of nasogastric tube and Foley catheter use, and more carbapenem use. All available isolates were divided into 36 subtypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The proportion of the same subtypes with their appearance within 1 and 2 months was 62.5% and 87.5%, respectively. We concluded that many different MDR Acb complex clones could be found in a hospital and that the same clones often spread on a small scale within a short period of time if no outbreaks noted.

  6. Molecular identification of isolated fungi from unopened containers of greek yogurt by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-06-25

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  7. Molecular structures that influence the immunomodulatory properties of the lipid A and inner core region oligosaccharides of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, P J; Hraba, T; Taylor, C E; Stashak, P W; Fauntleroy, M B; Zähringer, U; Takayama, K; Sievert, T R; Hronowski, X; Cotter, R J

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between chain length as well as the position of fatty acyl groups to the ability of lipid A to abolish the expression of suppressor T-cell (Ts) activity was examined. Fatty acyl chain lengths of C12 to C14, as in the lipid A of Escherichia coli and Salmonella minnesota, appear to be optimal for this bioactivity, since lipid A preparations with fatty acyl groups of relatively short chain length (C10 to C12 for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum) or predominantly long chain length (C18 for Helicobacter pylori) are without effect. The presence of an acyloxyacyl group of appropriate chain length at the 3' position of the glucosamine disaccharide backbone of lipid A also plays a decisive role. By contrast, the lipid A proximal inner core region oligosaccharides of some bacterial lipopolysaccharides increase the expression of Ts activity; this is due mainly to the capacity of such oligosaccharides, which are relatively conserved in structure among gram-negative bacteria, to enlarge or expand upon the population of CD8+ Ts generated during the course of a normal antibody response to unrelated microbial antigens. The minimal structure required for the expression of the added immunosuppression observed appears to be a hexasaccharide containing one 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate residue, two glucose residues, and three heptose residues to which are attached two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups. The relevance of these findings to virulence and to the pathogenesis of gram-negative infections is discussed. PMID:8188347

  8. Molecular properties of a matrix attachment region-binding protein located in the nucleoli of tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shiori; Matsuda, Nao; Sato, Tomohiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2002-12-01

    We cloned a cDNA for matrix-attachment region (MAR)-binding protein from Nicotiana tabacum cells to elucidate the structure and function of the nuclear matrix. The cDNA encodes a protein of 555 amino acids (61,050 Da) with an isoelectric point of 9.4. We named the protein NtMARBP61. The sequence is 45% identical to yeast Nop58p, which is involved in rRNA processing. The C-terminal part is unique and rich in lysine residues. The recombinant C-terminal part had the ability to bind double-stranded DNAs of 12 tobacco MARs. The intracellular localization was determined to be in the nucleolus by fluorescent microscopy using the antibody to the recombinant NtMARBP61. The mRNA level was high in the lag and early-log phases of cultured cells but low in the stationary phase. The protein was accumulated only in the middle- and late-log phases, suggesting that NtMARBP61 is essential for growing cells. The results suggest at least the structural and regulatory function of NtMARBP61 in the nucleolus as a MAR-binding protein in a growth-stage specific manner.

  9. Prevalence and Molecular Characterisation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli in Raw Milk Cheeses from Lazio Region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Paola; Lovari, Sarah; Condoleo, Roberto; Bilei, Stefano; Marcianò, Rita; Mezher, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of foodborne diseases caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has increased globally. For this reason, within the specific regional control plan for the detection of STEC in food products in Italy, the presence of STEC in unpasteurised milk cheeses was investigated. In total, 203 samples obtained from March 2011 to December 2013 were analysed, with two standard methods (ISO 16654:2001 and ISO 13136:2012). Two strains of E. coli O157 were isolated (2/161, 1.2%) but did not carry any virulence-associated genes and 22 stx-positive samples (22/146, 15.1%) were detected in enrichment cultures, mostly from ovine cheeses. Only two strains isolated from different ovine cheeses carried stx gene and none of these was eae-positive. This study confirms the presence of stx-positive E. coli and suggests that this type of food cannot be excluded as a potential vehicle of STEC. PMID:27800426

  10. Molecular properties of a matrix attachment region-binding protein located in the nucleoli of tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shiori; Matsuda, Nao; Sato, Tomohiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2002-12-01

    We cloned a cDNA for matrix-attachment region (MAR)-binding protein from Nicotiana tabacum cells to elucidate the structure and function of the nuclear matrix. The cDNA encodes a protein of 555 amino acids (61,050 Da) with an isoelectric point of 9.4. We named the protein NtMARBP61. The sequence is 45% identical to yeast Nop58p, which is involved in rRNA processing. The C-terminal part is unique and rich in lysine residues. The recombinant C-terminal part had the ability to bind double-stranded DNAs of 12 tobacco MARs. The intracellular localization was determined to be in the nucleolus by fluorescent microscopy using the antibody to the recombinant NtMARBP61. The mRNA level was high in the lag and early-log phases of cultured cells but low in the stationary phase. The protein was accumulated only in the middle- and late-log phases, suggesting that NtMARBP61 is essential for growing cells. The results suggest at least the structural and regulatory function of NtMARBP61 in the nucleolus as a MAR-binding protein in a growth-stage specific manner. PMID:12514253

  11. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  12. Molecular authentication of Panax ginseng and ginseng products using robust SNP markers in ribosomal external transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Kim, Min-Kyeoung; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Jin, Haizhu; Liang, Zhiqi; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2011-07-15

    Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius are the most widely used Panax species, but they are known to have different properties and medicinal values. The aim of this study is to develop a robust and accurate DNA marker for identifying P. ginseng and the origins of ginseng products. Two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites specific to P. ginseng were exploited from nuclear ribosomal external transcribed spacer (ETS) region. Based on the SNP sites, two specific primers were designed for P. ginseng and P. quinquefolius respectively. P. ginseng can be easily discriminated from P. quinquefolius by amplifying the two specific alleles using multiplex allele-specific PCR. Favorable results can also be obtained from commercial ginseng products. The established method is highly sensitive and can detect 1% of intentional adulteration of P. quinquefolius into P. ginseng down to the 0.1ng level of total DNA. Therefore this study provides a reliable and simple DNA method for authentication of the origins and purities of ginseng products.

  13. Molecular typing of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated in Abruzzo region (Italy) from 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Alessiani, Alessandra; Sacchini, Lorena; Pontieri, Eugenio; Gavini, Jacopo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 47 antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) were characterised, including 15 monophasic variants 1, 4, [5], 12:i:-, (STm) isolated from different matrices. They were all selected from 389 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains isolated during 2008-2010 in Abruzzo region (Italy). Thirty-seven strains showed to be resistant to more than 1 antibiotic. Among 47 isolates, phage type U311 and DT104 were identified. The ASSuT resistance pattern was predominant in mST strains and ACSSuT in ST DT104 and U302. A multiplex Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method was used to investigate 4 genes: fluorfenicol (floSt), virulence (spvC), invasine (invA) and integrase (int). All ST the strain were positive for invA gene and 28,32% of strains were positive for spvC gene. PFGE analysis revealed a large number of small clonal populations, however not ascrivable to outbreaks.

  14. Cholecystokinin in White Sea Bream: Molecular Cloning, Regional Expression, and Immunohistochemical Localization in the Gut after Feeding and Fasting

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascola, Angela; Guerrera, M. Cristina; Levanti, M. Beatrice; Germanà, Antonino; Muglia, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), secreted by the midgut, plays a key role in digestive physiology of vertebrates including teleosts, by stimulating pancreatic secretion, gut motility, and gallbladder contraction, as well as by delaying gastric emptying. Moreover, CCK is involved in the regulation of food intake and satiation. Secretion of CCK by the hindgut is controversial, and its biological activity remains to be elucidated. The present paper addresses the regional distribution of intestinal CCK in the white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, as well as the possible involvement of hindgut CCK in digestive processes. Methodology/Principal Findings Full-lengths mRNAs encoding two CCK isoforms (CCK-1 and CCK-2) were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. CCK gene and protein expression levels in the different gut segments were measured 3 h and 72 h after feeding, by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Moreover, endocrine CCK cells were immunoistochemically detected. Fasting induced a significant decrease in CCK-2 in all intestinal segments, including the hindgut. On the other hand, no significant difference was induced by fasting on hindgut CCK-1. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated two CCK isoforms in the hindgut of D.sargus, one of which (CCK-2) may be involved in the feedback control of uncompleted digestive processes. On the other hand, a functional role alternative to regulation of digestive processes may be inferred for D.sargus CCK-1, since its expression was unaffected by feeding or fasting. PMID:23285038

  15. Molecular tracking of mountain lions in the Yosemite valley region in California: genetic analysis using microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ernest, H B; Penedo, M C; May, B P; Syvanen, M; Boyce, W M

    2000-04-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were characterized in California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and sufficient polymorphism was found to uniquely genotype 62 animals sampled at necropsy. Microsatellite genotypes obtained using mountain lion faecal DNA matched those from muscle for all of 15 individuals examined. DNA from potential prey species and animals whose faeces could be misidentified as mountain lion faeces were reliably distinguished from mountain lions using this microsatellite panel. In a field application of this technique, 32 faecal samples were collected from hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley region where seven mountain lions previously had been captured, sampled, and released. Twelve samples yielded characteristic mountain lion genotypes, three displayed bobcat-type genotypes, and 17 did not amplify. The genotype of one of the 12 mountain lion faecal samples was identical to one of the mountain lions that previously had been captured. Three of the 12 faecal samples yielded identical genotypes, and eight new genotypes were detected in the remaining samples. This analysis provided a minimum estimate of 16 mountain lions (seven identified by capture and nine identified by faecal DNA) living in or travelling through Yosemite Valley from March 1997 to August 1998. Match probabilities (probabilities that identical DNA genotypes would be drawn at random a second time from the population) indicated that the samples with identical genotypes probably came from the same mountain lion. Our results demonstrate that faecal DNA analysis is an effective method for detecting and identifying individual mountain lions. PMID:10736046

  16. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  17. In situ study of the impact of inter- and intra-reader variability on region of interest (ROI) analysis in preclinical molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Frezghi; Budhiraja, Shradha; Keren, Shay; Doyle, Timothy C; Levin, Craig S; Paik, David S

    2013-01-01

    We estimated reader-dependent variability of region of interest (ROI) analysis and evaluated its impact on preclinical quantitative molecular imaging. To estimate reader variability, we used five independent image datasets acquired each using microPET and multispectral fluorescence imaging (MSFI). We also selected ten experienced researchers who utilize molecular imaging in the same environment that they typically perform their own studies. Nine investigators blinded to the data type completed the ROI analysis by drawing ROIs manually that delineate the tumor regions to the best of their knowledge and repeated the measurements three times, non-consecutively. Extracted mean intensities of voxels within each ROI are used to compute the coefficient of variation (CV) and characterize the inter- and intra-reader variability. The impact of variability was assessed through random samples iterated from normal distributions for control and experimental groups on hypothesis testing and computing statistical power by varying subject size, measured difference between groups and CV. The results indicate that inter-reader variability was 22.5% for microPET and 72.2% for MSFI. Additionally, mean intra-reader variability was 10.1% for microPET and 26.4% for MSFI. Repeated statistical testing showed that a total variability of CV < 50% may be needed to detect differences < 50% between experimental and control groups when six subjects (n = 6) or more are used and statistical power is adequate (80%). Surprisingly high variability has been observed mainly due to differences in the ROI placement and geometry drawn between readers, which may adversely affect statistical power and erroneously lead to negative study outcomes. PMID:23526701

  18. Molecular Epidemiology over an 11-Year Period (2000 to 2010) of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Bacteremia in a Centralized Canadian Region

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Gisele; van der Bij, Akke K.; Gregson, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    A study was designed to assess the importance of sequence types among extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates causing bacteremia over an 11-year period (2000 to 2010) in a centralized Canadian region. A total of 197 patients with incident infections were identified; the majority presented with community-onset urosepsis, with a significant increase in the prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli during the later part of the study. The majority of E. coli isolates produced either CTX-M-15 or CTX-M-14. We identified 7 different major sequence types among 91% of isolates (i.e., the ST10 clonal complex, ST38, ST131, ST315, ST393, ST405, and ST648) and provided insight into their clinical and molecular characteristics. ST38 was the most antimicrobial-susceptible sequence type and predominated during 2000 to 2004 but disappeared after 2008. ST131 was the most antimicrobial-resistant sequence type, and the influx of a single pulsotype of this sequence type was responsible for the significant increase of ESBL-producing E. coli strains since 2007. During 2010, 49/63 (78%) of the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates belonged to ST131, and this sequence type had established itself as a major drug-resistant pathogen in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, posing an important new public health threat within our region. We urgently need well-designed epidemiological and molecular studies to understand the dynamics of transmission, risk factors, and reservoirs for E. coli ST131. This will provide insight into the emergence and spread of this multiresistant sequence type. PMID:22162555

  19. Development of molecular markers, based on chloroplast and ribosomal DNA regions, to discriminate three popular medicinal plant species, Cynanchum wilfordii, Cynanchum auriculatum, and Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun-Heui; Cho, KyeMan; Goo, YoungMin; Kim, ManBae; Shin, Young-Wook; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Identification of plant species is important for standardizing herbal medicine. Cynanchum wilfordii (Baekshuoh in Korean) and Polygonum multiflorum (Hashuoh in Korean) are important oriental medicinal herbs in Korea, Japan, and China. Cynanchum auriculatum is a faster growing and more productive plant than C. wilfordii; and, it is not recognized as a medicinal plant in the Korean Pharmacopoeia. C. wilfordii, P. multiflorum, and C. auriculatum are often misidentified in the Korean herbal medicine marketplace due to their morphological similarities and similar names. In this study, we investigated molecular authentication of these three medicinal plants using DNA sequences in the TrnL-F chloroplast intergenic region. Specific species identification was achieved by detecting allelic variations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and high resolution melting curve analysis. Our results demonstrate that the intraspecific genetic distance between C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum is relatively low. We also developed a quantitative PCR assay using species-specific TrnL-F primers, which allowed us to estimate the ratio of C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum using varying ratios of mixed genomic DNA template from the two species. Additionally, to identify species in hybrid plants produced by cross-fertilization, we analyzed nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions in C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum by ARMS-PCR. Our results indicate that SNP-based molecular markers, usable to barcode tools could provide efficient and rapid authentication of these closely related medicinal plant species, and will be useful for preventing the distribution of products contaminated with adulterants. PMID:26902862

  20. Molecular Analysis of Echinostome Metacercariae from Their Second Intermediate Host Found in a Localised Geographic Region Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity and Possible Cryptic Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Noikong, Waraporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Chai, Jong-Yil; Saenphet, Supap; Trudgett, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Echinostome metacercariae are the infective stage for humans and animals. The identification of echinostomes has been based until recently on morphology but molecular techniques using sequences of ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial DNA have indicated major clades within the group. In this study we have used the ITS2 region of ribosomal RNA and the ND1 region of mitochondrial DNA to identify metacercariae from snails collected from eight well-separated sites from an area of 4000 km2 in Lamphun Province, Thailand. The derived sequences have been compared to those collected from elsewhere and have been deposited in the nucleotide databases. There were two aims of this study; firstly, to determine the species of echinostome present in an endemic area, and secondly, to assess the intra-specific genetic diversity, as this may be informative with regard to the potential for the development of anthelmintic resistance and with regard to the spread of infection by the definitive hosts. Our results indicate that the most prevalent species are most closely related to E. revolutum, E. trivolvis, E. robustum, E. malayanum and Euparyphium albuferensis. Some sites harbour several species and within a site there could be considerable intra-species genetic diversity. There is no significant geographical structuring within this area. Although the molecular techniques used in this study allowed the assignment of the samples to clades within defined species, however, within these groupings there were significant differences indicating that cryptic speciation may have occurred. The degree of genetic diversity present would suggest the use of targeted regimes designed to minimise the selection of anthelmintic resistance. The apparent lack of geographic structuring is consistent with the transmission of the parasites by the avian hosts. PMID:24699358

  1. In situ study of the impact of inter- and intra-reader variability on region of interest (ROI) analysis in preclinical molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Habte, Frezghi; Budhiraja, Shradha; Keren, Shay; Doyle, Timothy C; Levin, Craig S; Paik, David S

    2013-01-01

    We estimated reader-dependent variability of region of interest (ROI) analysis and evaluated its impact on preclinical quantitative molecular imaging. To estimate reader variability, we used five independent image datasets acquired each using microPET and multispectral fluorescence imaging (MSFI). We also selected ten experienced researchers who utilize molecular imaging in the same environment that they typically perform their own studies. Nine investigators blinded to the data type completed the ROI analysis by drawing ROIs manually that delineate the tumor regions to the best of their knowledge and repeated the measurements three times, non-consecutively. Extracted mean intensities of voxels within each ROI are used to compute the coefficient of variation (CV) and characterize the inter- and intra-reader variability. The impact of variability was assessed through random samples iterated from normal distributions for control and experimental groups on hypothesis testing and computing statistical power by varying subject size, measured difference between groups and CV. The results indicate that inter-reader variability was 22.5% for microPET and 72.2% for MSFI. Additionally, mean intra-reader variability was 10.1% for microPET and 26.4% for MSFI. Repeated statistical testing showed that a total variability of CV < 50% may be needed to detect differences < 50% between experimental and control groups when six subjects (n = 6) or more are used and statistical power is adequate (80%). Surprisingly high variability has been observed mainly due to differences in the ROI placement and geometry drawn between readers, which may adversely affect statistical power and erroneously lead to negative study outcomes. PMID:23526701

  2. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 13q33-34 region and molecular analysis of ING1 and p53 genes in bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Arslan, Ahmet; Erturhan, Sakip; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Pala, Elif; Gogebakan, Bulent; Karakok, Metin; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Cengiz, Beyhan

    2015-02-01

    Cancer is a consequence of accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in the cell which can lead to activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Since members of ING family were discovered as TSGs in different cancer types, it was aimed to analyze the chromosome 13q33-34 region, ING1 and p53 genes in bladder cancer. 30 paired normal and tumor tissues were investigated in terms of microdeletion of chromosome 13q33-34 region, ING1 expression and mutation status of ING1 and p53 genes. Because there is no data available about the transcription factors which bind to ING1 promoter, the promoter sequence was analyzed via Genomatix-MatInspector and TFSEARCH softwares. Used DS markers were D13S285, D13S1315, D13S796, D13S278, D13S158, and D13S779 where loss of heterozygosity (LOH) results were as 23.3, 20, 6.7, 3.3, 6.7, and 0 %, respectively. The highest LOH scores were obtained with markers D13S285 and D13S1315 which are flanking the ING1. Seven of 30 cases showed alteration in expression (p > 0.05). However, no mutation was detected in the exons of ING1. One patient showed a two-nucleotide deletion in p53 gene. However no significant TSG activity of ING1 was observed while higher activity was reported in different cancer types. As for the LOH data 13q33-34 region may contain different candidate TSGs like COL4A1, COL4A2 and SOX1. As a result of computational promoter analysis, some factors like ABL, E2F, HIF1, SOX, P53, BPTF, NRSF, c-Rel and c-ETS were associated with the promoter region. Molecular analysis of ING1 promoter warrants further analysis.

  3. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment—EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  4. First External Quality Assessment of Molecular and Serological Detection of Rift Valley Fever in the Western Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Doumbia, Baba; Madani, Hafsa; El Mellouli, Fatiha; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Sghaier, Soufien; Marianneau, Philippe; Cetre-Sossah, Catherine; Polci, Andrea; Lacote, Sandra; Lakhdar, Magtouf; Fernandez-Pinero, Jovita; Sari Nassim, Chabane; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Gallardo, Carmina; Bouzid, Taoufiq; Conte, Annamaria; Bortone, Grazia; Savini, Giovanni; Petrini, Antonio; Puech, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis which affects humans and a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants. The large spread of RVF in Africa and its potential to emerge beyond its geographic range requires the development of surveillance strategies to promptly detect the disease outbreaks in order to implement efficient control measures, which could prevent the widespread of the virus to humans. The Animal Health Mediterranean Network (REMESA) linking some Northern African countries as Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia with Southern European ones as France, Italy, Portugal and Spain aims at improving the animal health in the Western Mediterranean Region since 2009. In this context, a first assessment of the diagnostic capacities of the laboratories involved in the RVF surveillance was performed. The first proficiency testing (external quality assessment--EQA) for the detection of the viral genome and antibodies of RVF virus (RVFV) was carried out from October 2013 to February 2014. Ten laboratories participated from 6 different countries (4 from North Africa and 2 from Europe). Six laboratories participated in the ring trial for both viral RNA and antibodies detection methods, while four laboratories participated exclusively in the antibodies detection ring trial. For the EQA targeting the viral RNA detection methods 5 out of 6 laboratories reported 100% of correct results. One laboratory misidentified 2 positive samples as negative and 3 positive samples as doubtful indicating a need for corrective actions. For the EQA targeting IgG and IgM antibodies methods 9 out of the 10 laboratories reported 100% of correct results, whilst one laboratory reported all correct results except one false-positive. These two ring trials provide evidence that most of the participating laboratories are capable to detect RVF antibodies and viral RNA thus recognizing RVF infection in affected ruminants with the diagnostic methods currently

  5. Molecular line survey of the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334I with Herschel/HIFI and the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernickel, A.; Schilke, P.; Schmiedeke, A.; Lis, D. C.; Brogan, C. L.; Ceccarelli, C.; Comito, C.; Emprechtinger, M.; Hunter, T. R.; Möller, T.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: We aim at deriving the molecular abundances and temperatures of the hot molecular cores in the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334I and consequently deriving their physical and astrochemical conditions. Methods: In the framework of the Herschel guaranteed time key program CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions), NGC 6334I is investigated by using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. A spectral line survey is carried out in the frequency range 480-1907 GHz, and further auxiliary interferometric data from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in the 230 GHz band provide spatial information for disentangling the different physical components contributing to the HIFI spectrum. The spectral lines in the processed Herschel data are identified with the aid of former surveys and spectral line catalogs. The observed spectrum is then compared to a simulated synthetic spectrum, assuming local thermal equilibrium, and best fit parameters are derived using a model optimization package. Results: A total of 46 molecules are identified, with 31 isotopologues, resulting in about 4300 emission and absorption lines. High-energy levels (Eu > 1000 K) of the dominant emitter methanol and vibrationally excited HCN (ν2 = 1) are detected. The number of unidentified lines remains low with 75, or <2% of the lines detected. The modeling suggests that several spectral features need two or more components to be fitted properly. Other components could be assigned to cold foreground clouds or to outflows, most visible in the SiO and H2O emission. A chemical variation between the two embedded hot cores is found, with more N-bearing molecules identified in SMA1 and O-bearing molecules in SMA2. Conclusions: Spectral line surveys give powerful insights into the study of the interstellar medium. Different molecules trace different physical conditions like the inner hot core, the envelope, the outflows or the cold foreground

  6. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, Lukáš; Petrtýl, Miloslav; Chaloupková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The headwaters of five large African river basins flow through the Bié Plateau in Angola and still remain faunistically largely unexplored. We investigated fish fauna from the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi river systems from central Angola. We reconstructed molecular phylogenies of the most common cichlid species from the region, Tilapia sparrmanii and Serranochromis macrocephalus, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We found evidence for ichthyofaunal contact and gene flow between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi watersheds in the Bié Plateau in central Angola. Waterfalls and rapids also appeared to restrict genetic exchange among populations within the Cuanza basin. Further, we found that the Angolan Serranochromis cichlid fishes represent a monophyletic lineage with respect to other haplochromines, including the serranochromines from the Congo and Zambezi rivers. This study represents an important initial step in a biodiversity survey of this extremely poorly explored region, as well as giving further understanding to species distributions and gene flow both between and within river basins. PMID:23724120

  7. In situ mask designed for selective growth of InAs quantum dots in narrow regions developed for molecular beam epitaxy system

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yusui; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Asakawa, Kiyoshi

    2007-07-15

    We have developed an in situ mask that enables the selective formation of molecular beam epitaxially grown layers in narrow regions. This mask can be fitted to a sample holder and removed in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment; thus, device structures can be fabricated without exposing the sample surfaces to air. Moreover, this mask enables the observation of reflection high-energy electron diffraction during growth with the mask positioned on the sample holder and provides for the formation of marker layers for ensuring alignment in the processes following the selective growth. To explore the effectiveness of the proposed in situ mask, we used it to grow quantum dot (QD) structures in narrow regions and verified the perfect selectivity of the QD growth. The grown QDs exhibited high optical quality with a photoluminescence peak at approximately 1.30 {mu}m and a linewidth of 30 meV at room temperature. The proposed technique can be applied for the integration of microstructures into optoelectronic functional devices.

  8. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, Lukáš; Petrtýl, Miloslav; Chaloupková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The headwaters of five large African river basins flow through the Bié Plateau in Angola and still remain faunistically largely unexplored. We investigated fish fauna from the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi river systems from central Angola. We reconstructed molecular phylogenies of the most common cichlid species from the region, Tilapia sparrmanii and Serranochromis macrocephalus, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We found evidence for ichthyofaunal contact and gene flow between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi watersheds in the Bié Plateau in central Angola. Waterfalls and rapids also appeared to restrict genetic exchange among populations within the Cuanza basin. Further, we found that the Angolan Serranochromis cichlid fishes represent a monophyletic lineage with respect to other haplochromines, including the serranochromines from the Congo and Zambezi rivers. This study represents an important initial step in a biodiversity survey of this extremely poorly explored region, as well as giving further understanding to species distributions and gene flow both between and within river basins.

  9. Functional and molecular characterization of the transcriptional regulatory region of Tcp-10bt, a testes-expressed gene from the t complex responder locus.

    PubMed

    Ewulonu, U K; Buratynski, T J; Schimenti, J C

    1993-01-01

    Mouse t haplotypes contain several mutant alleles that disrupt spermatogenesis. Their phenotypes include sterility, reduced fertility and transmission ratio distortion (TRD). The substantial genetic analyses of these mutant alleles, coupled with intensive physical characterization of the t complex, provides a fertile ground for identifying and understanding genes essential to male gametogenesis. The t complex responder (Tcr) locus plays a central role in this process, interacting with other t haplotype-encoded genes to mediate TRD. A candidate responder gene, Tcp-10bt, has been cloned and subjected to molecular characterization. Here, we define the transcriptional regulatory regions of this gene in transgenic mice. A 1.6 kb (but not 0.6 kb) DNA fragment upstream of the transcription start site contains all the regulatory signals for appropriate temporal and germ cell-specific expression of this gene. Two smaller fragments within this region bound specifically to nuclear factor(s) from germ cell protein extracts in gel shift assays. This work is a step towards understanding the mechanism of Tcp-10bt regulated expression and may ultimately help reveal a common regulatory pathway shared by other similarly expressed spermatogenic genes. PMID:8223262

  10. Molecular evidence that the genes for dioecism and monoecism in Spinacia oleracea L. are located at different loci in a chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Oda, Y; Haseda, A; Fujito, S; Mikami, T; Onodera, Y

    2014-03-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely known to be dioecious. However, monoecious plants can also occur in this species. Sex expression in dioecious spinach plants is controlled by a single gene pair termed X and Y. Our previous study showed that a single, incompletely dominant gene, which controls the monoecious condition in spinach line 03-336, should be allelic or linked to X/Y. Here, we developed 19 AFLP markers closely linked to the monoecious gene. The AFLP markers were mapped to a 38.2-cM chromosomal region that included the monoecious gene, which is bracketed between flanking markers with a distance of 7.1 cM. The four AFLP markers developed in our studies were converted into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which are linked to both the monoecious gene and Y and are common to both populations segregating for the genes. Linkage analysis using the SCAR markers suggested that the monoecious gene (M) and Y are located in different intervals, between different marker pairs. Analysis of populations segregating for both M and Y also directly demonstrates linkage of the genes at a distance of ~12 cM. The data presented in this study may be useful for breeding dioecious and highly male monoecious lines utilized as the pollen parents for hybrid seed production, as well as for studies of the evolutionary history of sexual systems in this species, and can provide a molecular basis for positional cloning of the sex-determining genes.

  11. Use of nucleotide sequencing of the genomic cDNA fragments of the capsid/premembrane junction region for molecular epidemiology of dengue type 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Singh, U B; Seth, P

    2001-06-01

    The recent emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/ DSS) in India has been a source of concern. In the present study a quantitative comparison of 406 nucleotide long sequence from the capsid-premembrane junction region (C-PrM) of 9 dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) isolates from Delhi with 10 DEN-2 isolates from diverse geographic areas provided sufficient information for estimating genetic relationships. The data indicated that the 1996 epidemic of DHF in Delhi was caused by genotype IV strains of DEN-2. This genotype, perhaps, displaced genotype V strains of DEN-2, which was circulating genotype in 1967. The period during which this displacement had occurred is not clear from the present study. Nonetheless, similar experience in four countries in Latin America and in Sri Lanka suggest that the introduction of new genotypes of DEN-2 displacing the circulating genotype may be associated with the appearance of DHF/DSS. More work is required to elucidate this hypothesis. Transitions at nucleotide positions 406 and 431 resulted in amino acid substitutions near (aa position 104, methionine --> valine) and at the hinge region (aa position 112, valine --> alanine) of C-PrM, respectively in all/most genotypes of group III and IV DEN-2 viruses analysed. Most of these virus strains have been isolated from DHF/DSS outbreaks. Significance of this observation is discussed. The data presented in this study suggest the utility of C-PrM sequence analysis for molecular epidemiology of dengue viruses.

  12. A matrix attachment region is located upstream from the high-molecular-weight glutenin gene Bx7 in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rampitsch, C; Jordan, M C; Cloutier, S

    2000-06-01

    A 2.2-kb nucleotide sequence rich in AT, located upstream from the Bx7 allele of the high-molecular-weight glutenin Glu-B1 locus in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Glenlea) was cloned following amplification by PCR. The 5' region of this sequence contains motifs typically found in matrix attachment regions (MARs) in other plants. We have shown that part of the 2.2-kb DNA binds to wheat nuclear matrix (NM) in vitro, at least as strongly as a known MAR (Adh1) from maize suggesting that there is a MAR upstream of Bx7. This MAR is approximately 800 bases in length running from -750 to -1560 bases, relative to the start codon. Although the MAR is associated with a tissue-specific gene and is beside a strong tissue-specific promoter, the MAR sequence did not lead to tissue-specific expression of the beta-glucuronidase marker gene under the control of the rice actin promoter in various tissues. Presence of the MAR was only slightly beneficial with respect to expression levels, which were not greatly altered in transient expression assays in various wheat tissues although a slight increase in the number of foci was observed in leaves, which have low transformation efficiencies.

  13. Molecular and seroepidemiological survey of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infections in cattle and water buffaloes in the central region of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Luo, Yuzi; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Long, Phung Thang; Yu, Longzheng; Zhou, Mo; Gong, Haiyan; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Jinlin; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a total of 137 blood samples were collected from cattle and water buffaloes in central region of Vietnam and tested using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to determine the molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. In cattle, the prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 21.3% and 16.0% by nPCR, 73.4% and 42.6% by ELISA and 60.6% and 59.6% by IFAT, respectively, whereas those of water buffalos were 23.3% and 0% by nPCR, 37.2% and 9.3% by ELISA and 27.9% and 18.6% by IFAT, respectively. IFAT and ELISA detected a higher number of infected cattle and water buffaloes than nPCR totally. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age. Overall, the current data suggest high incidence of B. bovis and B. bigemina infections in the central region of Vietnam, which is needed to develop comprehensive approach to the modern surveillance, diagnosis and control of bovine babesiosis.

  14. Serological and molecular investigation of Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in ticks and blood of dogs, in the Thrace Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Handan; Matur, Erdal; Akyazi, İbrahim; Ekiz, Elif Ergul; Aydin, Levent; Toparlak, Mufit

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, tick-borne diseases like ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis became widespread worldwide threatening the health of both human and companion animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. A total of 400 blood samples and 912 ticks were collected from dogs living in shelters that are located in four cities (Istanbul, Edirne, Tekirdag and Kirklareli) of the Thrace Region. Blood and buffy coat smears were prepared for microscopic examination. Hematologic and serologic analyses were performed using cell counter and commercial Snap3Dx test kit, respectively. Eight hundred fifty of collected ticks were classified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 33 as Rhipicephalus turanicus and 29 as Ixodes ricinus. After DNA extraction from blood samples and pooled ticks (127 tick pools, in total), nested PCR was performed to detect the DNA of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. The seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis was 27.25% (109) by Snap3Dx test and the total molecular positivity was 11.75% (47) in dog blood samples and 21.25% (27) in tick pools by nested PCR. The frequencies of the infected blood samples with E. canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys were detected as 6%, 4% and 6%, respectively. E. canis and A. platys were detected in R. sanguineus pools with a ratio of 15.75% and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, A. platys was also detected in R. turanicus pools (0.7%). A. phagocytophilum was found only in I. ricinus pools (3.93%). Morulae of three species were detected in buffy coat and blood smears. While anemia was observed in dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected (with one or more species), thrombocytopenia was observed only in co-infected dogs. This is the first study providing evidence for the presence of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. Based on the results of the tests used in this study

  15. Serological and molecular investigation of Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in ticks and blood of dogs, in the Thrace Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Handan; Matur, Erdal; Akyazi, İbrahim; Ekiz, Elif Ergul; Aydin, Levent; Toparlak, Mufit

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, tick-borne diseases like ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis became widespread worldwide threatening the health of both human and companion animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. A total of 400 blood samples and 912 ticks were collected from dogs living in shelters that are located in four cities (Istanbul, Edirne, Tekirdag and Kirklareli) of the Thrace Region. Blood and buffy coat smears were prepared for microscopic examination. Hematologic and serologic analyses were performed using cell counter and commercial Snap3Dx test kit, respectively. Eight hundred fifty of collected ticks were classified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 33 as Rhipicephalus turanicus and 29 as Ixodes ricinus. After DNA extraction from blood samples and pooled ticks (127 tick pools, in total), nested PCR was performed to detect the DNA of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. The seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis was 27.25% (109) by Snap3Dx test and the total molecular positivity was 11.75% (47) in dog blood samples and 21.25% (27) in tick pools by nested PCR. The frequencies of the infected blood samples with E. canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys were detected as 6%, 4% and 6%, respectively. E. canis and A. platys were detected in R. sanguineus pools with a ratio of 15.75% and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, A. platys was also detected in R. turanicus pools (0.7%). A. phagocytophilum was found only in I. ricinus pools (3.93%). Morulae of three species were detected in buffy coat and blood smears. While anemia was observed in dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected (with one or more species), thrombocytopenia was observed only in co-infected dogs. This is the first study providing evidence for the presence of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. Based on the results of the tests used in this study

  16. A comparison of the molecular organization of genomic regions associated with resistance to common bacterial blight in two Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Gregory; Dinatale, Claudia; Xie, Weilong; Navabi, Alireza; Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Crosby, William; Yu, Kangfu; Shi, Chun; Pauls, K Peter

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, in Phaseolus vulgaris is conditioned by several loci on different chromosomes. Previous studies with OAC-Rex, a CBB-resistant, white bean variety of Mesoamerican origin, identified two resistance loci associated with the molecular markers Pv-CTT001 and SU91, on chromosome 4 and 8, respectively. Resistance to CBB is assumed to be derived from an interspecific cross with Phaseolus acutifolius in the pedigree of OAC-Rex. Our current whole genome sequencing effort with OAC-Rex provided the opportunity to compare its genome in the regions associated with CBB resistance with the v1.0 release of the P. vulgaris line G19833, which is a large seeded bean of Andean origin, and (assumed to be) CBB susceptible. In addition, the genomic regions containing SAP6, a marker associated with P. vulgaris-derived CBB-resistance on chromosome 10, were compared. These analyses indicated that gene content was highly conserved between G19833 and OAC-Rex across the regions examined (>80%). However, fifty-nine genes unique to OAC Rex were identified, with resistance gene homologues making up the largest category (10 genes identified). Two unique genes in OAC-Rex located within the SU91 resistance QTL have homology to P. acutifolius ESTs and may be potential sources of CBB resistance. As the genomic sequence assembly of OAC-Rex is completed, we expect that further comparisons between it and the G19833 genome will lead to a greater understanding of CBB resistance in bean. PMID:24009615

  17. Molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome in subjects with intellectual disability of unknown origin: implications of its prevalence in regional Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Madiha; Alyas, Saadia; Afzal, Muhammad; Mansoor, Atika; Abbasi, Rashda; Tassone, Flora; Malik, Sajid; Mazhar, Kehkashan

    2015-01-01

    Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and affects 0.7-3.0% of intellectually compromised population of unknown etiology worldwide. It is mostly caused by repeat expansion mutations in the FMR1 at chromosome Xq27.3. The present study aimed to develop molecular diagnostic tools for a better detection of FXS, to assess implementation of diagnostic protocols in a developing country and to estimate the prevalence of FXS in a cohort of intellectually disabled subjects from Pakistan. From a large pool of individuals with below normal IQ range, 395 subjects with intellectual disability of unknown etiology belonging to different regions of the country were recruited. Conventional-PCR, modified-PCR and Southern blot analysis methods were employed for the detection of CGG repeat polymorphisms in the FMR1 gene. Initial screening with conventional-PCR identified 13 suspected patients. Subsequent investigations through modified PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the FMR1 mutation, suggesting a prevalence of 3.5% and 2.8% (mean 3.3%) among the male and female ID patients, respectively. These diagnostic methods were further customized with the in-house conditions to offer robust screening of referral patients/families for diagnostics and genetic counseling. Prescreening and early diagnosis are crucial for designing a prudent strategy for the management of subjects with ID. Outcome of the study recommends health practitioners for implementation of molecular based FXS diagnosis in routine clinical practice to give a better care for patients similar to the ones included in the study. PMID:25875842

  18. Distinctive mitochondrial genome of Calanoid copepod Calanus sinicus with multiple large non-coding regions and reshuffled gene order: Useful molecular markers for phylogenetic and population studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Copepods are highly diverse and abundant, resulting in extensive ecological radiation in marine ecosystems. Calanus sinicus dominates continental shelf waters in the northwest Pacific Ocean and plays an important role in the local ecosystem by linking primary production to higher trophic levels. A lack of effective molecular markers has hindered phylogenetic and population genetic studies concerning copepods. As they are genome-level informative, mitochondrial DNA sequences can be used as markers for population genetic studies and phylogenetic studies. Results The mitochondrial genome of C. sinicus is distinct from other arthropods owing to the concurrence of multiple non-coding regions and a reshuffled gene arrangement. Further particularities in the mitogenome of C. sinicus include low A + T-content, symmetrical nucleotide composition between strands, abbreviated stop codons for several PCGs and extended lengths of the genes atp6 and atp8 relative to other copepods. The monophyletic Copepoda should be placed within the Vericrustacea. The close affinity between Cyclopoida and Poecilostomatoida suggests reassigning the latter as subordinate to the former. Monophyly of Maxillopoda is rejected. Within the alignment of 11 C. sinicus mitogenomes, there are 397 variable sites harbouring three 'hotspot' variable sites and three microsatellite loci. Conclusion The occurrence of the circular subgenomic fragment during laboratory assays suggests that special caution should be taken when sequencing mitogenomes using long PCR. Such a phenomenon may provide additional evidence of mitochondrial DNA recombination, which appears to have been a prerequisite for shaping the present mitochondrial profile of C. sinicus during its evolution. The lack of synapomorphic gene arrangements among copepods has cast doubt on the utility of gene order as a useful molecular marker for deep phylogenetic analysis. However, mitochondrial genomic sequences have been valuable markers for

  19. Creating stable stem regions for loop elongation in Fcabs — Insights from combining yeast surface display, in silico loop reconstruction and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hasenhindl, Christoph; Lai, Balder; Delgado, Javier; Traxlmayr, Michael W.; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Serrano, Luis; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Fcabs (Fc antigen binding) are crystallizable fragments of IgG where the C-terminal structural loops of the CH3 domain are engineered for antigen binding. For the design of libraries it is beneficial to know positions that will permit loop elongation to increase the potential interaction surface with antigen. However, the insertion of additional loop residues might impair the immunoglobulin fold. In the present work we have probed whether stabilizing mutations flanking the randomized and elongated loop region improve the quality of Fcab libraries. In detail, 13 libraries were constructed having the C-terminal part of the EF loop randomized and carrying additional residues (1, 2, 3, 5 or 10, respectively) in the absence and presence of two flanking mutations. The latter have been demonstrated to increase the thermal stability of the CH3 domain of the respective solubly expressed proteins. Assessment of the stability of the libraries expressed on the surface of yeast cells by flow cytometry demonstrated that loop elongation was considerably better tolerated in the stabilized libraries. By using in silico loop reconstruction and mimicking randomization together with MD simulations the underlying molecular dynamics were investigated. In the presence of stabilizing stem residues the backbone flexibility of the engineered EF loop as well as the fluctuation between its accessible conformations were decreased. In addition the CD loop (but not the AB loop) and most of the framework regions were rigidified. The obtained data are discussed with respect to the design of Fcabs and available data on the relation between flexibility and affinity of CDR loops in Ig-like molecules. PMID:24792385

  20. Creating stable stem regions for loop elongation in Fcabs - insights from combining yeast surface display, in silico loop reconstruction and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hasenhindl, Christoph; Lai, Balder; Delgado, Javier; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Serrano, Luis; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Fcabs (Fc antigen binding) are crystallizable fragments of IgG where the C-terminal structural loops of the CH3 domain are engineered for antigen binding. For the design of libraries it is beneficial to know positions that will permit loop elongation to increase the potential interaction surface with antigen. However, the insertion of additional loop residues might impair the immunoglobulin fold. In the present work we have probed whether stabilizing mutations flanking the randomized and elongated loop region improve the quality of Fcab libraries. In detail, 13 libraries were constructed having the C-terminal part of the EF loop randomized and carrying additional residues (1, 2, 3, 5 or 10, respectively) in the absence and presence of two flanking mutations. The latter have been demonstrated to increase the thermal stability of the CH3 domain of the respective solubly expressed proteins. Assessment of the stability of the libraries expressed on the surface of yeast cells by flow cytometry demonstrated that loop elongation was considerably better tolerated in the stabilized libraries. By using in silico loop reconstruction and mimicking randomization together with MD simulations the underlying molecular dynamics were investigated. In the presence of stabilizing stem residues the backbone flexibility of the engineered EF loop as well as the fluctuation between its accessible conformations were decreased. In addition the CD loop (but not the AB loop) and most of the framework regions were rigidified. The obtained data are discussed with respect to the design of Fcabs and available data on the relation between flexibility and affinity of CDR loops in Ig-like molecules. PMID:24792385

  1. Molecular Detection of Equine Herpesvirus Types 1 and 4 Infection in Healthy Horses in Isfahan Central and Shahrekord Southwest Regions, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taktaz Hafshejani, Taghi; Nekoei, Shahin; Vazirian, Behnam; Doosti, Abbas; Khamesipour, Faham; Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate molecularly the occurrence of EHV-1 and EHV-4 infection among equine population in regions, Iran. Blood samples from 53 and 37 randomly selected horses settled in Isfahan and Shahrekord, Iran, respectively, were collected. Detection of EHV-1 and EHV-4 genes in the blood samples was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of 53 and 37 samples from Isfahan and Shahrekord, 4 (18.18%) and 3 (8.10%) were positive for PCR of EHV-1, respectively. Nine (16.98%) and 6 (16.21%) were positive for PCR of EHV-4, while 6 (11.32%) and 3 (8.10%) were positive for PCR of both EHV-1 and EHV-4, in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. Of the 7 blood samples positive for EHV-1, 4 (16.66%) and 3 (8.10%) were from horses >3 years old while 2 (18.18%) and 1 (16.66%) were from 2-3 years old horses, in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. Out of the 7 and 3 samples positive for PCR of EHV-1 in Isfahan and Shahrekord, 4 (22.2%) and 1 (7.69%) were Standardbred, while 3 (14.28%) and 2 (13.33%) were Thoroughbreds, respectively. EHV-4 was detected in blood of 4 (22.22%) and 2 (15.83%) Standardbreds and from 4 (19.04%) and 4 (26.66%) Thoroughbred horses in Isfahan and Shahrekord, respectively. This study has shown that horses settled in Isfahan central and Shahrekord southwest regions, Iran, are infected by EHV-1 and EHV-4 and thus serve as potential reservoirs and disseminators of the viruses. PMID:26421307

  2. Molecular evidence that the genes for dioecism and monoecism in Spinacia oleracea L. are located at different loci in a chromosomal region

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Oda, Y; Haseda, A; Fujito, S; Mikami, T; Onodera, Y

    2014-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely known to be dioecious. However, monoecious plants can also occur in this species. Sex expression in dioecious spinach plants is controlled by a single gene pair termed X and Y. Our previous study showed that a single, incompletely dominant gene, which controls the monoecious condition in spinach line 03–336, should be allelic or linked to X/Y. Here, we developed 19 AFLP markers closely linked to the monoecious gene. The AFLP markers were mapped to a 38.2-cM chromosomal region that included the monoecious gene, which is bracketed between flanking markers with a distance of 7.1 cM. The four AFLP markers developed in our studies were converted into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which are linked to both the monoecious gene and Y and are common to both populations segregating for the genes. Linkage analysis using the SCAR markers suggested that the monoecious gene (M) and Y are located in different intervals, between different marker pairs. Analysis of populations segregating for both M and Y also directly demonstrates linkage of the genes at a distance of ∼12 cM. The data presented in this study may be useful for breeding dioecious and highly male monoecious lines utilized as the pollen parents for hybrid seed production, as well as for studies of the evolutionary history of sexual systems in this species, and can provide a molecular basis for positional cloning of the sex-determining genes. PMID:24169648

  3. Nucleotide sequence and molecular genetic analysis of the vaccinia virus HindIII N/M region encoding the genes responsible for resistance to alpha-amanitin.

    PubMed

    Tamin, A; Villarreal, E C; Weinrich, S L; Hruby, D E

    1988-07-01

    The genomic location of the gene(s) which provides vaccinia virus (VV) alpha-amanitin-resistant mutants with a drug-resistant phenotype have been mapped to the HindIII N/M region of the genome by the use of marker rescue techniques [E. C. Villarreal and D. E. Hruby (1986) J. Virol. 57, 65-70]. Nucleotide sequencing of a 2356-bp HindIII-Sau3A fragment of the vaccinia virus genome encompassing this region reveals the presence of two complete leftward-reading open reading frames (ORFs, N2 and M1) and two incomplete ORFs (N1 and M2). By computer analysis the N2 and M1 ORFs would be predicted to encode soluble VV polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 20 and 48 kDa, respectively. The N2 and M1 ORFs have extremely A-T-rich 5'-proximal sequences, consistent with previous data regarding the location and A-T-richness of viral early promoters. Likewise, the consensus signal believed to be involved in terminating VV early gene transcription, TTTTTNT, was evident at the 3'-boundary of both the N2 and M1 ORFs suggesting that these genes may be VV early genes. The in vivo transcriptional activity, orientation, and limits of these putative transcriptional units were investigated by Northern blot, nuclease S1, and primer extension analysis. Both N2- and M1-specific transcripts were detected in the cytoplasm of VV-infected cells, suggesting that these loci are bonafide viral genes. Time-course nuclease S1 experiments revealed that the N2 gene was transcribed exclusively prior to VV DNA replication. In contrast, the M1 gene was transcribed throughout infection, although different start sites were used at early versus late times postinfection. These results are discussed in relation to the drug-resistant phenotype and future experiments to identify the viral gene product responsible.

  4. Binding hotspots on K-ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-05-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in nonpocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu.

  5. Molecular characterisation of the clonal emergence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant Haemophilus influenzae in the Region of Southern Denmark.

    PubMed

    Fuursted, Kurt; Hartmeyer, Gitte Nyvang; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2016-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen usually susceptible to quinolones. Here we report the emergence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant H. influenzae in the Region of Southern Denmark. Four isolates were collected for phenotypic and molecular characterisation using whole-genome sequencing (WGS). During an 18-month period, the occurrence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant H. influenzae in patients aged 1-77 years from sputum, ear and eye samples was detected. An epidemiological link between the patients could not be identified. The isolates were non-encapsulated, biotype III and were demonstrated by WGS to be clonal belonging to a single clade with an unknown multilocus sequence type (double-locus variant of ST196). The antibiogram demonstrated that they were all monoresistant to ciprofloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >32mg/L. In silico resistome analysis revealed identical, both previously characterised and novel, putative resistance-related mutations in gyrA (S84L and D88N), parC (K20R, S84I, D356A or T356A, and M481I) and parE (E151K, I159A, D420N and S599A) in all isolates. The isolates were otherwise negative for any resistance genes. This is the first description of the clonal emergence of high-level monoresistant H. influenzae due to amino acid substitutions in gyrA, parC and parE. PMID:27436470

  6. Molecular evolution of the hypervariable region of the attachment glycoprotein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B genotypes BA9 and BA10.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Koo; Hirano, Eiko; Kobayashi, Miho; Ryo, Akihide; Oishi, Kazunori; Obuchi, Masatsugu; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Noda, Masahiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimojo, Naoki; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the C-terminal 3rd hypervariable region in the attachment glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B (HRSV-B) genotypes BA9 and BA10. We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We also performed a genetic distance analysis (p-distance analysis), positive and negative selection analyses, and a Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) analysis. We found that genotype BA9 diverged from the common ancestor of genotypes BA7, BA8, and BA10, while genotype BA10 diverged from the ancestor of genotypes BA7 and BA8. Strains of both genotypes were distributed worldwide. BA9 and BA10 diverged between 1999 and 2001. Both BA9 and BA10 evolved rapidly (about 4.8×10(-3)substitutions/site/year) and formed three distinct lineages in a 10-year period. BA10 strains belonging to lineage 3 had large genetic distances (p-distance>0.07). Thus, it may be possible to classify these strains as a new genotype, BA11. No positive selection site was detected in either genotype. Phylodynamic analyses showed that the effective population size of BA10 decreased gradually since 2010 and BA9 slightly decreased since 2009. The results suggested that the recently prevalent HRSV-B genotypes BA9 and BA10 evolved uniquely, leading to epidemics of HRSV-B worldwide over a 15-year period. PMID:26408340

  7. Molecular characterisation of the clonal emergence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant Haemophilus influenzae in the Region of Southern Denmark.

    PubMed

    Fuursted, Kurt; Hartmeyer, Gitte Nyvang; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2016-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen usually susceptible to quinolones. Here we report the emergence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant H. influenzae in the Region of Southern Denmark. Four isolates were collected for phenotypic and molecular characterisation using whole-genome sequencing (WGS). During an 18-month period, the occurrence of high-level ciprofloxacin-monoresistant H. influenzae in patients aged 1-77 years from sputum, ear and eye samples was detected. An epidemiological link between the patients could not be identified. The isolates were non-encapsulated, biotype III and were demonstrated by WGS to be clonal belonging to a single clade with an unknown multilocus sequence type (double-locus variant of ST196). The antibiogram demonstrated that they were all monoresistant to ciprofloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >32mg/L. In silico resistome analysis revealed identical, both previously characterised and novel, putative resistance-related mutations in gyrA (S84L and D88N), parC (K20R, S84I, D356A or T356A, and M481I) and parE (E151K, I159A, D420N and S599A) in all isolates. The isolates were otherwise negative for any resistance genes. This is the first description of the clonal emergence of high-level monoresistant H. influenzae due to amino acid substitutions in gyrA, parC and parE.

  8. Identification and gene mapping of a 14,700-molecular-weight protein encoded by region E3 of group C adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, A E; Wold, W S

    1988-01-01

    Early region E3 of adenovirus type 5 should encode at least nine proteins as judged by the DNA sequence and the spliced structures of the known mRNAs. Only two E3 proteins have been proved to exist, a glycoprotein (gp19K) and an 11,600-molecular-weight protein (11.6K protein). Here we describe an abundant 14.7K protein coded by a gene in the extreme 3' portion of E3. To identify this 14.7K protein, we constructed a bacterial vector which synthesized a TrpE-14.7K fusion protein, then we prepared antiserum against the fusion protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated the 14.7K protein from cells infected with adenovirus types 5 and 2, as well as with a variety of E3 deletion mutants. Synthesis of the 14.7K protein correlated precisely with the presence or absence of the 14.7K gene and with the synthesis of the mRNA (mRNA h) which encodes the 14.7K protein. The 14.7K protein appeared as a triplet on immunoprecipitation gels and Western blots (immunoblots). Images PMID:3275435

  9. Molecular confirmation of Trichomonas gallinae and other parabasalids from Brazil using the 5.8S and ITS-1 rRNA regions.

    PubMed

    Ecco, Roselene; Preis, Ingred S; Vilela, Daniel A R; Luppi, Marcela M; Malta, Marcelo C C; Beckstead, Robert B; Stimmelmayr, Raphaela; Stimmelmayer, Raphaela; Gerhold, Richard W

    2012-11-23

    Clinical, gross, and histopathology lesions and molecular characterization of Trichomonas spp. infection were described in two striped owls (Asio (Rhinoptynx) clamator), one American kestrel (Falco sparverius), two green-winged saltators (Saltator similis), and in a toco toucan (Ramphastos toco) from Brazil. These birds presented clinical signs including emaciation, ruffled feathers, abundant salivation and open mouth breathing presumably due to abundant caseous material. Gross lesions were characterized by multifocal yellow friable plaques on the surface of the tongue, pharynx and/or caseous masses partially occluding the laryngeal entrance. In the owls, the caseous material extended into the mandibular muscles and invaded the sinuses of the skull. Histopathologically, marked necrotic and inflammatory lesions were associated with numerous round to oval, pale eosinophilic structures (6-10μm) with basophilic nuclei, consistent with trichomonads. Organisms similar to those described above also were found in the liver of the two green-winged saltators. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of trichomonosis in a striped owl and a toco toucan. Sequence analysis of the Trichomonas spp. internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region and partial 5.8S of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) disclosed significant genetic diversity. Two sequences had 100% identity to Trichomonas gallinae, whereas two sequences had a 99% and 92% identity to a Trichomonas vaginalis-like sequence, respectively. One sequence (green-winged saltator 502-08) had a 100% identity to a newly recognized genus Simplicomonas. PMID:22749289

  10. Solution NMR and molecular dynamics reveal a persistent alpha helix within the dynamic region of PsbQ from photosystem II of higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Rathner, Petr; Rathner, Adriana; Horničáková, Michaela; Wohlschlager, Christian; Chandra, Kousik; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extrinsic proteins of photosystem II of higher plants and green algae PsbO, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbR are essential for stable oxygen production in the oxygen evolving center. In the available X‐ray crystallographic structure of higher plant PsbQ residues S14‐Y33 are missing. Building on the backbone NMR assignment of PsbQ, which includes this “missing link”, we report the extended resonance assignment including side chain atoms. Based on nuclear Overhauser effect spectra a high resolution solution structure of PsbQ with a backbone RMSD of 0.81 Å was obtained from torsion angle dynamics. Within the N‐terminal residues 1–45 the solution structure deviates significantly from the X‐ray crystallographic one, while the four‐helix bundle core found previously is confirmed. A short α‐helix is observed in the solution structure at the location where a β‐strand had been proposed in the earlier crystallographic study. NMR relaxation data and unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations corroborate that the N‐terminal region behaves as a flexible tail with a persistent short local helical secondary structure, while no indications of forming a β‐strand are found. Proteins 2015; 83:1677–1686. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26138376

  11. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of As(V) Respiration / As Resistance Bacteria From Arsenic-Contaminated Groundwater in Blackfoot Disease Region in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Hsiao, S.; Liu, C.; Liao, C.; Chang, F.; Liao, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic concerns range from local to international. The contamination of groundwater with arsenic is a major concern to public health in many countries. Arsenic problems in groundwater in Taiwan were first recognized during the 1960s and then Taiwan becomes the classic area for the study of Blackfoot disease and a number of other typical health problems including cancers. However, both the biogeochemistry of the groundwater and the mineral sources of arsenic in Taiwan are poorly defined at present. Increasing evidence suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic is significant dependent on microbial transformations which affect the distribution and the mobility of arsenic species in the environment. Known arsenic transforming bacteria possess diverse mechanisms for either oxidizing As(III) or reducing As(V), including energy generation and detoxification. To date, although a number of phylogenetically diverse As(V)-reducing bacteria have been isolated, studies on molecular basis of As(V) respiration are limited. In this study, the isolation and molecular characterization of relationship between As(V) respiration and As resistance were investigated. Forty-nine strains were isolated in the presence of 10 mM As(V) under anaerobic condition from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Blackfoot disease region in Taiwan. ArrA and ArsR were used as marker genes for As(V) respiration and As resistance, respectively, by means of PCR. Of these isolated strains, one designed as L6510 was selected for further investigation because it appears to contain both ArrA and ArsR genes. Moreover, L6510 was able to grow under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Resistance tests showed that L6510 was able to resist the high concentrations of As(V) and As(III) when grown in LB medium. Together, L6510 might possess both As(V) respiration and As resistance pathways. Further investigations including As(V) respiration, phylogenetic analysis, growth characteristics, and transposon mutagenesis

  12. Enterotoxin Gene Profile and Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Bovine Bulk Milk and Milk Products of Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tarekgne, Enquebaher K; Skjerdal, Taran; Skeie, Siv; Rudi, Knut; Porcellato, Davide; Félix, Benjamin; Narvhus, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is an important foodborne disease worldwide, and milk and milk products are commonly associated with SFP outbreaks. The objectives of this study were to investigate the distribution of staphylococcal enterotoxin (se) genes in Staphylococcus aureus from raw cow's milk and milk products and to assess their genetic background with the spa typing method. Of the 549 samples (297 bulk milk and 162 milk product samples) collected from Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia, 160 (29.1%) were positive for S. aureus, of which 82 (51%) were found to harbor se genes by a modified multiplex PCR. Nine se genes were identified: sea (n = 12), seb (n = 3), sec (n = 3), sed(n = 4), seg (n = 49), seh (n = 2), sei (n = 40), sej (n = 1), and tsst-1 (n = 24). The classical type of genes accounted for 27%. Of the 82 enterotoxigenic isolates, 41.5 and 12.4% harbored two or more se genes, respectively. The highest gene association was observed between sei and seg, whereas sea and seb were always found together with the new types of se genes. Altogether, 18 genotypes of toxin genes were identified, and 33% of the samples contained > 5 log CFU ml(-1) S. aureus. spa typing identified 22 spa types and three novel spa sequences, which showed the high genetic diversity of the isolates. No apparent relationship was observed between spa type and se genes. Of the 25 spa types, 13 (52%) were from raw milk, 3 (12%) from milk products, and 9 (36%) from both types of sample. Types t314 (20.7%,n = 17), t458 (18.3%, n = 15), and t6218 (9.8%, n= 8) were the most common spa types identified and were widely distributed in three of the eight studied localities. This is the first study from the Tigray region to report the high distribution of enterotoxigenic S. aureus with a diversified genetic background from dairy food. The study may provide valuable data for microbial food safety risk assessment, molecular epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies of S. aureus in Ethiopia.

  13. Enterotoxin Gene Profile and Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Bovine Bulk Milk and Milk Products of Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tarekgne, Enquebaher K; Skjerdal, Taran; Skeie, Siv; Rudi, Knut; Porcellato, Davide; Félix, Benjamin; Narvhus, Judith A

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is an important foodborne disease worldwide, and milk and milk products are commonly associated with SFP outbreaks. The objectives of this study were to investigate the distribution of staphylococcal enterotoxin (se) genes in Staphylococcus aureus from raw cow's milk and milk products and to assess their genetic background with the spa typing method. Of the 549 samples (297 bulk milk and 162 milk product samples) collected from Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia, 160 (29.1%) were positive for S. aureus, of which 82 (51%) were found to harbor se genes by a modified multiplex PCR. Nine se genes were identified: sea (n = 12), seb (n = 3), sec (n = 3), sed(n = 4), seg (n = 49), seh (n = 2), sei (n = 40), sej (n = 1), and tsst-1 (n = 24). The classical type of genes accounted for 27%. Of the 82 enterotoxigenic isolates, 41.5 and 12.4% harbored two or more se genes, respectively. The highest gene association was observed between sei and seg, whereas sea and seb were always found together with the new types of se genes. Altogether, 18 genotypes of toxin genes were identified, and 33% of the samples contained > 5 log CFU ml(-1) S. aureus. spa typing identified 22 spa types and three novel spa sequences, which showed the high genetic diversity of the isolates. No apparent relationship was observed between spa type and se genes. Of the 25 spa types, 13 (52%) were from raw milk, 3 (12%) from milk products, and 9 (36%) from both types of sample. Types t314 (20.7%,n = 17), t458 (18.3%, n = 15), and t6218 (9.8%, n= 8) were the most common spa types identified and were widely distributed in three of the eight studied localities. This is the first study from the Tigray region to report the high distribution of enterotoxigenic S. aureus with a diversified genetic background from dairy food. The study may provide valuable data for microbial food safety risk assessment, molecular epidemiology, and phylogenetic studies of S. aureus in Ethiopia. PMID

  14. Liposomal vaccines incorporating molecular adjuvants and intrastructural T-cell help promote the immunogenicity of HIV membrane-proximal external region peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Melissa C.; Abraham, Wuhbet; Crespo, Monica P.; Chen, Stephanie H.; Liu, Haipeng; Szeto, Greg Lee; Kim, Mikyung; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    An HIV vaccine capable of inducing high and durable levels of broadly neutralizing antibodies has thus far proven elusive. A promising antigen is the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) from gp41, a segment of the viral envelope recognized by a number of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Though an attractive vaccine target due to the linear nature of the epitope and its highly conserved sequence, MPER peptides are poorly immunogenic and may require display on membranes to achieve a physiological conformation matching the native virus. Here we systematically explored how the structure and composition of liposomes displaying MPER peptides impacts the strength and durability of humoral responses to this antigen as well as helper T-cell responses in mice. Administration of MPER peptides anchored to the surface of liposomes induced MPER-specific antibodies whereas MPER administered in oil-based emulsion adjuvants or alum did not, even when combined with Toll like receptor agonists. High-titer IgG responses to liposomal MPER required the inclusion of molecular adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A. Anti-MPER humoral responses were further enhanced by incorporating high-Tm lipids in the vesicle bilayer and optimizing the MPER density to a mean distance of ~10–15 nm between peptides on the liposomes' surfaces. Encapsulation of helper epitopes within the vesicles allowed efficient “intrastructural” T-cell help, which promoted IgG responses to MPER while minimizing competing B-cell responses against the helper sequence. These results define several key properties of liposome formulations that promote durable, high-titer antibody responses against MPER peptides, which will be a prerequisite for a successful MPER-targeting vaccine. PMID:25559188

  15. The molecular origin of a loading-induced black layer in the deep region of articular cartilage at the magic angle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nian; Kahn, David; Badar, Farid; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular origin of an unusual low-intensity layer in the deep region of articular cartilage as seen in MRI when the tissue is imaged under compression and oriented at the magic angle. Materials and Methods Microscopic MRI (μMRI) T2 and T1ρ experiments were carried out for both native and degraded (treated with trypsin) 18 specimens. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations in the specimens were quantified by both sodium ICP-OES and μMRI Gd(DTPA)2--contrast methods. The mechanical modulus of the specimens was also measured. Results Native tissue shows no load-induced layer, while the trypsin-degraded tissue shows clearly the low-intensity line at the deep part of tissue. The GAG reductions are confirmed by the sodium ICP-OES (from 81.7 ± 5.4 mg/ml to 9.2 ± 3.4 mg/ml), MRI GAG quantification (from 72.4 ± 6.7 mg/ml to 11.2 ± 2.9 mg/ml). The modulus reduction is confirmed by biomechanics (from 4.3 ± 0.7 MPa to 0.3 ± 0.1 MPa). Conclusion Both T2 and T1ρ profiles in native and degraded cartilage show strongly strain-, depth-, and angle-dependent using high resolution MRI. The GAG reduction is responsible for the visualization of a low-intensity layer in deep cartilage when it is loaded and orientated at 55°. PMID:24833266

  16. Molecular characterisation of three regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA unit and the mitochondrial cox1 gene of Sarcocystis fusiformis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad; Mawgood, Sahar Abdel

    2015-09-01

    A total of 33 macroscopically visible (3-11 × 1-5 mm) sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis were excised from the oesophagus of 12 freshly slaughtered water buffalos in Giza, Egypt. Genomic DNA was extracted from the sarcocysts, and all isolates were characterised at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene through PCR amplification and direct sequencing, whereas a few selected isolates were characterised at the 18S and 28S ribosomal (r) RNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the nuclear rDNA unit following cloning. Among the 33 cox1 sequences (1,038-bp long), there was a total of 13 haplotypes, differing from each other by one to seven substitutions and sharing an identity of 99.3-99.9 %. In comparison, the sequence identity was 98.8-99.0 % among eight complete 18S rRNA gene sequences (1,873-1,879-bp long), 98.1-100 % among 28 complete ITS1 sequences (853-864-bp long) and 97.4-99.6 % among five partial 28S rRNA gene sequences (1,607-1,622 bp). At the three nuclear loci, the intraspecific (and intra-isolate) sequence variation was due to both substitutions and indels, which necessitated cloning of the PCR products before sequencing. Some additional clones of the 18S and 28S rRNA genes were highly divergent from the more typical clones, but the true nature of these aberrant clones could not be determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses based on either 18S rRNA gene or cox1 nucleotide sequences, placed S. fusiformis closest to Sarcocystis cafferi from the African buffalo, but only the analyses based on cox1 data separated the two taxa clearly from each other and showed that they were separate species (monophyletic clusters and 93 % sequence identity at cox1 versus interleaved sequences and 98.7-99.1 % sequence identity at the 18S rRNA gene). Two cats experimentally infected with sarcocysts of S. fusiformis started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8-10 days post-infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15

  17. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  18. Molecular and genetic studies on the region of translocation and duplication in the neuroblastoma cell line NGP at the 1p36.13-p36.32 chromosomal site.

    PubMed

    Casciano, I; Marchi, J V; Muresu, R; Volpi, E V; Rozzo, C; Opdenakker, G; Romani, M

    1996-05-16

    Cytogenetic and molecular studies suggest that chromosome 1p might contain oncosuppressor genes involved in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma and other adult tumors. The isolation of these genes by the 'positional cloning' approach will be facilitated by the characterization of cell lines with well defined chromosomal aberrations. In the present report we provide molecular data on the NGP neuroblastoma cell line which contains a reciprocal t(1;15) translocation. Two regions, possibly hosting oncosuppressor genes, have been identified: one is distal to the ENO1 locus, the other one is comprised between PND and A12M2 and corresponds to that of a constitutional t(1;17) translocation described in a neuroblastoma patient. Genetic data also suggest that the NGP cell line, despite the presence of two chromosomes 1, might be hemizygous for the subtelomeric 1p region.

  19. Novel "omics" approach for study of low-abundance, low-molecular-weight components of a complex biological tissue: regional differences between chorionic and basal plates of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Komal; Nichols, Caitlin A; Thulin, Craig D; Graves, Steven W

    2015-11-01

    Tissue proteomics has relied heavily on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, for protein separation and quantification, then single protein isolation, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometric protein identification. Such methods are predominantly used for study of high-abundance, full-length proteins. Tissue peptidomics has recently been developed but is still used to study the most highly abundant species, often resulting in observation and identification of dozens of peptides only. Tissue lipidomics is likewise new, and reported studies are limited. We have developed an "omics" approach that enables over 7,000 low-molecular-weight, low-abundance species to be surveyed and have applied this to human placental tissue. Because the placenta is believed to be involved in complications of pregnancy, its proteomic evaluation is of substantial interest. In previous research on the placental proteome, abundant, high-molecular-weight proteins have been studied. Application of large-scale, global proteomics or peptidomics to the placenta have been limited, and would be challenging owing to the anatomic complexity and broad concentration range of proteins in this tissue. In our approach, involving protein depletion, capillary liquid chromatography, and tandem mass spectrometry, we attempted to identify molecular differences between two regions of the same placenta with only slightly different cellular composition. Our analysis revealed 16 species with statistically significant differences between the two regions. Tandem mass spectrometry enabled successful sequencing, or otherwise enabled chemical characterization, of twelve of these. The successful discovery and identification of regional differences between the expression of low-abundance, low-molecular weight biomolecules reveals the potential of our approach.

  20. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Virulence and molecular diversity of the Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici population in Xinjiang in relation to other regions of western China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, wheat stripe rust caused severe yield losses in western China, especially the Xinjiang Autonomous Region. The population of the stripe rust fungus, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), in the vast region had not been well studied. To determine the population structure and comp...

  2. [Molecular genetic characteristics of the neolithic population of the Baikal region: RFLP analysis of the ancient mitochondrial DNA from osseous remains found in the Ust-Ida I burial ground].

    PubMed

    Naumova, O Iu; Rychkov, S Iu; Bazaliĭskiĭ, V I; Mamonova, N N; Sulerzhitskiĭ, L D; Rychkov, Iu G

    1997-10-01

    Nineteen mtDNA samples from osseous remains found in the Ust-Ida I burial ground (middle Angara River) were analyzed. An ancient population dated back to 4020-3210 B.C. by radiocarbon (14C) analysis and archeologically assigned to the Neolithic Isakovo culture of the Baikal region was described in terms of molecular genetics. Data on restriction-site polymorphisms in fragment 16,106-16,545 of the mtDNA D-loop were obtained for seven restriction endonucleases. On the basis of these data, the mitotypic structure and nucleotide diversity of the ancient population were determined. The molecular genetic characteristics of the Neolithic population were compared to the modern populations of Siberia, Mongolia, and Urals. The data obtained indicate that the studied Baikal Neolithic population was ancestral for the modern indigenous Siberian population. The time of divergence of the three regional populations (5572 years ago) was estimated from the genetic distances between the Neolithic and modern Siberian populations, assuming that the average rate of nucleotide substitution was constant. This estimation agrees with the results of the radiocarbon dating (5542-5652 years ago). The fact that the studied samples were 14C-dated allowed the rate of nucleotide substitution in the studied region of mtDNA D-loop to be directly determined.

  3. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  4. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Zain, S B; Salim, M; Chou, W G; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E M; Majocha, R E; Marotta, C A

    1988-01-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of beta-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, we cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)+ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambda gt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the beta-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approximately equal to 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, we conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product. Images PMID:2893379

  5. Molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory idiotope on antibodies encoded by immunoglobulin variable-region genes from various families.

    PubMed Central

    Zaghouani, H; Bonilla, F A; Meek, K; Bona, C

    1989-01-01

    The idiotype defined by the levan-specific BALB/c myeloma protein ABPC48 (A48) has previously been encountered only in antibodies the variable regions of which derive from the VHX24 and V kappa 10 gene families. We have demonstrated expression of the idiotope recognized by the monoclonal anti-A48 idiotype antibody IDA10 on five monoclonal antibodies from different mouse strains, with different specificities including foreign and self antigens and deriving their variable regions from families other than VHX24 and V kappa 10. We analyzed variable region protein structure (deduced from nucleotide sequences) and hydrophilicity profiles of idiotype+ and idiotype- antibodies. We identified four surface-exposed areas (one in the heavy chain and three in the light chain) that may contribute to expression of the idiotope defined by antibody IDA10. Images PMID:2494665

  6. Molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory idiotope on antibodies encoded by immunoglobulin variable-region genes from various families.

    PubMed

    Zaghouani, H; Bonilla, F A; Meek, K; Bona, C

    1989-04-01

    The idiotype defined by the levan-specific BALB/c myeloma protein ABPC48 (A48) has previously been encountered only in antibodies the variable regions of which derive from the VHX24 and V kappa 10 gene families. We have demonstrated expression of the idiotope recognized by the monoclonal anti-A48 idiotype antibody IDA10 on five monoclonal antibodies from different mouse strains, with different specificities including foreign and self antigens and deriving their variable regions from families other than VHX24 and V kappa 10. We analyzed variable region protein structure (deduced from nucleotide sequences) and hydrophilicity profiles of idiotype+ and idiotype- antibodies. We identified four surface-exposed areas (one in the heavy chain and three in the light chain) that may contribute to expression of the idiotope defined by antibody IDA10.

  7. B- AND A-TYPE STARS IN THE TAURUS-AURIGA STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-07-10

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), {tau} Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  8. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  9. Molecular mapping across three populations reveals a QTL hotspot region on chromosome 3 for secondary traits associated with drought tolerance in tropical maize.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Nair, Sudha; Borém, Aluízio; Cairns, Jill; Trachsel, Samuel; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Bänziger, Marianne; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Crossa, Jose; Babu, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) of sizeable effects that are expressed in diverse genetic backgrounds across contrasting water regimes particularly for secondary traits can significantly complement the conventional drought tolerance breeding efforts. We evaluated three tropical maize biparental populations under water-stressed and well-watered regimes for drought-related morpho-physiological traits, such as anthesis-silking interval (ASI), ears per plant (EPP), stay-green (SG) and plant-to-ear height ratio (PEH). In general, drought stress reduced the genetic variance of grain yield (GY), while that of morpho-physiological traits remained stable or even increased under drought conditions. We detected consistent genomic regions across different genetic backgrounds that could be target regions for marker-assisted introgression for drought tolerance in maize. A total of 203 QTL for ASI, EPP, SG and PEH were identified under both the water regimes. Meta-QTL analysis across the three populations identified six constitutive genomic regions with a minimum of two overlapping traits. Clusters of QTL were observed on chromosomes 1.06, 3.06, 4.09, 5.05, 7.03 and 10.04/06. Interestingly, a ~8-Mb region delimited in 3.06 harboured QTL for most of the morpho-physiological traits considered in the current study. This region contained two important candidate genes viz., zmm16 (MADS-domain transcription factor) and psbs1 (photosystem II unit) that are responsible for reproductive organ development and photosynthate accumulation, respectively. The genomic regions identified in this study partially explained the association of secondary traits with GY. Flanking single nucleotide polymorphism markers reported herein may be useful in marker-assisted introgression of drought tolerance in tropical maize.

  10. Involvement of the glucose moiety in the molecular recognition of methyl beta-lactoside by ricin: synthesis, conformational analysis, and binding studies of different derivatives at the C-3 region.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M; Solís, D; Díaz-Mauriño, T

    1994-04-01

    Syntheses of the 3-aminodeoxy (4), 3-deoxy-3-methyl (5), and 3-epi (6) derivatives of methyl beta-lactoside (1) have been achieved from 1 in a straightforward way, and their solution conformations in water and dimethyl sulfoxide analysed through molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance data. The overall shape of all the compounds studied is fairly similar and may be described by conformers included in a low energy region with phi = 15 +/- 45 degrees and psi = -25 +/- 30 degrees, that is ca. 5% of the total potential energy surface for the glycosidic linkages of the disaccharides. The binding of the different compounds to ricin, the galactose-specific toxin from Ricinus communis, has been investigated. The results confirm the involvement of the C-3 region in a nonpolar interaction with the protein at the periphery of the combining site. PMID:8187100

  11. Involvement of the glucose moiety in the molecular recognition of methyl beta-lactoside by ricin: synthesis, conformational analysis, and binding studies of different derivatives at the C-3 region.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Jiménez-Barbero, J; Martín-Lomas, M; Solís, D; Díaz-Mauriño, T

    1994-04-01

    Syntheses of the 3-aminodeoxy (4), 3-deoxy-3-methyl (5), and 3-epi (6) derivatives of methyl beta-lactoside (1) have been achieved from 1 in a straightforward way, and their solution conformations in water and dimethyl sulfoxide analysed through molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance data. The overall shape of all the compounds studied is fairly similar and may be described by conformers included in a low energy region with phi = 15 +/- 45 degrees and psi = -25 +/- 30 degrees, that is ca. 5% of the total potential energy surface for the glycosidic linkages of the disaccharides. The binding of the different compounds to ricin, the galactose-specific toxin from Ricinus communis, has been investigated. The results confirm the involvement of the C-3 region in a nonpolar interaction with the protein at the periphery of the combining site.

  12. Molecular characterization of the U.S. Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray collection using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) and Targeted Region Amplification Polymorphism (TRAP) markers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray), a truly Native American crop, is a short life-cycle annual desert legume indigenous to northwestern Mexico and the southwestern USA and is considered drought and heat tolerant. The Western Regional Plant Introduction Station currently maintains 211 acce...

  13. The molecular cascades of long-term potentiation underlie memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, but not in the basolateral amygdala or the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Rossato, Janine I; da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Data accumulated through the past 15 years showed that memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance learning relies on a sequence of molecular events in the CA1 region of the hippocampus that is practically identical to that of long-term potentiation (LTP) in that area. Recent findings have indeed described CA1 LTP concomitant to the consolidation of this and other tasks. However, abundant evidence suggests that, in addition, other molecular events, involving some of the same steps but with different timing and in different sequence in the basolateral amygdala, entorhinal, parietal and cingulate cortex are as important as those of the hippocampus for memory consolidation. Here we review the hippocampal mechanisms involved and the possible interconnections between all these processes. Overall, the findings indicate that memory consolidation of even a task as deceivingly simple as one-trial avoidance relies on hippocampal LTP but also requires the concomitant participation of other brain systems and molecular events. Further, they point to the mechanisms that account for the enhanced consolidation usually seen for emotion-laden memories.

  14. A molecular beacon strategy for the thermodynamic characterization of triplex DNA: triplex formation at the promoter region of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Antony, T; Thomas, T; Sigal, L H; Shirahata, A; Thomas, T J

    2001-08-01

    We studied the formation of triplex DNA in the purine-pyrimidine-rich promoter site sequence of cyclin D1, located at -116 to -99 from the transcription initiation site, with a molecular beacon comprised of a G-rich 18-mer triplex forming oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Formation of triplex DNA was monitored by enhanced fluorescence of the beacon, due to the weakening of fluorescence energy transfer, upon its binding to the target duplex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed triplex DNA formation by these oligonucleotides. In low salt buffer (10 mM Na(+)), triplex DNA formation was not observed in the absence of a ligand such as spermine. At room temperature (22 degrees C), the equilibrium association constant (K(a)) calculated in the presence of 1 microM spermine and 10 mM Na(+) was 3.2 x 10(8) M(-1). The K(a) value was 1.0 x 10(9) M(-1) in the presence of 150 mM Na(+), and it increased by 10-fold by the addition of 1 mM spermine. Delta H, Delta S, and Delta G of triplex DNA formation, calculated from the temperature dependence of K(a) in the range of 20--45 degrees C, were -35.9 kcal/mol, -77 cal/(mol.K), and -13 kcal/mol, respectively, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. The corresponding values were -52.9 kcal/mol, -132.5 cal/(mol.K), and -13.4 kcal/mol in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 1 mM spermine. Structurally related polyamines exerted different degrees of triplex DNA stabilization, as determined by binding constant measurements. Comparison of spermine versus hexamine showed a 17-fold increase in the equilibrium association constant, whereas bis(ethyl) derivatization lead to a 4-fold decrease of this value. In the absence of added duplex and polyamines, the molecular beacon dissociated with a melting temperature of 67 degrees C. Thermodynamic parameters of beacon melting were calculated from the melting curve, and the Delta H, Delta S, and Delta G values were 37.8 kcal/mol, 112 cal/(mol.K), and 4.4 kcal/mol, respectively. These results demonstrate that

  15. Molecular mapping of uncharacteristically small 5q deletions in two patients with the 5q-syndrome: Delineation of the critical region on 5q and identification of a 5q-breakout

    SciTech Connect

    Boultwood, J.; Fidler, C.; Lewis, S.; Littlewood, T.J.; Wainscoat, J.S.; Buckle, V.J. ); Kelly, S. ); Sheridan, H. )

    1994-02-01

    Molecular mapping techniques have defined the region of gene loss in two patients with the 5q-syndrome and uncharacteristically small 5q deletions (5q31-q33). The allelic loss of 10 genes localized to 5q23-qter (centromere-CSF2-EGR1-FGFA-GRL-ADRB2-CSF1R-SPARC-GLUH1-NKSF1-FLT4-telomere) was investigated in peripheral blood cell fractions. Gene dosage experiments demonstrated that CSF2, EGR1, NKSF1, and FLT4 were retained on the 5q-chromosome in both patients and that FGFA was retained in one patient, thus placing these genes outside the critical region. GRL, ADRB2, CSF1R, SPARC, and GLUH1 were shown to be deleted in both patients. The proximal breakpoint is localized between EGR1 and FGFA in one patient and between FGFA and ADRB2 in the other, and the distal breakpoint is localized between GLUH1 and NKSF1 in both patients. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to map the 5q deletion breakpoints, and breakpoint-specific fragments were detected with FGFA in the granulocyte but not the lymphocyte fraction of one patient. This study has established the critical region of gene loss of the 5q-chromosome in the 5q-syndrome, giving the location for a putative tumor-suppressor gene in the 5.6-Mb region between FGFA and NKSF1. 54 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The Faraday filter-based spectrometer for observing sodium nightglow and studying atomic and molecular oxygen associated with the sodium chemistry in the mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Sean D.; She, Chiao-Yao; Yuan, Tao; Krueger, David A.; Plane, J. M. C.; Slanger, Tom

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the operational principles, design and field testing of a new, compact, Faraday filter-based spectrometer to measure the D2 (589.158 nm) to D1 (589.756 nm) intensity ratio of the sodium nightglow. This work was motivated by the observations of Slanger et al. (2005) who reported an annual variation in D2/D1 with values ranging from 1.2 to 1.8. Their proposed explanation, a modified Chapman mechanism, requires that the intensity ratio is related to the concentration ratio of atomic oxygen [O] to molecular oxygen [O2]. Our method of measuring D2/D1 utilizes narrowband Na vapor Faraday filters, which can yield observations on the fractional contributions of the two chemical pathways of the modified Chapman mechanism. Since delineation of the two chemical pathways requires a spectral resolution of 0.0002 nm, this is not possible with any other existing instrument.

  17. Molecular characterization of an intragenic minisatellite (VNTR) polymorphism in the human parathyroid hormone-related peptide gene in chromosome region 12p12. 1-p11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pausova, Z.; Morgan, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Bourdon, J.; Goltzman, D.; Hendy, G.N. )

    1993-07-01

    The human parathyroid hormone-related peptide (hPTHrP) gene in chromosome region 12p12.1-p11.2 plays an important role in mammalian development and specifically in skeletogenesis. The authors have characterized a VNTR polymorphism in the hPTHrP gene that is located in an intron 100-bp downstream of exon VI that encodes a 3[prime] untranslated region. By PCR analysis eight different alleles were identified in a group of 112 unrelated individuals. All eight alleles were sequenced and the repeat unit was identified as the general sequence [G(TA)[sub n]C][sub N], where n = 4 to 11 and N = 3 to 17. This polymorphic sequence-tagged site will be useful for mapping chromosome 12p and will aid in testing for linkage of genetic diseases to the hPTHrP gene. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  18. A naturally occurring mutation within the probe-binding region compromises a molecular-based West Nile virus surveillance assay for mosquito pools (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Brault, Aaron C; Fang, Ying; Dannen, Maureen; Anishchenko, Michael; Reisen, William K

    2012-07-01

    A naturally occurring mutation was detected within the probe binding region targeting the envelope gene sequence of West Nile virus used in real-time polymerase chain reaction assays to test mosquito pools and other samples. A single C-->T transition 6nt from the 5' end of the 16mer in the envelope gene probe-binding region at genomic position 1,194 reduced assay sensitivity. The mutation first was detected in 2009 and persisted at a low prevalence into 2011. The mutation caused a 0.4% false negative error rate during 2011. These data emphasized the importance of confirmational testing and redundancy in surveillance systems relying on highly specific nucleic acid detection platforms.

  19. Molecular and pigment studies of the picophytoplankton in a region of the Southern Ocean (42 54°S, 141 144°E) in March 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmotte, A.; Demonceau, C.; Goffart, A.; Hecq, J.-H.; Demoulin, V.; Crossley, A. C.

    Seven filtered seawater samples (depths between 30 and 55 m) collected during the SAZ project of the Austral summer of 1997-1998 were used for a simultaneous study of the picophytoplankton pigments based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses and flow cytometry, and of the molecular diversity of the picophytoplankton based on their rDNA sequences. The sampling sites could be divided into three temperature zones, distinguished by their proximity to the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Fronts. HPLC analysis of total chlorophylls and carotenoids showed fairly low phytoplankton concentrations (77-262 ng chl a l -1), with minimal values of the pigments in the two samples of the Polar Front Zone around 54°S (water temperature of 4°C at time of collection). In this zone, a similar decrease of particles, identified as cyanobacteria on the basis of their fluorescence, was observed by flow cytometry. Sequences very similar to the 16S rDNA sequence of Synechococcus WH8103 were present in all samples. This Synechococcus genotype is thus found in the Southern Ocean in addition to the Atlantic and Pacific locations where it has been previously observed. The yield of PCR products was lower in the two samples taken in the Polar Front Zone, showing a good agreement between molecular and pigment data. 16S rDNA sequences of plastids of eukaryotic algae also were retrieved, mostly related to those of an environmental clone called OM164, which has not been cultivated but has phylogenetic affinities to the Raphidophyceae.

  20. Molecular identification of veterinary yeast isolates by use of sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Garner, Cherilyn D; Starr, Jennifer K; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig

    2010-06-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods-traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit-showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population.

  1. Molecular Identification of Veterinary Yeast Isolates by Use of Sequence-Based Analysis of the D1/D2 Region of the Large Ribosomal Subunit▿

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Cherilyn D.; Starr, Jennifer K.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Altier, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods—traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit—showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population. PMID:20392917

  2. Molecular markers for X-ray-insensitive differentiated cells in the Inner and outer regions of the mesenchymal space in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Machiko; Kudome-Takamatsu, Tomomi; Nishimura, Osamu; An, Yang; Kashima, Makoto; Shibata, Norito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-09-01

    Planarian's strong regenerative ability is dependent on stem cells (called neoblasts) that are X-ray-sensitive and proliferative stem cells. In addition to neoblasts, another type of X-ray-sensitive cells was newly identified by recent research. Thus, planarian's X-ray-sensitive cells can be divided into at least two populations, Type 1 and Type 2, the latter corresponding to planarian's classically defined "neoblasts". Here, we show that Type 1 cells were distributed in the outer region (OR) immediately underneath the muscle layer at all axial levels from head to tail, while the Type 2 cells were distributed in a more internal region (IR) of the mesenchymal space at the axial levels from neck to tail. To elucidate the biological significance of these two regions, we searched for genes expressed in differentiated cells that were locate close to these X-ray-sensitive cell populations in the mesenchymal space, and identified six genes mainly expressed in the OR or IR, named OR1, OR2, OR3, IR1, IR2 and IR3. The predicted amino acid sequences of these genes suggested that differentiated cells expressing OR1, OR3, IR1, or IR2 provide Type 1 and Type 2 cells with specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments.

  3. Molecular organization of the maternal effect region of the Shaker complex of Drosophila: characterization of an IA channel transcript with homology to vertebrate Na+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, A.; Krah-Jentgens, I.; Müller, R.; Müller-Holtkamp, F.; Seidel, R.; Kecskemethy, N.; Casal, J.; Ferrus, A.; Pongs, O.

    1987-01-01

    We have cloned 215-kb DNA containing the maternal effect region (ME) of the Shaker gene complex (shC) at 16F of the Drosophila X chromosome. Five translocation and deletion breakpoints have been mapped on the cloned DNA allowing a correlation of the genetic map to transcription units. The ME region spans ˜100 kb. The genetic behavior of this region correlates with the occurrence of maternal RNAs in this part of the ShC. Two transcripts have been identified in the vicinity of chromosomal rearrangements which cause a Sh phenotype. These are a 4.5-kb transcript interrupted by T(x;2)B27 and a 2-kb transcript interrupted by T(X;3)ShLC and T(X;Y)W32. The latter transcript is derived from a primary transcript which spans >65 kb genomic DNA. The cDNA-sequencing data show that this Shaker (IAchannel) gene can encode a protein of ˜35 kd with three α-helical membrane-spanning sequences near its carboxyl terminus. These have a striking homology with membrane-spanning sequences of the vertabrate Na+ channel. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 11. PMID:16453805

  4. Molecular markers for X-ray-insensitive differentiated cells in the Inner and outer regions of the mesenchymal space in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Machiko; Kudome-Takamatsu, Tomomi; Nishimura, Osamu; An, Yang; Kashima, Makoto; Shibata, Norito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-09-01

    Planarian's strong regenerative ability is dependent on stem cells (called neoblasts) that are X-ray-sensitive and proliferative stem cells. In addition to neoblasts, another type of X-ray-sensitive cells was newly identified by recent research. Thus, planarian's X-ray-sensitive cells can be divided into at least two populations, Type 1 and Type 2, the latter corresponding to planarian's classically defined "neoblasts". Here, we show that Type 1 cells were distributed in the outer region (OR) immediately underneath the muscle layer at all axial levels from head to tail, while the Type 2 cells were distributed in a more internal region (IR) of the mesenchymal space at the axial levels from neck to tail. To elucidate the biological significance of these two regions, we searched for genes expressed in differentiated cells that were locate close to these X-ray-sensitive cell populations in the mesenchymal space, and identified six genes mainly expressed in the OR or IR, named OR1, OR2, OR3, IR1, IR2 and IR3. The predicted amino acid sequences of these genes suggested that differentiated cells expressing OR1, OR3, IR1, or IR2 provide Type 1 and Type 2 cells with specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments. PMID:27530596

  5. Plant molecular phylogeography in China and adjacent regions: Tracing the genetic imprints of Quaternary climate and environmental change in the world's most diverse temperate flora.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Fu, Cheng-Xing; Comes, Hans Peter

    2011-04-01

    The Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) of East Asia harbors the most diverse of the world's temperate flora, and was the most important glacial refuge for its Tertiary representatives ('relics') throughout Quaternary ice-age cycles. A steadily increasing number of phylogeographic studies in the SJFR of mainland China and adjacent areas, including the Qinghai-Tibetan-Plateau (QTP) and Sino-Himalayan region, have documented the population histories of temperate plant species in these regions. Here we review this current literature that challenges the oft-stated view of the SJFR as a glacial sanctuary for temperate plants, instead revealing profound effects of Quaternary changes in climate, topography, and/or sea level on the current genetic structure of such organisms. There are three recurrent phylogeographic scenarios identified by different case studies that broadly agree with longstanding biogeographic or palaeo-ecological hypotheses: (i) postglacial re-colonization of the QTP from (south-)eastern glacial refugia; (ii) population isolation and endemic species formation in Southwest China due to tectonic shifts and river course dynamics; and (iii) long-term isolation and species survival in multiple localized refugia of (warm-)temperate deciduous forest habitats in subtropical (Central/East/South) China. However, in four additional instances, phylogeographic findings seem to conflict with a priori predictions raised by palaeo-data, suggesting instead: (iv) glacial in situ survival of some hardy alpine herbs and forest trees on the QTP platform itself; (v) long-term refugial isolation of (warm-)temperate evergreen taxa in subtropical China; (vi) 'cryptic' glacial survival of (cool-)temperate deciduous forest trees in North China; and (vii) unexpectedly deep (Late Tertiary/early-to-mid Pleistocene) allopatric-vicariant differentiation of disjunct lineages in the East China-Japan-Korea region due to past sea transgressions. We discuss these and other consequences

  6. Plant molecular phylogeography in China and adjacent regions: Tracing the genetic imprints of Quaternary climate and environmental change in the world's most diverse temperate flora.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Fu, Cheng-Xing; Comes, Hans Peter

    2011-04-01

    The Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) of East Asia harbors the most diverse of the world's temperate flora, and was the most important glacial refuge for its Tertiary representatives ('relics') throughout Quaternary ice-age cycles. A steadily increasing number of phylogeographic studies in the SJFR of mainland China and adjacent areas, including the Qinghai-Tibetan-Plateau (QTP) and Sino-Himalayan region, have documented the population histories of temperate plant species in these regions. Here we review this current literature that challenges the oft-stated view of the SJFR as a glacial sanctuary for temperate plants, instead revealing profound effects of Quaternary changes in climate, topography, and/or sea level on the current genetic structure of such organisms. There are three recurrent phylogeographic scenarios identified by different case studies that broadly agree with longstanding biogeographic or palaeo-ecological hypotheses: (i) postglacial re-colonization of the QTP from (south-)eastern glacial refugia; (ii) population isolation and endemic species formation in Southwest China due to tectonic shifts and river course dynamics; and (iii) long-term isolation and species survival in multiple localized refugia of (warm-)temperate deciduous forest habitats in subtropical (Central/East/South) China. However, in four additional instances, phylogeographic findings seem to conflict with a priori predictions raised by palaeo-data, suggesting instead: (iv) glacial in situ survival of some hardy alpine herbs and forest trees on the QTP platform itself; (v) long-term refugial isolation of (warm-)temperate evergreen taxa in subtropical China; (vi) 'cryptic' glacial survival of (cool-)temperate deciduous forest trees in North China; and (vii) unexpectedly deep (Late Tertiary/early-to-mid Pleistocene) allopatric-vicariant differentiation of disjunct lineages in the East China-Japan-Korea region due to past sea transgressions. We discuss these and other consequences

  7. Molecular analysis of a U3 RNA gene locus in tomato: transcription signals, the coding region, expression in transgenic tobacco plants and tandemly repeated pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, T; Solymosy, F

    1990-04-25

    By screening a tomato genomic library with a tomato U3 RNA probe, we detected a U3 genomic locus whose coding region was determined by primer extension (5' end) and direct RNA sequencing of purified U3 RNA from tomato (3' end). Tomato U3 RNA is 216 nucleotides long, contains all the four evolutionarily highly conserved sequence blocks (Boxes A to D), has at its 5' end a cap not precipitable with anti-m3G antibodies and can be folded into a peculiar secondary structure with two stem-loops at its 5' end. A tagged derivative of the U3 gene was faithfully expressed in transgenic tobacco plants. In the 5' flanking region both plant-specific UsnRNA transcription signals [the TATA-like sequence and the upstream sequence element (USE)] were present, but were positioned closer to each other and also to the cap site in the U3 gene than in the genes for the plant spliceosomal UsnRNAs studied so far. The 3' flanking region of the tomato U3 gene lacked the consensus sequence of the putative termination signal established for the plant spliceosomal UsnRNA genes and contained a pyrimidine-rich tract (R1) followed by four tandemly repeated U3 pseudogenes (U3.1 ps to U3.4 ps) flanked by slightly altered forms (R2 to R5) of R1 and most probably generated by DNA-mediated events. Our results are in line with the conjecture that the enzyme transcribing the tomato U3 gene has different structural requirements for transcriptional activity than the enzyme transcribing plant U1, U2 and U5 genes.

  8. Molecular instability in the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of the human mitochondrial genome: multiple origins of the 9-bp deletion and heteroplasmy for expanded repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M G; Cook, C E; Miller, K W; Waring, M J; Hagelberg, E

    1998-01-01

    We have identified two individuals from Glasgow in Scotland who have a deletion of one of two copies of the intergenic 9-bp sequence motif CCCCCTCTA, located between the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) and lysine tRNA (tRNA(Lys)) genes of the human mitochondrial genome. Although this polymorphism is common in Africa and Asia, it has not been reported in Northern Europe. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of these two individuals suggests that they belong to a lineage that originated independently of the previously characterized African and Asian 9-bp deleted lineages. Among the Scottish population we have also identified a maternal lineage of three generations exhibiting heteroplasmy for two, three and four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif. Polymerase chain reaction amplification across the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of these individuals gives different ratios of the three product lengths that are dependent on the concentration of the DNA-binding dye crystal violet. To investigate whether changes in repeat number were generated de novo, we constructed clones containing known numbers of the CCCCCTCTA motif. In the presence of high concentrations of crystal violet we obtained two, three and four copies of this motif when the amplification template contained only four copies. Various DNA-binding drugs are known to stabilize bulged structures in DNA and contribute to the process of slipped-strand mispairing during DNA replication. These results suggest that the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region is unstable owing to slipped-strand mispairing. Although sequences containing four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif are less stable in vitro, we observed an increase in the proportion of mitochondrial genomes with four repeats between-a mother and a daughter in the heteroplasmic lineage. From this we conclude that drift in the germ-line lineage is a main factor in the maintenance or loss of heteroplasmy. PMID:9684291

  9. Molecular Basis of β-Thalassemia in the Population of the Aegean Region of Turkey: Identification of A Novel Deletion Mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozkinay, Ferda; Onay, Huseyin; Karaca, Emin; Arslan, Esra; Erturk, Biray; Ece Solmaz, Asli; Tekin, Ismihan Merve; Cogulu, Ozgur; Aydinok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is the most common monogenic disorder in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectrum of β-thal mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey. The data was derived from 1171 unrelated β-thal subjects, detected in a regional reference hospital between November 2004 and December 2013. Screening for the 22 common mutations was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse dot-blot method, and direct automated DNA sequencing for the unknown samples. Thirty-one different β-thal alleles were identified. Seven mutations, namely IVS-I-110 (G > A) (41.7%), IVS-I-1 (G > A) (8.9%), IVS-II-745 (C > G) (8.6%), codon 8 (-AA) (7.7%), IVS-II-1 (G > A) (7.2%), IVS-I-6 (T > C) (6.6%), codon 39 (C > T) (4.6%) accounted for 85.3% of the mutated alleles. Frequencies of the remaining 24 β-thal mutations were less than 2.2%; these included one novel mutation [HBB: c.206_212del (p.Leu69Profs*19)], and four others [-56 (G > C), codon 16 (-C), IVS-I (-3) (C > T) (codon 29), codon 76 (-C)] found in Turkey for the first time. The results will help to prevent severe β-thal through genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis (PND) in the Aegean region of Turkey.

  10. High-Resolution Soft X-Ray Spectral Analysis in the CK Region of Titanium Carbide (TiC) using the DV-X alpha Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Kenta; Muramatsu, Yasuji; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2008-10-31

    We used the DV-X alpha method to analyze the high-resolution soft X-ray emission and absorption spectra in the CK region of titanium carbide (TiC). The spectral profiles of the X-ray emission and absorption can be ssuscfucelly reproduced by the occupied and unoccupied density of states (DOS ), respectively, in the C2p orbitals of the center carbon atoms in a Ti62C63 cluster model, suggesting that the center carbon atom in a large cluster model expanded to the cubic-structured 53 (= 125) atoms provides sufficient DOS for the X-ray spectral analysis of rock-salt structured metal carbides.

  11. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Virus in Two Italian Regions during 2010-2015: The Experience of Sicily and Liguria.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Orsi, Andrea; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Costantino, Claudio; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Vitale, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of influenza B virus remained poorly studied in Italy, despite representing a major contributor to seasonal epidemics. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin gene sequences of 197 influenza B strains circulating in both Southern (Sicily) and Northern (Liguria) Italy between 2010 and 2015. Upper respiratory tract specimens of patients displaying symptoms of influenza-like illness were screened by real-time RT-PCR assay for the presence of influenza B virus. PCR-positive influenza B samples were further analyzed by sequencing. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees were constructed and the amino-acid alignments were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed clusters in B/Victoria clade 1A/1B (n = 29, 14.7%), and B/Yamagata clades 2 (n = 112, 56.8%) and 3 (n = 56, 28.4%). Both influenza B lineages were found to co-circulate during the study period, although a lineage swap from B/Victoria to B/Yamagata occurred in Italy between January 2011 and January 2013. The most represented amino-acid substitutions were N116K in the 120-loop (83.9% of B/Yamagata clade 3 strains) and I146V in the 150-loop (89.6% of B/Victoria clade 1 strains). D197N in 190-helix was found in almost all viruses collected. Our findings provide further evidence to support the adoption of quadrivalent influenza vaccines in our country.

  12. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Virus in Two Italian Regions during 2010-2015: The Experience of Sicily and Liguria.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Orsi, Andrea; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Costantino, Claudio; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Vitale, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of influenza B virus remained poorly studied in Italy, despite representing a major contributor to seasonal epidemics. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin gene sequences of 197 influenza B strains circulating in both Southern (Sicily) and Northern (Liguria) Italy between 2010 and 2015. Upper respiratory tract specimens of patients displaying symptoms of influenza-like illness were screened by real-time RT-PCR assay for the presence of influenza B virus. PCR-positive influenza B samples were further analyzed by sequencing. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees were constructed and the amino-acid alignments were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed clusters in B/Victoria clade 1A/1B (n = 29, 14.7%), and B/Yamagata clades 2 (n = 112, 56.8%) and 3 (n = 56, 28.4%). Both influenza B lineages were found to co-circulate during the study period, although a lineage swap from B/Victoria to B/Yamagata occurred in Italy between January 2011 and January 2013. The most represented amino-acid substitutions were N116K in the 120-loop (83.9% of B/Yamagata clade 3 strains) and I146V in the 150-loop (89.6% of B/Victoria clade 1 strains). D197N in 190-helix was found in almost all viruses collected. Our findings provide further evidence to support the adoption of quadrivalent influenza vaccines in our country. PMID:27089319

  13. The Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Virus in Two Italian Regions during 2010–2015: The Experience of Sicily and Liguria

    PubMed Central

    Tramuto, Fabio; Orsi, Andrea; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Costantino, Claudio; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Vitale, Francesco; Ansaldi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of influenza B virus remained poorly studied in Italy, despite representing a major contributor to seasonal epidemics. This study aimed to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin gene sequences of 197 influenza B strains circulating in both Southern (Sicily) and Northern (Liguria) Italy between 2010 and 2015. Upper respiratory tract specimens of patients displaying symptoms of influenza-like illness were screened by real-time RT-PCR assay for the presence of influenza B virus. PCR-positive influenza B samples were further analyzed by sequencing. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees were constructed and the amino-acid alignments were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed clusters in B/Victoria clade 1A/1B (n = 29, 14.7%), and B/Yamagata clades 2 (n = 112, 56.8%) and 3 (n = 56, 28.4%). Both influenza B lineages were found to co-circulate during the study period, although a lineage swap from B/Victoria to B/Yamagata occurred in Italy between January 2011 and January 2013. The most represented amino-acid substitutions were N116K in the 120-loop (83.9% of B/Yamagata clade 3 strains) and I146V in the 150-loop (89.6% of B/Victoria clade 1 strains). D197N in 190-helix was found in almost all viruses collected. Our findings provide further evidence to support the adoption of quadrivalent influenza vaccines in our country. PMID:27089319

  14. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi Isolates of horse breeding farms from an endemic region in South of Brazil by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Krewer, Cristina da Costa; Spricigo, Dênis Augusto; de Avila Botton, Sônia; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Schrank, Irene; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2008-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive coco-bacillus and an intracellular opportunistic pathogen which causes pneumonia in foals. It is widely detected in environment and has been isolated from several sources, as soil, feces and gut from health and sick foals. The goal of this study was to characterize the epidemiological status (endemic, sporadic or no infection) of horse breeding farms from Bage County in South of Brazil, using a multiplex PCR. One hundred and eighteen R. equi isolates were identified by biochemical tests and submitted to a specie-specific and vapA multiplex PCR. These isolates were obtained from: three farms where the R. equi infection has been noticed, two farms where the disease has been not reported and one farm where the disease is frequent. All clinical isolates from horse breeding farms where the disease is endemic and/or sporadic were vapA-positive. None environmental isolates were vapA-positive. In three horse breeding farms with sporadic R. equi infection, 11.54% of the isolates from adult horse feces were vapA-positive. The multiplex PCR technique has proven to be effective for the molecular and epidemiological characterization of the R. equi isolates in horse breeding farms. An important finding in this study was the isolation of vapApositive R. equi from adult horse feces, which is an evidence for other routes of dissemination of this pathogen in the farms. PMID:24031201

  15. Molecular phylogenetic studies of Brassica, rorippa, arabidopsis and allied genera based on the internal transcribed spacer region of 18S-25S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y W; Lai, K N; Tai, P Y; Ma, D P; Li, W H

    1999-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of nine genera in four tribes of the family Brassicaceae were estimated from the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of the 18S-25S nuclear ribosomal DNA. The entire ITS region of 16 accessions belonging to 10 species of seven genera was sequenced. Eight published sequences of Brassicaceae were also used. A total of 27 sequences were included in this study; four of them were found to be pseudogenes. Both the neighbor-joining and the parsimony trees suggest that the nine genera can be divided into three groups: (1) Arabidopsis, Cardaminopsis, Capsella, and Lepidium; (2) Rorippa and Cardamine; and (3) Brassica, Sinapis, and Raphanus. In contradiction to the proposal that Cardaminopsis and Arabidopsis be put into an expanded tribe Arabideae, our data show that these two genera are more closely related to Capsella and Lepidium (tribe Lepidieae) than to Rorippa and Cardamine (tribe Arabideae). Further, our data show that within the tribe Brassiceae, Raphanus is more closely related to B. nigra than to the B. oleracea/B. rapa clade. This result is in agreement with the nuclear data obtained in several studies, but is in conflict with the RFLP data of mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA. As pointed out by previous authors, it is possible that Raphanus is a hybrid between the B. nigra and B. oleracea/B. rapa lineages with the latter as the maternal parent.

  16. Molecular Cloning of Spergen-4, Encoding a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Protein Associated with Sperm Flagella and the Acrosome Region in Rat Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howida, Ali; Salaheldeen, Elsaid; Iida, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We used a differential display in combination with complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning approach to isolate a novel rat gene LOC690919 with an open reading frame of 1227-length nucleotides encoding a protein of 409 amino acids. This gene was designated as Spergen-4 (a spermatogenic cell-specific gene-4). Spergen-4 mRNA was highly expressed in testis, and its expression was detected in rat testis starting at three weeks of postnatal development and persisting up to adulthood. Mouse and human orthologs, which lack N-terminal 77 amino acid residues of rat Spegen-4, were found in the database. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Spergen-4 was not expressed in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids, but was restrictedly detected at sperm head, cytoplasm, and developing flagella of elongated spermatids in rat testis. In mature spermatozoa, Spergen-4 was detected at the acrosome region as well as the principal piece of flagella. Spergen-4 immunosignal disappeared from sperm heads on acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. These data suggest that Spergen-4 integrated into elongated spermatids during spermiogenesis serves as a constituent for acrosome region and flagella of rat spermatozoa. PMID:27032685

  17. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections samples and healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region.

    PubMed

    Svent-Kucina, Natasa; Pirs, Mateja; Kofol, Romina; Blagus, Rok; Smrke, Dragica Maja; Bilban, Marjan; Seme, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the most important human pathogens. It is associated with different infections and is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). The aim of our study was to compare S. aureus isolates associated with SSTIs with isolates obtained from healthy carriers in the Central Slovenia region in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, genetic diversity by clonal complex (CC)/sequence type, spa type, and by toxin gene profiling. In total, 274 S. aureus isolates were collected prospectively by culturing wound samples from 461 SSTI patients and nasal samples from 451 healthy carriers. We have demonstrated high heterogeneity in terms of CCs and spa type in both groups of isolates. The main clone among SSTI strains was Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (pvl) positive CC121, whereas the main clone among carrier strains was CC45 carrying a large range of toxin genes. The main spa type in both groups was t091. Pvl was more frequently present in SSTI strains (31.2% SSTI vs 3.6% carrier strains) and staphylococcal enterotoxin C was more frequently present in carrier strains (1.6% SSTI vs 17.0% carrier strains). We have also demonstrated that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was a rare cause (2.8%) of SSTIs in our region.

  18. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS.

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, O; Oyake, M; Takano, H; Ikeuchi, T; Igarashi, S; Tsuji, S

    1995-01-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these polyserine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7485154

  19. Molecular Cloning of Spergen-4, Encoding a Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Protein Associated with Sperm Flagella and the Acrosome Region in Rat Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howida, Ali; Salaheldeen, Elsaid; Iida, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We used a differential display in combination with complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning approach to isolate a novel rat gene LOC690919 with an open reading frame of 1227-length nucleotides encoding a protein of 409 amino acids. This gene was designated as Spergen-4 (a spermatogenic cell-specific gene-4). Spergen-4 mRNA was highly expressed in testis, and its expression was detected in rat testis starting at three weeks of postnatal development and persisting up to adulthood. Mouse and human orthologs, which lack N-terminal 77 amino acid residues of rat Spegen-4, were found in the database. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that Spergen-4 was not expressed in spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and round spermatids, but was restrictedly detected at sperm head, cytoplasm, and developing flagella of elongated spermatids in rat testis. In mature spermatozoa, Spergen-4 was detected at the acrosome region as well as the principal piece of flagella. Spergen-4 immunosignal disappeared from sperm heads on acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. These data suggest that Spergen-4 integrated into elongated spermatids during spermiogenesis serves as a constituent for acrosome region and flagella of rat spermatozoa.

  20. Ninety-Nine Is Not Enough: Molecular Characterization of Inhibitor-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Mutants with Insertions in the Flap Region

    SciTech Connect

    Koiek, Milan; Saskova, Klara Grantz; Rezaova, Pavlina; Brynda, Jii; van Maarseveen, Noortje M.; De Jong, Dorien; Boucher, Charles A.; Kagan, Ron M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Konvalinka, Jan

    2008-07-21

    While the selection of amino acid insertions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a known mechanism of resistance against RT inhibitors, very few reports on the selection of insertions in the protease (PR) coding region have been published. It is still unclear whether these insertions impact protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and/or viral replication capacity. We show that the prevalence of insertions, especially between amino acids 30 to 41 of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) PR, has increased in recent years. We identified amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 of the PR of HIV-1-infected patients who had undergone prolonged treatment with PIs, and we characterized the contribution of these insertions to viral resistance. We prepared the corresponding mutated, recombinant PR variants with or without insertions at positions 33 and 35 and characterized them in terms of enzyme kinetics and crystal structures. We also engineered the corresponding recombinant viruses and analyzed the PR susceptibility and replication capacity by recombinant virus assay. Both in vitro methods confirmed that the amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 contribute to the viral resistance to most of the tested PIs. The structural analysis revealed local structural rearrangements in the flap region and in the substrate binding pockets. The enlargement of the PR substrate binding site together with impaired flap dynamics could account for the weaker inhibitor binding by the insertion mutants. Amino acid insertions in the vicinity of the binding cleft therefore represent a novel mechanism of HIV resistance development.

  1. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Untypical even-to-odd predominance in the low-molecular n-alkanes of water, suspended matter, and bottom sediments in some regions of the Arctic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdova, Anastasia; Belyaev, Nikolay; Ponyaev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, several studies have shown an unusual predominance of even-carbon number n-alkanes in dissolved and particulate phase samples and sediment samples from various regions of the World Ocean [Nachman, 1985; Nishimura and Baker, 1985; Elias et al., 1997]. Different possible sources were proposed such as diagenesis (diagenetic origin from co-occurring fatty acids and alcohols), direct microbial input, microbial degradation of algal detritus, etc. Some researchers, however, are incredulous about this phenomenon and consider relatively high content of even-carbon number n-alkanes as contamination during the experiments. We report here the results of GC and GC-MS analysis of water, suspended particulate matter and sediment samples collected during 7 marine and coastal scientific expeditions to the White and Kara Seas, and to the central Arctic Basin (2004-2013). Many of the above samples (more than 30) present n-alkane distribution with a strong even-carbon number predominance of n-C14H30, and n-C16H34. Maximum enrichment was observed in some suspended matter samples with predominance of n-C16H34. The origin of even-carbon number n-alkanes in marine ecosystems is still not clear. In Antarctic region n-C16 and n-C18 and other even chain n-alkanes were reported to be dominant in the samples of the sea-ice algae, zooplankton and fish [Green et al. 1997] however in the Arctic region this phenomenon has not been demonstrated yet. Increasing of bacteria number and δ13C values observed in course of the accompanying studies [Lein et al., 2013] suggest existence of mechanism of phytoplankton bacterial destruction in the Arctic ecosystems, leading to formation of even-carbon number n-alkanes. R.J. Nachman - Lipids, Vol. 20, No 9, pp. 629-633 (1985). M. Nishimura, E.W. Baker - Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta, Vol. 50, pp. 299-305 (1986). V.O. Elias, B.R.T. Simoneit, J.N. Cardoso - Naturwissenschaften, Vol. 84, pp. 415-420 (1997). G. Green et al. - Marine Pollution

  3. Molecular Characterization of the ORF3 and S1 Genes of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Non S-INDEL Strains in Seven Regions of China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Enyu; Guo, Donghua; Li, Chunqiu; Wei, Shan; Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Qiujin; Zhang, Bei; Kong, Fanzhi; Feng, Li; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to trace the evolution of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), S1 and ORF3 genes of viruses identified in 41 pig farms from seven regions (North, Northeast, Northwest, Central, East, South West, and South, respectively) of China in 2015 were sequenced and analyzed. Sequence analysis revealed that the 41 ORF3 genes and 29 S1 genes identified in our study exhibited nucleotide homologies of 98.2%–100% and 96.6%–100%, respectively; these two genes exhibited low nucleotide sequence similarities with classical CV777 strain and early Chinese strain LZC. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the identified PEDV strains belonged to global non S-INDEL strains, and exhibited genetic diversity; S1 gene of the HLJ2015/DP1-1 strain harbored an unique deletion of 12 nucleotides (A1130CAACTCCACTG1141); while the Chinese PEDV S-INDEL reference strains included two types of the “CV777” S-INDEL as well as the “US” S-INDEL, and all co-circulated with Chinese non S-INDEL strains. Of 29 identified S1 genes, the SS2 epitope (Y748SNIGVCK755) was highly conserved, while the SS6 epitope (L764QDGQVKI771) and pAPN receptor-binding region (aa 490–615) exhibited amino substitutions. Nine possible recombination events were identified between the 29 identifed S1 genes and the 3 S1 reference genes from early Chinese PEDV strains. The complete S genes of selected Chinese PEDV field strains (2011–2015) showed 5.18%–6.07% nucleotide divergence, which is far higher than the divergence observed in early Chinese PEDV strains (3.1%) (P<0.05). Our data provide evidence that PEDV non S-INDEL strains with genetic diversities and potential recombination circulate in seven regions of China in 2015; Chinese PEDV S-INDEL strains exhibit genetic diversity and co-circulate with non S-INDEL strains. PMID:27494026

  4. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-01

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  5. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  6. [Molecular characterisation and phenotypic description of two patients with reciprocal chromosomal aberrations in the region of the 3q29 microdeletion/microduplication syndromes].

    PubMed

    Quintela, I; Barros-Angueira, F; Perez-Gay, L; Dacruz, D; Castro-Gago, M; Carracedo, A; Eiris-Punal, J

    2015-09-16

    Introduccion. Los sindromes de microdelecion y microduplicacion 3q29 se caracterizan por una marcada heterogeneidad fenotipica, y el retraso del desarrollo y la discapacidad intelectual de grado leve-moderado son las manifestaciones clinicas mas frecuentes. Casos clinicos. Dos pacientes con aberraciones cromosomicas reciprocas en la region 3q29. La paciente con la microdelecion 3q29 presenta dificultades de aprendizaje, microcefalia limite, dismorfismo facial leve, deficit atencional e impulsividad, y rasgos ansiosos y obsesivos. El paciente con la microduplicacion 3q29 reciproca presenta dificultades de aprendizaje, dismorfismo facial leve y un perfil conductual disruptivo no asociado previamente con esta duplicacion. Conclusion. Se comparan los fenotipos de estos pacientes y se revisa la bibliografia de pacientes pediatricos con microdeleciones y microduplicaciones 3q29.

  7. Characterization of feline T cell receptor gamma (TCRG) variable region genes for the molecular diagnosis of feline intestinal T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter F; Woo, Jennifer C; Vernau, William; Kosten, Sandra; Graham, Petra S

    2005-07-15

    A diagnosis of intestinal lymphoma is currently made on the basis of clinical and morphologic criteria. This can prove problematic for many reasons that include inadequate sample size, the coexistence of lymphoma and inflammation, and the inability to assess architectural integrity of all tissue compartments in biopsy specimens obtained endoscopically. The detection of a clonal population of cells in a lymphoproliferative lesion represents an important criterion for the diagnosis of neoplasia, but this has not been assessed in feline intestinal lymphoma. T cell receptor gamma (TCRG) gene rearrangement analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a methodology that can be used to detect clonality in T cell populations. The basis of this assay depends on the assessment of the junctional diversity that results from rearrangement of TCRG V (variable) and J (joining) gene segments. Feline TCRG transcripts from normal small intestine and spleen were obtained using a rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'RACE) method. Limited diversity of TCRG V and J gene segments was observed. The high degree of sequence homology in the TCRG V and J gene segments was exploited to develop a PCR test for the assessment of TCRG V--J junctional diversity and hence clonality determination of T cell populations in cats. Molecular clonality determination was applied to feline intestinal lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (9 cats), and transmural and mucosal T cell lymphoma (28 cats). Clonal rearrangement of the TCRG V--J junction was detected in 22 of 28 intestinal T cell lymphomas, and oligoclonality was detected in 3 intestinal T cell lymphomas. This contrasted with the detection of polyclonal rearrangement in normal intestinal tissues (3 cats) and in lymphoplasmacytic IBD (9 cats). It is proposed that assessment of TCRG V--J junctional diversity for the detection of clonality represents an important adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of T cell lymphoma in the cat.

  8. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Chinese indigenous blue-shelled chickens inferred from whole genomic region of the SLCO1B3 gene.

    PubMed

    Dalirsefat, Seyed Benyamin; Dong, Xianggui; Deng, Xuemei

    2015-08-01

    In total, 246 individuals from 8 Chinese indigenous blue- and brown-shelled chicken populations (Yimeng Blue, Wulong Blue, Lindian Blue, Dongxiang Blue, Lushi Blue, Jingmen Blue, Dongxiang Brown, and Lushi Brown) were genotyped for 21 SNP markers from the SLCO1B3 gene to evaluate phylogenetic relationships. As a representative of nonblue-shelled breeds, White Leghorn was included in the study for reference. A high proportion of SNP polymorphism was observed in Chinese chicken populations, ranging from 89% in Jingmen Blue to 100% in most populations, with a mean of 95% across all populations. The White Leghorn breed showed the lowest polymorphism, accounting for 43% of total SNPs. The mean expected heterozygosity varied from 0.11 in Dongxiang Blue to 0.46 in Yimeng Blue. Analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) for 2 groups of Chinese chickens based on eggshell color type revealed 52% within-group and 43% between-group variations of the total genetic variation. As expected, FST and Reynolds' genetic distance were greatest between White Leghorn and Chinese chicken populations, with average values of 0.40 and 0.55, respectively. The first and second principal coordinates explained approximately 92% of the total variation and supported the clustering of the populations according to their eggshell color type and historical origins. STRUCTURE analysis showed a considerable source of variation among populations for the clustering into blue-shelled and nonblue-shelled chicken populations. The low estimation of genetic differentiation (FST) between Chinese chicken populations is possibly due to a common historical origin and high gene flow. Remarkably similar population classifications were obtained with all methods used in the study. Aligning endogenous avian retroviral (EAV)-HP insertion sequences showed no difference among the blue-shelled chickens.

  9. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population–diagnostic molecular marker

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-01-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population–diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  10. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  11. Genetic and metal analyses of fragmented populations of Betula papyrifera (Marsh) in a mining reclaimed region: identification of population-diagnostic molecular marker.

    PubMed

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe K; Michael, Paul

    2014-09-01

    White birch (Betula papyrifera) is an open pollinate species that is, dominant in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. In fact, this species represents 65% of all trees in the region. We hypothesized that the exchange of genetic information between fragmented populations by range-wide paternal introgression is possible in wind-pollinated species such as B. papyrifera. On the other hand, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on plant growth and population dynamics are well documented. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the level of genetic variation, gene flow, and population sustainability of B. papyrifera after land reclamation; and (2) to determine the level of phytoavailable metals in soil and their accumulation in trees. We found that B. papyrifera is a Ni and Zn accumulator with a translocation factor of 6.4 and 81, respectively, and an indicator of Cu and Pb. The level of polymorphic loci, Shannon index, Nei's genetic diversity, observed number of alleles, and gene flow were determined for the fragmented populations within the targeted region. The percent of polymorphic loci ranged from 28% to 56%; the gene flow was also low with a value of 0.89, and the population differentiation was very high with a value of 0.36. Two population-diagnostic ISSR markers were identified. They were cloned, sequenced, and converted to SCAR markers. Overall, the fragmented populations of B. papyrifera in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable based on the moderate level of intrapopulation variability. PMID:25535559

  12. Molecular analysis of red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a reclaimed mining region in Northern Ontario (Canada): soil metal accumulation and translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Narendrula, R; Michael, P; Omri, A

    2015-04-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum) species is one of the most widespread deciduous (hardwood) trees of eastern North America. It is among the dominant tree species in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. To date, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood. The main objectives of the present study are (1) to determine the level of phytoavailable metal in soil and accumulation in A. rubrum, and (2) to compare the levels of genetic variation among and within A. rubrum populations from areas with different metal contents in a Northern Ontario region. The total heavy metal levels were found to be high but the availability of these metals were much lower. We found that red maple does not accumulate heavy metals in their leaves as other hardwood species. The translocation factors were 0.05, 0.21, 0.38, 0.90, and 2.8 for Cu, Ni, Fe, Zn, and Mg, respectively. The levels of genetic variation in red maple populations from reclaimed lands in Northern Ontario were moderate to high since the percentage of polymorphic loci varied between 51 and 67%. The mean values for observed number of alleles (Na), effective number of alleles (Ne), Nei's gene diversity (h), and Shannon's information index (I) were 1.60, 1.24, 0.15 and 0.24, respectively. The population differentiation (GST) among the fragmented populations was high (0.28) despite a high level of gene flow (Nm = 1.28). Nevertheless, all the populations within the targeted region were genetically closely related. A specific ISSR marker that was identified in all the samples from the reference sites was absent in most samples from metal contaminated. This specific band was cloned and sequenced. Overall, the present study confirms that red maple populations in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable despite the high level of total metal content in soil. PMID:25560741

  13. Molecular analysis of red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a reclaimed mining region in Northern Ontario (Canada): soil metal accumulation and translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Narendrula, R; Michael, P; Omri, A

    2015-04-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum) species is one of the most widespread deciduous (hardwood) trees of eastern North America. It is among the dominant tree species in the Northern Ontario after land reclamation. To date, the effects of heavy metal contamination from the mining activities on terrestrial ecosystems are not well understood. The main objectives of the present study are (1) to determine the level of phytoavailable metal in soil and accumulation in A. rubrum, and (2) to compare the levels of genetic variation among and within A. rubrum populations from areas with different metal contents in a Northern Ontario region. The total heavy metal levels were found to be high but the availability of these metals were much lower. We found that red maple does not accumulate heavy metals in their leaves as other hardwood species. The translocation factors were 0.05, 0.21, 0.38, 0.90, and 2.8 for Cu, Ni, Fe, Zn, and Mg, respectively. The levels of genetic variation in red maple populations from reclaimed lands in Northern Ontario were moderate to high since the percentage of polymorphic loci varied between 51 and 67%. The mean values for observed number of alleles (Na), effective number of alleles (Ne), Nei's gene diversity (h), and Shannon's information index (I) were 1.60, 1.24, 0.15 and 0.24, respectively. The population differentiation (GST) among the fragmented populations was high (0.28) despite a high level of gene flow (Nm = 1.28). Nevertheless, all the populations within the targeted region were genetically closely related. A specific ISSR marker that was identified in all the samples from the reference sites was absent in most samples from metal contaminated. This specific band was cloned and sequenced. Overall, the present study confirms that red maple populations in Northern Ontario are genetically sustainable despite the high level of total metal content in soil.

  14. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  15. [Molecular genetic analysis of TUB18 and TUB20 intragenic polymorphism and various mutations of the CFTR gene in the Moscow region].

    PubMed

    Sazonova, M A; Amosenko, F A; Kapranov, N I; Kalinin, V N

    1997-09-01

    Allelic frequencies of two intron polymorphisms in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, TUB18 and TUB20, were estimated on chromosomes of 67 cystic fibrosis patients and on that of 37 healthy donors from Moscow and the Moscow oblast. Allele 2 of the TUB 18, and allele 1 of the TUB20 were 2.1 and 1.5 times more frequent on the non-delta F508 chromosomes of the cystic fibrosis patients than on chromosomes of healthy donors, i.e. these alleles were in linkage disequilibrium with the CFTR gene. Allele 1 of the TUB18 marker and allele 2 of the TUB20 marker demonstrated absolute linkage disequilibrium with the delta F508 mutation of the CFTR gene. The degree of association between the TUB18 and TUB20 intron polymorphisms and the GATT and T854T intragenic polymorphisms was analyzed. Of all 62 delta F508 chromosomes tested, 98.3% shared the 2-1-1-2 GATT- T854T-TUB18-TUB20 haplotype. Eight major (more frequent) GATT-T854T-TUB18-TUB20 haplotypes were found in 89.5% of normal, and in 97.9% of non-delta F508 chromosomes of cystic fibrosis patients from the Moscow region. Three of these major haplotypes, 2-1-1-2, 1-2-2-1, and 2-2-1-2, were respectively 2.5, 2, and 1.5 times more frequent on non-delta F508 cystic fibrosis chromosomes than on normal chromosomes. Data on screening for the G542X, N1303K, and 394delTT mutations of the CFTR gene, carried out on 134 chromosomes of cystic fibrosis patients from the Moscow region are presented. The frequencies of the G542X and 394delTT mutations were estimated as 1.5%, while the frequency of the N1303K mutation was 2.2%.

  16. Molecular Scanning of β-Thalassemia in the Southern Region of Central Java, Indonesia; a Step Towards a Local Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Rujito, Lantip; Basalamah, Muhammad; Mulatsih, Sri; Sofro, Abdul Salam M

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic blood disorder worldwide, and particularly prevalent in Indonesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of β-thalassemia (β-thal) mutations found in the southern region of Central Java, Indonesia. The subjects of the study included 209 β-thal Javanese patients from Banyumas Residency, a southwest region of Central Java Province. DNA analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and the direct sequencing method. The results showed that 14 alleles were found in the following order: IVS-I-5 (G > C) (HBB: c.92 + 5G > C) 43.5%, codon 26 (Hb E; HBB: c.79G > A) 28.2%, IVS-I-1 (G > A) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > A) 5.0%, codon 15 (TGG > TAG) (HBB: c.47G > A) 3.8%, IVS-I-1 (G > T) (HBB: c.92 + 1G > T) 3.1%, codon 35 (-C) (HBB: c.110delC) 2.4%. The rest, including codons 41/42 (-TTCT) (HBB: c.126_129delCTTT), codons 8/9 (+G) (HBB: c.27_28insG), codon 19 (AAC > AGC) (HBB: c.59A > G), codon 17 (AAG > TAG) (HBB: c.52A > T), IVS-I-2 (T > C) (HBB: c.92 + 2T > C), codons 123/124/125 (-ACCCCACC) (HBB: c.370_378delACCCCACCA), codon 40 (-G) (HBB: c.123delG) and Cap +1 (A > C) (HBB: c.-50A > C), accounted for up to 1.0% each. The most prevalent alleles would be recommended to be used as part of β-thal screening for the Javanese, one of the major ethnic groups in the country.

  17. Molecular evidence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti co-infections in Ixodes ricinus ticks in central-eastern region of Poland.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Hapunik, Joanna; Szpechciński, Adam; Supergan-Marwicz, Marta; Goławska, Sylwia; Sprawka, Iwona; Czerniewicz, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the distribution of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti co-infection in Ixodes ricinus populations within the central-eastern region of Poland. The prevalence of analysed tick-borne human pathogens in single and polymicrobial infections in I. ricinus ticks were analysed using the conventional and nested PCR techniques. A total number of 1,123 questing tick individuals (291 females, 267 males and 565 nymphs) were collected at different ecosystems (municipal parks, suburban forests, and woodlands). In the presented study, 95 samples of ticks (8.5%) were infected with A.phagocytophilum, 3.1% (n=35) with B. microti, whereas the co-existence status of these human pathogens was detected in 1.8% (n=20) of all tested samples. It has been demonstrated that the prevalence of co-infection status was the highest among females of I. ricinus (11 samples, 3.8%), whereas the lowest within tested nymphs (5 samples, 0.9%). Ticks collected at city parks in Warsaw and suburban areas of this town characterized the highest prevalence of co-infections (3.3 and 4.8%, respectively). Furthermore, it was established that co-infection rates of ticks inhabiting woodlands within Kampinos National Park and Nadbużański Landscape Park were similar and reached the levels of 1.4% (n=5) and 1.1% (n=4), respectively.

  18. Double differential cross sections for proton induced electron emission from molecular analogues of DNA constituents for energies in the Bragg peak region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; Bug, Marion U.; Wang, Mingjie; Baek, Woon Yong; Buhr, Ticia; Hilgers, Gerhard; Champion, Christophe; Rabus, Hans

    2016-09-01

    For track structure simulations in the Bragg peak region, measured electron emission cross sections of DNA constituents are required as input for developing parameterized model functions representing the scattering probabilities. In the present work, double differential cross sections were measured for the electron emission from vapor-phase pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran, and trimethyl phosphate that are structural analogues to the base, the sugar, and the phosphate residue of the DNA, respectively. The range of proton energies was from 75 keV to 135 keV, the angles ranged from 15° to 135°, and the electron energies were measured from 10 eV to 200 eV. Single differential and total electron emission cross sections are derived by integration over angle and electron energy and compared to the semi-empirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht (HKS) model and a quantum mechanical calculation employing the first Born approximation with corrected boundary conditions (CB1). The CB1 provides the best prediction of double and single differential cross section, while total cross sections can be fitted with semi-empirical models. The cross sections of the three samples are proportional to their total number of valence electrons.

  19. Seroprevalence of Rickettsia spp. in Equids and Molecular Detection of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in Amblyomma cajennense Sensu Lato Ticks From the Pantanal Region of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Alvair Da S; Melo, Andréia L T; Amorim, Marcus V; Borges, Alice M C M; Gaíva E Silva, Lucas; Martins, Thiago F; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate exposure of equids to rickettsial agents (Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri, 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii', Rickettsia rhipicephali, and Rickettsia bellii) and rickettsial infection in ticks of a Pantanal region of Brazil. Sera of 547 equids (500 horses and 47 donkeys) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In total, 665 adults and 106 nymphal pools of Amblyomma cajennense F. sensu lato, 10 Dermacentor nitens Neumann ticks, and 88 larval pools of Amblyomma sp. were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall, 337 (61.6%) equids were reactive (titer ≥64) to at least one antigen of Rickettsia spp. The prevalence values for Rickettsia were 66%, and the highest endpoint titers were observed for 'Ca. R. amblyommii'. By PCR 3 (0.45%) A. cajennense s.l. females were positive for 'Ca. R. amblyommii'. Minimum infection rates of 0.75% for nymphs and 0.34% for larvae were calculated. Positive samples of ticks have had a fragment of the 16S mitochondrial rRNA gene sequenced and sequences showed 99% identity to Amblyomma sculptum Berlese. This study reports a wide exposure of equids to Rickettsia agents, and PCR evidence of infection with 'Ca. R. amblyommii', for the first time, in A. sculptum.

  20. Genetic Structure of Earthworm Populations at a Regional Scale: Inferences from Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Molecular Markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations. PMID:25003795

  1. [Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of enteroviruses inducing the outbreaks and seasonal rises of morbidity in different regions of the Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Amvros'eva, T V; Poklonskaia, N V; Bezruchko, A A; Fisenko, E G

    2006-01-01

    As shown by the results of the analysis, viruses ECHO 30 circulating over the period of the last 8 years in Belarus, belonged to 3 different genetic subtypes which earlier or simultaneously circulated in other European states. The outbreaks of enterovirus infections (EVI) were facilitated by the appearance of a genetic viral subtype, relatively "new" for human population, and which had not earlier circulated on this territory. Thus, the development of outbreak morbidity in 2003 was caused by a change in the dominating subtype of virus ECHO 30, which caused the outbreak of 1997. The relatively "soft" rise of morbidity in 2004 was due to the continued circulation of the same subtype of virus ECHO 30, that in 2003. The largest outbreaks of EVI in the Republic of Belarus had a number of considerable differences: the outbreak of 1997 in Gomel was characterized by the genetic heterogeneity of infective agents, being simultaneously geographically localized within the limits of one city. However, during the outbreaks of 2003 the circulation of genetically closely related viruses of the one subtype among the population of geographically remote regions of the country was registered.

  2. Molecular determinants of enterovirus 71 viral entry: cleft around GLN-172 on VP1 protein interacts with variable region on scavenge receptor B 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Song, Zilin; Qi, Yonghe; Feng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Naiqing; Sun, Yinyan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Mao, Qunyin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Wenjuan; Wan, Xiaobo; Huang, Niu; Shen, Xinliang; Liang, Zhenglun; Li, Wenhui

    2012-02-24

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major pathogens that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease outbreaks in young children in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years. Human scavenger receptor class B 2 (SCARB2) is the main cellular receptor for EV71 on target cells. The requirements of the EV71-SCARB2 interaction have not been fully characterized, and it has not been determined whether SCARB2 serves as an uncoating receptor for EV71. Here we compared the efficiency of the receptor from different species including human, horseshoe bat, mouse, and hamster and demonstrated that the residues between 144 and 151 are critical for SCARB2 binding to viral capsid protein VP1 of EV71 and seven residues from the human receptor could convert murine SCARB2, an otherwise inefficient receptor, to an efficient receptor for EV71 viral infection. We also identified that EV71 binds to SCARB2 via a canyon of VP1 around residue Gln-172. Soluble SCARB2 could convert the EV71 virions from 160 S to 135 S particles, indicating that SCARB2 is an uncoating receptor of the virus. The uncoating efficiency of SCARB2 significantly increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.6). These studies elucidated the viral capsid and receptor determinants of enterovirus 71 infection and revealed a possible target for antiviral interventions.

  3. The prion protein unstructured N-terminal region is a broad-spectrum molecular sensor with diverse and contrasting potential functions.

    PubMed

    Béland, Maxime; Roucou, Xavier

    2012-03-01

    The physiological function of the prion protein (PrP(C) ) and its conversion into its infectious form (PrP(Sc) ) are central issues to understanding the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The N-terminal moiety of PrP(C) (NH(2) -PrP(C) ) is an unstructured region with the characteristic of interacting with a broad range of partners. These interactions endow PrP(C) with multifunctional and sometimes contrasting capabilities, including neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. Recently, binding of β-sheet rich conformers to NH(2) -PrP(C) demonstrated a probable neurotoxic function for PrP(C) in Alzheimer's disease. NH(2) -PrP(C) also enhances the propagation of prions in vivo and is the target of the most potent antiprion compounds. Another level of complexity is provided by endoproteolysis and release of most of NH(2) -PrP(C) into the extracellular space. Further studies will be necessary to understand how NH(2) -PrP(C) regulates the physiological function of PrP(C) and how it is involved in the corruption of its normal function in diseases.

  4. Molecular phylogenetics of the species-rich angiosperm genus Goniothalamus (Annonaceae) inferred from nine chloroplast DNA regions: Synapomorphies and putative correlated evolutionary changes in fruit and seed morphology.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chin Cheung; Thomas, Daniel C; Saunders, Richard M K

    2015-11-01

    A phylogenetic study of the genus Goniothalamus (Annonaceae) is presented using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, with 65 species sampled (48.5% of the genus) based on sequences of nine chloroplast DNA regions (11,214 aligned positions). The resultant phylogeny clearly indicates that Goniothalamus is monophyletic. Preliminary research initially focused on identifying synapomorphies and estimating the phylogenetic signal of selected morphological characters based on parsimony and likelihood ancestral character state reconstructions. This prescreening of characters enabled 40 to be selected for further study, and of these 15 are shown here to demonstrate significant phylogenetic signal and to provide clear synapomorphies for several infrageneric clades. Although floral structure in Goniothalamus is comparatively uniform, suggesting a common basic pattern of pollination ecology, fruit and seed morphology in the genus is very diverse and is presumably associated with different patterns of frugivory. The present study assesses correlations amongst fruit and seed characters which are putatively of functional importance with regard to frugivory and dispersal. One-way phylogenetic ANOVA indicates significant phylogenetically independent correlation between the following fruit and seed characters: fruits borne on older branches and/or on the main trunk have larger monocarps than fruits borne on young branches; and monocarps that contain seeds with a hairy testa are larger than those with glabrous seeds. We discuss fruit morphologies and potential explanations for the inferred correlations, and suggest that they may be the result of adaptation to different frugivores (birds, larger non-volant animal and primate seed dispersers, respectively).

  5. Double differential cross sections for proton induced electron emission from molecular analogues of DNA constituents for energies in the Bragg peak region.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; Bug, Marion U; Wang, Mingjie; Baek, Woon Yong; Buhr, Ticia; Hilgers, Gerhard; Champion, Christophe; Rabus, Hans

    2016-09-14

    For track structure simulations in the Bragg peak region, measured electron emission cross sections of DNA constituents are required as input for developing parameterized model functions representing the scattering probabilities. In the present work, double differential cross sections were measured for the electron emission from vapor-phase pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran, and trimethyl phosphate that are structural analogues to the base, the sugar, and the phosphate residue of the DNA, respectively. The range of proton energies was from 75 keV to 135 keV, the angles ranged from 15° to 135°, and the electron energies were measured from 10 eV to 200 eV. Single differential and total electron emission cross sections are derived by integration over angle and electron energy and compared to the semi-empirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht (HKS) model and a quantum mechanical calculation employing the first Born approximation with corrected boundary conditions (CB1). The CB1 provides the best prediction of double and single differential cross section, while total cross sections can be fitted with semi-empirical models. The cross sections of the three samples are proportional to their total number of valence electrons. PMID:27634254

  6. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5’- and 3’-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species. PMID:25923814

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Llamas (Lama glama) Casein Cluster Genes Transcripts (CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, CSN3) and Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Erhardt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we report for the first time the characterization of llama (Lama glama) caseins at transcriptomic and genetic level. A total of 288 casein clones transcripts were analysed from two lactating llamas. The most represented mRNA populations were those correctly assembled (85.07%) and they encoded for mature proteins of 215, 217, 187 and 162 amino acids respectively for the CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2 and CSN3 genes. The exonic subdivision evidenced a structure made of 21, 9, 17 and 6 exons for the αs1-, β-, αs2- and κ-casein genes respectively. Exon skipping and duplication events were evidenced. Two variants A and B were identified in the αs1-casein gene as result of the alternative out-splicing of the exon 18. An additional exon coding for a novel esapeptide was found to be cryptic in the κ-casein gene, whereas one extra exon was found in the αs2-casein gene by the comparison with the Camelus dromedaries sequence. A total of 28 putative phosphorylated motifs highlighted a complex heterogeneity and a potential variable degree of post-translational modifications. Ninety-six polymorphic sites were found through the comparison of the lama casein cDNAs with the homologous camel sequences, whereas the first description and characterization of the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions allowed to identify the main putative consensus sequences involved in the casein genes expression, thus opening the way to new investigations -so far- never achieved in this species.

  8. Synthetic Human NOTCH1 EGF Modules Unraveled Molecular Mechanisms for the Structural and Functional Roles of Calcium Ions and O-Glycans in the Ligand-Binding Region.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Shun; Koide, Ryosuke; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionarily highly conserved mechanism that operates across multicellular organisms and is critical for cell-fate decisions during development and homeostasis in most tissues. Notch signaling is modified by posttranslational glycosylations of the Notch extracellular EGF-like domain. To evaluate the structural and functional roles of various glycoforms at multiple EGF domains in the human Notch transmembrane receptor, we established a universal method for the construction of NOTCH1 EGF modules displaying the desired O-glycans at the designated glycosylation sites. The versatility of this strategy was demonstrated by the rapid and highly efficient synthesis of NOTCH1 EGF12 concurrently having a β-D-glucopyranose-initiated glycan (Xylα1 → 3Xylα1 → 3Glcβ1 →) at Ser458 and α-L-fucopyranose-initiated glycan (Neu5Acα2 → 3Galβ1 → 4GlcNAcβ1 → 3Fucα1 →) at Thr466. The efficiency of the proper folding of the glycosylated EGF12 was markedly enhanced in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2. A nuclear magnetic resonance study revealed the existence of strong nuclear Overhauser effects between key sugar moieties and neighboring amino acid residues, indicating that both O-glycans contribute independently to the intramolecular stabilization of the antiparallel β-sheet structure in the ligand-binding region of EGF12. A preliminary test using synthetic human NOTCH1 EGF modules showed significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation and adhesiveness of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549, demonstrating for the first time evidence that exogenously applied synthetic EGF modules have the ability to interact with intrinsic Notch ligands on the surface of cancer cells.

  9. Molecular detection of human noroviruses in influent and effluent samples from two biological sewage treatment plants in the region of Monastir, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hassine-Zaafrane, Mouna; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Kaplon, Jérôme; Ben Salem, Imen; Pothier, Pierre; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia

    2014-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are responsible for numerous cases of waterborne and foodborne gastroenteritis every year. They are released in the sewage and their detection in this environment can reflect the epidemiology of the viral strains circulating in the community. A three-year (2007-2010) survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of human NoVs using RT-PCR in 518 sewage samples collected at the entrance and exit of two biological sewage treatment plants located in Monastir region, Tunisia. In this study, we aimed to genetically characterize the most prevalent GI and GII NoV strains, in order to obtain a rough estimate of the efficacy of disinfection treatments and to compare the results with clinical data documented in the same area during the same period. This work confirms the wide circulation and the genetic diversity of NoVs in Tunisia and the widespread distribution of NoV variants in both raw and treated wastewater. Indeed, NoV was detected in 192 (37.1%) sewage samples, among them mixed infections with group A rotavirus were detected in 125 (65.1%) cases. The genotypes of the GI NoVs were GI.1, GI.2, GI.4, GI.5, and GI of unassigned genotype (GI.UA), and the genotypes of the GII NoVs were all GII.12. This study enhances the currently poor environmental virological data gathered in Tunisia, demonstrates the benefit of environmental surveillance as a tool to determine the epidemiology of NoVs circulating in a given community, and underlines the need for the design and support of similar long-term studies in our country, in order to compensate for the absence of a national surveillance system for gastroenteric viruses.

  10. Preferential Glutathione Conjugation of a Reverse Diol Epoxide Compared to a Bay Region Diol Epoxide of Phenanthrene in Human Hepatocytes: Relevance to Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Glutathione-S-Transferase Polymorphisms and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Berg, Jeannette Zinggeler; Hochalter, J. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Bay region diol epoxides are recognized ultimate carcinogens of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and in vitro studies have demonstrated that they can be detoxified by conjugation with glutathione, leading to the widely investigated hypothesis that individuals with low activity forms of glutathione-S-transferases are at higher risk of PAH induced cancer, a hypothesis that has found at most weak support in molecular epidemiology studies. A weakness in this hypothesis was that the mercapturic acids resulting from conjugation of PAH bay region diol epoxides had never been identified in human urine. We recently analyzed smokers’ urine for mercapturic acids derived from phenanthrene, the simplest PAH with a bay region. The only phenanthrene diol epoxide-derived mercapturic acid in smokers’ urine was produced from the reverse diol epoxide, anti-phenanthrene-3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide (11), not the bay region diol epoxide, anti-phenanthrene-1,2-diol-3,4-epoxide (10), which does not support the hypothesis noted above. In this study, we extended these results by examining the conjugation of phenanthrene metabolites with glutathione in human hepatocytes. We identified the mercapturic acid N-acetyl-S-(r-4,t-2,3-trihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-c-1-phenanthryl)-L-cysteine (14a), (0.33–35.9 pmol/mL at 10 µM 8, 24h incubation, N = 10) in all incubations with phenanthrene-3,4-diol (8) and the corresponding diol epoxide 11, but no mercapturic acids were detected in incubations with phenanthrene-1,2-diol (7) and only trace amounts were observed in incubations with the corresponding bay region diol epoxide 10. Taken together with our previous results, these studies clearly demonstrate that glutathione conjugation of a reverse diol epoxide of phenanthrene is favored over conjugation of a bay region diol epoxide. Since reverse diol epoxides of PAH are generally weakly or non-mutagenic/carcinogenic, these results, if generalizable to other PAH, do not support the widely held

  11. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic analysis of Citrus (L) from north-east India as revealed by meiosis, and molecular analysis of internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hynniewta, Marlykynti; Malik, Surendra Kumar; Rao, Satyawada Rama

    2014-12-01

    The north-eastern region of India is reported to be the center of origin and rich in diversity of Citrus (L.) species, where some wild and endangered species namely Citrus indica, Citrus macroptera, Citrus latipes, Citrus ichagensis and Citrus assamensis exist in their natural and undisturbed habitat. In order to have comprehensive information about the extent of genetic variability and the occurrence of cryptic genomic hybridity between and within various Citrus species, a combined approach involving morphological, cytogenetical and molecular approaches were adopted in the present study. Cytogenetic approaches are known to resolve taxonomic riddles in a more efficient manner, by clearly delineating taxa at species and sub species levels. Male meiotic studies revealed a gametic chromosome number of n = 9, without any evidence of numerical variations. Bivalents outnumbered all other types of associations in pollen mother cells (PMCs) analyzed at diplotene, diakinesis and metaphase I. Univalents were frequently encountered in nine species presently studied, though their presence appropriately did not influence the distributional pattern of the chromosomes at anaphases I and II. The molecular approaches for phylogenetic analysis based on sequence data related to ITS 1, ITS 2 and ITS 1 + 5.8 s + ITS 2 of rDNA using maximum parsimony method and Bayesian inference have thrown light on species inter-relationship and evolution of Citrus species confirming our cytogenetical interpretations. The three true basic species i.e. Citrus medica, Citrus maxima and Citrus reticulata with their unique status have been resolved into distinct clades with molecular approaches as well. C. indica which occupies a unique position in the phylogenetic ladder of the genus Citrus has been resolved as a distinct clade and almost behaving as an out-group. The presences of quadrivalents in C. indica also echo and support its unique position. From our study it is amply clear that C

  12. Isolation of Microsporum gypseum in soil samples from different geographical regions of brazil, evaluation of the extracellular proteolytic enzymes activities (keratinase and elastase) and molecular sequencing of selected strains.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Mauro Cintra; Reis-Menezes, Adriana Araújo; Rittner, Glauce Mary Gomes; Mota, Adolfo José; Gambale, Walderez

    2012-07-01

    A survey of Microsporum gypseum was conducted in soil samples in different geographical regions of Brazil. The isolation of dermatophyte from soil samples was performed by hair baiting technique and the species were identified by morphology studies. We analyzed 692 soil samples and the recuperating rate was 19.2%. The activities of keratinase and elastase were quantitatively performed in 138 samples. The sequencing of the ITS region of rDNA was performed in representatives samples. M. gypseum isolates showed significant quantitative differences in the expression of both keratinase and elastase, but no significant correlation was observed between these enzymes. The sequencing of the representative samples revealed the presence of two teleomorphic species of M. gypseum (Arthroderma gypseum and A. incurvatum). The enzymatic activities may play an important role in the pathogenicity and a probable adaptation of this fungus to the animal parasitism. Using the phenotypical and molecular analysis, the Microsporum identification and their teleomorphic states will provide a useful and reliable identification system.

  13. Isolation of Microsporum gypseum in soil samples from different geographical regions of brazil, evaluation of the extracellular proteolytic enzymes activities (keratinase and elastase) and molecular sequencing of selected strains

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Mauro Cintra; Reis-Menezes, Adriana Araújo; Rittner, Glauce Mary Gomes; Mota, Adolfo José; Gambale, Walderez

    2012-01-01

    A survey of Microsporum gypseum was conducted in soil samples in different geographical regions of Brazil. The isolation of dermatophyte from soil samples was performed by hair baiting technique and the species were identified by morphology studies. We analyzed 692 soil samples and the recuperating rate was 19.2%. The activities of keratinase and elastase were quantitatively performed in 138 samples. The sequencing of the ITS region of rDNA was performed in representatives samples. M. gypseum isolates showed significant quantitative differences in the expression of both keratinase and elastase, but no significant correlation was observed between these enzymes. The sequencing of the representative samples revealed the presence of two teleomorphic species of M. gypseum (Arthroderma gypseum and A. incurvatum). The enzymatic activities may play an important role in the pathogenicity and a probable adaptation of this fungus to the animal parasitism. Using the phenotypical and molecular analysis, the Microsporum identification and their teleomorphic states will provide a useful and reliable identification system. PMID:24031904

  14. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  15. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  16. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  17. Molecular Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  18. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  19. Identification of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using a simple set of biochemical tests correlating with 16S-23S interspace region molecular weight patterns.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Martison; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus spp. not only as human pathogens, but also as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants, requires the development of methods for their rapid and reliable identification in medically important samples. The aim of this study was to compare three phenotypic methods for the identification of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from patients with urinary tract infection using the PCR of the 16S-23S interspace region generating molecular weight patterns (ITR-PCR) as reference. All 57 S. saprophyticus studied were correctly identified using only the novobiocin disk. A rate of agreement of 98.0% was obtained for the simplified battery of biochemical tests in relation to ITR-PCR, whereas the Vitek I system and novobiocin disk showed 81.2% and 89.1% agreement, respectively. No other novobiocin-resistant non-S. saprophyticus strain was identified. Thus, the novobiocin disk is a feasible alternative for the identification of S. saprophyticus in urine samples in laboratories with limited resources. ITR-PCR and the simplified battery of biochemical tests were more reliable than the commercial systems currently available. This study confirms that automated systems are still unable to correctly differentiate CoNS species and that simple, reliable and inexpensive methods can be used for routine identification.

  20. Molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Weihong; Wang, Kemim; Drake, Timothy J

    2004-10-01

    This opinion covers the field of molecular beacons (MBs), in which nucleic acids are molecularly engineered to have unique functions for the investigation of biomolecules. Molecular beacons have been used in a variety of formats, and this review discusses four: first, in vitro RNA and DNA monitoring; second, biosensors and biochips based on MBs; third, real-time monitoring of genes and gene expression in living systems; and finally, the next generation of molecular beacons that will be highly useful for studies with proteins, molecular beacon aptamers. These unique applications have shown that MBs holds great potential in genomics and proteomics where real-time molecular recognition with high sensitivity and excellent specificity is critical.

  1. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  3. Warm and Dense Molecular Gas in the N 159 Region: 12CO J = 4-3 and 13CO J = 3-2 Observations with NANTEN2 and ASTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoji; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Muller, Erik; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mizuno, Akira; Stutzki, Jürgen; Pineda, Jorge L.; Klein, Uli; Bertoldi, Frank; Koo, Bon-Chul; Rubio, Monica; Burton, Michael; Benz, Arnold; Ezawa, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Ott, Jürgen; Wong, Tony; Hughes, Annie; Meixner, Margaret; Indebetouw, Remy; Gordon, Karl D.; Whitney, Barbara; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Fukui, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    New 12CO J = 4-3 and 13CO J = 3-2 observations of the N 159 region, an active site of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud, have been made with the NANTEN2 and ASTE submillimeter telescopes, respectively. The 12CO J = 4-3 distribution is separated into three clumps, each associated with N 159 W, N 159 E, and N 159 S. These new measurements toward the three clumps are used in coupled calculations of molecular rotational excitation and line radiation transfer, along with other transitions of the 12CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, J = 3-2, and J = 7-6 as well as the isotope transitions of 13CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, J = 3-2, and J = 4-3. The 13CO J = 3-2 data were newly taken for the present work. The temperatures and densities were found to be ˜70-80 K and ˜3 × 10³ cm-3 in N 159 W and N 159 E, and ˜30 K and ˜1.6 × 10³ cm-3 in N 159 S. These results were compared with the star-formation activity based on data of young stellar clusters and HII regions as well as midinfrared emission obtained with the Spitzer MIPS. The N 159 E clump is associated with cluster(s) embedded, as observed at 24μm by the Spitzer MIPS, and the derived high temperature, 80 K, is interpreted as being heated by these sources. The N 159 E clump is likely to be responsible for a dark lane in a large HII region by dust extinction. On the other hand, the N 159 W clump is associated with clusters embedded mainly toward the eastern edge of the clump only. These clusters show offsets of 20''-40'' from the 12CO J = 4-3 peak, and are probably responsible for heating indicated by the derived high temperature, 70 K. The N 159 W clump exhibits no sign of star formation toward the 12CO J = 4-3 peak position and its western region that shows enhanced R4-3/1-0 and R3-2/1-0 ratios. We therefore suggest that the N 159 W peak represents a pre-star-cluster core of ˜105Modot which deserves further detailed studies. The N 159 S clump shows little sign of star formation, as is consistent with the lower

  4. MUSCLE W49: A multi-scale continuum and line exploration of the most luminous star formation region in the Milky Way. I. Data and the mass structure of the giant molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Pineda, J. E.; Peng, T.-C.; Liu, H. B.; Ho, P. T. P.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E. R.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Zapata, L.; Peters, T.; De Pree, C. G.

    2013-12-20

    The Multi-scale Continuum and Line Exploration of W49 is a comprehensive gas and dust survey of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) of W49A, the most luminous star-formation region in the Milky Way. The project covers, for the first time, the entire GMC at different scales and angular resolutions. In this paper, we present (1) an all-configuration Submillimeter Array mosaic in the 230 GHz (1.3 mm) band covering the central ∼3' × 3' (∼10 pc, known as W49N), where most of the embedded massive stars reside and (2) Purple Mountain Observatory 14 m telescope observations in the 90 GHz band, covering the entire GMC with maps of up to ∼35' × 35' in size, or ∼113 pc. We also make use of archival data from the Very Large Array, JCMT-SCUBA, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory BOLOCAM Galactic Plane Survey. We derive the basic physical parameters of the GMC at all scales. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The W49 GMC is one of the most massive in the Galaxy, with a total mass M {sub gas} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} within a radius of 60 pc. Within a radius of 6 pc, the total gas mass is M {sub gas} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. At these scales, only ∼1% of the material is photoionized. The mass reservoir is sufficient to form several young massive clusters (YMCs) as massive as a globular cluster. (2) The mass of the GMC is distributed in a hierarchical network of filaments. At scales <10 pc, a triple, centrally condensed structure peaks toward the ring of HC H II regions in W49N. This structure extends to scales from ∼10 to 100 pc through filaments that radially converge toward W49N and its less-prominent neighbor W49S. The W49A starburst most likely formed from global gravitational contraction with localized collapse in a 'hub-filament' geometry. (3) Currently, feedback from the central YMCs (with a present mass M {sub cl} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) is still not enough to entirely disrupt the GMC, but further stellar

  5. MUSCLE W49: A Multi-Scale Continuum and Line Exploration of the Most Luminous Star Formation Region in the Milky Way. I. Data and the Mass Structure of the Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Pineda, J. E.; Peng, T.-C.; Zhang, Q.; Keto, E. R.; Ho, P. T. P.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Zapata, L.; Peters, T.; De Pree, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Multi-scale Continuum and Line Exploration of W49 is a comprehensive gas and dust survey of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) of W49A, the most luminous star-formation region in the Milky Way. The project covers, for the first time, the entire GMC at different scales and angular resolutions. In this paper, we present (1) an all-configuration Submillimeter Array mosaic in the 230 GHz (1.3 mm) band covering the central ~3' × 3' (~10 pc, known as W49N), where most of the embedded massive stars reside and (2) Purple Mountain Observatory 14 m telescope observations in the 90 GHz band, covering the entire GMC with maps of up to ~35' × 35' in size, or ~113 pc. We also make use of archival data from the Very Large Array, JCMT-SCUBA, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory BOLOCAM Galactic Plane Survey. We derive the basic physical parameters of the GMC at all scales. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The W49 GMC is one of the most massive in the Galaxy, with a total mass M gas ~ 1.1 × 106 M ⊙ within a radius of 60 pc. Within a radius of 6 pc, the total gas mass is M gas ~ 2 × 105 M ⊙. At these scales, only ~1% of the material is photoionized. The mass reservoir is sufficient to form several young massive clusters (YMCs) as massive as a globular cluster. (2) The mass of the GMC is distributed in a hierarchical network of filaments. At scales <10 pc, a triple, centrally condensed structure peaks toward the ring of HC H II regions in W49N. This structure extends to scales from ~10 to 100 pc through filaments that radially converge toward W49N and its less-prominent neighbor W49S. The W49A starburst most likely formed from global gravitational contraction with localized collapse in a "hub-filament" geometry. (3) Currently, feedback from the central YMCs (with a present mass M cl >~ 5 × 104 M ⊙) is still not enough to entirely disrupt the GMC, but further stellar mass growth could be enough to allow radiation pressure to clear the

  6. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  7. Molecular Haeckel.

    PubMed

    Elinson, Richard P; Kezmoh, Lorren

    2010-07-01

    More than a century ago, Ernst Haeckel created embryo drawings to illustrate the morphological similarity of vertebrate early embryos. These drawings have been both widely presented and frequently criticized. At the same time that the idea of morphological similarity was recently attacked, there has been a growing realization of molecular similarities in the development of tissues and organs. We have surveyed genes expressed in vertebrate embryos, and we have used them to construct drawings that we call Molecular Haeckels. The Molecular Haeckels emphasize that, based on gene expression, there is a greater similarity among vertebrate embryos than even Haeckel might have imagined. PMID:20549737

  8. HNCO in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

    1984-05-15

    In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

  9. Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid, polymerase chain reaction–based detection of bacterial genes, and metabolomic determination of responses to orthopaedic infection. PMID:25808967

  10. Molecular Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Michael

    The prospects of using organic materials in electronics and optoelectronics applications have attracted scientists and technologists since the 1970s. This field has become known as molecular electronics. Some successes have already been achieved, for example the liquid-crystal display. Other products such as organic light-emitting displays, chemical sensors and plastic transistors are developing fast. There is also a keen interest in exploiting technologies at the molecular scale that might eventually replace silicon devices. This chapter provides some of the background physics and chemistry to the interdisciplinary subject of molecular electronics. A review of some of the possible application areas for organic materials is presented and some speculation is provided regarding future directions.

  11. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  12. Electrostatics in molecular phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náray-Szabó, G.

    1995-04-01

    Molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) and fields (MEF) became very popular in the last two decades since they offer a pictorial modeling of complicated molecular events. In this paper we give an overview on applications. We can discuss chemical reactivity in terms of MEP maps: negative and positive regions are preferred by electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents, respectively. We may define the concept of electrostatic enzyme catalysis. In cases when the ground-state polarity of the active site essentially increases in the transition state the catalytic rate enhancement is due to electrostatic stabilization by the polar protein and solvent environment. Crystal surfaces provide strong MEF, thus enhanced reactivity, in their vicinity. Hydration depends also on the electrostatic behaviour. It is possible to define the average MEF of a molecule that is an appropriate descriptor of hydration ability to be used in quantitative structure-activity relationships. Molecular recognition has also important electrostatic aspects. Complementarity and similarity are determined beside steric aspects by electrostatic and hydrophobic factors, as well. We may define hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions around a molecule in terms of the MEF and apply this representation to the study of host-guest complementarity, as well as crystal packing.

  13. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  14. Effect of dark, hard, and vitreous kernel content on protein molecular weight distribution and on milling and breadmaking quality characteristics for hard spring wheat samples from diverse growing regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kernel vitreousness is an important grading characteristic for segregation of sub-classes of hard red spring (HRS) wheat in the U.S. This research investigated the protein molecular weight distribution (MWD), and flour and baking quality characteristics of different HRS wheat market sub-classes. T...

  15. Diagnostic Molecular Mycobacteriology in Regions With Low Tuberculosis Endemicity: Combining Real-time PCR Assays for Detection of Multiple Mycobacterial Pathogens With Line Probe Assays for Identification of Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Deggim-Messmer, Vanessa; Bloemberg, Guido V; Ritter, Claudia; Voit, Antje; Hömke, Rico; Keller, Peter M; Böttger, Erik C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assays have not yet been able to replace time-consuming culture-based methods in clinical mycobacteriology. Using 6875 clinical samples and a study period of 35months we evaluated the use of PCR-based assays to establish a diagnostic workflow with a fast time-to-result of 1-2days, for 1. detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB), 2. detection and identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and 3. identification of drug susceptible MTB. MTB molecular-based detection and culture gave concordant results for 97.7% of the specimens. NTM PCR-based detection and culture gave concordant results for 97.0% of the specimens. Defining specimens on the basis of combined laboratory data as true positives or negatives with discrepant results resolved by clinical chart reviews, we calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for PCR-based MTB detection as 84.7%, 100%, 100%, and 98.7%; the corresponding values for culture-based MTB detection were 86.3%, 100%, 100%, and 98.8%. PCR-based detection of NTM had a sensitivity of 84.7% compared to 78.0% of that of culture-based NTM detection. Molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) by line-probe assay was found to predict phenotypic DST results in MTB with excellent accuracy. Our findings suggest a diagnostic algorithm to largely replace lengthy culture-based techniques by rapid molecular-based methods.

  16. Molecular thermometry.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Kevin M; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients' temperatures could be measured, recorded, and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review, the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nanoscale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even subcellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic, this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia-based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry rapidly moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers.

  17. Molecular Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaud, V.; Bonneviot, L.

    Our senses of smell and taste are able to recognise molecules selectively, to the point where they can even discriminate between different chiral states. This property, called molecular recognition, is essential to all forms of life [1]. It is based on the principle of a specific interaction between a receptor or host and a target molecule, which will be identified among a multitude of others, then selectively adsorbed. If the host is endowed with reactive functions, the attached molecule may be transported or transformed. Enzymes are the archetypal host molecules exploiting the idea of molecular recognition. Their complexation sites comprise a hydrophobic pocket with definite shape within which amino acid residues are located in a precisely defined way. The combined effect of these different characteristics underlies not only the affinity for some specific substrate, but also the transformation of this substrate into the desired product [2]. In fact, the phenomena actually brought into play are much more involved, being made up of an ensemble of physicochemical events that act together in a cooperative way, either simultaneously or sequentially, and in which the molecular processes are difficult to follow in detail.

  18. Molecular Thermometry

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kevin M.; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients’ temperatures could be measured, recorded and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nano-scale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even sub-cellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers. PMID:20139796

  19. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  20. Molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-05-23

    In the 1960s, several groups of scientists, including Emile Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling, had noted that proteins experience amino acid replacements at a surprisingly consistent rate across very different species. This presumed single, uniform rate of genetic evolution was subsequently described using the term 'molecular clock'. Biologists quickly realised that such a universal pacemaker could be used as a yardstick for measuring the timescale of evolutionary divergences: estimating the rate of amino acid exchanges per unit of time and applying it to protein differences across a range of organisms would allow deduction of the divergence times of their respective lineages (Figure 1). PMID:27218841

  1. Molecular spintronics.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The electron spin made its debut in the device world only two decades ago but today our ability of detecting the spin state of a moving electron underpins the entire magnetic data storage industry. This technological revolution has been driven by a constant improvement in our understanding on how spins can be injected, manipulated and detected in the solid state, a field which is collectively named Spintronics. Recently a number of pioneering experiments and theoretical works suggest that organic materials can offer similar and perhaps superior performances in making spin-devices than the more conventional inorganic metals and semiconductors. Furthermore they can pave the way for radically new device concepts. This is Molecular Spintronics, a blossoming research area aimed at exploring how the unique properties of the organic world can marry the requirements of spin-devices. Importantly, after a first phase, where most of the research was focussed on exporting the concepts of inorganic spintronics to organic materials, the field has moved to a more mature age, where the exploitation of the unique properties of molecules has begun to emerge. Molecular spintronics now collects a diverse and interdisciplinary community ranging from device physicists to synthetic chemists to surface scientists. In this critical review, I will survey this fascinating, rapidly evolving, field with a particular eye on new directions and opportunities. The main differences and challenges with respect to standard spintronics will be discussed and so will be the potential cross-fertilization with other fields (177 references).

  2. Molecular paleontology.

    PubMed

    Marota, I; Rollo, F

    2002-01-01

    Molecular paleontology, i.e., the recovery of DNA from ancient human, animal, and plant remains is an innovative research field that has received progressively more attention from the scientific community since the 1980s. In the last decade, the field was punctuated by claims which aroused great interest but eventually turned out to be fakes--the most famous being the sequence of dinosaur DNA later shown to be of human origin. At present, the discipline is characterized by some certainties and many doubts. We know, for example, that we have reasonable chances to recover authentic DNA from a mammoth carcass, while our chances are negligible (or nonexistent) in the case of a dynastic mummy from Egypt. On the other hand, though we are developing convincing models of DNA decay in bone, we are not yet able to predict whether a certain paleontological or archeological site will yield material amenable to DNA analysis. This article reviews some of the most important and promising investigations using molecular paleontology approaches, such as studies on the conservation of DNA in human bone, the quest for ancient DNA in permafrost-frozen fauna, the Tyrolean iceman, and the Neandertals.

  3. Astrochemistry : The molecular universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen J.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.; Williams, David A.

    2002-04-01

    Helen J Fraser, Martin R S McCoustra and David A Williams present a simple guide to astrochemistry. Molecules play a fundamental role in many regions of our universe. The science where chemistry and astronomy overlap is known as astrochemistry, a branch of astronomy that has risen in importance over recent years. In this article we review the significance of chemistry in several astronomical years. IN this article we review the significance of chemistry in several astronomical environments including the early universe, interstellar clouds, starforming regions and protoplanetary disks. We discuss theoretical models, laboratory experiments and observational data, and present several recent and exciting results that challenge our perception of the ``molecular universe''.

  4. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  5. Regional odontodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, D N; Bailoor, D; Patel, B

    2011-01-01

    Regional odontodysplasia is an unusual developmental anomaly in which ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components are affected. We present a rare case of a developmental anomaly called regional odontodysplasia or 'ghost teeth' in a 12-year-old Indian girl. The anomaly affected right maxillary permanent teeth. The mandibular teeth were unaffected. The clinical, radiographic and histological features are reviewed. The management of affected patients is discussed.

  6. [CII] dynamics in the S140 region

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, C.; Röllig, M.; Okada, Y.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Collaboration: WADI Team

    2015-01-22

    We report the observation of [C II] emission in a cut through the S140 region together with single pointing observations of several molecular tracers, including hydrides, in key regions of the photon-dominated region (PDR) and molecular cloud [1]. At a distance of 910 pc, a BOV star ionizes the edge of the molecular cloud L1204, creating S140. In addition, the dense molecular cloud hosts a cluster of embedded massive young stellar objects only 75' from the H II region [e.g. 2, 3]. We used HIFI on Herschel to observe [CII] in a strip following the direction of the impinging radiation across the ionisation front and through the cluster of embedded YSOs. With [C II], we can trace the ionising radiation and, together with the molecular tracers such as CO isotopologues and HCO{sup +}, study the dynamical processes in the region. Combining HIFIs high spectral resolution data with ground based molecular data allows us to study the dynamics and excitation conditions both in the ionization front and the dense molecular star forming region and model their physical conditions [4].

  7. Molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation holds the promise of revealing the mechanisms of biological processes in their ultimate detail. It is carried out by computing the interaction forces acting on each atom and then propagating the velocities and positions of the atoms by numerical integration of Newton's equations of motion. In this review, we present an overview of how the MD simulation can be conducted to address computational toxicity problems. The study cases will cover a standard MD simulation performed to investigate the overall flexibility of a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme and a set of more advanced MD simulations to examine the barrier to ion conduction in a human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).

  8. Molecular characterization of the interaction between the N-terminal region of Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) and Nicotiana benthamiana PVX CP-interacting protein, NbPCIP1.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-06-01

    Using yeast two-hybrid assays and a Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA library, we previously identified an N. benthamiana protein, NbPCIP1, that interacts with Potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP). We also previously determined that NbPCIP1 enhances PVX replication in plants. To determine the domains and/or amino acid residues required for PVX CP and NbPCIP1 interaction, here we used yeast two-hybrid and β-galactosidase filter assays to test the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on the interaction. Truncation analysis revealed that the N-terminal region of PVX CP interacts with NbPCIP1. To identify which N-terminal region PVX CP amino acid(s) interact with NbPCIP1, we substituted the 12 charged amino acids on the PVX CP N-terminal region to alanine. Yeast two-hybrid, β-galactosidase filter, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays confirmed that ten of the 12 alanine-substituted mutations blocked the interaction with NbPCIP1. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of PVX CP including its helical structure is important for interaction with NbPCIP1.

  9. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  10. Molecular-beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, M. F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HC1 (FEMALE) NAC1 + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2(2)P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3(2)P/sub 3/2) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  11. Star Formation Regions in LDN 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2015-09-01

    A group of three star formation regions in the dark cloud LDN 1667 is examined. All three of these regions contain Trapezium type systems. 12C(1-0) observations are made of the part of the molecular cloud LDN 1667 associated with one of the star formation regions. Three molecular clouds were detected, one of which (the main cloud) has a red and a blue outflow. Three stars from the star formation regions are found to have annular nebulae and one star has a conical nebula. The dark cloud LDN 1667 is associated with a radial system of dark globules which is formed by the star HD 57061.

  12. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  13. H.E.S.S. detection of TeV emission from the interaction region between the supernova remnant G349.7+0.2 and a molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2015-01-01

    G349.7+0.2 is a young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) located at the distance of 11.5 kpc and observed across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio to high energy (HE; 0.1 GeV molecular cloud. In this paper, the detection of very high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) γ-ray emission coincident with this SNR with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is reported. This makes it one of the farthest Galactic SNR ever detected in this domain. An integral flux F(E> 400 GeV) = (6.5 ± 1.1stat ± 1.3syst) × 10-13 ph cm-2 s-1 corresponding to ~0.7% of that of the Crab Nebula and to a luminosity of ~1034 erg s-1 above the same energy threshold, and a steep photon index ΓVHE = 2.8 ± 0.27stat ± 0.20syst are measured. The analysis of more than 5 yr of Fermi-LAT data towards this source shows a power-law like spectrum with a best-fit photon index ΓHE = 2.2 ± 0.04stat+0.13-0.31 sys. The combined γ-ray spectrum of G349.7+0.2 can be described by either a broken power-law (BPL) or a power-law with exponential (or sub-exponential) cutoff (PLC). In the former case, the photon break energy is found at Ebr,γ = 55+70-30 GeV, slightly higher than what is usually observed in the HE/VHE γ-ray emitting middle-aged SNRs known to be interacting with molecular clouds. In the latter case, the exponential (respectively sub-exponential) cutoff energy is measured at Ecut,γ = 1.4+1.6-0.55 (respectively 0.35+0.75-0.21) TeV. A pion-decay process resulting from the interaction of the accelerated protons and nuclei with the dense surrounding medium is clearly the preferred scenario to explain the γ-ray emission. The BPL with a spectral steepening of 0.5-1 and the PLC provide equally good fits to the data. The product of the average gas density and the total energy content of accelerated protons and nuclei amounts to nHWp ~ 5 × 1051 erg cm-3.

  14. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  15. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding human SPH-binding factor, a conserved protein that binds to the enhancer-like region of the U6 small nuclear RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J C; Engler, S K; Hargrove, B W; Kunkel, G R

    1998-11-01

    Many vertebrate small nuclear RNA gene promoters contain an SPH motif in their distal control regions that can confer transcriptional stimulation by RNA polymerase II or RNA polymerase III. Using the human U6 gene SPH motif as a probe, we isolated a cDNA encoding human SPH-binding factor (hSBF) from a HeLa cell expression library. The coding region of hSBF is almost identical to ZNF143, a 626 amino acid, seven zinc finger protein of previously unknown function. Furthermore, the predicted amino acid sequence of hSBF is highly homologous to Xenopus laevis and mouse Staf proteins, that bind to SPH motifs and stimulate transcription of selenocysteine tRNA gene promoters. Recombinant hSBF expressed in vitro or from Escherichia coli bound specifically to the human U6 gene SPH motif as shown by DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays using various mutant SPH sites as competitors. Antibodies prepared against recombinant hSBF inhibited assembly of native SBF-DNA complexes. Immunodepleted HeLa S100 transcription extract no longer supported elevated levels of transcription by RNA polymerase III from a U6 promoter containing an SPH motif, whereas addition of recombinant hSBF protein to the immunodepleted extract reconstituted stimulated transcription.

  16. Physical conditions in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments have complicated the picture of the physical conditions in molecular clouds. The discoveries of widespread emission from high-J lines of CD and 12-micron IRAS emission have revealed the presence of considerably hotter gas and dust near the surfaces of molecular clouds. These components can complicate interpretation of the bulk of the cloud gas. Commonly assumed relations between column density or mean density and cloud size are called into question by conflicting results and by consideration of selection effects. Analysis of density and density structure through molecular excitation has shown that very high densities exist in star formation regions, but unresolved structure and possible chemical effects complicate the interpretation. High resolution far-IR and submillimeter observations offer a complementary approach and are beginning to test theoretical predictions of density gradients in clouds.

  17. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  18. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: mlombard@eso.or

    2009-09-20

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 +- 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A{sub K} > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} a few x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak based on the inter-genomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Atreyi; Majumdar, Anasuya; Ghosh, Ranajit K

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak. ISR classes 'a' and 'g' were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O 139 serogroup and post-O 139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  20. Unveiling the pan-genome of the SXT/R391 family of ICEs: molecular characterisation of new variable regions of SXT/R391-like ICEs detected in Pseudoalteromonas sp. and Vibrio scophthalmi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2016-08-01

    Integrating conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family have been identified in fish-isolated bacterial strains collected from marine aquaculture environments of the northwestern Iberian Peninsula. Here we analysed the variable regions of two ICEs, one preliminarily characterised in a previous study (ICEVscSpa3) and one newly identified (ICEPspSpa1). Bacterial strains harboring these ICEs were phylogenetically assigned to Vibrio scophthalmi and Pseudoalteromonas sp., thus constituting the first evidence of SXT/R391-like ICEs in the genus Pseudoalteromonas to date. Variable DNA regions, which confer element-specific properties to ICEs of this family, were characterised. Interestingly, the two ICEs contained 29 genes not found in variable DNA insertions of previously described ICEs. Most notably, variable gene content for ICEVscSpa3 showed similarity to genes potentially involved in housekeeping functions of replication, nucleotide metabolism and transcription. For these genes, closest homologues were found clustered in the genome of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19, suggesting a transfer as a block to ICEVscSpa3. Genes encoding antibiotic resistance, restriction modification systems and toxin/antitoxin systems were absent from hotspots of ICEVscSpa3. In contrast, the variable gene content of ICEPspSpa1 included genes involved in restriction/modification functions in two different hotspots and genes related to ICE maintenance. The present study unveils a relatively large number of novel genes in SXT/R391-ICEs, and demonstrates the major role of ICE elements as contributors to horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27230650

  1. Molecular surveillance for drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in clinical and subclinical populations from three border regions of Burma/Myanmar: cross-sectional data and a systematic review of resistance studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    health workers can contribute to molecular surveillance of drug resistance in remote areas of Myanmar. Marginal and displaced populations under-represented among previous resistance investigations can and should be included in resistance surveillance efforts, particularly once genetic markers of artemisinin-delayed parasite clearance are identified. Subclinical infections may contribute to the epidemiology of drug resistance, but determination of gene amplification from desiccated filter samples requires further validation when DNA concentration is low. PMID:22992214

  2. Molecular and genetic analysis of a region of plasmid pCF10 containing positive control genes and structural genes encoding surface proteins involved in pheromone-inducible conjugation in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, S M; Olmsted, S B; Viksnins, A S; Gallo, J C; Dunny, G M

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of Enterococcus faecalis cells carrying the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCF10 to the heptapeptide pheromone cCF10 results in an increase in conjugal transfer frequency by as much as 10(6)-fold. Pheromone-induced donor cells also express at least two plasmid-encoded surface proteins, the 130-kDa Sec 10 protein, which is involved in surface exclusion, and the 150-kDa Asc10 protein, which has been associated with the formation of mating aggregates. Previous subcloning and transposon mutagenesis studies indicated that the adjacent EcoRI c (7.5 kb) and e (4.5 kb) fragments of pCF10 encode the structural genes for these proteins and that the EcoRI c fragment also encodes at least two regulatory genes involved in activation of the expression of the genes encoding Asc10 and Sec10. In this paper, the results of physical and genetic analysis of this region of pCF10, along with the complete DNA sequences of the EcoRI c and e fragments, are reported. The results of the genetic studies indicate the location of the structural genes for the surface proteins and reveal important features of their transcription. In addition, we provide evidence here and in the accompanying paper (S. B. Olmsted, S.-M. Kao, L. J. van Putte, J. C. Gallo, and G. M. Dunny, J. Bacteriol. 173:7665-7672, 1991) for a role of Asc10 in mating aggregate formation. The data also reveal a complex positive control system that acts at distances of at least 3 to 6 kb to activate expression of Asc10. DNA sequence analysis presented here reveals the positions of a number of specific genes, termed prg (pheromone-responsive genes) in this region of pCF10. The genes mapped include prgA (encoding Sec10) and prgB (encoding Asc10), as well as four putative regulatory genes, prgX, -R, -S, and -T. Although the predicted amino acid sequences of Sec10 and Asc10 have some structural features in common with a number of surface proteins of gram-positive cocci, and the Asc10 sequence is highly similar to that of a

  3. Molecular analysis of T cell receptor (Ti) variable region (V) gene expression. Evidence that a single Ti beta V gene family can be used in formation of V domains on phenotypically and functionally diverse T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Acuto, O; Campen, T J; Royer, H D; Hussey, R E; Poole, C B; Reinherz, E L

    1985-06-01

    We examine the rules governing Ti beta variable (V) gene segment usage in the formation of T cell antigen-MHC receptors in diverse regulatory and effector T lymphoid subpopulations. To this end, a single Ti beta V gene family and its products were analyzed. A monoclonal antibody, termed anti-Ti3A, which was shown to be reactive with an epitope encoded by members of the REX cell line Ti beta V gene family, and which was expressed on 2% of human T lymphocytes was used in selection of clones from unprimed peripheral T lymphocytes. Both T4+, as well as T8+ T cell clones with inducer, suppressor, and/or cytotoxic function were defined. Southern analysis, isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional peptide mapping indicated that individual members of the REX V gene family were linked to different Ti beta diversity and/or joining and constant region segments. Moreover, the Ti alpha chains of such clones were distinct. These results imply that Ti beta V gene usage is not restricted to any functionally or phenotypically defined T cell subsets, and there is presumably little, if any, restriction on the mechanisms that generate combinational, junctional or chain association-mediated diversity.

  4. The molecular epidemiology of iridovirus in Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii peelii) and dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia) from distant biogeographical regions suggests a link between trade in ornamental fish and emerging iridoviral diseases.

    PubMed

    Go, Jeffrey; Lancaster, Malcolm; Deece, Kylie; Dhungyel, Om; Whittington, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Iridoviruses have emerged over 20 years to cause epizootics in finfish and amphibians in many countries. They may have originated in tropical Asia and spread through trade in farmed food fish or ornamental fish, but this has been difficult to prove. Consequently, MCP, ATPase and other viral genes were sequenced from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from farmed Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii peelii) that died during an epizootic in 2003 and from diseased gouramis that had been imported from Asia. There was almost complete homology (99.95%) over 4,527 bp between Murray cod iridovirus (MCIV) and an iridovirus (DGIV) present in dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia) that had died in aquarium shops in Australia in 2004, and very high homology with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) (99.9%). These viruses are most likely to be a single species within the genus Megalocytivirus and probably have a common geographic origin. Primers for genus-specific PCR and for rapid discrimination of MCIV/DGIV/ISKNV and red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV), a notifiable pathogen, were developed. These were used in a survey to determine that the prevalence of DGIV infection in diseased gourami in retail aquarium shops in Sydney was 22% (95% confidence limits 15-31%). The global trade in ornamental fish may facilitate the spread of Megalocytivirus and enable emergence of disease in new host species in distant biogeographic regions.

  5. Critical interpretation of CH– and OH– stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 2–5) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase O–H⋅⋅⋅O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the C–H stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the C–H stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ν{sub 3}, ν{sub 9}, and ν{sub 2} C–H stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  6. NMR structure determination of the Escherichia coli DnaJ molecular chaperone: secondary structure and backbone fold of the N-terminal region (residues 2-108) containing the highly conserved J domain.

    PubMed Central

    Szyperski, T; Pellecchia, M; Wall, D; Georgopoulos, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-01-01

    DnaJ from Escherichia coli is a 376-amino acid protein that functions in conjunction with DnaK and GrpE as a chaperone machine. The N-terminal fragment of residues 2-108, DnaJ-(2-108), retains many of the activities of the full-length protein and contains a structural motif, the J domain of residues 2-72, which is highly conserved in a superfamily of proteins. In this paper, NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the secondary structure and the three-dimensional polypeptide backbone fold of DnaJ-(2-108). By using 13C/15N doubly labeled DnaJ-(2-108), nearly complete sequence-specific assignments were obtained for 1H, 15N, 13C alpha, and 13C beta, and about 40% of the peripheral aliphatic carbon resonances were also assigned. Four alpha-helices in polypeptide segments of residues 6-11, 18-31, 41-55, and 61-68 in the J domain were identified by sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser effects. For the J domain, the three-dimensional structure was calculated with the program DIANA from an input of 536 nuclear Overhauser effect upper-distance constraints and 52 spin-spin coupling constants. The polypeptide backbone fold is characterized by the formation of an antiparallel bundle of two long helices, residues 18-31 and 41-55, which is stabilized by a hydrophobic core of side chains that are highly conserved in homologous J domain sequences. The Gly/Phe-rich region from residues 77 to 108 is flexibly disordered in solution. Images PMID:7972061

  7. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  8. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  9. Molecular clouds. [significance in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand star formation in the context of the dense interstellar molecular gas from which stars are made. Attention is given to how molecular observations (e.g., UV spectroscopy and radio 21-cm and recombination line observations) provide data on the physical state of the dense interstellar gas; observations of H II regions, stellar associations, and dark nebulae are discussed. CO clouds are studied with reference to radial velocity, temperature, density, ionization, magnetic field.

  10. Feedback Mechanisms of Starbursts and AGNs through Molecular Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, S.; Krips, M.; Lim, J.; Muller, S.; Tsai, A.-L.

    2013-10-01

    Our deep molecular line images of nearby starburst galaxies and AGNs exhibit molecular outflows in most galaxies, and have revealed that the molecular outflows co-exist with outflows or jets seen in other wavelengths. In case of starbursts, X-ray outflows have higher energy and pressure than those of molecular outflows, suggesting that plasma outflows are blowing the molecular gas away from starburst regions, which suggests a strong negative feedback. On the other hand, current starburst regions in M82 can be seen at the inner edge of an expanding molecular bubble, suggesting a positive feedback. In case of AGNs, jets seem to entrain the surrounding molecular gas away from the AGNs, suggesting a negative feedback.

  11. The chemical composition of interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative molecular abundances are becoming available for dense interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, revealing both similarities across a wide range of source conditions and significant differences in the chemistries involved. As understanding concerning the processes that lead to particular compositions increases, it may become possible to relate these findings to the evolution of molecular clouds and hence to the chemistry of regions in which stellar and planetary formation is in progress. Attention is given to the results of a recently completed spectral scan of the Orion molecular cloud, as well as the envelope around the evolved star IRC + 10216, published by Johansson et al. (1983).

  12. The Eutherian Pseudoautosomal Region.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp, Terje; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2015-01-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a unique segment of sequence homology between differentiated sex chromosomes where recombination occurs during meiosis. Molecular and functional properties of the PAR are distinctive from the autosomes and the remaining regions of the sex chromosomes. These include a higher rate of recombination than genome average, bias towards GC-substitutions and increased interindividual nucleotide divergence and mutations. As yet, the PAR has been physically demarcated in only 28 eutherian species representing 6 mammalian orders. Murid rodents have the smallest, gene-poorest and most diverged PARs. Other eutherian PARs are largely homologous but differ in size and gene content, being the smallest in equids and human/simian primates and much larger in other eutherians. Because pseudoautosomal genes escape X inactivation, their dosage changes with sex chromosome aneuploidies, whereas phenotypic effects of the latter depend on the size and gene content of the PAR. Thus, X monosomy is more viable in mice, humans and horses than in species with larger PARs. Presently, little is known about the functions of PAR genes in individual species, though human studies suggest their involvement in early embryonic development. The PAR is, thus, of evolutionary, genetic and biomedical significance and a 'research hotspot' in eutherian genomes. PMID:26730606

  13. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  14. Multiscale coupling of molecular dynamics and peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2016-10-01

    We propose a multiscale computational model to couple molecular dynamics and peridynamics. The multiscale coupling model is based on a previously developed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) theory, which has three dynamics equations at three different scales, namely, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. In the proposed multiscale coupling approach, we divide the simulation domain into atomistic region and macroscale region. Molecular dynamics is used to simulate atom motions in atomistic region, and peridynamics is used to simulate macroscale material point motions in macroscale region, and both methods are nonlocal particle methods. A transition zone is introduced as a messenger to pass the information between the two regions or scales. We employ the "supercell" developed in the MMMD theory as the transition element, which is named as the adaptive multiscale element due to its ability of passing information from different scales, because the adaptive multiscale element can realize both top-down and bottom-up communications. We introduce the Cauchy-Born rule based stress evaluation into state-based peridynamics formulation to formulate atomistic-enriched constitutive relations. To mitigate the issue of wave reflection on the interface, a filter is constructed by switching on and off the MMMD dynamic equations at different scales. Benchmark tests of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) wave propagations from atomistic region to macro region are presented. The mechanical wave can transit through the interface smoothly without spurious wave deflections, and the filtering process is proven to be efficient.

  15. Molecular Electronics - Current Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2010-12-01

    Molecular electronics is a flourishing area of nano-science and -technology, with a promise for cheap electronics of novel functionality. Here we outline the major challenges for molecular electronics becoming an established scientific discipline, including models with predictive power.

  16. Molecular imaging in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dzik-Jurasz, A S K

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that manifests in loss of normal cellular homeostatic mechanisms. The biology and therapeutic modulation of neoplasia occurs at the molecular level. An understanding of these molecular processes is therefore required to develop novel prognostic and early biomarkers of response. In addition to clinical applications, increased impetus for the development of such technologies has been catalysed by pharmaceutical companies investing in the development of molecular therapies. The discipline of molecular imaging therefore aims to image these important molecular processes in vivo. Molecular processes, however, operate at short length scales and concentrations typically beyond the resolution of clinical imaging. Solving these issues will be a challenge to imaging research. The successful implementations of molecular imaging in man will only be realised by the close co-operation amongst molecular biologists, chemists and the imaging scientists. PMID:18250026

  17. The Object CLN 138 - a Double Star-Formation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    A double star formation region associated with the biconical cometary nebula CLN 138 is studied. 12CO(1-0) observations of a molecular cloud associated with this object reveal the existence of several molecular clouds in this region, as well as the existence of red and blue molecular outflows. Several new Herbig-Haro objects are found, two of which have undergone a luminosity increase of at least 8m. The first star formation region is basically embedded in the molecular cloud; most of the stars in it are infrared stars and many have dust envelopes. The second star formation region has already left the molecular cloud; it has no IR stars and few of its stars have dust clouds.

  18. Molecular genetics of cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S

    2001-09-01

    The underlying molecular basis of primary cutaneous lymphomas has not yet been clarified. However, abnormalities of cell cycle control genes and well-defined tumor suppressor genes such as p53 are common and may contribute to disease progression and treatment resistance. Biallelic inactivation of tumor suppressor genes usually occurs by a combination of deletion, point mutation, and/or promotor hypermethylation. The detection of UVB-specific mutations of p53 requires confirmation but may have important implications for the management of patients with mycosis fungoides. Molecular cytogenetic studies have identified common regions of chromosomal deletion and amplification, which suggests the presence and location of genes that are of critical importance in the pathogenesis of cutaneous lymphoma.

  19. [Molecular diagnostics of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ryska, A; Dziadziuszko, R; Olszewski, W; Berzinec, P; Öz, B; Gottfried, M; Cufer, T; Samarzija, M; Plank, L; Ostoros, Gy; Tímár, J

    2015-09-01

    Development of the target therapies of lung cancer was a rapid process which fundamentally changed the pathological diagnosis as well. Furthermore, molecular pathology became essential part of the routine diagnostics of lung cancer. These changes generated several practical problems and in underdeveloped countries or in those with reimbursement problems have been combined with further challenges. The central and eastern region of Europe are characterized by similar problems in this respect which promoted the foundation of NSCLC Working Group to provide up to date protocols or guidelines. This present paper is a summary of the molecular pathology and target therapy guidelines written with the notion that it has to be upgraded continuously according to the development of the field.

  20. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  1. Molecular electronics: Observation of molecular rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeck, D.H.; Beratan, D.N. )

    1993-07-30

    The authors review some experiments in molecular rectification and their implication for commercial uses of molecular electronic devices. Two of the cases involve rectification by single molecules which consist of an electron donor on one side, an electron acceptor on the other side, and a bridge in between, coupled to electrodes. The third case involves rectification at a graphite electrode derivatized with a Cu phthalocyanine derivative, and probed with a Pt/Ir scanning tunneling microscope tip. Some potential applications of molecular devices are in high-density memory storage of holographic memory devices, neural networks, cellular automata, and chemical and biochemical sensors.

  2. Returning "Region" to World Regional Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Peter W.; Legates, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    World regional geography textbooks rarely focus on the process of region formation, despite frequent calls to reincorporate a regional approach to teaching global geography. An instructional strategy using problem-based learning in a small honors section of a large world regional geography course is described. Using a hypothetical scenario…

  3. Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Patricia D.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) computer program developed to aid in design of single- and double-junction cascade cells made of silicon. Cascade cell has efficiency 1 or 2 percent higher than single cell, with twice the open-circuit voltage. Input parameters include doping density, diffusion lengths, thicknesses of regions, solar spectrum, absorption coefficients of silicon (data included for 101 wavelengths), and surface recombination velocities. Results include maximum power, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  4. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  5. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  6. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  7. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  8. Ionospheric research. [E region, F region, D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: D-region theory; E and F-region; wave propagation; mass spectrometer measurements; and atmospheric reactions. Various supporting operations are included: design and construction of instrumentation; and programming.

  9. Cyclodextrin-based molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    This chapter overviews molecular machines based on cyclodextrins (CDs). The categories of CD-based molecular machines, external stimuli for CD-based molecular machines, and typical examples of CD-based molecular machines are briefly described.

  10. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters.

  11. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters. PMID:26776057

  12. The molecular basis of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Storb, U

    1996-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation amplifies the variable region repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. Recent experimental evidence has thrown light on various molecular models of somatic hypermutation. A link between somatic hypermutation and transcription coupled DNA repair is shaping up.

  13. The Molecular Baryon Cycle of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Matsushita, Satoki

    2016-10-01

    Baryons cycle into galaxies from the intergalactic medium and are converted into stars; a fraction of the baryons are ejected out of galaxies by stellar feedback. Here we present new high-resolution (3.″9 68 pc) 12CO(2–1) and 12CO(3–2) images that probe these three stages of the baryon cycle in the nearby starburst M82. We combine these new observations with previous 12CO(1–0) and [Fe ii] images to study the physical conditions within the molecular gas. Using a Bayesian analysis and the radiative transfer code RADEX, we model temperatures and densities of molecular hydrogen, as well as column densities of CO. Besides the disk, we concentrate on two regions within the galaxy: an expanding super-bubble and the base of a molecular streamer. Shock diagnostics, kinematics, and optical extinction suggest that the streamer is an inflowing filament, with a mass inflow rate of molecular gas of 3.5 {M}ȯ yr‑1. We measure the mass outflow rate of molecular gas of the expanding super-bubble to be 17 {M}ȯ yr‑1, five times higher than the inferred inflow rate and 1.3 times the star formation rate of the galaxy. The high mass outflow rate and large star formation rate will deplete the galaxy of molecular gas within eight million years, unless there are additional sources of molecular gas.

  14. W3 North: Far-infrared and radio molecular observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Schwartz, P. R.; Smith, H. A.; Lada, C. J.; Glaccum, W.; Harper, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The W3 North (G133.8 + 1.4) source is the northernmost member of a string of active star forming regions that marks the western boundary of the giant HII region W4. Far infrared and radio observations of molecular CO were made of the W3 star forming region. The W3 North object shows extended dust and gas emission which suggests a fairly advanced disruption of a molecular cloud. An estimate of the age of the embedded HII region is given, and emission maps of the W3 object are presented. The W3 North source may be the oldest object among the W3 complex of sources.

  15. Identifying Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Shah, R. Y., Jackson, J. M.; Bania, T. M.; Clemens, D. P.; Johnson, A. M.; Flynn, E.; Bonaventura, N.; Simon, R.; Meyer, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent molecular surveys, such as the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey, are revealing the complex structure and dynamics of clouds within the Galactic plane. Yet, difficulties often remain in separating molecular clouds along a line of sight. Identification of nearby clouds is facilitated through the combination of molecular datasets and extinction maps. Star counts at optical and infrared (IR) wavelengths indirectly trace extinction, and when morphologically similar to molecular emission, unambiguously reveal nearby clouds. Here we present the methodology and data used to separate and determine the relative distance to two molecular clouds along the same line of sight (GRSMC 45.60+0.30 and GRSMC 45.46+0.05). We use a combination of optical and near-IR star count maps (derived from the US Naval Observatory and 2MASS catalogs, respectively) and molecular data from the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey.

  16. The effects of HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work on the effects of HII regions on giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and their embedded clusters is discussed. Although the dispersive effects of ionising radiation on clouds, particularly massive ones with high escape velocities, is rather modest, it is argued that it is still a vitally important process in the evolution of GMCs and clusters. It is able to drive turbulence on GMC scales, to set the optical emergence timescales of at last ˜ 103 M⊙ clusters, and has a strong influence on the large-scale energy and momentum input of supernovae by determining their detonation environments.

  17. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  18. Exercises in Molecular Computing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus The successes of electronic digital logic have transformed every aspect of human life over the last half-century. The word “computer” now signifies a ubiquitous electronic device, rather than a human occupation. Yet evidently humans, large assemblies of molecules, can compute, and it has been a thrilling challenge to develop smaller, simpler, synthetic assemblies of molecules that can do useful computation. When we say that molecules compute, what we usually mean is that such molecules respond to certain inputs, for example, the presence or absence of other molecules, in a precisely defined but potentially complex fashion. The simplest way for a chemist to think about computing molecules is as sensors that can integrate the presence or absence of multiple analytes into a change in a single reporting property. Here we review several forms of molecular computing developed in our laboratories. When we began our work, combinatorial approaches to using DNA for computing were used to search for solutions to constraint satisfaction problems. We chose to work instead on logic circuits, building bottom-up from units based on catalytic nucleic acids, focusing on DNA secondary structures in the design of individual circuit elements, and reserving the combinatorial opportunities of DNA for the representation of multiple signals propagating in a large circuit. Such circuit design directly corresponds to the intuition about sensors transforming the detection of analytes into reporting properties. While this approach was unusual at the time, it has been adopted since by other groups working on biomolecular computing with different nucleic acid chemistries. We created logic gates by modularly combining deoxyribozymes (DNA-based enzymes cleaving or combining other oligonucleotides), in the role of reporting elements, with stem–loops as input detection elements. For instance, a deoxyribozyme that normally exhibits an oligonucleotide substrate recognition region is

  19. Polyvalent carbocyanine molecular beacons for molecular recognitions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yunpeng; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2004-06-30

    Polyvalent carboxylate-terminating near-infrared (NIR) carbocyanine molecular beacons were prepared by homologation of reactive carboxyl groups of the beacon with imino diacetic acid. Their conjugation with unprotected d-(+)-glucosamine gave dendritic arrays of the carbohydrate on an inner NIR chromophore core. In vivo evaluation of the dendritic glucosamine constructs shows enhanced uptake in proliferating tumor cells relative to surrounding normal tissue. The structural framework of these polyvalent beacons permits the amplification by synergistic effects of a variety of bioactive motifs or chemical sensors in molecular recognition interactions without dramatic change of their desirable NIR spectral properties.

  20. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  1. Ephemeral regions versus pseudo ephemeral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, S. F.; Livi, S. H. B.; Wang, J.; Shi, Z.

    1985-01-01

    New studies of the quiet Sun reveal that ephemeral active regions constitute minority rather than a majority of all the short lived, small scale bipolar features on the Sun. In contrast to the recognized patterns of growth and decay of ephemeral regions, various examples of the creation of other temporary bipoles nicknamed pseudo ephemeral regions are illustrated. The pseudo ephemeral regions are the consequence of combinations of small scale dynamic processes of the quiet Sun including: (1) fragmentation of network magnetic fields, (2) the separation of opposite polarity halves of ephemeral regions as they grow and evolve, and (3) the coalescence of weak network or intranetwork magnetic fields. New observations offer the possibility of resolving the discrepancies that have arisen in the association of ephemeral regions with X-ray bright points. Many X-ray bright points may be related to those pseudo ephemeral regions which have begun to exhibit magnetic flux loss.

  2. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  3. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  4. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  5. Molecular biology of development

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, E.H.; Firtel, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book is a compilation of papers presented at a symposium on the molecular biology of development. Topics discussed include: cytoplasmic localizations and pattern formations, gene expression during oogenesis and early development, developmental expression of gene families molecular aspects of plant development and transformation in whole organisms and cells.

  6. Crystalline molecular flasks.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Yasuhide; Kawano, Masaki; Fujita, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    A variety of host compounds have been used as molecular-scale reaction vessels, protecting guests from their environment or restricting the space available around them, thus favouring particular reactions. Such molecular 'flasks' can endow guest molecules with reactivities that differ from those in bulk solvents. Here, we extend this concept to crystalline molecular flasks, solid-state crystalline networks with pores within which pseudo-solution-state reactions can take place. As the guest molecules can spontaneously align along the walls and channels of the hosts, structural changes in the substrates can be directly observed by in situ X-ray crystallography during reaction. Recently, this has enabled observation of the molecular structures of transient intermediates and other labile species, in the form of sequential structural snapshots of the chemical transformation. Here, we describe the principles, development and applications of crystalline molecular flasks.

  7. Multifunctionality in molecular magnetism.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Czarnecki, Bernard; Reczyński, Mateusz; Arczyński, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetism draws from the fundamental ideas of structural chemistry and combines them with experimental physics resulting in one of the highest profile current topics, namely molecular materials that exhibit multifunctionality. Recent advances in the design of new generations of multifunctional molecular magnets that retain the functions of the building blocks and exhibit non-trivial magnetic properties at higher temperatures provide promising evidence that they may be useful for the future construction of nanoscale devices. This article is not a complete review but is rather an introduction into thefascinating world of multifunctional solids with magnetism as the leitmotif. We provide a subjective selection and discussion of the most inspiring examples of multifunctional molecular magnets: magnetic sponges, guest-responsive magnets, molecular magnets with ionic conductivity, photomagnets and non-centrosymmetric and chiral magnets.

  8. BIONET: national computer resource for molecular biology.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D H; Brutlag, D; Friedland, P; Kedes, L H

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the BIONET National Computer Resource for Molecular Biology. This presentation is intended as information for scientists in molecular biology and related disciplines who require access to computational methods for sequence analysis. We describe the goals, and the service and research opportunities offered to the community by BIONET, the relationship of BIONET to other national and regional resources, our recent efforts toward distribution of the resource to BIONET Satellites, and procedures for investigators to gain access to the Resource. PMID:3945548

  9. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  10. Regional Sustainable Environmental Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional sustainable environmental management is an interdisciplinary effort to develop a sufficient understanding of the interactions between ecosystems, the economy, law, and technology to formulate effective long-term management strategies on a regional scale. Regional sustai...

  11. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  12. Molecular gearing systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds thatmore » of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.« less

  13. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  14. Molecular Programming with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfree, Erik

    2009-05-01

    Information can be stored in molecules and processed by molecular reactions. Molecular information processing is at the heart of all biological systems; might it soon also be at the heart of non-biological synthetic chemical systems? Perhaps yes. One technological approach comes from DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing, where DNA is used as a non-biological informational polymer that can be rationally designed to create a rich class of molecular systems -- for example, DNA molecules that self-assemble precisely, that fold into complex nanoscale objects, that act as mechanical actuators and molecular motors, and that make decisions based on digital and analog logic. I will argue that to fully exploit their design potential, we will need to invent programming languages for specifying the behavior of information-based molecular systems, to create theoretical tools for understanding and analyzing the behavior of molecular programs, to develop compilers that automate the design of molecules with the desired behaviors, and to expand experimental techniques so that the implementation and debugging of complex molecular systems becomes as commonplace and practical as computer programming.

  15. Molecular gearing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.

  16. Magnetomotive Molecular Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    John, Renu; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Tremendous developments in the field of biomedical imaging in the past two decades have resulted in the transformation of anatomical imaging to molecular-specific imaging. The main approaches towards imaging at a molecular level are the development of high resolution imaging modalities with high penetration depths and increased sensitivity, and the development of molecular probes with high specificity. The development of novel molecular contrast agents and their success in molecular optical imaging modalities have lead to the emergence of molecular optical imaging as a more versatile and capable technique for providing morphological, spatial, and functional information at the molecular level with high sensitivity and precision, compared to other imaging modalities. In this review, we discuss a new class of dynamic contrast agents called magnetomotive molecular nanoprobes for molecular-specific imaging. Magnetomotive agents are superparamagnetic nanoparticles, typically iron-oxide, that are physically displaced by the application of a small modulating external magnetic field. Dynamic phase-sensitive position measurements are performed using any high resolution imaging modality, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), ultrasonography, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The dynamics of the magnetomotive agents can be used to extract the biomechanical tissue properties in which the nanoparticles are bound, and the agents can be used to deliver therapy via magnetomotive displacements to modulate or disrupt cell function, or hyperthermia to kill cells. These agents can be targeted via conjugation to antibodies, and in vivo targeted imaging has been shown in a carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor model. The iron-oxide nanoparticles also exhibit negative T2 contrast in MRI, and modulations can produce ultrasound imaging contrast for multimodal imaging applications. PMID:21517766

  17. Potential molecular wires and molecular alligator clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Jeffry S.; Pearson, Darren L.; Jones, LeRoy, II; Hara, Ryuichiro; Tour, James M.

    1996-12-01

    The synthesis of oligo(2-ethylphenylene-ethynylene)s, oligo(2-(0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s, and oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s is described via an iterative divergent convergent approach. Synthesized were the monomer, dimer, tetramer, octamer and 16-mer of the oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s and oligo(2-0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s. The 16-mers are 100 Å and 128 Å long, respectively. At each stage in the iteration, the length of the framework doubles. Only three sets of reaction conditions are needed for the entire iterative synthetic sequence; an iodination, a protodesilylation, and a Pd/Cu-catalyzed cross coupling. The oligomers were characterized spectroscopically and by mass spectrometry. The optical properties are presented which show the stage of optical absorbance saturation. The size exclusion chromatography values for the number average weights, relative to polystyrene, illustrate the tremendous differences in the hydrodynamic volume of these rigid rod oligomers versus the random coils of polystyrene. These differences become quite apparent at the octamer stage. The preparation of thiol-protected end groups is described. These may serve as molecular alligator clips for adhesion to gold surfaces. These oligomers may act as molecular wires in molecular electronic devices and they also serve as useful models for understanding related bulk polymers.

  18. Molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-07-19

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40-50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed.

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  20. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica