Science.gov

Sample records for molecular cytogenetic techniques

  1. Recent patents on molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Yurov, Yuri B

    2008-01-01

    The questions surrounding patenting of DNA sequences encoding specific proteins are relatively well reviewed in the available literature. However, neither applications nor molecular cytogenetic techniques, which use these sequences as a probe, have been reviewed in the light of the patenting. Furthermore, the patenting of the use of numerous probes, which are produced on different types of repetitive genome elements (i.e. satellite DNA or telomeric DNA sequences) and those generated by chromosome microdissection has not been reviewed. Molecular cytogenetic techniques are one of the most applied in current bioscience (as to June 2007, over 40,000 papers in browseable scientific databases mention one or several molecular cytogenetic techniques). Therefore, reviewing recent patents in this field is of general interest for numerous researchers in different areas of biology and medicine. Here, we address world-wide patents on DNA sequences used as molecular cytogenetic probes and molecular cytogenetic techniques to define current state and perspectives of this biomedical direction.

  2. Novel cytogenetic and molecular techniques in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies in newborns.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Śmigiel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of what causes developmental disorders, including congenital structural defects/anomalies, in the newborn population, facilitates the choice of further investigations, therapy and rehabilitation, allows the use of appropriate prophylaxis against comorbidities, makes it possible to specify prognosis, as well as provide reliable family counselling (both pre- and postnatal). Attempting to formulate a clinical diagnosis of a specific congenital anomaly syndrome, with or without dysmorphic features, based on history and detailed physical examination, remains crucial for the selection of the right genetic testing. Modern methods of molecular cytogenetics and molecular biology are targeted in nature (microdeletion MLPA, single gene sequencing) or are capable of analyzing the genome as a whole (array CGH, newgeneration sequencing). Especially the latter techniques are now causing a rapid increase of diagnostic efficacy across different age groups, including newborns.

  3. Human molecular cytogenetics: From cells to nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Mariluce

    2014-03-01

    The field of cytogenetics has focused on studying the number, structure, function and origin of chromosomal abnormalities and the evolution of chromosomes. The development of fluorescent molecules that either directly or via an intermediate molecule bind to DNA has led to the development of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a technology linking cytogenetics to molecular genetics. This technique has a wide range of applications that increased the dimension of chromosome analysis. The field of cytogenetics is particularly important for medical diagnostics and research as well as for gene ordering and mapping. Furthermore, the increased application of molecular biology techniques, such as array-based technologies, has led to improved resolution, extending the recognized range of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and genomic disorders. In adopting these newly expanded methods, cytogeneticists have used a range of technologies to study the association between visible chromosome rearrangements and defects at the single nucleotide level. Overall, molecular cytogenetic techniques offer a remarkable number of potential applications, ranging from physical mapping to clinical and evolutionary studies, making a powerful and informative complement to other molecular and genomic approaches. This manuscript does not present a detailed history of the development of molecular cytogenetics; however, references to historical reviews and experiments have been provided whenever possible. Herein, the basic principles of molecular cytogenetics, the technologies used to identify chromosomal rearrangements and copy number changes, and the applications for cytogenetics in biomedical diagnosis and research are presented and discussed.

  4. Genomic imbalances in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the chromosomal changes detected by molecular cytogenetic approaches in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the ninth most common malignancy in the world. Whole genome analyses of ESCC cell lines and tumors indicated that the most frequent genomic gains occurred at 1, 2q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7, 8q, 9q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 15q, 16, 17, 18p, 19q, 20q, 22q and X, with focal amplifications at 1q32, 2p16-22, 3q25-28, 5p13-15.3, 7p12-22, 7q21-22, 8q23-24.2, 9q34, 10q21, 11p11.2, 11q13, 13q32, 14q13-14, 14q21, 14q31-32, 15q22-26, 17p11.2, 18p11.2-11.3 and 20p11.2. Recurrent losses involved 3p, 4, 5q, 6q, 7q, 8p, 9, 10p, 12p, 13, 14p, 15p, 18, 19p, 20, 22, Xp and Y. Gains at 5p and 7q, and deletions at 4p, 9p, and 11q were significant prognostic factors for patients with ESCC. Gains at 6p and 20p, and losses at 10p and 10q were the most significant imbalances, both in primary carcinoma and in metastases, which suggested that these regions may harbor oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Gains at 12p and losses at 3p may be associated with poor relapse-free survival. The clinical applicability of these changes as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC, or as molecular targets for personalized therapy should be evaluated. PMID:21637470

  5. [Will the new molecular karyotyping BACs-on-Beads technique replace the traditional cytogenetic prenatal diagnostics? Preliminary reports].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Krzysztof; Henkelman, Małgorzata; Zajaczek, Stanisław

    2012-04-01

    Recently several attempts have been made to introduce molecular karyotyping techniques into prenatal diagnosis. These methods can be used not only for the diagnosis of classical aneuploidies, but first of all they should be employed in the diagnostics of microaberrations, which are not revealed by low resolution methods of classical cytogenetics. The new method BACs-on-Beads is designed for quick detection of broad panel of aneuploidies and microdeletions, by the specified detection of deletions and duplications in the examined fetal DNA acquired from amniocytes. Prenatal diagnostics was performed with the use of BACs-on-Beads and classical amniocyte karyotyping simultaneously in a group of 54 pregnancies. This new method proved to be fully compatible with typical karyotyping in cultures of amniocytes in 98.2%. It was confirmed that the main advantage of this method is the possibility of quick diagnosis, within 48 hours, with much wider spectrum of detected anomalies when compared to classical methods. Contrary to other molecular karyotyping methods, the BACs-on-Beads technique is more economical, less time consuming and less complex equipment is needed than in case of other methods. We suppose that this technique can replace classical karyotyping methods in the near future.

  6. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Molecular karyotyping in human constitutional cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Sanlaville, Damien; Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Turleau, Catherine; Coquin, Aurélie; Borck, Guntram; Colleaux, Laurence; Vekemans, Michel; Romana, Serge Pierrick

    2005-01-01

    Using array CGH it is possible to detect very small genetic imbalances anywhere in the genome. Its usefulness has been well documented in cancer and more recently in constitutional disorders. In particular it has been used to detect interstitial and subtelomeric submicroscopic imbalances, to characterize their size at the molecular level and to define the breakpoints of chromosomal translocation. Here, we review the various applications of array CGH in constitutional cytogenetics. This technology remains expensive and the existence of numerous sequence polymorphisms makes its interpretation difficult. The challenge today is to transfer this technology in the clinical setting.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, De-Bing; Wei, Bing; Abraham, Susan C; Huo, Lei; Albarracin, Constance T; Zhang, Hong; Babiera, Gildy; Caudle, Abigail S; Akay, Catherine L; Rao, Pulivarthi; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Lu, Xinyan; Wu, Yun

    2014-09-01

    Primary mammary neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is an uncommon entity that accounts for 2% to 5% of breast carcinomas. Recent reports have shown that NEC of the breast is an aggressive subtype of mammary carcinoma that is distinct from invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, and have suggested that these tumors have a poorer prognosis than invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified. In this study, we provide the first cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC using both conventional G-banding and spectral karyotype on a group of 7 tumors. We identified clonal chromosomal aberrations in 5 (71.4%) cases, with 4 of them showing complex karyotypes. Of these, recurrent numerical aberrations included gain of chromosome 7 (n = 2) and loss of chromosome 15 (n = 2). Recurrent clonal structural chromosomal aberrations involved chromosomes 1 (n = 3), 3 (n = 2), 6q (n = 3), and 17q (n = 3). Of the 4 (57.1%) cases with complex karyotypes, 2 showed evidence of chromothripsis, a phenomenon in which tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. One of these had evidence of chromothripsis involving chromosomes 1, 6, 8, and 15. The other also had evidence of chromosome 8 chromothripsis, making this a recurrent finding shared by both cases. We also found that mammary NEC shared some cytogenetic abnormalities--such as trisomy 7 and 12--with other neuroendocrine tumors in the lung and gastrointestinal tract, suggesting trisomy 7 and 12 as potential common molecular aberrations in neuroendocrine tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular cytogenetic characterization of mammary NEC.

  9. Nanotechnology and molecular cytogenetics: the future has not yet arrived

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Dimitris; Griffin, Darren K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a novel class of inorganic fluorochromes composed of nanometer-scale crystals made of a semiconductor material. They are resistant to photo-bleaching, have narrow excitation and emission wavelengths that can be controlled by particle size and thus have the potential for multiplexing experiments. Given the remarkable optical properties that quantum dots possess, they have been proposed as an ideal material for use in molecular cytogenetics, specifically the technique of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH). In this review, we provide an account of the current QD-FISH literature, and speculate as to why QDs are not yet optimised for FISH in their current form. PMID:22110858

  10. Evolutionary molecular cytogenetics of catarrhine primates: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R; Rocchi, M; Bigoni, F; Archidiacono, N

    2012-01-01

    The catarrhine primates were the first group of species studied with comparative molecular cytogenetics. Many of the fundamental techniques and principles of analysis were initially applied to comparisons in these primates, including interspecific chromosome painting, reciprocal chromosome painting and the extensive use of cloned DNA probes for evolutionary analysis. The definition and importance of chromosome syntenies and associations for a correct cladistics analysis of phylogenomic relationships were first applied to catarrhines. These early chromosome painting studies vividly illustrated a striking conservation of the genome between humans and macaques. Contemporarily, it also revealed profound differences between humans and gibbons, a group of species more closely related to humans, making it clear that chromosome evolution did not follow a molecular clock. Chromosome painting has now been applied to more that 60 primate species and the translocation history has been mapped onto the major taxonomic divisions in the tree of primate evolution. In situ hybridization of cloned DNA probes, primarily BAC-FISH, also made it possible to more precisely map breakpoints with spanning and flanking BACs. These studies established marker order and disclosed intrachromosomal rearrangements. When applied comparatively to a range of primate species, they led to the discovery of evolutionary new centromeres as an important new category of chromosome evolution. BAC-FISH studies are intimately connected to genome sequencing, and probes can usually be assigned to a precise location in the genome assembly. This connection ties molecular cytogenetics securely to genome sequencing, assuring that molecular cytogenetics will continue to have a productive future in the multidisciplinary science of phylogenomics.

  11. Systematics of Mepraia (Hemiptera-Reduviidae): cytogenetic and molecular variation.

    PubMed

    Calleros, L; Panzera, F; Bargues, M D; Monteiro, F A; Klisiowicz, D R; Zuriaga, M A; Mas-Coma, S; Pérez, R

    2010-03-01

    The haematophagous insects of the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae) have great epidemiological importance as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Mepraia was originally described as a monotypic genus comprised of Mepraia spinolai, distributed along coastal areas of northern Chile (from Region I to the Metropolitan Region). Recently, some M. spinolai populations have been ranked as a new species named Mepraia gajardoi. Several populations along the distribution range of the genus were sampled, and genetic differentiation was studied based upon the analysis of three molecular markers: cytogenetics (karyotype and chromosome behaviour during meiosis using the C-banding technique), mitochondrial DNA (a cytochrome oxidase I gene fragment), and nuclear ribosomal DNA (intergenic region including the two internal transcribed spacers ITS-1 and ITS-2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene). The data here presented indicate that populations within the Mepraia genus (excluding Region II specimens) can be divided into two separate lineages. One lineage is comprised of specimens from the northernmost Region I and represents M. gajardoi. The other includes samples from the southern III, IV and the Metropolitan Regions, and represents M. spinolai. Region II individuals deserve particular attention as their relationship to the two identified lineages is not clear-cut. While they appear to belong to M. spinolai based on cytogenetics and rDNA markers, COI results indicate a closer relationship to M. gajardoi. This disagreement can be due to mitochondrial DNA introgression or the retention of ancestral polymorphisms.

  12. Methods in molecular biology: plant cytogenetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytogenetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of genetics, biology, reproduction, and evolution. From early studies in basic chromosome behavior the field has expanded enabling whole genome analysis to the manipulation of chromosomes and their organization. This book covers a ran...

  13. Development and Application of Camelid Molecular Cytogenetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Felipe; Das, Pranab J.; Kutzler, Michelle; Owens, Elaine; Perelman, Polina; Rubes, Jiri; Hornak, Miroslav; Johnson, Warren E.

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic chromosome maps offer molecular tools for genome analysis and clinical cytogenetics and are of particular importance for species with difficult karyotypes, such as camelids (2n = 74). Building on the available human–camel zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data, we developed the first cytogenetic map for the alpaca (Lama pacos, LPA) genome by isolating and identifying 151 alpaca bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones corresponding to 44 specific genes. The genes were mapped by FISH to 31 alpaca autosomes and the sex chromosomes; 11 chromosomes had 2 markers, which were ordered by dual-color FISH. The STS gene mapped to Xpter/Ypter, demarcating the pseudoautosomal region, whereas no markers were assigned to chromosomes 14, 21, 22, 28, and 36. The chromosome-specific markers were applied in clinical cytogenetics to identify LPA20, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-carrying chromosome, as a part of an autosomal translocation in a sterile male llama (Lama glama, LGL; 2n = 73,XY). FISH with LPAX BACs and LPA36 paints, as well as comparative genomic hybridization, were also used to investigate the origin of the minute chromosome, an abnormally small LPA36 in infertile female alpacas. This collection of cytogenetically mapped markers represents a new tool for camelid clinical cytogenetics and has applications for the improvement of the alpaca genome map and sequence assembly. PMID:23109720

  14. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a human thyroid cancercell line

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tuton, Tiffany B.; Ito, Yuko; Chu, LisaW.; Lu, Chung-Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier,Jingly F.

    2006-01-04

    The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) increases significantly after exposure of the head and neck region to ionizing radiation, yet we know neither the steps involved in malignant transformation of thyroid epithelium nor the specific carcinogenic mode of action of radiation. Such increased tumor frequency became most evident in children after the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. In the twelve years following the accident, the average incidence of childhood PTCs (chPTC) increased over one hundred-fold compared to the rate of about 1 tumor incidence per 10{sup 6} children per year prior to 1986. To study the etiology of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, we formed an international consortium to investigate chromosomal changes and altered gene expression in cases of post-Chernobyl chPTC. Our approach is based on karyotyping of primary cultures established from chPTC specimens, establishment of cell lines and studies of genotype-phenotype relationships through high resolution chromosome analysis, DNA/cDNA micro-array studies, and mouse xenografts that test for tumorigenicity. Here, we report the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based techniques for the molecular cytogenetic characterization of a highly tumorigenic chPTC cell line, S48TK, and its subclones. Using chromosome 9 rearrangements as an example, we describe a new approach termed ''BAC-FISH'' to rapidly delineate chromosomal breakpoints, an important step towards a better understanding of the formation of translocations and their functional consequences.

  15. Cytogenetic characterization by in situ hybridization techniques and molecular analysis of 5S rRNA genes of the European hazelnut (Corylus avellana).

    PubMed

    Falistocco, E; Marconi, G

    2013-03-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is widespread in Europe, where it has been cultivated for centuries. Despite progress in genetics, most of the cytogenetic aspects of this species have been overlooked. The aim of this study was to fill in this gap and obtain basic information on the chromosome structure of this species. Karyomorphological analysis confirmed the chromosome number 2n = 22 and showed that, despite their apparent uniformity, the chromosomes could be separated into three groups of different size: large (L), medium (M), and small (S). As a first step towards the physical mapping of the hazelnut chromosomes, we applied FISH to localize the position of rRNA genes (rDNA). The sites of 45S and 5S rDNA enabled us to identify two chromosome pairs belonging, respectively, to the L and S groups. The self-GISH procedure revealed that repetitive DNA is concentrated in the pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes, as with other species with rather small genomes. The analysis of 5S rDNA repeats offered additional information on the hazelnut genome by obtaining the whole sequence of the transcribed region so far unpublished. The overall results constitute a substantial advance in hazelnut cytogenetics. Further investigation of other species of Corylus could be an effective approach to understanding the phylogenesis of the genus and resolving taxonomic problems.

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 7 in uterine leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishwad, C.; Ferrell, R.E.; Davare, J.

    1994-09-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors which arise clonally from smooth muscle cells of the myometrium. Cytogenetic studies of uterine leiomyomas revealed that about 50% have chromosome abnormalities and that deletion 7q is a common finding. This observation suggest the possible location of a growth suppressor gene within the 7q21-q22 region. Molecular genetic analysis of cytogenetically normal tumors has frequently revealed somatic loss of specific tumor suppressor genes detected by loss of heterozygosity in the critical region (RB1 in retinoblastoma and WT1 in Wilms tumor). To test the hypothesis that chromosome region 7q21-q22 contains a growth suppressor gene involved in the development of leiomyomas, we tested 67 leiomyomas for allelic loss of 7q markers spanning the cytogenetically defined critical region. Nineteen tumors with cytogenetically defined 7q deletion and 48 tumors without cytogenetically visible 7q deletion were examined for allelic loss of loci D7S487, D7S440, D7S492, D7S518, D7S471, D7S466 and D7S530. Loss of heterozygosity for one or more of these loci was observed in 14/19 (73.7%) of tumors with deletion 7q and no evidence of allelic loss was observed in tumors without cytogenetic deletion. The tumors with deletion 7q but no loss of 7q21-q22 markers were tumors which were mosaics with only a minority of cells showing chromosome 7q deletion. The critical region of loss is defined by markers D7S518 and D7S471, each showing loss in 56% of informative cases. These markers define a 10cM region of 7q21.2-q22 consistent with the cytogenetically defined smallest region of overlap. These markers exclude loss of the MET oncogene locus and WNT1, the murine mammary tumor virus integration site, from the critical region. These results define a region that is consistently lost in leiomyomas with abnormalities in chromosome 7q and may define the location of a gene involved in the development of a subset of leiomyomas.

  17. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic diagnosis of Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Hamao; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Kimura, Misa

    1996-08-23

    Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by distinct facial changes, growth deficiency, mental retardation, and congenital heart defect (particularly supravalvular aortic stenosis), associated at times with infantile hypercalcemia. Molecular genetic studies have indicated that hemizygosity at the elastin locus (7q11.23) causes WS. The purpose of this study was to confirm that this regional deletion, involving the elastin locus, is the cause of WS in Japan, and to clarify the correlation between the phenotype and the elastin locus. Thirty-two patients with WS and thirty of their relatives were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using the WS chromosome region (WSCR) probe. All patients had cardiovascular disease (100%), 30 had typical WS facial changes (94%), 31 had mental retardation or developmental delay (97%), 16 were small-for-date at birth (50%), 14 had short stature (44%), and 13 had dental anomalies (41%). No relatives showed any manifestation of WS. Hemizygosity for a region of 7q11.23, involving the elastin locus, was found in all WS patients, but was not found in the 30 relatives. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Biegel, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made toward improving survival for children with brain tumors, and yet there is still relatively little known regarding the molecular genetic events that contribute to tumor initiation or progression. Nonrandom patterns of chromosomal deletions in several types of childhood brain tumors suggest that the loss or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are critical events in tumorigenesis. Deletions of chromosomal regions 10q, 11 and 17p, and example, are frequent events in medulloblastoma, whereas loss of a region within 22q11.2, which contains the INI1 gene, is involved in the development of atypical teratoid and rhabdoid tumors. A review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic changes identified to date in childhood brain tumors will be presented. PMID:11550309

  20. [Dicentric Y chromosomes. First part: cytogenetic and molecular aspects].

    PubMed

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, N; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes have been reviewed twice in 1994 by Hsu et al. and in 1995 by Tuck-Muller et al. who showed that dic(Y) are the most common Y structural abnormalities and that their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. The prediction of their phenotypic consequences is often difficult because of the variety of genomic sequences concerned by duplications and deletions, because of the variable degrees of mosaicism (cell line 45,X in particular) and at the end, because of identification and analysis technical difficulties of the structure of the rearranged Y chromosome. The clinical specter of this cytogenetic abnormality is rather wide going from almost-normal or infertile males, to females with or without stigmas of Turner syndrome. Middle phenotypes consist of various degrees of genital ambiguities. However, clinical expression seems to be related to the genomic capital of the Y chromosome, mainly the Y genes involved in the control of the process of the determination of gonads (Yp) and spermatogenesis (Yq) as well as control of the growth and the skeletal development (Yp). Here, we report a third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. In the light of previous reviews as well as the recent data of the genetic cartography of the Y chromosome, we try, in this first part, to determine characteristics of reported dicentric Y chromosomes as well as their chromosomal mechanics, their mitotic stability and finally their cytogenetic and molecular investigations.

  1. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae), Maritime Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Amosova, Alexandra V.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Samatadze, Tatiana E.; Twardovska, Maryana O.; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A.; Andreev, Igor O.; Badaeva, Ekaterina D.; Kunakh, Viktor A.; Muravenko, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) (2n = 26) is one of the two vascular plants adapted to the harshest environment of the Antarctic. Although the species is a valuable model for study of environmental stress tolerance in plants, its karyotype is still poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica collected on four islands of the Maritime Antarctic. D. antarctica karyotypes were studied by Giemsa C- and DAPI/C-banding, Ag-NOR staining, multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization with repeated DNA probes (pTa71, pTa794, telomere repeats, pSc119.2, pAs1) and the GAA simple sequence repeat probe. We also performed sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. caespitosa. Two chromosome pairs bearing transcriptionally active 45S rDNA loci and five pairs with 5S rDNA sites were detected. A weak intercalary site of telomere repeats was revealed on the largest chromosome in addition to telomere hybridization signals at terminal positions. This fact confirms indirectly the hypothesis that chromosome fusion might have been the cause of the unusual for cereals chromosome number in this species. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined molecular cytogenetic markers, all chromosomes in karyotypes were identified, and chromosome idiograms of D. antarctica were constructed. B chromosomes were found in most karyotypes of plants from Darboux Island. A mixoploid plant with mainly triploid cells bearing a Robertsonian rearrangement was detected among typical diploid specimens from Great Jalour Island. The karyotype variability found in D. antarctica is probably an expression of genome instability induced by environmental stress factors. The differences in C-banding patterns and in chromosome distribution of rDNA loci as well as homologous highly repeated DNA sequences detected between genomes of D. antarctica and its related species D. caespitosa indicate that genome reorganization involving

  2. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae), Maritime Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Twardovska, Maryana O; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Andreev, Igor O; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Kunakh, Viktor A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2015-01-01

    Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) (2n = 26) is one of the two vascular plants adapted to the harshest environment of the Antarctic. Although the species is a valuable model for study of environmental stress tolerance in plants, its karyotype is still poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica collected on four islands of the Maritime Antarctic. D. antarctica karyotypes were studied by Giemsa C- and DAPI/C-banding, Ag-NOR staining, multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization with repeated DNA probes (pTa71, pTa794, telomere repeats, pSc119.2, pAs1) and the GAA simple sequence repeat probe. We also performed sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. caespitosa. Two chromosome pairs bearing transcriptionally active 45S rDNA loci and five pairs with 5S rDNA sites were detected. A weak intercalary site of telomere repeats was revealed on the largest chromosome in addition to telomere hybridization signals at terminal positions. This fact confirms indirectly the hypothesis that chromosome fusion might have been the cause of the unusual for cereals chromosome number in this species. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined molecular cytogenetic markers, all chromosomes in karyotypes were identified, and chromosome idiograms of D. antarctica were constructed. B chromosomes were found in most karyotypes of plants from Darboux Island. A mixoploid plant with mainly triploid cells bearing a Robertsonian rearrangement was detected among typical diploid specimens from Great Jalour Island. The karyotype variability found in D. antarctica is probably an expression of genome instability induced by environmental stress factors. The differences in C-banding patterns and in chromosome distribution of rDNA loci as well as homologous highly repeated DNA sequences detected between genomes of D. antarctica and its related species D. caespitosa indicate that genome reorganization involving

  3. Cytogenetic and molecular profile of endometrial stromal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Micci, Francesca; Gorunova, Ludmila; Agostini, Antonio; Johannessen, Lene E; Brunetti, Marta; Davidson, Ben; Heim, Sverre; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-11-01

    Recent cytogenetic and molecular investigations have improved our understanding of endometrial stromal tumors, including sarcomas (ESS), and helped redefine their classification into more pathogenetically meaningful categories. Because much more can be gained through such studies, we add information on another 22 ESS examined by karyotyping, PCR analysis, expression array analysis, and transcriptome sequencing. In spite of the known preference for certain pathogenetic pathways, we found considerable genetic heterogeneity in high-grade (HG) as well as in low-grade (LG) ESS. Not all HG tumors showed a YWHAE-NUTM chimeric transcript and as many as six LGESS showed no hitherto known ESS-related fusions. Among the transcripts identified by transcriptome sequencing and verified by Sanger sequencing, new variants of ZC3H7-BCOR and its reciprocal BCOR-ZC3H7 were identified as was involvement of the CREBBP and MLLT4 genes (both well known leukemia-related genes) in two new fusions. FISH analysis identified a known EPC1-PHF1 fusion which led to the identification of a new variant at the molecular level. The fact that around 70 genes were found differentially expressed, by microarray analysis, when comparing LGESS showing ESS-related fusions with LGESS without such transcripts, underscores the biochemical importance of the observed genetic heterogeneity and hints that new subgroups/entities in LGESS still remain undiscovered. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular and cytogenetic evaluation of a patient with ring chromosome 13 and discordant results.

    PubMed

    Kaylor, Julie; Alfaro, Maria; Ishwar, Arjun; Sailey, Charles; Sawyer, Jeffrey; Zarate, Yuri A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a male newborn with ring chromosome 13 found to have dysmorphic features, growth retardation, imperforate anus, and ambiguous genitalia. An initial karyotype showed 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34) in the 30 cells analyzed. SNP microarray from peripheral blood revealed not only an 8.14-Mb 13q33.2q34 deletion, but also a duplication of 87.49 Mb suggesting partial trisomy 13q that the patient did not appear to have clinically. Further cytogenetic characterization detected 3 distinct cell lines in the repeated peripheral blood sample: 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34)[89]/ 46,XY,r(13;13)(p13q34)[7]/45,XY,-13[5] and 2 in cultured fibroblasts: 46,XY,r(13)(p13q34)[65]/45,XY,-13[35]. Repeated molecular studies on peripheral blood and fibroblasts, however, failed to document the initially seen partial trisomy 13q. We postulate that the presence of duplicated material may be evidence of the high burden of duplicate rings in peripheral blood at any given time, with the high rates of cell death caused by mitotically unstable double rings accounting for the repeated microarray results that failed to detect any duplications. We emphasize the correlation between both cytogenetic and molecular studies with thorough clinical assessment and suggest that given the high sensitivity of newer molecular cytogenetic techniques, careful interpretation of results is critical in the context of ring chromosomes.

  5. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  6. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of down syndrome individual with leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J.; Williams, B.J.; Zupursky, A.; Doyle, J.; Sherman, S.L.; Jacobs, P.A.; Shugar, A.L.; Soukup, S.W.

    1995-04-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients, with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for chromosomally normal children. Furthermore, one type of leukemia, called {open_quotes}transient leukemia{close_quotes} (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown, but we and others have hypothesized that it may be influenced by the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 55 individuals consisting of 17 cases with TL, 7 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia subtype M7 (ANLL-M7, or acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, postulated to be related to TL), and 31 cases of other forms of leukemia. Analysis of these cases suggests differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. Specifically, the TL and ANLL-M7 cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e., mosaic trisomies, rings, and/or isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Additionally, genetic mapping studies suggest an increase in the frequency of disomic homozygosity, especially in proximal 21q, in DS individuals with TL and ANLL-M7. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Prenatal identification of i(Yp) by molecular cytogenetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.T.; Peng, W.; Williams, J. III

    1994-09-01

    An isochromosome derived from the short arm of the Y chromosome, i(Yp), is a rare marker chromosome. Its de novo presence prenatally represents a diagnostic dilemna since its impact on fetal development is difficult to predict. We present a case of 46,X,+i(Yp) de novo detected in an amniotic fluid specimen received for karyotype analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies using a panel of Y-specific biotinylated DNA probes including a Y-centromere probe, a Y whole chromosome painting probe, and a lambda HAM2 probe containing 19 kb of AMG-Y sequence, located to Yp11.2, have identified the marker chromosome as i(Yp). The breakpoint on this marker chromosome is tentatively assigned to Yq11.1 which is close to the centromere. The present report illustrates the importance of FISH techniques as a complement to cytogenetic methods for accurate identification of chromosome rearrangements in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  8. [Molecular cytogenetic methods for studying interphase chromosomes in human brain cells].

    PubMed

    Iurov, I Iu; Vorsanova, S G; Solov'ev, I V; Iurov, Iu B

    2010-09-01

    One of the main genetic factors determining the functional activity of the genome in somatic cells, including brain nerve cells, is the spatial organization of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus. For a long time, no studies of human brain cells were carried out until high-resolution methods of molecular cytogenetics were developed to analyze interphase chromosomes in nondividing somatic cells. The purpose of the present work was to assess the potential of high-resolution methods of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying chromosomes and the nuclear organization in postmitotic brain cells. A high efficiency was shown by such methods as multiprobe and quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Multiprobe FISH and QFISH), ImmunoMFISH (analysis of the chromosome organization in different types of brain cells), and interphase chromosome-specific multicolor banding (ICS-MCB). These approaches allowed studying the nuclear organization depending on the gene composition and types of repetitive DNA of specific chromosome regions in certain types of brain cells (in neurons and glial cells, in particular). The present work demonstrates a high potential of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying the structural and functional organizations of the cell nucleus in highly differentiated nerve cells. Analysis of interphase chromosomes of brain cells in the normal and pathological states can be considered as a promising line of research in modern molecular cytogenetics and cell neurobiology, i. e., molecular neurocytogenetics.

  9. Molecular and cytogenetic assessment of Dipterygium glaucum genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Altwaty, Nada H; El-Sayed, Osama E; Aly, Nariman A H; Baeshen, Mohamed N; Baeshen, Nabih A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the genotoxicity of Dipterygium glaucum grows widely in Saudi Arabia desert to produce safety herbal products. This work is considered the first and pioneer report so far due to the lack and poor evaluated reports of the plant species for their mutagensity, genotoxicity and cytogenetics effects. Cytogenetic effects of D. glaucum on mitotic in roots of Vicia faba showed reduction in mitotic activity using three extracts; water, ethanol and ethyl acetate. Chromosomal abnormalities were recorded that included stickiness of chromosomes, chromatin bridge, fragments, lagging chromosome and micronuclei. Protein bands and RAPD analyses of V. faba treated with three D. glaucum extracts revealed some newly induced proteins and DNA fragments and other disappeared. Chemical constitution of the plant species should be identified with their biological activities against human and animal cells like HeLa cancer cell line. We are recommending using additional genotoxicity tests and other toxicity tests on animal culture with different concentrations and also utilizing several drought and heat tolerant genes of the plant species in gene cloning to develop and improve other economical crop plants instead of using the species as oral herbal remedy.

  10. Inferring Diversity and Evolution in Fish by Means of Integrative Molecular Cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Castro, Jonathan Pena; Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Lima-Filho, Paulo Augusto; da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck Félix; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fish constitute a paraphyletic and profusely diversified group that has historically puzzled ichthyologists. Hard efforts are necessary to better understand this group, due to its extensive diversity. New species are often identified and it leads to questions about their phylogenetic aspects. Cytogenetics is becoming an important biodiversity-detection tool also used to measure biodiversity evolutionary aspects. Molecular cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed integrating quantitative and qualitative data from DNA sequences and their physical location in chromosomes and genomes. Although there is no intention on presenting a broader review, the current study presents some evidences on the need of integrating molecular cytogenetic data to other evolutionary biology tools to more precisely infer cryptic species detection, population structuring in marine environments, intra- and interspecific karyoevolutionary aspects of freshwater groups, evolutionary dynamics of marine fish chromosomes, and the origin and differentiation of sexual and B chromosomes. The new cytogenetic field, called cytogenomics, is spreading due to its capacity to give resolute answers to countless questions that cannot be answered by traditional methodologies. Indeed, the association between chromosomal markers and DNA sequencing as well as between biological diversity analysis methodologies and phylogenetics triggers the will to search for answers about fish evolutionary, taxonomic, and structural features.

  11. Inferring Diversity and Evolution in Fish by Means of Integrative Molecular Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Castro, Jonathan Pena; Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Lima-Filho, Paulo Augusto; Félix da Costa, Gideão Wagner Werneck; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fish constitute a paraphyletic and profusely diversified group that has historically puzzled ichthyologists. Hard efforts are necessary to better understand this group, due to its extensive diversity. New species are often identified and it leads to questions about their phylogenetic aspects. Cytogenetics is becoming an important biodiversity-detection tool also used to measure biodiversity evolutionary aspects. Molecular cytogenetics by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed integrating quantitative and qualitative data from DNA sequences and their physical location in chromosomes and genomes. Although there is no intention on presenting a broader review, the current study presents some evidences on the need of integrating molecular cytogenetic data to other evolutionary biology tools to more precisely infer cryptic species detection, population structuring in marine environments, intra- and interspecific karyoevolutionary aspects of freshwater groups, evolutionary dynamics of marine fish chromosomes, and the origin and differentiation of sexual and B chromosomes. The new cytogenetic field, called cytogenomics, is spreading due to its capacity to give resolute answers to countless questions that cannot be answered by traditional methodologies. Indeed, the association between chromosomal markers and DNA sequencing as well as between biological diversity analysis methodologies and phylogenetics triggers the will to search for answers about fish evolutionary, taxonomic, and structural features. PMID:26345638

  12. Combined Use of Cytogenetic and Molecular Methods in Prenatal Diagnostics of Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Mehinovic, Lejla; Konjhodzic, Rijad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of prenatal diagnostics is to provide information of the genetic abnormalities of the fetus early enough for the termination of pregnancy to be possible. Chromosomal abnormalities can be detected in an unborn child through the use of cytogenetic, molecular- cytogenetic and molecular methods. In between them, central spot is still occupied by cytogenetic methods. In cases where use of such methods is not informative enough, one or more molecular cytogenetic methods can be used for further clarification. Combined use of the mentioned methods improves the quality of the final findings in the diagnostics of chromosomal abnormalities, with classical cytogenetic methods still occupying the central spot. Material and methods: Conducted research represent retrospective-prospective study of a four year period, from 2008 through 2011. In the period stated, 1319 karyotyping from amniotic fluid were conducted, along with 146 FISH analysis. Results: Karyotyping had detected 20 numerical and 18 structural aberrations in that period. Most common observed numerical aberration were Down syndrome (75%), Klinefelter syndrome (10%), Edwards syndrome, double Y syndrome and triploidy (5% each). Within observed structural aberrations more common were balanced chromosomal aberrations then non balanced ones. Most common balanced structural aberrations were as follows: reciprocal translocations (60%), Robertson translocations (13.3%), chromosomal inversions, duplications and balanced de novo chromosomal rearrangements (6.6% each). Conclusion: With non- balanced aberrations observed in the samples of amniotic fluid, non- balanced translocations, deletions and derived chromosomes were equally represented. Number of detected aneuploidies with FISH, prior to obtaining results with karyotyping, were 6. PMID:26005269

  13. First cytogenetic analysis of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) by conventional and molecular methods with comments on the karyotypic evolution in Prochilodontidae.

    PubMed

    Tursellino, Mauro Nirchio; Silva, Duílio Mazzoni Zerbinato de Andrade; Abad, César Quezada; Blacio, Wilmer Arnoldo Moreira; Romero, Omar Rogerio Sánchez; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We used conventional cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa, C-banding, Ag-NOR), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes to investigate the karyotype and cytogenetic characteristics of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) from Ecuador. The specimens studied have a karyotype with 2n=54 biarmed chromosomes (32 M + 22 SM) and C-positive heterochromatin located on the centromeric, pericentromeric, interstitial, and terminal regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions occurred terminally on the long arm of chromosome pair 2. FISH confirmed the presence of only one 18S rDNA cluster with nonsyntenic localization with the 5S rDNA. Cytogenetic data allow us to refute the earlier morphological hypothesis of a sister relationship between Semaprochilodus Fowler, 1941 and Ichthyoelephas Posada Arango, 1909 and support the molecular proposal that Ichthyoelephas is a sister group to the monophyletic clade containing Prochilodus Agassiz, 1829 and Semaprochilodus.

  14. First cytogenetic analysis of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) by conventional and molecular methods with comments on the karyotypic evolution in Prochilodontidae

    PubMed Central

    Tursellino, Mauro Nirchio; Silva, Duílio Mazzoni Zerbinato de Andrade; Abad, César Quezada; Blacio, Wilmer Arnoldo Moreira; Romero, Omar Rogerio Sánchez; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We used conventional cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa, C-banding, Ag-NOR), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes to investigate the karyotype and cytogenetic characteristics of Ichthyoelephas humeralis (Günther, 1860) from Ecuador. The specimens studied have a karyotype with 2n=54 biarmed chromosomes (32 M + 22 SM) and C-positive heterochromatin located on the centromeric, pericentromeric, interstitial, and terminal regions of some chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer regions occurred terminally on the long arm of chromosome pair 2. FISH confirmed the presence of only one 18S rDNA cluster with nonsyntenic localization with the 5S rDNA. Cytogenetic data allow us to refute the earlier morphological hypothesis of a sister relationship between Semaprochilodus Fowler, 1941 and Ichthyoelephas Posada Arango, 1909 and support the molecular proposal that Ichthyoelephas is a sister group to the monophyletic clade containing Prochilodus Agassiz, 1829 and Semaprochilodus. PMID:28123682

  15. Molecular cytogenetics of the california condor: evolutionary and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Modi, W S; Romanov, M; Green, E D; Ryder, O

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary cytogenetic comparisons involved 5 species of birds (California condor, chicken, zebra finch, collared flycatcher and black stork) belonging to divergent taxonomic orders. Seventy-four clones from a condor BAC library containing 80 genes were mapped to condor chromosomes using FISH, and 15 clones containing 16 genes were mapped to the stork Z chromosome. Maps for chicken and finch were derived from genome sequence databases, and that for flycatcher from the published literature. Gene content and gene order were highly conserved when individual condor, chicken, and zebra finch autosomes were compared, confirming that these species largely retain karyotypes close to the ancestral condition for neognathous birds. However, several differences were noted: zebra finch chromosomes 1 and 1A are homologous to condor and chicken chromosomes 1, the CHUNK1 gene appears to have transposed on condor chromosome 1, condor chromosomes 4 and 9 and zebra finch chromosomes 4 and 4A are homologous to chicken chromosome arms 4q and 4p, and novel inversions on chromosomes 4, 12 and 13 were found. Condor and stork Z chromosome gene orders are collinear and differentiated by a series of inversions/transpositions when compared to chicken, zebra finch, or flycatcher; phylogenetic analyses suggest independent rearrangement along the chicken, finch, and flycatcher lineages.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of Humulus lupulus sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Divashuk, M G; Alexandrov, O S; Kroupin, P Yu; Karlov, G I

    2011-01-01

    Dioecy is relatively rare in plants and sex determination systems vary among such species. A good example of a plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes is hop (Humulus lupulus). The genotypes carrying XX or XY chromosomes correspond to female and male plants, respectively. Until now no clear cytogenetic markers for the sex chromosomes of hop have been established. Here, for the first time the sex chromosomes of hop are clearly identified and characterized. The high copy sequence of hop (HSR1) has been cloned and localized on chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The HSR1 repeat has shown subtelomeric location on autosomes with the same intensity of the signal. The signal has been present in the subtelomeric region of the long arm and in the near-centromeric region but absent in the telomeric region of the short arm of the X chromosome. At the same time the signal has been found in the telomeric region only of the long arm of the Y chromosome. This finding indicates that the sex chromosomes of hop have evolved from a pair of autosomes via ancient translocation or inversion. The observation of the meiotic configuration of the sex bivalents shows the location of a pseudoautosomal region on the long arms of X and Y chromosomes.

  17. A clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study of 40 adults with the Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T; Clarke, D; Hardy, C A; Kilpatrick, M W; Corbett, J; Dahlitz, M

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study has been carried out on 40 adults with a firm diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. A cytogenetically detectable deletion was observed in 58% while further subjects had a deletion which was detectable by molecular methods only, giving a total of 76%. Four cases of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) were all female. Three of them were heterodisomic while the fourth was isodisomic. Two male probands were heterozygous at all loci tested yet did not have UPD. Although methylation studies showed that one of them had a single band using probe PW71, the other one had two bands. Psychiatric studies suggest that females with maternal UPD are indistinguishable psychologically from those with a paternal deletion in 15q11q13. Images PMID:7783165

  18. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients.

    PubMed

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-09-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient's karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases.

  19. The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex: comparative cytogenetic analysis in support of Sterile Insect Technique applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex currently harbors approximately 90 different members. The species complex has undergone many revisions in the past decades, and there is still an ongoing debate about the species limits. The availability of a variety of tools and approaches, such as molecular-genomic and cytogenetic analyses, are expected to shed light on the rather complicated issues of species complexes and incipient speciation. The clarification of genetic relationships among the different members of this complex is a prerequisite for the rational application of sterile insect technique (SIT) approaches for population control. Results Colonies established in the Insect Pest Control Laboratory (IPCL) (Seibersdorf, Vienna), representing five of the main economic important members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex were cytologically characterized. The taxa under study were B. dorsalis s.s., B. philippinensis, B. papayae, B. invadens and B. carambolae. Mitotic and polytene chromosome analyses did not reveal any chromosomal characteristics that could be used to distinguish between the investigated members of the B. dorsalis complex. Therefore, their polytene chromosomes can be regarded as homosequential with the reference maps of B. dorsalis s.s.. In situ hybridization of six genes further supported the proposed homosequentiallity of the chromosomes of these specific members of the complex. Conclusions The present analysis supports that the polytene chromosomes of the five taxa under study are homosequential. Therefore, the use of the available polytene chromosome maps for B. dorsalis s.s. as reference maps for all these five biological entities is proposed. Present data provide important insight in the genetic relationships among the different members of the B. dorsalis complex, and, along with other studies in the field, can facilitate SIT applications targeting this complex. Moreover, the availability of 'universal' reference polytene chromosome

  20. Toward a Molecular Cytogenetic Map for Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by Landed BAC/BIBAC Clones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Liu, Zhao; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n = 34). However, the relationship between linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown and has considerable relevance for the sunflower research community. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific bacterial /binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC/BIBAC) clones was identified from two complementary BAC and BIBAC libraries constructed for cultivated sunflower cv. HA89. In the present study, we used these linkage group-specific clones (∼100 kb in size) as probes to in situ hybridize to HA89 mitotic chromosomes at metaphase using the BAC- fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Because a characteristic of the sunflower genome is the abundance of repetitive DNA sequences, a high ratio of blocking DNA to probe DNA was applied to hybridization reactions to minimize the background noise. As a result, all sunflower chromosomes were anchored by one or two BAC/BIBAC clones with specific FISH signals. FISH analysis based on tandem repetitive sequences, such as rRNA genes, has been previously reported; however, the BAC-FISH technique developed here using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)−derived BAC/BIBAC clones as probes to apply genome-wide analysis is new for sunflower. As chromosome-specific cytogenetic markers, the selected BAC/BIBAC clones that encompass the 17 linkage groups provide a valuable tool for identifying sunflower cytogenetic stocks (such as trisomics) and tracking alien chromosomes in interspecific crosses. This work also demonstrates the potential of using a large-insert DNA library for the development of molecular cytogenetic resources. PMID:23316437

  1. Toward a molecular cytogenetic map for cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by landed BAC/BIBAC clones.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Liu, Zhao; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n = 34). However, the relationship between linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown and has considerable relevance for the sunflower research community. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific bacterial /binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC/BIBAC) clones was identified from two complementary BAC and BIBAC libraries constructed for cultivated sunflower cv. HA89. In the present study, we used these linkage group-specific clones (~100 kb in size) as probes to in situ hybridize to HA89 mitotic chromosomes at metaphase using the BAC-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Because a characteristic of the sunflower genome is the abundance of repetitive DNA sequences, a high ratio of blocking DNA to probe DNA was applied to hybridization reactions to minimize the background noise. As a result, all sunflower chromosomes were anchored by one or two BAC/BIBAC clones with specific FISH signals. FISH analysis based on tandem repetitive sequences, such as rRNA genes, has been previously reported; however, the BAC-FISH technique developed here using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-derived BAC/BIBAC clones as probes to apply genome-wide analysis is new for sunflower. As chromosome-specific cytogenetic markers, the selected BAC/BIBAC clones that encompass the 17 linkage groups provide a valuable tool for identifying sunflower cytogenetic stocks (such as trisomics) and tracking alien chromosomes in interspecific crosses. This work also demonstrates the potential of using a large-insert DNA library for the development of molecular cytogenetic resources.

  2. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of Epinephelus bruneus and Epinephelus moara (Perciformes, Epinephelidae).

    PubMed

    Guo, Minglan; Wang, Shifeng; Su, Yongquan; Zhou, Yongcan; Liu, Min; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Genus Epinephelus (Perciformes, Epinephelidae), commonly known as groupers, are usually difficult in species identification for the lack and/or change of morphological specialization. In this study, molecular cytogenetic analyses were firstly performed to identify the closely related species Epinephelus bruneus and E. moara in this genus. The species-specific differences of both fish species showed in karyotype, chromosomal distribution of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and localization of 18S rDNA. The heterochromatin (interstitial C-bands) and distribution pattern of telomere (TTAGGG) n in E. bruneus revealed the chromosomal rearrangements and different karyotypic evolutionary characteristics compared to those in E. moara. The cytogenetic data suggested that the lineages of E. bruneus and E. moara were recently derived within the genus Epinephelus, and E. moara exhibited more plesiomorphic features than E. bruneus. All results confirmed that E. moara, which has long been considered a synonym of E. bruneus, is a distinct species in the family Epinephelidae. In addition, molecular cytogenetic analyses are useful in species differentiation and phylogenetic reconstruction in groupers.

  3. The history of human cytogenetics in India-A review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R

    2016-09-10

    It is 60years since the discovery of the correct number of chromosomes in 1956; the field of cytogenetics had evolved. The late evolution of this field with respect to other fields is primarily due to the underdevelopment of lenses and imaging techniques. With the advent of the new technologies, especially automation and evolution of advanced compound microscopes, cytogenetics drastically leaped further to greater heights. This review describes the historic events that had led to the development of human cytogenetics with a special attention about the history of cytogenetics in India, its present status, and future. Apparently, this review provides a brief account into the insights of the early laboratory establishments, funding, and the German collaborations. The details of the Indian cytogeneticists establishing their labs, promoting the field, and offering the chromosomal diagnostic services are described. The detailed study of chromosomes helps in increasing the knowledge of the chromosome structure and function. The delineation of the chromosomal rearrangements using cytogenetics and molecular cytogenetic techniques pays way in identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in the chromosomal rearrangement. Although molecular cytogenetics is greatly developing, the conventional cytogenetics still remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of various numerical chromosomal aberrations and a few structural aberrations. The history of cytogenetics and its importance even in the era of molecular cytogenetics are discussed.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B.; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient’s karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases. PMID:27625853

  5. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species

    PubMed Central

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  7. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species.

    PubMed

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  8. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of 57 individuals with the Parder-Willi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Forrest, K.B.; Miller, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by hypotonia, early childhood obesity, mental deficiency, hypogonadism and an interstitial deletion of 15q11q13 of paternal origin in 50-70% of patients. The remaining patients have either submicroscopic deletions, maternal disomy or other anomalies of chromosome 15. We have undertaken cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies of 57 individuals presenting with features consistent with PWS (28 males and 29 females; age range of 3 months to 38 years), 25 with recognizable 15q11q13 deletions (44%), 28 with normal appearing chromosomes (49%), and four patients with other chromosome 15 anomalies (7%). High resolution chromosome analysis and PCR amplification were performed utilizing 17 STRs from 15q11q13 region, quantitative Southern hybridization using seven 15q11q13 probes, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using four 15q11q13 probes (4-3R, SNRPN, 3-21, and GABRB3). The cytogenetic deletion was paternal in all PWS families studied but the deletion varied in size in 10 patients. Parental DNA studies from 20 of 28 non-deletion patients showed maternal disomy in 7 patients and biparental inheritance in 13 non-deletion patients. In order to evaluate for submicroscopic deletions, PCR amplification with several loci in the area of the PWS minimal critical region, FISH using SNRPN and quantitative hybridization using a PCR product generated from primers of exons E and H of the SNRPN gene were undertaken on the non-deletion patients. Quantitative hybridization and FISH using SNRPN from 3 of 11 non-deletion patients (excluding maternal disomy cases) showed a submicroscopic deletion. One of these patients also showed a paternal deletion of D15S128 and MN1. We furthur support the use of both cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods for determining the genetic status of PWS patients.

  9. Cytogenetic Nomenclature and Reporting.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian; Simons, Annet; Rack, Katrina; Hastings, Rosalind J

    2017-01-01

    A standardized nomenclature is critical for the accurate and consistent description of genomic changes as identified by karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization and microarray. The International System for Human Cytogenomic Nomenclature (ISCN) is the central reference for the description of karyotyping, FISH, and microarray results, and provides rules for describing cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic findings in laboratory reports. These laboratory reports are documents to the referring clinician, and should be clear, accurate and contain all information relevant for good interpretation of the cytogenetic findings. Here, we describe guidelines for cytogenetic nomenclature and laboratory reports for cytogenetic testing applied to tumor samples.

  10. Molecular Mutations and Their Cooccurrences in Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengning; Yang, Chuanwei

    2017-01-01

    Adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) clinically is a disparate disease that requires intensive treatments ranging from chemotherapy alone to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Historically, cytogenetic analysis has been a useful prognostic tool to classify patients into favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable prognostic risk groups. However, the intermediate-risk group, consisting predominantly of cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML), itself exhibits diverse clinical outcomes and requires further characterization to allow for more optimal treatment decision-making. The recent advances in clinical genomics have led to the recategorization of CN-AML into favorable or unfavorable subgroups. The relapsing nature of AML is thought to be due to clonal heterogeneity that includes founder or driver mutations present in the leukemic stem cell population. In this article, we summarize the clinical outcomes of relevant molecular mutations and their cooccurrences in CN-AML, including NPM1, FLT3ITD, DNMT3A, NRAS, TET2, RUNX1, MLLPTD, ASXL1, BCOR, PHF6, CEBPAbiallelic, IDH1, IDH2R140, and IDH2R170, with an emphasis on their relevance to the leukemic stem cell compartment. We have reviewed the available literature and TCGA AML databases (2013) to highlight the potential role of stem cell regulating factor mutations on outcome within newly defined AML molecular subgroups. PMID:28197208

  11. Fragile X syndrome: clinical, cytogenetic and molecular screening among autism spectrum disorder children in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Winarni, T I; Utari, A; Mundhofir, F E P; Hagerman, R J; Faradz, S M H

    2013-12-01

    Fragile X testing is a priority in the evaluation of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) cases because identification of the FMR1 mutation leads to new treatment options. This study is focused on determining the prevalence of the FMR1 gene mutation among ASD cases in Indonesia. DSM-IV-TR criteria were administered to diagnose ASD; symptom severity was classified using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale. Cytogenetic analysis, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern blot for FMR1 gene analysis were carried out to confirm the diagnosis of fragile X syndrome. The fragile X site and FMR1 full mutation allele were identified in 3 out of 65 (4.6%) and 4 out of 65 (6.15%) children aged 3-17 years (57 boys and 8 girls), respectively. The Fragile X laboratory workup is essential in the evaluation of patients with ASD. Molecular analysis is most accurate, while cytogenetic documentation of the fragile X site can also be useful if molecular testing is not available.

  12. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  13. Clinical characteristics, cytogenetic and molecular findings in patients with disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li; Chen, Ming; Peng, Jian-hong; Zhang, Jian-wu; Li, Li

    2014-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), and the diagnostic values of classic cytogenetic and molecular genetic assays for DSD were investigated. In the enrolled 56 cases, there were 9 cases of 46,XY DSD, 6 cases of Turner syndrome (TS), one case of Super female syndrome, 25 cases of Klinefelter syndrome, 14 cases of 46,XX DSD, and one case of autosomal balanced rearrangements with hypospadias. The diagnosis of sex was made through physical examination, cytogenetic assay, ultrasonography, gonadal biopsy and hormonal analysis. PCR was used to detect SRY, ZFX, ZFY, DYZ3 and DYZ1 loci on Y and X chromosomes respectively. The DSD patients with the same category had similar clinical characteristics. The karyotypes in peripheral blood lymphocytes of all patients were identified. PCR-based analysis showed presence or absence of the X/Y-linked loci in several cases. Of the 9 cases of 46,XY DSD, 6 were positive for SRY, 9 for ZFX/ZFY, 9 for DYZ3 and 8 for DYZ1 loci. Of the 6 cases of TS, only 1 case with the karyotype of 45,X,/46,XX/46,XY was positive for all 5 loci. Of the 25 cases of Klinefelter syndrome, all were positive for all 5 loci. In one case of rare Klinefelter syndrome variants azoospermia factor (AZF) gene detection revealed the loss of the AZFa+AZFb region. In 14 cases of 46,XX DSD, 7 cases were positive for SRY, 14 for ZFX, 7 for ZFY, 7 for ZYZ3, and 5 for DYZ1. PCR can complement and also confirm cytogenetic studies in the diagnosis of sex in cases of DSD.

  14. Molecular cytogenetic map of the central bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Squamata: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Young, M J; O'Meally, D; Sarre, S D; Georges, A; Ezaz, T

    2013-07-01

    Reptiles, as the sister group to birds and mammals, are particularly valuable for comparative genomic studies among amniotes. The Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is being developed as a reptilian model for such comparisons, with whole-genome sequencing near completion. The karyotype consists of 6 pairs of macrochromosomes and 10 pairs microchromosomes (2n = 32), including a female heterogametic ZW sex microchromosome pair. Here, we present a molecular cytogenetic map for P. vitticeps comprising 87 anchor bacterial artificial chromosome clones that together span each macro- and microchromosome. It is the first comprehensive cytogenetic map for any non-avian reptile. We identified an active nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on the sub-telomeric region of 2q by mapping 18S rDNA and Ag-NOR staining. We identified interstitial telomeric sequences in two microchromosome pairs and the W chromosome, indicating that microchromosome fusion has been a mechanism of karyotypic evolution in Australian agamids within the last 21 to 19 million years. Orthology searches against the chicken genome revealed an intrachromosomal rearrangement of P. vitticeps 1q, identified regions orthologous to chicken Z on P. vitticeps 2q, snake Z on P. vitticeps 6q and the autosomal microchromosome pair in P. vitticeps orthologous to turtle Pelodiscus sinensis ZW and lizard Anolis carolinensis XY. This cytogenetic map will be a valuable reference tool for future gene mapping studies and will provide the framework for the work currently underway to physically anchor genome sequences to chromosomes for this model Australian squamate.

  15. Segregation of FRAXE in a large family: clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular data.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, B. C.; Smits, A. P.; de Graaff, E.; Smeets, D. F.; Schoute, F.; Eussen, B. H.; Knight, S. J.; Davies, K. E.; Assman-Hulsmans, C. F.; Oostra, B. A.

    1994-01-01

    During an ongoing study on X-linked mental retardation, we ascertained a large family in which mild mental retardation was cosegregating with a fragile site at Xq27-28. Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular studies were performed. Apart from mild mental retardation, affected males and females did not show a specific clinical phenotype. Psychometric assessment of four representative affected individuals revealed low academic achievements, with verbal and performance IQs of 61-75 and 70-82, respectively. Cytogenetically the fragile site was always present in affected males and was not always present in affected females. With FISH the fragile site was located within the FRAXE region. The expanded GCC repeat of FRAXE was seen in affected males and females either as a discrete band or as a broad smear. No expansion was seen in unaffected males, whereas three unaffected females did have an enlarged GCC repeat. Maternal transmission of FRAXE may lead to expansion or contraction of the GCC repeat length, whereas in all cases of paternal transmission contraction was seen. In striking contrast to the situation in fragile X syndrome, affected males may have affected daughters. In addition, there appears to be no premutation of the FRAXE GCC repeat, since in the family studied here all males lacking the normal allele were found to be affected. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7977354

  16. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and genomic organization of major DNA repeats in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, O S; Karlov, G I

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the bioinformatic, molecular genetic, and cytogenetic study of castor bean (Ricinus communis, 2n = 20), which belongs to the monotypic Ricinus genus within the Euphorbiaceae family. Because castor bean chromosomes are small, karyotypic studies are difficult. However, the use of DNA repeats has yielded new prospects for karyotypic research and genome characterization. In the present study, major DNA repeat sequences were identified, characterized and localized on mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes. Analyses of the nucleotide composition, curvature models, and FISH localization of the rcsat39 repeat suggest that this repeat plays a key role in building heterochromatic arrays in castor bean. Additionally, the rcsat390 sequences were determined to be chromosome-specific repeats located in the pericentromeric region of mitotic chromosome A (pachytene chromosome 1). The localization of rcsat39, rcsat390, 45S and 5S rDNA genes allowed for the development of cytogenetic landmarks for chromosome identification. General questions linked to heterochromatin formation, DNA repeat distribution, and the evolutionary emergence of the genome are discussed. The article may be of interest to biologists studying small genome organization and short monomer DNA repeats.

  17. Segregation of FRAXE in a large family: Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular data

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Smeets, F.C.M.; Schoute, F.; Assman-Hulsmans, C.F.C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Eussen, B.H.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Knight, S.J.L.

    1994-11-01

    During an ongoing study on X-linked mental retardation, we ascertained a large family in which mild mental retardation was cosegregating with a fragile site at Xq27-28. Clinical, psychometric, cytogenetic, and molecular studies were performed. Apart from mild mental retardation, affected males and females did not show a specific clinical phenotype. Psychometric assessment of four representative affected individuals revealed low academic achievements, with verbal and performance IQs of 61-75 and 70-82, respectively. Cytogenetically the fragile site was always present in affected males and was not always present in affected females. With FISH the fragile site was located within the FRAXE region. The expanded GCC repeat of FRAXE was seen in affected males and females either as a discrete band or as a broad smear. No expansion was seen in unaffected males, whereas three unaffected females did have an enlarged GCC repeat. Maternal transmission of FRAXE may lead to expansion or contraction of the GCC repeat length, whereas in all cases of paternal transmission contraction was seen. In striking contrast to the situation in fragile X syndrome, affected males may have affected daughters. In addition, there appears to be no premutation of the FRAXE GCC repeat, since in the family studied here all males lacking the normal allele were found to be affected. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. The strength of combined cytogenetic and mate-pair sequencing techniques illustrated by a germline chromothripsis rearrangement involving FOXP2.

    PubMed

    Nazaryan, Lusine; Stefanou, Eunice G; Hansen, Claus; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Bak, Mads; Sharkey, Freddie H; Mantziou, Theodora; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Velissariou, Voula; Liehr, Thomas; Syrrou, Maria; Tommerup, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation mate-pair sequencing (MPS) has revealed that many constitutional complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are associated with local shattering of chromosomal regions (chromothripsis). Although MPS promises to identify the molecular basis of the abnormal phenotypes associated with many CCRs, none of the reported mate-pair sequenced complex rearrangements have been simultaneously studied with state-of-the art molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we studied chromothripsis-associated CCR involving chromosomes 2, 5 and 7, associated with global developmental and psychomotor delay and severe speech disorder. We identified three truncated genes: CDH12, DGKB and FOXP2, confirming the role of FOXP2 in severe speech disorder, and suggestive roles of CDH12 and/or DGKB for the global developmental and psychomotor delay. Our study confirmes the power of MPS for detecting breakpoints and truncated genes at near nucleotide resolution in chromothripsis. However, only by combining MPS data with conventional G-banding and extensive fluorescence in situ hybridizations could we delineate the precise structure of the derivative chromosomes.

  19. Nodular Fasciitis of the Orbit: A Case Report Confirmed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anzeljc, Andrew J; Oliveira, Andre M; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Kim, Hee Joon; Hayek, Brent

    2016-02-12

    Nodular fasciitis is a benign fibroblastic proliferation typically found in the subcutaneous tissue or superficial fascia of the extremities that is often confused for malignancy. These lesions rarely occur on the eyelids and ocular adnexa and are seldom analyzed by ophthalmic pathologists. USP6 gene rearrangement has been recently demonstrated in nodular fasciitis and this rearrangement may lead to the formation of a fusion gene MYH9-USP6 in some cases. Herein, the authors describe a 38-year-old woman with a 6-month history of a progressively enlarging mass beneath her right medial upper eyelid. Histopathologic analysis of the excisional biopsy confirmed classic features of nodular fasciitis. Molecular cytogenetic analysis revealed a rearrangement of the USP6 locus, confirming the diagnosis of benign nodular fasciitis.

  20. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    PubMed

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  1. Granulocytic sarcoma in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia in complete haematological, cytogenetic and molecular remission

    PubMed Central

    Kittai, Adam; Yu, Eun-Mi; Tabbara, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma, also known as myeloid sarcoma, is an extramedullary tumour composed of immature myeloid cells. Granulocytic sarcoma is typically found in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, accelerated phase or blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or as an isolated event without bone marrow involvement. We present a case of granulocytic sarcoma in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia in the setting of complete haematological, molecular and cytogenetic remission. Our patient was first treated with imatinib for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia. After maintaining remission for 42 months, he developed a granulocytic sarcoma in his spine. In this case report, we describe our case, along with the three other cases reported in the literature. In addition to being a rare diagnosis, this case demonstrates the importance of being vigilant in diagnosing the cause of back pain and atypical symptoms in patients with a history of leukaemia. PMID:25538217

  2. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular evaluation in a dog with bilateral cryptorchidism and hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Cassata, R; Iannuzzi, A; Parma, P; De Lorenzi, L; Peretti, V; Perucatti, A; Iannuzzi, L; Di Meo, G P

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate prognostic factors in a Dalmatian dog with bilateral cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses revealed a normal karyotype (2n = 78,XY) and the presence of SRY, INSL3 and RXFP2 genes with a normal DNA sequence for SRY and RXFP2, while the INSL3 sequence differed slightly from the normal one due to a heterozygous nucleotide change involving amino acid 22 of the INSL3 dog precursor protein. Levels of plasmatic testosterone were only 0.01 ng/ml, while FSH and LH serum levels were not detectable. After the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test, the serum testosterone level was 0.01 ng/ml. Therefore, the phenotypic aetiology of this subject can not be well-defined because cryptorchidism and hypospadias were frequent clinical features with high genetic heterogeneity.

  3. Cryptic Caribbean species of Scorpaena (Actinopterygii: Scorpaeniformes) suggested by cytogenetic and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Nirchio, M; Oliveira, C; Siccha-Ramirez, Z R; Sene, V F; Sánchez-Romero, O R; Ehemann, N R; Milana, V; Rossi, A R; Sola, L

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses enabled identification of two cytotypes among individuals of the spotted scorpion fish Scorpaena plumieri from Margarita Island, Venezuela. Cytotype 1 was characterized by 48 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and fundamental number (number of chromosome arms; FN) equalled 48, while cytotype 2 was characterized by two metacentric and 46 subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes and FN was 50. These cytotypes also differed in the location of the ribosomal gene clusters and in the distribution of the constitutive heterochromatin. Moreover, fish from the cytotypes 1 and 2 were found to belong to distinct mitochondrial lineages. The presence of two S. plumieri cytotypes from two lineages separated by high genetic distance suggests that they correspond to sympatric cryptic species.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  5. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods in the detection of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mačkić-Đurović, Mirela; Projić, Petar; Ibrulj, Slavka; Čakar, Jasmina; Marjanović, Damir

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 6 STR markers application (D21S1435, D21S11, D21S1270, D21S1411, D21S226 and IFNAR) in molecular genetic diagnostics of Down syndrome (DS) and to compare it with cytogenetic method. Testing was performed on 73 children, with the previously cytogenetically confirmed Down syndrome. DNA isolated from the buccal swab was used. Previously mentioned loci located on chromosome 21 were simultaneously amplified using quantitative fluorescence PCR (QF PCR). Using this method, 60 previously cytogenetically diagnosed DS with standard type of trisomy 21 were confirmed. Furthermore, six of eight children with mosaic type of DS were detected. Two false negative results for mosaic type of DS were obtained. Finally, five children with the translocation type of Down syndrome were also confirmed with this molecular test. In conclusion, molecular genetic analysis of STR loci is fast, cheap and simple method that could be used in detection of DS. Regarding possible false results detected for certain number of mosaic types, cytogenetic analysis should be used as a confirmatory test. PMID:24856381

  6. A first generation cytogenetic ideogram for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) based on multiple chromosome banding techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, B.A.; Zori, Roberto T.; McGuire, P.M.; Bonde, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed chromosome studies were conducted for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) utilizing primary chromosome banding techniques (G- and Q-banding). Digital microscopic imaging methods were employed and a standard G-banded karyotype was constructed for both sexes. Based on chromosome banding patterns and measurements obtained in these studies, a standard karyotype and ideogram are proposed. Characterization of additional cytogenetic features of this species by supplemental chromosome banding techniques, C-banding (constitutive heterochromatin), Ag-NOR staining (nucleolar organizer regions), and DA/DAPI staining, was also performed. These studies provide detailed cytogenetic data for T. manatus latirostris, which could enhance future genetic mapping projects and interspecific and intraspecific genomic comparisons by techniques such as zoo-FISH.

  7. Cytogenetic and Molecular Analyses of Philadelphia Chromosome Variants in CML (chronic myeloid leukemia) Patients from Sindh using Karyotyping and RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ujjan, Ikram Din; Akhund, Anwar Ali; Saboor, Muhammad; Qureshi, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) and its variants in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cases at a tertiary care hospital of Sindh. Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Pathology, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro and Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad during May-to-September 2014. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples from a total of 145 diagnosed cases of CML were collected. Cytogenetic analyses were performed using karyotyping as per the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature guidelines. All karyotypic images were analyzed using the Cytovision software. In order to identify BCR-ABL transcripts, RT-PCR was performed. Statistical analysis of the data was done using SPSS-version-21.0. Results: Of the 145 samples, a total of 133 (91.7%) were positive for the Ph (Ph+) while 12 (8.3%) were negative for the Ph (Ph-). Of the 133 Ph+ samples, standard karyotypes were noted in 121 (91%), simple variants in 9 (6.7%) and complex variants in 3 (2.3%) of the samples. All the Ph+ samples (n=133) showed BCR-ABL positivity. Of the 12 Ph- samples, a total of 7 (58.3%) were BCR-ABL-positive and 5 (41.6%) were BCR-ABL-negative. Conclusion: Frequency of the Ph was found to be of 90.9% in CML patients using a highly sensitive technique, the RT-PCR. Cytogenetic abnormalities were at a lower frequency. Cytogenetic and molecular studies must be conducted for better management of CML cases. These findings could be very useful in guiding the appropriate therapeutic options for CML patients. PMID:26430433

  8. Interphase cytogenetics of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia by FISH-technique

    SciTech Connect

    Peddanna, N.; Gogineni, S.K.; Rosenthal, C.J.

    1994-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL] accounts for about 30% of all lymphoproliferative disorders. In over 95% of these cases, the leukemia is caused by B-cells, rarely T-cells. Fifty percent of B-CLL have chromosomal aberrations and of such cases, one-third have trisomy 12. Malignant B-cells have a very low mitotic index and those metaphases that can be analyzed usually represent the normal T-cell population. Retrospectively, we decided to identify the additional chromosome 12 (trisomy 12) directly at interphase by the FISH-technique using centrometric 12 specific alphoid probe (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD). Preparations were made from 9 patients with B-CLL. All cultures except one failed to produce metaphases for conventional karyotyping. Eighty percent of the cells have two dots (normal cells) over the interphase nuclei while the remaining 20% have three dots (trisomy 12). The clinical implication of trisomy 12 in the pathogenesis of CLL including age, staging and duration of disease, differentials and immunological markers are correlated with interphase cytogenetic data. The loss and/or gain of specific chromosomes in human neoplasia is common and rapid evaluation of such cases should be considered as a routine approach.

  9. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Grillo, A.; Ferrero, G.B.; Baldini, A.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Roth, E.J.; Magenis, E.; Grompe, M.; Hulten, M.

    1994-01-15

    The microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome (MIM309801) is a severe developmental disorder observed in XX individuals with distal Xp segmental monosomy. The phenotype of this syndrome overlaps with that of both Aicardi (MIM 305050) and Goltz (MIM 305600) syndromes, two X-linked dominant, male-lethal disorders. Here the authors report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of 3 patients with this syndrome. Two of these patients are females with a terminal Xpter-p22.2 deletion. One of these 2 patients had an aborted fetus with anencephaly and the same chromosome abnormality. The third patient is an XX male with Xp/Yp exchange spanning the SRY gene which results in distal Xp monosomy. The extensive clinical variability observed in these patients and the results of the molecular analysis suggest that X-inactivation plays an important role in determining the phenotype of the MLS syndrome. The authors propose that the MLS, Aicardi, and Goltz syndromes are due to the involvement of the same gene(s), and that different patterns of X-inactivation are responsible for the phenotypic differences observed in these 3 disorders. However, they cannot rule out that each component of the MLS phenotype is caused by deletion of a different gene (a contiguous gene syndrome). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of partial trisomy 9q in a case with pyloric stenosis and a review

    PubMed Central

    Heller, A.; Seidel, J; Hubler, A; Starke, H; Beensen, V; Senger, G; Rocchi, M; Wirth, J; Chudoba, I; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2000-01-01

    Partial trisomy 9q represents a rare and heterogeneous group of chromosomal aberrations characterised by various clinical features including pyloric stenosis. Here, we describe the case of a 1 year old female patient with different dysmorphic features including pyloric stenosis and prenatally detected partial trisomy 9q. This partial trisomy 9q has been analysed in detail to determine the size of the duplication and to characterise the chromosomal breakpoints. According to the data gained by different molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with whole and partial chromosome painting probes, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) probes, and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), the derivative chromosome 9 can be described as dup(9)(pter→q22.1::q31.1→q22.1::q31.1→ q22.1::q31.1→qter). Four breakpoint spanning YACs have been identified (y806f02, y906g6, y945f5, and y747b3) for the proximal breakpoint. According to this new case and previously published data, the recently postulated putative critical region for pyloric stenosis can be narrowed down to the subbands 9q22.1-q31.1 and is the result of either partial trisomy of gene(s) located in this region or a gene disrupted in 9q31.


Keywords: partial trisomy 9q; pyloric stenosis; FISH; CGH PMID:10882757

  11. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of Cucumis sativus and C. melo using highly repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Koo, Dal-Hoe; Nam, Young-Woo; Choi, Doil; Bang, Jae-Wook; de Jong, Hans; Hur, Yoonkang

    2010-04-01

    Chromosomes often serve as one of the most important molecular aspects of studying the evolution of species. Indeed, most of the crucial mutations that led to differentiation of species during the evolution have occurred at the chromosomal level. Furthermore, the analysis of pachytene chromosomes appears to be an invaluable tool for the study of evolution due to its effectiveness in chromosome identification and precise physical gene mapping. By applying fluorescence in situ hybridization of 45S rDNA and CsCent1 probes to cucumber pachytene chromosomes, here, we demonstrate that cucumber chromosomes 1 and 2 may have evolved from fusions of ancestral karyotype with chromosome number n = 12. This conclusion is further supported by the centromeric sequence similarity between cucumber and melon, which suggests that these sequences evolved from a common ancestor. It may be after or during speciation that these sequences were specifically amplified, after which they diverged and specific sequence variants were homogenized. Additionally, a structural change on the centromeric region of cucumber chromosome 4 was revealed by fiber-FISH using the mitochondrial-related repetitive sequences, BAC-E38 and CsCent1. These showed the former sequences being integrated into the latter in multiple regions. The data presented here are useful resources for comparative genomics and cytogenetics of Cucumis and, in particular, the ongoing genome sequencing project of cucumber.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY chromosome sex determination system.

    PubMed

    Divashuk, Mikhail G; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Razumova, Olga V; Kirov, Ilya V; Karlov, Gennady I

    2014-01-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71), 5S rDNA (pCT4.2), a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1) and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants). The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a familial pericentric inversion 3 associated with short stature.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R; Hansmann, Ingo; Schlote, Dietmar

    2015-03-01

    Short stature refers to the height of an individual which is below expected. The causes are heterogenous and influenced by several genetic and environmental factors. Chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of diseases and cytogenetic mapping is one of the powerful tools for the identification of novel disease genes. Here we report a three generation family with a heterozygous pericentric inversion of 46, XX, inv(3) (p24.1q26.1) associated with Short stature. Positional cloning strategy was used to physically map the breakpoint regions by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Fine mapping was performed with Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones spanning the breakpoint regions. In order to further characterize the breakpoint regions extensive molecular mapping was carried out with the breakpoint spanning BACs which narrowed down the breakpoint region to 2.9 kb and 5.3 kb regions on p and q arm respectively. Although these breakpoints did not disrupt any validated genes, we had identified a novel putative gene in the vicinity of 3q26.1 breakpoint region by in silico analysis. Trying to find the presence of any transcripts of this putative gene we analyzed human total RNA by RT-PCR and identified transcripts containing three new exons confirming the existence of a so far unknown gene close to the 3q breakpoint.

  14. Molecular Cytogenetics in Trough Shells (Mactridae, Bivalvia): Divergent GC-Rich Heterochromatin Content

    PubMed Central

    García-Souto, Daniel; Pérez-García, Concepción; Kendall, Jack; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    The family Mactridae is composed of a diverse group of marine organisms, commonly known as trough shells or surf clams, which illustrate a global distribution. Although this family includes some of the most fished and cultured bivalve species, their chromosomes are poorly studied. In this work, we analyzed the chromosomes of Spisula solida, Spisula subtruncata and Mactra stultorum by means of fluorochrome staining, C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization using 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), 5S rDNA, H3 histone gene and telomeric probes. All three trough shells presented 2n = 38 chromosomes but different karyotype compositions. As happens in most bivalves, GC-rich regions were limited to the nucleolus organizing regions in Spisula solida. In contrast, many GC-rich heterochromatic bands were detected in both Spisula subtruncata and Mactra stultorum. Although the three trough shells presented single 5S rDNA and H3 histone gene clusters, their chromosomal locations differed. Regarding major rDNA clusters, while Spisula subtruncata presented a single cluster, both Spisula solida and Mactra stultorum showed two. No evidence of intercalary telomeric signals was detected in these species. The molecular cytogenetic characterization of these taxa will contribute to understanding the role played by chromosome changes in the evolution of trough shells. PMID:27537915

  15. Molecular cytogenetics of tragelaphine and alcelaphine interspecies hybrids: hybridization, introgression and speciation in some African antelope

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, T. J.; Cernohorska, H.; Schulze, E.; Duran-Puig, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization can occur naturally among diverging lineages as part of the evolutionary process leading to complete reproductive isolation, or it can result from range shifts and habitat alteration through global warming and/or other anthropogenic influences. Here we report a molecular cytogenetic investigation of hybridization between taxonomically distinct species of the Alcelaphini (Alcelaphus buselaphus 2n = 40 × Damaliscus lunatus 2n = 36) and the Tragelaphini (Tragelaphus strepsiceros 2n = 31/32 × Tragelaphus angasii 2n = 55/56). Cross-species fluorescence in situ hybridization provides unequivocal evidence of the scale of karyotypic difference distinguishing parental species. The findings suggest that although hybrid meiosis of the former cross would necessitate the formation of a chain of seven, a ring of four and one trivalent, the progeny follow Haldane's rule showing F1 male sterility and female fertility. The tragelaphine F1 hybrid, a male, was similarly sterile and, given the 11 trivalents and chain of five anticipated in its meiosis, not unexpectedly so. We discuss these findings within the context of the broader evolutionary significance of hybridization in African antelope, and reflect on what these hold for our views of antelope species and their conservation. PMID:26582842

  16. Molecular cytogenetics of tragelaphine and alcelaphine interspecies hybrids: hybridization, introgression and speciation in some African antelope.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T J; Cernohorska, H; Schulze, E; Duran-Puig, A

    2015-11-01

    Hybridization can occur naturally among diverging lineages as part of the evolutionary process leading to complete reproductive isolation, or it can result from range shifts and habitat alteration through global warming and/or other anthropogenic influences. Here we report a molecular cytogenetic investigation of hybridization between taxonomically distinct species of the Alcelaphini (Alcelaphus buselaphus 2n = 40 × Damaliscus lunatus 2n = 36) and the Tragelaphini (Tragelaphus strepsiceros 2n = 31/32 × Tragelaphus angasii 2n = 55/56). Cross-species fluorescence in situ hybridization provides unequivocal evidence of the scale of karyotypic difference distinguishing parental species. The findings suggest that although hybrid meiosis of the former cross would necessitate the formation of a chain of seven, a ring of four and one trivalent, the progeny follow Haldane's rule showing F1 male sterility and female fertility. The tragelaphine F1 hybrid, a male, was similarly sterile and, given the 11 trivalents and chain of five anticipated in its meiosis, not unexpectedly so. We discuss these findings within the context of the broader evolutionary significance of hybridization in African antelope, and reflect on what these hold for our views of antelope species and their conservation.

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of Down syndrome individuals with transient leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J.; Zipursky, A.

    1994-09-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for normal children. Furthermore, one subtype of leukemia, called transient myeloproliferative disorder, or transient leukemia (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown but we and others have hypothesized that it may be attributable to the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we have initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 54 individuals, consisting of 16 cases with TL and 6 with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (postulated to be related to TL), and 32 cases of other forms of leukemia (15 ALL, 10 AML, 7 others). Our preliminary data suggest significant differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. For example, the TL cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e. mosaic trisomies, rings, isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Initial gene mapping studies of these cases aimed at identifying loci important in the genesis of TL will be presented and compared to similar data from DS individuals with other forms of leukemia and those without leukemia.

  18. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of the Dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY Chromosome Sex Determination System

    PubMed Central

    Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Alexandrov, Oleg S.; Razumova, Olga V.; Kirov, Ilya V.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71), 5S rDNA (pCT4.2), a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1) and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants). The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution. PMID:24465491

  20. De novo proximal interstitial deletions of 14q: Cytogenetic and molecular investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, S.K.; Anderson, K.L.; Orr-Urtregar, A.; Craigen, W.J.; Lupski, J.R.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    We report on 2 unrelated patients who had chromosome analysis performed because of psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and minor anomalies. Each patient had a novel proximal 14q deletion (q11.2 to q21.1 in patient 737 and q12 to q22 in patient 777). Polymorphic (C-A){sub n} microsatellite markers distributed along the length of chromosome 14q were examined in both patients and their parents in order to determine which marker loci were deleted. The deletion in patient 737 was found to be paternal in origin, based on the analysis of 2 marker loci (D14S54 and D14S70), thus assigning these loci to the deleted interval q11.2 q21.1. Furthermore, 3 loci were not deleted (TCRD, D14S50, and D14S80), suggesting that they are within or proximal to 14q11.2. In the other family (patient 777), none of the markers were fully informative, but the deleted chromosome was determined to be paternally derived based on cytogenetic heteromorphisms. Despite having overlapping proximal 14q deletions, these 2 patients shared few phenotypic similarities except for failure to thrive, micrognathia, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Therefore, a distinct proximal 14q deletion syndrome is not yet apparent. However, the molecular analyses facilitated the localization of several 14q DNA markers to the deletion regions in these 2 patients, while excluding other markers from each deletion. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  2. Molecular cytogenetic studies in the ladybird beetle Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae)

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Sanllorente, Olivia; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ladybird Henosepilachna argus Geoffroy, 1762 has been cytogenetically studied. In addition we have conducted a review of chromosome numbers and the chromosomal system of sex determination available in the literature in species belonging to the genus Henosepilachna and in its closely related genus Epilachna. Chromosome number of Henosepilachna argus was 2n=18, including the sex chromosome pair, a common diploid chromosome number within the tribe Epilachnini. The study of prophase I meiotic chromosomes showed the typical Xyp “parachute” bivalent as in the majority of species of Coccinellidae. C-banding and fluorescent staining with AT-specific DAPI fluorochrome dye have been carried out for the first time in H. argus. C-banding technique revealed that heterochromatic blocks are pericentromerically located and DAPI staining showed that this heterochromatin is AT rich. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations using rDNA and the telomeric TTAGG sequence as probes have been carried out. FISH using rDNA showed that the nucleolar organizing region is located on the short arm of the X chromosome. FISH with the telomeric sequence revealed that in this species telomeres of chromosomes are composed of the pentanucleotide TTAGG repeats. This is the first study on the telomeric sequences in Coccinellidae. PMID:26312131

  3. Clinical, Molecular- and Cytogenetic Analysis of a Case of Severe Radio-Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Greulich-Bode, K.M.; Zimmermann, F.; Müller, W.-U.; Pakisch, B.; Molls, M.; Würschmidt, F.

    2012-01-01

    In radiotherapy the normal tissue reaction is often a limiting factor for radiation treatment. Still there is no screening method, which predicts normal tissue reaction on radiotherapy, especially in comparison to tumor tissue, and therefore allows tailoring of the radiation dose to each patient. Here, we present a case of severe radiation-related side effects. We applied classical cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa-banding and staining of centromeric regions), the comet assay as well as multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization on peripheral blood lymphocytes of this patient in order to determine the radio-sensitivity on the DNA level and to correlate these findings with the clinical outcome. Our investigations revealed abnormalities on chromosome 9, deficiencies in the DNA-repair capacity after radiation exposure and a high number of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations. A detected high amount of residual damage two or three hours after radiation exposure and repair as well as the high number of chromosomal aberrations (ChAs) suggests a correlation between repair capacity and radiation induced ChAs. We concluded that the detected abnormalities might serve as a genetic basis for the radio-sensitive phenotype of this patient. Taken together this report strengthens the idea that intensive DNA genomic analysis of individual patients can serve as the basis for more favourable treatment of cancer patients. PMID:23450188

  4. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  5. Molecular and cytogenetic studies in a case of XX SRY-negative sex reversal in an Arabian horse.

    PubMed

    Ciotola, F; Albarella, S; Pasolini, M P; Auletta, L; Esposito, L; Iannuzzi, L; Peretti, V

    2012-01-01

    An 18-month-old Arabian foal characterized by a stallion-like appearance was submitted for cytogenetic and molecular genetics examinations due to abnormalities of external genitalia and the presence of ovotestis-like structures in the abdominal cavity. By RB-banding the animal showed the normal female equine karyotype (2n = 64,XX). Molecular analysis revealed the absence of the SRY and ZFY genes and the presence of ZFX, a typical female equine condition. The entire RSPO1 coding region was examined to exclude its involvement. Although a SNP was found in exon 3, it was not responsible for an amino acid substitution.

  6. Molecular Cytogenetic Approach to Characterize Novel and Cryptic Chromosome Abnormalities in Childhood Myeloid Malignances of Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria L R; Capela de Matos, Roberto R; Amaral, Bethânia D A Silva; Soares-Ventura, Eliane M; Leite, Edinalva P; Silva, Mariluze O D; Cornélio, Maria T M Nogueira; Silva, Maria L M; Liehr, Thomas; Marques-Salles, Terezinha D J

    2017-03-01

    Myeloid malignancies can be either primary or secondary, whether or not a specific cause can be determined. Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare constitutional bone marrow failure, usually presents an increased possibility of clonal evolution, due to the increase in chromosomal instability, TP53 activation, and cell death. The evolution of FA may include aplastic anemia by the progressive failure of the bone marrow and myelod neoplasias, such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Chromosome abnormalities, particularly of chromosomes, 1, 3, and 7, during the aplastic phase of the disease are predictive of evolution to acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic studies are indispensable to characterize chromosome abnormalities, and thus an important part of the clinical management, and for planning of therapeutic interventions. Here, clinical data and outcomes of 4 FA, 3 of them with myeloid malignances and 1 asymptomatic, and detailed characterization of their chromosome abnormalities using cytogenetics techniques are described.

  7. Cytogenetic and molecular evidence suggest multiple origins and geographical parthenogenesis in Nothoscordum gracile (Alliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Crosa, Orfeo; Speranza, Pablo; Guerra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nothoscordum gracile is an apomitic tetraploid widely distributed throughout the Americas and naturalized in many temperate regions of other continents. It has been suggested to form a species complex with sexual and apomictic N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon. Tetraploids of these species also share a structurally heterozygous chromosome complement 2n = 19 (13M + 6A). In this work, the origin of N. gracile and its relationships with its related species was investigated based on cytological and molecular data. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were based on meiotic behaviour, CMA bands, localization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Nuclear ITS and plastidial trnL-trnF sequences were also obtained for most individuals. Key Results Proximal CMA bands were observed in the long arms of all acrocentrics of 2x and 4x N. macrostemon but not in diploid and some tetraploid cytotypes of N. nudicaule. Samples of N. gracile showed a variable number of CMA bands in the long arms of acrocentrics. Analysis of ITS sequences, dot-blot, GISH, and 5S and 45S rDNA sites, revealed no differentiation among the three species. The trnL-trnF cpDNA fragment showed variation with a trend to geographical structuring irrespective of morphospecies and fully congruent with karyotype variation. Conclusions The 2n = 19 karyotype was probably formed by a centric fusion event occurring in N. nudicaule and later transmitted to tetraploid cytotypes of N. macrostemon. Diploids of N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon appeared as consistent recently diverged species, whereas tetraploid apomicts seem to constitute an assemblage of polyploid hybrids originating from multiple independent hybridization events between them, part of which are morphologically recognizable as N. gracile. PMID:22362660

  8. Branchio-otic syndrome caused by a genomic rearrangement: clinical findings and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T; Bierhals, T; Kortüm, F; Bartels, I; Liehr, T; Burfeind, P; Shoukier, M; Frank, V; Bergmann, C; Kutsche, K

    2014-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited developmental disorder, which is characterized by anomalies of the ears, the branchial arches and the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in the genes EYA1,SIX1 and SIX5. Genomic rearrangements of chromosome 8 affecting the EYA1 gene have also been described. Owing to this fact, methods for the identification of abnormal copy numbers such as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) have been introduced as routine laboratory techniques for molecular diagnostics of BOR syndrome. The advantages of these techniques are clear compared to standard cytogenetic and array approaches as well as Southern blot. MLPA detects deletions or duplications of a part or the entire gene of interest, but not balanced structural aberrations such as inversions and translocations. Consequently, disruption of a gene by a genomic rearrangement may escape detection by a molecular genetic analysis, although this gene interruption results in haploinsufficiency and, therefore, causes the disease. In a patient with clinical features of BOR syndrome, such as hearing loss, preauricular fistulas and facial dysmorphisms, but no renal anomalies, neither sequencing of the 3 genes linked to BOR syndrome nor array comparative genomic hybridization and MLPA were able to uncover a causative mutation. By routine cytogenetic analysis, we finally identified a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8 in the affected female. High-resolution multicolor banding confirmed the chromosome 8 inversion and narrowed down the karyotype to 46,XX,inv(8)(p22q13). By applying fluorescence in situ hybridization, we narrowed down both breakpoints on chromosome 8 and found the EYA1 gene in q13.3 to be directly disrupted. We conclude that standard karyotyping should not be neglected in the genetic diagnostics of BOR syndrome or other Mendelian disorders, particularly when molecular testing failed to detect any causative alteration in patients with

  9. Molecular cytogenetics and comparative mapping in goats (Capra hircus, 2n = 60).

    PubMed

    Schibler, L; Di Meo, G P; Cribiu, E P; Iannuzzi, L

    2009-01-01

    Few goat genome analysis projects have been developed in the last 10 years. The aim of this review was to compile and update all available cytogenetic mapping data, according to the last goat chromosome nomenclature, as well as human and cattle whole genome sequences. In particular, human regions homologous to most of the FISH-mapped microsatellites were identified in silico. This new goat cytogenetic map made it possible to refine delineation of conserved segments relative to the human and cattle genomic sequence. These improvements did not lead to detection of major new rearrangements within ruminants but confirmed the good conservation of synteny and the numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements observed between goats and humans.

  10. Use of AFLP and RAPD molecular genetic markers and cytogenetic analysis to explore relationships among taxa of the Patagonian Bromus setifolius complex

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Bromus setifolius var. pictus (Hook) Skottsb., B. setifolius var. setifolius Presl. and B.setifolius var. brevifolius Ness are three native Patagonian taxa in the section Pnigma Dumort of the genus Bromus L. AFLP and RAPD analysis, in conjunction with genetic distance measurements and statistical techniques, revealed variation within this group and indicated that B. setifolius var. brevifolius was closely related to B. setifolius var. pictus, with both taxa being more distantly related to B. setifolius var. setifolius. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed the chromosomal number of B. setifolius var. pictus (2n = 70) and B. setifolius var. setifolius (2n = 28) and showed for the first time that B. setifolius var. brevifolius had 2n = 70. The combination of molecular genetic and cytogenetic evidence supported a species status for two of the three taxa and suggested hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of these complex taxa. Species status was also indicated for B. setifolius var. setifolius. Based on these findings, we suggest that B. setifolius var. pictus be referred to as B. pictus Hook var. pictus, and B. setifolius var brevifolius as B. pictus Hook var brevifolius. The correlation between AFLP diversity and variation in ecological parameters suggested that this marker system could be used to assess breeding progress and to monitor the domestication of Patagonian Bromus species for agronomic use. PMID:21637686

  11. Unique mosaicism of tetraploidy and trisomy 8: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in a live-born infant

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.E.; Saxe, D.F.; Muralidharan, K.

    1996-03-29

    We report on a live-born infant with mosaicism of tetraploidy and trisomy 8 who had craniofacial abnormalities, cardiac and genitourinary defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and anomalies of limbs. The infant died at age 14 weeks. Molecular studies were done on peripheral blood lymphocytes and cultured amniocytes to determine the origin of the cytogenetic abnormalities. On the basis of the results, we describe a possible mechanism to explain these abnormalities. To our knowledge, this infant represents the first reported case of mosaic trisomy 8 with a tetraploid cell line. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Cytogenetics and chromosomes of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Spakulová, Marta; Orosová, Martina; Mackiewicz, John S

    2011-01-01

    Tapeworms (Cestoda, Platyhelminthes) are a highly diversified group of parasites that can have significant veterinary importance as well as medical impact as disease agents of human alveococcosis, hydatidosis, taeniosis/cysticercosis/neurocysticercosis, hymenolepidosis or diphyllobothriasis. Because of their great diversity, there has been keen interest in their phylogenetic relationships to other obligate parasitic platyhelminthes, as well as within the group itself. Recent phylogenetic analyses of cestodes, however, have focused on morphological, molecular, life cycle, embryology and host-specificity features and conspicuously omitted inclusion of karyological data. Here we review the literature from 1907 to 2010 and the current status of knowledge of the chromosomes and cytogenetics within all of the cestode orders and place it within an evolutionary perspective. Karyological data are discussed and tabulated for 115 species from nine eucestode orders with ideograms of 46 species, and a comparison of cytogenetic patterns between acetabulate and bothriate cestode lineages is made. Attention is drawn to gaps in our knowledge for seven remaining orders and cestodarian groups Gyrocotylidea and Amphilinidea. Among the cytogenetic aspects covered are: chromosome number, triploidy, classical karyotype cytogenetics (banding patterns, karyotype asymmetry, secondary constrictions), as well as advanced karyotype techniques allowing location of genes on chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We demonstrate that further progress in cestode karyosystematics rests with new molecular approaches and the application of advanced cytogenetic markers facilitating intimate karyotype analysis.

  13. Pre-transplantation minimal residual disease with cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic features improves risk stratification in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betül; Jorgensen, Jeff L.; Marin, David; Wang, Sa; Ahmed, Sairah; Alousi, Amin M.; Andersson, Borje S.; Bashir, Qaiser; Bassett, Roland; Lyons, Genevieve; Chen, Julianne; Rezvani, Katy; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Patel, Keyur; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Champlin, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to improve outcome prediction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia by combining cytogenetic and molecular data at diagnosis with minimal residual disease assessment by multicolor flow-cytometry at transplantation. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission in whom minimal residual disease was assessed at transplantation were included and categorized according to the European LeukemiaNet classification. The primary outcome was 1-year relapse incidence after transplantation. Of 152 patients eligible, 48 had minimal residual disease at the time of their transplant. Minimal residual disease-positive patients were older, required more therapy to achieve first remission, were more likely to have incomplete recovery of blood counts and had more adverse risk features by cytogenetics. Relapse incidence at 1 year was higher in patients with minimal residual disease (32.6% versus 14.4%, P=0.002). Leukemia-free survival (43.6% versus 64%, P=0.007) and overall survival (48.8% versus 66.9%, P=0.008) rates were also inferior in patients with minimal residual disease. In multivariable analysis, minimal residual disease status at transplantation independently predicted 1-year relapse incidence, identifying a subgroup of intermediate-risk patients, according to the European LeukemiaNet classification, with a particularly poor outcome. Assessment of minimal residual disease at transplantation in combination with cytogenetic and molecular findings provides powerful independent prognostic information in acute myeloid leukemia, lending support to the incorporation of minimal residual disease detection to refine risk stratification and develop a more individualized approach during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27540139

  14. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Particular aspects in the cytogenetics and molecular biology of salivary gland tumours – current review of reports

    PubMed Central

    Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a group of lesions whose heterogeneity of biological and pathological features is widely reflected in the molecular aspect. This is demonstrated by an increasing number of studies in the field of genetics of these tumours. The aim of this study was to collect the most significant scientific reports on the cytogenetic and molecular data concerning these tumours, which might facilitate the identification of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The analysis covered 71 papers included in the PubMed database. We focused on the most common tumours, such as pleomorphic adenoma, Warthin tumour, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and others. The aim of this study is to present current knowledge about widely explored genotypic alterations (such as PLAG1 gene in pleomorphic adenoma or MECT1 gene in mucoepidermoid carcinoma), and also about rare markers, like Mena or SOX10 protein, which might also be associated with tumourigenesis and carcinogenesis of these tumours. PMID:27688723

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of inv dup(15) chromosomes observed in two patients with autistic disorder and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.L.; Bennett-Baker, P.E.; Gorski, J.L.

    1996-01-11

    A variety of distinct phenotypes has been associated with supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Although different cytogenetic rearrangements have been associated with distinguishable clinical syndromes, precise genotype-phenotype correlations have not been determined. However, the availability of chromosome 15 DNA markers provides a means to characterize inv dup(15) chromosomes in detail to facilitate the determination of specific genotype-phenotype associations. We describe 2 patients with an autistic disorder, mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, and supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed the chromosomal origin of the supernumerary chromosomes and showed that the duplicated region extended to at least band 15q13. An analysis of chromosome 15 microsatellite CA polymorphisms suggested a maternal origin of the inv dup(15) chromosomes and biparental inheritance of the two intact chromosome 15 homologs. The results of this study add to the existing literature which suggests that the clinical phenotype of patients with a supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome is determined not only by the extent of the duplicated region, but by the dosage of genes located within band 15q13 and the origin of the normal chromosomes 15. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Trisomy and tetrasomy 15q11-q13 diagnosed by molecular cytogenetic analysis in two patients with mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Soyah, Najla; Hanene, Hannachi; Mougou, Soumaya; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report two patients with the supernumerary marker chromosome (15)s. The first case is an 8.5-year-old girl with an inv dup (15) syndrome, mental retardation and dysmorphic features. The second case is a 13-year-old boy with a ring chromosome 15, who was referred to the Laboratory of Cytogenetic and Biology of Reproduction in Sousse, Tunisia for mental retardation, epilepsy, speech delay, hypotonia and other mild dysmorphic features. R banding showed the presence of a marker chromosome in both cases. Molecular cytogenetic investigation using fluorescence in situ hybridization method allowed us to characterize the markers including the Prader-Willi syndrome locus that contains the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene. Tetrasomy and trisomy for the 15q11-q13 chromosomal region were found in the first and the second patient, respectively. This observation reinforces the hypothesis that additional copies of proximal chromosome 15q11 segment may be causally related to mental retardation and dysmorphic features. PMID:27625804

  18. A New Sythetic Hybrid (A1D5) between Gossypium herbaceum and G. raimondii and Its Morphological, Cytogenetic, Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuijin; Zhang, Lufei; Li, Lingjiao

    2017-01-01

    The diploid species G. herbaceum (A1) and G. raimondii (D5) are the progenitors of allotetraploid cotton, respectively. However, hybrids between G. herbaceum and G. raimondii haven’t been reported. In the present study, hybridization between G. herbaceum and G. raimondii was explored. Morphological, cytogenetic and molecular analyses were used to assess the hybridity. The interspecific hybrid plants were successfully obtained. Most of the morphological characteristics of the hybrids were intermediate between G. herbaceum and G. raimondii. However, the color of glands, anther cases, pollen and corolla, and the state of bracteoles in hybrids were associated with the G. herbaceum. The color of staminal columns and filaments in hybrids were associated with G. raimondii. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed abnormal meiotic behavior existed in hybrids. The hybrids couldn’t produce boll-set. Simple sequence repeat results found that besides the fragments inherited from the two parents, some novel bands were amplified in hybrids, indicating that potential mutations and chromosomal recombination occurred between parental genomes during hybridization. These results may provide some novel insights in speciation, genome interaction, and evolution of the tetraploid cotton species. PMID:28187145

  19. Molecular cytogenetic insights into the ageing syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS).

    PubMed

    Corso, C; Parry, E M; Faragher, R G A; Seager, A; Green, M H L; Parry, J M

    2005-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing in childhood and serves as a valuable model for the human ageing process in general. Most recently, point mutations in the lamin A (LMNA) gene on chromosome 1q have been associated with the disease, however how these mutations relate to the complex phenotype of HGPS remains to be established. It has been shown that fibroblasts from HGPS patients are frequently resistant to immortalization with telomerase (hTERT), consistent with the idea that the loss of a dominant acting HGPS gene is a pre-requisite for immortalization. In this study we report the first detailed cytogenetic analysis of hTERT-immortalised HGPS cell lines from three patients and one corresponding primary fibroblast culture. Our results provide evidence for a cytogenetic mosaicism in HGPS with a distinctive pattern of chromosome aberrations in all the HGP clones. Chromosome 11 alterations were observed at a high frequency in each immortalised HGPS cell line but were also present at a lower frequency in the corresponding primary cells. Moreover, we were able to identify the 11q13-->q23 region as a potential site of breakage. Our results are therefore consistent with a role of chromosome 11 alterations in the escape from senescence observed in HGPS cells. In addition to this defined rearrangement, we consistently observed complex chromosomal rearrangements, suggesting that HGPS displays features of chromosomal instability.

  20. De novo tandem duplication of chromosome segement 22q11-q12: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Carrozzo, R.

    1995-04-10

    We report on a case of duplication of the segment 22q11-q12 due to a de novo duplication. Molecular cytogenetics studies demonstrated this to be a tandem duplication, flanked proximally by the marker D22Z4, a centromeric alpha satellite DNA repeat, and distally by D22S260, an anonymous DNA marker proximal to the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint. The segment includes the regions responsible for the {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes}, Di George, and velo-cardio-facial syndromes and extends distal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). The clinical picture is dominated by the cardiac defects and includes findings reminiscent of {open_quotes}cat-eye{close_quotes} syndrome. These findings reinforce the hypothesis that the proximal 22q region contains dosage-sensitive genes involved in development. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Identification of ins(8;21) with AML1/ETO fusion in acute myelogenous leukemia M2 by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Mateo, M S; Martínez, P; Contra, T; Benítez, J

    2002-02-01

    A high percentage of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) of the M2 subtype show a rearrangement between the AML1 and ETO genes. The detection of the AML1/ETO fusion has clinical relevance because patients with this subtype have a good prognosis. We present the results of conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia French-American-British M2 classification, who had a complex karyotype involving chromosomes 8 and 21. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the AML1/ETO probe demonstrated a recombination of both genes on an add(8) chromosome. The use of other FISH probes (CEP8, c-myc and TEL21) and spectral karyotyping indicated that AML1/ETO fusion occurred as a consequence of a previously undescribed ins(8;21)(q22;q22.1q22.3).

  2. Cytogenetic, FISH and molecular characterization of 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements in NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiodarska, I.; Styl, M.; Mecucci, C.

    1994-09-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the chromosomal region 3q27 and one of the immunoglobulin loci at 14q32, 2p12 or 22q11 have been identified as the third most common type of chromosomal abnormality in Non Hodgkin`s lymphomas (NHLs), in addition to t(14;18) and t(8;14). These abnormalities appeared to be strongly associated with a diffuse, large cell subtype of B-cell NHL. Recently, a t(3;14) and t(3;22) have been cloned and a new transcriptional unit at 3q27, designated BCL-5, BCL-6 or LAZ3, has been identified. The gene appears to encode a new zinc finger protein with the putative function of a transcription factor. Rearrangements of the BCL-6 gene have been detected not only in cases with a typical t(3;14), t(2;3) and t(3;22), but also in a few NHL cases carrying 3q27 translocations not involving Ig genes. We report on nine B-NHL cases with a 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangement demonstrated by cytogenetic, FISH, and Southern analysis. Cytogenetic analysis complemented by FISH studies showed the presence of a classical t(3;14) or a t(3;22) in three cases and a variety of chromosomal aberrations involving the 3q27 locus in the remaining cases. Some of these translocations were not previously identified by conventional banding analysis. In three patients chromosome painting demonstrated involvement of both chromosome at the 3q24 band. We conclude: 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements seem not to be restricted to diffuse large cell lymphoma. We here documented 3q27/BCL-6 abnormalities in Richter syndrome and follicular lymphomas. The variety of 3q27 aberrations at cytogenetic level suggests that, in addition to immunoglobulin genes, a number of other genes spreading over the human genome may deregulate BCL-6 in lymphomas. Chromosome painting is a powerful tool to demonstrate 3q27 abnormalities, not identified by conventional banding analysis.

  3. Classical and molecular cytogenetics of Khawia sinensis (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), invasive parasite of carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Orosová, Martina; Oros, Mikuláš

    2012-05-01

    Chromosomes of the invasive tapeworm Khawia sinensis (Caryophyllidea), the specific parasite of common carp, were analyzed by means of conventional Giemsa staining and using fluorescent DAPI and YOYO-1 dyes, silver staining, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA probe. The karyotype is composed of eight pairs of metacentric and telocentric chromosomes (2n = 16, n = 3m + 5t, TCL = 42.54 μm). Constitutive heterochromatin was located at pericentromeric regions of all pairs, except for the largest metacentric pair (no. 1), which possessed no DAPI-positive band. FISH with rDNA probe revealed that both homologues of chromosome pair no. 6 carry a cluster of ribosomal arrays, which were located interstitially close to the centromere. Present results are compared with previous cytogenetic data on Khawia spp., and comments are made on the karyotypes with respect to their phylogenetic links.

  4. [Half a century of human and medical cytogenetics].

    PubMed

    Vago, P

    2009-01-01

    In 1956, the number of chromosomes in humans is set at 46; in 1959, the link between a disability (mongolism) and a chromosomal anomaly (the Down syndrome) is established: human and medical cytogenetics were born. Since then, progress has been remarkable: the techniques of chromosomal and molecular cytogenetics can reach a resolution of the size of a single gene with a pangenomic scope. Practical applications are constantly expanded. The clinical impact is significant, from the genetic counselling in constitutional to the targeted therapies. Fifty years later, cytogenetics can be defined as the science which aims to detect chromosomal abnormalities, whether constitutional or acquired, using chromosomal or molecular techniques aiming to study the arrangement of genes in chromosomes, to quantify the number of gene copy and to look for the presence of gene fusion.

  5. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular observations in a patient with Pallister-Killian-syndrome with an unusual karyotype.

    PubMed

    Leube, Barbara; Majewski, Frank; Gebauer, Jürgen; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2003-12-15

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a clinically recognizable syndrome, usually due to a tissue-limited mosaicism for a supernumary 12p isochromosome (i12p). Here we report an unusual case with tetrasomy/trisomy/disomy 12p mosaic in fibroblasts and trisomy/disomy 12p mosaic in lymphocytes. The tetrasomy 12p was due to an i12p, the trisomy 12p to a single 12p marker. Both marker chromosomes were investigated with conventional cytogenetic techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Stability under culturing conditions was studied. DNA-analysis revealed prezygotic maternal origin of the extra 12p material. Clinically, the patient seems to have less retardation than most patients with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

  6. A molecular cytogenetic study of imprinting effect in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the t(1;19)(q23;p13)

    SciTech Connect

    Knops, J.F.; Han, J.; Finley, W.H.

    1994-09-01

    Genomic imprinting (the functional difference between homologous alleles dependent upon parent of origin) seems to play an important role in some forms of recessive tumors as well as in the genetic predisposition to cancer. Recently, this phenomenon has been implicated in reciprocal translocations found in hematological malignancies. Cytogenetic polymorphism studies on the t(9;22) chromosome in chronic myelogenous leukemia have shown chromosome 9 to be paternal in origin while chromosome 22 is maternally derived in all the cases studied. We developed a molecular technique using chromosome microdissection and polymerase chain reaction (CMPCR) to study the possible involvement of genomic imprinting in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the t(1;19). This technique has an advantage over conventional molecular techniques because it can distinguish the translocated chromosome from the normal homologue. Amplification of highly polymorphic microsatellite loci was performed on the microdissected translocated chromosomes and compared with parental alleles to assess the parent of origin of the chromosome 1 and chromosome 19 involved in the translocation. Parental origin of the derivative chromosomes 1 and 19 has been evaluated in six children with pre-B cell ALL and t(1;19)(q23;p13). The ratio of maternal:paternal:uncertain origin was 3:2:1 for chromosome 1 and 1:3:2 for chromosome 19. Thus far, the data do not indicate a strong parent of origin bias for this specific ALL associated translocation. Although genomic imprinting does not appear to be involved in this subgroup of childhood ALL patients, this technique can be used to determine parental origin of aberrant chromosomes in other hematological malignancies.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of a mosaic add(12)(p13.3) with an inv dup(3)(q26.31 → qter) detected in an autistic boy

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Isabel M; Melo, Joana B; Rodrigues, Carlos; Backx, Liesbeth; Vermeesch, Joris; Weise, Anja; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Oliveira, Guiomar; Matoso, Eunice

    2009-01-01

    Background Inverted duplications (inv dup) of a terminal chromosome region are a particular subset of rearrangements that often results in partial tetrasomy or partial trisomy when accompanied by a deleted chromosome. Associated mosaicism could be the consequence of a post-zygotic event or could result from the correction of a trisomic conception. Tetrasomies of distal segments of the chromosome 3q are rare genetic events and their phenotypic manifestations are diverse. To our knowledge, there are only 12 cases reported with partial 3q tetrasomy. Generally, individuals with this genomic imbalance present mild to severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphisms and skin pigmentary disorders. Results We present the results of the molecular cytogenetic characterization of an unbalanced mosaic karyotype consisting of mos 46,XY,add(12)(p13.3) [56]/46,XY [44] in a previously described 11 years old autistic boy, re-evaluated at adult age. The employment of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multicolor banding (MCB) techniques identified the extra material on 12p to be derived from chromosome 3, defining the additional material on 12p as an inv dup(3)(qter → q26.3::q26.3 → qter). Subsequently, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) confirmed the breakpoint at 3q26.31, defining the extra material with a length of 24.92 Mb to be between 174.37 and 199.29 Mb. Conclusion This is the thirteenth reported case of inversion-duplication 3q, being the first one described as an inv dup translocated onto a non-homologous chromosome. The mosaic terminal inv dup(3q) observed could be the result of two proposed alternative mechanisms. The most striking feature of this case is the autistic behavior of the proband, a characteristic not shared by any other patient with tetrasomy for 3q26.31 → 3qter. The present work further illustrates the advantages of the use of an integrative cytogenetic strategy, composed both by conventional and molecular techniques, on

  8. The role of the Giemsa stain in cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M

    2011-04-01

    In just half a century since the human diploid chromosome number was correctly identified as 46, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of both the genetic foundation of normal human development and the development of various constitutional and acquired abnormalities. The ability to detect numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities was made possible by the Giemsa stain. Despite the recent advent of powerful molecular-based cytogenetic techniques (e.g., fluorescence in situ hybridization, array-based comparative genomic hybridization), Giemsa-based chromosomal banding and staining techniques retain their crucial role in cytogenetics.

  9. Genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular analyses of mutations induced by melphalan demonstrate high frequencies of heritable deletions and other rearrangements from exposure of postspermatogonial stages of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Rinchik, E M

    1992-01-01

    Specific-locus experiments have previously shown melphalan to be mutagenic in all male germ-cell stages tested and particularly so in early spermatids. All but 2 of 24 specific-locus mutations recovered were tested genetically, cytogenetically, and/or molecularly. At least 12 of 15 tested mutations recovered from postspermatogonial stages but only 1 of 7 mutations recovered from stem-cell or differentiating spermatogonia gave evidence of being deletions or other rearrangements. Melphalan-induced mutations, thus, confirm the pattern of dependence of mutation structure on germ-cell stage that had been shown earlier for other chemicals. Results of the present investigation illustrate the capabilities of combined genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular analyses for characterizing the nature of specific-locus mutations. Fine-structure molecular mapping of long regions surrounding specific loci has been greatly facilitated by the availability of genetic reagents (particularly, deletion complexes) generated in specific-locus experiments over the course of decades. Reciprocally, this mapping permits increasingly detailed characterization of the nature of lesions induced by mutagenic exposures of germ cells, adding great powers for qualitative analysis of mutations to the specific-locus test. Cytogenetic and genetic investigations also provide evidence on lesion type, especially for loci at which mutations cannot yet be analyzed molecularly. Melphalan, like chlorambucil, can generate many mutations, a high proportion of which are deletions and other rearrangements, making this chemical valuable for generating mutations (at any locus) amenable to molecular access. Images PMID:1352884

  10. Cancer cytogenetics: methodology revisited.

    PubMed

    Wan, Thomas S K

    2014-11-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome was the first genetic abnormality discovered in cancer (in 1960), and it was found to be consistently associated with CML. The description of the Philadelphia chromosome ushered in a new era in the field of cancer cytogenetics. Accumulating genetic data have been shown to be intimately associated with the diagnosis and prognosis of neoplasms; thus, karyotyping is now considered a mandatory investigation for all newly diagnosed leukemias. The development of FISH in the 1980s overcame many of the drawbacks of assessing the genetic alterations in cancer cells by karyotyping. Karyotyping of cancer cells remains the gold standard since it provides a global analysis of the abnormalities in the entire genome of a single cell. However, subsequent methodological advances in molecular cytogenetics based on the principle of FISH that were initiated in the early 1990s have greatly enhanced the efficiency and accuracy of karyotype analysis by marrying conventional cytogenetics with molecular technologies. In this review, the development, current utilization, and technical pitfalls of both the conventional and molecular cytogenetics approaches used for cancer diagnosis over the past five decades will be discussed.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic insights to the phylogenetic affinities of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana).

    PubMed

    Cernohorska, Halina; Kubickova, Svatava; Kopecna, Olga; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Elder, Frederick F B; Robinson, Terence J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Rubes, Jiri

    2013-08-01

    Five families are traditionally recognized within higher ruminants (Pecora): Bovidae, Moschidae, Cervidae, Giraffidae and Antilocapridae. The phylogenetic relationships of Antilocapridae and Giraffidae within Pecora are, however, uncertain. While numerous fusions (mostly Robertsonian) have accumulated in the giraffe's karyotype (Giraffa camelopardalis, Giraffidae, 2n = 30), that of the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana, Antilocapridae, 2n = 58) is very similar to the hypothesised pecoran ancestral state (2n = 58). We examined the chromosomal rearrangements of two species, the giraffe and pronghorn, using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization painting probes and BAC clones derived from cattle (Bos taurus, Bovidae). Our data place Moschus (Moschidae) closer to Bovidae than Cervidae. Although the alternative (i.e., Moschidae + Cervidae as sister groups) could not be discounted in recent sequence-based analyses, cytogenetics bolsters conclusions that the former is more likely. Additionally, DNA sequences were isolated from the centromeric regions of both species and compared. Analysis of cenDNA show that unlike the pronghorn, the centromeres of the giraffe are probably organized in a more complex fashion comprising different repetitive sequences specific to single chromosomal pairs or groups of chromosomes. The distribution of nucleolar organiser region (NOR) sites, often an effective phylogenetic marker, were also examined in the two species. In the giraffe, the position of NORs seems to be autapomorphic since similar localizations have not been found in other species within Pecora.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular characteristics of 25 Chilean patients with a variant Ph translocation.

    PubMed

    Legues, Maria E; Encina, Andrea; Valenzuela, Mercedes; Palma, Tamara; Undurraga, Maria S

    2011-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), which results from a balanced translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, the t(9;22)(q34;q11.2). In 5-10% of the cases, variants of the Ph (vPh) are detected, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11.2. Deletions on the der(9) and der(22) can be detected in approximately 10-15% of CML patients. The frequency of a deletion of the der(9) in vPh CML is variable. Most studies have shown high frequencies (30-45%) in this subgroup. We report the cytogenetic evaluation of 25 vPh cases, which represents 6.8% of the CML cases diagnosed at one institution in 20 years. The breakpoints of the partners of the vPh in our patients agree with those reported previously, except for a novel 18q23. We found a low incidence of deletions of the der(9) (10%) and der(22) (5%) in these patients, contrasting with several reports in the literature. This finding may reflect the extensive spectrum of aberrations in vPh, and the possibility that a considerable group of these aberrations may not affect the genetic stability of 5'ABL1 and 3'BCR. Epidemiologic differences may also exist and could explain our results. These differences would require further investigation.

  13. Development of new techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of warm season grasses, the assessment of their genetic and cytogenetic effects and biomass production from grass. Annual progress report, November 1, 1979 to October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G W; Hanna, W W

    1980-01-01

    New techniques are described for using irradiation and chemical mutagens in the genetic improvement of several warm season grasses. Genetic and cytogenetic effects of these treatments are also being studied. (ACR)

  14. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis and Resequencing of Contactin Associated Protein-Like 2 in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaloglu, Betul; O'Roak, Brian J.; Louvi, Angeliki; Gupta, Abha R.; Abelson, Jesse F.; Morgan, Thomas M.; Chawarska, Katarzyna; Klin, Ami; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Stillman, Althea A.; Tanriover, Gamze; Abrahams, Brett S.; Duvall, Jackie A.; Robbins, Elissa M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Biederer, Thomas; Gunel, Murat; Lifton, Richard P.; State, Matthew W.

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of related neurodevelopmental syndromes with complex genetic etiology.1 We identified a de novo chromosome 7q inversion disrupting Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2) and Contactin Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in a child with cognitive and social delay. We focused our initial analysis on CNTNAP2 based on our demonstration of disruption of Contactin 4 (CNTN4) in a patient with ASD;2 the recent finding of rare homozygous mutations in CNTNAP2 leading to intractable seizures and autism;3 and in situ and biochemical analyses reported herein that confirm expression in relevant brain regions and demonstrate the presence of CNTNAP2 in the synaptic plasma membrane fraction of rat forebrain lysates. We comprehensively resequenced CNTNAP2 in 635 patients and 942 controls. Among patients, we identified a total of 27 nonsynonymous changes; 13 were rare and unique to patients and 8 of these were predicted to be deleterious by bioinformatic approaches and/or altered residues conserved across all species. One variant at a highly conserved position, I869T, was inherited by four affected children in three unrelated families, but was not found in 4010 control chromosomes (p = 0.014). Overall, this resequencing data demonstrated a modest nonsignificant increase in the burden of rare variants in cases versus controls. Nonethless, when viewed in light of two independent studies published in this issue of AJHG showing a relationship between ASD and common CNTNAP2 alleles,4,5 the cytogenetic and mutation screening data suggest that rare variants may also contribute to the pathophysiology of ASD, but place limits on the magnitude of this contribution. PMID:18179895

  15. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of feline leukemia virus insertions in cat lymphoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Satoh, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to map the acquired proviral insertions in the chromosomal genome of feline lymphoid tumors induced by feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Chromosome specimens of the lymphoid tumor-derived cell lines and normal cat lymphocytes were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization and tyramide signal amplification, using an exogenous FeLV-A genome as a probe. Specific hybridization signals were detected only on the metaphase chromosomes of the tumor cells. Poisson's distribution-based statistics indicated that 6 chromosomal loci in each cell line showed FeLV integration. In the examination of metaphase chromosomes of FL-74, FT-1 and KO-1 cells, significant signals were detected on B2p15-p14, B2q11, D1p14, E1p14-p13, E1q12 and F2q16; A2p23-p22, B2p15-p14, B4p15-p14, D4q23-q24, E1p14-p13 and E2p13-p12; and A2p22, A3q22, B1p13, B1q13, D1p13 and D3p15-p14, respectively. Consistently, Southern blot hybridization using an FeLV LTR-U3 probe specific for exogenous FeLV revealed the presence of at least 6 copies of exogenous FeLV proviruses at different integration sites in each cell line. These results indicate that there may be common FeLV integration sites at least in A2p22 and B2p15-p14. The cytogenetic analysis used in this study can promptly screen FeLV insertions and provide tags for identifying the novel common integration site.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a rearrangement involving 10q23 in a patient with ALL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosemblum-Vos, L.S.; Frantz, C.N.; Punzalan, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    A patient with pre-B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) demonstrated a novel complex karyotype, elucidated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which involved the region of a rare heritable fragile site at 10q23-q24. An asymptomatic two-year-old white female presented with anemia; her physical examination was normal. WBC was 6,200 with 8% blasts, and 35% atypical lymphocytes. Her bone marrow showed 50% lymphoblasts, expressing CD9, CD10, CD19, CD22, CD24, CD45, and HLA-DR, consistent with B-cell lineage. Cytogenetic examination of a bone marrow biopsy yielded GTG-banded chromosomes of sub-optimal morphology. The karyotype was initially interpreted as mosaic 46,X,-X,+4,-10,+13,der(19)/46,XX with 40% abnormal cells. Subsequent FISH studies revealed the der(19) to be an unbalanced form of the 1;19 translocation frequently found in pre-B cell ALL. Using FISH, we also identified a complex rearrangement in which an X chromosome segment was inserted interstitially into 10q at the q23.3/q24 junction, the location of a rare heritable fragile site. The karyotype has been reinterpreted as 46,X,del(X)(:p11.2{r_arrow}qter), ins(10;X)(q23.3;p11.2p22.3),der(19)t(1;19)(q23p13)/46,XX. To our knowledge, this is only the second reported case involving this breakpoint in ALL-L1, the other being a patient with biphenotypic pre-B/myeloid acute leukemia. Our patient is currently being investigated for this fragile site. The complete elucidation of the chromosomes involved in this complex rearrangement and the possible implications of the chromosome 10 breakpoint would have gone undetected without the application of FISH.

  17. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Cucumis Wild Species Distributed in Southern Africa: Physical Mapping of 5S and 45S rDNA with DAPI.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kouhei; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Osipowski, Paweł; Siedlecka, Ewa; Przybecki, Zbigniew; Tagashira, Norikazu; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Malepszy, Stefan; Pląder, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Wild Cucumis species have been divided into Australian/Asian and African groups using morphological and phylogenetic characteristics, and new species have been described recently. No molecular cytogenetic information is available for most of these species. The crossability between 5 southern African Cucumis species (C. africanus, C. anguria, C. myriocarpus, C. zeyheri, and C. heptadactylus) has been reported; however, the evolutionary relationship among them is still unclear. Here, a molecular cytogenetic analysis using FISH with 5S and 45 S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to investigate these Cucumis species based on sets of rDNA-bearing chromosomes (rch) types I, II and III. The molecular cytogenetic and phylogenetic results suggested that at least 2 steps of chromosomal rearrangements may have occurred during the evolution of tetraploid C. heptadactylus. In step 1, an additional 45 S rDNA site was observed in the chromosome (type III). In particular, C. myriocarpus had a variety of rch sets. Our results suggest that chromosomal rearrangements may have occurred in the 45 S rDNA sites. We propose that polyploid evolution occurred in step 2. This study provides insights into the chromosomal characteristics of African Cucumis species and contributes to the understanding of chromosomal evolution in this genus.

  18. Demographic processes in the montane Atlantic rainforest: molecular and cytogenetic evidence from the endemic frog Proceratophrys boiei.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Renata Cecília; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Carnaval, Ana Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Historical climatic refugia predict genetic diversity in lowland endemics of the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest. Yet, available data reveal distinct biological responses to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions across species of different altitudinal ranges. We show that species occupying Brazil's montane forests were significantly less affected by LGM conditions relative to lowland specialists, but that pre-Pleistocene tectonics greatly influenced their geographic variation. Our conclusions are based on palaeoclimatic distribution models, molecular sequences of the cytochrome b, 16S, and RAG-1 genes, and karyotype data for the endemic frog Proceratophrys boiei. DNA and chromosomal data identify in P. boiei at least two broadly divergent phylogroups, which have not been distinguished morphologically. Cytogenetic results also indicate an area of hybridization in southern São Paulo. The location of the phylogeographic break broadly matches the location of a NW-SE fault, which underwent reactivation in the Neogene and led to remarkable landscape changes in southeastern Brazil. Our results point to different mechanisms underpinning diversity patterns in lowland versus montane tropical taxa, and help us to understand the processes responsible for the large number of narrow endemics currently observed in montane areas of the southern Atlantic forest hotspot.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic evaluation in a patient with a translocation (3;21) associated with blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES).

    PubMed

    Praphanphoj, V; Goodman, B K; Thomas, G H; Niel, K M; Toomes, C; Dixon, M J; Geraghty, M T

    2000-04-01

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome type I (BPES; OMIM 110100) is an autosomal dominant disorder affecting craniofacial development and ovarian function. We have identified a patient with BPES who carried a de novo reciprocal translocation [46, XX,t(3;21)(q23;q22.1)]. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis at band 3q23 using probes derived from BAC 175G20 (Research Genetics), PACs 108L15 and 169C10 (RPCI1), and cosmids AC174D4, AC68D3, AC44F5, and AC125C5 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) was performed. The patient's breakpoint was found to lie within the overlapping region of the BAC and PACs but centromeric to all the cosmids. However, a 10.5-kb BamHI-digested fragment, common to the BAC and PAC clones, was shown to cross the breakpoint. The results have placed our patient's breakpoint proximal to that of the previously reported patient [46,XY,t(3;4)(q23;p15.2)] and within a 10.5-kb interval. This is the second patient in which a breakpoint was refined by molecular cytogenetics. Our findings emphasize the significance of this region for BPES.

  20. Molecular cytogenetics of Alstroemeria: identification of parental genomes in interspecific hybrids and characterization of repetitive DNA families in constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G; van Os, D P; de Jong, J H; Ramanna, M S

    1997-02-01

    The genus Alstroemeria consists of diploid (2n = 2x = 16) species originating mainly from Chile and Brazil. Most cultivars are triploid or tetraploid interspecific hybrids. C-banding of eight species revealed obvious differentiation of constitutive heterochromatin within the genus. The present study focused on the molecular (cyto)genetic background of this differentiation. Genomic slot-blot analysis demonstrated strong conservation of major parts of the genomes among six species. The chromosomes of A. aurea and A. ligtu, species with pronounced interstitial C-bands, were found to contain large amounts of highly repetitive and species-specific DNA. The variation in size, number and intensity of strongly probed bands of major repetitive DNA families observed in genomic Southern blots of Sau3A, HaeIII, and MseI digests indicated a strong correlation between variation in genomic DNA composition and different C-banding patterns among Alstroemeria species. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) revealed a clear distinction between parental chromosomes in the hybrids between Chilean and Brazilian species and also between Chilean species, as long as at least one of the parental species possessed prominent C-banding. Regarding the latter, discriminative hybridization resulted from highly repetitive species specific DNA in the heterochromatic chromosome regions of A. aurea and A. ligtu, and caused GISH banding patterns that coincided with the C-banding patterns.

  1. Centromeric association of small supernumerary marker chromosomes with their sister-chromosomes detected by three dimensional molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are detected in 0.043% of general population and can be characterized for their chromosomal origin, genetic content and shape by molecular cytogenetic approaches. Even though recently progress was achieved towards genotype-phenotype-correlations of sSMC, nothing is known on the influence that an additional derivative extra chromosome has on the nuclear architecture. Results Here we present the first three-dimensional interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for the nuclear architecture of sSMC. It could be shown that sSMC derived from chromosomes 15, 16 or 18 preferentially colocalized with one of their corresponding sister chromosomes. This was true in B- and T-lymphocytes as well as in skin fibroblasts. Additionally, a case with a complex sSMC with a karyotype 47,XY,+der(18)t(8;18)(8p23.2 ~ 23.1;18q11.1) was studied. Here the sSMC co-localized with one homologous chromosome 8 instead of 18. Conclusion Overall, there is a kind of "attraction" between an sSMC and one of its homologous sister chromosomes. This seems to be transmitted by the euchromatic part of the sSMC rather than its heterochromatic one. PMID:22413994

  2. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Delayed cytogenetic and major molecular responses associated to increased BMI at baseline in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Mancini, Marco; Diverio, Daniela; Latagliata, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2013-06-01

    Obesity, measured as body mass index (BMI), has been identified as a possible risk factor for several solid tumors as well as for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). To date, no correlations have been reported in this latter disease between BMI at baseline and response to targeted therapies. We refer here on the impact of BMI on clinical response in 339 chronic phase (CP) CML patients treated with imatinib and 35 CP-CML patients treated frontline with nilotinib. If compared to patients with low BMI (<18.5-25), patients with increased BMI (>25-40) at diagnosis who received imatinib showed a significantly longer median time to achieve complete cytogenetic response (6.8 months vs 3.3 months, p=0.001), a reduced rate of major molecular response (77% vs 58%, p=0.01) which was also achieved in a longer median time (29 months compared to 14 months, p=0.01). Conversely, no differences were revealed with respect to BMI in patients treated frontline with nilotinib and also patients with increased BMI obtained rapidly CCyR and MMR with an incidence similar to that of underweight/normal weight patients. These results suggest that CML patients with increased weight at baseline should be followed and carefully monitored if treated with standard dose imatinib frontline for a possible early switch.

  4. Molecular Cytogenetics in Digenean Parasites: Linked and Unlinked Major and 5S rDNAs, B Chromosomes and Karyotype Diversification.

    PubMed

    García-Souto, Daniel; Pasantes, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Digenetic trematodes are the largest group of internal metazoan parasites, but their chromosomes are poorly studied. Although chromosome numbers and/or karyotypes are known for about 300 of the 18,000 described species, molecular cytogenetic knowledge is mostly limited to the mapping of telomeric sequences and/or of major rDNA clusters in 9 species. In this work we mapped major and 5S rDNA clusters and telomeric sequences in chromosomes of Bucephalus minimus, B. australis, Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Bucephaloidea), Monascus filiformis (Gymnophalloidea), Parorchis acanthus (Echinostomatoidea), Cryptocotyle lingua (Opisthorchioidea), Cercaria longicaudata, Monorchis parvus (Monorchioidea), Diphterostomum brusinae, and Bacciger bacciger (Microphalloidea). Whilst single major and minor rDNA clusters were mapped to different chromosome pairs in B. minimus and P. acanthus, overlapping signals were detected on a single chromosome pair in the remaining taxa. FISH experiments using major rDNA and telomeric probes clearly demonstrated the presence of highly stretched NORs in most of the digenean taxa analyzed. B chromosomes were detected in the B. bacciger samples hosted by Ruditapes decussatus. Although the cercariae specimens obtained from Donax trunculus, Tellina tenuis, and R. decussatus were in agreement with B. bacciger, their karyotypes showed striking morphological differences in agreement with the proposed assignation of these cercariae to different species of the genus Bacciger. Results are discussed in comparison with previous data on digenean chromosomes.

  5. Molecular-cytogenetic characterisation of sex cord-stromal tumours: CGH analysis in sertoli cell tumours of the testis.

    PubMed

    Verdorfer, I; Höllrigl, A; Strasser, U; Susani, M; Hartmann, A; Rogatsch, H; Mikuz, G

    2007-04-01

    Sertoli cell tumours (SCT) are rare and poorly explored neoplasias, and the genetic features of these uncommon tumours are largely unknown. Data about chromosomal aberrations in human SCT of the testis are very rare. We present in this paper the first molecular-cytogenetic study of SCT of the testis. DNA was isolated from paraffin-embedded tumour material from 11 patients with unilateral SCT. We used comparative genomic hybridisation to investigate changes in DNA copy number. The detected DNA imbalances showed variation from case to case, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 9 of the 11 tumours evaluated, with 13 losses versus 14 gains. The most frequent aberrations detected were gain of chromosome X (5 of 11 cases) followed by losses of entire or part of chromosomes 2 and 19 in three cases. This study suggests a high variability in histomorphological and genetic patterns. Only gain of the entire chromosome X seems to be a frequent aberration in these tumours. Further studies of these tumour types are necessary to clarify the significance of chromosomal alterations in carcinogenesis of SCT.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of chromosome site-specific repetitive sequences in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum, Petromyzontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nunome, Mitsuo; Nishida, Chizuko; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract All extant lamprey karyotypes are characterized by almost all dot-shaped microchromosomes. To understand the molecular basis of chromosome structure in lampreys, we performed chromosome C-banding and silver staining and chromosome mapping of the 18S–28S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and telomeric TTAGGG repeats in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum). In addition, we cloned chromosome site-specific repetitive DNA sequences and characterized them by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. Three types of repetitive sequences were detected; a 200-bp AT-rich repetitive sequence, LCA-EcoRIa that co-localized with the 18S–28S rRNA gene clusters of 3 chromosomal pairs; a 364-bp AT-rich LCA-EcoRIb sequence that showed homology to the EcoRI sequence family from the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which contains short repeats as centromeric motifs; and a GC-rich 702-bp LCA-ApaI sequence that was distributed on nearly all chromosomes and showed significant homology with the integrase-coding region of a Ty3/Gypsy family long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. All three repetitive sequences are highly conserved within the Petromyzontidae or within Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of these site-specific repeats showed that they may be correlated with programed genome rearrangement (LCA-EcoRIa), centromere structure and function (LCA-EcoRIb), and site-specific amplification of LTR retroelements through homogenization between non-homologous chromosomes (LCA-ApaI). PMID:28025319

  8. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a non-robertsonian dicentric chromosome 14;19 identified in a girl with short stature and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Usha R; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Dalal, Ashwin

    2012-01-01

    We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with short stature and amenorrhea. Initially the cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of a mosaic non-Robertsonian dicentric chromosome involving chromosomes 14 and 19. Subsequent molecular cytogenetic analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome paints, centromeric probes, as well as gene specific probes confirmed the dicentric nature of the derivative chromosome and indicated that the rearrangement involved the short arms of both of these chromosomes. Furthermore, we also determined that the chromosome 19p13.3 breakpoint occurred within the terminal 1 Mb region. This is the first report of a mosaic non-Robertsonian dicentric chromosome involving chromosomes 14 and 19 with the karyotype determined as 45,XX,dic(14;19)(p11.2;p13.3)[35]/46,XX[15], and we suggest that the chromosome rearrangement could be the cause of clinical phenotype.

  9. Cytogenetic investigation of Triticum timopheevii (Zhuk.) Zhuk. and related species using the C-banding technique.

    PubMed

    Badaeva, E D; Filatenko, A A; Badaev, N S

    1994-11-01

    Triticum timopheevii and related species T. militinae (2n=28, A(t)G) and T. zhukovskyi (2n=42, A(m)A(t)G), hybrids T. kiharae, T. miguschovae, the amphidiploid T. timopheevii x T. tauschii (all 2n=42, A(t)GD), T. fungicidum (ABA(t)G) and T. timonovum (2n=56, A(t)A(t)GG) were analyzed using the C-banding technique. Chromosomes of the A(m) and A(t) genomes in the karyotype of T. zhukovskyi differed in their C-banding pattern. Partial substitutions of A(t)-genome chromosomes and a complete substitution of the G-genome chromosomes by homoeologous chromosomes of an unidentified tetraploid wheat species with an AB genome composition were found in the T. timonovum karyotype. A(t)- and G-genome chromosomes in the karyotypes of all studied species had similar C-banding patterns and were characterized by a low level of polymorphism. The comparative stability of the A(t) and G genomes is determined by the origin and specifity of cultivation of studied species.

  10. Relevance of Stereotyped B-Cell Receptors in the Context of the Molecular, Cytogenetic and Clinical Features of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Sonia; Colombo, Monica; Tuana, Giacomo; Agnelli, Luca; Matis, Serena; Lionetti, Marta; Gentile, Massimo; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Musolino, Caterina; Ilariucci, Fiorella; Di Renzo, Nicola; Pesce, Emanuela; Molica, Stefano; Federico, Massimo; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Morabito, Fortunato; Ferrarini, Manlio; Neri, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    Highly homologous B-cell receptors, characterized by non-random combinations of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (IGHV) genes and heavy-chain complementarity determining region-3 (HCDR3), are expressed in a recurrent fraction of patients affected by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated the IGHV status of 1131 productive IG rearrangements from a panel of 1126 CLL patients from a multicenter Italian study group, and correlated the presence and class of HCDR3 stereotyped subsets with the major cytogenetic alterations evaluated by FISH, molecular prognostic factors, and the time to first treatment (TTFT) of patients with early stage disease (Binet A). Stereotyped HCDR3 sequences were found in 357 cases (31.7%), 231 of which (64.7%) were unmutated. In addition to the previously described subsets, 31 new putative stereotypes subsets were identified. Significant associations between different stereotyped HCDR3 sequences and molecular prognostic factors, such as CD38 and ZAP-70 expression, IGHV mutational status and genomic abnormalities were found. In particular, deletion of 17p13 was significantly represented in stereotype subset #1. Notably, subset #1 was significantly correlated with a substantially reduced TTFT compared to other CLL groups showing unmutated IGHV, ZAP-70 or CD38 positivity and unfavorable cytogenetic lesions including del(17)(p13). Moreover, subset #2 was strongly associated with deletion of 13q14, subsets #8 and #10 with trisomy 12, whereas subset #4 was characterized by the prevalent absence of the common cytogenetic abnormalities. Our data from a large and representative panel of CLL patients indicate that particular stereotyped HCDR3 sequences are associated with specific cytogenetic lesions and a distinct clinical outcome. PMID:21897877

  11. Karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes: an examination of the process of karyotypic evolution by comparison of the molecular cytogenetic findings with the molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shibusawa, M; Nishibori, M; Nishida-Umehara, C; Tsudzuki, M; Masabanda, J; Griffin, D K; Matsuda, Y

    2004-01-01

    To define the process of karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes on a molecular basis, we conducted genome-wide comparative chromosome painting for eight species, i.e. silver pheasant (Lophura nycthemera), Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Chinese bamboo-partridge (Bambusicola thoracica) and common peafowl (Pavo cristatus) of the Phasianidae, and plain chachalaca (Ortalis vetula) of the Cracidae, with chicken DNA probes of chromosomes 1-9 and Z. Including our previous data from five other species, chicken (Gallus gallus), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis) of the Phasianidae, guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) of the Numididae and California quail (Callipepla californica) of the Odontophoridae, we represented the evolutionary changes of karyotypes in the 13 species of the Galliformes. In addition, we compared the cytogenetic data with the molecular phylogeny of the 13 species constructed with the nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, and discussed the process of karyotypic evolution in the Galliformes. Comparative chromosome painting confirmed the previous data on chromosome rearrangements obtained by G-banding analysis, and identified several novel chromosome rearrangements. The process of the evolutionary changes of macrochromosomes in the 13 species was in good accordance with the molecular phylogeny, and the ancestral karyotype of the Galliformes is represented.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  13. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-02-04

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species--diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis--was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species--rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies--IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)--were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs.

  14. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species—diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis—was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species—rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies—IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)—were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs. PMID:26861283

  15. Rhabdoid glioblastoma is distinguishable from classical glioblastoma by cytogenetics and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Sun-Ju; Cho, Hwa Jin; Baek, Hae Woon; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hong; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Park, Sung-Hye

    2014-03-01

    The clinicopathologic and molecular genetic features of 5 cases of rhabdoid glioblastoma, an extremely rare variant of glioblastoma that tends to affect patients at a young age, were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis and focused molecular genetic studies including array-based comparative genomic hybridization. All 5 cases had supratentorial tumors that immunohistochemical analysis revealed to be robustly positive for epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, p53, and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) but only focally positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Although complete retention of SMARCB1 (INI1) was observed in all 5 cases, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) loss, homozygous deletion of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, 1p/19q codeletion, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132/IDH2 R172 mutation were not observed in any case, although a high level of EGFR polysomy was detected in 1 recurrent tumor. Although c-MET (MET protein) expression was focal but robustly positive in 3 cases, met proto-oncogene (MET) fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed low polysomy but not MET amplification. MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-40 transferase) methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed MGMT methylation in only 1 case. Furthermore, array-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed gain of chromosome 7 and loss of 1p, 6, 8p, 11, 13q, and 18q but no deletion of chromosome 22. In contrast to the classical subtype of primary glioblastoma, the cases studied here were characterized by the absence of EGFR amplification, PTEN loss, and 9p homozygous deletion and overexpression of p53, PDGFRα, and c-MET, suggesting that they can be classified as the proneural or mesenchymal subtype of glioblastoma and benefit from intensive therapy that includes temozolomide.

  16. MicroRNA expression at diagnosis adds relevant prognostic information to molecular categorization in patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Beyá, M; Brunet, S; Nomdedéu, J; Tejero, R; Díaz, T; Pratcorona, M; Tormo, M; Ribera, J M; Escoda, L; Duarte, R; Gallardo, D; Heras, I; Queipo de Llano, M P; Bargay, J; Monzo, M; Sierra, J; Navarro, A; Esteve, J

    2014-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease, and optimal treatment varies according to cytogenetic risk factors and molecular markers. Several studies have demonstrated the prognostic importance of microRNAs (miRNAs) in AML. Here we report a potential association between miRNA expression and clinical outcome in 238 intermediate-risk cytogenetic AML (IR-AML) patients from 16 institutions in the CETLAM cooperative group. We first profiled 670 miRNAs in a subset of 85 IR-AML patients from a single institution and identified 10 outcome-related miRNAs. We then validated these 10 miRNAs by individual assays in the total cohort and confirmed the prognostic impact of 4 miRNAs. High levels of miR-196b and miR-644 were independently associated with shorter overall survival, and low levels of miR-135a and miR-409-3p with a higher risk of relapse. Interestingly, miR-135a and miR-409-3p maintained their independent prognostic value within the unfavorable molecular subcategory (wild-type NPM1 and CEBPA and/or FLT3-ITD), and miR-644 retained its value within the favorable molecular subcategory. miR-409-3p, miR-135a, miR-196b and mir-644 arose as prognostic markers for IR-AML, both overall and within specific molecular subgroups.

  17. A liftoff technique for molecular nanopatterning.

    PubMed

    Hang, Qingling; Wang, Yuliang; Lieberman, Marya; Bernstein, Gary H

    2003-08-01

    For quantum-dot cellular automata molecular electronic devices, one of the fundamental tasks is to arrange the molecules on a surface in a controlled manner. In this report, we discuss a molecular lift off technique to form nanopatterns toward the development of molecular circuits. In our molecular lift off technique, we use electron beam lithography to form nano-trenches on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film on a SiO2 wafer. This wafer is soaked in a Creutz-Taube ion [(NH3)5Ru(pyrazine)Ru(NH3)5](o-toluenesulfonate)5 (CT5) aqueous solution. After residual PMMA removal, atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the resulting surface. Thirty-five nanometer CT5 lines are demonstrated on a SiO2 surface. Compared with other molecular nanopatterning techniques, ours is both economical and capable of high-resolution.

  18. Cytogenetic and Molecular Data Demonstrate that the Bryconinae (Ostariophysi, Bryconidae) Species from Southeastern Brazil Form a Phylogenetic and Phylogeographic Unit

    PubMed Central

    Travenzoli, Natália Martins; Silva, Priscilla Caroline; Santos, Udson; Zanuncio, José Cola; Oliveira, Claudio; Dergam, Jorge Abdala

    2015-01-01

    Brycon spp. occur in Neotropical watersheds to the west and east of the Andes, and as they are sensitive to anthropogenic changes, many these species are endangered in southeastern Brazil. Coastal rivers in southeastern Brazil are characterized by the presence of relatively few freshwater fish species and high endemism of this fauna. The objective of this study was to examine whether Brycon spp. occurring in the coastal basins of southeastern Brazil are monophyletic, using cytogenetic data, mitochondrial, and nuclear molecular markers. All the species showed a diploid number of 50 chromosomes, a conserved number within the subfamily Bryconinae. However, the karyotypic formulas were unique to most species, including Brycon devillei (26m+22sm+2st), Brycon ferox (26m+12sm+12st), Brycon insignis (22m+20sm+8st), Brycon opalinus, and Brycon vermelha (24m+20sm+6st), indicating the prevalence of pericentric and paracentric inversions in the chromosomal evolution of these species. All of them had nucleolar organizer regions in the first pair of subtelocentric chromosomes and no equilocal distribution of heterochromatin in the first pair of chromosomes of the karyotype. These two features, not seen in any other Brycon spp. examined to date, indicate that Bryconinae species from the Brazilian southeastern coastal basins, including the monotypic genus Henochilus, are monophyletic. Also, this is the first study that reports NOR location and C-banding patterns as synapomorphies for a Neotropical fish species group. The monophyly was also supported by a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA (16S), cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI), alpha-myosin (MYH6) genes and S72 intron molecular data. Our results partially corroborate the “Brycon acuminatus” group proposed by Howes in 1982: our proposed clade keeps B. devillei, B. ferox, and B. insignis; but it also includes B. opalinus, B. vermelha, and H. weatlandii whereas it excludes B. nattereri. The phylogeographic unit formed by

  19. Cytogenetic and Molecular Characterization of Heterochromatin Gene Models in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Fabrizio; Moschetti, Roberta; Caizzi, Ruggiero; Corradini, Nicoletta; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, genome-sequencing projects have yielded a great amount of information on DNA sequences in several organisms. The release of the Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin sequence by the Drosophila Heterochromatin Genome Project (DHGP) has greatly facilitated studies of mapping, molecular organization, and function of genes located in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Surprisingly, genome annotation has predicted at least 450 heterochromatic gene models, a figure 10-fold above that defined by genetic analysis. To gain further insight into the locations and functions of D. melanogaster heterochromatic genes and genome organization, we have FISH mapped 41 gene models relative to the stained bands of mitotic chromosomes and the proximal divisions of polytene chromosomes. These genes are contained in eight large scaffolds, which together account for ∼1.4 Mb of heterochromatic DNA sequence. Moreover, developmental Northern analysis showed that the expression of 15 heterochromatic gene models tested is similar to that of the vital heterochromatic gene Nipped-A, in that it is not limited to specific stages, but is present throughout all development, despite its location in a supposedly “silent” region of the genome. This result is consistent with the idea that genes resident in heterochromatin can encode essential functions. PMID:17110485

  20. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of inverted duplicated chromosomes 15 from 11 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sou-De; Knoll, J.H.M.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H.

    1994-10-01

    We have studied the inverted duplicated chromosomes 15 (inv dup(15)) from 11 individuals - 7 with severe mental retardation and seizures, 3 with a normal phenotype, and 1 with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Through a combination of FISH and quantitative DNA analyses, three different molecular sizes of inv dup(15) were identified. The smallest inv dup(15) was positive only for the centromeric locus D15Z1 (type 1); the next size was positive for D15Z1 and D15S18 (type 2); and the largest inv dup(15) was positive for two additional copies of loci extending from D15Z1 and D15S18 through D15S12 (type 3). Type 1 or type 2 was observed in the three normal individuals and the PWS patient. Type 3 was observed in all seven individuals with mental retardation and seizures but without PWS or Angelman Syndrome (AS). The PWS patient, in addition to being mosaic for a small inv dup(15), demonstrated at D15S63 a methylation pattern consistent with material uniparental inheritance of the normal chromosomes 15. The results from this study show (a) two additional copies of proximal 15q loci, D15S9 through D15S12, in mentally retarded patients with an inv dup(15) but without AS or PWS and (b) no additional copies of these loci in patients with a normal phenotype or with PWS. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic characterization of a de novo interstitial deletion of 7q (7q22.1→q31.1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Chen, Yu-Ting; Su, Jun-Wei; Chen, Wen-Lin; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-06-01

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic characterization of de novo interstitial deletion of 7q (7q22.1→q31.1) by aCGH, FISH and QF-PCR in a fetus with an abnormal maternal serum screening result and ultrasound findings of facial cleft and hypogenitalism. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation and the consequence of haploinsufficiency of ZKSCAN5, ARPC1A, CYP3A43, RELN, LAMB1, IMMP2L and DOCK4 in this case.

  2. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  3. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic search for cryptic sex chromosomes in painted turtles Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole; Badenhorst, Daleen; Montiel, Eugenia E; Literman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sex determination is triggered by factors ranging from genotypic (GSD) to environmental (ESD), or both GSD + EE (GSD susceptible to environmental effects), and its evolution remains enigmatic. The presence/absence of sex chromosomes purportedly separates species at the ESD end of the continuum from the rest (GSD and GSD + EE) because the evolutionary dynamics of sex chromosomes and autosomes differ. However, studies suggest that turtles with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) are cryptically GSD and possess sex chromosomes. Here, we test this hypothesis in painted turtles Chrysemys picta (TSD), using comparative-genome-hybridization (CGH), a technique known to detect morphologically indistinguishable sex chromosomes in other turtles and reptiles. Our results show no evidence for the existence of sex chromosomes in painted turtles. While it remains plausible that cryptic sex chromosomes may exist in TSD turtles that are characterized by minor genetic differences that cannot be detected at the resolution of CGH, previous attempts have failed to identify sex-specific markers. Genomic sequencing should prove useful in providing conclusive evidence in this regard. If such efforts uncover sex chromosomes in TSD turtles, it may reveal the existence of a fundamental constraint for the evolution of a full spectrum of sex determination (from pure GSD to pure TSD) that is predicted theoretically. Finding sex chromosomes in ESD organisms would question whether pure ESD mechanisms exist at all in nature, or whether those systems currently considered pure ESD simply await the characterization of an underlying GSD architecture.

  5. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2008-01-01

    Background Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100 kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. Results We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific ~6 kb plasmid onto an unusually small, ~55 kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-κB2 locus. Conclusion The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements. PMID:19108707

  6. Study of the origin of nondisjunction in a family with two cases of Down syndrome using cytogenetic and molecular polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Stinissen, P; Van Roy, B; Van Camp, G; Backhovens, H; Partoens, P; Wehnert, A; Verniers, H; Dumon, J; Vandenberghe, A; Van Broeckhoven, C

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed the possibility of inherited predisposition to nondisjunction in a family with two cases of Down syndrome using restriction fragment length polymorphisms and cytogenetic heteromorphisms. In both patients the extra chromosome 21 was the result of a nondisjunction event at first meiotic division in the mother. Since both patients are maternally related, genetic predisposition cannot be excluded in this family.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic study of heterochromatin in Hisonotus leucofrenatus (Teleostei, Loricariidae, Hypoptopomatinae).

    PubMed

    Andreata, Artur Antonio; Ferreira, Daniela Cristina; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2010-02-01

    The fish species Hisonotus leucofrenatus exhibits a large amount of C-band positive segments with different responses after application of the C-banding technique. Type I class named herein appeared to be heavily stained after C-banding in the terminal position of five chromosome pairs and type II class, weakly stained after C-banding in the interstitial or pericentromeric position in nine chromosome pairs and in the supernumerary chromosomes. No variation was observed in type II C-band positive segments, however, type I segments displayed conspicuous polymorphisms, and six cytotypes were detected among the fish analyzed. Chromosomes were also analyzed by CMA(3) and DAPI staining, which showed that type I C-band positive segments comprised both AT-rich and GC-rich DNA, while type II segments were mainly composed of GC-rich sequences. HindIII-digested genomic DNA exhibits fragments of the ladder-like pattern, characteristic of tandemly arrayed repetitive sequences. Two of those fragments corresponding to monomeric and dimeric units of a 78 bp repetitive DNA sequence were cloned and sequenced. The cloned repetitive DNA was used as probe in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments. The results revealed that these sequences were located in the same position as the type I C-band positive segments. This satellite DNA did not hybridize with DNA from other species of Hisonotus or from other fish of the family Loricariidae, suggesting that this sequence is specific to H. leucofrenatus. The role of these repetitive sequences in the karyotypic evolution of this species is discussed.

  8. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  9. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  10. Genomic arrays in chronic lymphocytic leukemia routine clinical practice: are we ready to substitute conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques?

    PubMed

    Puiggros, Anna; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Salido, Marta; Ferrer, Ana; Abella, Eugènia; Gimeno, Eva; Nonell, Lara; Herranz, María José; Galván, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Melero, Carme; Pairet, Silvia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca

    2013-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Del(11q) and del(17p), routinely studied by conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been related to progression and shorter overall survival. Recently, array-based karyotyping has gained acceptance as a high-resolution new tool for detecting genomic imbalances. The aim of the present study was to compare genomic arrays with CGC and FISH to ascertain whether the current techniques could be substituted in routine procedures. We analyzed 70 patients with CLL using the Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7M Array and CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix), CGC and FISH with the classical CLL panel. Whereas 31.4% and 68.6% of patients presented abnormalities when studied by CGC and FISH, respectively, these rates increased when arrays were also analyzed (78.6% and 80%). Although abnormality detection is higher when arrays are applied, one case with del(11q) and three with del(17p) were missed by genomic arrays due to their limited sensitivity. We consider that the complete substitution of CGC and FISH by genomic arrays in routine laboratories could negatively affect the management of some patients harboring 11q or 17p deletions. In conclusion, genomic arrays are valid to detect known and novel genomic imbalances in CLL, but should be maintained as a complementary tool to the current techniques.

  11. Cytogenetics and cladistics.

    PubMed

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Ducroz, Jean-François; Robinson, Terence J; Volobouev, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    Chromosomal data have been underutilized in phylogenetic investigations despite the obvious potential that cytogenetic studies have to reveal both structural and functional homologies among taxa. In large part this is associated with difficulties in scoring conventional and molecular cytogenetic information for phylogenetic analysis. The manner in which chromosomal data have been used by most authors in the past was often conceptionally flawed in terms of the methods and principles underpinning modern cladistics. We present herein a review of the different methods employed, examine their relative strengths, and then outline a simple approach that considers the chromosomal change as the character, and its presence or absence the character state. We test this using one simulated and several empirical data sets. Features that are unique to cytogenetic investigations, including B-chromosomes, heterochromatic additions/deletions, and the location and number of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), as well as the weighting of chromosomal characters, are critically discussed with regard to their suitability for phylogenetic reconstruction. We conclude that each of these classes of data have inherent problems that limit their usefulness in phylogenetic analyses and in most of these instances, inclusion should be subject to rigorous appraisal that addresses the criterion of unequivocal homology.

  12. The use of a novel combination of diagnostic molecular and cytogenetic approaches in horses with sexual karyotype abnormalities: a rare case with an abnormal cellular chimerism.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Anaya, G; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Membrillo, A; Valera, M; Moreno-Millán, M

    2014-05-01

    Sex chromosome aberrations are known to cause congenital abnormalities and unexplained infertility in horses. Most of these anomalies remain undiagnosed because of the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of specialized laboratories that can perform such diagnoses. On the other hand, the utilization of microsatellite markers is a technique widely spread in horse breeding, mostly because of their usage in parentage tests. We studied the usage of a novel combination of diagnostic approaches in the evaluation of a very uncommon case of chromosomal abnormalities in a Spanish purebred colt, primarily detected using a commercial panel of short tandem repeat (STR) makers. Based on these results, we performed a full cytogenetic analysis using conventional and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques with individual Equus caballus chromosome X and Equus caballus chromosome Y painting probes. We also tested the presence of two genes associated with the sexual development in horses and an extra novel panel of eight microsatellite markers specifically located in the sex chromosome pair. This is the first case report of a leukocyte chimerism between chromosomally normal (64,XY) and abnormal (63,X0) cell lines in horses. Our results indicate that the use of the short tandem repeat markers as a screening technique and as a confirmation utilizing cytogenetic techniques can be used as a very interesting, easy, and nonexpensive diagnostic approach to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the domestic horse.

  13. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  14. Insect pathogens: molecular approaches and techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book serves as a primer for molecular techniques in insect pathology and is tailored for a wide scientific audience. Contributing authors are internationally recognized experts. The book comprises four sections: 1) pathogen identification and diagnostics, 2) pathogen population genetics and p...

  15. Fine-needle aspiration cytology yield as a basis for morphological, molecular, and cytogenetic diagnosis in alk-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanic, Maja; Ostojic Kolonic, Slobodanka; Kaic, Gordana; Kardum Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Lasan Trcic, Ruzica; Kardum-Skelin, Ika

    2017-01-01

    ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma usually occurring in children and young adults. It frequently involves lymph nodes and extranodal sites and is associated with favorable prognosis. A 20-year old man was admitted for painful mass in the left axilla with overlying skin redness. Clinical presentation and US findings were highly suspicious for sarcoma. Definitive diagnosis was established cytolologically and using ancillary technologies from cytological samples. Fine needle aspiration cytology of tumor mass (lymph node conglomerate and surrounding tissue) show predominance of large, pleomorphic, atypical cells with large nuclei and vacuolised cytoplasm. Atypical cells immunocytochemically were positive for LCA, CD30, CD3, EMA, and ALK; negative for CD15 and CD56. NPM-ALK transcript was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCT). Molecular analysis of TCRß and TCRγ genes demonstrated clonal TCR genes rearrangement. Complex karyotype with multiple numerical and structural changes was found on conventional cytogenetics. These findings excluded sarcoma and corroborated the diagnosis of ALK positive ALCL. Cutaneous involvement in ALCL can clinically mimic sarcoma, especially in cases with localized disease without B symptoms. In those cases, immunostaining, PCR, and conventional cytogenetics are helpful to exclude sarcoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:51-54. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Use of molecular techniques in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Płaza, G; Ulfig, K; Hazen, T C; Brigmon, R L

    2001-01-01

    In a practical sense, biotechnology is concerned with the production of commercial products generated by biological processes. More formally, biotechnology may be defined as "the application of scientific and engineering principles to the processing of material by biological agents to provide goods and services" (Cantor, 2000). From a historical perspective, biotechnology dates back to the time when yeast was first used for beer or wine fermentation, and bacteria were used to make yogurt. In 1972, the birth of recombinant DNA technology moved biotechnology to new heights and led to the establishment of a new industry. Progress in biotechnology has been truly remarkable. Within four years of the discovery of recombinant DNA technology, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) were making human insulin, interferon, and human growth hormone. Now, recombinant DNA technology and its products--GMOs are widely used in environmental biotechnology (Glick and Pasternak, 1988; Cowan, 2000). Bioremediation is one of the most rapidly growing areas of environmental biotechnology. Use of bioremediation for environmental clean up is popular due to low costs and its public acceptability. Indeed, bioremediation stands to benefit greatly and advance even more rapidly with the adoption of molecular techniques developed originally for other areas of biotechnology. The 1990s was the decade of molecular microbial ecology (time of using molecular techniques in environmental biotechnology). Adoption of these molecular techniques made scientists realize that microbial populations in the natural environments are much more diverse than previously thought using traditional culture methods. Using molecular ecological methods, such as direct DNA isolation from environmental samples, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), PCR methods, nucleic acid hybridization etc., we can now study microbial consortia relevant to pollutant degradation in the environment. These techniques promise to

  17. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J. ); Jenkins, L. ); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. ); Sheppard, L. ); Flejter, W.L. ); Zackowski, J. ); Tsien, F. ); Schwartz, S. )

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Molecular cytogenetics: unraveling of the genetic composition of individual cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanke, H J; Florijn, R J; Vrolijk, J; Raap, A K

    1995-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques allow the unraveling of the genetic alterations that cause or accompany malignant disease. Since tumors are often heterogeneous, biochemical analysis of tissue homogenates is of limited diagnostic value. This paper gives examples of methods that are presently operational to analyze the genetic composition of individual cells. They are based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. First, the current status of indirect and direct FISH staining methods with respect to probe labeling, detection sensitivity, multiplicity, and DNA resolution is summarized. Microscope hardware as well as charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras required for FISH analysis are then described. Applications potentially important for the analysis of urological malignancies, such as the automated enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities (counting of dots in interphase cells) and high-resolution DNA mapping on highly extended chromatin, are described in detail. Finally, the limitations of the present methodology and its future prospects are discussed.

  19. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  20. CYTOGENETIC AND MOLECULAR RESPONSES OF AMMONIUM SULPHATE APPLICATION FOR TOLERANCE TO EXTREME TEMPERATURES IN VICIA FABA L.

    PubMed

    Öney, S; Tabur, S; Tuna, M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of ammonium sulphate [(NH4)2SO4] on mitosis, cell cycle and chromosomes in Vicia faba L. seeds exposed to extreme temperatures were investigated using flowcytometric and cytogenetic analysis. Seeds germinated at high and low temperatures showed a signiicant decrease in mitotic index as compared to those of optimum temperature conditions. Application of 50 and 1000 µM (NH4)2SO4 were successful in alleviating the negative effects of low and high temperature on mitotic activity, respectively. 50 µM (NH4)2SO4 showed the most positive effect on cell cycle at the extreme temperatures. This concentration increased the cell division removing or decreasing the negative effects of temperature stress. Namely, the highest G2/M and S phase percentages under stress conditions were obtained with application of 50 µM (NH4)2SO4. Chromosomal aberrations were not observed in cells of seeds germinated in distilled water and also at any temperatures. However, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations increased significantly by increasing (NH4)2SO4 concentration. The highest aberration frequency in all temperature degree tested was found at 1000 µM (NH4)2SO4 concentration.

  1. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of lymphoblastoid and colon cancer cell lines from cotton-top tamarin (Sagiunus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Mao, X; McGuire, S; Hamoudi, R A

    2000-07-01

    The cotton-top tamarin (CTT) (Sagiunus oedipus) has been used as an animal model to investigate the etiology and pathophysiology of several human diseases, including ulcerative colitis and its associated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Little is known, however, about genetic synteny between CTT and humans, and about chromosome aberrations in CTT CRC. To address these issues, we have analyzed CTT lymphoblastoid and CRC cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (Zoo-FISH), and direct sequencing. The CTT lymphocytes had pseudodiploid chromosomes of 46. The CTT CRC cells showed near-diploid chromosomes of 45. Several clonal structural aberrations were observed, including der(1), a marker chromosome, and double minutes. Zoo-FISH using human chromosome 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, and X paints identified homologous chromosomes and subchromosomal regions in the CTT genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with human telomeric probe also detected a homologous sequence in CTT genome. Direct sequencing of CTT genomic DNA using primers amplifying exons 4 and 15 of the human APC gene identified DNA sequences in CTT genome with 99% and 95% homology, respectively. These results provide a basis for further comparative studies of CTT and human genome.

  2. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    PubMed

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants.

  3. Flow Sorting and Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of Individual Chromosomes of Dasypyrum villosum L. (H. villosa) by a Single DNA Probe

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Valentina; Farina, Anna; Gennaro, Andrea; Giorgi, Debora; Lucretti, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy (sin. Haynaldia villosa) is an annual wild diploid grass species (2n = 2x = 14; genome VV) belonging to the Poaceae family, which is considered to be an important source of biotic and abiotic stress resistance genes for wheat breeding. Enhanced characterization of D. villosum chromosomes can facilitate exploitation of its gene pool and its use in wheat breeding programs. Here we present the cytogenetic identification of D. villosum chromosomes on slide by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), with the GAA simple sequence repeat (SSR) as a probe. We also describe the isolation and the flow cytometric analysis of D. villosum chromosomes in suspension, resulting in a distinguished flow karyotype. Chromosomes were flow sorted into three fractions, according their DNA content, one of which was composed of a single type of chromosome, namely 6 V, sorted with over 85% purity. Chromosome 6 V is known to carry genes to code for important resistance and seed storage characteristics, and its isolation represents a new source of genetic traits and specific markers useful for wheat improvement. PMID:23185561

  4. Cytogenetic effects of cyclamates

    SciTech Connect

    Jemison, E.W.; Brown, K.; Rivers, B.; Knight, R.

    1984-01-01

    PHA-stimulated human peripheral lymphocytes were used as a model system for assessing the in vitro effects of calcium cyclamate. Techniques of autoradiography, cytological staining, cell counting, liquid scintillation and karyotyping were used to study the cytogenetic damage and biochemical effects of calcium cyclamate when assayed in 24 hour intervals for 96 hours. The cells were exposed to 10(-2) and 10(-3) molar concentrations of calcium cyclamate in TC 199 medium with fetal calf serum and antibiotics. It was noted that the addition of cyclamate increased mitotic rate of lymphocyte cells in cultures. It was determined that calcium cyclamate impaired the synthesis of deoxribonunucleic acid (as depicted by decreased incorporation of tritiated thymidine), reduced grain counts in autoradiographs and increased chromosome aberrations in cyclamate treated PHA stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Morphological changes and growth rates showed significant effects. These studies indicate that calcium cyclamate has variable significant effects on leucocytes growth and chromosome morphology.

  5. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of A2BP1/FOX1 as a candidate gene for autism.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christa Lese; Duvall, Jacqueline A; Ilkin, Yesim; Simon, Jason S; Arreaza, M Gladys; Wilkes, Kristin; Alvarez-Retuerto, Ana; Whichello, Amy; Powell, Cynthia M; Rao, Kathleen; Cook, Edwin; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2007-10-05

    Cytogenetic imbalances are increasingly being realized as causes of autism. Here, we report a de novo translocation between the short arms of chromosomes 15 and 16 in a female with autism, epilepsy, and global developmental delay. FISH analysis identified a cryptic deletion of approximately 160 kb at the boundary of the first exon and first intron of the 1.7 Mb ataxin-2 binding protein-1 (A2BP1) gene, also called FOX1. Quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR) analysis verified a deletion of exon 1 in the 5' promoter region of the A2BP1 gene. Reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) showed reduced mRNA expression in the individual's lymphocytes, demonstrating the functional consequence of the deletion. A2BP1 codes for a brain-expressed RNA binding or splicing factor. Because of emerging evidence in the role of RNA processing and gene regulation in pervasive developmental disorders, we performed further screening of A2BP1 in additional individuals with autism from the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange (AGRE) collection. Twenty-seven SNPs were genotyped across A2BP1 in 206 parent-child trios and two regions showed association at P < or = 0.008 level. No additional deletions or clear mutations were identified in 88 probands by re-sequencing of all exons and surrounding intronic regions or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) of exon 1. Although only nominal association was observed, and no obvious causal mutations were identified, these results suggest that A2BP1 may affect susceptibility or cause autism in a subset of patients. Further investigations in a larger sample may provide additional information regarding the involvement of this gene in the autistic phenotype.

  6. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of Rumex papillaris, a dioecious plant with an XX/XY(1)Y (2) sex chromosome system.

    PubMed

    Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Schwarzacher, Trude; Rejón, Manuel Ruiz; Garrido-Ramos, Manuel A

    2009-01-01

    Rumex papillaris Boiss, & Reut., an Iberian endemic, belongs to the section Acetosa of the genus Rumex whose main representative is R. acetosa L., a species intensively studied in relation to sex-chromosome evolution. Here, we characterize cytogenetically the chromosomal complement of R. papillaris in an effort to enhance future comparative genomic approaches and to better our understanding of sex chromosome structure in plants. Rumex papillaris, as is common in this group, is a dioecious species characterized by the presence of a multiple sex chromosome system (with females 2n = 12 + XX and males 2n = 12 + XY(1)Y(2)). Except for the X chromosome both Y chromosomes are the longest in the karyotype and appear heterochromatic due to the accumulation of at least two satellite DNA families, RAE180 and RAYSI. Each chromosome of pair VI has an additional major heterochromatin block at the distal region of the short arm. These supernumerary heterochromatic blocks are occupied by RAE730 satellite DNA family. The Y-related RAE180 family is also present in an additional minor autosomal locus. Our comparative study of the chromosomal organization of the different satellite-DNA sequences in XX/XY and XX/XY(1)Y(2) Rumex species demonstrates that of active mechanisms of heterochromatin amplification occurred and were accompanied by chromosomal rearrangements giving rise to the multiple XX/XY(1)Y(2) chromosome systems observed in Rumex. Additionally, Y(1) and Y(2) chromosomes have undergone further rearrangements leading to differential patterns of Y-heterochromatin distribution between Rumex species with multiple sex chromosome systems.

  7. Automatic Molecular Design using Evolutionary Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Molecular nanotechnology is the precise, three-dimensional control of materials and devices at the atomic scale. An important part of nanotechnology is the design of molecules for specific purposes. This paper describes early results using genetic software techniques to automatically design molecules under the control of a fitness function. The fitness function must be capable of determining which of two arbitrary molecules is better for a specific task. The software begins by generating a population of random molecules. The population is then evolved towards greater fitness by randomly combining parts of the better individuals to create new molecules. These new molecules then replace some of the worst molecules in the population. The unique aspect of our approach is that we apply genetic crossover to molecules represented by graphs, i.e., sets of atoms and the bonds that connect them. We present evidence suggesting that crossover alone, operating on graphs, can evolve any possible molecule given an appropriate fitness function and a population containing both rings and chains. Prior work evolved strings or trees that were subsequently processed to generate molecular graphs. In principle, genetic graph software should be able to evolve other graph representable systems such as circuits, transportation networks, metabolic pathways, computer networks, etc.

  8. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1

    PubMed Central

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J.; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176–178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree. PMID:26633808

  9. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1.

    PubMed

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176-178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree.

  10. Molecular Technique to Understand Deep Microbial Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Current sequencing-based and DNA microarray techniques to study microbial diversity are based on an initial PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification step. However, a number of factors are known to bias PCR amplification and jeopardize the true representation of bacterial diversity. PCR amplification of the minor template appears to be suppressed by the exponential amplification of the more abundant template. It is widely acknowledged among environmental molecular microbiologists that genetic biosignatures identified from an environment only represent the most dominant populations. The technological bottleneck has overlooked the presence of the less abundant minority population, and underestimated their role in the ecosystem maintenance. To generate PCR amplicons for subsequent diversity analysis, bacterial l6S rRNA genes are amplified by PCR using universal primers. Two distinct PCR regimes are employed in parallel: one using normal and the other using biotinlabeled universal primers. PCR products obtained with biotin-labeled primers are mixed with streptavidin-labeled magnetic beads and selectively captured in the presence of a magnetic field. Less-abundant DNA templates that fail to amplify in this first round of PCR amplification are subjected to a second round of PCR using normal universal primers. These PCR products are then subjected to downstream diversity analyses such as conventional cloning and sequencing. A second round of PCR amplified the minority population and completed the deep diversity picture of the environmental sample.

  11. Fifty years of cytogenetics: a parallel view of the evolution of cytogenetics and genotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sagredo, J M

    2008-01-01

    A parallelism exists between human cytogenetics and cytogenetic toxicology. The breakthroughs, mostly coming from and used in clinical genetics, are widely used in genetic toxicology. The birth of human cytogenetics occurred in 1956 when it was published that the diploid number of chromosomes in humans is 46. The first stage in chromosome-induced mutagenesis began in 1938 when Sax published the effects of X-rays on the chromosomes of Drosophila. In 1959, the cytogenetic anomalies for Down, Klinefelter, and Turner syndromes were described, and parallelly in 1960, the first publication on chromosomal aberrations in man caused by ionizing radiation appeared. The cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in cell cultures is considered one of the primary methods to evaluate induced mutagenesis. At the end of the 1960s, banding techniques allowed chromosomes to be individually identified, in parallel, the sister chromatid exchange analysis technology was described. Another milestone in the history of induced mutagenesis was the discovery that mutagenic agents were able to alter chromosomal division and segregation in gonads inducing meiotic nondisjunction. Here we review new approaches and applications such as biological dosimetry, translocation scoring using FISH, and micronucleus test. Chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus test are now effective cytogenetic biomarkers of early effect used as cancer predictors. Human cytogenetics has proven to be effective over its 50-year lifespan and, although each new technique that has appeared seemed to announce its end, the fact is that the current state of cytogenetics is in reality a collection of techniques that, while common, are cheap, fast, and wide-ranging. Therefore, in genotoxicology, they continue to be useful to identify mutagenic agents as well as to evaluate and analyze exposed populations.

  12. Cytogenetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, S A

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. I summarize the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. I explore the effect of molecular genetics on these issues and its possible future effects on the entire practice of prenatal diagnosis as it relates to the risk for chromosome nondisjunction (trisomy). I also discuss the use of cytogenetic analysis in the prenatal diagnosis of certain inherited genetic diseases. Images PMID:8236978

  13. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a wheat-rye 1R addition line with multiple spikelets and resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wujuan; Wang, Changyou; Chen, Chunhuan; Wang, Yajuan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Xinlun; Ji, Wanquan

    2016-04-01

    Alien addition lines are important for transferring useful genes from alien species into common wheat. Rye is an important and valuable gene resource for improving wheat disease resistance, yield, and environment adaptation. A new wheat-rye addition line, N9436B, was developed from the progeny of the cross of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) cultivar Shaanmai 611 and rye (Secale cereal L., 2n = 2x = 14, RR) accession Austrian rye. We characterized this new line by cytology, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), molecular markers, and disease resistance screening. N9436B was stable in morphology and cytology, with a chromosome composition of 2n = 42 + 2t = 22II. GISH investigations showed that this line contained two rye chromosomes. GISH, FISH, and molecular maker identification suggested that the introduced R chromosome and the missing wheat chromosome arms were 1R chromosome and 2DL chromosome arm, respectively. N9436B exhibited 30-37 spikelets per spike and a high level of resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) isolate E09 at the seedling stage. N9436B was cytologically stable, had the trait of multiple spikelets, and was resistant to powdery mildew; this line should thus be useful in wheat improvement.

  14. [Application of molecular biological techniques in Taenia identification].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Hang; Yang, Yi-Mei

    2011-10-01

    The traditional identification of Taenia spp. based on morphological features of adult and cysticercus has difficulties in identifying the morphologically similar species. The recent development of molecular techniques provides more scientific ways for distinguishing Taenia species. This paper summarizes the application of molecular biological techniques in the identification of Taenia, such as analysis of DNA sequence, PCR-RFLP and LAMP.

  15. A novel microdeletion syndrome involving 5q14.3-q15: clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of three patients

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Hartmut; Wohlleber, Eva; Zink, Alexander; Hoyer, Juliane; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moog, Ute; Hellmann-Mersch, Birgit; Weber, Ruthild G; Willatt, Lionel; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, Martina; Firth, Helen V; Rauch, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping is being increasingly applied to delineate novel disease causing microaberrations and related syndromes in patients with mental retardation of unknown aetiology. We report on three unrelated patients with overlapping de novo interstitial microdeletions involving 5q14.3-q15. All three patients presented with severe psychomotor retardation, epilepsy or febrile seizures, muscular hypotonia and variable brain and minor anomalies. Molecular karyotyping revealed three overlapping microdeletions measuring 5.7, 3.9 and 3.6 Mb, respectively. The microdeletions were identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays (Affymetrix 100K and Illumina 550K) and array comparative genomic hybridization (1 Mb Sanger array-CGH). Confirmation and segregation studies were performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR. All three aberrations were confirmed and proven to have occurred de novo. The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the three patients were different, but an overlapping region of around 1.6 Mb in 5q14.3 was defined. It included five genes: CETN3, AC093510.2, POLR3G, LYSMD3 and the proximal part of GPR98/MASS1, a known epilepsy gene. Haploinsufficiency of GPR98/MASS1 is probably responsible for the seizure phenotype in our patients. At least one other gene contained in the commonly deleted region, LYSMD3, shows a high level of central nervous expression during embryogenesis and is also, therefore, a good candidate gene for other central nervous system (CNS) symptoms, such as psychomotor retardation, brain anomalies and muscular hypotonia of the 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19471318

  16. IDH1 and IDH2 Gene Mutations Identify Novel Molecular Subsets Within De Novo Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Maharry, Kati; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Holland, Kelsi B.; Whitman, Susan P.; Becker, Heiko; Schwind, Sebastian; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the frequency and associations with prognostic markers and outcome of mutations in IDH genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases in adult de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Diagnostic bone marrow or blood samples from 358 patients were analyzed for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations by DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification/sequencing. FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, WT1, and MLL mutational analyses and gene- and microRNA-expression profiling were performed centrally. Results IDH mutations were found in 33% of the patients. IDH1 mutations were detected in 49 patients (14%; 47 with R132). IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, were detected in 69 patients (19%; 13 with R172 and 56 with R140). R172 IDH2 mutations were mutually exclusive with all other prognostic mutations analyzed. Younger age (< 60 years), molecular low-risk (NPM1-mutated/FLT3-internal tandem duplication–negative) IDH1-mutated patients had shorter disease-free survival than molecular low-risk IDH1/IDH2-wild-type (wt) patients (P = .046). R172 IDH2-mutated patients had lower complete remission rates than IDH1/IDH2wt patients (P = .007). Distinctive microarray gene- and microRNA-expression profiles accurately predicted R172 IDH2 mutations. The highest expressed gene and microRNAs in R172 IDH2-mutated patients compared with the IDH1/IDH2wt patients were APP (previously associated with complex karyotype AML) and miR-1 and miR-133 (involved in embryonal stem-cell differentiation), respectively. Conclusion IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are recurrent in CN-AML and have an unfavorable impact on outcome. The R172 IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, characterize a novel subset of CN-AML patients lacking other prognostic mutations and associate with unique gene- and microRNA-expression profiles that may lead to the discovery of novel, therapeutically targetable leukemogenic mechanisms. PMID:20368543

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of the Abies alba genome and its relationship with other members of the Pinaceae.

    PubMed

    Puizina, J; Sviben, T; Krajacić-Sokol, I; Zoldos-Pećnik, V; Siljak-Yakovlev, S; Papes, D; Besendorfer, V

    2008-03-01

    Genome size, karyotype structure, heterochromatin distribution, position and number of ribosomal genes, as well as the ITS2 sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were analysed in silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). The analysis also included characterization of the Arabidopsis-type of telomeric repeats in silver fir and in related species. The results were compared with results from other species of the Pinaceae, to evaluate phylogeny and chromosomal and molecular evolution in the Pinaceae. Integrated chromosomal data provided insights into chromosome and karyotype evolution in the Pinaceae. The evolutionary trend for GC-rich heterochromatic blocks seems to involve loss of blocks that are not associated with rDNA. Similarly, numerous large blocks of interstitial plant telomeric repeats that are typical for all analysed species of the genus Pinus were not observed in the evolutionarily younger genera, such as Abies, Picea and Larix. On the contrary, the majority of telomeric sequences in these three genera appeared confined to the chromosome ends. We confirmed the current position of Abies and Tsuga in subfamily Abietoideae and the position of Pinus in the subfamily Pinoideae based on ITS2 sequences. Pseudotsuga is placed together with Larix into the subfamily Laricoideae. We conclude that the current position of the genus Picea in the subfamily Abietoideae should be reconsidered and, possibly, the genus Picea should be reclassified as a separate subfamily, Piceoideae, as recently proposed.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of a highly repeated DNA sequence in the peach potato aphid Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, M; Bizzaro, D; Manicardi, G C; Gionghi, D; Bassoli, L; Bianchi, U

    1999-12-01

    Electrophoresis following digestion of Myzus persicae genomic DNA with HindIII showed the presence of a prominent band of approximately 200 bp whereas a faint electrophoretic band corresponding to DNA fragments of about 3000 bp was observed after digestion with ApaI. In situ digestion with restriction enzymes, followed by in situ nick translation, showed that ApaI targets are localized at the nucleolus organizer-bearing X telomeric region, whereas HindIII restriction sites are clustered in intercalary C-positive areas on the same X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) carried out by using digoxygenin-labeled HindIII repeats as probe fully confirmed overlapping between the hybridization sites of this probe and the AT-rich intercalary heterochromatic bands on the X chromosome. These findings, together with published data, allow us to conclude that the M. persicae genome possesses three classes of C-positive heterochromatin: (i) a GC-rich argentophilic band located on one telomere of the X chromosome that contains ApaI targets; (ii) AT-rich intercalary bands located on the X chromosome containing clustered HindIII fragments; (iii) AT-rich telomeric bands located on autosomes, consisting of HaeIII repeats. Molecular analysis has shown that the length of the HindIII repeat consensus sequence is 189 bp with an AT content of 67%. Southern blotting with HindIII monomers revealed a regular ladder of bands composed of multimers of basic length that are characteristic of satellite DNAs. The HindIII repeat displays other features typical of eukaryotic satellite arrays such as overlapping with heterochromatic bands and a high degree of sequence similarity among monomers (84%-94%). A similarity plot showed that sequences were particularly variable in the 50-100 bp region whereas they proved to be highly conservative in the first 50 bp, thus suggesting that this portion of the repeat might be functionally important.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of 17 rob(13q14q) Robertsonian translocations by FISH, narrowing the region containing the breakpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J. Y.; Choo, K. H.; Shaffer, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized 17 rob(13q14q) Robertsonian translocations, using six molecular probes that hybridize to the repetitive sequences of the centromeric and shortarm regions of the five acrocentric chromosomes by FISH. The rearrangements include six de novo rearrangements and the chromosomally normal parents, five maternally and three paternally inherited translocations, and three translocations of unknown origin. The D21Z1/D13Z1 and D14Z1/D22Z1 centromeric alpha-satellite DNA probes showed all rob(13q14q) chromosomes to be dicentric. The rDNA probes did not show hybridization on any of the 17 cases studied. The pTRS-47 satellite III DNA probe specific for chromosomes 14 and 22 was retained around the breakpoints in all cases. However, the pTRS-63 satellite III DNA probe specific for chromosome 14 did not show any signals on the translocation chromosomes examined. In 16 of 17 translocations studied, strong hybridization signals on the translocations were detected with the pTRI-6 satellite I DNA probe specific for chromosome 13. All parents of the six de novo rob(13q14q), including one whose pTRI-6 sequence was lost, showed strong positive hybridization signals on each pair of chromosomes 14 and 13, with pTRS-47, pTRS-63, and pTRI-6. Therefore, the translocation breakpoints in the majority of rob(13q14q) are between the pTRS-47 and pTRS-63 sequences in the p11 region of chromosome 14 and between the pTRI-6 and rDNA sequences within the p11 region of chromosome 13. Images p[962]-a Figure 2 PMID:7977359

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Development and Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a Novel Wheat–Leymus mollis Lm#7Ns (7D) Disomic Substitution Line with Stripe Rust Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Changyou; Li, Xin; Chen, Chunhuan; Tian, Zengrong; Wang, Yajuan; Ji, Wanquan

    2015-01-01

    Leymus mollis (2n = 4x = 28, NsNsXmXm) possesses novel and important genes for resistance against multi-fungal diseases. The development of new wheat—L. mollis introgression lines is of great significance for wheat disease resistance breeding. M11003-3-1-15-8, a novel disomic substitution line of common wheat cv. 7182 –L. mollis, developed and selected from the BC1F5 progeny between wheat cv. 7182 and octoploid Tritileymus M47 (2n = 8x = 56, AABBDDNsNs), was characterized by morphological and cytogenetic identification, analysis of functional molecular markers, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)—genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and disease resistance evaluation. Cytological observations suggested that M11003-3-1-15-8 contained 42 chromosomes and formed 21 bivalents at meiotic metaphase I. The GISH investigations showed that line contained 40 wheat chromosomes and a pair of L. mollis chromosomes. EST-STS multiple loci markers and PLUG (PCR-based Landmark Unique Gene) markers confirmed that the introduced L. mollis chromosomes belonged to homoeologous group 7, it was designated as Lm#7Ns. While nulli-tetrasomic and sequential FISH-GISH analysis using the oligonucleotide Oligo-pSc119.2 and Oligo-pTa535 as probes revealed that the wheat 7D chromosomes were absent in M11003-3-1-15-8. Therefore, it was deduced that M11003-3-1-15-8 was a wheat–L. mollis Lm#7Ns (7D) disomic substitution line. Field disease resistance demonstrated that the introduced L. mollis chromosomes Lm#7Ns were responsible for the stripe rust resistance at the adult stage. Moreover, M11003-3-1-15-8 had a superior numbers of florets. The novel disomic substitution line M11003-3-1-15-8, could be exploited as an important genetic material in wheat resistance breeding programs and genetic resources. PMID:26465140

  2. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  3. Cytogenetic characterization of seven human cancer cell lines by combining G- and R-banding, M-FISH, CGH and chromosome- and locus-specific FISH.

    PubMed

    Cottier, Michèle; Tchirkov, Andrei; Perissel, Bernard; Giollant, Michel; Campos, Lydia; Vago, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Leukemia cell lines K562, KG1a, U937, HL60, Jurkat and solid tumor cell lines A549 and M4Beu are widely used in studies of cell cycle, apoptosis and adhesion mechanisms in cancer cells. Although the K562 and U937 cell lines were previously subjected to a detailed cytogenetic characterization, only a few molecular cytogenetic investigations have been performed on the other five cell lines. We combined several molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multicolor FISH (M-FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to demonstrate the precise genetic aberrations in tumor genomes of these seven cell lines. This information may be useful for multiple studies on these cell lines, providing a genetic basis for the interpretations of experimental findings.

  4. Airborne myxomycete spores: detection using molecular techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamono, Akiko; Kojima, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Jun; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Fukui, Manabu

    2009-01-01

    Myxomycetes are organisms characterized by a life cycle that includes a fruiting body stage. Myxomycete fruiting bodies contain spores, and wind dispersal of the spores is considered important for this organism to colonize new areas. In this study, the presence of airborne myxomycetes and the temporal changes in the myxomycete composition of atmospheric particles (aerosols) were investigated with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for Didymiaceae and Physaraceae. Twenty-one aerosol samples were collected on the roof of a three-story building located in Sapporo, Hokkaido Island, northern Japan. PCR analysis of DNA extracts from the aerosol samples indicated the presence of airborne myxomycetes in all the samples, except for the one collected during the snowfall season. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the PCR products showed seasonally varying banding patterns. The detected DGGE bands were subjected to sequence analyses, and four out of nine obtained sequences were identical to those of fruiting body samples collected in Hokkaido Island. It appears that the difference in the fruiting period of each species was correlated with the seasonal changes in the myxomycete composition of the aerosols. Molecular evidence shows that newly formed spores are released and dispersed in the air, suggesting that wind-driven dispersal of spores is an important process in the life history of myxomycetes. This study is the first to detect airborne myxomycetes with the use of molecular ecological analyses and to characterize their seasonal distribution.

  5. Hybrid opto-electric techniques for molecular diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Aeraj Ul

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid optoelectric techniques reflect a new paradigm in microfluidics. In essence, these are microfluidic techniques that employ a synergistic combination of optical and electrical forces to enable noninvasive manipulation of fluids and/or particle-type entities at the micro/nano-scale [1]. Synergy between optical and electrical forces bestows these techniques with several unique features that are promising to bring new opportunities in molecular diagnostics. Within the scope of molecular diagnostics, several aspects of optoelectric techniques promise to play a relevant role. These include, but are not limited to, sample preparation, sorting, purification, amplification and detection.

  6. Application of molecular techniques on heterotrophic hydrogen production research.

    PubMed

    Li, R Y; Zhang, T; Fang, H H P

    2011-09-01

    This paper reviews the application of molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies. Commonly used molecular techniques are introduced briefly first, including cloning-sequencing after polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative real-time PCR. Application of the molecular techniques in heterotrophic hydrogen production studies are discussed in details, focusing on identification of new isolates for hydrogen production, characterization of microbial compositions in bioreactors, monitoring microbial diversity variation, visualization of microbial distribution in hydrogen-producing granular sludge, and quantification of various microbial populations. Some significant findings in recent hydrogen production studies with the application of molecular techniques are discussed, followed by a research outlook of the heterotrophic biohydrogen field.

  7. 42 CFR 493.1276 - Standard: Clinical cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 493.1276 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of accessioning, cell preparation, photographing or other image reproduction technique, photographic... of cells counted and analyzed, and use the International System for Human Cytogenetic...

  8. Teaching Molecular Biological Techniques in a Research Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, John W.; Coggins, T. Chad

    2006-01-01

    Molecular biological methods, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis, are now commonly taught to students in introductory biology courses at the college and even high school levels. This often includes hands-on experience with one or more molecular techniques as part of a general biology laboratory. To assure that most…

  9. Analytical cytology applied to detection of induced cytogenetic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Straume, T.; Pinkel, D.

    1987-08-06

    Radiation-induced biological damage results in formation of a broad spectrum of cytogenetic changes such as translocations, dicentrics, ring chromosomes, and acentric fragments. A battery of analytical cytologic techniques are now emerging that promise to significantly improve the precision and ease with which these radiation induced cytogenetic changes can be quantified. This report summarizes techniques to facilitate analysis of the frequency of occurrence of structural and numerical aberrations in control and irradiated human cells. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Comparison of cytogenetic and molecular genetic data including parent of origin dependent methylation DNA patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.

    1996-01-11

    This letter to the editor discusses a recent study concerning the parent-of-origin methylation site at D15S63 and its application in molecular diagnostics confirming Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). It concludes that more research is needed to clear up questions which remain regarding the causation of PWS. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular Imprinting Techniques Used for the Preparation of Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-04

    Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among the most promising approaches for detection of several analytes. There are a variety of molecular imprinting techniques used for the preparation of biomimetic sensors including bulk imprinting, surface imprinting (soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization) and epitope imprinting. This chapter presents an overview of all of these techniques with examples from particular publications.

  12. Molecular Imprinting Techniques Used for the Preparation of Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among the most promising approaches for detection of several analytes. There are a variety of molecular imprinting techniques used for the preparation of biomimetic sensors including bulk imprinting, surface imprinting (soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization) and epitope imprinting. This chapter presents an overview of all of these techniques with examples from particular publications. PMID:28165419

  13. Utility and limitations of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique in the detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, D; Agarwal, M; Gupta, D; Agrawal, S; Das, V; Phadke, SR

    2016-01-01

    Background and Introduction: Chromosomal abnormality is found in about half of first-trimester abortions. Karyotype is the gold standard to detect chromosomal abnormalities. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) offers advantage over karyotype in terms of lower failure rate, faster turnaround time, and much higher resolution than conventional karyotyping and found to be 98% concordant with conventional karyotype. Aim: We performed this study to look for the utility of MLPA in diagnosing chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester abortions. Materials and Methods: MLPA using subtelomeric SALSA probe sets (P036 and P070) was used to detect cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception in missed/spontaneous abortions. Results: A total of ninety abortus samples were analyzed by MLPA. Successful results were provided in (67) 74.4% of the cases while no conclusion could be drawn in 25.6% (23) of the cases. Fifty-five (82.1%) cases were cytogenetically normal and 17.9% (12) had some abnormality. Aneuploidy was detected in 8 (66.7%) cases, 3 (25%) had double-segment imbalance, and one (8.3%) had partial aneuploidy. Conclusion: We suggest that MLPA is a good substitute to traditional karyotype. PMID:27763481

  14. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  15. Cytogenetic analysis of three species of Pseudacteon (Diptera, Phoridae) parasitoids of the fire ants using standard and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Pseudacteon flies, parasitoids of worker ants, are being intensively studied as potentially effective agents in the biological control of the invasive pest fire ant genus Solenopsis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). This is the first attempt to describe the karyotype of P. curvatus Borgmeier, P. nocens Borgmeier and P. tricuspis Borgmeier. The three species possess 2n = 6; chromosomes I and II were metacentric in the three species, but chromosome pair III was subtelocentric in P. curvatus and P. tricuspis, and telocentric in P. nocens. All three species possess a C positive band in chromosome II, lack C positive heterochromatin on chromosome I, and are mostly differentiated with respect to chromosome III. P. curvatus and P. tricuspis possess a C positive band, but at different locations, whereas this band is absent in P. nocens. Heterochromatic bands are neither AT nor GC rich as revealed by fluorescent banding. In situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe revealed a signal on chromosome II in a similar location to the C positive band in the three species. The apparent lack of morphologically distinct sex chromosomes is consistent with proposals of environmental sex determination in the genus. Small differences detected in chromosome length and morphology suggests that chromosomes have been highly conserved during the evolutionary radiation of Pseudacteon. Possible mechanisms of karyotype evolution in the three species are suggested. PMID:21637448

  16. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation in clinical cytogenetics.

    PubMed Central

    Hulten, M A; Gould, C P; Goldman, A S; Waters, J J

    1991-01-01

    The use of chromosome in situ suppression hybridisation with whole chromosome libraries has previously been reported by various research laboratories to be an effective method of identifying specific human chromosomal material. As a clinical cytogenetic service laboratory we have used the technique as a complement to diagnosis by classical chromosome banding. In three examples of structural rearrangements the potential use of the 'chromosome painting' method is assessed for its ability to enhance the routine cytogenetic service currently available. Images PMID:1956055

  17. LS-CAP: an algorithm for identifying cytogenetic aberrations in hepatocellular carcinoma using microarray data.

    PubMed

    He, Xianmin; Wei, Qing; Sun, Meiqian; Fu, Xuping; Fan, Sichang; Li, Yao

    2006-05-01

    Biological techniques such as Array-Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and affymetrix single nucleotide pleomorphism (SNP) array have been used to detect cytogenetic aberrations. However, on genomic scale, these techniques are labor intensive and time consuming. Comparative genomic microarray analysis (CGMA) has been used to identify cytogenetic changes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using gene expression microarray data. However, CGMA algorithm can not give precise localization of aberrations, fails to identify small cytogenetic changes, and exhibits false negatives and positives. Locally un-weighted smoothing cytogenetic aberrations prediction (LS-CAP) based on local smoothing and binomial distribution can be expected to address these problems. LS-CAP algorithm was built and used on HCC microarray profiles. Eighteen cytogenetic abnormalities were identified, among them 5 were reported previously, and 12 were proven by CGH studies. LS-CAP effectively reduced the false negatives and positives, and precisely located small fragments with cytogenetic aberrations.

  18. Comparison between two FISH techniques in the in vitro study of cytogenetic markers for low-dose X-ray exposure in human primary fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, D.; Berardinelli, F.; Antoccia, A.; Tanzarella, C.; Sgura, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    This work is about the setup of an in vitro system to report low-dose of X-rays as measured as cytogenetic damage. Q- and multicolor FISH (m-FISH), for telomere length and chromosome instability analysis, respectively, were compared to evaluate their sensitivity in the low-dose range in human primary fibroblasts. No telomere length modulation was observed up to 1 Gy in cycling fibroblasts, though reported for high doses, by that frustrating the purpose of using it as a low-exposure marker. To date the m-FISH is the best setup for the assessment of the chromosome structural damage: it allows stable and instable aberrations to be detected all over the karyotype. Stable ones such as balanced translocations, are not eliminated due to cell-cycle as unstable ones, so they are considered transmissible markers for retrospective dosimetry. The induction of chromosome damage showed a clear dependence on dose delivered; unstable aberrations were demonstrated after doses of 0.1 Gy, and stable aberrations after doses higher than 0.5 Gy. Summarizing, q-FISH is unfit to report low exposures while m-FISH provides better results: unstable aberrations are sensible short-term reporters, while stable ones long report exposures but with a higher induction threshold. PMID:23908663

  19. Prognostic Significance of the European LeukemiaNet Standardized System for Reporting Cytogenetic and Molecular Alterations in Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Krzysztof; Marcucci, Guido; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Becker, Heiko; Whitman, Susan P.; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Pettenati, Mark J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Block, AnneMarie W.; Patil, Shivanand R.; Baer, Maria R.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Moore, Joseph O.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Stone, Richard M.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic significance of the international European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines for reporting genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods We analyzed 1,550 adults with primary AML, treated on Cancer and Leukemia Group B first-line trials, who had pretreatment cytogenetics and, for cytogenetically normal patients, mutational status of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 available. We compared complete remission (CR) rates, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) among patients classified into the four ELN genetic groups (favorable, intermediate-I, intermediate-II, adverse) separately for 818 younger (age < 60 years) and 732 older (age ≥ 60 years) patients. Results The percentages of younger versus older patients in the favorable (41% v 20%; P < .001), intermediate-II (19% v 30%; P < .001), and adverse (22% v 31%; P < .001) genetic groups differed. The favorable group had the best and the adverse group the worst CR rates, DFS, and OS in both age groups. Both intermediate groups had significantly worse outcomes than the favorable but better than the adverse group. Intermediate-I and intermediate-II groups in older patients had similar outcomes, whereas the intermediate-II group in younger patients had better OS but not better CR rates or DFS than the intermediate-I group. The prognostic significance of ELN classification was confirmed by multivariable analyses. For each ELN group, older patients had worse outcomes than younger patients. Conclusion The ELN classification clearly separates the genetic groups by outcome, supporting its use for risk stratification in clinical trials. Because they have different proportions of genetic alterations and outcomes, younger and older patients should be reported separately when using the ELN classification. PMID:22987078

  20. Phase behaviors of polymer solutions using molecular simulation technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2008-08-14

    Phase behaviors of polymer solutions are estimated using a combination of thermodynamic models and molecular simulation technique. In general, many parameters of binary systems are determined by fitting a thermodynamic model with experimental data. In this study, we obtained all parameters using molecular simulation. To take the specific interaction into account, we assume that it only occurs between a solvent molecule and a specific group. Our results show that the theoretical treatment accounting for the specific interaction gives more accurate predictions than those without consideration of specific interaction. Also, our approach describes the phase equilibria of various polymer solutions over the entire concentration remarkably well.

  1. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  2. Overview of Clinical Cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Patrick R; Carroll, Andrew J; Korf, Bruce R

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome analysis is one of the first approaches to genetic testing and remains a key component of genetic analysis of constitutional and somatic genetic disorders. Numerical or unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities usually lead to multiple congenital anomalies. Sometimes these are compatible with live birth, usually resulting in severe cognitive and physical handicaps; other times they result in miscarriage or stillbirth. Chromosome rearrangements also occur as somatic changes in malignancies. Identification of constitutional chromosomal anomalies (anomalies present in most or all cells of the body and/or the germline) can provide important information for genetic counseling. In this unit, we introduce chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), which is a relatively recent addition to cytogenetic technologies, and has become the recommended first-tier testing method for patients with developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism, and/or multiple congenital anomalies. We also discuss non-invasive prenatal testing/screening (NIPTS), which uses circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma to rapidly screen for autosomal and sex-chromosome aneuploidies. Cytogenetic analysis of tumors is helpful in diagnosis and in monitoring the effects of treatment. The protocols in this chapter cover the clinical study of chromosomes in nonmalignant tissues.

  3. Evolutionary cytogenetics in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Stanley K

    2008-01-01

    Salamanders (Amphibia: Caudata/Urodela) have been the subject of numerous cytogenetic studies, and data on karyotypes and genome sizes are available for most groups. Salamanders show a more-or-less distinct dichotomy between families with large chromosome numbers and interspecific variation in chromosome number, relative size, and shape (i.e. position of the centromere), and those that exhibit very little variation in these karyological features. This dichotomy is the basis of a major model of karyotype evolution in salamanders involving a kind of 'karyotypic orthoselection'. Salamanders are also characterized by extremely large genomes (in terms of absolute mass of nuclear DNA) and extensive variation in genome size (and overall size of the chromosomes), which transcends variation in chromosome number and shape. The biological significance and evolution of chromosome number and shape within the karyotype is not yet understood, but genome size variation has been found to have strong phenotypic, biogeographic, and phylogenetic correlates that reveal information about the biological significance of this cytogenetic variable. Urodeles also present the advantage of only 10 families and less than 600 species, which facilitates the analysis of patterns within the entire order. The purpose of this review is to present a summary of what is currently known about overall patterns of variation in karyology and genome size in salamanders. These patterns are discussed within an evolutionary context.

  4. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Put, Stéphanie; Westhovens, René; Lahoutte, Tony; Matthys, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ₃ integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein.

  5. Cytogenetics in the management of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Bilhou-Nabéra, Chrystèle; Bidet, Audrey; Eclache, Virginie; Lippert, Eric; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle

    2016-10-01

    The recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in the molecular characterization of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Beside a better understanding of pathophysiology, these abnormalities often constitute very useful diagnostic markers in diseases where exclusion of reactive states used to be the strongest argument. However, conventional and molecular cytogenetics keep a major interest in MPN, either as a second line exploration, in cases where no molecular marker is available, for differential diagnosis or as a proof of clonality or in first line for cases with hyperleukocytosis, for differential diagnosis (CML), to evidence druggable targets (ABL1, RET, PDGFR…) or as a prognosis marker. In this article, we will review the interest of cytogenetic techniques in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  6. Cytogenetic and Molecular Evidence of Additional Cryptic Diversity in High Elevation Black fly Simulium feuerborni (Diptera: Simuliidae) Populations in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Pramual, Pairot; Thaijarern, Jiraporn; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Hadi, Upik Kesumawati; Takaoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Simulium feuerborni Edwards is geographically widespread in Southeast Asia. Previous cytogenetic study in Thailand revealed that this species is a species complex composed of two cytoforms (A and B). In this study, we cytologically examined specimens obtained from the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia, and Puncak, Java, Indonesia. The results revealed two additional cytoforms (C and D) of S. feuerborni. Specimens from Malaysia represent cytoform C, differentiated from other cytoforms by a fixed chromosome inversion on the long arm of chromosome III (IIIL-5). High frequencies of the B chromosome (33-83%) were also observed in this cytoform. Specimens from Indonesia represent the cytoform D. This cytoform is differentiated from others by a fixed chromosome inversion difference on the long arm of chromosome II (IIL-4). Mitochondrial DNA sequences support genetic differentiation among cytoforms A, B, and C. The pairwise F(ST) values among these cytoforms were highly significantly consistent with the divergent lineages of the cytoforms in a median-joining haplotype network. However, a lack of the sympatric populations prevented us from testing the species status of the cytoforms.

  7. Clinical and molecular-cytogenetic evaluation of a family with partial Jacobsen syndrome without thrombocytopenia caused by an approximately 5 Mb deletion del(11)(q24.3).

    PubMed

    Bernaciak, Joanna; Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Derwińska, Katarzyna; Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Bocian, Ewa; Sasiadek, Maria Małgorzata; Makowska, Izabela; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Smigiel, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Clinical manifestations of Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) depend on the size of the 11qter deletion, which usually varies between approximately 7 and 20 Mb. Typical JBS features include developmental delay/mental retardation, short stature, congenital heart defects, thrombocytopenia, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features. We report on a family in which a 4-year-old girl as well as her mother and maternal uncle present with subtle features of JBS. Notably, neither thrombocytopenia nor congenital anomalies were detected in this family. Cytogenetic analyses revealed normal karyotypes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and whole-genome oligonucleotide array CGH analyses, we identified an approximately 5 Mb deletion of the terminal part of chromosome 11q in all the three affected family members. The deletion breakpoint was mapped between 129,511,419 and 129,519,794 bp. This is the smallest deletion reported in a JBS patient. Interestingly, the FLI1 (friend leukemia virus integration 1) hematopoiesis factor gene located approximately 6.5 Mb from 11qter and usually deleted in patients with JBS, is intact. Our data support previous hypotheses that FLI1 haploinsufficiency is responsible for thrombocytopenia in patients with JBS.

  8. Comparative genomic hybridization in clinical cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bryndorf, T.; Kirchhoff, M.; Rose, H.

    1995-11-01

    We report the results of applying comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a cytogenetic service laboratory for (1) determination of the origin of extra and missing chromosomal material in intricate cases of unbalanced aberrations and (2) detection of common prenatal numerical chromosome aberrations. A total of 11 fetal samples were analyzed. Seven cases of complex unbalanced aberrations that could not be identified reliably by conventional cytogenetics were successfully resolved by CGH analysis. CGH results were validated by using FISH with chromosome-specific probes. Four cases representing common prenatal numerical aberrations (trisomy 21, 18, and 13 and monosomy X) were also successfully diagnosed by CGH. We conclude that CGH is a powerful adjunct to traditional cytogenetic techniques that makes it possible to solve clinical cases of intricate unbalanced aberrations in a single hybridization. CGH may also be a useful adjunct to screen for euchromatic involvement in marker chromosomes. Further technical development may render CGH applicable for routine aberration screening. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Analysis of Copy Number Variations in Patients with Autism Using Cytogenetic and MLPA Techniques: Report of 16p13.1p13.3 and 10q26.3 Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi Firouzabadi, Saghar; Vameghi, Roshanak; Kariminejad, Roxana; Darvish, Hossein; Banihashemi, Susan; Firouzkouhi Moghaddam, Mahboubeh; Jamali, Peyman; Farbod Mofidi Tehrani, Hassan; Dehghani, Hossein; Raeisoon, Mohammad Reza; Narooie-Nejad, Mehrnaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Tafakhori, Abbas; Sadabadi, Saeid; Behjati, Farkhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a common neuropsychiatric disorder affecting 1 in 68 children. Copy number variations (CNVs) are known to be major contributors of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There are different whole genome or targeted techniques to identify CNVs in the patients including karyotyping, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array CGH. In this study, we used karyotyping and MLPA to detect CNVs in 50 Iranian patients with autism. GTG banding and 4 different MLPA kits (2 subtelomeric and 2 autism kits) were utilized. To elevate our detection rate, we selected the sporadic patients who had additional clinical features including intellectual disability, seizure, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and abnormal head circumference. Two out of 50 patients (4%) showed microscopic chromosome abnormalities and 5 out of 50 (10%) demonstrated copy number gains or losses using MLPA kits. Including one overlapping result between karyotype and MLPA techniques, our overall detection rate was 6 out of 50 (12%). Three out of 6 CNVs were de novo and three others were paternally inherited. Two of CNVs detected by karyotyping and MLPA tests were 16p13.1q13.3 and 10q26.3 duplications, respectively. For these two CNVs genotype and phenotype of the patients were compared with other studies. Although the pathogenicity of cytogenetic results was certain, most of MLPA results needed to be better refined using other more accurate techniques such as array CGH. Our findings suggest that it might be possible to obtain some useful information using MLPA technique but it cannot be used as a single diagnostic tool for the autism. PMID:28357200

  10. Analysis of Copy Number Variations in Patients with Autism Using Cytogenetic and MLPA Techniques: Report of 16p13.1p13.3 and 10q26.3 Duplications.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi Firouzabadi, Saghar; Vameghi, Roshanak; Kariminejad, Roxana; Darvish, Hossein; Banihashemi, Susan; Firouzkouhi Moghaddam, Mahboubeh; Jamali, Peyman; Farbod Mofidi Tehrani, Hassan; Dehghani, Hossein; Raeisoon, Mohammad Reza; Narooie-Nejad, Mehrnaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Tafakhori, Abbas; Sadabadi, Saeid; Behjati, Farkhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a common neuropsychiatric disorder affecting 1 in 68 children. Copy number variations (CNVs) are known to be major contributors of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There are different whole genome or targeted techniques to identify CNVs in the patients including karyotyping, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array CGH. In this study, we used karyotyping and MLPA to detect CNVs in 50 Iranian patients with autism. GTG banding and 4 different MLPA kits (2 subtelomeric and 2 autism kits) were utilized. To elevate our detection rate, we selected the sporadic patients who had additional clinical features including intellectual disability, seizure, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and abnormal head circumference. Two out of 50 patients (4%) showed microscopic chromosome abnormalities and 5 out of 50 (10%) demonstrated copy number gains or losses using MLPA kits. Including one overlapping result between karyotype and MLPA techniques, our overall detection rate was 6 out of 50 (12%). Three out of 6 CNVs were de novo and three others were paternally inherited. Two of CNVs detected by karyotyping and MLPA tests were 16p13.1q13.3 and 10q26.3 duplications, respectively. For these two CNVs genotype and phenotype of the patients were compared with other studies. Although the pathogenicity of cytogenetic results was certain, most of MLPA results needed to be better refined using other more accurate techniques such as array CGH. Our findings suggest that it might be possible to obtain some useful information using MLPA technique but it cannot be used as a single diagnostic tool for the autism.

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymers for on-line extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Moein, Mohammad M; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as a sorbent for different extraction methods and this is due to its high selectivity. The MIP is designed to show specificity for the analyte of interest. Moreover, MIPs show physical robustness, resistance to high temperatures and pressures, and stability in the presence of acids, bases and a wide range of organic solvents. In the present article, various novel sample preparation techniques which MIPs applied as sorbent and on-line connected with analytical instruments were highlighted and discussed. The future aspects of MIPs as well were described.

  12. Delineation of the dup5q phenotype by molecular cytogenetic analysis in a patient with dup5q/del 5p (cri du chat).

    PubMed

    Levy, Brynn; Dunn, Teresa M; Kern, Jeffrey H; Hirschhorn, Kurt; Kardon, Nataline B

    2002-03-15

    An infant girl presented with multiple congenital abnormalities and a distinctive mewing cry. Her karyotype was 46,XX,add5p. Chromosome analysis on the mother revealed an apparently balanced pericentric inversion of chromosome 5, with the precise position of the breakpoints not clearly discernable by GTG banding, 46,XX,inv(5)(p15.2/3?q35.1?). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies using a commercial cri du chat probe (D5S721,D5S23) revealed signals on both the normal and derivative chromosomes. Telomeric probes specific for 5p and 5q were used to confirm the pericentric inversion in the mother and demonstrated the loss of the terminal 5p region and a duplication of the terminal 5q region in the proband. The imbalance on chromosome 5 in the patient was further defined using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), which revealed a loss of material from 5p15.3 --> pter and a gain of 5q34 --> qter. The presence of the cat-like cry appears to be the only specific feature that can be linked to the loss of 5p material. The remaining dysmorphic features of this infant appear to be due specifically to the duplication of the 5q sequences. The combination of FISH, CGH, and cytogenetics has confirmed that the characteristic cry of the cri du chat syndrome is due to the deletion of the most distal part of the classic del 5p region. More importantly, our investigation has defined the duplication of 5q34 --> qter as a distinct clinical phenotype.

  13. Hybrid molecular-continuum techniques for micro and nano flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Jason; Ritos, Konstantinos; Borg, Matthew; Lockerby, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    Nano- and micro-confined fluid flows are often characterised by non-continuum effects that require special treatment beyond the scope of conventional continuum-fluid modelling. However, if the flow system has high-aspect-ratio components (e.g. long narrow channels) the computational cost of a fully molecular-based simulation can be prohibitive. In this talk we present some important elements of a heterogeneous molecular-continuum method that exploits the various degrees of scale separation in both time and space that are very often present in these types of flows. We demonstrate the ability of these techniques to predict the flow of water in aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes: the tube diameters are 1-2 nm and the tube lengths (i.e. the membrane thicknesses) are 2-6 orders of magnitude larger. We compare our results with experimental data. We also find very good agreement with experimental results for a 1 mm thick membrane that has CNTs of diameter 1.59 nm. In this case, our hybrid multiscale simulation is orders of magnitude faster than a full molecular dynamics simulation.

  14. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-05-02

    The molecular genetic tools used in fission yeast have generally been adapted from methods and approaches developed for use in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Initially, the molecular genetics of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was developed to aid gene identification, but it is now applied extensively to the analysis of gene function and the manipulation of noncoding sequences that affect chromosome dynamics. Much current research using fission yeast thus relies on the basic processes of introducing DNA into the organism and the extraction of DNA for subsequent analysis. Targeted integration into specific genomic loci is often used to create site-specific mutants or changes to noncoding regulatory elements for subsequent phenotypic analysis. It is also regularly used to introduce additional sequences that generate tagged proteins or to create strains in which the levels of wild-type protein can be manipulated through transcriptional regulation and/or protein degradation. Here, we draw together a collection of core molecular genetic techniques that underpin much of modern research using S. pombe We summarize the most useful methods that are routinely used and provide guidance, learned from experience, for the successful application of these methods.

  15. Cytogenetic Assessment of the Rat Cell Line CLS-ACI-1: An in vitro Cell Model for Mycn Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Meles, Susana; Adega, Filomena; Castro, João; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the establishment of cell models in order to properly study the disease at the molecular and cellular level is of utmost importance. Here, we present the cytogenetic characterization and gene expression analysis of the tumoral mammary rat cell line CLS-ACI-1. The use of banding and molecular cytogenetic techniques allowed the description of the complex CLS-ACI-1 karyotype and the identification of breakpoints in clonal chromosome rearrangements. Moreover, a Mycn and Erbb2 comparative expression analysis by RT-qPCR was performed, revealing a high expression level of Mycn in CLS-ACI-1 cells. Moreover, a considerable number of putative mutated genes and chromosome alterations detected through cytogenetic analysis seem to be in the MYCN biological network. Therefore, the CLS-ACI-1 cell line is presented as a promising cell model for the study of the role of MYCN in breast cancer and also as a tool for developing appropriate cancer therapies, namely for Mycn targeting.

  16. Cytogenetic and Molecular Data Support the Occurrence of Three Gymnotus Species (Gymnotiformes: Gymnotidae) Used as Live Bait in Corumbá, Brazil: Implications for Conservation and Management of Professional Fishing.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Tatiane Pires; Marques, Débora Karla Silvestre; Vitorino, Carla de Andrade; Faria, Karina de Cassia; Braga, Gisele da Silva Ferreira; Ferreira, Daniela Cristina; Venere, Paulo Cesar

    2017-04-01

    In the Pantanal of Mato Grosso do Sul, electric fish (Gymnotus spp.) are the primary source of live bait, accounting for more than three-quarters of total sales. Based on chromosomal and molecular markers, the present study attempted to identify the Gymnotus species used as bait in the region of Corumbá, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Three species were detected, based on their distinct karyotypes: G. paraguensis (2n = 54), G. sylvius (2n = 40), and G. pantanal (2n = 39-40, X1X2Y/X1X1X2X2), with no evidence being found of interspecific hybrids. All three species presented a single nucleolar organizer regions (NOR) (heterochromatin CMA3(+)/DAPI(-)) and pericentromeric heterochromatin in almost all chromosomes, with a few distal and/or interstitial blocks. G. sylvius and G. pantanal had one and two pairs of chromosomes with 5S rDNA sites, respectively, while G. paraguensis had 17 chromosome pairs with these markers. The three species formed well-defined clusters in the DNA barcoding analysis. The integrated analysis of the cytogenetic and DNA barcoding data confirmed that the diversity of Gymnotus species exploited as live bait in the study region has been underestimated. These findings indicate that the markers analyzed represent valuable tools for the conservation and fishery management of the Gymnotus stocks exploited.

  17. Highly species-specific centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in lizards: molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel family of satellite DNA sequences isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota).

    PubMed

    Chaiprasertsri, Nampech; Uno, Yoshinobu; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Charernsuk, Saranon; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Koga, Akihiko; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2013-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, VSAREP1 and VSAREP2, were isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota) and characterized using molecular cytogenetics. The respective lengths and guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of the sequences were 190 bp and 57.5% for VSAREP1 and 185 bp and 59.7% for VSAREP2, and both elements were tandemly arrayed as satellite DNA in the genome. VSAREP1 and VSAREP2 were each located at the C-positive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2q, the centromeric region of chromosome 5, and 3 pairs of microchromosomes. This suggests that genomic compartmentalization between macro- and microchromosomes might not have occurred in the centromeric repetitive sequences of V. salvator macromaculatus. These 2 sequences did only hybridize to genomic DNA of V. salvator macromaculatus, but no signal was observed even for other squamate reptiles, including Varanus exanthematicus, which is a closely related species of V. salvator macromaculatus. These results suggest that these sequences were differentiated rapidly or were specifically amplified in the V. salvator macromaculatus genome.

  18. Diagnosis of Whipple's disease using molecular biology techniques.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ángel; Ojeda, Evelia; Muñagorri, Ana I; Gaminde, Eduardo; Bujanda, Luis; Larzabal, Mikel; Gil, Inés

    2011-04-01

    The diagnosis of Whipple's disease (WD) is based on the existence of clinical signs and symptoms compatible with the disease and in the presence of PAS-positive diastase-resistant granules in the macrophages of the small intestine. If there is suspicion of the disease but no histological findings or only isolated extraintestinal manifestations, species-specific PCR using different sequences of the T. whippleii genome from different tissue types and biological fluids is recommended.This study reports two cases: the first patient had diarrhea and the disease was suspected after an endoscopic examination of the ileum, while the second patient had multi-systemic manifestations,particularly abdominal, thoracic, and peripheral lymphadenopathies. In both cases, the diagnosis was confirmed using molecular biology techniques to samples from the small intestine or from a retroperineal lymph node, respectively.

  19. Is Having Clonal Cytogenetic Abnormalities the Same as Having Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Farina, Mirko; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Daniella; Marchina, Eleonora; Gale, Robert Peter

    2016-01-01

    A finding of cytogenetic abnormalities, even when these are clonal and even when the abnormalities are typically associated with leukaemia, is not the same as a person having leukaemia. We describe a person who had acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and achieved a complete haematological remission and who then had persistent and transient clonal cytogenetic abnormalities for 22 years but no recurrence of leukaemia. These data suggest that clones of myeloid cells with mutations and capable of expanding to levels detectable by routine cytogenetic analyses do not all eventuate in leukaemia, even after a prolonged observation interval. The possibility of incorrectly diagnosing a person as having leukaemia becomes even greater when employing more sensitive techniques to detect mutations such as by polymerase chain reaction and whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing. Caution is needed when interpreting clonal abnormalities in AML patients with normal blood and bone marrow parameters.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of HIG, a novel human cell line carrying t(1;3)(p36.3;q25.3) established from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriko; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Tohru; Hangaishi, Akira; Wang, Lili; Qiao, Ying; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kogi, Mieko; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving 1p36, 3q21, and/or 3q26 have been reported in a subset of myeloid neoplasms having characteristic dysmegakaryopoiesis, and the overexpression of EVI1 on 3q26 or of MEL1 on 1p36 has been implicated in their pathogenesis. We describe molecular cytogenetic analyses of a novel human cell line, HIG, established from a unique case in which a novel translocation t(1;3)(p36;q26) appeared as the sole additional chromosomal abnormality at the time of blastic transformation of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient displayed clinical features resembling those of the 3q21q26 syndrome. The HIG cell line retained der(1)t(1;3)(p36;q26) but lost t(9;22)(q34;q11). To identify the relevant gene that would be deregulated by this translocation, we molecularly cloned the translocation's breakpoints. They were distant from the breakpoint cluster regions of the 3q21q26 syndrome or t(1;3)(p36;q21), and neither the EVI1 nor the MEL1 transcript was detected in the HIG cell line. None of the genes located within 150 kilobase pairs of the breakpoints were aberrantly expressed, suggesting that in this case other gene(s) more distant from the breakpoints are deregulated by possible remote effects. Further analyses of the deregulated genes in the HIG cell line should provide important insight into the mechanisms involved in these types of leukemias.

  1. Modeling large RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles using molecular mechanics techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, A; Tan, R K; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    There is a growing body of low-resolution structural data that can be utilized to devise structural models for large RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. These models are routinely built manually. We introduce an automated refinement protocol to utilize such data for building low-resolution three-dimensional models using the tools of molecular mechanics. In addition to specifying the positions of each nucleotide, the protocol provides quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in those positions, i.e., the resolution of the model. In typical applications, the resolution of the models is about 10-20 A. Our method uses reduced representations and allows us to refine three-dimensional structures of systems as big as the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, which are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than nucleic acids that can be examined by traditional all-atom modeling methods. Nonatomic resolution structural data--secondary structure, chemical cross-links, chemical and enzymatic footprinting patterns, protein positions, solvent accessibility, and so on--are combined with known motifs in RNA structure to predict low-resolution models of large RNAs. These structural constraints are imposed on the RNA chain using molecular mechanics-type potential functions with parameters based on the quality of experimental data. Surface potential functions are used to incorporate shape and positional data from electron microscopy image reconstruction experiments into our models. The structures are optimized using techniques of energy refinement to get RNA folding patterns. In addition to providing a consensus model, the method finds the range of models consistent with the data, which allows quantitative evaluation of the resolution of the model. The method also identifies conflicts in the experimental data. Although our protocol is aimed at much larger RNAs, we illustrate these techniques using the tRNA structure as an example and test-bed. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7521223

  2. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques for Marchantia polymorpha Research.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    Liverworts occupy a basal position in the evolution of land plants, and are a key group to address a wide variety of questions in plant biology. Marchantia polymorpha is a common, easily cultivated, dioecious liverwort species, and is emerging as an experimental model organism. The haploid gametophytic generation dominates the diploid sporophytic generation in its life cycle. Genetically homogeneous lines in the gametophyte generation can be established easily and propagated through asexual reproduction, which aids genetic and biochemical experiments. Owing to its dioecy, male and female sexual organs are formed in separate individuals, which enables crossing in a fully controlled manner. Reproductive growth can be induced at the desired times under laboratory conditions, which helps genetic analysis. The developmental process from a single-celled spore to a multicellular body can be observed directly in detail. As a model organism, molecular techniques for M. polymorpha are well developed; for example, simple and efficient protocols of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation have been established. Based on them, various strategies for molecular genetics, such as introduction of reporter constructs, overexpression, gene silencing and targeted gene modification, are available. Herein, we describe the technologies and resources for reverse and forward genetics in M. polymorpha, which offer an excellent experimental platform to study the evolution and diversity of regulatory systems in land plants.

  3. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  4. Cytogenetic characterization of cat eye syndrome marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Wenger, S L; Surti, U; Nwokoro, N A; Steele, M W

    1994-01-01

    Cat eye syndrome is associated with a partial tetrasomy 22q and can be inherited. The authors have evaluated the marker chromosome in a proband and his mother by cytogenetic banding techniques to verify the dicentric chromosomal rearrangement and by fluorescence in situ hybridization to confirm the involvement of 22. The mother also had an affected offspring with an unrelated aneuploidy, trisomy 21.

  5. Taxonomic review of the species of Mugil (Teleostei: Perciformes: Mugilidae) from the Atlantic South Caribbean and South America, with integration of morphological, cytogenetic and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Naércio A; Nirchio, Mauro; De Oliveira, Cláudio; Siccharamirez, Raquel

    2015-01-10

    Analysis of morphological, molecular and cytological data helped to define and more precisely characterize the species of Mugil from the Atlantic coasts of South Caribbean and South America, allowing a correction of prior misidentifications and distributional ranges. A new species from Venezuela is described and all the species from the area are redescribed. It is demonstrated that the apparent similarity in morphological traits, which contradicted the results from recent molecular studies, is the result of the misuse of traditional morphological characters, and thus both the molecular and cytological data instead are congruent with the morphological differences that are found among mullet species. The presence of Mugil hospes Jordan & Culver in the western south Atlantic is refuted based on the comparison of type material of this species with specimens from this area that also indicated a very significant morphological difference, what on the other hand justifies the recognition of these specimens as Mugil brevirostris (Ribeiro). The distribution of Mugil incilis Hancock is restricted and the similarities among the species formerly depicted in a prior dendrogram is modified following the inclusion of recently obtained molecular data for Mugil curvidens Valenciennes.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) with Xyp sex determination system using standard staining, C-bands, NOR and synaptonemal complex microspreading techniques.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, M C; Zacaro, A A; Cella, D M

    2000-01-01

    The mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of the beetles Epicauta atomaria (Meloidae) and Palembus dermestoides (Tenebrionidae) were analysed using standard staining, C-banding and silver impregnation techniques. We determine the diploid and haploid chromosome numbers, the sex determination system and describe the chromosomal morphology, the C-banding pattern and the chromosome(s) bearing NORs (nucleolar organizer regions). Both species shown 2n = 20 chromosomes, the chromosomal meioformula 9 + Xyp, and regular chromosome segregation during anaphases I and II. The chromosomes of E. atomaria are basically metacentric or submetacentric and P. dermestoides chromosomes are submetacentric or subtelocentric. In both beetles the constitutive heterochromatin is located in the pericentromeric region in all autosomes and in the Xp chromosome; additional C-bands were observed in telomeric region of the short arm in some autosomes in P. dermestoides. The yp chromosome did not show typical C-bands in these species. As for the synaptonemal complex, the nucleolar material is associated to the 7th bivalent in E. atomaria and 3rd and 7th bivalents in P. dermestoides. Strong silver impregnated material was observed in association with Xyp in light and electron microscopy preparations in these species and this material was interpreted to be related to nucleolar material.

  7. [Benefit of human gamete cytogenetics: results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Vialard, F; Pellestor, F

    2008-09-01

    In man, the incidence of reproductive failures is high and chromosomal abnormalities remains the major cause of pregnancy wastage. The advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques and assisted reproduction technology have brought forth new approaches for the chromosomal analysis of human oocytes and spermatozoa. The oocyte analyses have evidenced the high rate of chromosomal abnormalities in women and identified premature separation of sister chromatid as a major mechanism in aneuploidy occurrence. High frequencies of aneuploidy have been found in various groups of women, such as patients over 35 or 38 years old, patients with recurrent implantation failures or recurrent miscarriages. The polar body analysis has confirmed the major contribution of premature separation of sister chromatids in aneuploidies and the effect of maternal ageing on its occurrence. In spermatozoa, the efficient adaptation of in situ chromosomal detection techniques has facilitated the segregation analysis of chromosomal abnormalities. Despite the consensus observed in sperm studies of robertsonnian translocations and inversions, new data are required for accurate estimates of imbalances in various types of structural rearrangements. For infertile patients with normal karyotypes, there is significant increase in aneuploidy frequencies, which can be extremely elevated in some groups of subjects, such as patients with large headed spermatozoa syndrome.

  8. Cytogenetic studies of small ape (Hylobatidae) chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Stanyon, R

    2013-01-01

    Each genus of small apes has a highly distinctive karyotype (karyomorph) at every level of cytogenetic analysis. Early workers using classical staining and banding had problems integrating the karyolocial data with that of other primates. Chromosome painting allowed syntenic homology maps to be constructed for each of the four karyomorphs (2n = 38, 44, 50 and 52). They revealed that the great apes and Old World monkeys had strongly conserved karyotypes while those of small apes were highly rearranged. However, they provided contradictory phylogenetic results to other bio-molecular tree of small ape evolution. More recently BAC-FISH investigations using a panel of about 900 BACs defined each breakpoint by spanning or flanking BAC clones The syntenic map was refined and now includes small segments of homology which had previously gone undected, marker order (synteny block orientation) and the location of ancestral and Evolutionarily New Centromeres. However, the BAC-FISH data similar to other biomolecular methods used up to now could not resolve the phylogenetic tree of hylobatids. These difficulties may be explained by the rapid divergence of crown hylobatids, reticulate evolution and incomplete lineage sorting. The lack of significant cytogenetic landmarks at the nodes of the gibbon tree could indicate that chromosomal rearrangements did not play a primary role in hylobatid speciation.

  9. Whole-arm translocation of der(5;17)(p10;q10) with concurrent TP53 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS): A unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Hao, Suyang; Patel, Keyur P; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lin, Pei; Lu, Xinyan

    2016-05-01

    Der(5;17)(p10;q10) is a recurrent but rare aberration reported in myeloid neoplasms (MNs). We report 48 such patients including 19 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 29 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), to characterize their clinicopathological features. There were 29 men and 19 women, with a median age of 61 years (range, 18-80). 62.5% patients had therapy-related diseases (t-MNs), 70.8% had multilineage dysplasia and 83.3% showed complex karyotypes. In 39 patients tested, FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, KIT were all wild type and NRAS, KRAS, IDH1, APC, TET2 mutations were detected in single case(s) respectively. TP53 mutations were identified in 8 of 10 cases (80%) tested. Median disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3 and 10 months, respectively and did not differ between AML or MDS cases, or between de novo versus therapy-related cases, or between the groups with or without complex karyotypes. In 19 patients who achieved complete remission after chemotherapy, and in 9 patients who underwent stem cell transplantation, the OS was better (14 and 17.5 months, P = 0.0128 and P = 0.0086, respectively). The der(5;17)(p10;q10) represents a unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup in t-MNs and, associated with complex karyotypes. TP53 inactivation, resulting from 17p deletion coupled with TP53 mutation, likely contributes to the poor clinical outcome of these patients.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  11. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic studies in ten patients with hematological malignancies characterized by t(20;21)(q11;q11) resulted from del(20q).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Shuxiao; Yao, Jianxin; Qiu, Huiying; Xue, Yongquan; Chen, Suning; Wu, Yafang; Shen, Juan; Pan, Jinlan

    2016-10-01

    This study reports 10 patients with hematological malignances with t(20;21)(q11;q11) resulting from del(20q) (for example, der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) and der(21)t(20;21)(q11;q11)) and described their clinical features and the possible prognostic significance of this abnormality. The t(20;21)(q11;q11) was a rare but recurrent abnormality secondary to del(20q) besides i(20q-). The frequency of der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) among our patients with del(20q) was 2.4%. It was considered that the 20q deletion preceded translocation with chromosome 21. This abnormality is often cryptic, occurs predominantly in older men and is observed most often in myelodysplastic syndromes. Patients with this abnormality have an unfavorable prognosis, similar to patients with i(20q-). The molecular consequences of der(20)del(20)(q11q13)t(20;21)(q11;q11) may be different from patients with i(20q-). To the best of our knowledge this is the largest dataset published to date.

  12. B chromosomes: from cytogenetics to systems biology.

    PubMed

    Valente, Guilherme T; Nakajima, Rafael T; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Marques, Diego F; Almeida, Rodrigo O; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2017-02-01

    Though hundreds to thousands of reports have described the distribution of B chromosomes among diverse eukaryote groups, a comprehensive theory of their biological role has not yet clearly emerged. B chromosomes are classically understood as a sea of repetitive DNA sequences that are poor in genes and are maintained by a parasitic-drive mechanism during cell division. Recent developments in high-throughput DNA/RNA analyses have increased the resolution of B chromosome biology beyond those of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods; B chromosomes contain many transcriptionally active sequences, including genes, and can modulate the activity of autosomal genes. Furthermore, the most recent knowledge obtained from omics analyses, which is associated with a systemic view, has demonstrated that B chromosomes can influence cell biology in a complex way, possibly favoring their own maintenance and perpetuation.

  13. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of the European Hake Merluccius merluccius (Merlucciidae, Gadiformes): U1 and U2 snRNA Gene Clusters Map to the Same Location.

    PubMed

    García-Souto, Daniel; Troncoso, Tomás; Pérez, Montse; Pasantes, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The European hake (Merluccius merluccius) is a highly valuable and intensely fished species in which a long-term alive stock has been established in captivity for aquaculture purposes. Due to their huge economic importance, genetic studies on hakes were mostly focused on phylogenetic and phylogeographic aspects; however chromosome numbers are still not described for any of the fifteen species in the genus Merluccius. In this work we report a chromosome number of 2n = 42 and a karyotype composed of three meta/submetacentric and 18 subtelo/telocentric chromosome pairs. Telomeric sequences appear exclusively at both ends of every single chromosome. Concerning rRNA genes, this species show a single 45S rDNA cluster at an intercalary location on the long arm of subtelocentric chromosome pair 12; the single 5S rDNA cluster is also intercalary to the long arm of chromosome pair 4. While U2 snRNA gene clusters map to a single subcentromeric position on chromosome pair 13, U1 snRNA gene clusters seem to appear on almost all chromosome pairs, but showing bigger clusters on pairs 5, 13, 16, 17 and 19. The brightest signals on pair 13 are coincident with the single U2 snRNA gene cluster signals. Therefore, the use of these probes allows the unequivocal identification of at least 7 of the chromosome pairs that compose the karyotype of Merluccius merluccius thus opening the way to integrate molecular genetics and cytological data on the study of the genome of this important species.

  14. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of the European Hake Merluccius merluccius (Merlucciidae, Gadiformes): U1 and U2 snRNA Gene Clusters Map to the Same Location

    PubMed Central

    García-Souto, Daniel; Troncoso, Tomás; Pérez, Montse; Pasantes, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The European hake (Merluccius merluccius) is a highly valuable and intensely fished species in which a long-term alive stock has been established in captivity for aquaculture purposes. Due to their huge economic importance, genetic studies on hakes were mostly focused on phylogenetic and phylogeographic aspects; however chromosome numbers are still not described for any of the fifteen species in the genus Merluccius. In this work we report a chromosome number of 2n = 42 and a karyotype composed of three meta/submetacentric and 18 subtelo/telocentric chromosome pairs. Telomeric sequences appear exclusively at both ends of every single chromosome. Concerning rRNA genes, this species show a single 45S rDNA cluster at an intercalary location on the long arm of subtelocentric chromosome pair 12; the single 5S rDNA cluster is also intercalary to the long arm of chromosome pair 4. While U2 snRNA gene clusters map to a single subcentromeric position on chromosome pair 13, U1 snRNA gene clusters seem to appear on almost all chromosome pairs, but showing bigger clusters on pairs 5, 13, 16, 17 and 19. The brightest signals on pair 13 are coincident with the single U2 snRNA gene cluster signals. Therefore, the use of these probes allows the unequivocal identification of at least 7 of the chromosome pairs that compose the karyotype of Merluccius merluccius thus opening the way to integrate molecular genetics and cytological data on the study of the genome of this important species. PMID:26716701

  15. Genomic Alteration in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) Cell Lines Inferred from Karyotyping, Molecular Cytogenetics, and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rerkarmnuaychoke, Budsaba; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Fu, Beiyuan; Bodhisuwan, Winai; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Yang, Fengtang; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was studied in two cell line pairs (HN30-HN31 and HN4-HN12) using conventional C-banding, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). HN30 and HN4 were derived from primary lesions in the pharynx and base of tongue, respectively, and HN31 and HN12 were derived from lymph-node metastatic lesions belonging to the same patients. Gain of chromosome 1, 7, and 11 were shared in almost all cell lines. Hierarchical clustering revealed that HN31 was closely related to HN4, which shared eight chromosome alteration cases. Large C-positive heterochromatins were found in the centromeric region of chromosome 9 in HN31 and HN4, which suggests complex structural amplification of the repetitive sequence. Array CGH revealed amplification of 7p22.3p11.2, 8q11.23q12.1, and 14q32.33 in all cell lines involved with tumorigenesis and inflammation genes. The amplification of 2p21 (SIX3), 11p15.5 (H19), and 11q21q22.3 (MAML2, PGR, TRPC6, and MMP family) regions, and deletion of 9p23 (PTPRD) and 16q23.1 (WWOX) regions were identified in HN31 and HN12. Interestingly, partial loss of PTPRD (9p23) and WWOX (16q23.1) genes was identified in HN31 and HN12, and the level of gene expression tended to be the down-regulation of PTPRD, with no detectable expression of the WWOX gene. This suggests that the scarcity of PTPRD and WWOX genes might have played an important role in progression of HNSCC, and could be considered as a target for cancer therapy or a biomarker in molecular pathology. PMID:27501229

  16. Tumor functional and molecular imaging utilizing ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical techniques.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques.

  17. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  18. [AML treatment strategy based on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to morphological and histocytochemical analyses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), data on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations are used for classification of AML. The risk stratification based on these examinations facilitates determining the treatment strategy for AML. Cytogenetic risk category definitions by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), and The Medical Research Council (MRC) classify AML patients into favorable, intermediate, and adverse groups. Approximately 80% of patients in the intermediate group have a normal karyotype and the importance of molecular genetic analyses in these patients is increasing. Somatic mutations of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 are known to be related to the prognosis of AML patients. The European LeukemiaNet (ELN) introduced risk stratification for AML patients based on cytogenetic abnormalities and NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 mutations. This risk stratification can be used to select only chemotherapy or chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as consolidation therapy for individual AML patients. Development of molecular targeted therapies against FLT3 or IDH mutations is in progress and these novel therapies are expected to contribute to improving the prognosis of AML patients.

  19. Molecular alignment and orientation with a hybrid Raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Lausten, R.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for the preparation of molecular alignment and angular momentum orientation using a hybrid combination of two limits of Raman scattering. First a weak, impulsive pump pulse initializes the system via the nonresonant dynamic Stark effect. Then, having overcome the influence of the vacuum fluctuations, an amplification pulse selectively enhances the initial coherences by transient stimulated Raman scattering, generating alignment and angular momentum orientation of molecular hydrogen. The amplitude and phase of the resulting coherent dynamics are experimentally probed, indicating an amplification factor of 4.5. An analytic theory is developed to model the dynamics.

  20. Molecular Cytogenetics of Human Single Pronucleated Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ana Raquel; Pinho, Maria João; Silva, Joaquina; Sá, Rosália; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig; Barros, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to use fluorescence in situ hybridization to analyze the chromosome status of zygotes with a single pronucleus from in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment cycles. In addition, we performed immunocytochemical detection of nuclear lamins and histone H3 trimethylated at lysine-9, Me(3)H3K9. Zygotes were processed 24 hours after insemination or injection to assure the absence of asynchrony. In opposition to previous results, we observed 2 pronuclei in 16 of 18 IVF zygotes and 40 of 64 ICSI zygotes, suggesting premature pronuclear breakdown. In IVF and ICSI zygotes, the rate of normal diploidy was only 6 of 16 and 27 of 56, respectively, suggesting that monopronucleated zygotes should not be used in assisted reproductive treatments. The possible mechanisms are discussed and compared to previous studies of monopronucleated zygotes. PMID:24717739

  1. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Telomere Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christa Lese; Ledbetter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imbalances involving the telomeric regions of human chromosomes, which contain the highest gene concentration in the genome, are proposed to have severe phenotypic consequences. For this reason, it is important to identify telomere rearrangements and assess their contribution to human pathology. This unit describes the structure and function of human telomeres and outlines several FISH-based methodologies that can be employed to study these unique regions of human chromosomes. It is a revision of the original version of the unit published in 2000, now including an introductory section describing advances in the discipline that have taken place since the original publication. PMID:25599669

  2. The Use of Molecular Techniques at Hazardous Waste Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is clear that typical protocols used for soil analysis would certainly fail to adequately interrogate ground-water treatment systems unless they were substantially modified. The modifications found necessary to compensate for the low biomass include molecular tools and techniq...

  3. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  4. Cytogenetics in the management of multiple myeloma: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Daudignon, Agnès; Quilichini, Benoît; Ameye, Geneviève; Poirel, Hélène; Bastard, Christian; Terré, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetics of multiple myeloma has evolved in recent years by the emergence of Interphasic fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) performed on sorted plasma cells detecting abnormalities independently of a proliferative and infiltrative index. Cytogenetic analysis plays a major part in the risk stratification of myeloma diagnosis due to prognostic impact of various cytogenetic abnormalities as well as to the association between emerging therapeutic approaches in MM. Thus, practice guidelines now recommend interphasic FISH or alternative molecular technics as the initial analysis for multiple myeloma. The Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH) proposes in this issue an update of managing multiple myeloma cytogenetics.

  5. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  6. Phosphoproteomics and molecular cardiology: techniques, applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zeyu; Hamilton, Karyn L; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been widely documented as a key regulatory and signaling mechanism associated with many cardiac diseases. Recent advances in phosphoproteomic technologies such as phosphopeptide enrichment, novel mass spectrometry applications, and bioinformatic tools have resulted in high-throughput identification and quantitation of protein phosphorylation in a global manner. This review summarizes mainstream phosphoproteomic workflows and highlights the most recent applications of phosphoproteomics used in a range of molecular cardiology research.

  7. Molecular Probes in Marine Ecology: Concepts, Techniques and Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-16

    bacterial Woody Hastings: bioluminescence . 20 Wed. Paul Dunlap: The lux genes in bacteria : organization, structure, and expression. 21 Thurs. Chuck...probes for microbial identification. Ken Nealson: Taxonomy physiology and distribution of marine bioluminescent bacteria . 10 Tues. Ann Bucklin: Allozymic...cuponsored with the microbiology course, the first of these being on bioluminescence and symbiosis on July 7, and the second on molecular approaches to

  8. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Techniques for Person Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrero, Salvador; Ivorra, Jose Luis; Garcia-Sogo, Magdalena; Martinez-Cortina, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Using the traditional serological tests and the most novel techniques for DNA fingerprinting, forensic scientists scan different traits that vary from person to person and use the data to include or exclude suspects based on matching with the evidence obtained in a criminal case. Although the forensic application of these methods is well known,…

  9. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces using molecular beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Thermal energy molecular beams have been used to study chemical interactions with metal surfaces. Chemisorption of simple molecules such as H2, O2, CH4, C2Hx and CO was investigated on single and polycrystalline surfaces of Pt, Ni, Co, and Ag. Kinetic parameters and reaction mechanisms were determined for model catalytic reactions including CO and C2Hx oxidation and methanation from H2/CO mixtures. Chemical reactions of NOx with CO and D2 on Pt(111) and other surfaces have been surveyed and the kinetics of NO and O2 chemisorption have been measured. The theory of adsorption/desorption kinetics is reviewed and certain deficiencies identified.

  10. Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Rasmussen, John C

    2008-01-01

    We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine.

  11. Assessment of knowledge of participants on basic molecular biology techniques after 5-day intensive molecular biology training workshops in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Yisau, J I; Adagbada, A O; Bamidele, T; Fowora, M; Brai, B I C; Adebesin, O; Bamidele, M; Fesobi, T; Nwaokorie, F O; Ajayi, A; Smith, S I

    2017-02-01

    The deployment of molecular biology techniques for diagnosis and research in Nigeria is faced with a number of challenges, including the cost of equipment and reagents coupled with the dearth of personnel skilled in the procedures and handling of equipment. Short molecular biology training workshops were conducted at the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), to improve the knowledge and skills of laboratory personnel and academics in health, research, and educational facilities. Five-day molecular biology workshops were conducted annually between 2011 and 2014, with participants drawn from health, research facilities, and the academia. The courses consisted of theoretical and practical sessions. The impact of the workshops on knowledge and skill acquisition was evaluated by pre- and post-tests which consisted of 25 multiple choice and other questions. Sixty-five participants took part in the workshops. The mean knowledge of molecular biology as evaluated by the pre- and post-test assessments were 8.4 (95% CI 7.6-9.1) and 13.0 (95 CI 11.9-14.1), respectively. The mean post-test score was significantly greater than the mean pre-test score (p < 0.0001). The five-day molecular biology workshop significantly increased the knowledge and skills of participants in molecular biology techniques. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  12. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  13. Using "Pseudomonas Putida xylE" Gene to Teach Molecular Cloning Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xu; Xin, Yi; Ye, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a serial experiment in molecular cloning laboratory course for undergraduate students majored in biotechnology. "Pseudomonas putida xylE" gene, encoding catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase, was manipulated to learn molecular biology techniques. The integration of cloning, expression, and enzyme assay gave students…

  14. Molecular techniques in the diagnosis of deep and systemic mycosis.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jan; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Making an early and sensitive diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in high-risk patients is mandatory, because it has major consequences on the effectiveness of antifungal therapy. Molecular assays have the potential to become the cornerstone of diagnosis, allowing for rapid, reliable detection of minute amounts of fungal DNA in various specimens at a low cost. PCR is gaining popularity as the platforms become more automated and commercially available; however, further studies are needed to explore the diagnostic value in patient subgroups (ie, children) and to define whether the underlying disease or the use of antifungal prophylaxis may influence assay results. Individualized management of high-risk patients would be desirable to integrate preemptive therapy strategies, and individual host and genetic factors. Pharmacological and epidemiological considerations should also be evaluated.

  15. Improved Molecular Technique for the Differentiation of Neotropical Anopheline Species

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Ryan; Rios, Carlos Tong; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Gilman, Robert H.; Florin, David; Sifuentes, Victor Lopez; Greffa, Roldan Cardenas; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Fernandez, Roberto; Portocarrero, Daniel Velasquez; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Kosek, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a PCR-RFLP of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) to distinguish species of Anopheles commonly reported in the Amazon and validated this method using reared F1 offspring. The following species of Anopheles were used for molecular analysis: An. (Nys.) benarrochi, An. (Nys.) darlingi, An. (Nys.) nuneztovari, An. (Nys.) konderi, An. (Nys.) rangeli, and An. (Nys.) triannulatus sensu lato (s.l.). In addition, three species of the subgenus Anopheles, An. (Ano.) forattini, An. (Ano.) mattogrossensis, and An. (Ano.) peryassui were included for testing. Each of the nine species tested yielded diagnostic banding patterns. The PCR-RFLP method was successful in identifying all life stages including exuviae with small fractions of the sample. The assay is rapid and can be applied as an unbiased confirmatory method for identification of morphologic variants, disputed samples, imperfectly preserved specimens, and life stages from which taxonomic keys do not allow for definitive species determination. PMID:18337348

  16. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion.

  17. Array comparative genomic hybridization and cytogenetic analysis in pediatric acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A J; Yanofsky, R; Vallente, R; Bal, S; Schroedter, I; Liang, L; Mai, S

    2011-10-01

    Most patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (all) are reported to have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in their leukemic bone marrow cells. Many established chromosome rearrangements have been described, and their associations with specific clinical, biologic, and prognostic features are well defined. However, approximately 30% of pediatric and 50% of adult patients with all do not have cytogenetic abnormalities of clinical significance. Despite significant improvements in outcome for pediatric all, therapy fails in approximately 25% of patients, and these failures often occur unpredictably in patients with a favorable prognosis and "good" cytogenetics at diagnosis.It is well known that karyotype analysis in hematologic malignancies, although genome-wide, is limited because of altered cell kinetics (mitotic rate), a propensity of leukemic blasts to undergo apoptosis in culture, overgrowth by normal cells, and chromosomes of poor quality in the abnormal clone. Array comparative genomic hybridization (acgh-"microarray") has a greatly increased genomic resolution over classical cytogenetics. Cytogenetic microarray, which uses genomic dna, is a powerful tool in the analysis of unbalanced chromosome rearrangements, such as copy number gains and losses, and it is the method of choice when the mitotic index is low and the quality of metaphases is suboptimal. The copy number profile obtained by microarray is often called a "molecular karyotype."In the present study, microarray was applied to 9 retrospective cases of pediatric all either with initial high-risk features or with at least 1 relapse. The conventional karyotype was compared to the "molecular karyotype" to assess abnormalities as interpreted by classical cytogenetics. Not only were previously undetected chromosome losses and gains identified by microarray, but several karyotypes interpreted by classical cytogenetics were shown to be discordant with the microarray results. The complementary use of microarray

  18. Complex cytogenetic abnormalities including telomeric associations and MEN1 mutation in a pediatric ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Colmenero, I; Madero, L; Robledo, M; Martínez-Delgado, B; Benítez, J

    2002-10-15

    Ependymomas are neuroectodermal tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Some recurrent cytogenetic aberrations have been reported in these tumors, including alterations involving chromosomes 22, 6, and 11. However, consistent molecular alterations have not been identified in ependymal tumors. We studied a recurrent ependymoma in a 3-year-old patient by standard cytogenetic and molecular analysis of TP53 and MEN1 genes. In the present case, we found many of the cytogenetic features previously described as being recurrent in ependymomas, including unstable telomeric alterations. Furthermore, we detected a novel acquired heterozygous mutation in the MEN1 gene. The chromosomal instability produced by the telomeric alterations and the mutation in the MEN1 gene could be important events in the tumorigenesis of ependymomas.

  19. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  20. Techniques for studying protein trafficking and molecular motors in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shanxi; Arnold, Don B.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on techniques that facilitate the visualization of protein trafficking. In the mid-1990’s the cloning of GFP allowed fluorescently tagged proteins to be expressed in cells and then visualized in real time. This advance allowed a glimpse, for the first time, of the complex system within cells for distributing proteins. It quickly became apparent, however, that time-lapse sequences of exogenously expressed GFP-labeled proteins can be difficult to interpret. Reasons for this include the relatively low signal that comes from moving proteins and high background rates from stationary proteins and other sources, as well as the difficulty of identifying the origins and destinations of specific vesicular carriers. In this review we will examine a range of techniques that have overcome these issues to varying degrees and discuss the insights into protein trafficking that they have enabled. We will concentrate on neurons, as they are highly polarized and, thus, their trafficking systems tend to be accessible for study. PMID:26800506

  1. Bioluminescence: a versatile technique for imaging cellular and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Miranda A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a ubiquitous imaging modality for visualizing biological processes in vivo. This technique employs visible light and interfaces readily with most cell and tissue types, making it a versatile technology for preclinical studies. Here we review basic bioluminescence imaging principles, along with applications of the technology that are relevant to the medicinal chemistry community. These include noninvasive cell tracking experiments, analyses of protein function, and methods to visualize small molecule metabolites. In each section, we also discuss how bioluminescent tools have revealed insights into experimental therapies and aided drug discovery. Last, we highlight the development of new bioluminescent tools that will enable more sensitive and multi-component imaging experiments and, thus, expand our broader understanding of living systems. PMID:27594981

  2. Advanced Techniques for Constrained Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Balaraman, Gouthaman S.; Niesen, Michiel J. M.; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed in order to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this paper we have designed a new framework for 1) initializing velocities for non-independent CICMD coordinates, 2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, 3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and 4) cancelling out the “flying ice cube effect” that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this paper, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided “freezing and thawing” of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during MD simulations, and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion. PMID:23345138

  3. Usefulness of molecular techniques to identify ongoing tuberculosis transmission in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajoj, Sahal A; Mohammed, Viqaruddin K; Al-Hokail, Abdullah A

    2007-02-01

    This study represents the first time that molecular tracing techniques have been used to identify patterns of tuberculosis TB infection in Saudi Arabia. The 2 strains were isolated from a socio-economically advantage family who share a number of common facilities including a car and a driver. There are several factors that may play vital roles in on-going transmission of TB in Saudi Arabia including a high number of expatriates, the Hajj pilgrimage, and the social habits of Saudi citizens. Our sibling case series is believed to be a frequent pattern of disease transmission in this country. Control measures such as health education, active case finding, and prompt and supervised medical treatment are needed. More studies using molecular techniques are recommended to find the incidence of cross infection in Saudi Arabia. In addition, molecular techniques have to be established in all reference laboratories to help the detection of ongoing active transmission, molecular epidemiology and detect sources of infection.

  4. Ocular findings in cytogenetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W A; Alfi, O S; Donnell, G N

    1979-06-01

    Several cytogenetic syndromes are reviewed, and the salient ocular and facial abnormalities that might lead to a diagnosis are pointed out. Examples are given of mongoloid slant to the palpebral fissures, not only in Down's syndrome, but also in monosomy 9p, where, in addition, the triangular skull is almost diagnostic. Antimongoloid slant is found in trisomy 9p, where the eyes also have enophthalmos of monosomy 9p. Hypertelorism is another common finding in these syndromes; in monosomy 5p it is almost always present, although it occurs in other conditions as well, including trisomy 12p. The ring 22 syndrome has a distinguishing finding called "doe's eyes" because of the shape of the palpebral fissures. Trisomy 13 has numerous ocular findings as well as skull and facial involvements.

  5. Molecular techniques for studying gene expression in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2002-11-01

    Many genes and signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, death, differentiation, and genomic integrity are involved in cancer development. Various methods are available for detection and quantification of messenger RNA. Older methods such as Northern blots, nuclease protection, plaque hybridization, and slot blots suffer from being inherently serial, measure a single mRNA at a time, or being difficult to automate. New techniques for analysis of gene expression include: (a) comprehensive open systems such as serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), differential display (DD) analysis, RNA arbitrarily primer (RAP)-PCR, restriction endonucleolytic analysis of differentially expressed sequences (READS), amplified restriction fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP), total gene expression analysis (TOGA), and use of internal standard competitive template primers (CTs) in a quantitative multiplex RT-PCR method [StaRT-(PCR)], and (b) focused closed systems such as: high density cDNA filter hybridization (HDFCA) analysis, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), differential screening (DS), several forms of high-density cDNA arrays, or oligonucleotide chips, and tissue microarrays. Sometimes, a combination of these systems is used to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the assays. While closed systems are excellent for the initial screening of large number of sequences, the value of the information generated is generally limited to an often arbitrarily chosen known sequence. On the other hand, only the open system platform has the potential to evaluate the expression patterns of tens of thousands of genes that have not yet been cloned or partially sequenced in a quantitative manner. A cost analysis of the most commonly used expression technologies is provided. A method for purifying tumors from surrounding stroma and normal tissue employing laser microdissection, and subsequent RNA isolation/amplification from few cells employing sensitive kits are also

  6. [New molecular methods in prenatal invasive diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Łaczmańska, Izabela; Stembalska, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic techniques employed in laboratories all over the world enable to create new tests for prenatal genetic diagnosis. They include cytogenetics, molecular-cytogenetics and molecular methods. Chromosomal numerical aberrations (aneuploidies) remain to be the most frequent genetic changes diagnosed prenatally Therefore, our paper presents the latest methods used mainly in prenatal diagnosis of the most common chromosome numerical changes, as well as other methods applicable in detecting chromosome structural changes or gene mutations. One of the main advantages of these new approaches is the short period of time needed to obtain a result. Some of these techniques are used world-wide: QF-PCR (Fluorescence Quantitive Polymerase Chain Reaction)--based on the analysis of the short polymorphic sequences characteristic for each individual; MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification)--based on the probes ligation to complementary genomic fragments in patient DNA; microarray CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridization)--based on genomic hybridization to microarray, which enables analysis of the entire genome. Other new methods are also gradually introduced to invasive prenatal diagnosis: NGS (Next-generation DNA sequencing)--for the analysis of the whole genome at the DNA level; BoBs (BACS-on-Beads)--molecular-cytogenetic technique based on hybridization of probes immobilized on polystyrene microspheres with fetal DNA. Nowadays, rapid diagnosis of the most common chromosomal aneuploidies is not a standard procedure in Poland, as opposed to cytogenetics (karyotyping). However, for specific clinical indications, fast and reliable methods of genetic analysis present are likely to become standard procedures in prenatal diagnosis.

  7. Cytogenetic risk stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Costa, Dolors; Solé, Francesc; Vallespí, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Calasanz, María J.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Nomdedeu, Benet; Mallo, Mar; Carbonell, Felix; Bueno, Javier; Ardanaz, María T.; Ramos, Fernando; Tormo, Mar; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Gómez, Valle; Marco, Victor; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Pedro, Carmen; Bernal, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of cytogenetic findings in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the independent prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia included in the database of the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Design and Methods We studied 414 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia according to WHO criteria and with a successful conventional cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. Different patient and disease characteristics were examined by univariate and multivariate methods to establish their relationship with overall survival and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Results Patients with abnormal karyotype (110 patients, 27%) had poorer overall survival (P=0.001) and higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution (P=0.010). Based on outcome analysis, three cytogenetic risk categories were identified: low risk (normal karyotype or loss of Y chromosome as a single anomaly), high risk (presence of trisomy 8 or abnormalities of chromosome 7, or complex karyotype), and intermediate risk (all other abnormalities). Overall survival at five years for patients in the low, intermediate, and high risk cytogenetic categories was 35%, 26%, and 4%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that this new CMML-specific cytogenetic risk stratification was an independent prognostic variable for overall survival (P=0.001). Additionally, patients belonging to the high-risk cytogenetic category also had a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution on univariate (P=0.001) but not multivariate analysis. Conclusions Cytogenetic findings have a strong prognostic impact in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. PMID:21109693

  8. Cytogenetic investigations of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wren, Catherine; Moriarty, Helen; Marsden, Katherine; Tegg, Elizabeth

    2010-04-15

    This study aimed to determine which culture method would yield the highest culture success rate, mitotic index, banding resolution, and abnormality rate in investigation of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A range of culture techniques for conventional cytogenetic (CC) analyses was compared: 24-hour unstimulated, 72 hours incubation with additional fetal calf serum, 72 hours stimulation with interleukin 4, 72 hours stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 72 hours stimulation with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate), and 72 hours stimulation with CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 + Interleukin-2 (IL-2). CC abnormality rates were also compared to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results using probes for CLL (LSI D13S319/13q34/CEP 12: LSI ATM/p53). Forty-five samples from 24 patients (consisting of 11 newly diagnosed and 13 previously diagnosed patients) were included. For CC, a 100.0% culture success rate was achieved (n = 45) by means of an EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) peripheral blood sample with an associated 62.5% CC abnormality rate (n = 24). FISH detected an abnormality rate of 75.0% (n = 24). The combined CC and FISH abnormality rate was 87.5% (n = 24). This study demonstrates that CC that uses TPA and DSP30 + IL-2 on EDTA peripheral blood is effective in the investigation of CLL and may be used as a supplement to FISH studies.

  9. Cytogenetic Investigation in a Group of Ten Infertile Men with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia: First Algerian 46, XX Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BAZIZ, Meriem; HAMOULI-SAID, Zohra; RATBI, Ilham; HABEL, Mohamed; GUAOUA, Soukaina; SBITI, Aziza; SEFIANI, Abdelaziz

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Algeria, the data on infertility and its various causes are rare. Recently, the introduction of assisted reproduction has allowed expecting that 300000 couples, which represent 7% of couples of reproductive age, face difficulty conceiving a child. Knowing that most idiopathic cases are likely to be due to chromosomal abnormalities, we aimed to investigate genetic defects by karyotype analysis in Algerian infertile men, using peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: A cytogenetic study was conducted on 10 men from infertile couples by Karyotype analysis of R-banding performed by lymphocyte culture technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed and molecular abnormalities were investigated by polymerase chain reaction. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were evaluated by immunoradiometric method. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 30% of the patients. We identified a homogenous Klinefelter syndrome patient with 47, XXY karyotype, a mosaic Klinefelter syndrome patient with 47, XXY/46, XY karyotype and a 46, XX male. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the sex-determining region Y was translocated to the short arm of the X chromosome in patient with 46, XX chromosomal constitution and the presence of the SRY gene was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and electrophoresis. Conclusion: The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 30% of the infertile men strongly supports the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing for diagnostic establishment and suitable counseling for couples seeking for assisted reproduction technologies. PMID:27648416

  10. New insight into biodegradation of polylactide (PLA)/clay nanocomposites using molecular ecological techniques.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Parveen; Way, Cameron; Wu, Dong-Yang

    2009-07-07

    Novel molecular ecological techniques were used to study changes in microbial community structure and population during degradation of polylactide (PLA)/organically modified layered silicates (OMLS) nanocomposites. Cloned gene sequences belonging to members of the phyla Actinobacteria and Ascomycota comprized the most dominant groups of microorganisms during biodegradation of PLA/OMLS nanocomposites. Due to their numerical abundance, members of these microbial groups are likely to play an important role during biodegradation process. This paper presents new insights into the biodegradability of PLA/OMLS nanocomposites and highlights the importance of using novel molecular ecological techniques for in situ identification of new microorganisms involved in biodegradation of polymeric materials.

  11. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  12. [Molecular techniques for cyanobacteria detection at Riogrande II and La Fe water reservoirs, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alarcón, Julio César; Polanía-Vorenberg, Jaime

    2014-03-01

    In lentic water bodies as reservoirs occur eutrophication processes, originated mainly from human activities (i.e. agriculture, animal exploitation). This influx of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems could promote blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The purpose of this work is to detect the presence of cyanobacteria strains in water samples, using molecular techniques to help in preventive management of reservoirs dedicated to water purification. We used two molecular techniques to detect genes implied with the synthesis of hepatotoxic microcystins from potentially toxic cyanobacteria strains, and to evaluate the molecular diversity of cyanobacteria in water samples from two high-mountain reservoirs used for purification of drinking water for the metropolitan area of Medellin, Colombia. Between 2010-2011 collections of 12 water samples were taken and DNA extraction together with PCR and DGGE analyses where carried out. We amplified 22 sequences between 250-300bp of the genes mcyA and mcyE, and these sequences were related with several strains and cyanobacteria genera accessions from NCBI-GenBank databases. Moreover, sequence amplifications of the 16S small ribosomal RNA subunit - 16S rRNA- between 400-800bp were also performed in order to use them for the DGGE technique. The amplification products of DGGE were set in polyacrilamide gel with posterior denaturing electrophoresis, and the scanned images of the gel bands were analysed with the software GelCompar II. For Riogrande II and La Fe reservoirs we found 35 and 30 different DGGE bands, respectively, as a measurement of molecular diversity in these artificial ecosystems. Here, we demonstrated the utility of two molecular techniques for the detection of genes associated with toxicity and molecular diversity of cyanobacteria in reservoirs destined for drinking water in urban centers. We recommend strongly following with periodically molecular biology studies in these ecosystems combined with limnological and

  13. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  14. Cytogenetic analysis in a large series of children with non-syndromic mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Mougou-Zrelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Gadour, Naoufel; Harrabi, Imed; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Mental retardation affects 1–3% of the population. To evaluate the implication of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of mental retardation, 1420 patients with non-syndromic mental retardation recruited at the department of cytogenetics of Farhat Hached hospital (Sousse, Tunisia) between January 2005 and December 2009, were analyzed using standard cytogenetic techniques. Age ranged between 3 and 18 years with a median of 8 years. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 7.8% of patients and an increased prevalence of chromosome anomalies was observed in patients when the mental retardation is associated with a severe degree of intellectual disability, facial dysmorphic features and/or congenital malformations or epilepsy. PMID:27625819

  15. Cytogenetic analysis in a large series of children with non-syndromic mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Bouhjar, Inesse Ben Abdallah; Gmidène, Abir; Mougou-Zrelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Soyah, Najla; Gadour, Naoufel; Harrabi, Imed; Elghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Mental retardation affects 1-3% of the population. To evaluate the implication of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of mental retardation, 1420 patients with non-syndromic mental retardation recruited at the department of cytogenetics of Farhat Hached hospital (Sousse, Tunisia) between January 2005 and December 2009, were analyzed using standard cytogenetic techniques. Age ranged between 3 and 18 years with a median of 8 years. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 7.8% of patients and an increased prevalence of chromosome anomalies was observed in patients when the mental retardation is associated with a severe degree of intellectual disability, facial dysmorphic features and/or congenital malformations or epilepsy.

  16. [Non-radioactive in situ hybridization of alpha-satellite sequences in cytogenetic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Perfumo, C; Arslanian, A; Zara, F; Piombo, G; Pierluigi, M

    1992-01-01

    Non isotopic in situ hybridization with alpha-satellite DNA probes in the cytogenetic diagnosis. Standard banding cytogenetic techniques do not always allow to define the structure and the origin of chromosome rearrangements involving the centromere region. Non-isotopic in situ hybridization of alphoid sequences has allowed to determine the origin of the centromeres in the metaphases of 5 patients referred to us for: 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome 21, 2 structural rearrangements involving chromosome Y and 1 reciprocal translocation involving on chromosome 20 and one chromosome 15.

  17. Millimeter-wave Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy as a Technique to Selectively Detect Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, Dewayne; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-05-01

    Molecular ions are usually very unstable and reactive species. As a result, their spectroscopic features can be difficult to identify and distinguish from those of neutral species, which tend to be more stable and thus have stronger signals. The technique of velocity modulation allows this disadvantage to be removed. This method uses the alternating plus and minus polarity of an electric field created by an AC discharge, which also produces the molecular ions, to selectively detect the molecular ions, while eliminating the neutral features. This technique has been applied at infrared and optical wavelengths for many years with much success. Recently, we designed and built a millimeter-wave velocity modulation spectrometer, the first ever constructed. This instrument has been used to create and study multiple molecular ions, including metal-bearing molecular ions. The rotational spectrum of these species, such as TiCl^+, VCl^+, TiF^+, FeO^+, FeCO^+, and SiCl^+, has been investigated with this new machine in our laboratory. Results of these studies along with a description of the velocity modulation technique and instrument will be presented.

  18. Molecular and clinical study of 61 Angelman syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Shinji; Harada, Naoki; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; Fukushima; Yoshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tateo; Renedo, Monica

    1994-08-15

    We analyzed 61 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients by cytogenetic and molecular techniques. On the basis of molecular findings, the patients were classified into the following 4 groups: familial cases without deletion, familial cases with submicroscopic deletion, sporadic cases with deletion, and sporadic cases without deletion. Among 53 sporadic cases, 37 (70%) had molecular deletion, which commonly extended from D15S9 to D15S12, although not all deletions were identical. Of 8 familial cases, 3 sibs from one family had a molecular deletion involving only 2 loci, D15S10 and GABRB3, which define the critical region for AS phenotypes. The parental origin of deletion, both in sporadic and familial cases, was exclusively maternal and consistent with a genomic imprinting hypothesis. Among sporadic and familial cases without deletion, no uniparental disomy was found and most of them were shown to inherit chromosomes 15 from both parents (biparental inheritance). A discrepancy between cytogenetic and molecular deletion was observed in 14 (26%) of 53 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis could be performed. Ten (43%) of 23 patients with a normal karyotype showed a molecular deletion, and 4 (13%) of 30 patients with cytogenetic deletion, del(15) (q11q13), showed no molecular deletion. Most clinical manifestations, including neurological signs and facial characteristics, were not distinct in each group except for hypopigmentation of skin or hair. Familial cases with submicroscopic deletion were not associated with hypopigmentation. These findings suggested that a gene for hypopigmentation is located outside the critical region of AS and is not imprinted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Significance of FISH in clinical cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Harris, S.; Roop, H.

    1994-09-01

    Ever since its discovery, FISH technology has become an invaluable adjunct to conventional cytogenetics. FISH has been instrumental in resolving previously unresolved cytogenetic dilemmas. FISH has been used to elucidate complex as well as subtle chromosomal translocations, in detection of microdeletions, to confirm duplications and inversions and to identify marker chromosomes. We report a few selected cases where FISH proved to be invaluable in not only confirming the anomaly, but also in arriving at an accurate diagnosis and appropriate counseling of the patients. These include 3 cases of prenatal and 3 cases of postnatal diagnosis. The results clearly demonstrate the significance of FISH in identifying and interpreting the difficult karyotype in clinical cytogenetics. In addition, FISH has been used to rule out microdeletions in Prader-Willi (16), Angelman (3), Miller-Dieker (7), DiGeorge (4) and Smith-Magenis (1) syndrome patients. Without FISH in the majority of these cases, it would not have been possible to accurately identify the karyotype and interpret the results. Hence, we recommend that FISH be used as a powerful adjunct to conventional cytogenetics in order to arrive at an accurate interpretation of the results but not to replace routine cytogenetic studies.

  20. Molecular techniques in the biotechnological fight against halogenated compounds in anoxic environments

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chang; He, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Summary Microbial treatment of environmental contamination by anthropogenic halogenated organic compounds has become popular in recent decades, especially in the subsurface environments. Molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction‐based fingerprinting methods have been extensively used to closely monitor the presence and activities of dehalogenating microbes, which also lead to the discovery of new dehalogenating bacteria and novel functional genes. Nowadays, traditional molecular techniques are being further developed and optimized for higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to better fit the contexts of dehalogenation. On the other hand, newly developed high throughput techniques, such as microarray and next‐generation sequencing, provide unsurpassed detection ability, which has enabled large‐scale comparative genomic and whole‐genome transcriptomic analysis. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of various molecular tools in the field of microbially mediated dehalogenation of various halogenated organic compounds. It is expected that traditional molecular techniques and nucleic‐acid‐based biomarkers will still be favoured in the foreseeable future because of relative low costs and high flexibility. Collective analyses of metagenomic sequencing data are still in need of information from individual dehalogenating strains and functional reductive dehalogenase genes in order to draw reliable conclusions. PMID:22070763

  1. The GenTechnique Project: Developing an Open Environment for Learning Molecular Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calza, R. E.; Meade, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    The GenTechnique project at Washington State University uses a networked learning environment for molecular genetics learning. The project is developing courseware featuring animation, hyper-link controls, and interactive self-assessment exercises focusing on fundamental concepts. The first pilot course featured a Web-based module on DNA…

  2. Traditional and Molecular Techniques for the Study of Emerging Bacterial Diseases: One Laboratory’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Houpikian, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Identification of emerging bacterial pathogens generally results from a chain of events involving microscopy, serology, molecular tools, and culture. Because of the spectacular molecular techniques developed in the last decades, some authors think that these techniques will shortly supplant culture. The key steps that led to the discovery of emerging bacteria have been reviewed to determine the real contribution of each technique. Historically, microscopy has played a major role. Serology provided indirect evidence for causality. Isolation and culture were crucial, as all emerging bacteria have been grown on artificial media or cell lines or at least propagated in animals. With the use of broad-range polymerase chain reaction, some bacteria have been identified or detected in new clinical syndromes. Culture has irreplaceable advantages for studying emerging bacterial diseases, as it allows antigenic studies, antibiotic susceptibility testing, experimental models, and genetic studies to be carried out, and remains the ultimate goal of pathogen identification. PMID:11897062

  3. 42 CFR 493.1225 - Condition: Clinical cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. 493.1225 Section... Testing § 493.1225 Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Clinical cytogenetics, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230...

  4. Closing the diarrhoea diagnostic gap in Indian children by the application of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Ajjampur, S S R; Rajendran, P; Ramani, S; Banerjee, I; Monica, B; Sankaran, P; Rosario, V; Arumugam, R; Sarkar, R; Ward, H; Kang, G

    2008-11-01

    A large proportion of diarrhoeal illnesses in children in developing countries are ascribed to an unknown aetiology because the only available methods, such as microscopy and culture, have low sensitivity. This study was aimed at decreasing the diagnostic gap in diarrhoeal disease by the application of molecular techniques. Faecal samples from 158 children with and 99 children without diarrhoea in a hospital in South India were tested for enteric pathogens using conventional diagnostic methods (culture, microscopy and enzyme immunoassays) and molecular methods (six PCR-based assays). The additional use of molecular techniques increased identification to at least one aetiological agent in 76.5 % of diarrhoeal specimens, compared with 40.5 % using conventional methods. Rotavirus (43.3 %), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (15.8 %), norovirus (15.8 %) and Cryptosporidium spp. (15.2 %) are currently the most common causes of diarrhoea in hospitalized children in Vellore, in contrast to a study conducted two decades earlier in the same hospital, where bacterial pathogens such as Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp. and enterotoxigenic E. coli were more prevalent. Molecular techniques significantly increased the detection rates of pathogens in children with diarrhoea, but a more intensive study, testing for a wider range of infectious agents and including more information on non-infectious causes of diarrhoea, is required to close the diagnostic gap in diarrhoeal disease.

  5. DNA-binding study of anticancer drug cytarabine by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Maghsudi, Maryam

    2017-01-02

    The interaction of anticancer drug cytarabine with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove-binding mode, while the binding constant of UV-vis and the number of binding sites were 4.0 ± 0.2 × 10(4) L mol(-1) and 1.39, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drugs with CT-DNA is exothermic. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to measure the conformational change of DNA in the presence of cytarabine. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity for DNA interaction. The molecular modeling results illustrated that cytarabine strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -20.61 KJ mol(-1). This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules for clarifying the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  6. Techniques for achieving thermal equilibrium in molecular dynamics calculations for solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ernest Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1990-06-01

    We develop techniques for achieving thermal equilibrium in molecular dynamics calculations for solids. Atoms in a Lennard-Jones solid are initially given random velocities and displacements from their equilibrium positions with suitably scaled Maxwellian distributions. A quantitative criterion for thermal equilibrium of the solid is established by using the equipartition of energy theorem. At high temperatures, thermal expansion is studied, and we introduce a method for adjusting the lattice parameter to ensure zero external pressure. The results of molecular dynamics simulations show agreement with experimental data for rare gas and ionic crystals.

  7. [Cytogenetic aberrations in histologically benign infiltratively growing sphenoid wing meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A; Bekiashev, A Kh; Sycheva, R V

    2007-01-01

    Meningiomas of the sphenoid wing (SW) frequently show an invasive pattern of growth and cause destruction of the adjacent structures. As a result, the rate of recurrent SW meningiomas is as high as 30%. Cytogenetic investigations showed no aberrations specific to invasively growing meningiomas. During this study, the authors evaluated 10 invasive and 5 non-invasive SW meningiomas via comparative genome hybridization (CGH) (matrix CGH), by using the gene chips of GenoSensor Array micromatrixes. The mean number of aberrations in the tumor cells was much greater in case of invasive meningiomas (67.4 versus 40.5 in case of non-invasive SW meningiomas. Furthermore, in invasive SW meningiomas, there were frequently losses in loci 1p, 6q, and 14q and gains in loci 15q and 10, which had been predetermined as molecular markers of stepwise progression of meningioma. Thus, the presence of a complex cytogenetic profile and progression-associated chromosome aberrations in benign SW meningiomas is linked with the increase of their invasive potential. Due to the fact that there are no well-defined adjuvant therapy regimens for recurring meningiomas at present, the revealed genomic aberrations may become potential targets for searching for drugs and a therapeutic intervention in future.

  8. Wing Membrane Biopsies for Bat Cytogenetics: Finding of 2n = 54 in Irish Rhinolophushipposideros (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera, Mammalia) Supports Two Geographically Separated Chromosomal Variants in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kacprzyk, Joanna; Teeling, Emma C; Kelleher, Conor; Volleth, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, 2 different diploid chromosome numbers, 2n = 54 and 2n = 56, have been described in the lesser horseshoe bat (Rhinolophushipposideros). The eastern form with 2n = 56 extends from the Czech Republic to Greece. To date, specimens with 54 chromosomes have been reported only from Spain and Germany. This study expands the distributional area of the western variant to Ireland. Strikingly, this distribution of European chromosomal variants is in contrast to the available molecular data that indicate little genetic differentiation of R. hipposideros populations spanning Northwestern to Central Europe. Further, we have developed an optimized protocol for establishing fibroblast cell cultures, suitable for karyotype analyses, from 3-mm wing membrane biopsies. This is a useful technique for cytogenetic studies of endangered bat species, as this non-lethal sampling method imposes only minimum stress to the animal without lasting adverse effects and is routinely used to sample tissue probes for molecular genetic studies in bats.

  9. Follow-up of the tumor load in patients with de novo chronic myeloid leukemia and in complete cytogenetic remission treated with imatinib in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    González, Jaime A; Lopera, Diego E; González, Manuel; Saavedra, José D; Lobaton, José Fernando; Duque, Jorge Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular responses in Colombian patients with CML chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with imatinib. Methods: Two groups of patients, one with the novo diagnostic and another in state of complete cytogenetic remission were followed for 12 months with quantitative PCR evaluations every three months and with chromosomal analysis every 6 months. Results: The group with the novo diagnosis showed 50% of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months while the other 50% were considered to have primary resistance. Respect the molecular analysis, 10.5% of the patients reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts at 12 months. In the complete cytogenetic remission group, 10.6% lost the state of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months, 50% reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts but 10% showed levels higher than 10%, which in our standardization was equal to no molecular response. Conclusions: Despite having received the conventional dosages of 400 mg/day of imatinib, the cytogenetic and molecular responses obtained in our group of Colombian patients with CML, were lower than those in other international studies. PMID:24893299

  10. Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-risk cytogenetics: a consensus of the International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Lonial, Sagar; Usmani, Saad; Siegel, David; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Kyle, Robert A.; Caers, Jo; Hillengass, Jens; San Miguel, Jesús; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Einsele, Hermann; Bladé, Joan; Durie, Brian G. M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mateos, María-Victoria; Palumbo, Antonio; Orlowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The International Myeloma Working Group consensus updates the definition for high-risk (HR) multiple myeloma based on cytogenetics Several cytogenetic abnormalities such as t(4;14), del(17/17p), t(14;16), t(14;20), nonhyperdiploidy, and gain(1q) were identified that confer poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients showing these abnormalities may vary with the choice of therapy. Treatment strategies have shown promise for HR cytogenetic diseases, such as proteasome inhibition in combination with lenalidomide/pomalidomide, double autologous stem cell transplant plus bortezomib, or combination of immunotherapy with lenalidomide or pomalidomide. Careful analysis of cytogenetic subgroups in trials comparing different treatments remains an important goal. Cross-trial comparisons may provide insight into the effect of new drugs in patients with cytogenetic abnormalities. However, to achieve this, consensus on definitions of analytical techniques, proportion of abnormal cells, and treatment regimens is needed. Based on data available today, bortezomib and carfilzomib treatment appear to improve complete response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p), whereas lenalidomide may be associated with improved progression-free survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p). Patients with multiple adverse cytogenetic abnormalities do not benefit from these agents. FISH data are implemented in the revised International Staging System for risk stratification. PMID:27002115

  11. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-01

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on β-carotene are discussed.

  12. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  13. Cytogenetic activity of the coumarin glucoside seseloside

    SciTech Connect

    Arshava, E.A.

    1986-05-01

    The cytogenetic effect of the coumarin glucoside seseloside on plant objects was studied. It was established that low concentrations of the preparation (from 1 x 10/sup -5/ to 1 x 10/sup -3/ ..mu..g/ml) inhibit both spontaneous and radiation-induced mutagenesis. The effect of high concentrations (10 and 100 ..mu..g/ml) causes a mutagenic effect.

  14. Cytogenetic Biodosimetry for Radiation Disasters: Recent Advances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Radiation exposure induces many types of chromosomal aberrations in the exposed individual’s peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of dicentrics , a... chromosomal structural aberration, in an individual’s pe- ripheral blood lymphocytes indicates radiation exposure. Dicentrics are considered relatively...method. This cytogenetic chromosome aberration bioassay is a thoroughly investigated biodosimetry method. The dicentric assay is conventionally

  15. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    51nipple, Phyllodes Tumor , and tubular carcinoma.3 52Breast cancer is grouped into stages which 53indicate the invasiveness of the disease. There 54are...enhances the tumor MR image contrast but is also an excellent probe for optical imaging. We have established three breast cancer tumor models...magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and optical imaging techniques for better imaging of tumors . In vivo molecular imaging, which utilizes these two

  16. Force detection technique for molecular experiments in living cells using gradient optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farre, Arnau; Lopez-Quesada, Carol; Mas, Josep; Martin-Badosa, Estela; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2009-05-01

    The powerful results in the molecular and cellular domain that are currently obtained using optical tweezers are leading to an increasing interest in this biophysical tool. This technique uses a highly focused laser beam to noninvasively trap and manipulate microscopic particles. Moreover, once calibrated, it can be used to accurately measure the forces and positions involved in many different molecular processes. Our research interest revolves around the study of the mechanics of cytoplasmic streaming in tobacco cells. Unfortunately, standard force detection techniques are not suitable for experiments in living cells. Golgi apparatuses that need to be used as handles to interact with motor proteins propelling them along the cytoskeletal filaments are not spherical, and the cytoplasm is an optically nonhomogeneous medium. In that case, the experiment does not meet the requirements for current force calibration methods, so forces cannot be accurately measured. Here, we show a new force detection technique for gradient optical traps based on the measurement of the change in momentum of the photons of a trapping beam. This method allows the study of molecular processes in living samples, and the use of beams and particles with arbitrary shapes.

  17. The emergence of molecular profiling and omics techniques in seagrass biology; furthering our understanding of seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Davey, Peter A; Pernice, Mathieu; Sablok, Gaurav; Larkum, Anthony; Lee, Huey Tyng; Golicz, Agnieszka; Edwards, David; Dolferus, Rudy; Ralph, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Seagrass meadows are disappearing at alarming rates as a result of increasing coastal development and climate change. The emergence of omics and molecular profiling techniques in seagrass research is timely, providing a new opportunity to address such global issues. Whilst these applications have transformed terrestrial plant research, they have only emerged in seagrass research within the past decade; In this time frame we have observed a significant increase in the number of publications in this nascent field, and as of this year the first genome of a seagrass species has been sequenced. In this review, we focus on the development of omics and molecular profiling and the utilization of molecular markers in the field of seagrass biology. We highlight the advances, merits and pitfalls associated with such technology, and importantly we identify and address the knowledge gaps, which to this day prevent us from understanding seagrasses in a holistic manner. By utilizing the powers of omics and molecular profiling technologies in integrated strategies, we will gain a better understanding of how these unique plants function at the molecular level and how they respond to on-going disturbance and climate change events.

  18. Charge transport in molecular junctions: From tunneling to hopping with the probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-14

    We demonstrate that a simple phenomenological approach can be used to simulate electronic conduction in molecular wires under thermal effects induced by the surrounding environment. This “Landauer-Büttiker’s probe technique” can properly replicate different transport mechanisms, phase coherent nonresonant tunneling, ballistic behavior, and hopping conduction. Specifically, our simulations with the probe method recover the following central characteristics of charge transfer in molecular wires: (i) the electrical conductance of short wires falls off exponentially with molecular length, a manifestation of the tunneling (superexchange) mechanism. Hopping dynamics overtakes superexchange in long wires demonstrating an ohmic-like behavior. (ii) In off-resonance situations, weak dephasing effects facilitate charge transfer, but under large dephasing, the electrical conductance is suppressed. (iii) At high enough temperatures, k{sub B}T/ϵ{sub B} > 1/25, with ϵ{sub B} as the molecular-barrier height, the current is enhanced by a thermal activation (Arrhenius) factor. However, this enhancement takes place for both coherent and incoherent electrons and it does not readily indicate on the underlying mechanism. (iv) At finite-bias, dephasing effects may impede conduction in resonant situations. We further show that memory (non-Markovian) effects can be implemented within the Landauer-Büttiker’s probe technique to model the interaction of electrons with a structured environment. Finally, we examine experimental results of electron transfer in conjugated molecular wires and show that our computational approach can reasonably reproduce reported values to provide mechanistic information.

  19. Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in the microcanonical ensemble: Quantitative comparison and reweighting techniques.

    PubMed

    Schierz, Philipp; Zierenberg, Johannes; Janke, Wolfhard

    2015-10-07

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are the most popular simulation techniques for many-particle systems. Although they are often applied to similar systems, it is unclear to which extent one has to expect quantitative agreement of the two simulation techniques. In this work, we present a quantitative comparison of MD and MC simulations in the microcanonical ensemble. For three test examples, we study first- and second-order phase transitions with a focus on liquid-gas like transitions. We present MD analysis techniques to compensate for conservation law effects due to linear and angular momentum conservation. Additionally, we apply the weighted histogram analysis method to microcanonical histograms reweighted from MD simulations. By this means, we are able to estimate the density of states from many microcanonical simulations at various total energies. This further allows us to compute estimates of canonical expectation values.

  20. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  1. Probing the molecular interaction of triazole fungicides with human serum albumin by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhuang, Shulin; Tong, Changlun; Liu, Weiping

    2013-07-31

    Triazole fungicides, one category of broad-spectrum fungicides, are widely applied in agriculture and medicine. The extensive use leads to many residues and casts potential detrimental effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health. After exposure of the human body, triazole fungicides may penetrate into the bloodstream and interact with plasma proteins. Whether they could have an impact on the structure and function of proteins is still poorly understood. By using multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling, the interaction of several typical triazole fungicides with human serum albumin (HSA), the major plasma protein, was investigated. The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectra manifested that static type, due to complex formation, was the dominant mechanism for fluorescence quenching. Structurally related binding modes speculated by thermodynamic parameters agreed with the prediction of molecular modeling. For triadimefon, hydrogen bonding with Arg-218 and Arg-222 played an important role, whereas for imazalil, myclobutanil, and penconazole, the binding process was mainly contributed by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Via alterations in three-dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism spectral properties, it was concluded that triazoles could induce slight conformational and some microenvironmental changes of HSA. It is anticipated that these data can provide some information for possible toxicity risk of triazole fungicides to human health and be helpful in reinforcing the supervision of food safety.

  2. Diagnostic procedures in tularaemia with special focus on molecular and immunological techniques.

    PubMed

    Splettstoesser, W D; Tomaso, H; Al Dahouk, S; Neubauer, H; Schuff-Werner, P

    2005-08-01

    Tularaemia is a severe bacterial zoonosis caused by the highly infectious agent Francisella tularensis. It is endemic in countries of the northern hemisphere ranging from North America to Europe, Asia and Japan. Very recently, Francisella-like strains causing disease in humans were described from tropical northern Australia. In the last decade, efforts have been made to develop sensitive and specific immunological and molecular techniques for the laboratory diagnosis of tularaemia and also for the definite identification of members of the species F. tularensis and its four subspecies. Screening for the keyword 'Francisella' a Medline search over the last decade was performed and articles describing diagnostic methods for tularaemia and its causative agent were selected. Besides classical microbiological techniques (cultivation, biochemical profiling, susceptibility testing) several new immunological and molecular approaches to identify F. tularensis have been introduced employing highly specific antibodies and various polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Whereas direct antigen detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or immunofluorescence might allow early presumptive diagnosis of tularaemia, these methods--like all PCR techniques--still await further evaluation. Therefore, diagnosis of tularaemia still relies mainly on the demonstration of specific antibodies in the host. ELISA and immunoblot methods started to replace the standard tube or micro-agglutination assays. However, the diagnostic value of antibody detection in the very early clinical phase of tularaemia is limited. Francisella tularensis is regarded as a 'highest priority' biological agent (category 'A' according to the CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA), thus rapid and reliable diagnosis of tularaemia is required not only for a timely onset of therapy, the handling of outbreak investigations but also for the surveillance of endemic foci. Only very recently, evaluated test kits for

  3. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    High-speed laminar-to-turbulent transition and turbulence affect the control of flight vehicles, the heat transfer rate to a flight vehicle's surface, the material selected to protect such vehicles from high heating loads, the ultimate weight of a flight vehicle due to the presence of thermal protection systems, the efficiency of fuel-air mixing processes in high-speed combustion applications, etc. Gaining a fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the transition process will lead to the development of predictive capabilities that can identify transition location and its impact on parameters like surface heating. Currently, there is no general theory that can completely describe the transition-to-turbulence process. However, transition research has led to the identification of the predominant pathways by which this process occurs. For a truly physics-based model of transition to be developed, the individual stages in the paths leading to the onset of fully turbulent flow must be well understood. This requires that each pathway be computationally modeled and experimentally characterized and validated. This may also lead to the discovery of new physical pathways. This document is intended to describe molecular based measurement techniques that have been developed, addressing the needs of the high-speed transition-to-turbulence and high-speed turbulence research fields. In particular, we focus on techniques that have either been used to study high speed transition and turbulence or techniques that show promise for studying these flows. This review is not exhaustive. In addition to the probe-based techniques described in the previous paragraph, several other classes of measurement techniques that are, or could be, used to study high speed transition and turbulence are excluded from this manuscript. For example, surface measurement techniques such as pressure and temperature paint, phosphor thermography, skin friction measurements and

  4. Integrating Nanostructured Artificial Receptors with Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Microresonators via Inorganic Molecular Imprinting Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, G. Denise; Vojta, Adam L.; Grant, Sheila A.; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-01-01

    The creation of label-free biosensors capable of accurately detecting trace contaminants, particularly small organic molecules, is of significant interest for applications in environmental monitoring. This is achieved by pairing a high-sensitivity signal transducer with a biorecognition element that imparts selectivity towards the compound of interest. However, many environmental pollutants do not have corresponding biorecognition elements. Fortunately, biomimetic chemistries, such as molecular imprinting, allow for the design of artificial receptors with very high selectivity for the target. Here, we perform a proof-of-concept study to show how artificial receptors may be created from inorganic silanes using the molecular imprinting technique and paired with high-sensitivity transducers without loss of device performance. Silica microsphere Whispering Gallery Mode optical microresonators are coated with a silica thin film templated by a small fluorescent dye, fluorescein isothiocyanate, which serves as our model target. Oxygen plasma degradation and solvent extraction of the template are compared. Extracted optical devices are interacted with the template molecule to confirm successful sorption of the template. Surface characterization is accomplished via fluorescence and optical microscopy, ellipsometry, optical profilometry, and contact angle measurements. The quality factors of the devices are measured to evaluate the impact of the coating on device sensitivity. The resulting devices show uniform surface coating with no microstructural damage with Q factors above 106. This is the first report demonstrating the integration of these devices with molecular imprinting techniques, and could lead to new routes to biosensor creation for environmental monitoring. PMID:27314397

  5. Tracking down sulphate-reducing microorganisms by molecular and isotope-labelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loy, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) are of great ecological importance for carbon compound degradation and sulphur cycling in many anoxic ecosystems, including marine sediments, peatlands, and oil reservoirs. However, the activity of SRM can result in oil souring and pipeline corrosion and thus is also an economic burden for the oil industry. Molecular diversity surveys based on rRNA genes and dsrAB, genes that encode major subunits of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase, indicate that our view of the natural diversity of SRM (as we know it from cultivation) is far from being complete. This enormous phylogenetic diversity complicates unbiased identification and quantification of SRM by molecular methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time PCR or DNA microarrays. Combining these 16S rRNA and dsrAB-based molecular methods with substrate-mediated isotope labelling techniques is a potential solution for identification and functional characterization of yet uncultivated SRM. Using SRM in peatlands as an example, the problems and opportunities of these techniques for diagnosing and monitoring SRM in the environment will be discussed in this talk.

  6. Integrating Nanostructured Artificial Receptors with Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Microresonators via Inorganic Molecular Imprinting Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hammond, G Denise; Vojta, Adam L; Grant, Sheila A; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-06-15

    The creation of label-free biosensors capable of accurately detecting trace contaminants, particularly small organic molecules, is of significant interest for applications in environmental monitoring. This is achieved by pairing a high-sensitivity signal transducer with a biorecognition element that imparts selectivity towards the compound of interest. However, many environmental pollutants do not have corresponding biorecognition elements. Fortunately, biomimetic chemistries, such as molecular imprinting, allow for the design of artificial receptors with very high selectivity for the target. Here, we perform a proof-of-concept study to show how artificial receptors may be created from inorganic silanes using the molecular imprinting technique and paired with high-sensitivity transducers without loss of device performance. Silica microsphere Whispering Gallery Mode optical microresonators are coated with a silica thin film templated by a small fluorescent dye, fluorescein isothiocyanate, which serves as our model target. Oxygen plasma degradation and solvent extraction of the template are compared. Extracted optical devices are interacted with the template molecule to confirm successful sorption of the template. Surface characterization is accomplished via fluorescence and optical microscopy, ellipsometry, optical profilometry, and contact angle measurements. The quality factors of the devices are measured to evaluate the impact of the coating on device sensitivity. The resulting devices show uniform surface coating with no microstructural damage with Q factors above 10⁶. This is the first report demonstrating the integration of these devices with molecular imprinting techniques, and could lead to new routes to biosensor creation for environmental monitoring.

  7. Concentration measurements in molecular gas mixtures with a two-pump pulse femtosecond polarization spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertz, E.; Chaux, R.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2001-08-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the ability of the Raman-induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS) technique to accurately determine concentration or polarizability anisotropy ratio in low-pressure binary molecular mixtures [E. Hertz, B. Lavorel, O. Faucher, and R. Chaux, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 6629 (2000)]. It has been also pointed out that macroscopic interference, occurring when two revivals associated to different molecules time overlap, can be used to achieve measurements with picosecond time resolution. The applicability of the technique is intrinsically limited to a concentration range where the signals of both molecules are of the same magnitude. In this paper, a two-pump pulse sequence with different intensities is used to overcome this limitation. The relative molecular responses are weighted by the relative laser pump intensities to give comparable signals. Furthermore, by tuning the time delay between the two-pump pulses, macroscopic interference can be produced regardless of the accidental coincidences between the two molecular temporal responses. The study is performed in a CO2-N2O gas mixture and the concentration is measured with and without macroscopic interference. Applications of the method in the field of noninvasive diagnostics of combustion media are envisaged.

  8. Control of molecular weight of polystyrene using the reverse iodine transfer polymerization (RITP)-emulsion technique.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeong Geun; Shin, Hongcheol; Jung, Hyejun; Lee, Byung Hyung; Choe, Soonja

    2011-01-15

    The RITP-emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of molecular iodine has been successfully performed using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and 1-hexadecanesulfonate as an emulsifier under argon atmosphere at 80°C for 7 hrs in the absence of light. The effects of the iodine concentration, molar ratio between KPS and iodine, and solid contents on the molecular weight of polystyrene (PS) were studied. As the iodine concentration increased from 0.05 to 0.504 mmol under the fixed [KPS]/[I(2)] ratio at 4.5, the weight-average molecular weight of PS substantially decreased from 126,120 to 35,690 g/mol, the conversion increased from 85.0% to 95.2%, and the weight-average particle diameter decreased from 159 to 103 nm. In addition, as the ratio of [KPS]/[I(2)] increased from 0.5 to 6.0 at the fixed [I(2)] of 0.504 mmol, the weight-average molecular weight of PS decreased from 72,170 to 30,640 g/mol with high conversion between 81.7% and 96.5%. Moreover, when the styrene solid content increased from 10 to 40 wt.% at the fixed [KPS]/[I(2)] ratio of 4.5, the weight-average molecular weight of PS varied between 33,500 and 37,200 g/mol, the conversion varied between 94.9% and 89.7% and the weight-average diameter varied from 122 to 205 nm. Thus, the control of molecular weight of PS less than 100,000g/mol with high conversion (95%) and particle stability of up to 40 wt.% solid content were easily achieved through the usage of iodine with suitable ratio of [KPS]/[I(2)] in the RITP-emulsion polymerization technique, which is of great industrial importance.

  9. Polymorphism of cytogenetic markers in wild and farm red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations.

    PubMed

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Sołek, Przemysław; Potocki, Leszek; Pawlina, Klaudia; Wnuk, Maciej; Jezewska-Witkowska, Grazyna; Słota, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the origin of domestic animals is of wide interest and has many practical applications in areas such as agriculture and evolutionary biology. Identification of an ancestor and comparison with the domesticated form allows for an analysis of genetic, physiological, morphological and behavioral effects of domestication. Because fox breeding has been an ongoing process for over a century, differences are expected between farm and wild populations at the chromosomal level. The aim of this work was to analyse polymorphisms at the chromosomal level in foxes raised on farms and those living in the wild. Blood samples and lung tissue served as the experimental material and were obtained after slaughter of 35 foxes, including 28 breeding animals and 7 wild animals. The classical cytogenetic method was used including AgNOR technique, as well as molecular methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and primed in situ labeling (PRINS). Analysis of the number of B chromosomes showed the presence of polymorphisms in foxes from both studied populations, but there was no correlation between the number of B chromosomes and the origin and gender of particular animals. An analysis ofactive nucleolar organizers showed the presence of a large number of polymorphisms and a tendency towards reduction of the number of NORs in the captive-raised population.

  10. Comparison of molecular techniques for the typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae isolates.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Maes, Dominiek; Peeters, Johan; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    In this study, we compared the potential of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the gene encoding lipoprotein P146, and the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) of the P97 encoding gene, as possible methods for typing an international collection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae isolates. All techniques showed a typeability of 100% and high intraspecific diversity. However, the discriminatory power of the different techniques varied considerably. AFLP (>0.99) and PCR-RFLP of the P146 encoding gene (>0.98) were more discriminatory than RAPD (0.95) and estimation of the VNTR of P97 (<0.92). Other, preferentially well spread, tandem repeat regions should be included in order for this latter technique to become valuable for typing purposes. RAPD was also found to be a less interesting typing technique because of its low reproducibility between different runs. Nevertheless, all molecular techniques showed overall more resemblance between strains isolated from different pigs from the same herd. On the other hand, none of the techniques was able to show a clear relationship between the country of origin and the fingerprints obtained. We conclude that AFLP and an earlier described PFGE technique are highly reliable and discriminatory typing techniques for outlining the genomic diversity of M. hyopneumoniae isolates. Our data also show that RFLP of a highly variable gene encoding P146 may be an equally useful alternative for demonstrating intraspecific variability, although the generation of sequence variability of the gene remains unclear and must be further examined.

  11. Mass spectrometric techniques for characterizing low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, I; Colombini, M P; Degano, I; Di Girolamo, F; La Nasa, J; Modugno, F; Orsini, S

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure of three low-molecular-weight resins used as paint varnishes has been characterized by use of an approach based on three different mass spectrometric techniques. We investigated the ketone resin MS2A, the aldehyde resin Laropal A81, and the hydrocarbon resin Regalrez 1094, now commonly used in restoration. To date, the molecular structures of these resins have not been completely elucidated. To improve current knowledge of the chemical composition of these materials, information obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-ToF) was combined. Analysis, in solution, of the whole polymeric fraction of the resins by flow-injection ESI-Q-ToF, and of the non-polymeric fraction by GC-MS, enabled us to identify previously unreported features of the polymer structures. In addition, the Py-GC/MS profiles that we obtained will help to enhance the databases currently available in the literature. The proposed approach can be extended to other low-molecular-weight resins used as varnishes in conservation.

  12. Comparison of mass spectrometric techniques for generating molecular weight information on a class of ethoxylated oligomers.

    PubMed

    Parees, D M; Hanton, S D; Clark, P A; Willcox, D A

    1998-04-01

    The results of fast atom bombardment (FAB), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALD/I), electrospray ionization (ESI), and field desorption (FD) analyses of ethoxylated oligomers of 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7-diol (Surfynol(®) 104) were compared.Each of these desorption mass spectrometry (MS) techniques can produce spectra of unfragmented cationized oligomers. From the observed ion series we calculate average molecular weight information. We have compared the results of mass spectrometric analyses of a series of ethoxylated Surfynol surfactants. Our data indicate that FAB, ToF-SIMS, MALDI/I, and ESI produce similar results for the lower molecular weight species, but that as the average molecular weight increases FAB and SIMS produce slightly lower results than MALD/I and FD. This could be due to increased fragmentation. ESI produced a result similar to FAB and SIMS for the highest average molecular weight material. Further experiments compare the mass spectral results with gas chromatographic quantitative data. Although gas chromatography is not expected to accurately analyze the higher mass oligomers, we observe significant differences in intensities of the short-chain oligomers (especially the 0- and 1-mers) when compared to the desorption mass spectrometer results. These differences may reflect poor cationization efficiency for very short oligomer chains in the mass spectrometric analyses.

  13. Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Techniques for Detection of Food-borne Pathogens; Current Applications and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Umesha, S; Manukumar, H M

    2016-01-08

    The elimination of disease-causing microbes from the food supply is a primary goal and this review deals with the overall techniques availavle for detection of food-borne pathogens. Now-a-days conventional methods are replaced by advanced methods like Biosensors, Nucleic Acid-based Tests (NAT) and different PCR based techniques used in molecular biology to identify specific pathogens. Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp, Aspergillus spp. Fusarium spp. Penicillium spp., and pathogens are detected in contaminated food items which cause always diseases in human in any one or the other way. Identification of food-borne pathogens in a short period of time is still a challenge to the scientific field in general and food technology in particular. The low level of food contamination by major pathogens requires specific sensitive detection platforms and the present area of hot research looking forward to new nanomolecular techniques for nanomaterials, make them suitable for the development of assays with high sensitivity, response time and portability. With the sound of these we attemet to highlight a comprehensive overview about food-borne pathogen detection by rapid, sensitive, accurate and cost affordable in situ analytical methods from conventional methods to recent molecular approaches for advanced food and microbiology research.

  14. Nanotools and molecular techniques to rapidly identify and fight bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Dinarelli, S; Girasole, M; Kasas, S; Longo, G

    2016-01-20

    Reducing the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is one of the major healthcare issues of our century. In addition to the increased mortality, infections caused by multi-resistant bacteria drastically enhance the healthcare costs, mainly because of the longer duration of illness and treatment. While in the last 20years, bacterial identification has been revolutionized by the introduction of new molecular techniques, the current phenotypic techniques to determine the susceptibilities of common Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria require at least two days from collection of clinical samples. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to determine rapidly drug susceptibility in bacteria and to achieve faster diagnoses. These techniques would also lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the insurgence of the resistance, greatly helping the quest for new antibacterial systems and drugs. In this review, we describe some of the tools most currently used in clinical and microbiological research to study bacteria and to address the challenge of infections. We discuss the most interesting advancements in the molecular susceptibility testing systems, with a particular focus on the many applications of the MALDI-TOF MS system. In the field of the phenotypic characterization protocols, we detail some of the most promising semi-automated commercial systems and we focus on some emerging developments in the field of nanomechanical sensors, which constitute a step towards the development of rapid and affordable point-of-care testing devices and techniques. While there is still no innovative technique that is capable of completely substituting for the conventional protocols and clinical practices, many exciting new experimental setups and tools could constitute the basis of the standard testing package of future microbiological tests.

  15. Describing sequencing results of structural chromosome rearrangements with a suggested next-generation cytogenetic nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Ordulu, Zehra; Wong, Kristen E; Currall, Benjamin B; Ivanov, Andrew R; Pereira, Shahrin; Althari, Sara; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2014-05-01

    With recent rapid advances in genomic technologies, precise delineation of structural chromosome rearrangements at the nucleotide level is becoming increasingly feasible. In this era of "next-generation cytogenetics" (i.e., an integration of traditional cytogenetic techniques and next-generation sequencing), a consensus nomenclature is essential for accurate communication and data sharing. Currently, nomenclature for describing the sequencing data of these aberrations is lacking. Herein, we present a system called Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, which is concordant with the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (2013). This system starts with the alignment of rearrangement sequences by BLAT or BLAST (alignment tools) and arrives at a concise and detailed description of chromosomal changes. To facilitate usage and implementation of this nomenclature, we are developing a program designated BLA(S)T Output Sequence Tool of Nomenclature (BOSToN), a demonstrative version of which is accessible online. A standardized characterization of structural chromosomal rearrangements is essential both for research analyses and for application in the clinical setting.

  16. A new crossed molecular beam apparatus using time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Guorong; Zhang Weiqing; Pan Huilin; Shuai Quan; Jiang Bo; Dai Dongxu; Yang Xueming

    2008-09-15

    A new crossed molecular beam apparatus has been constructed for investigating polyatomic chemical reactions using the time-sliced ion velocity map imaging technique. A unique design is adopted for one of the two beam sources and allows us to set up the molecular beam source either horizontally or vertically. This can be conveniently used to produce versatile atomic or radical beams from photodissociation and as well as electric discharge. Intensive H-atom beam source with high speed ratio was produced by photodissociation of the HI molecule and was reacted with the CD{sub 4} molecule. Vibrational-state resolved HD product distribution was measured by detecting the CD{sub 3} product. Preliminary results were also reported on the F+SiH{sub 4} reaction using the discharged F atom beam. These results demonstrate that this new instrument is a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics of polyatomic reactions.

  17. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  18. Roberts syndrome: study of 4 new Rgyptian cases with comparison of clinical and cytogenetic findings.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, S A; Ismail, S; Helmy, N A

    2006-01-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder (MIM 268300). It is characterized by pre and postnatal growth retardation, severe shortening of limbs with radial defects, oligodactyly and characteristic facial features. The present study reports 4 new cases of Roberts syndrome from 3 families presenting variable phenotypes. Patients were thoroughly investigated clinically and cytogenetically. By reviewing literature, we compared our cases to those previously reported. The rating severity system proposed by Van den Berg and Francke (30) was applied to correlate the phenotypic and cytogenetics changes. We observed more severe reduction defects in the upper limbs than in the lower limbs. While the main reduction defects in the upper limbs involved the thumb and radius ranging to phocomelia, absent or severely hypoplastic fibula was the main lower limb involvement. We emphasize this finding in the present investigation. Heterochromatin repulsion of chromosomes derived from Roberts syndrome patients is a characteristic cytogenetic abnormality. It was a constant finding in our studied patients demonstrated by DABI stain which supports the possibility that mutations in Roberts syndrome lie in centromere related proteins which may also play a role in body patterning. This was proved recently by Vega et al. (31). Application of the clinical rating score and its correlation with cytogenetic changes showed negative results. Cytogenetic studies in normal obligatory heterozygotes parents showed no changes. Phenotypic variability within the same family as well as between different families was observed. The ascertainment of 4 cases with Roberts syndrome from 3 Egyptian consanguineous families during one year in our department may indicate a high frequency of the Roberts syndrome allele among Egyptians. This confirms the need for molecular studies for early and accurate prenatal diagnosis to prevent such dramatic malformation syndrome.

  19. [Cytogenetic analysis of cosmonaut's blood lymphocytes exposed to low space radiation doses and its place in clinical-physiological health monitoring].

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, B S; Snigireva, G P; Ivanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the informative significance and pertinence of cytogenetic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes to the clinical-physiological investigations of cosmonauts conducted before and after space missions (SM) of varying duration. The authors point out high sensitivity of the technique, relative simplicity and affordability of the analysis of instable chromosomal aberrations including such radiation effect markers as dicentrics and centric rings. Cytogenetic investigation of cosmonauts could be used to estimate ionizing radiation dose, and to predict delayed effects.

  20. Cytogenetics in the management of hematologic malignancies: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Daudignon, Agnès; Eclache, Virginie; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Lefebvre, Christine; Luquet, Isabelle; Penther, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is still important in the management of many hematological malignancies, despite the new techniques available such as the high-throughput sequencing analysis, and the discovery of many acquired gene mutations in these diseases. The Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH) published in 2004 the recommendations for the cytogenetic management of hematological malignancies. It reports here the update of these recommendations, with a review of the literature for each disease.

  1. Cytogenetic diversity in primary human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolman, S R; Camuto, P M; Perle, M A

    1988-02-01

    Cytogenetic patterns from primary short-term culture of breast cancer, renal carcinoma, and tumors of the central nervous system are presented to illustrate the range of karyotypic diversity of human solid tumors as well as their biologic differences in culture systems that support their growth. These studies have illustrated several major issues. 1) Results vary with the tissue of origin: primary cultures from breast are almost uniformly diploid, while renal tumors are near-diploid, mosaic, and show clonal aberrations; and CNS tumors are heterogeneous: some diploid, some near-diploid and some highly aneuploid. 2) Results after short-term culture are selective, representing subpopulations from the heterogeneous cells that are detected on direct analysis of fresh tumors by cytogenetics or flow cytometry (FCM). It is not yet clear whether prognosis depends on the dominant population of the primary tumor or alternatively should be influenced by detection of small aneuploid subpopulations. 3) Evidence from all three tumor types supports the interpretation that cytogenetically normal diploid cells constitute part of some tumor populations, and may be better adapted to routine growth in culture than aneuploid subpopulations from the same primary tumors. These cells may also compose a major portion of the viable population of tumors in vivo and, therefore, could represent a useful model for studies of tumorigenesis and therapeutic regimens.

  2. Gender identification of Grasshopper Sparrows comparing behavioral, morphological, and molecular techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammer, F.K.; Wood, P.B.; McPherson, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct gender identification in monomorphic species is often difficult especially if males and females do not display obvious behavioral and breeding differences. We compared gender specific morphology and behavior with recently developed DNA techniques for gender identification in the monomorphic Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum). Gender was ascertained with DNA in 213 individuals using the 2550F/2718R primer set and 3% agarose gel electrophoresis. Field observations using behavior and breeding characteristics to identify gender matched DNA analyses with 100% accuracy for adult males and females. Gender was identified with DNA for all captured juveniles that did not display gender specific traits or behaviors in the field. The molecular techniques used offered a high level of accuracy and may be useful in studies of dispersal mechanisms and winter assemblage composition in monomorphic species.

  3. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  4. An efficient and accurate molecular alignment and docking technique using ab initio quality scoring

    PubMed Central

    Füsti-Molnár, László; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate and efficient molecular alignment technique is presented based on first principle electronic structure calculations. This new scheme maximizes quantum similarity matrices in the relative orientation of the molecules and uses Fourier transform techniques for two purposes. First, building up the numerical representation of true ab initio electronic densities and their Coulomb potentials is accelerated by the previously described Fourier transform Coulomb method. Second, the Fourier convolution technique is applied for accelerating optimizations in the translational coordinates. In order to avoid any interpolation error, the necessary analytical formulas are derived for the transformation of the ab initio wavefunctions in rotational coordinates. The results of our first implementation for a small test set are analyzed in detail and compared with published results of the literature. A new way of refinement of existing shape based alignments is also proposed by using Fourier convolutions of ab initio or other approximate electron densities. This new alignment technique is generally applicable for overlap, Coulomb, kinetic energy, etc., quantum similarity measures and can be extended to a genuine docking solution with ab initio scoring. PMID:18624561

  5. Evaluation of genetically modified sugarcane lines carrying Cry 1AC gene using molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Roba M

    2013-01-01

    Five genetically modified insect resistant sugarcane lines harboring the Bt Cry 1AC gene to produce insecticidal proteins were compared with non-transgenic control by using three types of molecular marker techniques namely, RAPD, ISSR and AFLP. These techniques were applied on transgenic and non-transgenic plants to investigate the genetic variations, which may appear in sugarcane clones. This variation might demonstrate the genomic changes associated with the transformation process, which could change important molecular basis of various biological phenomena. Genetic variations were screened using 22 different RAPD primers, 10 ISSR primers and 13 AFLP primer combinations. Analysis of RAPD and ISSR banding patterns gave no exclusive evidence for genetic variations. Meanwhile, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 0.45% in each of RAPD and ISSR, while the polymorphism generated by AFLP analysis was 1.8%. The maximum percentage of polymorphic bands was 1.4%, 1.1% and 5.5% in RAPD, ISSR and AFLP, respectively. These results demonstrate that most transgenic lines showed genomic homogeneity and verified minor genomic changes. Dendrograms revealing the relationships among the transgenic and control plants were developed from the data of each of the three marker types.

  6. Recent applications of boxed molecular dynamics: a simple multiscale technique for atomistic simulations

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jonathan; Vazquez, Saulo; Martinez-Nunez, Emilio; Marks, Alison; Rodgers, Jeff; Glowacki, David R.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly review the boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) method which allows analysis of thermodynamics and kinetics in complicated molecular systems. BXD is a multiscale technique, in which thermodynamics and long-time dynamics are recovered from a set of short-time simulations. In this paper, we review previous applications of BXD to peptide cyclization, solution phase organic reaction dynamics and desorption of ions from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). We also report preliminary results of simulations of diamond etching mechanisms and protein unfolding in atomic force microscopy experiments. The latter demonstrate a correlation between the protein's structural motifs and its potential of mean force. Simulations of these processes by standard molecular dynamics (MD) is typically not possible, because the experimental time scales are very long. However, BXD yields well-converged and physically meaningful results. Compared with other methods of accelerated MD, our BXD approach is very simple; it is easy to implement, and it provides an integrated approach for simultaneously obtaining both thermodynamics and kinetics. It also provides a strategy for obtaining statistically meaningful dynamical results in regions of configuration space that standard MD approaches would visit only very rarely. PMID:24982247

  7. Molecular investigation on the interaction of spermine with proteinase K by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Davar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The alteration in structure, function and stability of proteinase K in the presence of spermine was investigated using spectroscopic methods and simulation techniques. The stability and enzyme activity of proteinase K-spermine complex were significantly enhanced as compared to that of the pure enzyme. The increase in the value of Vmax and the catalytic efficiency of Proteinase K in presence of spermine confirmed that the polyamine could bring the enzyme hyperactivation. UV-vis spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism methods demonstrated that the binding of spermine changed the microenvironment and structure of proteinase K. The fluorescence studies, showing that spermine quenched the intensity of proteinase K with static mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters analysis suggested that hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces play a key role in complex stability which is in agreement with modeling studies. The CD spectra represented the secondary structure alteration of proteinase K with an increase in α-helicity and a decrease in β-sheet of proteinase K upon spermine conjugation. The molecular simulation results proposed that spermine could interact with proteinase K spontaneously at single binding site, which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. This agreement between experimental and theoretical results may be a worth method for protein-ligand complex studies.

  8. X-ray Constrained Extremely Localized Molecular Orbitals: Theory and Critical Assessment of the New Technique.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Alessandro

    2013-07-09

    Following the X-ray constrained wave function approach proposed by Jayatilaka, we have devised a new technique that allows to extract molecular orbitals strictly localized on small molecular fragments from sets of experimental X-ray structure factors amplitudes. Since the novel strategy enables to obtain electron distributions that have quantum mechanical features and that can be easily interpreted in terms of traditional chemical concepts, the method can be also considered as a new useful tool for the determination and the analysis of charge densities from high-resolution X-ray experiments. In this paper, we describe in detail the theory of the new technique, which, in comparison to our preliminary work, has been improved both treating the effects of isotropic secondary extinctions and introducing a new protocol to halt the fitting procedure against the experimental X-ray scattering data. The performances of the novel strategy have been studied both in function of the basis-sets flexibility and in function of the quality of the considered crystallographic data. The tests performed on four different systems (α-glycine, l-cysteine, (aminomethyl)phosphonic acid and N-(trifluoromethyl)formamide) have shown that the achievement of good statistical agreements with the experimental measures mainly depends on the quality of the crystal structures (i.e., geometry positions and thermal parameters) used in the X-ray constrained calculations. Finally, given the reliable transferability of the obtained Extremely Localized Molecular Orbitals (ELMOs), we envisage to exploit the novel approach to construct new ELMOs databases suited to the development of linear-scaling methods for the refinement of macromolecular crystal structures.

  9. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M.; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L.; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). Methods One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Results Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. Conclusions By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood–brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. PMID:26188015

  10. New Molecular Techniques to Study the Skin Microbiota of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Sotto, Albert; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are a major and growing public health problem. They pose difficulties in clinical practice in both diagnosis and management. Bacterial interactions on the skin surface are important in the pathophysiology of DFU and may contribute to a delay in healing. Fully identifying bacteria present in these wounds is difficult with traditional culture methods. New molecular tools, however, have greatly contributed to our understanding of the role of the cutaneous microbiota in DFU. Recent Advances: Molecular technologies revealed new information concerning how bacteria are organized in DFU. This has led to the concept of “functionally equivalent pathogroups,” meaning that certain bacterial species which are usually nonpathogenic (or at least incapable of maintaining a chronic infection on their own) may coaggregate symbiotically in a pathogenic biofilm and act synergistically to cause a chronic infection. The distribution of pathogens in multispecies biofilms is nonrandom. The high bacterial diversity is probably related to the development of a microbial biofilm that is irreversibly attached to the wound matrix. Critical Issues: Using molecular techniques requires a financial outlay for high-cost equipment. They are still too time-consuming to perform and reporting is too delayed for them to be used in routine practice. Finally, they do not differentiate live from dead or pathogenic from nonpathogenic microorganisms. Future Directions: Molecular tools have better documented the composition and organization of the skin flora. Further advances are required to elucidate which among the many bacteria in the DFU flora are likely to be pathogens, rather than colonizers. PMID:25566413

  11. Case report: Concomitant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Cytogenetically Normal de novo Acute Leukaemia in a Patient.

    PubMed

    Kajtár, Béla; Rajnics, Péter; Egyed, Miklós; Alizadeh, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of acute myeloid leukaemia with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who was evaluated for macrocytic anaemia. Based on the morphology and immunophenotyping analysis of peripheral blood, a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was established. Subsequently, the bone marrow examination revealed the presence of two distinct, coexisting CLL and AML clones. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis detected deletion 13q14.3 and unmutated immunoglobulin variable heavy-chain in the CLL clone, only. The AML and CLL clones did not share clonality, and the AML did not involve the peripheral blood. A diagnosis of cytogenetically normal de novo AML occurring concurrently with untreated CLL has not been reported previously in English literature.

  12. Role of Artificial Intelligence Techniques (Automatic Classifiers) in Molecular Imaging Modalities in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cascianelli, Silvia; Scialpi, Michele; Amici, Serena; Forini, Nevio; Minestrini, Matteo; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Sinzinger, Helmut; Schillaci, Orazio; Palumbo, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a very active Computer Science research field aiming to develop systems that mimic human intelligence and is helpful in many human activities, including Medicine. In this review we presented some examples of the exploiting of AI techniques, in particular automatic classifiers such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Classification Tree (ClT) and ensemble methods like Random Forest (RF), able to analyze findings obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) scans of patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases, in particular Alzheimer's Disease. We also focused our attention on techniques applied in order to preprocess data and reduce their dimensionality via feature selection or projection in a more representative domain (Principal Component Analysis - PCA - or Partial Least Squares - PLS - are examples of such methods); this is a crucial step while dealing with medical data, since it is necessary to compress patient information and retain only the most useful in order to discriminate subjects into normal and pathological classes. Main literature papers on the application of these techniques to classify patients with neurodegenerative disease extracting data from molecular imaging modalities are reported, showing that the increasing development of computer aided diagnosis systems is very promising to contribute to the diagnostic process.

  13. A Research Project-Based and Self-Determined Teaching System of Molecular Biology Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Shuping

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology techniques play a very important role in understanding the biological activity. Students who major in biology should know not only how to perform experiments, but also the reasons for performing them. Having the concept of conducting research by integrating various techniques is especially important. This paper introduces a…

  14. Use of molecular epidemiological techniques in a pilot study on workers exposed to chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, M; Levy, L S; Faux, S P; Aw, T C; Braithwaite, R A; Brown, S S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Molecular epidemiological techniques, capable of detecting damage to DNA, were used to see if such damage occurred in the lymphocytes of a group of workers exposed to chromium. The two aims of this pilot study were to see if these new techniques might make useful biological monitoring tools for workers exposed to chromium and also, to help assess whether the current occupational exposure limit for chromium (VI) was sufficiently protective in this specific working situation. METHODS--Volunteer groups of 10 workers exposed to chromium and 10 non-exposed workers provided urine and blood samples towards the end of the working week. Chromium concentrations were measured in whole blood, plasma, lymphocytes, and urine. Lymphocytes were used to examine two forms of DNA damage in the two groups; these were the level of DNA strand breakage and, the production of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. RESULTS--Chromium concentration in whole blood, plasma, and urine of workers exposed to chromium was significantly raised (P < 0.01) compared with non-exposed controls, but in isolated lymphocytes, there was only a modest but significant (P < 0.05) increase in chromium in the group exposed to chromium. There was no difference in the levels of DNA strand breaks or 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine between the groups. Air monitoring for chromium was not undertaken but current levels for the group exposed to chromium were reported to be around 0.01 mg/m3, which is 20% of the current United Kingdom occupational exposure limit. CONCLUSIONS--We were unable to detect any damage in lymphocytic DNA due to exposure to chromium. This may have been due to the low chromium exposure (< 20% of the United Kingdom occupational exposure limit), the ability of plasma to detoxify chromium (VI) to chromium (III) before it reached the lymphocytes, or perhaps the insensitivity of the molecular techniques used. It is now important to test these and other such techniques on groups exposed to levels closer to the

  15. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rayavarapu, Raja Gopal; Petersen, Wilma; Ungureanu, Constantin; Post, Janine N.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods) with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed. PMID:18354723

  16. Development of molecular based optical techniques for thermometry and velocimetry for fluorocarbon media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, Shahram; Blanchard, Gary; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    Fluorocarbon solvents are very stable inert fluids with unique physical properties that make them attractive compounds as refrigerant and several medical applications such as contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging. Since they do not mix with typical organic solvents or water, most luminescent (fluorescent or phosphorescent) probes cannot be used as tracers for optical diagnostic techniques. Perfluoropentane, a compound from this family, is used as a simulant fluid by NASA for two-phase heat transfer/mixing experiments under micro-gravity condition due to its low boiling temperature. Here we study the feasibility of employing non-intrusive optical methods for measurements of temperature and/or velocity within Perfluoropentane as the working fluid. Preliminary results of temperature and velocity measurement using Laser Induced Fluorescence and Molecular Tagging Velocimetry are presented. This work was supported by NASA Grant Number NNX16AD52A.

  17. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques.

    PubMed

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques.

  18. Novel techniques and future directions in molecular diagnosis of malaria in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Oriero, Eniyou Cheryll; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nwakanma, Davis C; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Jacobs, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Despite being preventable and treatable, malaria remains a global health concern with approximately 1.2 billion people at high risk of being infected, 90% of whom are in the resource-limited settings of sub-Saharan Africa. The continued decline in malaria cases globally has rekindled the possibility of elimination in certain regions. As humans constitute the main reservoir of malaria, prompt and accurate diagnosis by microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests is part not only of effective disease management but also of control measures. However, for malaria elimination, more sensitive diagnostic tools are needed to detect asymptomatic and sub-microscopic infections that contribute to transmission. Molecular techniques, which involve amplification of nucleic acids, are being developed and modified to suit this purpose. This report provides a summary of the nucleic acid amplification tests that are currently available for diagnosis of malaria, with current improvements and adaptations for use in resource-limited settings.

  19. Electrical characterization of ensemble of GaN nanowires grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.

    2013-08-01

    High quality Schottky contacts are formed on GaN nanowires (NWs) structures grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique on Si(111) substrate. The current-voltage characteristics show the rectification ratio of about 103 and the leakage current of about 10-4 A/cm2 at room temperature. From the capacitance-voltage measurements the free carrier concentration in GaN NWs is determined as about 1016 cm-3. Two deep levels (H200 and E280) are found in the structures containing GaN NWs. H200 is attributed to an extended defect located at the interface between the substrate and SiNx or near the sidewalls at the bottom of the NWs whereas E280 is tentatively assigned to a gallium-vacancy- or nitrogen interstitials-related defect.

  20. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques. PMID:25566219

  1. Molecular techniques to distinguish morphologically similar Hydrilla verticillata, Egeria densa, Elodea nuttallii, and Elodea canadensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rybicki, Nancy B.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    The four submerged aquatic species, hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata [monoecious and dioecious]), Brazilian waterweed (Egeria densa), Canadian waterweed (Elodea canadensis), and western waterweed (Elodea nuttallii), are difficult to positively identify because of their morphological similarity to each other, resulting in possible misidentification. This limits our ability to understand their past and present distribution, which is important in aquatic plant management. We investigated a molecular technique to identify these species, which are problematic because of their invasive nature on multiple continents. Approximately 100 samples of these species, ranging in age from 40-yr-old herbarium samples to recently collected plants, were collected from regions across the United States. The distribution and range of the samples collected in this research were compared to those reported in the literature. We confirmed information on the current wide distribution of both hydrilla biotypes in the United States and discovered that hydrilla had actually invaded the waterways near Washington, DC 6 yr earlier than originally reported. In addition, we found evidence of the confusion, dating back to the 1980s, between Canadian waterweed and western waterweed in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Canadian waterweed was previously reported as common and western waterweed as rare; however, our samples indicate the opposite is true. This information indicates there is a need for investigators to anticipate the spread of hydrilla populations to northern U.S. waterways, where it will compete with existing plant species, including Canadian and western waterweeds. Our ability to confirm distribution and pace of spread of invasive and noninvasive species will improve with increased application of molecular techniques.

  2. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Cushing, G W; Navin, J K; Valadez, L; Johánek, V; Harrison, I

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T(g), T(s); ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, T(g), and surface temperature, T(s), can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with T(g) = T(s) = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(T(g), T(s); ϑ) measurements for which T(g) ≠ T(s) provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the T(g) of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  3. Supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosome 6: cytogenetic, molecular cytogenetic, and array CGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Pearle, Phyllis; Rauen, Katherine A; Cotter, Philip D

    2012-07-01

    Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMC) are relatively common in prenatal diagnosis. As the clinical outcomes vary greatly, a better understanding of the karyotype-phenotype correlation for different SMCs will be important for genetic counseling. We present two cases of prenatally detected de novo, small SMCs. The markers were present in 80% of amniocyte colonies in Case 1 and 38% of the colonies in Case 2. The SMCs were determined to be derived from chromosome 6 during postnatal confirmation studies. Although the sizes and the chromosomal origin of the SMCs in these two cases appeared to be similar, the clinical outcomes varied. The clinical manifestations observed in Case 1 included small for gestational age, feeding difficulty at birth, hydronephrosis, deviated septum and dysmorphic features, while the phenotype is apparently normal in Case 2. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed and showed increase in dosage for approximately 26 Mb of genetic material from the proximal short and long arms of chromosome 6 in Case 1. Results of array CGH were uninformative in Case 2, either due to mosaicism or lack of detectable euchromatin. The difference in the clinical presentation in these two patients may have resulted from the difference in the actual gene contents of the marker chromosomes and/or the differential distribution of the mosaicism.

  4. Selective extraction of lamivudine in human serum and urine using molecularly imprinted polymer technique.

    PubMed

    Shekarchi, Maryam; Pourfarzib, Mojgan; Akbari-Adergani, Behrouz; Mehramizi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2013-07-15

    In this work, a novel technique is described for determination of lamivudine in biological fluids by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the sample clean-up method joint with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). MIPs were prepared using methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as crosslinker, acetonitrile and tetrahydrofuran as porogen and lamivudine as the template molecule. The new imprinted polymer was used as a molecular sorbent for the separation of lamivudine from human serum and urine. Molecular recognition properties, binding capacity and selectivity of the MIPs were evaluated and the results showed that the obtained MIPs have a high affinity for lamivudine in aqueous medium. HPLC analyses showed that the extraction of lamivudine from serum and urine by MIPs had a linear calibration curve in the range of 60-700μg/L with excellent precisions of 2.73% for serum and 2.60% for urine. The limit of detection and quantization of lamivudine was 19.34 and 58.6μg/L in serum and 7.95 and 24.05μg/L in urine respectively. MIP extraction provided about 10 fold LOQ improvement in serum and 5 fold LOQ improvement in urine samples. The recoveries of lamivudine in serum and urine samples were found to be 84.2-93.5% and 82.5-90.8% respectively. Due to the high precision and accuracy, this method may be the UV-HPLC choice with MIP extraction for bioequivalence analysis of lamivudine in serum and urine.

  5. Application of molecular techniques for the assessment of microorganism diversity on cultural heritage objects.

    PubMed

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their unpredictable ability to adapt to varying environmental conditions, microorganisms inhabit different types of biological niches on Earth. Owing to the key role of microorganisms in many biogeochemical processes, trends in modern microbiology emphasize the need to know and understand the structure and function of complex microbial communities. This is particularly important if the strategy relates to microbial communities that cause biodeterioration of materials that constitute our cultural heritage. Until recently, the detection and identification of microorganisms inhabiting objects of cultural value was based only on cultivation-dependent methods. In spite of many advantages, these methods provide limited information because they identify only viable organisms capable of growth under standard laboratory conditions. However, in order to carry out proper conservation and renovation, it is necessary to know the complete composition of microbial communities and their activity. This paper presents and characterizes modern techniques such as genetic fingerprinting and clone library construction for the assessment of microbial diversity based on molecular biology. Molecular methods represent a favourable alternative to culture-dependent methods and make it possible to assess the biodiversity of microorganisms inhabiting technical materials and cultural heritage objects.

  6. Molecular techniques for detection of Tribolium confusum infestations in stored products.

    PubMed

    Nowaczyk, K; Obrepalska-Steplowska, A; Gawlak, M; Throne, J E; Olejarski, P; Nawrot, J

    2009-08-01

    The confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a stored-product pest that contaminates a wide range of food products, from flour and cereals to spices. The insect reduces food quality and is responsible for large economic losses every year. Although several methods for detection of stored-product pests are common and widely used, they are time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, establishing molecular methods of detection of stored-product pests could provide a useful alternative method. We have undertaken attempts to establish methods of detection of T. confusum based on molecular biology techniques of standard and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Total DNA of T. confusum and red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), used as a negative control, was isolated from insects and used as a template in standard and real-time PCR reactions. Specific primers have been designed on the basis of sequences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) fragment of rDNA and subunit I of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase of T. confusum available in the GenBank database. Standard PCR reactions with primers specific to the ITS fragment proved to be reliable and sensitive. Real-time PCR reactions with primers specific for mitochondrial DNA are considered to serve as a supplemental detection method for quantitative assessment of the infestation level.

  7. Development of Pressure Sensitive Molecular Film as a Measurement Technique for Micro-Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Mori, H.; Sakazaki, Y.; Uchida, T.; Suzuki, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-01

    The pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has potential as a diagnostic tool for pressure measurement in the high Knudsen number regime because it works as a so-called "molecular sensor." However, there are few reports concerning application of the PSP to micro devices, because the conventional PSP is too thick owing to the use of polymer binder. In our previous work, we have adopted Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to fabricate pressure sensitive molecular films (PSMFs) using Pd(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PdMP). The PSMF based on PdMP has pressure sensitivity only at low pressure range (below 3 kPa). In this study, we have constructed PSMF composed of Pt(II) Mesoporphyrin IX (PtMP) to be applied to pressure measurement near atmospheric pressure. The pressure sensitivity of PSMF based on PtMP has been tested, and it is clarified that the PSMF of PtMP has equivalent pressure sensitivity of polymer PSP. Moreover, we have applied PSMF to measurement of pressure distribution of micro-channel gas flow, showing its usefulness.

  8. Sex determination of Pohnpei Micronesian kingfishers using morphological and molecular genetic techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, Dylan C.; Lopes, I.F.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation-oriented studies of Micronesian Kingfishers (Todiramphus cinnamominus) have been hindered by a lack of basic natural history information, despite the status of the Guam subspecies (T. c. cinnamominus) as one of the most endangered species in the world. We used tissue samples and morphometric measures from museum specimens and wild-captured Pohnpei Micronesian Kingfishers (T. c. reichenbachii) to develop methods for sex determination. We present a modified molecular protocol and a discriminant function that yields the probability that a particular individual is male or female. Our results revealed that females were significantly larger than males, and the discriminant function correctly predicted sex in 73% (30/41) of the individuals. The sex of 86% (18/21) of individuals was correctly assigned when a moderate reliability threshold was set. Sex determination using molecular genetic techniques was more reliable than methods based on morphology. Our results will facilitate recovery efforts for the critically endangered Guam Micronesian Kingfisher and provide a basis for sex determination in the 11 other endangered congeners in the Pacific Basin.

  9. Cytogenetic characterizations of central nervous system tumors: the first comprehensive report from a single institution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Uk; Kim, Dae-Cheol; Park, Joo-In; Han, Jin-Yeong

    2009-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system (CNS) tumors incorporates morphology, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and immunologic markers. Despite the relatively large number of CNS tumors with clonal chromosome abnormalities, only few studies have investigated cytogenetic abnormalities for CNS tumors in Korea. Thus, we investigated 119 CNS tumors by conventional G-banded karyotypes to characterize patterns of chromosomal abnormalities involving various CNS tumors, and 92.4% of them were cultured and karyotyped successfully. Totally, 51.8% of karyotypable CNS tumors showed abnormal cytogenetic results, including neuroepithelial tumors (75.0%), meningeal tumors (71.1%), pituitary adenomas (4.2%), schwannomas (44.4%), and metastatic tumors (100.0%). Glioblastomas had hyperdiploid, complex karyotypes, mainly involving chromosomes Y, 1, 2, 6, 7, 10, 12, 13, and 14. Monosomy 22 was observed in 56.4% of meningiomas. There was a significant increase in the frequencies of karyotypic complexity according to the increase of WHO grade between grades I and II (P=0.0422) or IV (P=0.0101). Abnormal karyotypes were more complex at high-grade tumors, suggesting that the karyotype reflects the biologic nature of the tumor. More detailed cytogenetic and molecular characterizations of CNS tumors contribute to better diagnostic criteria and deeper insights of tumorigenesis, eventually resulting in development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Full symmetry implementation in condensed matter and molecular physics-Modified group projector technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damnjanović, Milan; Milošević, Ivanka

    2015-06-01

    Symmetry is well established as one of the fundamental concepts in physics, accurately extracting relevant characteristics of the studied object, giving deep and transparent insight to its properties. In the solid state and molecular physics the most abundant application is reduction of the dimension of the eigenproblem of the Hamiltonian, with the resulting eigenvectors labeled by good quantum numbers, forming the so called symmetry adapted basis. Such a basis is the starting point for subsequent analysis of the physical properties of the system, performed usually by applying adequate perturbation technique. Standard procedure for finding a symmetry adapted basis involves Wigner operators, which are sums of the operators acting in the quantum state space (Hilbert space, most usually) over all elements of the symmetry group of the systems. However, both the dimension of the state space and the number of the symmetry transformations are infinite even in the simplest approximate models in crystal physics making obstacles for direct application of the standard Wigner projector technique, and its numerical implementation. On the other hand, there is a minimal part of the system, the full symmetry elementary cell (symcell), from which the whole system can be built by action of the full symmetry group elements on it. A clear heuristic idea, that symcell and full symmetry group, determine the properties of the entire system, is fully realized within modified group projector technique. Namely, when applying this technique, the full symmetry of the system is used to provide reduction of calculations to the symcell only, singling out its state space (of a finite dimension!) as the effective state space to be worked in. Physical observables, expressed through their irreducible tensor components, obtain their counterparts in this finite-dimensional space of a symcell. It remains to consider only the symmetry transformations which leave the symcell invariant. This is absolutely

  11. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Development of Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Coating by Cold Spray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Kesavan; Ichikawa, Yuji; Deplancke, Tiana; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Lame, Olivier; Cavaille, Jean-Yves

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene or UHMWPE is an extremely difficult material to coat with, as it is rubbery and chemically very inert. The Cold Spray process appears to be a promising alternative processing technique but polymers are in general difficult to deposit using this method. So, attempts to develop UHMWPE coatings were made using a downstream injection cold spray technique incorporating a few modifications. A conventional cold spray machine yielded only a few deposited particles of UHMWPE on the substrate surface, but with some modifications in the nozzle geometry (especially the length and inner geometry) a thin coating of 45 μm on Al substrate was obtained. Moreover, experiments with the addition of fumed nano-alumina to the feedstock yielded a coating of 1-4 mm thickness on Al and polypropylene substrates. UHMWPE was seen to be melt crystallized during the coating formation, as can be seen from the differential calorimetry curves. Influence of nano-ceramic particles was explained by observing the creation of a bridge bond between UHMWPE particles.

  13. The use of molecular imaging combined with genomic techniques to understand the heterogeneity in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, R; Ganeshan, B; Irshad, S; Lawler, K; Eisenblätter, M; Milewicz, H; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Miles, K; Ellis, P; Groves, A; Punwani, S

    2014-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity has, in recent times, come to play a vital role in how we understand and treat cancers; however, the clinical translation of this has lagged behind advances in research. Although significant advancements in oncological management have been made, personalized care remains an elusive goal. Inter- and intratumour heterogeneity, particularly in the clinical setting, has been difficult to quantify and therefore to treat. The histological quantification of heterogeneity of tumours can be a logistical and clinical challenge. The ability to examine not just the whole tumour but also all the molecular variations of metastatic disease in a patient is obviously difficult with current histological techniques. Advances in imaging techniques and novel applications, alongside our understanding of tumour heterogeneity, have opened up a plethora of non-invasive biomarker potential to examine tumours, their heterogeneity and the clinical translation. This review will focus on how various imaging methods that allow for quantification of metastatic tumour heterogeneity, along with the potential of developing imaging, integrated with other in vitro diagnostic approaches such as genomics and exosome analyses, have the potential role as a non-invasive biomarker for guiding the treatment algorithm. PMID:24597512

  14. The use of molecular imaging combined with genomic techniques to understand the heterogeneity in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R; Ganeshan, B; Irshad, S; Lawler, K; Eisenblätter, M; Milewicz, H; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Miles, K; Ellis, P; Groves, A; Punwani, S; Ng, T

    2014-06-01

    Tumour heterogeneity has, in recent times, come to play a vital role in how we understand and treat cancers; however, the clinical translation of this has lagged behind advances in research. Although significant advancements in oncological management have been made, personalized care remains an elusive goal. Inter- and intratumour heterogeneity, particularly in the clinical setting, has been difficult to quantify and therefore to treat. The histological quantification of heterogeneity of tumours can be a logistical and clinical challenge. The ability to examine not just the whole tumour but also all the molecular variations of metastatic disease in a patient is obviously difficult with current histological techniques. Advances in imaging techniques and novel applications, alongside our understanding of tumour heterogeneity, have opened up a plethora of non-invasive biomarker potential to examine tumours, their heterogeneity and the clinical translation. This review will focus on how various imaging methods that allow for quantification of metastatic tumour heterogeneity, along with the potential of developing imaging, integrated with other in vitro diagnostic approaches such as genomics and exosome analyses, have the potential role as a non-invasive biomarker for guiding the treatment algorithm.

  15. High-Resolution Cytogenetic Map for the African Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharakhova, Maria V.; Sharakhov, Igor V.

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic and physical maps are indispensible for precise assembly of genome sequences, functional characterization of chromosomal regions, and population genetic and taxonomic studies. We have created a new cytogenetic map for Anopheles gambiae by using a high-pressure squash technique that increases overall band clarity. To link chromosomal regions to the genome sequence, we attached genome coordinates, based on 302 markers of BAC, cDNA clones, and PCR-amplified gene fragments, to the chromosomal bands and interbands at approximately a 0.5-1 Mb interval. In addition, we placed the breakpoints of seven common polymorphic inversions on the map and described the chromosomal landmarks for the arm and inversion identification. The map's improved resolution can be used to further enhance physical mapping, improve genome assembly, and stimulate epigenomic studies of malaria vectors. PMID:20609021

  16. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Badari Nath, A R S; Sivaramakrishna, A; Marimuthu, K M; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-05

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco. This PHA (Gibco) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  17. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badari Nath, A. R. S.; Sivaramakrishna, A.; Marimuthu, K. M.; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco®. This PHA (Gibco®) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco®) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  18. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  19. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  20. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  1. Integrated cytogenetic BAC map of the genome of the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Duke, S E; Samollow, P B; Mauceli, E; Lindblad-Toh, K; Breen, M

    2007-01-01

    The generation of high-quality genome assemblies for numerous species is advancing at a rapid pace. As the number of genome assemblies increases, so does our ability to investigate genome relationships and their contributions to unraveling complex biological, evolutionary, and biomedical processes. A key process in the generation of a genome assembly is to determine and verify the precise physical location and order of the large sequence blocks (scaffolds) that result from the assembly. For organisms of relatively recent common ancestry this process may be achieved largely through comparative sequence alignment. However, as the evolutionary distance between species lengthens, the use of comparative sequence alignment becomes increasingly less reliable. Simultaneous cytogenetic mapping, using multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, offers an alternative means to define the cytogenetic location and relative order of DNA sequences, thereby anchoring the genome sequence to the karyotype. In this article we report the molecular cytogenetic locations of 415 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that served to anchor sequence scaffolds of the gray, short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) to its karyotype, which enabled accurate integration of these regions into the genome assembly.

  2. Definition of the zebrafish genome using flow cytometry and cytogenetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer L; Adeniyi, Adeola; Banerjee, Ruby; Dallaire, Stephanie; Maguire, Sean F; Chi, Jianxiang; Ng, Bee Ling; Zepeda, Cinthya; Scott, Carol E; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Carter, Nigel P; Yang, Fengtang; Lee, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Background The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism system for biomedical research. The syntenic conservation between the zebrafish and human genome allows one to investigate the function of human genes using the zebrafish model. To facilitate analysis of the zebrafish genome, genetic maps have been constructed and sequence annotation of a reference zebrafish genome is ongoing. However, the duplicative nature of teleost genomes, including the zebrafish, complicates accurate assembly and annotation of a representative genome sequence. Cytogenetic approaches provide "anchors" that can be integrated with accumulating genomic data. Results Here, we cytogenetically define the zebrafish genome by first estimating the size of each linkage group (LG) chromosome using flow cytometry, followed by the cytogenetic mapping of 575 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones onto metaphase chromosomes. Of the 575 BAC clones, 544 clones localized to apparently unique chromosomal locations. 93.8% of these clones were assigned to a specific LG chromosome location using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and compared to the LG chromosome assignment reported in the zebrafish genome databases. Thirty-one BAC clones localized to multiple chromosomal locations in several different hybridization patterns. From these data, a refined second generation probe panel for each LG chromosome was also constructed. Conclusion The chromosomal mapping of the 575 large-insert DNA clones allows for these clones to be integrated into existing zebrafish mapping data. An accurately annotated zebrafish reference genome serves as a valuable resource for investigating the molecular basis of human diseases using zebrafish mutant models. PMID:17597531

  3. Electrochemical microfluidic chip based on molecular imprinting technique applied for therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Min; Tian, Liping; Sun, Shiguo; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Feilang; Li, Yingchun

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical detection platform was established by integrating molecularly imprinting technique with microfluidic chip and applied for trace measurement of three therapeutic drugs. The chip foundation is acrylic panel with designed grooves. In the detection cell of the chip, a Pt wire is used as the counter electrode and reference electrode, and a Au-Ag alloy microwire (NPAMW) with 3D nanoporous surface modified with electro-polymerized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film as the working electrode. Detailed characterization of the chip and the working electrode was performed, and the properties were explored by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two methods, respectively based on electrochemical catalysis and MIP/gate effect were employed for detecting warfarin sodium by using the prepared chip. The linearity of electrochemical catalysis method was in the range of 5×10(-6)-4×10(-4)M, which fails to meet clinical testing demand. By contrast, the linearity of gate effect was 2×10(-11)-4×10(-9)M with remarkably low detection limit of 8×10(-12)M (S/N=3), which is able to satisfy clinical assay. Then the system was applied for 24-h monitoring of drug concentration in plasma after administration of warfarin sodium in rabbit, and the corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained. In addition, the microfluidic chip was successfully adopted to analyze cyclophosphamide and carbamazepine, implying its good versatile ability. It is expected that this novel electrochemical microfluidic chip can act as a promising format for point-of-care testing via monitoring different analytes sensitively and conveniently.

  4. Evaluation of the ultraviolet/ozone technique for on-orbit removal of photolyzed molecular contamination from optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frink, Mark E.; Folkman, Mark A.; Darnton, Lane A.

    1992-12-01

    Molecular species outgassed from spacecraft materials adhere tenaciously to and darken spacecraft surfaces when exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Such deposits severely degrade the performance of optical systems operating at UV and visible wavelengths. Data is presented which demonstrates the feasibility of a UV/Ozone cleaning technique in removing such deposits in a space-compatible configuration without damage to the optical surface. The technique involves the UV irradiation of the optical surface in the presence of low pressure molecular oxygen, resulting in the photolytic formation of ozone (O3) and subsequent photochemical removal of the contamination.

  5. [Cat-eye syndrome. Clinical and cytogenetical differentialdiagnosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kunze, J; Tolksdorf, M; Wiedemann, H R

    1975-01-01

    We report a 5 1/2-year-old girl whose clinical symptoms are consistent with diagnosis of the cat-eye syndrome. The prominent symptoms are: anal stenosis, preauricular tags and pits, coloboma of the iris, doubling of the pelvis and ureter on both sides, vesicourethral reflux on the right side and normal mental development. Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase is normal. Chromosomal analysis shows a supernumerary submetacentric chromosome. This extra chromosome is smaller than the G-group chromosomes and has satellites on the short and long arms. Autoradiography after 3H-thymidine incorporation shows a late-labeling marker chromosome. After using the Giemsa-banding technique, the chromatides demonstrate dark bandings with only soft, unstained satellites. With the fluorescence method, one can see spotlike fluorescence of the satellites on both arms and diffuse fluorescence of the hetero-chromatic segments. In addition, the C-bandings demonstrate a homogeneous dark staining of the chromatids, but we did not find stained satellites. Using the Giemsa-11 technique one can see the 47th chromosome with predominantly heterochromatic parts, but small euchromatic segments are visible between them. Satellites are unstained. Using currently accepted cytogenetical methods, it is not possible to identify the origin of this supernumerary marker chromosome.

  6. Quantum and Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) Monte Carlo Techniques for Modeling Condensed-Phase Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Wiliiam L.

    2014-01-01

    A recent review (Acc. Chem. Res. 2010, 43:142–151) examined our use and development of a combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) technique for modelling organic and enzymatic reactions. Advances included the PDDG/PM3 semiempirical QM (SQM) method, computation of multi-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for rapidly treating proton-transfer reactions. The current article serves as a follow up on our progress. Highlights include new reactions, alternative SQM methods, a polarizable OPLS force field, and novel solvent environments, e.g., “on water” and room temperature ionic liquids. The methodology is strikingly accurate across a wide range of condensed-phase and antibody-catalyzed reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, isomerization, and pericyclic classes. Comparisons are made to systems treated with continuum-based solvents and ab initio or density functional theory (DFT) methods. Overall, the QM/MM methodology provides detailed characterization of reaction paths, proper configurational sampling, several advantages over implicit solvent models, and a reasonable computational cost. PMID:25431625

  7. Comparison of the utility of barley retrotransposon families for genetic analysis by molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Leigh, F; Kalendar, R; Lea, V; Lee, D; Donini, P; Schulman, A H

    2003-07-01

    The Sequence-Specific Amplification Polymorphism (S-SAP) method, and the related molecular marker techniques IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), are based on retrotransposon activity, and are increasingly widely used. However, there have been no systematic analyses of the parameters of these methods or of the utility of different retrotransposon families in producing polymorphic, scorable fingerprints. We have generated S-SAP, IRAP, and REMAP data for three barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) varieties using primers based on sequences from six retrotransposon families (BARE-1, BAGY-1, BAGY-2, Sabrina, Nikita and Sukkula). The effect of the number of selective bases on the S-SAP profiles has been examined and the profiles obtained with eight MseI+3 selective primers compared for all the elements. Polymorphisms detected in the insertion pattern of all the families show that each can be used for S-SAP. The uniqueness of each transposition event and differences in the historic activity of each family suggest that the use of multiple retrotransposon families for genetic analysis will find applications in mapping, fingerprinting, and marker-assisted selection and evolutionary studies, not only in barley and other Hordeum species and related taxa, but also more generally.

  8. Species identification of Mycobacterium avium complex isolates by a variety of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Beggs, M L; Stevanova, R; Eisenach, K D

    2000-02-01

    Organisms in the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; M. avium, M. intracellulare, and "nonspecific or X" MAC) are emerging pathogens among individual organisms of which significant genetic variability is displayed. The objective of the present study was to evaluate various molecular methods for the rapid and definitive identification of MAC species. Isolates were obtained from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and HIV-negative patients with and without known predisposing conditions. The isolates were initially hybridized with nucleic acid probes complementary to the rRNA of the respective mycobacterial species (AccuProbe Culture Confirmation kits for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MAC species; Gen-Probe). Isolates were also examined by PCR and in some cases by Southern blot hybridization for the insertion element IS1245. Two other techniques included a PCR assay that amplifies the mig gene, a putative virulence factor for MAC, and hsp65 gene amplification and sequencing. This study led to the following observations. Eighty-five percent of the isolates from HIV-positive patients were M. avium and 86% of the isolates from HIV-negative patients were M. intracellulare. Fifteen of the M. avium isolates did not contain IS1245 and 7% of the M. intracellulare isolates were found to carry IS1245. All of the M. avium strains were mig positive, and all of the M. intracellulare strains were mig negative.

  9. Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and haematology in 2013.

    PubMed

    Huret, Jean-Loup; Ahmad, Mohammad; Arsaban, Mélanie; Bernheim, Alain; Cigna, Jérémy; Desangles, François; Guignard, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemot-Perbal, Marie-Christine; Labarussias, Maureen; Leberre, Vanessa; Malo, Anne; Morel-Pair, Catherine; Mossafa, Hossein; Potier, Jean-Claude; Texier, Guillaume; Viguié, Franck; Yau Chun Wan-Senon, Sylvie; Zasadzinski, Alain; Dessen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology (http://AtlasGeneticsOncology.org) is a peer-reviewed internet journal/encyclopaedia/database focused on genes implicated in cancer, cytogenetics and clinical entities in cancer and cancer-prone hereditary diseases. The main goal of the Atlas is to provide review articles that describe complementary topics, namely, genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and a large iconography. This description, which was historically based on karyotypic abnormalities and in situ hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization) techniques, now benefits from comparative genomic hybridization and massive sequencing, uncovering a tremendous amount of genetic rearrangements. As the Atlas combines different types of information (genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and external links), its content is currently unique. The Atlas is a cognitive tool for fundamental and clinical research and has developed into an encyclopaedic work. In clinical practice, it contributes to the cytogenetic diagnosis and may guide treatment decision making, particularly regarding rare diseases (because they are numerous and are frequently encountered). Readers as well as the authors of the Atlas are researchers and/or clinicians.

  10. Clinical and cytogenetic features of 508 Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and comparison with those in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhao, W-L; Jin, J; Xue, Y-Q; Cheng, X; Chen, X-T; Cui, J; Chen, Z-M; Cao, Q; Yang, G; Yao, Y; Xia, H-L; Tong, J-H; Li, J-M; Chen, J; Xiong, S-M; Shen, Z-X; Waxman, S; Chen, Z; Chen, S-J

    2005-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and leukemia progression. Racial differences may exist on clinical pictures and the molecular events leading to MDS, which are heterogeneous. To better define the clinical and cytogenetic features in Chinese patients, a retrospective multicentric study was performed in 508 MDS cases. Compared with Western countries, Chinese patients showed younger age (median: 49 vs 65-73 years), lower percentages of RARS (2.8 vs 6.6-15.3%), and CMML (5.2 vs 11.7-30.6%). Cytogenetically, among 367 cases with evaluable data, abnormal karyotypes were found in 136 cases, including 56 numerical and 80 structural changes. Incidences of single chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities were lower than those in Western countries (2.2 vs 17.8-42.5%). However, complex cytogenetic aberrations and chromosome translocations were frequently observed and related to poor prognosis. Both multiple chromosome deletions and translocations were detected in advanced subtypes (RAEB and RAEB-T). Analysis of 200 cases revealed a higher incidence of hepatitis-B-virus infection than that in non-MDS population (21.00 vs 9.75%). This study further confirmed: (1) different genetic/environmental backgrounds between Asian and Western MDS populations; (2) a strong predictive value of cytogenetic abnormalities on disease outcome and involvement of genomic instability in leukemia clone development.

  11. Molecular and Cytogenic Analyses on Brazilian Youths with Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estecio, Marcos Roberto Higino; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Fridman, Cintia; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated cytogenetic and molecular parameters in 30 Brazilian youths with autism or other pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The high frequency of chromosomopathies found support the hypothesis that PDDs may develop as a consequence to chromosomal abnormalities and justify the cytogenetic and molecular assessment during diagnosis…

  12. Characterization of Microstructure and Molecular Dynamics with High Frequency Oscillatory Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmler, Torsten; Amin, Samiul; Ferrante, Andrea; Pechhold, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the rheological behaviour of complex viscoelastic fluids, polymer melts and other soft materials, motor-drive controlled rheometers are mainly used, either at constant stress or strain rate, or in the oscillatory mode. The latter has proved advantageous to discover the viscoelastic functions G*, η*, J* as fingerprints of the material under investigation, it's composition, molecular modelling and applicability. A conclusive analysis of such a viscoelastic spectrum can only be achieved if the amplitudes chosen guarantee linearity and if the frequency range covers more than 6 decades to reach the low kHz-domain. Investigations of many materials with motor-drive controlled rheometers are limited at higher frequencies and reach the above mentioned goal by applying the time-temperature superposition principle, i.e. the mastercurve technique. Since this method is restricted to rheologically simple materials (e.g. some polymer melts), but exclude those of small activation energies and others with temperature-sensitive chemical/physical structures including phase transitions, oscillating rheometry should be extended into higher real-frequency ranges, to establish useful linear viscoelastic spectroscopy. Since complex fluids can have structural arrangement over a wide range of lengthscales and their relaxation mechanisms can impact the dynamics over a wide range of timescales, multiple techniques need to be employed in order to accurately and fully establish the links between rheology, microstructure & dynamics. This is also critical information, required for fully validating developed theory and models. In this talk, advantages and limits of classical oscillatory rheometry will be covered, handling and principle of operation of two high frequency options are introduced and typical examples for real frequency spectra on soft matter, such as polymer melts, polymer solutions and weak gels will be shown. A xanthum gum based system has been investigated not only

  13. Clinical and molecular analyses of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: Comparison between spontaneous conception and assisted reproduction techniques.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Jair; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Fernández, García-Moya; Segovia, Mabel; Perandones, Claudia; Pérez Jurado, Luis A; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario; Arias, Pedro; Gordo, Gema; Dapía, Irene; Mena, Rocío; Palomares, María; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Nevado, Julián; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Vallespín, Elena; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by an excessive prenatal and postnatal growth, macrosomia, macroglossia, and hemihyperplasia. The molecular basis of this syndrome is complex and heterogeneous, involving genes located at 11p15.5. BWS is correlated with assisted reproductive techniques. BWS in individuals born following assisted reproductive techniques has been found to occur four to nine times higher compared to children with to BWS born after spontaneous conception. Here, we report a series of 187 patients with to BWS born either after assisted reproductive techniques or conceived naturally. Eighty-eight percent of BWS patients born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR in comparison with 49% for patients with BWS conceived naturally. None of the patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypermethylation of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR, neither CDKN1 C mutations nor patUPD11. We did not find differences in the frequency of multi-locus imprinting disturbances between groups. Patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had an increased frequency of advanced bone age, congenital heart disease, and decreased frequency of earlobe anomalies but these differences may be explained by the different molecular background compared to those with BWS and spontaneous fertilization. We conclude there is a correlation of the molecular etiology of BWS with the type of conception. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Cytogenetic findings in patients with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cortés, F; Alliende, M; Curotto, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to describe the frequency of non classical forms of 21 trisomy in patients with Down's syndrome at the cytogenetic's laboratory of our institution (Instituto de Nutrición y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Universidad de Chile) 201 chromosomal studies from peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients referred with a clinical diagnosis of Down's syndrome were analyzed. Among them 22 (11%) cases showed no chromosomal abnormalities, 161 (80%) had classic 21 trisomy, 7 (3.5%), showed 21 trisomy by translocation, 5 (2.5%) had 21 trisomy mosaicism, 6 (3%) showed 21 trisomy plus an autosomic balanced translocation. Male to female rate was 1.18:1 and diagnosis was done at the neonatal period in 26.8% of cases. Early recognition of the different kinds of chromosomal abnormalities in Down's syndrome is important if appropriate genetic council is the goal.

  15. Cytogenetics Findings in a Histiocytic Sarcoma Case

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Dominguez, J. M.; Calbacho, M.; Talavera, M.; Villalon, C.; Abalo, L.; Garcia-Gutierrez, J. V.; Lozano, S.; Tenorio, M.; Villarrubia, J.; Lopez-Jimenez, J.; Ferro, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is a neoplasm derived from histiocytes. Its diagnosis was not clear until its immunohistochemistry profile was correctly established. Not much is known about its genetic properties. We report a case of a 48-year-old male patient whose bone marrow was almost completely occupied by monomorphic medium size neoplastic cellularity. Its immunohistochemical profile was CD68+, CD4+, CD45+ with negativity of other dendritic cells, and other lineage markers. Cytogenetic study showed 4 related clones: one with trisomy 8 and extra material on the short arms of chromosome 4; a second line with tetrasomy of chromosome 8, add(4)(p16); the third clone had the same alterations as the previous and deletion of chromosome 3 at q11; the fourth line had tetrasomy 8 and translocation t(3;5)(q25;q35). To our knowledge this is the first HS case showing chromosome 8 trisomy and tetrasomy and the other described alterations. PMID:22937328

  16. Comparative Cytogenetics of the Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Seibold-Torres, Cassandra; Owens, Elaine; Chowdhary, Renuka; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Tizard, Ian; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-01-01

    The Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus, PER) is an endemic species of Central Africa, valued for its intelligence and listed as vulnerable due to poaching and habitat destruction. Improved knowledge about the P. erithacus genome is needed to address key biological questions and conservation of this species. The P. erithacus genome was studied using conventional and molecular cytogenetic approaches including Zoo-FISH. P. erithacus has a 'typical' parrot karyotype with 2n = 62-64 and 8 pairs of macrochromosomes. A distinct feature was a sharp macro-microchromosome boundary. Telomeric sequences were present at all chromosome ends and interstitially in PER2q, the latter coinciding with a C-band. NORs mapped to 4 pairs of microchromosomes which is in contrast to a single NOR in ancestral type avian karyotypes. Zoo-FISH with chicken macrochromosomes GGA1-9 and Z revealed patterns of conserved synteny similar to many other avian groups, though neighboring synteny combinations of GGA6/7, 8/9, and 1/4 were distinctive only to parrots. Overall, P. erithacus shared more Zoo-FISH patterns with neotropical macaws than Australian species such as cockatiel and budgerigar. The observations suggest that Psittaciformes karyotypes have undergone more extensive evolutionary rearrangements compared to the majority of other avian genomes.

  17. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Crossley, Maxwell J; Hush, Noel S; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-12-20

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology.

  18. Thin-film growth and patterning techniques for small molecular organic compounds used in optoelectronic device applications.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shaurjo; Shalev, Olga; Shtein, Max

    2013-01-01

    Rapid advances in research and development in organic electronics have resulted in many exciting discoveries and applications, including organic light-emitting devices for information display and illumination, solar cells, photodetectors, chemosensors, and logic. Organic optoelectronic materials are broadly classified as polymeric or small molecular. For the latter category, solvent-free deposition techniques are generally preferred to form well-defined interfaces and improve device performance. This article reviews several deposition and patterning methods for small molecular thin films and devices, including organic molecular beam deposition, vacuum thermal evaporation, organic vapor phase deposition, and organic vapor jet printing, and compares them to several other methods that have been proposed recently. We hope this review provides a compact but informative summary of the state of the art in organic device processing and addresses the various techniques' governing physical principles.

  19. Fabrication of a novel biosensor for macromolecules detection through molecular imprinting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingjie

    There is an increasing need for precise molecular detection as a diagnostic tool for early identification of diseases, pathogens, and abnormal protein levels in the body. Typical chemical analytical methods are generally costly, unstable, and time-consuming. Molecular imprinting (MI) technique, based on the "lock and key model", could be a simple method to overcome those shortcomings. In this study, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was employed as a platform to fabricate MI biosensor for detection of macromolecules. I demonstrated that, when the monolayer was formed on a rough surface, this method was in fact templating molecules in three dimensions, and hence was not limited by the height of the monolayer, but rather by the height of the roughness. This hypothesis was tested on biomolecules of multiple length scales. The SAM is assembled on the walls of the niche, forming a 3D pattern of the analyte uniquely molded to its contour. The surfaces with multi-scale roughness were prepared by evaporation of gold onto electropolished (smooth) and unpolished (rough) Si wafers, where the native roughness was found to have a normal distribution centered around 5 and 90 nm respectively. Our studies, using molecules, such as proteins, i.e., hemoglobin, ranging from a few nanometers, to viruses (i.e. polio, adenovirus), ranging from several tens of nanometers, and protein complexes ranging from several hundred nanometers, showed that when the size of the analyte matched the roughness of the gold surface, this method was very effective and could detect even small changes in the configuration, such as those induced by changes in the pH of the system. The detection method was further quantified by applying it to the detection of CEA in pancreatic cyst fluid obtained from 18 patients under IRB 95867-6. The results of the MI biosensor were directly compared with those obtained using ELISA in the hospital pathology laboratory with excellent agreement, except that the MI biosensor

  20. First cytogenetic information for Drymoreomys albimaculatus (Rodentia, Cricetidae), a recently described genus from Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Di-Nizo, Camilla B.; Neves, Carolina L.; Silva, Maria José de Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The recently described taxon Drymoreomys albimaculatus is endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and its biology and genetics are still poorly known. Herein, we present, for the first time, the karyotype of the species using classical and molecular cytogenetics, which showed 2n=62, FN=62, and interstitial telomeric signals at the sex chromosomes. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from the two karyotyped individuals verify the taxonomic identity as the recently described Drymoreomys albimaculatus and confirm the relationship of the species with other Oryzomyini. Additionally, external morphological information is provided. PMID:23794904

  1. Fundamentals of quality assessment of molecular amplification methods in clinical diagnostics. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Scientific Division Committee on Molecular Biology Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, M; Braun, A; Wagener, C

    1998-01-01

    The increasing interest in molecular biology diagnostics is a result of the tremendous gain of scientific knowledge in genetics, made possible especially since the introduction of amplification techniques. High expectations have been placed on genetic testing, and the number of laboratories now using the relevant technology is rapidly increasing--resulting in an obvious need for standardization and definition of laboratory organization. This communication is an effort towards that end. We address aspects that should be considered when structuring a new molecular diagnostic laboratory, and we discuss individual preanalytical and analytical procedures, from sampling to evaluation of assay results. In addition, different means of controlling contamination are discussed. Because the methodology is in constant change, no general standards can be defined. Accordingly, this publication is intended to serve as a recommendation for good laboratory practice and internal quality control and as a guide to troubleshooting, primarily in amplification techniques.

  2. An opportune life: 50 years in human cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    This article is one person's view of human cytogenetics over the past 50 years. The flowering of human cytogenetics led the way to the establishment of clinical genetics as one of the most important developments in medicine in the twentieth century. The article is written from the viewpoint of a scientist who never tired of analyzing the images of dividing cells on the light microscope and interpreting the wealth of information contained in them.

  3. Molecular Technique to Reduce PCR Bias for Deeper Understanding of Microbial Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Current planetary protection policies require that spacecraft targeted to sensitive solar system bodies be assembled and readied for launch in controlled cleanroom environments. A better understanding of the distribution and frequency at which high-risk contaminant microbes are encountered on spacecraft surfaces would significantly aid in assessing the threat of forward contamination. However, despite a growing understanding of the diverse microbial populations present in cleanrooms, less abundant microbial populations are probably not adequately taken into account due to technological limitations. This novel approach encompasses a wide spectrum of microbial species and will represent the true picture of spacecraft cleanroom-associated microbial diversity. All of the current microbial diversity assessment techniques are based on an initial PCR amplification step. However, a number of factors are known to bias PCR amplification and jeopardize the true representation of bacterial diversity. PCR amplification of a minor template appears to be suppressed by the amplification of a more abundant template. It is widely acknowledged among environmental molecular microbiologists that genetic biosignatures identified from an environment only represent the most dominant populations. The technological bottleneck overlooks the presence of the less abundant minority population and may underestimate their role in the ecosystem maintenance. DNA intercalating agents such as propidium monoazide (PMA) covalently bind with DNA molecules upon photolysis using visible light, and make it unavailable for DNA polymerase enzyme during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Environmental DNA samples will be treated with suboptimum PMA concentration, enough to intercalate with 90 99% of the total DNA. The probability of PMA binding with DNA from abundant bacterial species will be much higher than binding with DNA from less abundant species. This will increase the relative DNA concentration of

  4. [Evaluation of discriminatory power of molecular epidemiology techniques in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Venezuelan isolates].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marìa Victoria; León, Cristy; Escalona, Arnelly; Abadia, Edgar; Da Mata, Omaira; de Waard, Jacobus; Takiff, Howard Eugene

    2016-03-01

    The techniques of spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit and variable-number tandem repeat typing with 24 loci (MIRU-VNTR-24), have been used to study the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was: to evaluate the discriminative power of MIRU-VNTR 24 loci alone and in association with spoligotyping in clinical isolates of M tuberculosis in Venezuela; the allelic diversity of the 24 loci; and the discriminative power for the combination of 24 and 15 loci, 12 traditional loci (12t), those with higher allelic diversity and a new combination named 12inv. We analyzed one set of 104 strains of different lineages and a second set of 431 strains belonging to the Latin-America and Mediterranean lineage (LAM) that is predominant in Venezuela. The determination of allelic diversity showed that 4052, 2163b, 424 y 2996 are highly discriminative. Clustering rates of MIRU-VNTR 24 loci, spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR combined with spoligotyping for 104 isolates were 18.27%, 71.15% and 14.4%, respectively, whereas with the 431 LAM strains the values were 43.2 %, 95.8% and 37.4%. MIRU-VNTR combinations of 15, 12inv and 4 loci were more discriminatory than 12t. Clustering rates for MIRU-VNTR 15 and 12inv loci coupled with spoligotyping in the 104 isolated was 21% and 23%, while for LAM strains was 52% and 46% respectively. The number of different genetics patterns for 15 and 12inv loci were similar. In conclusion, we propose the use of a small number of informative loci MIRU-VNTR coupled to spoligotyping to investigate the transmission of tuberculosis in Venezuela.

  5. Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among Australian endemic tephritid fruit flies, the sibling species Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis have been serious horticultural pests since the introduction of horticulture in the nineteenth century. More recently, Bactrocera jarvisi has also been declared a pest in northern Australia. After several decades of genetic research there is now a range of classical and molecular genetic tools that can be used to develop improved Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) strains for control of these pests. Four-way crossing strategies have the potential to overcome the problem of inbreeding in mass-reared strains of B. tryoni. The ability to produce hybrids between B. tryoni and the other two species in the laboratory has proved useful for the development of genetically marked strains. The identification of Y-chromosome markers in B. jarvisi means that male and female embryos can be distinguished in any strain that carries a B. jarvisi Y chromosome. This has enabled the study of homologues of the sex-determination genes during development of B jarvisi and B. tryoni, which is necessary for the generation of genetic-sexing strains. Germ-line transformation has been established and a draft genome sequence for B. tryoni released. Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline. Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment. More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies. PMID:25470996

  6. Desulfovibrionales-related bacteria in a paper mill environment as detected with molecular techniques and culture.

    PubMed

    Maukonen, Johanna; Saarela, Maria; Raaska, Laura

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of a nested PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) method for the detection of Desulfovibrionales-related sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from paper mill samples. The samples were also analyzed with culturing. SRB cause/enhance industrial problems, namely creation of foul-smelling gases (hydrogen sulfide) and biological corrosion, and so far there has not been a simple method to study these bacteria in paper mill laboratories. In our study, culturing was able to detect Desulfovibrionales-related bacteria from two different white waters, two different brokes, pulp, clay, and slime. Out of the isolated Desulfovibrionales, 23 enrichment cultures were further characterized with Desulfovibrionales-selective PCR-DGGE. An identical Desulfovibrio species sequence was found from paper machine I (broke I, slime, and pulp) and from paper machine II (broke II and white water II), suggesting an in-house contamination with the same strain. Desulfovibrionales-selective PCR-DGGE was also performed from DNA templates extracted directly from the paper mill samples. The DGGE profiles derived from the samples without prior enrichment were more diverse and the sequenced amplicons proved to belong to the Desulfovibrionales order. Moreover, molecular techniques were able to detect Desulfovibrionales-related bacteria from calcium carbonate samples whereas culture did not. Altogether, the nested PCR-DGGE method used in this study was suitable for the detection of Desulfovibrionales-related SRB directly from different paper mill samples and it could be used for the rapid identification of SRB-contaminated industrial sites and, when combined with sequencing, for tracing of the contamination routes.

  7. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of familial Xp deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wandstrat, A.E.; Conroy, J.M.; Zurcher, V.L.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions involving the short arm of the X chromosome (del(Xp)) manifest phenotypes ranging from Turner syndrome to isolated short stature to normal. We have studied five familial cases of del(Xp), four with transmission over two generations and one over four generations, utilizing both high resolution chromosome banding and FISH with cosmid and YAC probes spanning the short arm of the X chromosome. Four of the families were ascertained because of short stature while the remaining family demonstrates normal stature and was ascertained through prenatal diagnosis. Consistent with existing data for a growth gene located within Xp22.33, the more terminal breakpoints in the female with normal stature is distal to CSF2RA. A correlation between genotype and phenotype amongst the families may reveal that this case is representative of an interstitial deletion and the other four cases have breakpoints distal to the growth gene locus possibly within the subtelomeric region of the chromosome. The proximal breakpoints are heterogenous; however, three of the families with short stature share a common proximal breakpoint which is located between two YAC probes 2-3 Mb apart in Xp22.12. The proximal break in the phenotypically normal female is in Xp11.4. Late replication studies in addition to methylation assays of the FMR1 locus reveal non-random X inactivation in these cases. This study shows the presence of a breakpoint distal to the CSF2RA locus in the family demonstrating normal stature confirming the location of a growth gene distal to this locus and within Xp22.33. The shared proximal breakpoint between the three families suggests a {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} for chromatin breakage. The proximal breakpoint, Xp11.4, in the normal female patient excludes this region as an etiologic factor in Turner syndrome. Work is in progress using additional probes to further elucidate both the proximal and distal breakpoints.

  8. A comprehensive molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome rearrangements in gibbons

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Oronzo; Carbone, Lucia; Stanyon, Roscoe R.; Marra, Annamaria; Yang, Fengtang; Whelan, Christopher W.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements in small apes are up to 20 times more frequent than in most mammals. Because of their complexity, the full extent of chromosome evolution in these hominoids is not yet fully documented. However, previous work with array painting, BAC-FISH, and selective sequencing in two of the four karyomorphs has shown that high-resolution methods can precisely define chromosome breakpoints and map the complex flow of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements. Here we use these tools to precisely define the rearrangements that have occurred in the remaining two karyomorphs, genera Symphalangus (2n = 50) and Hoolock (2n = 38). This research provides the most comprehensive insight into the evolutionary origins of chromosome rearrangements involved in transforming small apes genome. Bioinformatics analyses of the human–gibbon synteny breakpoints revealed association with transposable elements and segmental duplications, providing some insight into the mechanisms that might have promoted rearrangements in small apes. In the near future, the comparison of gibbon genome sequences will provide novel insights to test hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of chromosome evolution. The precise definition of synteny block boundaries and orientation, chromosomal fusions, and centromere repositioning events presented here will facilitate genome sequence assembly for these close relatives of humans. PMID:22892276

  9. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I.

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  10. Cytogenetic analysis of the third chromosome heterochromatin of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Koryakov, Dmitry E; Zhimulev, Igor F; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2002-01-01

    Previous cytological analysis of heterochromatic rearrangements has yielded significant insight into the location and genetic organization of genes mapping to the heterochromatin of chromosomes X, Y, and 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. These studies have greatly facilitated our understanding of the genetic organization of heterochromatic genes. In contrast, the 12 essential genes known to exist within the mitotic heterochromatin of chromosome 3 have remained only imprecisely mapped. As a further step toward establishing a complete map of the heterochomatic genetic functions in Drosophila, we have characterized several rearrangements of chromosome 3 by using banding techniques at the level of mitotic chromosome. Most of the rearrangement breakpoints were located in the dull fluorescent regions h49, h51, and h58, suggesting that these regions correspond to heterochromatic hotspots for rearrangements. We were able to construct a detailed cytogenetic map of chromosome 3 heterochromatin that includes all of the known vital genes. At least 7 genes of the left arm (from l(3)80Fd to l(3)80Fj) map to segment h49-h51, while the most distal genes (from l(3)80Fa to l(3)80Fc) lie within the h47-h49 portion. The two right arm essential genes, l(3)81Fa and l(3)81Fb, are both located within the distal h58 segment. Intriguingly, a major part of chromosome 3 heterochromatin was found to be "empty," in that it did not contain either known genes or known satellite DNAs. PMID:11861557

  11. [Cytogenetic features of teenage girls with secondary amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Nachetova, T A; Nefidova, V E

    2014-11-01

    Some features of the chromosome apparatus status were studied in 25 adolescent girls, aged 14-18, with secondary amenorrhea and in 29 girls of the same age with a regular menstrual cycle. Materials for cytogenetic analysis were preparations of chromosomes at the stage of metaphase obtained from the culture of the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The technique of the culture preparation was carried out according to the standard method. 2225 metaphase plates were analyzed in girls with secondary amenorrhea, and 2603 plates were tested in their healthy age-mates. An increased total level of chromosomal aberrations and a rise in the frequency of disorders in the chromatid, chromosome and genome types of peripheral blood lymphocytes have been registered in the examined persons as compared with their healthy age-mates. We have shown, that polyploid cell registered in 15 times oftener in adolescent girls with SA as compared with healthy girls. It can be assumed that some marked changes in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in patients with secondary amenorrhea and in their healthy age-mates may arise both as a result of exposure to the multiple environmental factors and disorders of rather complicated processes of DNA damages reparation.

  12. Differences in the distribution of cytogenetic subtypes between multiple myeloma patients with and without a family history of monoclonal gammopathy and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Cousin, Margot; Kumar, Shaji; Ketterling, Rhett P; Knudson, Ryan A; Larson, Dirk; Colby, Colin; Scott, Christopher; Vachon, Celine M; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-09-01

    We previously reported an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) in first-degree relatives of MGUS and multiple myeloma patients. Here, we examine whether primary cytogenetic categories of myeloma differ between patients with and without a family history of MGUS or myeloma. We studied 201 myeloma patients with available data on family history and molecular cytogenetic classification. Myeloma with trisomies was more common in probands who had an affected first-degree relative with MGUS or myeloma compared with those without a family history (46.9% vs. 33.5%, P = 0.125); however, the difference was not statistically significant. Additional studies on the cytogenetic types of myeloma associated with familial tendency are needed.

  13. Functional characterisation of metal(loid) processes in planta through the integration of synchrotron techniques and plant molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Erica; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lombi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    Functional characterisation of the genes regulating metal(loid) homeostasis in plants is a major focus of crop biofortification, phytoremediation, and food security research. This paper focuses on the potential for advancing plant metal(loid) research by combining molecular biology and synchrotron-based techniques. Recent advances in x-ray focussing optics and fluorescence detection have greatly improved the potential of synchrotron techniques for plant science research, allowing metal(loids) to be imaged in vivo in hydrated plant tissues at sub-micron resolution. Laterally resolved metal(loid) speciation can also be determined. By using molecular techniques to probe the location of gene expression and protein localisation and combining it with this synchrotron-derived data, functional information can be effectively and efficiently assigned to specific genes. This paper provides a review of the state of the art in this field, and provides examples as to how synchrotron-based methods can be combined with molecular techniques to facilitate functional characterisation of genes in planta. PMID:22200921

  14. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  15. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  16. Comparison of different cytogenetic methods and tissue suitability for the study of chromosomes in Cimex lectularius (Heteroptera, Cimicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sadílek, David; Angus, Robert B.; Šťáhlavský, František; Vilímová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the article we summarize the most common recent cytogenetic methods used in analysis of karyotypes in Heteroptera. We seek to show the pros and cons of the spreading method compared with the traditional squashing method. We discuss the suitability of gonad, midgut and embryo tissue in Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 chromosome research and production of figures of whole mitosis and meiosis, using the spreading method. The hotplate spreading technique has many advantages in comparison with the squashing technique. Chromosomal slides prepared from the testes tissue gave the best results, tissues of eggs and midgut epithelium are not suitable. Metaphase II is the only division phase in which sex chromosomes can be clearly distinguished. Chromosome number determination is easy during metaphase I and metaphase II. Spreading of gonad tissue is a suitable method for the cytogenetic analysis of holokinetic chromosomes of Cimex lectularius. PMID:28123691

  17. Comparison of different cytogenetic methods and tissue suitability for the study of chromosomes in Cimex lectularius (Heteroptera, Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Sadílek, David; Angus, Robert B; Šťáhlavský, František; Vilímová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    In the article we summarize the most common recent cytogenetic methods used in analysis of karyotypes in Heteroptera. We seek to show the pros and cons of the spreading method compared with the traditional squashing method. We discuss the suitability of gonad, midgut and embryo tissue in Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 chromosome research and production of figures of whole mitosis and meiosis, using the spreading method. The hotplate spreading technique has many advantages in comparison with the squashing technique. Chromosomal slides prepared from the testes tissue gave the best results, tissues of eggs and midgut epithelium are not suitable. Metaphase II is the only division phase in which sex chromosomes can be clearly distinguished. Chromosome number determination is easy during metaphase I and metaphase II. Spreading of gonad tissue is a suitable method for the cytogenetic analysis of holokinetic chromosomes of Cimex lectularius.

  18. Cytogenetic studies on Gonatodes (Reptilia, Squamata, Sphaerodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus; Feichtinger, Wolfgang; Haaf, Thomas; Mijares-Urrutia, Abraham; Schargel, Walter E; Hedges, S Blair

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of 5 species of the reptile genus Gonatodes are described by means of conventional staining, banding analyses and in situ hybridization using a synthetic telomeric DNA probe. The amount, location and fluorochrome affinities of constitutive heterochromatin, the number and positions of nucleolus organizer regions, and the patterns of telomeric DNA sequences were determined for most of the species. The karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae from northern Venezuela are distinguished by their extraordinarily reduced diploid chromosome number of 2n = 16, which is the lowest value found so far in reptiles. In contrast to most other reptiles, both species have exclusively large biarmed (meta- and submetacentric) chromosomes. Comparison of the karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae with those of other Gonatodes species indicates that the exceptional 2n = 16 karyotype originated by a series of 8 centric fusions. The karyotypes of G. falconensis and G. taniae are further characterized by the presence of considerable amounts of (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences in the centromeric regions of all chromosomes. These are probably not only relics of the centric fusion events, but a component of the highly repetitive DNA in the constitutive heterochromatin of the chromosomes. The genome sizes of 4 Gonatodes species were determined using flow cytometry. For comparative purposes, all previously published cytogenetic data on Gonatodes and other sphaerodactylids are included and discussed.

  19. Recent progress for the selective pharmaceutical analyses using molecularly imprinted adsorbents and their related techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Otsuka, Koji

    2016-10-25

    A well-organized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) provides the amazing selective molecular recognition ability, which have been close to natural enzymes and antibodies. One of the most efficient applications of MIPs is a selective separation and detection of pharmaceutical compounds in biological and/or environmental samples. MIP-based solid phase extraction now capacitates the selective concentration of the targeting compound from real samples. Also, many of the attractive methodological approaches and applications regarding the analysis of pharmaceutical samples using molecular imprinting technologies (MITs) have been reported in recent years. In this review, we summarize a part of the recent these works related to a new preparation concept of the adsorption adsorbents, sensitive sensor techniques, cell/bacteria separation, and drug delivery system. We believe that our concise summary will be of assistance to additional methodological MITs and highly selective separations/detections.

  20. Diagnostic Implication and Clinical Relevance of Ancillary Techniques in Clinical Pathology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Jaafar S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematoxylin–eosin-stained slide preparation is one of the most durable techniques in medicine history, which has remained unchanged since implemented. It allows an accurate microscopic diagnosis of the vast majority of tissue samples. In many circumstances, this technique cannot answer all the questions posed at the initial diagnostic level. The pathologist has always been looking for additional ancillary techniques to answer pending questions. In our daily histopathology practice, we referred to those techniques as special stains, but nowadays, they are more than stains and are collectively called ancillary tests. They include a wide range of techniques starting from histochemical stains and ending in one or more advanced techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, molecular studies, cytogenetic studies, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27042154

  1. Molecular modeling study of CP-690550 derivatives as JAK3 kinase inhibitors through combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and dynamics simulation techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing Li; Cheng, Li Ping; Wang, Tian Chi; Deng, Wei; Wu, Fan Hong

    2017-03-01

    To develop more potent JAK3 kinase inhibitors, a series of CP-690550 derivatives were investigated using combined molecular modeling techniques, such as 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD). The leave-one-out correlation (q(2)) and non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r(2)) of the best CoMFA model are 0.715 and 0.992, respectively. The q(2) and r(2) values of the best CoMSIA model are 0.739 and 0.995, respectively. The steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic fields played important roles in determining the inhibitory activity of CP-690550 derivatives. Some new JAK3 kinase inhibitors were designed. Some of them have better inhibitory activity than the most potent Tofacitinib (CP-690550). Molecular docking was used to identify some key amino acid residues at the active site of JAK3 protein. 10ns MD simulations were successfully performed to confirm the detailed binding mode and validate the rationality of docking results. The calculation of the binding free energies by MMPBSA method gives a good correlation with the predicted biological activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on MD simulations and free energy calculations for this series of compounds. The combination results of this study will be valuable for the development of potent and novel JAK3 kinase inhibitors.

  2. Teratoma with Malignant Transformation: A Case Report with Pathological, Cytogenetic, and Immunohistochemistry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Kazmi, Syed A. Jaffar

    2011-01-01

    Background. Teratoma with malignant transformation (TMT) is rare and most commonly encountered in adult patient with germ cell tumor (GCT). Method. We report a rare case of testicular teratoma with metastatic TMT/embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). A 44-year-old man underwent right orchiectomy which revealed a malignant teratoma, he subsequently had right pneumonectomy with two pulmonary masses containing a high-grade embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. The patient developed liver metastasis three months after initial diagnosis. He was treated with a chemotherapy regimen with vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) alternating with vincristine and irinotecan (VI) with complete resolution of his liver lesion. The tumors were examined with a battery of cytogenetic, immunohistochemical, and molecular assays. Results. The malignant cells were immunohistochemically positive for desmin, myogenin, and MyoD1. Molecular cytogenetics of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma tissue revealed the presence of i(12p). The tumor expressed high level of TOPO2A, TOPO1, MRP1, MGMT, BCRP, ERCC1, RRM1, and TS. Conclusion. The activity of topoisomerase inhibitors and the potential usefulness of topoisomerase expression as biomarkers should be further tested in aprospective study. PMID:21776193

  3. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    and in many cases, quantitatively at the molecular level (1-4). Molecular imaging is a growing research discipline aimed at developing and testing...alterations of disease, the effects of therapy may be monitored shortly after therapy has been initiated in contrast to the many months often required today...In vivo use of the physiological serum protein Tf is less likely to cause adverse reactions. Indeed, Tf has been successfully used in targeted gene

  4. [CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY AMENORRHEA].

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, V; Linev, A; Ivanov, H; Vachev, T

    2015-01-01

    Primary amenorrhea is one of the common reproductive disorder affecting females. It leads to the absence of menarche in the reproductive age group in females and/or complete absence of reproductive organs. The physiology of menstruation and reproduction has a strong correlation with the expression of the X chromosome. Thus, the role of the clinical geneticists in terms of diagnosis, risk assessment, genetic counseling and management of patients with primary amenorrhea and their families is essential. The genetic contribution to amenorrhea is studied both at the cellular and molecular level aiming at chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations. In the present study we aim to perform chromosomal analysis in 140 patients present with primary amenorrhea employing GTG banding technique. The resulting karyotype revealed 67.4% (n = 95) with normal chromosome composition and 32.6% (n = 46) showed chromosomal abnormalities. In patients with abnormal chromosome constituents, 20% (n = 9) exhibit numerical aberration, 22% (n = 10) showed structural abnormalities, 43% (n = 20) mosaic genotype and 15% (n = 7) of cases--male karyotype. Furthermore, the involvement of Y chromosome and the origin of marker chromosome was confirmed by applying fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in four patients.

  5. Recent research in flaxseed (oil seed) on molecular structure and metabolic characteristics of protein, heat processing-induced effect and nutrition with advanced synchrotron-based molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Kevin J; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-02

    Advanced synchrotron radiation-based infrared microspectroscopy is able to reveal feed and food structure feature at cellular and molecular levels and simultaneously provides composition, structure, environment, and chemistry within intact tissue. However, to date, this advanced synchrotron-based technique is still seldom known to food and feed scientists. This article aims to provide detailed background for flaxseed (oil seed) protein research and then review recent progress and development in flaxseed research in ruminant nutrition in the areas of (1) dietary inclusion of flaxseed in rations; (2) heat processing effect; (3) assessing dietary protein; (4) synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy as a tool of nutritive evaluation within cellular and subcellular dimensions; (5) recent synchrotron applications in flaxseed research on a molecular basis. The information described in this paper gives better insight in flaxseed research progress and update.

  6. Molecular techniques for detecting and typing of bacteria, advantages and application to foodborne pathogens isolated from ducks.

    PubMed

    Adzitey, Frederick; Huda, Nurul; Ali, Gulam Rusul Rahmat

    2013-04-01

    In recent times, several foodborne pathogens have become important and a threat to public health. Surveillance studies have provided data and a better understanding into the existence and spread of foodborne pathogens. The application of molecular techniques for detecting and typing of foodborne pathogens in surveillance studies provide reliable epidemiological data for tracing the source of human infections. A wide range of molecular techniques (including pulsed field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, random amplified polymorphism deoxyribonucleic acid, repetitive extragenic palindromic, deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and many more) have been used for detecting, speciating, typing, classifying and/or characterizing foodborne pathogens of great significance to humans. Farm animals including chickens, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs, and others (such as domestic and wild animals) have been reported to be primary reservoirs for foodborne pathogens. The consumption of contaminated poultry meats or products has been considered to be the leading source of human foodborne infections. Ducks like other farm animals are important source of foodborne pathogens and have been implicated in some human foodborne illnesses and deaths. Nonetheless, few studies have been conducted to explore the potential of ducks in causing foodborne outbreaks, diseases and its consequences. This review highlights some common molecular techniques, their advantages and those that have been applied to pathogens isolated from ducks and their related sources.

  7. Path integral molecular dynamics within the grand canonical-like adaptive resolution technique: Simulation of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Animesh Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-09-07

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however, computationally this technique is very demanding. The above mentioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One of the possible solutions to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this paper, we show the simulation of liquid water at room conditions where AdResS, in its latest and more accurate Grand-Canonical-like version (GC-AdResS), is merged with two of the most relevant PIMD techniques available in the literature. The comparison of our results with those reported in the literature and/or with those obtained from full PIMD simulations shows a highly satisfactory agreement.

  8. Path integral molecular dynamics within the grand canonical-like adaptive resolution technique: Simulation of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-09-01

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however, computationally this technique is very demanding. The above mentioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One of the possible solutions to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this paper, we show the simulation of liquid water at room conditions where AdResS, in its latest and more accurate Grand-Canonical-like version (GC-AdResS), is merged with two of the most relevant PIMD techniques available in the literature. The comparison of our results with those reported in the literature and/or with those obtained from full PIMD simulations shows a highly satisfactory agreement.

  9. Comparative cytogenetics of Neotropical cichlid fishes (Nannacara, Ivanacara and Cleithracara) indicates evolutionary reduction of diploid chromosome numbers

    PubMed Central

    Hodaňová, Lucie; Kalous, Lukáš; Musilová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A comparative cytogenetic analysis was carried out in five species of a monophyletic clade of neotropical Cichlasomatine cichlids, namely Cleithracara maronii Steindachner, 1881, Ivanacara adoketa (Kullander & Prada-Pedreros, 1993), Nannacara anomala Regan, 1905, N. aureocephalus Allgayer, 1983 and N. taenia Regan, 1912. Karyotypes and other chromosomal characteristics were revealed by CDD banding and mapped onto the phylogenetic hypothesis based on molecular analyses of four genes, namely cyt b, 16S rRNA, S7 and RAG1. The diploid numbers of chromosomes ranged from 44 to 50, karyotypes were composed predominantly of monoarmed chromosomes and one to three pairs of CMA3 signal were observed. The results showed evolutionary reduction in this monophyletic clade and the cytogenetic mechanisms (fissions/fusions) were hypothesized and discussed. PMID:25349669

  10. Are Cirripedia hopeful monsters? Cytogenetic approach and evidence for a Hox gene cluster in the cirripede crustacean Sacculina carcini.

    PubMed

    Géant, Elodie; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Deutsch, Jean S

    2006-01-01

    The "hopeful monster" has haunted evolutionary thinking since Richard Goldschmidt coined the phrase in 1933. The phrase is directly related to genetic mechanisms in development and evolution. Cirripedes are peculiar crustaceans in that they all lack abdomens as adults. In a previous study aimed at describing the repertoire of Hox genes of the Cirripedia, we failed to isolate the abdominal-A gene in three species representative of all three cirripede orders. To address the question of whether the cirripede ancestor could have been a "hopeful monster" arising from a rearrangement of the Hox complex, we have performed a cytogenetic analysis of the Hox complex of the cirripede Sacculina carcini. We present here molecular and cytogenetic evidence for the grouping of the Hox genes on a single chromosome. This is the first direct evidence reported for the grouping of Hox genes on the same chromosome in a non-insect arthropod species.

  11. Cytogenetic analysis of pulmonary alveolar macrophages from treated mice: the effects of cyclophosphimide and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Harper, B.L.; Gad-El-Karim, M.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.

    1982-02-01

    The lung is a unique organ in environmental toxicology due to its role in chemical absorption, metabolism and clearance. The development of assays for genotoxic events in the lung would allow observation of effects at a site of chemical administration. We are evaluating the genotoxic effects of chemical on the lung by cytogenetic analysis of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM's). Using male, Swiss (ICR) mice and a modified standard lavage technique, we can consistently recover 1.0-1.5 x 10/sup 6/ PAM cells per animal. Cells from the lavage material were prepared by standard cytogenetic procedures. In two experiments, cyclophosphamide was administered interperatoneally at 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg to 5-6 animals in each treatment group. This was to ascertain whether a clastogen, administered systemically, would manifest its effects in PAM cells, whether such effects were observable, and whether these effects were dose related. The results, analyzed as percent damaged cells, were respectively, 1.89%, 6.40% and 14.32%, (p-value < .001). Benzene was tested using the PAM cytogenetic technique. Doses of 440 and 880 mg/kg, administered via oral gavage, resulted in increased damage: 43.8% and 55.3% cells containing chromosome breaks, respectively. SKF had no apparent protective effect, suggesting the non-involvement of P-450 metabolism in the clastogenic process. In addition, in benzene treated animals a characteristic lesion involving destabilization of the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes resulted in linkage arrangements in over half of all metaphases. These results are consistent with the clastogenic activity of these agents in bone marrow.

  12. Results and Pitfalls in Prenatal Cytogenetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lillian Y. F.; Dubin, Elyse C.; Kerenyi, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Kurt

    1973-01-01

    Since 1969, we have cultured over 200 diagnostic amniotic fluids. Of these, 183 were for cytogenetic diagnosis. The chromosome analysis was successful in 168 cases. The indications and the results of the affected fetuses (followed by therapeutic abortion) are: (1) previous child with Down's syndrome: 62 cases (1:47,XX,+21); (2) advanced maternal age: 54 cases (1:47,XXY; 1:45,X/46,XY mosaicism; 1:47,+18); (3) previous child with multiple anomalies: 12 cases; (4) previous child with 47,XY,+18 or 47,+13: five cases; (5) translocation carrier: two cases; (6) parental mosaicism: three cases; (7) X-linked disorders: six cases (3:XY); (8) others: 24 cases. We have found firstly, that for prenatal sex determination, karyotype analysis of the cultured amniotic fluid cells is the only accurate means and that caution must be taken if sex chromatin and Y-fluorescent body determination from the uncultured amniotic fluid cells is used. Secondly, that diagnosis of chromosomal mosaicism can be problematic as exemplified by our case of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, where only 45,X cells were recovered from the first culture. Thirdly, that in cases with enlarged satellites, cells of late prophase or early metaphase must be used to eliminate confusion with translocations. We encountered three cases of enlarged satellites—one in the D group and two in the G group—and all three resulted in normal infants. Fourthly, that the karyotype may be altered by contamination and/or treatment or other unknown factors. We have observed two such cases where each mother delivered a normal infant. Images PMID:4268389

  13. Testing the Cambrian explosion hypothesis by using a molecular dating technique.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Rambaut, A; Fortey, R; Cooper, A; Penny, D

    1998-10-13

    Molecular studies have the potential to shed light on the origin of the animal phyla by providing independent estimates of the divergence times, but have been criticized for failing to account adequately for variation in rate of evolution. A method of dating divergence times from molecular data addresses the criticisms of earlier studies and provides more realistic, but wider, confidence intervals. The data are not compatible with the Cambrian explosion hypothesis as an explanation for the origin of metazoan phyla, and provide additional support for an extended period of Precambrian metazoan diversification.

  14. [Cytogenetic and clinical investigations in trisomia 22 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mangold, B; Müller, W; Hochleitner, M; Rosenkranz, W

    1976-01-01

    Since the introduction of new cytogenetic methods, as the "Pancreatin-Giemsa"-stain and similar methods, it is possible for the first time to determine the chromosomes of group G accurately. There are few cases reported in the literature with an additional small chromosome which could be associated with group G. None of those children presented the classical signs of a Down-Syndrome, therefore a trisomy 22 was discussed. This is the report of a female patient, on whom trisomy 22 was confirmed cytogenetically. So far it was only in a small number of cases possible to prove this thesis by cytogenetic studies. We compare our findings with previous reports of suspected or proven cases of trisomy 22.

  15. Cytogenetic abnormalities in Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Wiem; Amouri, Ahlem; Hammami, Wajih; Kilani, Olfa; Turki, Zinet; Harzallah, Fatma; Bouayed-Abdelmoula, Nouha; Chemkhi, Imen; Zhioua, Fethi; Slama, Claude Ben

    2014-12-01

    To identify the distribution of chromosome abnormalities among Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure (POF) referred to the department of Cytogenetic at the Pasteur Institute of Tunis (Tunisia), standard cytogenetic analysis was carried out in a total of 100 women younger than 40 affected with premature ovarian failure. We identified 18 chromosomal abnormalities, including seven X-numerical anomalies in mosaic and non-mosaic state (45,X; 47,XXX), four sex reversal, three X-structural abnormalities (terminal deletion and isochromosomes), one autosomal translocation and one supernumerary marker. The overall prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was 18% in our cohort. X chromosome aneuploidy was the most frequent aberration. This finding confirms the essential role of X chromosome in ovarian function and underlies the importance of cytogenetic investigations in the routine management of POF.

  16. Cytogenetic characterization and B chromosome diversity in direct-developing frogs of the genus Oreobates (Brachycephaloidea, Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Ferro, Juan Martín; Taffarel, Alberto; Cardozo, Darío; Grosso, Jimena; Puig, María Pía; Suárez, Pablo; Akmentins, Mauricio Sebastián; Baldo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Oreobates Jiménez de la Espada, 1872 is a large group of South American frogs with terrestrial reproduction and direct development, located in the superfamily Brachycephaloidea. About 260 brachycephaloidean species have been cytogenetically studied so far, at least with standard techniques. However, this information represents fewer than 17% species of the family Craugastoridae Hedges, Duellman & Heinicke, 2008, where the genus Oreobates is included. In the present work, using a diversity of standard and molecular techniques, we describe the karyotype of Oreobates barituensis Vaira & Ferrari, 2008, Oreobates berdemenos Pereyra, Cardozo, Baldo & Baldo, 2014 and Oreobates discoidalis (Peracca, 1895), from northwestern Argentina. The three species analyzed showed a diploid karyotype with 2n = 22 biarmed chromosomes, fundamental number (FN) = 44, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) located pericentromerically on pair 7, and a centromeric and pericentromeric C-banding pattern. We observed variations in the chromosome number in Oreobates barituensis due the presence of two morphs of B chromosomes, one medium-sized telocentric (BT) and another subtelocentric and smaller (Bst). Both B chromosomes are mitotically stable and were recorded in all somatic and germinal cells analyzed. The BT chromosome occurred at a maximum of one per individual (2n = 22+BT), and the other one was observed single (2n = 22 + Bst) or as a pair in two doses (2n = 22 + 2BT). We additionally observed other supernumerary chromosomes in the three species analyzed, all of them euchromatic, small, dot-shaped and with instability during mitoses, showing a frequency of occurrence below 50% in studied specimens. The occurrence of polymorphic and spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements and supernumerary chromosomes is a recurrent feature reported in frogs with terrestrial habits (Brachycephaloidea and Hemiphractidae Peters, 1862), which suggests that Brachycephaloidea may be a promising group for studying

  17. Cytogenetic characterization and B chromosome diversity in direct-developing frogs of the genus Oreobates (Brachycephaloidea, Craugastoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Juan Martín; Taffarel, Alberto; Cardozo, Darío; Grosso, Jimena; Puig, María Pía; Suárez, Pablo; Akmentins, Mauricio Sebastián; Baldo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oreobates Jiménez de la Espada, 1872 is a large group of South American frogs with terrestrial reproduction and direct development, located in the superfamily Brachycephaloidea. About 260 brachycephaloidean species have been cytogenetically studied so far, at least with standard techniques. However, this information represents fewer than 17% species of the family Craugastoridae Hedges, Duellman & Heinicke, 2008, where the genus Oreobates is included. In the present work, using a diversity of standard and molecular techniques, we describe the karyotype of Oreobates barituensis Vaira & Ferrari, 2008, Oreobates berdemenos Pereyra, Cardozo, Baldo & Baldo, 2014 and Oreobates discoidalis (Peracca, 1895), from northwestern Argentina. The three species analyzed showed a diploid karyotype with 2n = 22 biarmed chromosomes, fundamental number (FN) = 44, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) located pericentromerically on pair 7, and a centromeric and pericentromeric C-banding pattern. We observed variations in the chromosome number in Oreobates barituensis due the presence of two morphs of B chromosomes, one medium-sized telocentric (BT) and another subtelocentric and smaller (Bst). Both B chromosomes are mitotically stable and were recorded in all somatic and germinal cells analyzed. The BT chromosome occurred at a maximum of one per individual (2n = 22+BT), and the other one was observed single (2n = 22 + Bst) or as a pair in two doses (2n = 22 + 2BT). We additionally observed other supernumerary chromosomes in the three species analyzed, all of them euchromatic, small, dot-shaped and with instability during mitoses, showing a frequency of occurrence below 50% in studied specimens. The occurrence of polymorphic and spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements and supernumerary chromosomes is a recurrent feature reported in frogs with terrestrial habits (Brachycephaloidea and Hemiphractidae Peters, 1862), which suggests that Brachycephaloidea may be a promising group for

  18. Screening strawberry (Fragria x ananassa) germplasm for anthracnose disease resistance using traditional techniques and molecular makers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracnose of strawberry may be caused by any of three Colletotrichum species: C. acutatum, C. gloeosporioides or C. fragariae. These destructive pathogens may infect the fruit, leaves, petioles, crowns or roots and may cause plant death. Traditional and molecular approaches were used to identify a...

  19. Binding of fluorescent acridine dyes acridine orange and 9-aminoacridine to hemoglobin: Elucidation of their molecular recognition by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-06-01

    The molecular interaction between hemoglobin (HHb), the major human heme protein, and the acridine dyes acridine orange (AO) and 9-aminoacridine (9AA) was studied by various spectroscopic, calorimetric and molecular modeling techniques. The dyes formed stable ground state complex with HHb as revealed from spectroscopic data. Temperature dependent fluorescence data showed the strength of the dye-protein complexation to be inversely proportional to temperature and the fluorescence quenching was static in nature. The binding-induced conformational change in the protein was investigated using circular dichroism, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy results. Circular dichroism data also quantified the α-helicity change in hemoglobin due to the binding of acridine dyes. Calorimetric studies revealed the binding to be endothermic in nature for both AO and 9AA, though the latter had higher affinity, and this was also observed from spectroscopic data. The binding of both dyes was entropy driven. pH dependent fluorescence studies revealed the existence of electrostatic interaction between the protein and dye molecules. Molecular modeling studies specified the binding site and the non-covalent interactions involved in the association. Overall, the results revealed that a small change in the acridine chromophore leads to remarkable alteration in the structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding to HHb.

  20. [From conventional cytogenetics to microarrays. Fifty years of Philadelphia chromosome].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jesús M; Granada, Isabel; Solé, Francesc

    2011-07-23

    In 1960 Ph-chromosome was found associated with the presence of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In these 50 years an increasing number of cytogenetic abnormalities have been found associated with hematological malignancies. The presence of these abnormalities is not only important for the diagnosis of the patient, but it also contributes to the prognosis of patients with leukemia or lymphoma. For this reason the WHO classification of hematological disease has included these studies for the correct characterization of leukemias and lymphomas. In addition, the use of FISH and micromatrix methodologies have refined the genetic lesions present in these malignancies. The cytogenetic changes observed also provide further information in relation to the therapy.

  1. Cytogenetic findings in persons living near the Love Canal.

    PubMed

    Heath, C W; Nadel, M R; Zack, M M; Chen, A T; Bender, M A; Preston, R J

    1984-03-16

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed on peripheral blood from 46 present or past residents of the area surrounding Love Canal, a former dump site for chemical wastes in Niagara Falls, NY. Participants included 17 persons in whom cytogenetic analyses had been performed in 1980 and 29 persons who had been living in 1978 in seven homes that directly adjoined the canal and in which environmental tests showed elevated levels of chemicals spreading from the canal. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) did not differ significantly from control levels. For all participants, cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in sister chromatid exchange frequency.

  2. Cytogenetic findings in persons living near the Love Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, C.W. Jr.; Nadel, M.R.; Zack, M.M. Jr.; Chen, A.T.L.; Bender, M.A.; Preston, R.J.

    1984-03-16

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed on peripheral blood from 46 present or past residents of the areas surrounding Love Canal, a former dump site for chemical wastes in Niagara Falls, NY. Participants included 17 persons in whom cytogenetic analyses had been performed in 1980 and 29 persons who had been living in 1978 in seven homes that directly adjoined the canal and in which environmental tests showed elevated levels of chemicals spreading from the canal. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) did not differ significantly from control levels. For all participants, cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in sister chromatid exchange frequency.

  3. Cytogenetic damage and occupational exposure. 1. Exposure to stone dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sobti, R.C.; Bhardwaj, D.K. )

    1991-10-01

    Cytogenetic investigations were carried out on 50 workers exposed to stone dust in a stone crusher industry and on 25 control subjects never exposed to such dust. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in exposed individuals was significantly higher than that in controls. The cytogenetic indices demonstrated a clear dependence on the working environment. The effect of smoking and/or alcoholic habits coupled with exposure to stone dust has also been investigated. The results indicate that the mutagenic risk in the working environment is probably associated with silica dust in the area.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis in Thoracocharax stellatus (Kner, 1858) (Characiformes, Gasteropelecidae) from Paraguay River Basin, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Edson Lourenço; de Borba, Rafael Splendore; Centofante, Liano; Miyazawa, Carlos Suetoshi; Parise-Maltempi, Patrícia Pasquali

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Thoracocharax stellatus (Characiformes, Gasteropelecidae) is a small Neotropical species of fish, widely distributed in several rivers of South America. Evidence for karyotype heteromorphysm in populations from different geographical regions has been reported for this species. In this way, populations of Thoracocharax stellatus from the Paraguay River basin were cytogenetically characterized and the results were compared with other studies performed in the same species but from different basins. The results showed a diploid number of 2n = 54 for Thoracocharax stellatus, with chromosomes arranged in 6 metacentric (m), 6 submetacentric (sm), 2 subtelocentric (st) and 40 acrocentric (a), for both sexes, with a simple Nucleolus Organiser Region (NOR) system reported by the techniques of silver nitrate impregnation and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using 18S rDNA sequences as probe. The distribution of constitutive heterochromatin, observed by the C-band technique and Chromomycin A3 staining showed great similarity among the analyzed populations and consists mainly of discrete blocks in the pericentromeric and telomeric regions of most chromosomes. The presence of female heterogamety was also observed indicating a ZZ/ZW system with W chromosome almost totally heterochromatic. The results also show cytogenetic diversity of the group and are useful to understand the mechanisms of karyotype evolution of the family. PMID:24260672

  5. Detection of chromosomal changes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using classical cytogenetic methods and FISH: application of rich mitogen mixtures for lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Koczkodaj, Dorota; Popek, Sylwia; Zmorzyński, Szymon; Wąsik-Szczepanek, Ewa; Filip, Agata A

    2016-04-01

    One of the research methods of prognostic value in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is cytogenetic analysis. This method requires the presence of appropriate B-cell mitogens in cultures in order to obtain a high mitotic index. The aim of our research was to determine the most effective methods of in vitro B-cell stimulation to maximize the number of metaphases from peripheral blood cells of patients with CLL for classical cytogenetic examination, and then to correlate the results with those obtained using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The study group involved 50 consecutive patients with CLL. Cell cultures were maintained with the basic composition of culture medium and addition of respective stimulators. We used the following stimulators: Pokeweed Mitogen (PWM), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), ionophore, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30. We received the highest mitotic index when using the mixture of PWM+TPA+I+DSP30. With classical cytogenetic tests using banding techniques, numerical and structural aberrations of chromosomes were detected in 46 patients, and no change was found in only four patients. Test results clearly confirmed the legitimacy of using cell cultures enriched with the mixture of cell stimulators and combining classical cytogenetic techniques with the FISH technique in later patient diagnosing.

  6. Cytogenetic analyses of eight species in the genus Leptodactylus Fitzinger, 1843 (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae), including a new diploid number and a karyotype with multiple translocations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The karyotypes of Leptodactylus species usually consist of 22 bi-armed chromosomes, but morphological variations in some chromosomes and even differences in the 2n have been reported. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for these differences, eight species were analysed using classical and molecular cytogenetic techniques, including replication banding with BrdU incorporation. Results Distinct chromosome numbers were found: 2n = 22 in Leptodactylus chaquensis, L. labyrinthicus, L. pentadactylus, L. petersii, L. podicipinus, and L. rhodomystax; 2n = 20 in Leptodactylus sp. (aff. podicipinus); and 2n = 24 in L. marmoratus. Among the species with 2n = 22, only three had the same basic karyotype. Leptodactylus pentadactylus presented multiple translocations, L. petersii displayed chromosome morphological discrepancy, and L. podicipinus had four pairs of telocentric chromosomes. Replication banding was crucial for characterising this variability and for explaining the reduced 2n in Leptodactylus sp. (aff. podicipinus). Leptodactylus marmoratus had few chromosomes with a similar banding patterns to the 2n = 22 karyotypes. The majority of the species presented a single NOR-bearing pair, which was confirmed using Ag-impregnation and FISH with an rDNA probe. In general, the NOR-bearing chromosomes corresponded to chromosome 8, but NORs were found on chromosome 3 or 4 in some species. Leptodactylus marmoratus had NORs on chromosome pairs 6 and 8. The data from C-banding, fluorochrome staining, and FISH using the telomeric probe helped in characterising the repetitive sequences. Even though hybridisation did occur on the chromosome ends, telomere-like repetitive sequences outside of the telomere region were identified. Metaphase I cells from L. pentadactylus confirmed its complex karyotype constitution because 12 chromosomes appeared as ring-shaped chain in addition to five bivalents. Conclusions Species of Leptodactylus exhibited both major and minor

  7. Comparison of the detection of periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia after tooth brushing by culture and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Figuero, Elena; González, Itziar; O´Connor, Ana; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and amounts of periodontal pathogens detected in bacteraemia samples after tooth brushing-induced by means of four diagnostic technique, three based on culture and one in a molecular-based technique, have been compared in this study. Material and Methods Blood samples were collected from thirty-six subjects with different periodontal status (17 were healthy, 10 with gingivitis and 9 with periodontitis) at baseline and 2 minutes after tooth brushing. Each sample was analyzed by three culture-based methods [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), hemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and one molecular-based technique [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. With culture any bacterial isolate was detected and quantified, while with qPCR only Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected and quantified. Descriptive analyses, ANOVA and Chi-squared tests, were performed. Results Neither BACTEC nor qPCR detected any type of bacteria in the blood samples. Only LC (2.7%) and DAC (8.3%) detected bacteraemia, although not in the same patients. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently detected bacterial species. Conclusions The disparity in the results when the same samples were analyzed with four different microbiological detection methods highlights the need for a proper validation of the methodology to detect periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia samples, mainly when the presence of periodontal pathogens in blood samples after tooth brushing was very seldom. Key words:Bacteraemia, periodontitis, culture, PCR, tooth brushing. PMID:26946197

  8. Small‐angle X‐ray scattering as a useful supplementary technique to determine molecular masses of polyelectrolytes in solution

    PubMed Central

    Plazzotta, Beatrice; Diget, Jakob Stensgaard; Zhu, Kaizheng; Nyström, Bo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determination of molecular masses of charged polymers is often nontrivial and most methods have their drawbacks. For polyelectrolytes, a new possibility for the determination of number‐average molecular masses is represented by small‐angle X‐ray scattering (SAXS) which allows fast determinations with a 10% accuracy. This is done by relating the mass to the position of a characteristic peak feature which arises in SAXS due to the local ordering caused by charge‐repulsions between polyelectrolytes. Advantages of the technique are the simplicity of data analysis, the independency from polymer architecture, and the low sample and time consumption. The method was tested on polyelectrolytes of various structures and chemical compositions, and the results were compared with those obtained from more conventional techniques, such as asymmetric flow field‐flow fractionation, gel permeation chromatography, and classical SAXS data analysis, showing that the accuracy of the suggested method is similar to that of the other techniques. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2016, 54, 1913–1917 PMID:27840558

  9. Exploring Surface Analysis Techniques for the Detection of Molecular Contaminants on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Gugu N.; Seasly, Elaine; Thornblom, Mark; Baughman, James

    2016-01-01

    Molecular contamination is a known area of concern for spacecraft. To mitigate this risk, projects involving space flight hardware set requirements in a contamination control plan that establishes an allocation budget for the exposure of non-volatile residues (NVR) onto critical surfaces. The purpose of this work will focus on non-contact surface analysis and in situ monitoring to mitigate molecular contamination on space flight hardware. By using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) with Raman Spectroscopy, an unlikely contaminant was identified on space flight hardware. Using traditional and surface analysis methods provided the broader view of the contamination sources allowing for best fit solutions to prevent any future exposure.

  10. Molecular characterization of the plant biopolyester cutin by AFM and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Benítez, José J; Matas, Antonio J; Heredia, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance have been used to improve our current knowledge on the molecular characteristics of the biopolyester cutin, the main component of the plant cuticle. After comparison of samples of cutin isolated from young and mature tomato fruit cuticles has been possible to establish different degrees of cross-linking in the biopolymer and that the polymer is mainly formed after esterification of secondary hydroxyl groups of the monomers that form this type of cutin. Atomic force microscopy gave useful structural information on the molecular topography of the outer surface of the isolated samples. The texture of these samples is a consequence of the cross-linking degree or chemical status of the polymer. Thus, the more dense and cross-linked cutin from ripe or mature tomato fruit is characterized by a flatter and more globular texture in addition to the development of elongated and orientated superstructures.

  11. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  12. Position of cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for the space radiation exposure estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigiryova, Galina; Novitskaya, Natalia; Fedorenko, Boris

    The cytogenetic monitoring was carried out to evaluate of radiation induced stable and un-stable chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS (International Space Station). In the period of 1992 -2008 chromosome aberrations in 202 blood samples from 48 cosmonauts were analyzed using the conventional method. In addition 23 blood samples from 12 cosmonauts were analyzed using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) technique. Whole chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 1, 4 and 12 were used simultaneously with a pancentromeric probe. Samples taken before and after the flights were analyzed. Long-term space flights led to an increase of stable (FISH method) and unstable (conventional method) chromosome aber-ration frequencies. The frequencies of dicentrics and centric rings depend on the space flight duration and accumulated dose value. Extravehicular activity also adds to chromosome aber-ration frequency in blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts. Several years after the space flight the increased level of unstable chromosome aberrations is still apparent. The radiation load was decreased for cosmonauts after taking ISS over from MIR station. The cytogenetic results were in agreement with data of physical dosimetry. The dose interval after the first flight, estimated by the frequency of dicentrics, was 113-227 mSv for long-term flights (73 -199 days) and 53-107 mSv for short-term flights (1 -21 days). According to the frequency of FISH translocations, the average dose after the first long-term flight was 186 mSv, which is comparable with estimates made from the dicentric assay. Cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts, including analysis of dicentrics (conventional method) and translocations (FISH method) should find wider applica-tion to assessment of radiation effects associated with long-term space flights such as flights to Mars.

  13. Association of Bartonella with the fleas (Siphonaptera) of rodents and bats using molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Rogers, Thomas E; Durden, Lance A; Dasch, Gregory A

    2007-06-01

    Bartonella spp. are putatively vector-borne bacterial agents of humans and animals. Fleas have been incriminated as vectors of Bartonella spp. and are suspected of transmitting Bartonella of rodents and bats, but some of these Bartonella spp. have not yet been directly detected in wild caught fleas. We report the molecular detection of Bartonella tribocorum, Bartonella vinsonii subsp. vinsonii, and two novel genotypes of Bartonella from the fleas Xenopsylla cheopis, Ctenophthalmus pseudagyrtes, Sternopsylla texanus, or Orchopeas howardi.

  14. Comparison of molecular and microscopic technique for detection of Theileria annulata from the field cases of cattle

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, H. C.; Patel, B. K.; Bhagat, A. G.; Patel, M. V.; Patel, S. I.; Raval, S. H.; Panchasara, H. H.; Shrimali, M. D.; Patel, A. C.; Chandel, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Tropical theileriosis is fatal hemoprotozoal disease of dairy animals caused by Theileria annulata. The aim of the present study was to detect the T. annulata and comparison of results of molecular and microscopic techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 blood samples were collected from the cattle suspected for theileriosis across the Banaskantha district. All the samples were screened for theileriosis using Giemsa’s staining technique and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Total of 17 (32.69%) and 24 (46.15%) samples were found positive for theileriosis by microscopic examination and PCR test, respectively. It revealed that the study area is endemic for theileriosis, and the microscopic technique has 70.83% sensitivity and 100% specificity with respect to PCR technique. Conclusion: It may be concluded from the present study that the PCR is comparatively sensitive technique than microscopic examination and may be recommended to use in the field for screening of theileriosis in the study area, where a high prevalence of diseases have been reported due to intensive dairy farming. PMID:27047045

  15. Molecular Techniques for the Detection and Differentiation of Host and Parasitoid Species and the Implications for Fruit Fly Management.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Cheryl; Chapman, Toni A; Micallef, Jessica L; Reynolds, Olivia L

    2012-08-14

    Parasitoid detection and identification is a necessary step in the development and implementation of fruit fly biological control strategies employing parasitoid augmentive release. In recent years, DNA-based methods have been used to identify natural enemies of pest species where morphological differentiation is problematic. Molecular techniques also offer a considerable advantage over traditional morphological methods of fruit fly and parasitoid discrimination as well as within-host parasitoid identification, which currently relies on dissection of immature parasitoids from the host, or lengthy and labour-intensive rearing methods. Here we review recent research focusing on the use of molecular strategies for fruit fly and parasitoid detection and differentiation and discuss the implications of these studies on fruit fly management.

  16. Molecular Techniques for the Detection and Differentiation of Host and Parasitoid Species and the Implications for Fruit Fly Management

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cheryl; Chapman, Toni A.; Micallef, Jessica L.; Reynolds, Olivia L.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitoid detection and identification is a necessary step in the development and implementation of fruit fly biological control strategies employing parasitoid augmentive release. In recent years, DNA-based methods have been used to identify natural enemies of pest species where morphological differentiation is problematic. Molecular techniques also offer a considerable advantage over traditional morphological methods of fruit fly and parasitoid discrimination as well as within-host parasitoid identification, which currently relies on dissection of immature parasitoids from the host, or lengthy and labour-intensive rearing methods. Here we review recent research focusing on the use of molecular strategies for fruit fly and parasitoid detection and differentiation and discuss the implications of these studies on fruit fly management. PMID:26466628

  17. Photoelectrochemical sensor for pentachlorophenol on microfluidic paper-based analytical device based on the molecular imprinting technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoqiang; Wang, Panpan; Ge, Shenguang; Ge, Lei; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2014-06-15

    Combining microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) and the molecular imprinting technique, a visible light photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensing platform for the detection of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was established on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorated paper working electrode using polypyrrole-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles. Ascorbic acid (AA) was exploited as an efficient and nontoxic electron donor for scavenging photogenerated holes under mild solution medium and facilitating the generation of stable photocurrent. The microfluidic molecular imprinted polymer-based PEC analytical origami device is developed for the detection of PCP in the linear range from 0.01 ng mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 4 pg mL(-1). This disposable microfluidic PEC origami device would provide a new platform for sensitive, specific, and multiplex assay in public health, environmental monitoring, and the developing world.

  18. [Applications of molecular biology techniques for the control of aflatoxin contamination].

    PubMed

    Sanchis, V

    1993-02-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by species of Aspergillus flavus group. These toxins have received increased attention from the food industry and the general public because they shown a high toxicity against humans and animal. Different methods are applying to control the aflatoxin contamination. But these conventional methods do not seem to resolve the problem. So, new methods using techniques in biotechnology are now being developed: a) Inhibit the biosynthetic and secretory process responsible for aflatoxin contamination. b) Using biocompetitive agents that replace aflatoxigenic strains with non aflatoxigenic strains in the field. c) Using genetic engineering techniques to incorporate antifungal genes into specific plant species.

  19. Comparative Cytogenetics between Two Important Songbird, Models: The Zebra Finch and the Canary

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Bakker, Antje; Gahr, Manfred; O´Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.

    2017-01-01

    Songbird species (order Passeriformes, suborder Oscines) are important models in various experimental fields spanning behavioural genomics to neurobiology. Although the genomes of some songbird species were sequenced recently, the chromosomal organization of these species is mostly unknown. Here we focused on the two most studied songbird species in neuroscience, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and the canary (Serinus canaria). In order to clarify these issues and also to integrate chromosome data with their assembled genomes, we used classical and molecular cytogenetics in both zebra finch and canary to define their chromosomal homology, localization of heterochromatic blocks and distribution of rDNA clusters. We confirmed the same diploid number (2n = 80) in both species, as previously reported. FISH experiments confirmed the occurrence of multiple paracentric and pericentric inversions previously found in other species of Passeriformes, providing a cytogenetic signature for this order, and corroborating data from in silico analyses. Additionally, compared to other Passeriformes, we detected differences in the zebra finch karyotype concerning the morphology of some chromosomes, in the distribution of 5S rDNA clusters, and an inversion in chromosome 1. PMID:28129381

  20. Comparative Cytogenetics between Two Important Songbird, Models: The Zebra Finch and the Canary.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Bakker, Antje; Gahr, Manfred; O Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; de Oliveira, Edivaldo H C

    2017-01-01

    Songbird species (order Passeriformes, suborder Oscines) are important models in various experimental fields spanning behavioural genomics to neurobiology. Although the genomes of some songbird species were sequenced recently, the chromosomal organization of these species is mostly unknown. Here we focused on the two most studied songbird species in neuroscience, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and the canary (Serinus canaria). In order to clarify these issues and also to integrate chromosome data with their assembled genomes, we used classical and molecular cytogenetics in both zebra finch and canary to define their chromosomal homology, localization of heterochromatic blocks and distribution of rDNA clusters. We confirmed the same diploid number (2n = 80) in both species, as previously reported. FISH experiments confirmed the occurrence of multiple paracentric and pericentric inversions previously found in other species of Passeriformes, providing a cytogenetic signature for this order, and corroborating data from in silico analyses. Additionally, compared to other Passeriformes, we detected differences in the zebra finch karyotype concerning the morphology of some chromosomes, in the distribution of 5S rDNA clusters, and an inversion in chromosome 1.

  1. Cytogenetics and characterization of microsatellite loci for a South American pioneer tree species, Croton floribundus.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Milene; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A F; Zucchi, Maria I; dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in plant population genetic studies, the lack of information regarding pedigree, ploidy level, or mode of inheritance for many polyploids can compromise the analysis of the molecular data produced. The aim of this study was to examine both microsatellite and cytogenetic characteristics of the pioneer tree Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae) to test for the occurrence of polyploidy in the species and to evaluate its implications for the appropriate use of SSR markers. Seven microsatellite markers were developed and screened for 62 individuals from a semi-deciduous tropical forest in Brazil. Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were evaluated from male flower buds. All SSR loci were highly polymorphic. The number of bivalents observed in meiosis n = 56 (2n = 8× = 112) and the maximum number of alleles per individual (Ni = 8) demonstrated the occurrence of polyploidy in C. floribundus. The normal meiotic pairing and the high pollen viability suggested that C. floribundus is a regular and stable polyploid, most likely an allopolyploid. The combined SSR and cytogenetic data provided new evidence on the origin and evolution of the species as well as assured the accurate use of SSR loci for population genetic studies of the polyploid pioneer species.

  2. The cytogenetic theory of the pathogenesis of human adult male germ cell tumors. Review article.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, R S; Houldsworth, J

    1998-01-01

    Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a biological paradox because, in order to develop into a pluripotential tumor, a germ cell destined to a path of limited or no proliferation must acquire the potential for unlimited proliferation. In addition, it must acquire the ability to elicit embryonal differentiation patterns without the reciprocal inputs from fertilization and the imprinting-associated genomic changes which are a part of normal embryonal development. Although much speculated about, the genetic mechanisms underlying these properties of male GCTs remain enigmatic. Recent cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of these tumors are providing new insights and new testable hypotheses. Based on our recent work, we propose two such hypotheses. One relates to the mechanism of germ cell transformation and germ cell tumor development. We suggest that the invariable 12p amplification noted as early as in carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia (CIS/ITGCN) lesions leads to deregulated overexpression of cyclin D2, a cell cycle G1/S checkpoint regulator with oncogeneic potential. Such overexpression reinitiates the cell cycle. We visualize this happening during the pachytene stage of meiosis through aberrant recombinational events which lead to 12p amplification. The other hypothesis relates to the origin of primary extragonadal GCTs. By comparing cytogenetic changes in primary mediastinal versus gonadal lesions, we propose that, in contrast to long-standing speculation that primary extra-gonadal tumors arise from embryonally misplaced primordial germ cells, these lesions arise from migration of transformed gonadal germ cells.

  3. Fabrication of IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes by a molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes have been fabricated by a molecular beam epitaxy technique at 630 C. Good surface morphology was observed for IrSi(3) layers grown at temperatures below 680 C, and an increasing tendency to form islands is observed in samples grown at higher temperatures. Good diode current-voltage characteristics were observed and Schottky barrier heights of 0.14-0.18 eV were determined by activation energy analysis and spectral response measurement.

  4. Advanced Techniques to Decrease Defect Density in Molecular Beam Epitaxial Silicon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Toru; Aizaki, Naoaki; Tsuya, Hideki

    1985-04-01

    Defect density dependence on various surface cleaning conditions for molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) silicon films was investigated. Defect-free films were obtained on (100) and (511) wafers, using a combination of ozone cleaning and predeposition process after the usual wet cleaning. On the (111) wafer, the defect density dependence on growth rate was examined. The two-step growth-rate procedure was effective in decreasing stacking faults on the (111) wafer. The difference in defect density between (100) and (111) wafers is also discussed.

  5. Approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds with laser desorption/ionization techniques and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Nina; Shevchenko, Denys; Bergquist, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes various approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds by different laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry techniques (LDI-MS). It is common to use an agent to assist the ionization, and small molecules are normally difficult to analyze by, e.g., matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) using the common matrices available today, because the latter are generally small organic compounds themselves. This often results in severe suppression of analyte peaks, or interference of the matrix and analyte signals in the low mass region. However, intrinsic properties of several LDI techniques such as high sensitivity, low sample consumption, high tolerance towards salts and solid particles, and rapid analysis have stimulated scientists to develop methods to circumvent matrix-related issues in the analysis of LMW molecules. Recent developments within this field as well as historical considerations and future prospects are presented in this review.

  6. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  7. [Cytogenetic activity of the butylcaptax defoliant transformation product].

    PubMed

    Vesmanova, O Ia; Semykina, E E; Koblov, R K; Ergashev

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetical activity of the product of metabolitic butylcaptax transformations in cells of cotton plants G. barbadense has been studied. It is shown that butylcaptax, with a significant mutagenicity, looses its mutagenic activity, metabolizing in low mutagenic 2-oxyamylthiobenzthiazole. Low water solubility prevents its concentration to exceed 0.005% in tissue liquids and to exert a mutagenic action on cotton plants.

  8. Cytogenetic studies of the blood (M111), part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    The cytogenetic study of the crew appears to indicate that Skylab-type environmental conditions have no deleterious effect upon chromosomal material. The findings are, however, less clear-cut than might be desired, due in large measure to confounding of the experimental design by the administration of isotope injections for the purposes of other experiments and to the lack of control subjects.

  9. Constructing a Cytogenetic Map of the Maize Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are developing a pachytene cytogenetic FISH (Fluorescence in situ Hybridization) map of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome using maize marker-selected sorghum BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) as described by Koumbaris and Bass (2003, Plant J. 35:647). The two main projects are the production of...

  10. Continuous distribution model for the investigation of complex molecular architectures near interfaces with scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Nanda, Hirsh; Lösche, Mathias; Heinrich, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Biological membranes are composed of a thermally disordered lipid matrix and therefore require non-crystallographic scattering approaches for structural characterization with x-rays or neutrons. Here we develop a continuous distribution (CD) model to refine neutron or x-ray reflectivity data from complex architectures of organic molecules. The new model is a flexible implementation of the composition-space refinement of interfacial structures to constrain the resulting scattering length density profiles. We show this model increases the precision with which molecular components may be localized within a sample, with a minimal use of free model parameters. We validate the new model by parameterizing all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of bilayers and by evaluating the neutron reflectivity of a phospholipid bilayer physisorbed to a solid support. The determination of the structural arrangement of a sparsely-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (stBLM) comprised of a multi-component phospholipid bilayer anchored to a gold substrate by a thiolated oligo(ethylene oxide) linker is also demonstrated. From the model we extract the bilayer composition and density of tether points, information which was previously inaccessible for stBLM systems. The new modeling strategy has been implemented into the ga_refl reflectivity data evaluation suite, available through the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  11. Photorealistic image generation of molecular structure on PC screen using the ray-tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Yoon, C W; Mhin, B J; Kim, H S; Kim, K S

    1992-12-01

    A PC version of three-dimensional molecular graphics package has been developed to run under MS-DOS environment on IBM PC-compatible computers equipped with a VGA graphics board. The program consists of two parts: a menu-driven interactive system module in EGA mode, and a ray-tracing module in VGA mode. In the 256-color VGA mode, ray-tracing images are represented with a 4-color map, with 64 levels for each color: 32 levels of illuminance and 32 levels of saturation. Molecular structure can be analyzed along various directions with various light sources. Ray-tracing images are also represented in a 16-color EGA mode with the half-toning method, which can display 76 gray levels for each color. To obtain good photo-realistic images in an efficient way, we have used two light sources, with an intensity ratio of 7:3, which are located in front of the top right and bottom left corners of the screen.

  12. Application of traditional clinical pathology quality control techniques to molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Ling; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Hafez, Michael J; Gocke, Christopher D; Murphy, Kathleen M; Sokoll, Lori J; Eshleman, James R

    2008-03-01

    Many molecular diagnostic laboratories have evolved from research laboratories, initially performing low numbers of homebrew assays, but many laboratories now perform more kit-based assays, with ever increasing test volumes. One such assay is assessment of bone marrow transplantation engraftment. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is performed primarily in the treatment of hematological malignancies. Monitoring of engraftment was traditionally evaluated using minisatellites (variable number tandem repeats) and Southern blotting, but most laboratories now use Food and Drug Administration-cleared microsatellite (short tandem repeats) kits to assess the extent of engraftment. With the increase in equipment reliability, the use of kit-based assays, and the desire to provide the highest quality clinical data, we began applying traditional clinical pathology quality control tools to the molecular diagnostics laboratory. In this study, we demonstrate this approach using a microsatellite-based bone marrow engraftment assay. We analyzed control samples (pure and mixed) for two different microsatellites to establish quality control parameters and constructed Levey-Jennings charts to monitor both the precision and accuracy of this assay. By incorporating these tools into an overall quality assurance program, a laboratory can identify systematic errors and perform corrective actions before actual assay failure, thereby improving the quality of patient care.

  13. Investigation of molecular and elemental species dynamics in NTO, TNT, and ANTA using femtosecond LIBS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswara Rao, E.; Sunku, Sreedhar; Tewari, Surya P.; Manoj Kumar, G.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-05-01

    We present our initial experimental results from the LIBS studies of pyrazole, 1-nitropyrazole, 3-nitropyrazole, 3,4- dinitropyrazole and 1-methyl- 3,4,5 trinitro pyrazole recorded with femtosecond pulses and performed in argon atmosphere. CN molecular bands in three different spectral regions of 357 nm-360 nm, 384 nm-389 nm and 414 nm -423 nm, C2 swan bands near 460 nm-475 nm, 510 nm- 520 nm and 550 nm-565 nm were observed. The C peak at 247.82 nm, H peak at 656.2 nm have also been observed along with several peaks of O and N. CN/C2, CN/C, C2/C and C2/N ratios were measured from the average of 25 spectra obtained in argon. The effect of number of nitro groups on the atomic and molecular emission has been evaluated. A gate delay of 100 ns and a gate width of 800 ns were used for collecting the spectra.

  14. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration—Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids. PMID:23584028

  15. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration-Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2014-09-24

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids.

  16. Monitoring airborne molecular contamination: a quantitative and qualitative comparison of real-time and grab-sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupp, Aaron M.; Rodier, Dan; Rowley, Steven

    2007-03-01

    Monitoring and controlling Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) has become essential in deep ultraviolet (DUV) photolithography for both optimizing yields and protecting tool optics. A variety of technologies have been employed for both real-time and grab-sample monitoring. Real-time monitoring has the advantage of quickly identifying "spikes" and upset conditions, while 2 - 24 hour plus grab sampling allows for extremely low detection limits by concentrating the mass of the target contaminant over a period of time. Employing a combination of both monitoring techniques affords the highest degree of control, lowest detection limits, and the most detailed data possible in terms of speciation. As happens with many technologies, there can be concern regarding the accuracy and agreement between real-time and grab-sample methods. This study utilizes side by side comparisons of two different real-time monitors operating in parallel with both liquid impingers and dry sorbent tubes to measure NIST traceable gas standards as well as real world samples. By measuring in parallel, a truly valid comparison is made between methods while verifying the results against a certified standard. The final outcome for this investigation is that a dry sorbent tube grab-sample technique produced results that agreed in terms of accuracy with NIST traceable standards as well as the two real-time techniques Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Pulsed Fluorescence Detection (PFD) while a traditional liquid impinger technique showed discrepancies.

  17. Molecular identification of human tuberculosis in recent and historic bone tissue samples: The role of molecular techniques for the study of historic tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert R; Grabner, Waltraud; Nerlich, Andreas G

    2005-01-01

    We describe the molecular identification of the M. tuberculosis complex DNA in bone tissue samples from recent and historic populations. In a first set, archival paraffin material from vertebral bodies of 12 recent cases with clinically/microbiologically proven tuberculosis was compared to 12 further cases without tuberculosis. While eight TB cases revealed a specific mycobacterial amplification product, none of the controls was positive. Interestingly, one case with tuberculous sepsis (Landouzy sepsis), five cases with tuberculous spread beyond the primarily affected organ (i.e., lymph node or miliar involvement), and also two of six cases with restricted pulmonary tuberculosis reacted positively in the vertebral specimens. This indicates that a molecular analysis can detect mycobacteria even in unremarkable bone tissue, proving that organ tuberculosis is present. In addition, the extent of spread is of high significance for the frequency of positive reactions. In addition, we investigated a series of vertebral samples coming from an Egyptian population of the necropolis of Thebes-West dating to approximately 1450-500 BC. In this group of 36 cases, three of five cases with typical macromorphological signs for tuberculous spondylitis, 2 of 12 cases with nonspecific alterations, and 2 of 19 cases without macroscopic pathology revealed a specific amplicon of the M. tuberculosis complex. This suggests a significant frequency of infected people in that ancient population. Finally, a fourth group of 51 long bone samples with pathological alterations coming form a southern German ossuary (between AD 1400-1800) was investigated, and 10 cases were positive for the M. tuberculosis complex. These studies of historic material clearly support the notion that tuberculous infections can be unequivocally identified by molecular techniques. The relatively high frequency of ancient bacterial DNA amplifications in unremarkable bone is well-explained by our analysis of the recent

  18. Benefits and drawbacks of molecular techniques for diagnosis of viral respiratory infections. Experience with two multiplex PCR assays.

    PubMed

    García-Arroyo, Laura; Prim, Núria; Martí, Neus; Roig, Maria Carme; Navarro, Ferran; Rabella, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Molecular techniques have represented a major step forward in the diagnosis of viral respiratory infections. They are considered highly sensitive and specific compared to conventional techniques. In this study two nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) were compared to conventional methods (immunofluorescence and viral culture). The aim of this work was to discuss the clinical interpretation of the results obtained by NAATs on the basis of the two-decade experience of our group and the literature. Eighty nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under six years attended for acute respiratory illness at the pediatric emergency room of a third level Hospital. Both NAATs tested (Seeplex(®) and Clart(®)) showed an overall higher performance regarding sensitivity (76% and 90%, respectively). Compared to Seeplex(®), the Clart(®) system tripled the number of multiple detections (8 by Seeplex(®) vs. 25 by Clart(®)). In some specimens both NAATs detected different viruses. Given these discrepancies and the fact that detection of viral nucleic acids is not necessarily related to the current clinical syndrome, the interpretation of molecular results may not always be so straightforward. The pros and cons of NAATs should always be taken into account when giving a result.

  19. Symmetry-Based Techniques for Qualitative Understanding of Rovibrational Effects in Spherical-Top Molecular Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Justin Chadwick

    2011-12-01

    Using light to probe the structure of matter is as natural as opening our eyes. Modern physics and chemistry have turned this art into a rich science, measuring the delicate interactions possible at the molecular level. Perhaps the most commonly used tool in computational spectroscopy is that of matrix diagonalization. While this is invaluable for calculating everything from molecular structure and energy levels to dipole moments and dynamics, the process of numerical diagonalization is an opaque one. This work applies symmetry and semi-classical techniques to elucidate numerical spectral analysis for high-symmetry molecules. Semi-classical techniques, such as the Potential Energy Surfaces, have long been used to help understand molecular vibronic and rovibronic spectra and dynamics. This investigation focuses on newer semi-classical techniques that apply Rotational Energy Surfaces (RES) to rotational energy level clustering effects in high-symmetry molecules. Such clusters exist in rigid rotor molecules as well as deformable spherical tops. This study begins by using the simplicity of rigid symmetric top molecules to clarify the classical-quantum correspondence of RES semi-classical analysis and then extends it to a more precise and complete theory of modern high-resolution spectra. RES analysis is extended to molecules having more complex and higher rank tensorial rotational and rovibrational Hamiltonians than were possible to understand before. Such molecules are shown to produce an extraordinary range of rotational level clusters, corresponding to a panoply of symmetries ranging from C4v to C2 and C1 (no symmetry) with a corresponding range of new angular momentum localization and J-tunneling effects. Using RES topography analysis and the commutation duality relations between symmetry group operators in the lab-frame to those in the body-frame, it is shown how to better describe and catalog complex splittings found in rotational level clusters. Symmetry

  20. [Which molecular biology techniques must conform to the armamentarium for basic research in uro-oncology?].

    PubMed

    Oriola, Josep

    2013-06-01

    Molecular biology has been one of the scientific disciplines in which there has been more advances in the last years. The first impulse in the study of genetic alterations came from the discovery of DNA structure, followed by elucidation of the genetic code, the discovery of restriction enzymes and subsequently the invention of PCR, not forgetting the exponential development of computer science. All of them have allowed us to know much more about our genome and its regulation than we could imagine. The impulse in proteomics has been especially in tune up of soft methods of ionization coupled with mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, this seems to be only the beginning since today there are continuous methodological advances that will increase more, without doubt, the knowledge and applications in this discipline.

  1. Optimizing molecular properties using a relative index of thermodynamic stability and global optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, René; Mohareb, Amir

    2016-01-01

    We devised a global optimization (GO) strategy for optimizing molecular properties with respect to both geometry and chemical composition. A relative index of thermodynamic stability (RITS) is introduced to allow meaningful energy comparisons between different chemical species. We use the RITS by itself, or in combination with another calculated property, to create an objective function F to be minimized. Including the RITS in the definition of F ensures that the solutions have some degree of thermodynamic stability. We illustrate how the GO strategy works with three test applications, with F calculated in the framework of Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT) with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation. First, we searched the composition and configuration space of CmHnNpOq (m = 0-4, n = 0-10, p = 0-2, q = 0-2, and 2 ≤ m + n + p + q ≤ 12) for stable molecules. The GO discovered familiar molecules like N2, CO2, acetic acid, acetonitrile, ethane, and many others, after a small number (5000) of KS-DFT energy evaluations. Second, we carried out a GO of the geometry of Cu m Snn + (m = 1, 2 and n = 9-12). A single GO run produced the same low-energy structures found in an earlier study where each Cu m S nn + species had been optimized separately. Finally, we searched bimetallic clusters AmBn (3 ≤ m + n ≤ 6, A,B= Li, Na, Al, Cu, Ag, In, Sn, Pb) for species and configurations having a low RITS and large highest occupied Molecular Orbital (MO) to lowest unoccupied MO energy gap (Eg). We found seven bimetallic clusters with Eg > 1.5 eV.

  2. Optimizing molecular properties using a relative index of thermodynamic stability and global optimization techniques.

    PubMed

    Fournier, René; Mohareb, Amir

    2016-01-14

    We devised a global optimization (GO) strategy for optimizing molecular properties with respect to both geometry and chemical composition. A relative index of thermodynamic stability (RITS) is introduced to allow meaningful energy comparisons between different chemical species. We use the RITS by itself, or in combination with another calculated property, to create an objective function F to be minimized. Including the RITS in the definition of F ensures that the solutions have some degree of thermodynamic stability. We illustrate how the GO strategy works with three test applications, with F calculated in the framework of Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT) with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation. First, we searched the composition and configuration space of CmHnNpOq (m = 0-4, n = 0-10, p = 0-2, q = 0-2, and 2 ≤ m + n + p + q ≤ 12) for stable molecules. The GO discovered familiar molecules like N2, CO2, acetic acid, acetonitrile, ethane, and many others, after a small number (5000) of KS-DFT energy evaluations. Second, we carried out a GO of the geometry of CumSnn (+) (m = 1, 2 and n = 9-12). A single GO run produced the same low-energy structures found in an earlier study where each CumSnn (+) species had been optimized separately. Finally, we searched bimetallic clusters AmBn (3 ≤ m + n ≤ 6, A,B= Li, Na, Al, Cu, Ag, In, Sn, Pb) for species and configurations having a low RITS and large highest occupied Molecular Orbital (MO) to lowest unoccupied MO energy gap (Eg). We found seven bimetallic clusters with Eg > 1.5 eV.

  3. Sensitive force technique to probe molecular adhesion and structural linkages at biological interfaces.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K; Merkel, R

    1995-06-01

    Adhesion and cytoskeletal structure are intimately related in biological cell function. Even with the vast amount of biological and biochemical data that exist, little is known at the molecular level about physical mechanisms involved in attachments between cells or about consequences of adhesion on the material structure. To expose physical actions at soft biological interfaces, we have combined an ultrasensitive transducer and reflection interference microscopy to image submicroscopic displacements of probe contact with a test surface under minuscule forces. The transducer is a cell-size membrane capsule pressurized by micropipette suction where displacement normal to the membrane under tension is proportional to the applied force. Pressure control of the tension tunes the sensitivity in operation over four orders of magnitude through a range of force from 0.01 pN up to the strength of covalent bonds (approximately 1000 pN)! As the surface probe, a microscopic bead is biochemically glued to the transducer with a densely-bound ligand that is indifferent to the test surface. Movements of the probe under applied force are resolved down to an accuracy of approximately 5 nm from the interference fringe pattern created by light reflected from the bead. With this arrangement, we show that local mechanical compliance of a cell surface can be measured at a displacement resolution set by structural fluctuations. When desired, a second ligand is bound sparsely to the probe for focal adhesion to specific receptors in the test surface. We demonstrate that monitoring fluctuations in probe position at low transducer stiffness enhances detection of molecular adhesion and activation of cytoskeletal structure. Subsequent loading of an attachment tests mechanical response of the receptor-substrate linkage throughout the force-driven process of detachment.

  4. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Integrated with a Surface Acoustic Wave Technique for Detection of Sulfamethizole.

    PubMed

    Ayankojo, Akinrinade George; Tretjakov, Aleksei; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres; Rappich, Jörg; Furchner, Andreas; Hinrichs, Karsten; Syritski, Vitali

    2016-01-19

    The synergistic effect of combining molecular imprinting and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies for the selective and label-free detection of sulfamethizole as a model antibiotic in aqueous environment was demonstrated. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for sulfamethizole (SMZ) selective recognition was prepared in the form of a homogeneous thin film on the sensing surfaces of SAW chip by oxidative electropolymerization of m-phenylenediamine (mPD) in the presence of SMZ, acting as a template. Special attention was paid to the rational selection of the functional monomer using computational and spectroscopic approaches. SMZ template incorporation and its subsequent release from the polymer was supported by IR microscopic measurements. Precise control of the thicknesses of the SMZ-MIP and respective nonimprinted reference films (NIP) was achieved by correlating the electrical charge dosage during electrodeposition with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in order to ensure accurate interpretation of label-free responses originating from the MIP modified sensor. The fabricated SMZ-MIP films were characterized in terms of their binding affinity and selectivity toward the target by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded using the SAW system. The SMZ-MIPs had SMZ binding capacity approximately more than eight times higher than the respective NIP and were able to discriminate among structurally similar molecules, i.e., sulfanilamide and sulfadimethoxine. The presented approach for the facile integration of a sulfonamide antibiotic-sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target molecule at nanomolar concentration levels and could be potentially suitable for cost-effective fabrication of a multianalyte chemosensor for analysis of hazardous pollutants in an aqueous environment.

  5. Cytogenetic characterization and genome size of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Guilherme; Cardoso, Luísa; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Catharanthus roseus is a highly valuable medicinal plant producing several terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) with pharmaceutical applications, including the anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine. Due to the interest in its TIAs, C. roseus is one of the most extensively studied medicinal plants and has become a model species for the study of plant secondary metabolism. However, very little is known about the cytogenetics and genome size of this species, in spite of their importance for breeding programmes, TIA genetics and emerging genomic research. Therefore, the present paper provides a karyotype description and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data for C. roseus, as well as a rigorous characterization of its genome size. Methodology The organization of C. roseus chromosomes was characterized using several DNA/chromatin staining techniques and FISH of rDNA. Genome size was investigated by flow cytometry using an optimized methodology. Principal results The C. roseus full chromosome complement of 2n = 16 includes two metacentric, four subtelocentric and two telocentric chromosome pairs, with the presence of a single nucleolus organizer region in chromosome 6. An easy and reliable flow cytometry protocol for nuclear genome analysis of C. roseus was optimized, and the C-value of this species was estimated to be 1C = 0.76 pg, corresponding to 738 Mbp. Conclusions The organization and size of the C. roseus genome were characterized, providing an important basis for future studies of this important medicinal species, including further cytogenetic mapping, genomics, TIA genetics and breeding programmes. PMID:22479673

  6. Cytogenetic study of heptapterids (Teleostei, Siluriformes) with particular respect to the Nemuroglanis subclade

    PubMed Central

    Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; Moreira Peres, Wellington Adriano; Moreira-Filho, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The catfish family Heptapteridae (order Siluriformes) is endemic to the Neotropics and is one of the most common of the fish families in small bodies of water. Although over 200 species have been identified in this family, very few have been characterized cytogenetically. Here, we analyze the chromosome genomes of four species of Heptapteridae: Cetopsorhamdia iheringi (Schubart & Gomes, 1959), 2n = 58, comprising 28 metacentric (m) + 26 submetacentric (sm) + 4 subtelomeric (st) chromosomes; Pimelodella vittata (Lütken, 1874), 2n = 46, comprising 16m + 22sm + 8st; Rhamdia prope quelen (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), 2n = 58 comprising 26m + 16sm + 14st + 2 acrocentric; and Rhamdiopsis prope microcephala (Lütken, 1874), 2n = 56, comprising 12m + 30sm + 14st. The nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located in a single chromosome pair in all species. The two species that belonged to the subclade Nemuroglanis, Cetopsorhamdia iheringi and Rhamdia prope quelen, had a diploid chromosome number of 58 and an interstitial NOR adjacent to a C+ block located on one of the larger chromosome pairs in the complement. Our results from conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with FISH using 18S and 5S rDNA probes corroborated the taxonomical hypothesis for the formation of the Nemuroglanis subclade. PMID:25893072

  7. Contributions to cytogenetics of Plectranthus barbatus Andr. (Lamiaceae): a medicinal plant

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Aryane Campos; Viccini, Lyderson Facio; de Sousa, Saulo Marçal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Accessions of Plectranthus barbatus (Lamiaceae), a medicinal plant, were investigated using a cytogenetic approach and flow cytometry (FCM). Here, we describe for the first time details of the karyotype including chromosome morphology, physical mapping of GC rich bands (CMA3 banding), as well as the mapping of 45S and 5S rDNA sites. All accessions studied showed karyotypes with 2n = 30 small metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes. The CMA3 banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques revealed coincidence between CMA3 bands and 45S rDNA sites (6 terminal marks) while for the 5S rDNA were observed 4 subterminal marks no coincident with CMA3 marks. For nuclear genome size measurement, the FCM procedure provided histograms with G0/G1 peaks exhibiting CV between 2.0–4.9 and the mean values obtained for the species was 2C = 2.78 pg, with AT% = 61.08 and GC% = 38.92. The cytogenetic data obtained here present new and important information which enables the characterization of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26312133

  8. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  9. Simulation of macromolecular liquids with the adaptive resolution molecular dynamics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. H.; Klein, R.; Delle Site, L.

    2016-08-01

    We extend the application of the adaptive resolution technique (AdResS) to liquid systems composed of alkane chains of different lengths. The aim of the study is to develop and test the modifications of AdResS required in order to handle the change of representation of large molecules. The robustness of the approach is shown by calculating several relevant structural properties and comparing them with the results of full atomistic simulations. The extended scheme represents a robust prototype for the simulation of macromolecular systems of interest in several fields, from material science to biophysics.

  10. Interaction of the minocycline with extracelluar protein and intracellular protein by multi-spectral techniques and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qing; Wang, Yirun; Hu, Taoying; Liu, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of minocyeline (MNC) with extracelluar protein (lysozyme, LYSO) or intracellular protein (bovine hemoglobin, BHb) was investigated using multi-spectral techniques and molecular docking in vitro. Fluorescence studies suggested that MNC quenched LYSO/BHb fluorescence in a static mode with binding constants of 2.01 and 0.26 × 104 L•mol-1 at 298 K, respectively. The LYZO-MNC system was more easily influenced by temperature (298 and 310 K) than the BHb-MNC system. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding process. Based on the Förster theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distances between MNC and the inner tryptophan residues of LYSO and BHb were calculated to be 4.34 and 3.49 nm, respectively. Furthermore, circular dichroism spectra (CD), Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra results indicated the secondary structures of LYSO and BHb were partially destroyed by MNC with the α-helix percentage of LYZO-MNC increased (17.8-28.6%) while that of BHb-MNC was decreased (41.6-39.6%). UV-vis spectral results showed these binding interactions could cause conformational and some micro-environmental changes of LYSO and BHb. In accordance with the results of molecular docking, In LYZO-MNC system, MNC was mainly bound in the active site hinge region where Trp-62 and Trp-63 are located, and in MNC-BHb system, MNC was close to the subunit α 1 of BHb, molecular docking analysis supported the thermodynamic results well. The work contributes to clarify the mechanism of MNC with two proteins at molecular level.

  11. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes: manufacturing techniques and properties of customized nanocomponents for molecular-level technology.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sohaib; Taimoor, Aqeel A

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) since their discovery have been the focus of research on account of exceptional chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. However, manipulation and processing of CNTs have been limited by their compatibility with other materials. Considerable efforts have therefore been devoted to the surface modification of CNTs to pave the way to many useful applications and to realize the potential applications in successful products, especially composite manufacturing. The chemical modification, dispersion and solubilization of CNTs represent an emerging area in the research on nanotubes-based materials. Several research groups have reported successful and doable functionalization techniques for single-walled (SWCNT) and multi-wall (MWCNT) carbon nanotubes. This paper presents an overview of the functionalization of the carbon nanotubes covering both covalent and non-covalent techniques at tips and walls of SWCNTs and MWCNTs, and summarizes recent patents possessing significant commercial value and large-scale practicality. The principal aim is to review main approaches to chemical functionalization of CNTs and to account for the advances that have been made so far.

  12. Links between plant and rhizoplane bacterial communities in grassland soils, characterized using molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Naoise; Daniell, Timothy J; Singh, Brajesh K; Papert, Artemis; McNicol, James W; Prosser, James I

    2005-11-01

    Molecular analysis of grassland rhizosphere soil has demonstrated complex and diverse bacterial communities, with resultant difficulties in detecting links between plant and bacterial communities. These studies have, however, analyzed "bulk" rhizosphere soil, rather than rhizoplane communities, which interact most closely with plants through utilization of root exudates. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that plant species was a major driver for bacterial rhizoplane community composition on individual plant roots. DNA extracted from individual roots was used to determine plant identity, by analysis of the plastid tRNA leucine (trnL) UAA gene intron, and plant-related bacterial communities. Bacterial communities were characterized by analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes using two fingerprinting methods: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Links between plant and bacterial rhizoplane communities could not be detected by visual examination of T-RFLP patterns or DGGE banding profiles. Statistical analysis of fingerprint patterns did not reveal a relationship between bacterial community composition and plant species but did demonstrate an influence of plant community composition. The data also indicated that topography and other, uncharacterized, environmental factors are important in driving bacterial community composition in grassland soils. T-RFLP had greater potential resolving power than DGGE, but findings from the two methods were not significantly different.

  13. Molecular authentication and quality control using a high performance liquid chromatography technique of Fructus Evodiae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dan; Li, Shun Xiang; Cai, Guang Xian; Yue, Chun Hua; Wei, Li Jun; Zhang, Ping

    2008-02-01

    In present paper, the properties of molecular authentication combined with the fingerprints of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were validated by analyzing ten batches of Fructus Evodiae samples (the dried nearly ripe fruit of Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH., Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. officinalis (DODE) HUANG or Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. bodinieri (DODE) HUANG). The results of this investigation show that the similarities of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were almost 100% in Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. bodinieri (DODE) HUANG, 97% in Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH., and 96% in Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. officinalis (DODE) HUANG. The percentage of identity between the two groups of Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. bodinieri (DODE) HUANG and Evodia rutaecarpa (JUSS.) BENTH. var. officinalis (DODE) HUANG is almost 96%, but the identity among the group of these three species is only 73%. The results show that Fructus Evodiae comes from three species respectively. The fingerprints of HPLC show that Fructus Evodiae revealed 20 major common peaks. And the three species have almost the same chemical constituents. ITS sequence fingerprint combining the fingerprint of HPLC can not only be developed to identify and distinguish the three species in detail, but also can be used for optimizing location where Fructus Evodiae has much higher bioactive constituents and yield.

  14. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-04-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine.

  15. Molecular structure and spectroscopic characterization of Carbamazepine with experimental techniques and DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-04-15

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of Carbamazepine has been carried out by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations - ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP) performed with standard basis set 6-31G(d,p). Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, natural bond order analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR intensities have been computed. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the molecule has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED) by VEDA program. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λmax were determined by HF/6-311++G(d,p) Time-Dependent method. The thermodynamic functions of the title molecule were also performed using the RHF and DFT methods. The restricted Hartree-Fock and density functional theory-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) calculation procedure was also performed, and it was used for assigning the (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Carbamazepine.

  16. Molecular ion implantation technique for obtaining the same depth profile for the component atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Mimura, Masakazu; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    1996-12-31

    The molecular ion implantation, in which the ions of polyatomic molecule are used as an implantation particle, is expected to have two main advantages: (1) obtaining the similar depth profiles of implanted component atoms of different elements at a single implantation, and (2) achieving simultaneous implantation of different atoms at the same position. In this paper, we have showed these advantages by an analytical estimation of the projected ranges for each implanted atoms of a polyatomic molecule, and then, by the computer simulation by TRIM. In addition, the experimental results obtained by SIMS were also presented. As for the evaluation of depth profiles, the overlap areas between two depth distributions were calculated by a numerical integration as a degree of the similarity between two depth profiles of different atoms. As a result, the projected ranges and overlap areas showed that depth profiles are almost the same in a usual implantation energy range, except of hydrogen due to the lack of neutron in the nucleus. For the simple evaluation for the similarity of two depth profiles, a factor S was proposed instead of the overlap area.

  17. Analysis of molecular biology techniques for the diagnosis of human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Carestiato, Fernanda Nahoum; Silva, Kátia Cristina da; Balthazar, Daniela Signorelli; Silva, Licínio; Marinho, Marisa; Oliveira, Ledy Horto Dos Santos; Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria Baeta

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of molecular methodologies to access human papillomavirus genome in the genital tract. Samples from 136 women aged 17 to 52 years old obtained from the Dr. Sérgio Franco Laboratories between 2000 and 2001, were analyzed by the hybrid capture assay and amplified by PCR with generic primers MY09/MY11 and specific primers for types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 58. Viral genome was detected in 71.3% of the samples by hybrid capture and 75% by amplification. When cytopathology was used as a reference method for screening lesions, hybrid capture (p=0) and amplification (p=0.002) presented positive association. The 3 methods showed absolute agreement when cytopathology confirmed papillomavirus infection and high grade intraepithelial lesion. Disagreements occurred for 10 cases: seven inflammatory cases positive by PCR and negative for hybrid capture and 3 low squamous intraepithelial lesions positive for hybrid capture but negative for amplification. In conclusion, hybrid capture was shown to be sensitive and specific enough for use in clinical routines. Moreover, the evaluation of viral load values obtained by this method were shown to be related to the severity of the lesion and merit further studies to analyze the possible association with risk of progression to malignancy.

  18. Cytogenetic studies and karyotype nomenclature of three wild canid species: maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis) and fennec fox (Fennecus zerda).

    PubMed

    Pieńkowska-Schelling, A; Schelling, C; Zawada, M; Yang, F; Bugno, M; Ferguson-Smith, M

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed the chromosomes of three wild and endangered canid species: the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis) and the fennec fox (Fennecuszerda) using classical and molecular cytogenetic methods. For the first time detailed and encompassing descriptions of the chromosomes are presented including the chromosomal assignment of nucleolar organizer regions and the 5S rRNA gene cluster. We propose a karyotype nomenclature with ideograms including more than 300 bands per haploid set for each of these three species which will form the basis for further research. In addition, we propose four basic different patterns of karyotype organization in the family Canidae. A comparison of these patterns with the most recent molecular phylogeny of Canidae revealed that the karyotype evolution of a species is not always strongly connected with its phylogenetic position. Our findings underline the need and justification for basic cytogenetic work in rare and exotic species.

  19. High-throughput ultrasensitive molecular techniques for quantifying low-density malaria parasitemias.

    PubMed

    Imwong, Mallika; Hanchana, Sarun; Malleret, Benoit; Rénia, Laurent; Day, Nicholas P J; Dondorp, Arjen; Nosten, Francois; Snounou, Georges; White, Nicholas J

    2014-09-01

    The epidemiology of malaria in "low-transmission" areas has been underestimated. Molecular detection methods have revealed higher prevalences of malaria than conventional microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests, but these typically evaluate finger-prick capillary blood samples (∼5 μl) and therefore cannot detect parasite densities of <200/ml. Their use underestimates true parasite carriage rates. To characterize the epidemiology of malaria in low-transmission settings and plan elimination strategies, more sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) is needed to identify and quantify low-density malaria parasitemias. A highly sensitive "high-volume" quantitative PCR (qPCR) method based on Plasmodium sp. 18S RNA was adapted for blood sample volumes of ≥250 μl and scaled for high throughput. The methods were validated by assessment of the analytical sensitivity and specificity, diagnostic sensitivity, and specificity, efficiency, precision, analytical and diagnostic accuracies, limit of detection, root cause analysis of false positives, and robustness. The high-volume qPCR method based on Plasmodium sp. 18S RNA gave high PCR efficiency of 90 to 105%. Concentrations of parasite DNA from large volumes of blood gave a consistent analytical detection limit (LOD) of 22 parasites/ml (95% CI, 21.79 to 74.9), which is some 2,500 times more sensitive than conventional microscopy and 50 times more sensitive than currently used PCR methods from filter paper blood spots. The diagnostic specificity was 99.75%. Using automated procedures it was possible to process 700 blood samples per week. A very sensitive and specific high-throughput high-volume qPCR method for the detection of low-density parasitemias (>20 parasites/ml) was developed and validated.

  20. Measurement of surface stay times for physical adsorption of gases. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Univ.; [using molecular beam time of flight technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A molecular beam time-of-flight technique is studied as a means of determining surface stay times for physical adsorption. The experimental approach consists of pulsing a molecular beam, allowing the pulse to strike an adsorbing surface and detecting the molecular pulse after it has subsequently desorbed. The technique is also found to be useful for general studies of adsorption under nonequilibrium conditions including the study of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. The shape of the detected pulse is analyzed in detail for a first-order desorption process. For mean stay times, tau, less than the mean molecular transit times involved, the peak of the detected pulse is delayed by an amount approximately equal to tau. For tau much greater than these transit times, the detected pulse should decay as exp(-t/tau). However, for stay times of the order of the transit times, both the molecular speed distributions and the incident pulse duration time must be taken into account.

  1. Simple and rapid molecular techniques for identification of amylose levels in rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Acga; Ismail, Ismanizan; Osman, Mohamad; Hashim, Habibuddin

    2012-01-01

    The polymorphisms of Waxy (Wx) microsatellite and G-T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Wx gene region were analyzed using simplified techniques in fifteen rice varieties. A rapid and reliable electrophoresis method, MetaPhor agarose gel electrophoresis (MAGE), was effectively employed as an alternative to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for separating Wx microsatellite alleles. The amplified products containing the Wx microsatellite ranged from 100 to 130 bp in length. Five Wx microsatellite alleles, namely (CT)(10), (CT)(11), (CT)(16), (CT)(17), and (CT)(18) were identified. Of these, (CT)(11) and (CT)(17) were the predominant classes among the tested varieties. All varieties with an apparent amylose content higher than 24% were associated with the shorter repeat alleles; (CT)(10) and (CT)(11), while varieties with 24% or less amylose were associated with the longer repeat alleles. All varieties with intermediate and high amylose content had the sequence AGGTATA at the 5'-leader intron splice site, while varieties with low amylose content had the sequence AGTTATA. The G-T polymorphism was further verified by the PCR-AccI cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) method, in which only genotypes containing the AGGTATA sequence were cleaved by AccI. Hence, varieties with desirable amylose levels can be developed rapidly using the Wx microsatellite and G-T SNP, along with MAGE.

  2. Columnar and subsurface silicide growth with novel molecular beam epitaxy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Pike, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have found novel growth modes for epitaxial CoSi2 at high temperatures coupled with Si-rich flux ratios or low deposition rates. In the first of these modes, codeposition of metal and Si at 600-800 C with excess Si leads to the formation of epitaxial silicide columns surrounded by single-crystal Si. During the initial stages of the deposition, the excess Si grows homoepitaxially in between the silicide, which forms islands, so that the lateral growth of the islands is confined. Once a template layer is established by this process, columns of silicide form as a result of selective epitaxy of silicide on silicide and Si on Si. This growth process allows nanometer control over silicide particles in three dimensions. In the second of these modes, a columnar silicide seed layer is used as a template to nucleate subsurface growth of CoSi2. With a 100 nm Si layer covering CoSi2 seeds, Co deposited at 800C and 0.01 nm/s diffuses down to grow on the buried seeds rather than nucleating surface silicide islands. For thicker Si caps or higher deposition rates, the surface concentration of Co exceeds the critical concentration for nucleation of islands, preventing this subsurface growth mode from occurring. Using this technique, single-crystal layers of CoSi2 buried under single-crystal Si caps have been grown.

  3. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  4. A brief review on molecular, genetic and imaging techniques for HCV fibrosis evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic HCV is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the present day world. The assessment of disease progression not only provides useful information for diagnosis and therapeutic supervision judgment but also for monitoring disease. Different invasive and non invasive methods are applied to diagnose the disease from initial to end stage (mild fibrosis to cirrhosis). Although, liver biopsy is still considered as gold standard to identify liver histological stages, an assessment of the disease development based on non-invasive clinical findings is also emerging and this may replace the need of biopsy in near future. This review gives brief insight on non-invasive methods currently available for predicting liver fibrosis in HCV with their current pros and cons to make easier for a clinician to choose better marker to assess liver fibrosis in HCV infected patients. Methods More than 200 studies regarding invasive and noninvasive markers available for HCV liver disease diagnosis were thoroughly reviewed. We examined year wise results of these markers based on their sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and AUROCs. Results We found that in all non-invasive serum markers for HCV, FibroTest, Forn's Index, Fibrometer and HepaScore have high five-year predictive value but with low AUROCs (0.60~0.85) and are not comparable to liver biopsy (AUROC = 0.97). Even though from its beginning, Fibroscan is proved to be best with high AUROCs (> 0.90) in all studies, no single noninvasive marker is able to differentiate all fibrosis stages from end stage cirrhosis. Meanwhile, specific genetic markers may not only discriminate fibrotic and cirrhotic liver but also differentiate individual fibrosis stages. Conclusions There is a need of marker which accurately determines the stage based on simplest routine laboratory test. Genetic marker in combination of imaging technique may be the better non invasive diagnostic method in future. PMID:21299910

  5. Binding studies of lophirone B with bovine serum albumin (BSA): Combination of spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Otávio Augusto; da Silva, Veridiana A.; Sant'Anna, Carlos Maurício R.; Ferreira, Aurélio B. B.; Ribeiro, Tereza Auxiliadora N.; de Carvalho, Mário G.; Cesarin-Sobrinho, Dari; Netto-Ferreira, José Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the natural product lophirone B, was investigated by spectroscopic techniques combined with a computational method (molecular docking). From the KSV and kq values it was concluded that lophirone B quenches the fluorescence of BSA by dynamic and static mechanisms. The Ka values, of the order of 104 M-1, and the number of binding sites (n ≈ 1), indicate that the binding is moderate and there is just one main binding site in BSA for lophirone B. The negative ΔG° values are in accordance with the spontaneity of the process and the positive ΔH° and ΔS° values indicate that the binding is entropically driven; the main binding forces for the association BSA:lophirone B are probably lipophilic interactions. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show there is not a significant perturbation on the secondary structure of the albumin upon the binding process. In order to better understand the spectroscopic results, a computational method was applied: molecular docking suggests Trp-213 site, as the main binding site for the ligand. Lophirone B seems to be exposed to the aqueous media as well as accommodated inside the protein cavity, resulting in a moderate affinity for the albumin. The Arg-198, His-287, Lys-294 and Lys-439 residues are interacting via hydrogen bonding with lophirone B, whereas the interaction with Trp-213 residue occurs through a lipophilic interaction.

  6. First prokaryotic biodiversity assessment using molecular techniques of an acidic river in Neuquén, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Urbieta, M Sofía; González Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Giaveno, M Alejandra; Donati, E

    2012-07-01

    Two acidic hot springs close to the crater of Copahue Volcano (Neuquén, Argentina) are the source of the Río Agrio. The river runs several kilometres before flowing into Caviahue Lake. Along the river, temperature, iron, other metal and proton concentrations decrease gradually with distance downstream. From the source to the lake and depending on the season, pH can rise from 1.0 (or even less) to about 4.0, while temperature values decrease from 70°C to 15°C. Water samples were taken from different stations on the river selected according to their physicochemical parameters. In order to assess prokaryotic biodiversity throughout the water column, different and complementary molecular biology techniques were used, mainly in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. All microorganisms found are typical of acidic environments. Sulphur-oxidizing bacteria like Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus albertensis were detected in every station. Moderately thermophile iron- and sulphur-oxidizing bacteria like members of Alicyclobacillus and Sulfobacillus genera were also ubiquitous. Strict iron-oxidizing bacteria like Leptospirillum and Ferrimicrobium were present at the source of the river, but disappeared downstream where iron concentrations were much lower. Iron-oxidizing, mesophilic Ferroplasma spp. were the main archaea found. The data presented in this work represent the first molecular assessment of this rare natural acidic environment.

  7. Achiral and Chiral Separations Using Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography, Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Coatings, and Mixed Mode Separation Techniques with Molecular Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Luces, Candace A.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode separation using a combination of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings is herein reported for the separation of achiral and chiral analytes. Many analytes are difficult to separate by MEKC and PEM coatings alone. Therefore, the implementation of a mixed mode separation provides several advantages for overcoming the limitations of these well-established methods. In this study, it was observed that achiral separations using MEKC and PEM coatings individually resulted in partial resolution of 8 very similar aryl ketones when the molecular micelle (sodium poly(N-undecanoyl-l-glycinate) (poly-SUG)) concentration was varied from 0.25% – 1.00% (w/v) and the bilayer number varied from 2 – 4. However, when mixed mode separation was introduced, baseline resolution was achieved for all 8 analytes. In the case of chiral separations, temazepam, aminoglutethimide, benzoin, benzoin methyl ether and coumachlor were separated using the three separation techniques. For chiral separations, the chiral molecular micelle, sodium poly(N-undecanoyl-l-leucylvalinate) (poly-l-SULV), was employed at concentrations of 0.25–1.50% (w/v) for both MEKC and PEM coatings. Overall, the results revealed partial separation with MEKC and PEM coatings individually. However, mixed mode separation enabled baseline separation of each chiral mixture. The separation of achiral and chiral compounds from different compound classes demonstrates the versatility of this mixed mode approach. PMID:20155738

  8. Study on the interaction of the epilepsy drug, zonisamide with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khorshidi, Aref; Moghadam, Neda Hossinpour

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of zonisamide (ZNS) with the transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA) employing UV-Vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that binding of ZNS to HSA caused strong fluorescence quenching of HSA through static quenching mechanism, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein ZNS complex and the process of the binding of ZNS with HSA was driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -193.442 kJ mol-1). The results of CD and UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this drug to HSA induced conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also indicated that zonisamide could strongly bind to the site I (subdomain IIA) of HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction and there were hydrogen bond interactions between this drug and HSA, also known as the warfarin binding site.

  9. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  10. Cytogenetic findings in Serbian patients with Turner's syndrome stigmata.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, V A; Jovanović, J V; Pavković-Lučić, S B; Drakulić, D D; Djurović, M M; Gotić, M D

    2010-11-09

    Cytogenetic findings are reported for 31 female patients with Turner's syndrome. Chromosome studies were made from lymphocyte cultures. Non-mosaicism 45,X was demonstrated in 15 of these patients, whereas only three were apparently mosaic. Eight patients showed non-mosaic and four patients showed mosaic structural aberrations of the X-chromosome. One non-mosaic case displayed a karyotype containing a small marker chromosome. Conventional cytogenetics was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an X-specific probe to identify the chromosomal origin of the ring and a 1q12-specific DNA probe to identify de novo balanced translocation (1;9) in one patient. To our knowledge, this is the first finding of karyotype 45,X,t(1;9)(cen;cen)/46,X,r(X),t(1;9)(cen;cen) in Turner's syndrome. The same X-specific probe was also used to identify a derivative chromosome in one patient.

  11. Comparative cytogenetics of Auchenorrhyncha (Hemiptera, Homoptera): a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Valentina; Aguin-Pombo, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive review of cytogenetic features is provided for the large hemipteran suborder Auchenorrhyncha, which currently contains approximately 42,000 valid species. This review is based on the analysis of 819 species, 483 genera, and 31 families representing all presently recognized Auchenorrhyncha superfamilies, e.i. Cicadoidea (cicadas), Cercopoidea (spittle bugs), Membracoidea (leafhoppers and treehoppers), Myerslopioidea (ground-dwelling leafhoppers), and Fulgoroidea (planthoppers). History and present status of chromosome studies are described, as well as the structure of chromosomes, chromosome counts, trends and mechanisms of evolution of karyotypes and sex determining systems, their variation at different taxonomic levels and most characteristic (modal) states, occurrence of parthenogenesis, polyploidy, B-chromosomes and chromosome rearrangements, and methods used for cytogenetic analysis of Auchenorrhyncha. PMID:26807037

  12. Chorionic villus sampling in continuing pregnancies. II. Cytogenetic reliability.

    PubMed

    Martin, A O; Simpson, J L; Rosinsky, B J; Elias, S

    1986-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 103 chorionic villus samples. Analysis of the 103 samples revealed six abnormalities. In three of the six the abnormalities were confirmed in fetal or neonatal tissue (47,XY, + 13; 46,XY, t(13q13q); 45,X). In three samples the abnormalities detected were not confirmed; in two of the three the abnormalities were detected only in long-term cultures, whereas in the other samples the abnormality was restricted to direct analysis of the villi after overnight incubation. Our initial experience leads us to conclude that certain abnormalities in chorionic villus sampling may not be indicative of fetal abnormalities; 45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is such a complement. Discrepancies between cytogenetic analysis of intact villi processed soon after sampling and of cells grown in culture can be managed by adhering to several suggested guidelines and by liberal use of confirmatory amniocentesis.

  13. Risk Assessment of Radiation Exposure using Molecular Biodosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Todd F.; George, K.; Hammond, D. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Current cytogenetic biodosimetry methods would be difficult to adapt to spaceflight operations, because they require toxic chemicals and a substantial amount of time to perform. In addition, current biodosimetry techniques are limited to whole body doses over about 10cGy. Development of new techniques that assess radiation exposure response at the molecular level could overcome these limitations and have important implications in the advancement of biodosimetry. Recent technical advances include expression profiling at the transcript and protein level to assess multiple biomarkers of exposure, which may lead to the development of a radiation biomarker panel revealing possible fingerprints of individual radiation sensitivity. So far, many biomarkers of interest have been examined in their response to ionizing radiation, such as cytokines and members of the DNA repair pathway. New technology, such as the Luminex system can analyze many biomarkers simultaneously in one sample.

  14. Acardius in a triplet pregnancy: cytogenetic and morphological profile.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, I I; Mortimer, G; Meehan, F P; England, S; Greally, M

    1992-01-01

    We describe a rare case of acardius in a triplet pregnancy terminated by Caesarean Section at 32 weeks gestation. Morphological and chromosomal abnormalities of the fetus as well as structural abnormalities of the placenta are presented. Cytogenetic analysis and examination of the single disc triplet placenta provide evidence for the two major theories of pathogenesis of acardius, the twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence and the genetic theory, which we believe are not necessarily mutually exclusive.

  15. Cytogenetic toxicity of Aloe vera (a medicinal plant).

    PubMed

    Verma, Anjana; Gupta, Ashok K; Kumar, Amod; Khan, Parimal K

    2012-01-01

    The cytogenetic toxicity of the crude leaf extract of Aloe vera, a medicinal plant, was evaluated in two test systems, onion and Swiss albino mice, using their root tip meristematic and bone marrow cells, respectively. No significant increase in structural abnormalities in chromosomes was observed, but a marked increase in cells with chromosome-number anomalies was found. The extract, however, significantly increased the mitotic index of both cell types.

  16. Cytogenetics of monosomes in Zea mays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.F.

    1984-11-01

    The cytogenetics of monosomics in maize generated using the r-X1 system was studied. The goal was to isolate as many as possible of the ten possible primary monosomic types and to characterize them by studying: (1) the cytology of meiosis; (2) the cytological behavior of monosomic chromosomes in meiosis; (3) the effect of monosomic on recombination in heterozygous bivalents; and (4) the frequency and types of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations arising in monosomics. 113 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (ACR)

  17. Cytogenetic effects of pesticides. IV. Cytogenetic effects of the insecticides Gardona and Dursban.

    PubMed

    Amer, S M; Aly, F A

    1992-06-01

    The cytogenetic effects of the insecticides Gardona and Dursban were investigated. The toxicity and ability of both insecticides to induce chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchange in vitro was tested in a primary culture of mouse spleen cells, in order to assess the potential mutagenicity of both insecticides. The concentrations 10(-7)-10(-3) M were used for testing the toxic effects of the insecticides. Both Gardona and Dursban were toxic to spleen cell cultures and the percentage of viable cells decreased as the concentration of the insecticide was increased. It reached 76.8% and 77.8% of control after treatment with the highest concentration tested (10(-3) M) of Gardona and Dursban respectively. Gardona at 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 2.0 micrograms/ml, and Dursban at 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 micrograms/ml were tested for the induction of chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges. All of the tested concentrations of both insecticides induced a high percentage of metaphases with chromosomal aberrations in cultured mouse spleen cells after 4-h treatment. The frequency of SCEs/cell increased with increasing concentration of the insecticides. It reached 11.92 +/- 0.14/cell and 13.40 +/- 0.20/cell after treatment with Gardona (2 micrograms/ml) and Dursban (4 micrograms/ml), respectively, compared with 8.2 +/- 0.19/cell and 7.6 +/- 0.15/cell in the solvent control. The presented results indicate that both Gardona and Dursban in the tested concentrations are mutagenic in mouse spleen cell cultures.

  18. Cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Koichi; Manabe, Atsushi; Taketani, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed the cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Japan. Data on patients (<16 years) diagnosed with MDS from 1990 to 2000 were retrospectively collected from pediatric hematologists in 234 institutions. Chromosome analysis was successfully performed in 255 of 277 MDS patients. The numbers of patients with refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were 67 (24%), 51 (18%), 51 (18%), 20 (7%), and 65 (23%), respectively. The other 23 patients (8%) could not be classified specifically. The distribution of childhood MDS in Japan according to the French-American-British subclassification was similar to that in other countries. However, we identified a higher incidence of therapy-related cases. As for relationship between cytogenetics and prognoses, abnormal karyotypes were related to poorer prognoses than normal karyotype (P < 0.01). However, patients with trisomy 8 had prognoses comparable to those with normal karyotypes. Complex karyotypes were associated with poorer prognoses among RAEB and RAEBt patients. In conclusion, prognosis of pediatric MDS is related to cytogenetics. A more precise diagnosis and classification system is needed for childhood MDS.

  19. An overview of cytogenetics of the tribe Meliponini (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, Mara Garcia; Lopes, Denilce Meneses; Campos, L A O

    2017-03-18

    The present study provides a comprehensive review of cytogenetic data on Meliponini and their chromosomal evolution. The compiled data show that only 104 species of stingless bees, representing 32 of the 54 living genera have been studied cytogenetically and that among these species, it is possible to recognize three main groups with n = 9, 15 and 17, respectively. The first group comprises the species of the genus Melipona, whereas karyotypes with n = 15 and n = 17 have been detected in species from different genera. Karyotypes with n = 17 are the most common among the Meliponini studied to date. Cytogenetic information on Meliponini also shows that although chromosome number, in general, is conserved among species of a certain genus, other aspects, such as chromosome morphology, quantity, distribution and composition of heterochromatin, may vary between them. This reinforces the fact that the variations observed in the karyotypes of different Meliponini groups cannot be explained by a single theory or a single type of structural change. In addition, we present a discussion about how these karyotype variations are related to the phylogenetic relationships among the different genera of this tribe.

  20. Cytogenetic examination of cosmonauts for space radiation exposure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigiryova, G. P.; Novitskaya, N. N.; Fedorenko, B. S.

    2012-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate radiation induced chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS (International Space Station). Materials and methodsCytogenetic examination which has been performed in the period 1992-2008 included the analysis of chromosome aberrations using conventional Giemsa staining method in 202 blood samples from 48 cosmonauts who participated in flights on Mir Orbital Station and ISS. ResultsSpace flights led to an increase of chromosome aberration frequency. Frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings (Dic+Rc) depend on the space flight duration and accumulated dose value. After the change of space stations (from Mir Orbital Station to ISS) the radiation load of cosmonauts based on data of cytogenetic examination decreased. Extravehicular activity also adds to chromosome aberration frequency in cosmonauts' blood lymphocytes. Average doses after the first flight, estimated by the frequency of Dic+Rc, were 227 and 113 mGy Eq for long-term flights (LTF) and 107 and 53 mGy Eq for short-term flights (STF). ConclusionCytogenetic examination of cosmonauts can be applied to assess equivalent doses.