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Sample records for molecular da mama

  1. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 13149, as Cycle 20.

  2. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 12778, as Cycle 19.

  3. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis, Proposal 12416, as Cycle 18.

  4. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {10035} during Cycle 12.

  5. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {11863} during Cycle 17.

  6. NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS SMOV as proposal 13555 {visit 5}.

  7. Music Activities for "Mama", "Mama" and "Papa", "Papa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Jean Marzollo creates two beautiful texts using a child's first words, "Mama, Mama" and "Papa, Papa" as a recurring theme. Wildlife artist, Laura Regan, illustrates Marzollo's poetry with loving images of parents and children in the animal kingdom. Poetry and illustrations highlight the tenderness and care of Mama and Papa as they bond with their…

  8. Music Activities for "Mama", "Mama" and "Papa", "Papa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Jean Marzollo creates two beautiful texts using a child's first words, "Mama, Mama" and "Papa, Papa" as a recurring theme. Wildlife artist, Laura Regan, illustrates Marzollo's poetry with loving images of parents and children in the animal kingdom. Poetry and illustrations highlight the tenderness and care of Mama and Papa as they bond with their…

  9. MAMA NUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2013-10-01

    This program is aimed at obtaining NUV-MAMA flat-field observations for the construction of pixel-to-pixel flats {p-flats} with a SNR of 100 per binned pixel. The flats are obtained with the DEUTERIUM-lamp and the MR grisms G230M. The actual choice of central wavelength and slit combination depends on the observed count level within each exposure.Note that STIS NUV-MAMA flats are taken every other cycles{i.e. during odd number cycles} in order to not drain the DEUTERIUMlamp lifetime.

  10. MAMA NUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena

    2011-10-01

    This program is aimed at obtaining NUV-MAMA flat-field observations for the construction of pixel-to-pixel flats {p-flats} with a SNR of 100 per binned pixel. The flats are obtained with the DEUTERIUM-lamp and the MR grisms G230M. The actual choice of central wavelength and slit combination depends on the observed count level within each exposure.Note that STIS NUV-MAMA flats are taken every other cycles{i.e. during odd number cycles} in order to not drain the DEUTERIUMlamp lifetime.

  11. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  12. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  13. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {12723} during Cycle 19.

  14. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {11891} during Cycle 17.

  15. MAMA FUV Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena

    2012-10-01

    This program aims at obtaining FUV-MAMA flat-field observations to create a new p-flats with a SNR of 100 per {low resolution} pixel. The flats are obtained with the Krypton-lamp and the MR grating G140M, similarly to the cycle 17 and 18 programs. However the exact instrument setup {slit width and central wavelength} might change depending on the desired count level {which will be close to the internally allowed global rate limit}.

  16. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13128.

  17. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    PubMed

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  18. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Wavelength dispersion solutions will be determined on a yearly basis as part of a long-term monitoring program. Deep engineering wavecals for each MAMA grating will be obtained at common cenwaves. Intermediate settings will also be taken to check the reliability of derived dispersion solutions. Final selection was determined on basis of past monitoring and C17 requirements. The internal wavelength calibrations will be taken using the LINE line lamp. Extra-deep wavecals are included for some echelle modes and first order modes to ensure detection of weak lines.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of a (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine complex as a potential probe for in vivo visualization of tumor cell proliferation with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Celen, Sofie; de Groot, Tjibbe; Balzarini, Jan; Vunckx, Kathleen; Terwinghe, Christelle; Vermaelen, Peter; Van Berckelaer, Lizette; Vanbilloen, Hubert; Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy

    2007-04-01

    Cytosolic thymidine kinase (TK1) catalyzes phosphorylation of thymidine to its monophosphate. TK1 activity is closely related with DNA synthesis, and thymidine analogs derivatized with bulky carboranylalkyl groups at the N-3 position were reported to be good substrates for TK1. Accordingly, we have synthesized (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine and evaluated it as a potential tumor tracer. The bis(S-trityl)-protected MAMA-propyl-thymidine precursor (3-N-[S-trityl-2-mercaptoethyl]-N-[N'-(S-trityl-2-mercaptoethyl)amidoacetyl]-aminopropyl-thymidine) was prepared in three steps, and its structure was confirmed with (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. Deprotection of the thiols and labeling with (99m)Tc were done in a two-step, one-pot procedure, yielding (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine, which was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography, radio-LC-MS analysis (ESI+) and electrophoresis, and its log P was determined. The biodistribution in normal mice was evaluated, and its biodistribution in a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor mouse was compared with that of 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F] fluorothymidine [(18)F]FLT. (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine was obtained with a radiochemical yield of 70%. Electrophoresis indicated that the complex is uncharged, and its log P was 1.0. The molecular ion mass of the Tc complex was 589 Da, which is compatible with the hypothesized N(2)S(2)-oxotechnetium structure. Tissue distribution showed fast clearance from plasma primarily by the hepatobiliary pathway. Whole-body planar imaging after injection of (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine in an RIF tumor-bearing mouse showed high uptake in the liver and the intestines. No uptake was observed in the tumor, in contrast to the clear uptake observed for [(18)F] FLT visualized with muPET. Although it has been reported that TK1 accepts large substituents at the N-3 position of the thymine ring, the results of this study show that (99m)Tc-MAMA-propyl-thymidine cannot be used as a single photon emission

  20. WalkThrough Example Procedures for MAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Gaschen, Brian Keith; Bloch, Jeffrey Joseph

    2016-07-15

    This documentation is a growing set of walk through examples of analyses using the MAMA V2.0 software. It does not cover all the features or possibilities with the MAMA software, but will address using many of the basic analysis tools to quantify particle size and shape in an image. This document will continue to evolve as additional procedures and examples are added. The starting assumption is that the MAMA software has been successfully installed.

  1. COS Side 2 NUV MAMA Fold Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacinski, John

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {13128} during Cycle 20.This proposal is an exact duplication of nominal COS MAMA Fold Analysis {proposal 13128, Cycle 20}. Any changes 13128 or subsequent cycle submissions should be reflected in this proposal and vice versa.

  2. MAMA- User Feedback and Training Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B.; Ruggiero, Christy E.

    2014-05-21

    This document describes the current state of the MAMA (Morphological Analysis of Materials) software user identified bugs, issues, and requests for improvements. It also lists Current users and current training methods.

  3. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  4. MAMA Software Features: Quantification Verification Documentation-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-21

    This document reviews the verification of the basic shape quantification attributes in the MAMA software against hand calculations in order to show that the calculations are implemented mathematically correctly and give the expected quantification results.

  5. Parental Reports of "MAMA" Sounds in Infants: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Herbert I.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the use of "mama" or similar sounds referred to as "mama" by 75 infants less than 6 months of age. Parents were directed to listen for "mama" sounds and to note the sounds made, the age of onset, whether the sounds appeared to be directed to any person or persons, or whether they appeared to have a purpose. (Author/VWL)

  6. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13150.

  7. MAMA detector systems - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Slater, David C.; Kasle, David B.; Bybee, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    Third-generation, 224 x 960 and 360 x 1024-pixel multianode microchannel (MAMA) detectors are under development for satellite-borne FUV and EUV observations, using pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 microns. An account is presently given of the configurations, modes of operation, and recent performance data of these systems. At UV and visible wavelengths, these MAMAs employ a semitransparent, proximity-focused photocathode structure. At FUV and EUV wavelengths below about 1500 A, opaque alkali-halide photocathodes deposited directly on the front surface of the MCP furnish the best detective quantum efficiencies.

  8. "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son": A Memoir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Reta Ugena

    2010-01-01

    "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son" is Kevin Jennings's autobiographical account of growing up gay in the Southern United States. In his memoir, Jennings shares formative experiences relating to his impoverished childhood and his career as teacher and social activist. His rich description of the influence of family relationships on his personal…

  9. "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son": A Memoir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Reta Ugena

    2010-01-01

    "Mama's Boy; Preacher's Son" is Kevin Jennings's autobiographical account of growing up gay in the Southern United States. In his memoir, Jennings shares formative experiences relating to his impoverished childhood and his career as teacher and social activist. His rich description of the influence of family relationships on his personal…

  10. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12779.

  11. Parental reports of 'MAMA' sounds in infants: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Goldman, H I

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the use of 'mama' or similar sounds (collectively referred to as 'MAMA') by 75 infants less than six months of age. Parents were directed to listen for 'MAMA' sounds and to note the sounds made, the age of onset, whether the sounds appeared to be directed to any person or persons and whether they appeared to have a purpose. 'MAMA' began at a mode of two months, range two weeks to five months, was usually part of a cry, and was always interpreted as a 'wanting' sound. Most parents thought that the infant wanted some form of attention, but a minority thought it indicated hunger. Responses to a Structured Response Protocol indicated that some infants uttering 'MAMA' were satisfied if a favourite caretaker approached and paid attention to them while the remainder were satisfied if they were both paid attention to and picked up. The 'MAMA' cry appears to promote attention-giving behaviour by parents and other caretakers.

  12. The STIS MAMA status: Current detector performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danks, A. C.; Joseph, C.; Bybee, R.; Argebright, V.; Abraham, J.; Kimble, R.; Woodgate, B.

    1992-01-01

    The STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph) is a second generation Hubble instrument scheduled to fly in 1997. Through a variety of modes, the instrument will provide spectral resolutions from R approximately 50 in the objective spectroscopy mode to 100,000 in the high resolution echelle mode in the wavelength region from 115 to 1000 nm. In the UV the instrument employs two MAMA (Multimode Anode Microchannel plate Arrays) 1024 by 1024 pixel detectors, which provide high DQE (Detective Quantum Efficiency), and good dynamic range and resolution. The current progress and performance of these detectors are reported, illustrating that the technology is mature and that the performance is very close to flight requirements.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Ciprofloxacin Resistance Mechanisms in Malaysian ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates and Development of Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assays (MAMA) for Rapid Detection of gyrA and parC Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Tay, Sun Tee

    2014-01-01

    Ninety-three Malaysian extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were investigated for ciprofloxacin resistance. Two mismatch amplification mutation (MAMA) assays were developed and used to facilitate rapid detection of gyrA and parC mutations. The isolates were also screened for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes including aac(6′)-Ib-cr, qepA, and qnr. Ciprofloxacin resistance (MICs 4– ≥ 32 μg/mL) was noted in 34 (37%) isolates, of which 33 isolates had multiple mutations either in gyrA alone (n = 1) or in both gyrA and parC regions (n = 32). aac(6′)-Ib-cr was the most common PMQR gene detected in this study (n = 61), followed by qnrB and qnrS (n = 55 and 1, resp.). Low-level ciprofloxacin resistance (MICs 1-2 μg/mL) was noted in 40 (43%) isolates carrying qnrB accompanied by either aac(6′)-Ib-cr (n = 34) or a single gyrA 83 mutation (n = 6). Ciprofloxacin resistance was significantly associated with the presence of multiple mutations in gyrA and parC regions. While the isolates harbouring gyrA and/or parC alteration were distributed into 11 PFGE clusters, no specific clusters were associated with isolates carrying PMQR genes. The high prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance amongst the Malaysian ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates suggests the need for more effective infection control measures to limit the spread of these resistant organisms in the hospital. PMID:24860827

  14. Molecular analysis of ciprofloxacin resistance mechanisms in Malaysian ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates and development of mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) for rapid detection of gyrA and parC mutations.

    PubMed

    Al-Marzooq, Farah; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Tay, Sun Tee

    2014-01-01

    Ninety-three Malaysian extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were investigated for ciprofloxacin resistance. Two mismatch amplification mutation (MAMA) assays were developed and used to facilitate rapid detection of gyrA and parC mutations. The isolates were also screened for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes including aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, and qnr. Ciprofloxacin resistance (MICs 4- ≥ 32  μ g/mL) was noted in 34 (37%) isolates, of which 33 isolates had multiple mutations either in gyrA alone (n = 1) or in both gyrA and parC regions (n = 32). aac(6')-Ib-cr was the most common PMQR gene detected in this study (n = 61), followed by qnrB and qnrS (n = 55 and 1, resp.). Low-level ciprofloxacin resistance (MICs 1-2  μ g/mL) was noted in 40 (43%) isolates carrying qnrB accompanied by either aac(6')-Ib-cr (n = 34) or a single gyrA 83 mutation (n = 6). Ciprofloxacin resistance was significantly associated with the presence of multiple mutations in gyrA and parC regions. While the isolates harbouring gyrA and/or parC alteration were distributed into 11 PFGE clusters, no specific clusters were associated with isolates carrying PMQR genes. The high prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance amongst the Malaysian ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates suggests the need for more effective infection control measures to limit the spread of these resistant organisms in the hospital.

  15. Dark count rates in the STIS MAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-06-01

    The dark count rates in the STIS MAMA detectors have been monitored. This report covers the period since the Servicing Mission 4 of May 2009. We find both long-term and short-term variations which for the NUV side we express as a function of date and temperature. The NUV dark rate has declined significantly from its surprisingly high initial rate of 0.014 counts/pixel/s that was seen immediately after SM4. By October, 2012 it had dropped to an average value of about 0.002 counts/pixel/sec The behavior and characteristics of the FUV dark rate remain very similar to that seen in 2004, prior to the STIS side-2 failure and subsequent repair.

  16. MAMA User Guide v2.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Gaschen, Brian Keith; Bloch, Jeffrey Joseph; Porter, Reid; Ruggiero, Christy E.; Oyen, Diane Adele; Schaffer, Kevin M.

    2016-07-15

    Morphological signatures of bulk SNM materials have significant promise, but these potential signatures are not fully utilized. This document describes software tools, collectively called the MAMA (Morphological Analysis for Material Attribution) software that can help provide robust and accurate quantification of morphological features in bulk material microscopy images (Optical, SEM). Although many of the specific tools are not unique to Mama, the software package has been designed specifically for nuclear material morphological analysis, and is at a point where it can be easily adapted (by Los Alamos or by collaborators) in response to new, different, or changing forensics needs. The current release of the MAMA software only includes the image quantification, descriptions, and annotation functionality. Only limited information on a sample, its pedigree, and its chemistry are recorded inside this part of the software. This was decision based on initial feedback and the fact that there are several analytical chemistry databases being developed within the community. Currently MAMA is a standalone program that can export quantification results in a basic text format that can be imported into other programs such as Excel and Access. There is also a basic report generating feature that produces HTML formatted pages of the same information. We will be working with collaborators to provide better integration of MAMA into their particular systems, databases and workflows.

  17. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  18. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  19. Monolithic integrated circuit charge amplifier and comparator for MAMA readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Edward H.; Smeins, Larry G.

    1991-01-01

    Prototype ICs for the Solar Heliospheric Observatory's Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) have been developed; these ICs' charge-amplifier and comparator components were then tested with a view to pulse response and noise performance. All model performance predictions have been exceeded. Electrostatic discharge protection has been included on all IC connections; device operation over temperature has been consistent with model predictions.

  20. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  1. METHODS ADVANCEMENT FOR MILK ANALYSIS: THE MAMA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis (MAMA) study was designed by US EPA and CDC investigators to provide data to support the technological and study design needs of the proposed National Children=s Study (NCS). The NCS is a multi-Agency-sponsored study, authorized under the...

  2. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  3. METHODS ADVANCEMENT FOR MILK ANALYSIS: THE MAMA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis (MAMA) study was designed by US EPA and CDC investigators to provide data to support the technological and study design needs of the proposed National Children=s Study (NCS). The NCS is a multi-Agency-sponsored study, authorized under the...

  4. Dark count rates in the STIS FUV MAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2015-09-01

    Dark count rates in the STIS FUV MAMA are regularly monitored. The observation sequence was altered from an earlier method to measure the rate as a function of time and temperature shortly after the instrument is turned on. The dark rate exhibits an approximately quadratic de-pendence on temperature. A recommendation for estimating the observation-specific dark rate is given.

  5. STIS MAMA Full-Field Sensitivity Monitor C18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, W.

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to monitor the sensitivity of the MAMA detectors over the full field. This is achieved by observing the globular cluster NGC6681 once during Cycle 18. The data can be directly compared with similar data obtained in Cycles 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 17.

  6. STIS MAMA Full-Field Sensitivity Monitor C21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to monitor the sensitivity of the MAMA detectors over the full field. This is achieved by observing the globular cluster NGC6681 once during Cycle 21. The data can be directly compared with similar data obtained in previous cycles.

  7. STIS MAMA Full-Field Sensitivity Monitor C20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to monitor the sensitivity of the MAMA detectors over the full field. This is achieved by observing the globular cluster NGC6681 once during Cycle 19. The data can be directly compared with similar data obtained in Cycles 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, and 18.

  8. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  9. STIS MAMA Full-Field Sensitivity Monitor C19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to monitor the sensitivity of the MAMA detectors over the full field. This is achieved by observing the globular cluster NGC6681 once during Cycle 19. The data can be directly compared with similar data obtained in Cycles 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, and 18.

  10. Monolithic integrated circuit charge amplifier and comparator for MAMA readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Edward H.; Smeins, Larry G.

    1991-01-01

    Prototype ICs for the Solar Heliospheric Observatory's Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) have been developed; these ICs' charge-amplifier and comparator components were then tested with a view to pulse response and noise performance. All model performance predictions have been exceeded. Electrostatic discharge protection has been included on all IC connections; device operation over temperature has been consistent with model predictions.

  11. Agarose and Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis Methods for Molecular Mass Analysis of 5–500 kDa Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Bhilocha, Shardul; Amin, Ripal; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; LoBello, Jaclyn; Shytuhina, Anastasia; Wang, Wenlan; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; de la Motte, Carol; Cowman, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems for the molecular mass-dependent separation of hyaluronan (HA) in the size range of approximately 5–500 kDa have been investigated. For agarose-based systems, the suitability of different agarose types, agarose concentrations, and buffers systems were determined. Using chemoenzymatically synthesized HA standards of low polydispersity, the molecular mass range was determined for each gel composition, over which the relationship between HA mobility and logarithm of the molecular mass was linear. Excellent linear calibration was obtained for HA molecular mass as low as approximately 9 kDa in agarose gels. For higher resolution separation, and for extension to molecular masses as low as approximately 5 kDa, gradient polyacrylamide gels were superior. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in a sample, and calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The methods were validated for polydisperse HA samples with viscosity-average molecular masses of 112, 59, 37, and 22 kDa, at sample loads of 0.5 µg (for polyacrylamide) to 2.5 µg (for agarose). Use of the methods for electrophoretic mobility shift assays was demonstrated for binding of the HA-binding region of aggrecan (recombinant human aggrecan G1-IGD-G2 domains) to a 150 kDa HA standard. PMID:21684248

  12. Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods for molecular mass analysis of 5- to 500-kDa hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Bhilocha, Shardul; Amin, Ripal; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; LoBello, Jaclyn; Shytuhina, Anastasia; Wang, Wenlan; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; de la Motte, Carol; Cowman, Mary K

    2011-10-01

    Agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems for the molecular mass-dependent separation of hyaluronan (HA) in the size range of approximately 5-500 kDa were investigated. For agarose-based systems, the suitability of different agarose types, agarose concentrations, and buffer systems was determined. Using chemoenzymatically synthesized HA standards of low polydispersity, the molecular mass range was determined for each gel composition over which the relationship between HA mobility and logarithm of the molecular mass was linear. Excellent linear calibration was obtained for HA molecular mass as low as approximately 9 kDa in agarose gels. For higher resolution separation, and for extension to molecular masses as low as approximately 5 kDa, gradient polyacrylamide gels were superior. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in a sample as well as calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The methods were validated for polydisperse HA samples with viscosity-average molecular masses of 112, 59, 37, and 22 kDa at sample loads of 0.5 μg (for polyacrylamide) to 2.5 μg (for agarose). Use of the methods for electrophoretic mobility shift assays was demonstrated for binding of the HA-binding region of aggrecan (recombinant human aggrecan G1-IGD-G2 domains) to a 150-kDa HA standard.

  13. M S MOLECULARES Rumo aos limites da miniaturiza o - (Molecular Magnets - towards the limits of miniaturization)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-01-01

    Por s culos, acreditou-se que o magnetismo s se manifestava em metais, como aqueles contendo ferro; hoje, a imagem mais comum de um m talvez seja a daquelas plaquinhas flex veis coladas geladeira com propagandas dos mais diversos tipos. O leitor conseguiria imaginar um material puramente org nico daqueles que formam os seres vivos como magn tico? E m s do tamanho de mol culas? fato: ambos existem. Esses novos materiais, conhecidos como magnetos moleculares, descobertos e desenvolvidos em v rios laborat rios do mundo, j re nem longa lista de aplica es, do tratamento do c ncer a refrigeradores ecol gicos, passando pela transmiss o de eletricidade sem perda de calor e a fabrica o de computadores extremamente velozes.

  14. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2011-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  15. Preliminary results from the MAMA detectors for the SOHO mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Bergamini, Paolo; Bumala, Robert W.; Timothy, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems are being fabricated and tested for use in the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) and the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. The SOHO MAMA detector systems have formats of 360 x 1024 pixels and pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns and are optimized for operation at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths between 40 and 160 nm. In this paper we report on the initial results of measurements of the performance characteristics of the first flight-configuration detector system employing the new custom Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) which are designed to improve both the dynamic range and the uniformity of response. The performance characteristics of this detector system are compared with those of earlier breadboard systems employing discrete-component electronics circuits.

  16. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel

    2010-09-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  17. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2013-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  18. SOHO MAMA openable cover/vacuum seal mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Mitchell T.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements, design, and test results of an openable cover mechanism with a high-vacuum seal developed for the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) Detectors, aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The mechanism, tested in summer/fall of 1991, has completed 1000 test cycles in an inert atmosphere at room temperature and pressure. Measured mechanism performance included: vacuum seal less than 5 x 10 exp -10 torr-liter/second, 103 degree angular range of travel, 20-minute cycle time, and successful latching functions. An openable cover mechanism that provides a clean, high-vacuum seal is vital to the success of a MAMA Detector operating over a full wavelength coverage from 500 to 1600 A.

  19. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  20. Low molecular mass phosphoproteins from the frog rod outer segments form a complex with 48 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Krapivinsky, G B; Malenyov, A L; Zaikina, I V; Fesenko, E E

    1992-09-01

    Upon separation of cAMP-dependent low molecular mass phosphoproteins [Components I and II; Polans et al. (1979) J. gen. Physiol. 74, 595-613] from the frog rod outer segments by gel-chromatography, isoelectric focusing, non-denaturating electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography, they behave like subunits of the oligomeric complex. Apparent molecular mass of the complex determined by gel-chromatography is 52-57 kDa and by non-denaturating gradient electrophoresis is 62-66 kDa. The isoelectric point of the complex is 5.5. The elution profile of Components I and II upon gel-chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography coincides with that of major rod outer segment 48 kDa protein. The isoelectric point for them also coincides with the isoelectric point of 48 kDa protein. The amount of low molecular mass phosphoproteins is sealed rods is equal to one molecule per 60 rhodopsin molecules and coincides with that of a 48 kDa protein. It is suggested that in solution Components I and II form an oligomeric complex with 48 kDa protein.

  1. Wavelength Calibration Accuracy for the STIS CCD and MAMA Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Hodge, Phil; Proffitt, Charles R.; Ayres, T.

    2011-03-01

    Two calibration programs were carried out to determine the accuracy of the wavelength solutions for the most used STIS CCD and MAMA modes after Servicing Mission 4. We report here on the analysis of this dataset and show that the STIS wavelength solution has not changed after SM4. We also show that a typical accuracy for the absolute wavelength zero-points is 0.1 pixels while the relative wavelength accuracy is 0.2 pixels.

  2. Evaluation of IFN-γ polymorphism+874 T/A in patients with recurrent tonsillitis by PCR real time mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA real time PCR).

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Gambarino, Stefano; Loiacono, Elisa; Vergano, Luca; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Astegiano, Sara; Tavormina, Paolo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an important cytokine that plays a crucial role in the balance between normal and pathological immune response. Defect of IFN-γ can give a predisposition to infectious disease, autoimmune pathologies and tumours. Different polymorphisms in this gene have been described, in particular the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)+874∗T/A that may affect IFN-γ gene expression. Several techniques can be used for the detection of SNPs. In this work two PCR Real Time assays were developed, an Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and a Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay (MAMA). Twenty-seven samples from patients (tonsillectomy) and 85 from donor's blood bank were considered. As a result, 78/85 controls (91.7%) and 25/27 patients (92.6%) were heterozygosis, considering the ARMS-PCR; 55/85 (64.7%) and 14/27 (51.9%) were heterozygosis using MAMA-PCR assay. Fourteen of 85 (16.5%) and 8/27 (29.6%) were homozygosis A, 16/85 (18.8%) and 5/27 (18.5%) presented homozygosis T, taking into account the MAMA-PCR. There are statistically difference between the two assay with p<0.0001 at Chi-square test. Our preliminary data suggest that tonsillectomy patients had a statistical trend to possess the low IFN-γ polymorphism when compared with control subject (p=0.3) but is not statistically significant. In conclusion the Real time MAMA-PCR assay has several advantages over other SNP identification techniques such as rapidity, reliability, easily to perform in one working day and applicable in clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories, although sequencing remains the gold standard. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A prothrombin activator from Bothrops erythromelas (jararaca-da-seca) snake venom: characterization and molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Silva, Márcia B; Schattner, Mirta; Ramos, Celso R R; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Guarnieri, Míriam C; Lazzari, María A; Sampaio, Claudio A M; Pozner, Roberto G; Ventura, Janaina S; Ho, Paulo L; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M

    2003-01-01

    A novel prothrombin activator enzyme, which we have named 'berythractivase', was isolated from Bothrops erythromelas (jararaca-da-seca) snake venom. Berythractivase was purified by a single cation-exchange-chromatography step on a Resource S (Amersham Biosciences) column. The overall purification (31-fold) indicates that berythractivase comprises about 5% of the crude venom. It is a single-chain protein with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. SDS/PAGE of prothrombin after activation by berythractivase showed fragment patterns similar to those generated by group A prothrombin activators, which convert prothrombin into meizothrombin, independent of the prothrombinase complex. Chelating agents, such as EDTA and o -phenanthroline, rapidly inhibited the enzymic activity of berythractivase, like a typical metalloproteinase. Human fibrinogen A alpha-chain was slowly digested only after longer incubation with berythractivase, and no effect on the beta- or gamma-chains was observed. Berythractivase was also capable of triggering endothelial proinflammatory and procoagulant cell responses. von Willebrand factor was released, and the surface expression of both intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin was up-regulated by berythractivase in cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. The complete berythractivase cDNA was cloned from a B. erythromelas venom-gland cDNA library. The cDNA sequence possesses 2330 bp and encodes a preproprotein with significant sequence similarity to many other mature metalloproteinases reported from snake venoms. Berythractivase contains metalloproteinase, desintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domains. However, berythractivase did not elicit any haemorrhagic response. These results show that, although the primary structure of berythractivase is related to that of snake-venom haemorrhagic metalloproteinases and functionally similar to group A prothrombin activators, it is a prothrombin activator devoid of haemorrhagic activity. This is a feature

  4. STIS-21 FUV-MAMA Optical Format Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proffitt, Charles

    2009-07-01

    For each FUV-MAMA spectral optical element in the MSM {G140L, G140M, E140M, E140H}, a LINE lamp spectrum will be taken to match selected observations that were done as part of the cycle 11 STIS/CAL program 9618. These observations will be done at one CENWAVE value of each grating, will verify the optical paths and MSM positioning used for each of these modes, and will also allow a check of the spectral resolution. The normal monthly MSM offsetting will be turned off and the zero-offset MSM positions used for these observations.

  5. STIS-22 NUV-MAMA Optical Format Verifiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proffitt, Charles

    2009-07-01

    For each NUV-MAMA spectral optical element in the MSM {G230L, G230M, E230M, E230H, and PRISM}, a LINE or HITM1 lamp spectrum will be taken to match selected observations that were done as part of the cycle 11 STIS/CAL program 9618. These observations will be done at one CENWAVE value of each grating, will verify the optical paths and MSM positioning used for each of these modes, and will also allow a check of the spectral resolution. The normal monthly MSM offsetting will be turned off and the zero-offset MSM positions used for these observations.

  6. THE TRANSITION OF THE 37-kDa LAMININ RECEPTOR (RPSA) TO HIGHER MOLECULAR WEIGHT SPECIES: SUMOylation OR ARTIFACT?

    PubMed Central

    DIGIACOMO, VINCENT; GANDO, IVAN A.; VENTICINQUE, LISA; HURTADO, ALICIA; MERUELO, DANIEL

    2017-01-01

    The 37-kDa laminin receptor (37LRP or RPSA) is a remarkable, multifaceted protein that functions in processes ranging from matrix adhesion to ribosome biogenesis. Its ability to engage extracellular laminin is further thought to contribute to cellular migration and invasion. Most commonly associated with metastatic cancer, RPSA is also increasingly found to be important in other pathologies, including microbial infection, neurodegenerative disease and developmental malformations. Importantly, it is thought to have higher molecular weight forms, including a 67-kDa species (67LR), the expression of which is linked to strong laminin binding and metastatic behavior. The composition of these larger forms has remained elusive and controversial. Homo- and heterodimerization have been proposed as events capable of building the larger species from the monomeric 37-kDa precursor, but solid evidence is lacking. Here, we present data suggesting that higher molecular weight species require SUMOylation to form. We also comment on the difficulty of isolating larger RPSA species for unambiguous identification and demonstrate that cell lines stably expressing tagged RPSA for long periods of time fail to produce tagged higher molecular weight RPSA. It is possible that higher molecular weight species like 67LR are not derived from RPSA. PMID:26146125

  7. Dear-Mama: A photon counting X-ray imaging project for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Díaz, A.; Díaz, F.; Fernández, J.; García, E.; García, J.; Kainberger, F.; Lozano, M.; Maiorino, M.; Martínez, R.; Montagne, J. P.; Moreno, I.; Pellegrini, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sentís, M.; Teres, L.; Tortajada, M.; Ullán, M.

    2006-12-01

    Dear-Mama ( Detection of Early Markers in Mammography) is an EU funded project devoted to develop an X-ray Medical imaging device based on room temperature solid-state pixel detector coupled to photon counting readout electronics via bump bonding. The technology being used leads to signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thus the ability to detect low contrast anomalies such as micro-calcifications. The Dear-Mama machine is currently being evaluated and preliminary results show an excellent MTF response. Dear-Mama consortium is made up from six European institutions, the project runs from December 2001 to March 2006.

  8. Influence of formulation ratio of the plant components on the antimalarial properties of MAMA decoction.

    PubMed

    Odediran, Samuel Akintunde; Elujoba, Anthony Adebolu; Adebajo, Adeleke Clement

    2014-05-01

    Mangifera indica, Alstonia boonei, Morinda lucida and Azadirachta indica (MAMA) decoction, commonly prepared and used in Nigeria from 1:1:1:1 ratio of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae), Alstonia boonei De Wild (Apocynaceae), Morinda lucida Benth (Rubiaceae), and Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae) leaves, plus four new variants of this combination were subjected to three in vivo antimalarial test models using chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium berghei berghei to determine the most active under each of the test models. Using the original formulation, MAMA (1:1:1:1) which gave ED50 and ED90 of 101.54±2.95 and 227.18±2.95, respectively, as reference for comparison, MAMA-1 (1:2:2:2), with 79.58±1.30 and 170.98±1.30, gave significantly (p<0.05) higher survival at 85 and 340 mg/kg when 80 % of the mice survived for 15.6 and 17.8 days, respectively, while MAMA-2 (2:1:2:2), with 83.57±1.93 and 164.23±1.93, gave comparable survival except at 170 mg/kg with 60 % survivors for 12 days. MAMA-1 and MAMA-2 were the best curative formulations with MAMA-1 giving additional prophylactic activity. MAMA-3 (2:2:2:1) with 98.70±0.91 and 220.17±0.91, gave comparable (p>0.05) survival at 85 mg/kg with 60 % survival for 13.2 days and significantly higher survival at 42.5 mg/kg for 17 days with 40 % survival. Both MAMA and MAMA-3 were the best chemosuppressive formulations plus additional curative activities. MAMA-4 (1:1:2:2), the best prophylactic formulation with 94.87±2.43 and 201.20±2.43 gave significantly higher (p<0.05) survival at all doses except at 21.25 mg/kg which gave 60 % survival up to 10 days. Thus, the antimalarial therapy desired, following appropriate diagnosis, whether prophylactic, chemosuppressive or curative would determine which of the MAMA decoction formulations to be prescribed. This phenomenon of formulary optimization may also be applied to other pharmacological activities.

  9. An Introduction to MAMA (Meta-Analysis of MicroArray data) System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Fenstermacher, David

    2005-01-01

    Analyzing microarray data across multiple experiments has been proven advantageous. To support this kind of analysis, we are developing a software system called MAMA (Meta-Analysis of MicroArray data). MAMA utilizes a client-server architecture with a relational database on the server-side for the storage of microarray datasets collected from various resources. The client-side is an application running on the end user's computer that allows the user to manipulate microarray data and analytical results locally. MAMA implementation will integrate several analytical methods, including meta-analysis within an open-source framework offering other developers the flexibility to plug in additional statistical algorithms.

  10. Molecular studies of microbial community structure on stained pages of Leonardo da Vinci's Atlantic Codex.

    PubMed

    Principi, Pamela; Villa, Federica; Sorlini, Claudia; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, after a visual inspection of the Leonardo da Vinci's Atlantic Codex by a scholar, active molds were reported to have been present on Codex pages showing areas of staining. In the present paper, molecular methods were used to assess the current microbiological risk to stained pages of the manuscript. Bacterial and fungal communities were sampled by a non-invasive technique employing nitrocellulose membranes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16 S rRNA gene and internal transcribed space regions were carried out to study the structure of the bacterial and fungal communities and band patterns were analyzed by the multivariate technique of principal component analysis. Any relationship between the presence of an active microbial community and staining was excluded. The presence of potential biodeteriogens was evaluated by constructing bacterial and fungal clone libraries, analyzing them by an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) approach. Among the bacteria, some OTUs were associated with species found on floors in clean room while others were identified with human skin contamination. Some fungal OTU representatives were potential biodeteriogens that, under proper thermo-hygrometric conditions, could grow. The retrieval of these potential biodeteriogens and microorganisms related to human skin suggests the need for a continuous and rigorous monitoring of the environmental conditions, and the need to improve handling procedures.

  11. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  12. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  13. Development of the MAMA Detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems started in the early 1970's in order to produce multi-element detector arrays for use in spectrographs for solar studies from the Skylab-B mission. Development of the MAMA detectors for spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) began in the late 1970's, and reached its culmination with the successful installation of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the second HST servicing mission (STS-82 launched 11 February 1997). Under NASA Contract NAS5-29389 from December 1986 through June 1994 we supported the development of the MAMA detectors for STIS, including complementary sounding rocket and ground-based research programs. This final report describes the results of the MAMA detector development program for STIS.

  14. Self-recognition mechanism of MamA, a magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, promotes complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Ozyamak, Ertan; Ben-Harush, Kfir; Davidov, Geula; Levin, Maxim; Gat, Yair; Moyal, Tal; Brik, Ashraf; Komeili, Arash; Zarivach, Raz

    2011-08-16

    The magnetosome, a biomineralizing organelle within magnetotactic bacteria, allows their navigation along geomagnetic fields. Magnetosomes are membrane-bound compartments containing magnetic nanoparticles and organized into a chain within the cell, the assembly and biomineralization of magnetosomes are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the magnetosome-associated protein, MamA, from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. MamA folds as a sequential tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR) protein with a unique hook-like shape. Analysis of the MamA structures indicates two distinct domains that can undergo conformational changes. Furthermore, structural analysis of seven crystal forms verified that the core of MamA is not affected by crystallization conditions and identified three protein-protein interaction sites, namely a concave site, a convex site, and a putative TPR repeat. Additionally, relying on transmission electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography, we show that highly stable complexes form upon MamA homooligomerization. Disruption of the MamA putative TPR motif or N-terminal domain led to protein mislocalization in vivo and prevented MamA oligomerization in vitro. We, therefore, propose that MamA self-assembles through its putative TPR motif and its concave site to create a large homooligomeric scaffold which can interact with other magnetosome-associated proteins via the MamA convex site. We discuss the structural basis for TPR homooligomerization that allows the proper function of a prokaryotic organelle.

  15. A new-speckle interferometry system for the MAMA detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Morgan, J. S.; Giaretta, G.; Kasle, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new system for making speckle observations with the multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector. This system is a true photon-counting imaging device which records the arrival time of every detected photon and allows for reconstruction of image features near the diffraction limit of the telescope. We present a description of the system and summary of observational results obtained at the Lick Observatory 1-m reflector in 1991 September. The diffraction limit of the 1-m telescope at 5029 A is about 0.125 arcsec and we have successfully resolved the catalogued interferometric binary HD 202582 with a separation of 0.157 +/- 0.031 arcsec. A pair of stars in the open cluster Chi Persei separated by 2.65 +/- 0.22 arcsec with approximate V magnitudes 8.6 and 11.5 has also been successfully analyzed with the speckle technique.

  16. Laboratory test data on the stability of the STIS MAMAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.

    1997-01-01

    STIS has two MAMA detectors systems with distinctly different tube configurations. The first (designated BAND 1) has an opaque CsI photocathode deposited on the microchannel plate (MCP) providing wavelength coverage from 1150A to 1700A. The other MAMA (designated BAND 2) has a semitransparent CS2Te photocathode deposited on the faceplate in close proximity to the input of the MCP. It covers the 1650A to 3100A bandpass and serves as a backup for the short wavelength detector. Laboratory test data indicate that both of these detectors have good sensitivity, have good uniformity and provide stable response, making each capable of collecting data with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 100 per Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical resolution element. Over a multiyear development effort, a substantial body of laboratory test data (more than 6 GBytes spanning more than 6 years of collection) has accumulated on more than a dozen fabricated tubes. These tests even included a few destructive evaluations to examine the limitations and operating life. In addition, analyses where conducted regarding impact caused by the specified electronic tolerances and expected changes in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) thermal environment. Perhaps the simplest test of stability is to collect a sequence of images, each with a uniform illumination, and use these individual "flat fields" to remove the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity in the other flat fields. These sequences typically spanned 3-5 weeks of time. The detectors are very stable, allowing the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity to be removed with good precision. The STIS specification for stability is 1% (sufficient for data with a S/N = 100) over a 1 week period and 2% over 30 days. All Engineering Model Units as well as Flight Detectors tested exceeded this specification.

  17. Laboratory test data on the stability of the STIS MAMAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.

    1997-01-01

    STIS has two MAMA detectors systems with distinctly different tube configurations. The first (designated BAND 1) has an opaque CsI photocathode deposited on the microchannel plate (MCP) providing wavelength coverage from 1150A to 1700A. The other MAMA (designated BAND 2) has a semitransparent CS2Te photocathode deposited on the faceplate in close proximity to the input of the MCP. It covers the 1650A to 3100A bandpass and serves as a backup for the short wavelength detector. Laboratory test data indicate that both of these detectors have good sensitivity, have good uniformity and provide stable response, making each capable of collecting data with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 100 per Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical resolution element. Over a multiyear development effort, a substantial body of laboratory test data (more than 6 GBytes spanning more than 6 years of collection) has accumulated on more than a dozen fabricated tubes. These tests even included a few destructive evaluations to examine the limitations and operating life. In addition, analyses where conducted regarding impact caused by the specified electronic tolerances and expected changes in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) thermal environment. Perhaps the simplest test of stability is to collect a sequence of images, each with a uniform illumination, and use these individual "flat fields" to remove the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity in the other flat fields. These sequences typically spanned 3-5 weeks of time. The detectors are very stable, allowing the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity to be removed with good precision. The STIS specification for stability is 1% (sufficient for data with a S/N = 100) over a 1 week period and 2% over 30 days. All Engineering Model Units as well as Flight Detectors tested exceeded this specification.

  18. The poly dA helix: a new structural motif for high performance DNA-based molecular switches

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Sharma, Suruchi; Maiti, Prabal K.; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2009-01-01

    We report a pH-dependent conformational transition in short, defined homopolymeric deoxyadenosines (dA15) from a single helical structure with stacked nucleobases at neutral pH to a double-helical, parallel-stranded duplex held together by AH+-H+A base pairs at acidic pH. Using native PAGE, 2D NMR, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, we have characterized the two different pH dependent forms of dA15. The pH-triggered transition between the two defined helical forms of dA15 is characterized by CD and fluorescence. The kinetics of this conformational switch is found to occur on a millisecond time scale. This robust, highly reversible, pH-induced transition between the two well-defined structured states of dA15 represents a new molecular building block for the construction of quick-response, pH-switchable architectures in structural DNA nanotechnology. PMID:19279188

  19. Combining Real-Time COLD- and MAMA-PCR TaqMan Techniques to Detect and Quantify R201 GNAS Mutations in the McCune-Albright Syndrome
.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Luisa; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Matarazzo, Patrizia; Tessaris, Daniele; Bergallo, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    The McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a potentially severe disorder hallmarked by fibrous bone dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots, and endocrine hyperfunction. It is caused by postzygotic activating mutations at the R201 codon of the GNAS gene, leading to a state of somatic mosaicism. Our aim was to improve the mutation detection rate and to quantify the presence of R201 GNAS mutations in different DNA samples from MAS patients. Real-time COLD- and MAMA-PCR TaqMan techniques were combined to search for R201 mutations in the DNA of blood or affected tissues from 16 previously molecularly characterized MAS patients, from a further 84 subjects with MAS signs who were R201 negative at RFLP analysis, and from 36 controls. The ability of this new method to provide quantitative data was tested in the serial dilution of wild-type, R201H, or R201C cloned plasmid DNA samples; the mutant abundance was measured by spectrophotometry. A linear correlation between the true and the relative mutant abundance was observed until 2.5%, indicating a reliable quantification of R201 mutations. The assay's sensitivity was 0.05%, similar to that of previously described molecular methods. The real-time COLD-MAMA-PCR approach is a rapid, efficient, and inexpensive molecular technique for the identification of mutant alleles poorly represented in DNA samples.
. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Evaluation of 99mTc-MAMA-chrysamine G as an in vivo probe for amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dezutter, N A; Landman, W J; Jager, P L; de Groot, T J; Dupont, P J; Tooten, P C; Zekarias, B; Gruys, E; Verbruggen, A M

    2001-09-01

    To date, systemic amyloidosis is diagnosed histologically using Congo red staining or in vivo using iodine-123 labelled serum amyloid P component (123I-SAP) scintigraphy. We developed 99mTc-MAMA-CG, a 99mTc-labelled derivative of the lipophilic Congo red analogue chrysamine G (CG), as a possible alternative to 123I-SAP. In vivo 99mTc-MAMA-CG scintigraphy, performed in chickens with spontaneous joint amyloidosis, resulted as soon as 10 min after injection in scintigraphic images showing uptake of activity in amyloid-loaded organs (liver, joints). One of these chickens was studied also with 123I-SAP resulting in scintigraphic images revealing 123I-SAP binding to amyloid deposits in the liver. However, up to 11 h after injection no radioactivity was visible in the amyloid positive joints. In vitro autoradiography, performed on sections of chicken joints with Enterococcus faecalis induced amyloid arthropathy (chjAA), demonstrated the failure of 99mTc-MAMA-CG to bind significantly to amyloid deposits in the presence of 10 microM Congo red The specificity of 99mTc-MAMA-CG localisation was also established by the absence of 99mTc-MAMA-CG binding in non-amyloidotic organs in vitro and in vivo. 99mTc-MAMA-CG did not show any sign of acute toxicity. These findings establish the usefulness of 99mTc-MAMA-CG as a non-invasive in vivo diagnostic probe in chickens with amyloid arthropathy and suggest that it may also be applicable to human amyloidosis.

  1. Development of a competitor DNA template of the 38 kDa gene for molecular quantification of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, A; Sehajpal, P K

    2005-12-01

    The molecular quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) from clinical samples can improve the management of TB. Competitive polymerase chain reaction (C-PCR) is an accepted technique often used for this purpose, and IS6110 is the most popular target in such studies. As the number of these elements varies from 0 to 16 in clinical isolates, it is prone to give inconsistent results. A simple PCR-based approach is described in this study to generate a novel competitor for a single copy 38 kDa gene for the development of C-PCR for the quantification of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  2. Full-field sensitivity and its time-dependence for the STIS CCD and MAMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Proffitt, Charles

    2013-07-01

    The three STIS detectors - CCD, NUV-MAMA, FUV-MAMA - are subject to temperature- and time-dependent sensitivity changes. These temporal sensitivity variations are cal- ibrated as part of routine calibration monitoring programs, and corrected for in the standard CALSTIS pipeline. In order to determine whether the correction algorithms, developed based on spectroscopic observations prior to the 2004 failure of STIS, are adequate for pre- and post-SM4 STIS imaging data, we examine the photometry of stan- dard stellar fields (NGC5139 for the CCD, NGC6681 for the MAMAs) obtained between 1997 and 2012 as part of the routine full-field sensitivity calibration programs. For the CCD, we include a correction for CTE effects. We find statistically significant residual temporal variations in the full-field sensitivity of 0.5 mmag/year, 0.04 mmag/year, and 0.54 mmag/year for the CCD, NUV-MAMA, and FUV-MAMA respectively. However, these residual trends are small: they do not incur flux changes exceeding 1% over a 15 year time period.

  3. Protected amine labels: a versatile molecular scaffold for multiplexed nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue quantitative proteomic reagents.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Biagi, Jessica M; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I; Card, Joseph D; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G; Young, Nicolas L; Gray, Nathanael S; Marto, Jarrod A

    2014-04-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (1) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (2) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (3) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (4) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da, are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition, we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally, we provide exemplar data that extend the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

  4. Documentation of operational protocol for the use of MAMA software

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2016-01-21

    Image analysis of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs is a complex process that can vary significantly between analysts. The factors causing the variation are numerous, and the purpose of Task 2b is to develop and test a set of protocols designed to minimize variation in image analysis between different analysts and laboratories, specifically using the MAMA software package, Version 2.1. The protocols were designed to be “minimally invasive”, so that expert SEM operators will not be overly constrained in the way they analyze particle samples. The protocols will be tested using a round-robin approach where results from expert SEM users at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and the National Institute of Standards and Testing will be compared. The variation of the results will be used to quantify uncertainty in the particle image analysis process. The round-robin exercise will proceed with 3 levels of rigor, each with their own set of protocols, as described below in Tasks 2b.1, 2b.2, and 2b.3. The uncertainty will be developed using NIST standard reference material SRM 1984 “Thermal Spray Powder – Particle Size Distribution, Tungsten Carbide/Cobalt (Acicular)” [Reference 1]. Full details are available in the Certificate of Analysis, posted on the NIST website (http://www.nist.gov/srm/).

  5. TIME-TAG mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash; Danks, Anthony; Baum, Stefi; Balzano, Vicki; Kraemer, Steve; Kutina, Ray; Sears, William

    1995-04-01

    We summarize the time-tag mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors, both in imaging and spectroscopic modes. After a brief outline on the MAMA detector characteristics and the astronomical applications of the time-tag mode, the general philosophy and the details of the data management strategy are described in detail. The GO specifications, and the consequent different modes of data transfer strategy are outlined. Restrictions on maximum data rates, integration times, and BUFFER-TIME requirements are explained. A few cases where the subarray option would be useful are outlined.

  6. 99mTc-MAMA-chrysamine G, a probe for beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dezutter, N A; Dom, R J; de Groot, T J; Bormans, G M; Verbruggen, A M

    1999-11-01

    Chrysamine G (CG), an analogue of Congo red, is known to bind in vitro to the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta 10-43) and to homogenates of several regions of the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We synthesised a conjugate of 2-(acetamido)-CG with a bis-S-trityl protected monoamide-monoaminedithiol (MAMA-Tr(2)) tetraligand, which was efficiently deprotected and labelled with a 75% yield with technetium-99m, to obtain (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG. In mice, (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG was cleared mainly by the hepatobiliary system, resulting in a fast blood clearance. Brain uptake of (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG was low. Co-injection with the blood pool tracer iodine-125 human serum albumin ((125)I-HSA) demonstrated a brain/blood activity ratio for (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG that was significantly higher than that for (125)I-HSA (t test for dependent samples, P<0.02), indicating the ability of (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG to cross the blood-brain barrier. In vitro autoradiography demonstrated pronounced binding of (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG to beta-amyloid deposits in autopsy sections of the parietal and occipital cortex of an AD patient as compared with controls. Adding 10 microM Congo red during incubation displaced the binding of (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG. Congo red staining and autoradiography identified the same lesions. (99m)Tc-MAMA-CG seems to bind selectively to beta-amyloid deposition in human brain parenchyma and blood vessels in vitro and thus might be a lead compound for further development of a useful tracer agent for the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Protected Amine Labels: A Versatile Molecular Scaffold for Multiplexed Nominal Mass and Sub-Da Isotopologue Quantitative Proteomic Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Card, Joseph D.; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2014-01-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (i) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (ii) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (iii) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (iv) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally we provide exemplar data that extends the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers. PMID:24496597

  8. Performance characteristics of the imaging MAMA detector systems for SOHO, STIS, and FUSE/Lyman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Imaging Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 360 x 1024 pixels and pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for flight in two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). In addition, very-large-format (1024 x 1024)- and (2048 x 2048)-pixel Far Ultraviolet (FUV) and EUV MAMA detectors with pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 sq microns are being fabricated and tested for use in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), a second-generation instrument scheduled for in-orbit installation in 1997. Finally, FUV MAMA detectors with formats of 224 x 960 pixels and pixel dimensions of 14 x 14 sq microns are being evaluated as prototypes of the detector for the prime FUV spectrograph of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE/Lyman) mission. The configurations and performance characteristics of the different detector systems are described, and the plans for further development of the Advanced Technology MAMA detector system discussed.

  9. Amid the possible causes of a very famous foxing: molecular and microscopic insight into Leonardo da Vinci's self-portrait.

    PubMed

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Tafer, Hakim; Sterflinger, Katja; Pinzari, Flavia

    2015-12-01

    Leonardo da Vinci's self-portrait is affected by foxing spots. The portrait has no fungal or bacterial infections in place, but is contaminated with airborne spores and fungal material that could play a role in its disfigurement. The knowledge of the nature of the stains is of great concern because future conservation treatments should be derived from scientific investigations. The lack of reliable scientific data, due to the non-culturability of the microorganisms inhabiting the portrait, prompted the investigation of the drawing using non-invasive and micro-invasive sampling, in combination with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and molecular techniques. The fungus Eurotium halophilicum was found in foxing spots using SEM analyses. Oxalates of fungal origin were also documented. Both findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tonophilic fungi germinate on paper metabolizing organic acids, oligosaccharides and proteic compounds, which react chemically with the material at a low water activity, forming brown products and oxidative reactions resulting in foxing spots. Additionally, molecular techniques enabled a screening of the fungi inhabiting the portrait and showed differences when different sampling techniques were employed. Swabs samples showed a high abundance of lichenized Ascomycota, while the membrane filters showed a dominance of Acremonium sp. colonizing the drawing.

  10. Amid the possible causes of a very famous foxing: molecular and microscopic insight into Leonardo da Vinci's self‐portrait

    PubMed Central

    Tafer, Hakim; Sterflinger, Katja; Pinzari, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Leonardo da Vinci's self‐portrait is affected by foxing spots. The portrait has no fungal or bacterial infections in place, but is contaminated with airborne spores and fungal material that could play a role in its disfigurement. The knowledge of the nature of the stains is of great concern because future conservation treatments should be derived from scientific investigations. The lack of reliable scientific data, due to the non‐culturability of the microorganisms inhabiting the portrait, prompted the investigation of the drawing using non‐invasive and micro‐invasive sampling, in combination with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and molecular techniques. The fungus E urotium halophilicum was found in foxing spots using SEM analyses. Oxalates of fungal origin were also documented. Both findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tonophilic fungi germinate on paper metabolizing organic acids, oligosaccharides and proteic compounds, which react chemically with the material at a low water activity, forming brown products and oxidative reactions resulting in foxing spots. Additionally, molecular techniques enabled a screening of the fungi inhabiting the portrait and showed differences when different sampling techniques were employed. Swabs samples showed a high abundance of lichenized Ascomycota, while the membrane filters showed a dominance of A cremonium sp. colonizing the drawing. PMID:26111623

  11. 60kDa lysophospholipase, a new Sgk1 molecular partner involved in the regulation of ENaC.

    PubMed

    Menniti, Miranda; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Föller, Michael; Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Mariggiò, Stefania; Nofziger, Charity; Perri, Angela M; Amato, Rosario; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie; Corda, Daniela; Lang, Florian; Perrotti, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) is essential for hormonal regulation of ENaC-mediated sodium transport and is involved in the transduction of growth-factor-dependent cell survival and proliferation. The identification of molecular partners for Sgk1 is crucial for the understanding of its mechanisms of action. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screening based on a human kidney cDNA library to identify molecular partners of Sgk1. As a result the screening revealed a specific interaction between Sgk1 and a 60 kDa Lysophospholipase (LysoLP). LysoLP is a poorly characterized enzyme that, based on sequence analysis, might possess lysophospholipase and asparaginase activities. We demonstrate that LysoLP has indeed a lysophospholipase activity and affects metabolic functions related to cell proliferation and regulation of membrane channels. Moreover we demonstrate in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that LysoLP downregulates basal and Sgk1-dependent ENaC activity. In conclusion LysoLP may represent a new player in the regulation of ENaC and Sgk1-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Inter-phylum structural conservation of the magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, MamA.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Baran, Dror; Davidov, Geula; Zarivach, Raz

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria enclose the magnetosome, a unique prokaryotic sub-cellular organelle that allows the biomineralization of magnetic nano-crystals. Membrane-coated magnetosomes are arranged into a linear chain that permits magnetotactic bacteria to navigate geomagnetic fields. Magnetosome assembly and biomineralization are controlled by conserved magnetosome-associated proteins, including MamA, a tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein that was shown to coat the magnetosome membrane. In this study, two MamA structures from Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Mbav) were determined via X-ray crystallography. These structures confirm that Mbav MamA folds as a sequential TPR protein and shares a high degree of structural similarity with homologous MamA proteins from Magnetospirillum species. Furthermore, the two TPR-containing domains of MamA are separated by an interphylum-conserved region containing a flexible hinge that is involved in ligand binding and recognition. Finally, substantial differences were found in the local stabilization of the MamA N-terminal domain as a result of the loss of an evolutionary conserved salt bridge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MamA as a Model Protein for Structure-Based Insight into the Evolutionary Origins of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Cronin, Samuel; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Arnoux, Pascal; Baran, Dror; Shtein, Zvi; Davidov, Geula; Zarivach, Raz

    2015-01-01

    MamA is a highly conserved protein found in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), a diverse group of prokaryotes capable of navigating according to magnetic fields - an ability known as magnetotaxis. Questions surround the acquisition of this magnetic navigation ability; namely, whether it arose through horizontal or vertical gene transfer. Though its exact function is unknown, MamA surrounds the magnetosome, the magnetic organelle embedding a biomineralised nanoparticle and responsible for magnetotaxis. Several structures for MamA from a variety of species have been determined and show a high degree of structural similarity. By determining the structure of MamA from Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 using X-ray crystallography, we have opened up the structure-sequence landscape. As such, this allows us to perform structural- and phylogenetic-based analyses using a variety of previously determined MamA from a diverse range of MTB species across various phylogenetic groups. We found that MamA has remained remarkably constant throughout evolution with minimal change between different taxa despite sequence variations. These findings, coupled with the generation of phylogenetic trees using both amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA, indicate that magnetotaxis likely did not spread via horizontal gene transfer and instead has a significantly earlier, primordial origin.

  14. Digitalización de placas Carte du Ciel con MAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos Fierro, I. H.; Calderón, J. H.

    Fifteen Carte du Ciel plates and four Astrographic Catalog plates from Córdoba Zone were scanned with MAMA (Machine Automatique á Mesurer pour l'Astronomie) on July 1999. Those plates were taken between 1912 and 1924, therefore they are a good source of first epoch positions for the determination of proper motions. The fields correspond to some of the open clusters in CdC Córdoba zone -NGC 2527, NGC 2587, VdBergh 83, Coll 132 and Blanco 1- and two low-extinction windows in the galactic bulge. MAMA fulfils the requirements of accuracy and repetitivity at 1 micron level as needed for obtaining the highest profit from the astrometric information given by this photographic material. The catalogues of `objects' detected on every plate were automatically built by software SExtractor. Those catalogues must be filtered in order to reject spurious objects and retain only stellar images that will be used in the astrometric reduction.

  15. Photometry with Multi-anode Microchannel Arrays (mamas) and Charge Injection Devices (cids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of two kinds of detectors are summarized with emphasis on those aspects that would affect their use in high accuracy astronomical photometry. The first type, the multianode microchannel arrays (MAMA), are a family of pulse counting array detectors. Components and operation principles are reviewed and quantum efficiency, noise characteristics, and dynamic range characteristics are described. The second type, charge injection devices (CID), are discussed in reference to their applicability to photometric detection at optical wavelengths.

  16. Dynamic range considerations for EUV MAMA detectors. [Extreme UV Multianode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, Rainer M. E.; Bybee, Richard L.; Timothy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The multianode microchannel array (MAMA) has been chosen as the detector for two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory. The response of the MAMA to the two extreme types of solar spectra, disk and corona, have been modeled with a view toward evaluating dynamic range effects present. The method of MAMA operation is discussed, with emphasis given to modeling the effect of electron cloud charge spreading to several detector anodes and amplifiers (n-fold events). Representative synthetic EUV spectra have been created. The detector response to these spectra is modeled by dissecting the input photon radiation field across the detector array into contributions to the various amplifier channels. The results of this dissection are shown for spectral regions across the entire wavelength region of interest. These results are used to identify regions in which total array photon counting rate or individual amplifier rate may exceed the design limits. This allows the design or operational modes to be tailored to eliminate the problem areas.

  17. Dynamic range considerations for EUV MAMA detectors. [Extreme UV Multianode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, Rainer M. E.; Bybee, Richard L.; Timothy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The multianode microchannel array (MAMA) has been chosen as the detector for two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory. The response of the MAMA to the two extreme types of solar spectra, disk and corona, have been modeled with a view toward evaluating dynamic range effects present. The method of MAMA operation is discussed, with emphasis given to modeling the effect of electron cloud charge spreading to several detector anodes and amplifiers (n-fold events). Representative synthetic EUV spectra have been created. The detector response to these spectra is modeled by dissecting the input photon radiation field across the detector array into contributions to the various amplifier channels. The results of this dissection are shown for spectral regions across the entire wavelength region of interest. These results are used to identify regions in which total array photon counting rate or individual amplifier rate may exceed the design limits. This allows the design or operational modes to be tailored to eliminate the problem areas.

  18. Developing the "Skippu-Mama" program for mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Niinomi, Kazuteru; Asano, Midori; Kadoma, Akiko; Yoshida, Kumiko; Ohashi, Yukimi; Furuzawa, Ayako; Yamamoto, Mami; Yamakita, Naoko; Mori, Akiko

    2016-09-01

    The "Skippu-Mama" peer support program was developed to improve quality of life and reduce parental stress in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders. The program was designed to improve these variables by refreshing and healing participants' minds and bodies. Twenty-four mothers of 26 children diagnosed with ASD in Japan were included in the study and completed measures of quality of life and parental stress before, during, and after participation in the Skippu-Mama program. Our results demonstrated that time was a significant main effect. Further, multiple comparisons with Bonferroni corrections indicated a significant increase in World Health Organization Quality of Life 26 scores three months into the program and at its conclusion six months after commencement. Overall, the Skippu-Mama program improved the quality of life of mothers of children with ASD, and we believe that the intervention's focus on both individual and family variables may be especially effective in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Sissies, Mama's Boys, and Tomboys: Is Children's Gender Nonconformity More Acceptable When Nonconforming Traits Are Positive?

    PubMed

    Coyle, Emily F; Fulcher, Megan; Trübutschek, Darinka

    2016-10-01

    The evaluation of gender nonconformity in children was examined in two studies. In Study 1, 48 young adults evaluated the positivity of culturally popular labels for gender nonconformity, including "tomboy," "sissy," and two new labels generated in a pilot study, "mama's boy" and "brat." The "mama's boy" was described as a boy who has positive feminine traits (gentle and well-mannered) as opposed to the "sissy" who was described as having negative feminine traits (crying and easily frightened). In Study 2, 161 young adults read descriptions of gender-typical and nonconforming children, evaluating them in several domains. The label "mama's boy" was considered negative in Study 1 but an unlabeled positive nonconforming boy was rated as likable and competent in Study 2. However, participants worried about nonconforming boys, saying they would encourage them to behave differently and describing such children with derogatory sexual orientation slurs. "Tomboy" was generally considered a positive label in Study 1. In Study 2, gender nonconforming girls were considered neither likable nor dislikeable, and neither competent nor incompetent, reflecting ambivalence about girls' nonconformity. It may be that we use gender nonconformity labels as indicators of sexual orientation, even in young children. Therefore, even when an individual displays objectively positive traits, the stigma associated with homosexuality taints judgments about their nonconforming behavior.

  20. The effect of Wazzup Mama?! An antenatal intervention to prevent or reduce maternal distress in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fontein-Kuipers, Yvonne J; Ausems, Marlein; de Vries, Raymond; Nieuwenhuijze, Marianne J

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of the intervention WazzUp Mama?! on antenatal maternal distress in a non-randomized pre-post study including healthy women in 17 Dutch midwifery practices. The control group (n = 215) received antenatal care-as-usual. The experimental group (n = 218) received the intervention. Data were collected at the first and third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal distress (MD) was measured with the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ). We used multivariate repeated-measure analysis to examine the across time changes and ANCOVA was used to examine the differences between the two groups. In the control group, mean EDS, STAI, and MD scores significantly increased from first to third trimester of pregnancy, mean PRAQ scores increased, but not significantly, the proportion of scores above cut-off level of EDS, STAI, and PRAQ significantly increased from first to third trimester, and the proportion of MD scores above cut-off level increased, but not significantly. Within the experimental group, the mean STAI, PRAQ, and MD scores significantly decreased from first to third trimester, the EDS mean scores decreased but not significantly, proportions of scores above cut-off level for PRAQ and MD significantly decreased from first to third trimester of pregnancy, the proportions of EDS and STAI scores above cut-off level decreased but not significantly. There was a moderate significant positive effect of WazzUP Mama?! on the MD scores (F(1.43) = 27.05, p < 0.001, d = 0.5). The results provide support for the effectiveness of the intervention WazzUp Mama?!

  1. Far-ultraviolet MAMA detector imagery and emission-line CCD imagery of NGC 6240

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Robert S.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Timothy, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An image of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240 at 1480 A was obtained using a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector with a rocket-borne telescope. At distances greater than 12 arcsec from the nucleus, the measured ultraviolet luminosity implies intensive star formation activity equal to 2-3 times that of a spiral galaxy such as M83. Optical images in the H-beta and forbidden O III 5007 A emission lines reveal a region of high excitation east of the nucleus between the centers of disks 1 and 2 as described by Bland-Hawthorn et al.

  2. Far-ultraviolet MAMA detector imagery and emission-line CCD imagery of NGC 6240

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Robert S.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Timothy, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An image of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 6240 at 1480 A was obtained using a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector with a rocket-borne telescope. At distances greater than 12 arcsec from the nucleus, the measured ultraviolet luminosity implies intensive star formation activity equal to 2-3 times that of a spiral galaxy such as M83. Optical images in the H-beta and forbidden O III 5007 A emission lines reveal a region of high excitation east of the nucleus between the centers of disks 1 and 2 as described by Bland-Hawthorn et al.

  3. Melt analysis of mismatch amplification mutation assays (Melt-MAMA): a functional study of a cost-effective SNP genotyping assay in bacterial models.

    PubMed

    Birdsell, Dawn N; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P; Hornstra, Heidie M; Nera, Roxanne D; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L; Pettus, Amanda H; Hurbon, Audriana N; Buchhagen, Jordan L; Harms, N Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ~50% to ~80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (~100 ng to ~0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt-MAMA, which

  4. Prevention of Postpartum Depression in Low-Income Women: Development of the "Mamas y Bebes"/Mothers and Babies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Ippen, Chandra Ghosh; Diaz, Manuela A.; Urizar, Guido G., Jr.; Soto, Jose; Mendelson, Tamar; Delucchi, Kevin; Lieberman, Alicia F.

    2007-01-01

    A prenatal intervention designed to prevent the onset of major depressive episodes (MDEs) during pregnancy and postpartum was pilot tested at a public sector women's clinic. The "Mamas y Bebes"/Mothers and Babies Course is an intervention developed in Spanish and English that uses a cognitive-behavioral mood management framework, and incorporates…

  5. Prevention of Postpartum Depression in Low-Income Women: Development of the "Mamas y Bebes"/Mothers and Babies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Ippen, Chandra Ghosh; Diaz, Manuela A.; Urizar, Guido G., Jr.; Soto, Jose; Mendelson, Tamar; Delucchi, Kevin; Lieberman, Alicia F.

    2007-01-01

    A prenatal intervention designed to prevent the onset of major depressive episodes (MDEs) during pregnancy and postpartum was pilot tested at a public sector women's clinic. The "Mamas y Bebes"/Mothers and Babies Course is an intervention developed in Spanish and English that uses a cognitive-behavioral mood management framework, and incorporates…

  6. The Funky Mamas: Learning to Create and Perform Music for Young Children within a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolden, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a case study examining the music learning and making of the Funky Mamas--five professional mother-musicians who create and perform music for young children at festivals, fairs, theatres and community events across Canada. Data were collected through interviews with the band members and field observations of rehearsals and live…

  7. Purification, characterization and antioxidant properties of low molecular weight collagenous polypeptide (37 kDa) prepared from whale shark cartilage (Rhincodon typus).

    PubMed

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Zhang, Jingyi; Hong, Shaotong; Wu, Wenhui

    2015-10-01

    A low molecular weight type-II collagenous polypeptide (CIIp) from whale shark (WS) cartilage was prepared by thermolysin digestion; and examined for their physico-functional and antioxidant properties. The purified collagen was composed of an identical (α1)3 chains and was characterized as type-II. After hydrolysis with thermolysin, the α-chain of the WS collagen was degraded into smaller peptides with molecular weight ranging from 70 to 20KDa. CIIp was successfully separated from the hydrolysates with molecular weight of approximately 37 kDa. Amino acid analysis of CII, and CIIp indicated imino acid contents of 155 and 121 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CII and CIIp were observed, which suggested that the hydrolysis process by thermolysin affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of CII (34 °C) was higher than that of CIIp. Low content of glycoprotein was observed in CII than CIIp due to removal of some polypeptides by thermolysin digestion. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIp was greater than that of CII. The results proposed that the purified CIIp from WS cartilage with excellent antioxidant activities could be the suitable biomaterial for therapeutic applications.

  8. A novel TaqMAMA assay for allelic discrimination of TLR9 rs352140 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Montanari, Paola; Mareschi, Katia; Rassu, Marco; Galliano, Ilaria; Ravanini, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    TaqMAMA is an allele-specific PCR-based (ASPCR) method that may be suitable for broad and cost-effective genotyping applications in all types of laboratories. There is evidence that interactions between some toll like receptors (TLRs) with viruses influence both the immune response and outcome of HCMV infection. We developed a TaqMAMA genotyping assay for the detection of rs352140 TLR9 polymorphism in transplant recipients with and without HCMV infections. Performance parameters to ensure a solid pre-validation protocol have been here argued. We analysed a population of 74 kidney transplants recipients subdivided in 58 HCMV PCR positive and 16 HCMV PCR negative in the post-transplant routine control. All 74 samples were tested with 31/74 (41.9%) homozygotes (11 CC and 20 TT) and 43/74 (58.1%) heterozygotes (CT). Our preliminary data suggest that there is no correlation between TLR9 rs352140 polymorphism and frequency of HCMV infection.

  9. MAMA: an algebraic map for the secular dynamics of planetesimals in tight binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, A. M.; Correa-Otto, J. A.; Beaugé, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present an algebraic map (MAMA) for the dynamical and collisional evolution of a planetesimal swarm orbiting the main star of a tight binary system. The orbital evolution of each planetesimal is dictated by the secular perturbations of the secondary star and gas drag due to interactions with a protoplanetary disc. The gas disc is assumed eccentric with a constant precession rate. Gravitational interactions between the planetesimals are ignored. All bodies are assumed coplanar. A comparison with full N-body simulations shows that the map is of the order of 102 times faster, while preserving all the main characteristics of the full system. In a second part of the work, we apply multiparticle algebraic map for accretion (MAMA) to the γ-Cephei, searching for friendly scenarios that may explain the formation of the giant planet detected in this system. For low-mass protoplanetary discs, we find that a low-eccentricity static disc aligned with the binary yields impact velocities between planetesimals below the disruption threshold. All other scenarios appear hostile to planetary formation.

  10. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a human 372-kDA protein localized in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Sohda, M; Misumi, Y; Fujiwara, T; Nishioka, M; Ikehara, Y

    1994-12-15

    Autoantibodies from a patient with chronic rheumatoid arthritis recognized an antigen localized in the Golgi complex of various cells from different tissues and species. The autoantibodies were used as a probe for screening human QGP-1 cDNA library, resulting in identification of a 10.3-kb cDNA. The cDNA insert contained an open reading frame which encodes a 3225-residue protein with a calculated mass of 372 kDa. The predicted protein was found to have no NH2-terminal signal sequence but a single hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus. These results indicate that the 372-kDa antigen is cytoplasmically disposed and anchored to the Golgi membrane by the COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain.

  11. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E G; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-03-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants.

  12. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E.G.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-01-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants. PMID:15270076

  13. A importância da poeira e ondas de Alfvén na estabilidade de nuvens moleculares anãs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; de Juli, M. C.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2003-08-01

    Nuvens moleculares anãs se apresentam dinamicamente estáveis, embora possuam massas muito maiores que a massa de Jeans. Por este motivo, a estabilidade destes objetos não pode ser explicada considerando-se apenas a pressão térmica. Campos magnéticos, aproximadamente uniformes e de ~mG, exercem um termo extra de pressão que sustenta a nuvem, mas somente na direção perpendicular às linhas de campo. Para a direção paralela, ondas de Alfvén geradas por turbulências no meio, por exemplo, têm sido utilizadas. Estas, sendo supostamente fracamente amortecidas, poderiam sustentar a nuvem nesta direção. Entretanto, estes meios contêm grandes quantidades de poeira carregada eletricamente. Estes grãos de poeira possuem frequências cíclotron, que podem entrar em ressonância com as ondas. Neste trabalho calculamos os efeitos que o amortecimento cíclotron da poeira teriam na propagação da onda, e consequentemente na estabilidade da nuvem. Considerando um fluxo de ondas, com um dado espectro de frequências, e uma população de grãos de poeira, com distribuição de tamanho observada, foi possível mostrar que o amortecimento é eficiente em uma larga banda de frequências. Neste caso as ondas seriam rapidamente amortecidas gerando pequenas condensações de alta densidade, e não poderiam ser utilizadas para explicar a estabilidade de uma nuvem inteira. Desta forma, rotação e turbulência seriam candidatos alternativos para garantir a estabilidade destes objetos.

  14. Identification of nuclear/nucleolar localization signal in Aplysia learning associated protein of slug with a molecular mass of 18 kDa homologous protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung; Chang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2003-06-05

    We isolated a learning associated protein of slug with a molecular mass of 18 kDa (LAPS18) homologue from the expressed sequence tag database of Aplysia kurodai and named it Aplysia LAPS18-like protein (ApLLP). ApLLP encodes 120 amino acids and has 57% identity with LAPS18. To examine the subcellular expression pattern of ApLLP we constructed an EGFP-tagged ApLLP fusion protein and overexpressed it in both Aplysia neurons and COS-7 cells. In contrast to the previous findings, which showed that LAPS18 is secreted by COS-7 cells, ApLLP-EGFP was localized to the nucleus, and most of it to nucleoli. Analysis of deletion mutants of ApLLP-EGFP showed that the N-terminal and the C-terminal nucleolar and nucleus localization signal sequences are important for localization to the nucleus and the nucleoli.

  15. Ubiquitous 8 and 29 kDa gold:alkanethiolate cluster compounds: mass-spectrometric determination of molecular formulas and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Nirmalya K; Negishi, Yuichi; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Shichibu, Yukatsu; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2008-07-09

    The molecular formulas and charge state distributions of thus-far known ubiquitous alkanethiolate-protected gold clusters with core-masses of 8 and 29 kDa were assessed using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The 8 and 29 kDa clusters were determined to be composed of single species, [Au38(SCn)24]z and [Au144(SCn)59]z, respectively, with charge states of z >/= 0. Possible geometric structures for Au38(SCn)24 and Au144(SCn)59 are discussed, based on the structures of relevant systems that have been recently determined experimentally and theoretically: [Au25(SR)18]- and Au102(SR)44, in which the Au cores are protected by monomers [-SR-Au-SR-] and/or dimers [-SR-Au-SR-Au-SR-]. Their preferential formation and chemical robustness are proposed as being associated with high stability due to geometric factors, while the Au-thiolate interface takes on common motifs regardless of the underlying Au core.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 24-kDa gene

    SciTech Connect

    Coo, J. de; Buddiger, P.; Kessel, A.G. van

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) of the respiratory chain is composed of at least 41 individual proteins. Seven are encoded for by the mitochondrial genome and 34 are of nuclear origin. Mutations in the mitochondrial encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. In order to investigate the contribution of mutations in the nuclearly encoded subunits, we started to characterize the human gene for the 24 kDa flavoprotein fragment, one of the three key subunits of complex I. Two gene loci were detected with a human cDNA as a probe using somatic cell hybrids, one on chromosome 18 and one on chromosome 19. Cosmid clones were isolated containing the two genes. Using FISH analysis the map position was further refined to 18p11.2-18p11.31 and 19qter, respectively. RNA studies showed that only the chromosome 18 gene was expressed. This gene spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons. Exon and flanking intron sequences were characterized. The pseudogene differs from the intact cDNA by the lack of the methionine initiator codon. Currently, we are testing patients with complex I deficiencies for mutations in their 24 kDa gene.

  17. Evaluation of herbal antimalarial MAMA decoction-amodiaquine combination in murine malaria model.

    PubMed

    Adepiti, Awodayo O; Elujoba, Anthony A; Bolaji, Oluseye O

    2016-10-01

    Co-administration of amodiaquine with MAMA decoction (MD), an herbal antimalarial drug comprising the leaves of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae), Alstonia boonei De Wild (Apocynaceae), Morinda lucida Benth (Rubiaceae) and Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae) was investigated. The practice of concurrent administration of herbal medicines with orthodox drugs is currently on the increase globally. The study was designed to investigate the possible enhancement of the antimalarial potency as well as possible herb-drug interaction resulting from concurrent administration of MAMA decoction with amodiaquine (AQ). Combinations of MD with AQ were investigated in chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive Plasmodium berghei NK 65 in varying oral doses (mg/kg) at: sub-therapeutic [MD30 + AQ1.25], therapeutic [MD120 + AQ10] and median effective [MD40 + AQ3.8], using chemosuppressive and curative antimalarial test models. Secondly, P. berghei ANKA (CQ-resistant)-infected mice were orally treated with MD 120, 240, [MD120 + AQ10] and [MD240 + AQ10] mg/kg, using both models. The survival times of mice were monitored for 28 d. ED50 values of MD and AQ were 48.8 and 4.1 mg/kg, respectively. A total parasite clearance of CQ-sensitive P. berghei NK65 was obtained with the therapeutic combination dose in the curative test giving an enhanced survival time. In CQ-resistant P. berghei ANKA-infected mice, [MD120 + AQ10] and [MD240 + AQ10] mg/kg gave comparable activities with AQ (10 mg/kg) in both models. The therapeutic combination dose gave total parasite clearance of CQ-sensitive P. berghei NK65, whereas none of the doses tested showed notable activity against CQ-resistant P. berghei ANKA.

  18. Molecular identification of the trematode Paragonimus in faecal samples from the wild cat Prionailurus bengalensis in the Da Krong Nature Reserve, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Doanh, P N; Hien, H V; Tu, L A; Nonaka, N; Horii, Y; Nawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Conventional identification of Paragonimus species and their natural definitive hosts is based on the morphological features of adult parasites isolated from the lungs of wild mammalian hosts. However, wild animals are protected by strict regulations and sampling is not always possible. Recently, molecular techniques have been developed to identify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of Paragonimus eggs in faeces/sputum of human patients. Also, mammalian hosts can be identified using the D-loop sequence of mitochondrial DNA in faecal samples. In this study, we used molecular techniques on faeces from wild animals collected in Da Krong Nature Reserve, Quang Tri province, central Vietnam, where Paragonimus metacercariae are highly prevalent in mountain crabs, to identify Paragonimus species and their natural definitive hosts. The results indicated that wild cats, Prionailurus bengalensis, were infected with at least three different Paragonimus species, P. westermani, P. skrjabini and P. heterotremus. Because all of these species can infect humans in Asian countries, human paragonimiasis should be considered in this area.

  19. Detection of gyrA mutation among clinical isolates of Campylobacter jejuni isolated in Egypt by MAMA-PCR.

    PubMed

    Said, Mayar M; El-Mohamady, Hanan; El-Beih, Fawkia M; Rockabrand, David M; Ismail, Tharwat F; Monteville, Marshall R; Ahmed, Salwa F; Klena, John D; Salama, Mohamed S

    2010-10-04

    Campylobacter spp are the major cause of enteritis in humans and more than 90% of reported infections are caused by Campylobacter jejuni. Fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin are the antibiotics of choice for treatment. An increase in the frequency of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter has been reported globally due to a single base mutation (C-257 to T) in codon 86 of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of the gyrA gene altering the amino acid sequence from threonine at position 86 to isoleucine (Thr-86 to Ile). Campylobacter spp (n = 118) were selected from a collection of Egyptian isolates spanning 1998 to 2005. The presence of C. jejuni gyrA gene was confirmed in each isolate by a PCR assay amplifying 368 bp portion of the gyrA gene. C to T alteration was detected by the mismatch amplification mutation assay MAMA PCR. The MIC of nalidixic acid (NA) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) was determined by E-test. C. jejuni gyrA gene was detected in 100 of the Campylobacter spp studied; the other 18 isolates were found to be Campylobacter coli by lpxA PCR. The mutation was detected in 89 C. jejuni resistant isolates with MIC values (NA; 8 - >256 μg/ml) and (CIP; 4 - >32 μg/ml). The other 11 sensitive C. jejuni isolates with MIC values (NA; 0.38 - 3 µg/ml) and (CIP; 0.03 - 0.125 µg/ml) were not amplified by the MAMA primers. There was 100% congruence with MAMA PCR, MIC results and gyrA gene sequence analysis. In Egypt the main mechanism for resistance to fluoroquinolones is an alteration in the gyrA QRDR. MAMA PCR provides an economical and rapid means for screening fluoroquinolone resistance.

  20. The promise of Mama Kits: Perceptions of in-kind goods as incentives for facility deliveries in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Austin-Evelyn, Katherine; Sacks, Emma; Atuyambe, Lynn; Greeson, Dana; Kruk, Margaret E; Grépin, Karen A

    2017-05-01

    There is growing interest in the use of incentives to increase the utilisation of maternal health services globally, including the use of in-kind goods. As part of the Saving Mothers, Giving Life (SMGL) programme, pregnant women in three districts in Uganda were incentivised to deliver in a facility by the promise of 'Mama Kits' - clean delivery kits augmented with goods for newborns. We collected and analysed qualitative data from 18 focus groups (130 women) who had a recent home (N = 9) or facility delivery (N = 9 groups) to understand their overall perceptions of the SMGL programme, and, in particular, the Mama Kit. There was a high level of awareness of Mama Kits among women who delivered in a health facility and a moderate awareness among women who delivered at home. When available, kits positively affected women's perceptions of facility delivery because they associated availability of kits with affordability of care. When not available, women's perceptions of their actual or expected delivery experience were negatively affected. When well implemented, in-kind goods can be important complements in broader efforts to incentivise facility delivery. Inconsistent implementation and an underestimation of their influence on care-seeking can undermine efforts to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity.

  1. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  2. The first echinoderm poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60) from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization, inducible expression and involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Sun, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiao; Hu, Chaoqun; Qian, Jing; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Poly-U-binding factor 60 kDa (PUF60), also known as Ro RNA binding protein (RoBPI) and FBP interacting repressor (FIR), is a multifunctional protein that is involved in a variety of nuclear processes including pre-mRNA splicing, apoptosis and transcription regulation. In this study, the first echinoderm PUF60 named StmPUF60 was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmPUF60 cDNA is 4503 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 2963 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1506 bp that encoding a protein of 501 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 54.15 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.15. The putative StmPUF60 protein possesses all the main characteristics of known PUF60 proteins, including two RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2), a C-terminal PUMP domain and two conserved nucleic acid-binding ribonucleoprotein sequences (RNP1 and RNP2). For the gene structure, StmPUF60 contains nine exons separated by eight introns. In addition, the highest level of StmPUF60 mRNA expression was noticed in the gonad, followed by coelomocytes, intestine, respiratory tree and body wall. In in vivo experiments, the expression of StmPUF60 mRNA in coelomocytes and intestine was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge, suggesting that the sea cucumber PUF60 might play critical roles in the innate immune defense against bacterial infections. Moreover, we further confirmed that overexpressed StmPUF60 could induce apoptosis, and this function of StmPUF60 may be one of the innate immune defense mechanisms for sea cucumber against pathogen infections.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding an 18.0-kDa class-I low-molecular-weight heat-shock protein from rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y L; Chang, P F; Yeh, K W; Jinn, T L; Kung, C C; Lin, W C; Chen, Y M; Lin, C Y

    1995-11-20

    A novel cDNA clone, Oshp18.0 cDNA, encoding a rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Tainong 67) 18.0-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP), was isolated from a cDNA library of heat-shocked rice seedlings by use of the rice HSP cDNA, Oshsp17.3 cDNA, as a probe. The sequence showed that Oshsp18.0 cDNA contains a 749-bp insert encoding an ORF of 160 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 18.0 kDa and a pI of 7.3. Sequence comparison reveals that Oshsp18.0 cDNA is highly homologous to other low-molecular-weight (LMW) HSP cDNAs. Also, the results of hybrid-selected in vitro translation clearly establish that Oshsp18.0 cDNA is the rice 18.0-kDa LMW HSP-encoding cDNA clone. The recombinant Oshsp18.0 fusion protein produced in Escherichia coli was of the size predicted, and was recognized by the class-I rice 16.9-kDa HSP antiserum. The results suggest that Oshsp18.0 cDNA is an 18.0-kDa class-I LMW HSP- encoding cDNA clone from rice.

  4. Melt Analysis of Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assays (Melt-MAMA): A Functional Study of a Cost-Effective SNP Genotyping Assay in Bacterial Models

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Pearson, Talima; Price, Erin P.; Hornstra, Heidie M.; Nera, Roxanne D.; Stone, Nathan; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Emily L.; Pettus, Amanda H.; Hurbon, Audriana N.; Buchhagen, Jordan L.; Harms, N. Jane; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Gyuranecz, Miklos; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA), is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ∼50% to ∼80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (∼100 ng to ∼0.1 pg). Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs) and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of Melt-MAMA

  5. PCR Real time Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay (MAMA Real Time PCR) for evaluation of TNF-α promoter gene polymorphism -308 G/A in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Ponti, Renata; Gambarino, Stefano; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Fava, Paolo; Novelli, Mauro; Quaglino, Pietro; Fierro, Maria T; Marra, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease, the plaques are infiltrated by leukocytes producing high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and TNF-α. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene promoters have been shown to affect gene expression. The -308 G/A polymorphism could affect TNF synthesis at transcriptional level. The present study develops a MAMA Real Time PCR assay, in order to identify homozygosis or heterozygosis for TNF-α -308 G/A polymorphism. Seventy patients with psoriasis and 235 controls were considered for the development of the real time PCR assay. Whole blood was processed for nucleic acid extraction. A percentage of 36.17% controls and 38.6% patients were heterozygosis, considering Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR assay while 23% and 22.85% were heterozygosis using Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay (MAMA)-PCR. On the contrary, 1.3% and 1.4% were homozygosis A, while 75.7% and 75.75% presented homozygosis G, taking into account the MAMA-PCR results. The two assays were significantly different (P=0.0004 at χ2 Test), but MAMA-PCR showed a better performance for TNF-α -308 G/A gene polymorphism investigation. Further studies are needed for a better comprehension of the role of this polymorphism, such as MAMA real time PCR assays development for other players in cellular immune response.

  6. Inhibition of heat shock protein (molecular weight 90 kDa) attenuates proinflammatory cytokines and prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Aditya; Catalano, Donna; Lim, Arlene; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2012-05-01

    Endotoxin-mediated proinflammatory cytokines play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver diseases. Heat shock protein 90 (molecular weight, 90 kDa) (hsp90) functions as an important chaperone of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling and is required for the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that inhibition of hsp90 would prevent LPS-induced liver injury by decreasing proinflammatory cytokines. C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with an hsp90 inhibitor, 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), and LPS. Parameters of liver injury, proinflammatory cytokines, and associated mechanisms were studied by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Inhibition of hsp90 by 17-DMAG prevented LPS-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase activity and significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) protein as well as messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. Enhanced DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) and induction of target gene heat shock protein 70 (molecular weight, 70 kDa) confirmed hsp90 inhibition in liver. 17-DMAG treatment decreased cluster of differentiation 14 mRNA and LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) DNA binding without affecting Toll-like receptor 4 mRNA in liver. Mechanistic studies revealed that 17-DMAG-mediated inhibition of TNFα showed no effect on LPS-induced NFκB promoter-driven reporter activity, but significantly decreased TNFα promoter-driven reporter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that 17-DMAG enhanced HSF1 binding to the TNFα promoter, but not the IL-6 promoter, suggesting HSF1 mediated direct inhibition of TNFα, but not IL-6. We show that HSF1 indirectly regulates IL-6 by the induction of another transcription factor, activating transcription factor 3. Inhibition of HSF1, using small interfering RNA, prevented 17-DMAG-mediated down

  7. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bessonov, Kyrylo; De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence -T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99-) containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90) upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72-S107) with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012). Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the global structure

  8. The Effects of Threonine Phosphorylation on the Stability and Dynamics of the Central Molecular Switch Region of 18.5-kDa Myelin Basic Protein

    PubMed Central

    De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence –T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99–) containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90) upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72–S107) with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012). Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the global

  9. Oral Administration of High Molecular Weight Hyaluronan (900 kDa) Controls Immune System via Toll-like Receptor 4 in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Asari, Akira; Kanemitsu, Tomoyuki; Kurihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Low molecular weight hyaluronan enhances or induces inflammation through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4).However, the effects of high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA900) on TLR-4 are unknown. In this study, HA900 (900 kDa) was administered orally to MRL-lpr/lpr mice, a Th-1-type autoimmune disease model. Lymphoaccumulation of double-negative T cells, which is enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines, was suppressed by HA900 treatment. Cytokine array analysis showed that HA900 treatment enhanced production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and down-regulated chemokine production. HA900 colocalized with TLR-4 on the luminal surface of epithelial cells in the large intestine. These cells are parts of the immune system and express cytokines. DNA array analysis of the tissue from the large intestine showed that HA900 treatment up-regulated suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression and down-regulated pleiotrophin expression. Treatment of cultured double-negative T cells from MRL-lpr/lpr mice with pleiotrophin rescued these cells. SOCS3, which is known to suppress inflammation, was enhanced by HA900 treatment. In TLR-4 knockdown HT29 cells (a cell line derived from large intestinal cells), HA900 did not bind to HT29 cells and did not up-regulate SOCS3 expression. Our results suggest that oral administration of HA900 modulates Th-1-type autoimmune disease and inflammation by up-regulating SOCS3 expression and down-regulating pleiotrophin expression via TLR-4 in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:20504769

  10. Expression of a low-molecular-weight (10 kDa) calcium binding protein in glial cells of the brain of the trout (Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Manso, M J; Becerra, M; Becerra, M; Anadón, R

    1997-11-01

    Calcium-binding proteins of the EF-hand family are widely distributed in the vertebrate central nervous system. In the present study of the trout brain, immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against chick gut calbindin-28k and a polyclonal antibody against bovine S100 protein specifically stained ependymocytes and radial glia cells with identical patterns. Western blot analysis of trout brain extracts with the antibodies to S100 and calbindin stained the same low-molecular-weight (10 kDa) protein band. In rat brain extracts, however, the monoclonal antibody to calbindin recognized a major protein band with molecular weight corresponding to that of calbindin-28k. This indicates that the trout protein is a new calcium-binding-like (calbindin-like) molecule that is immunologically related to both S100 and calbindin. Immunocytochemical studies of the trout brain using the antibodies to CaB and S100 showed that ependymocytes were stained in most ventricular regions, except in a few specialized ependymal areas of the ventral telencephalon, epithalamus, hypothalamus (including the paraventricular organ and saccus vasculosus) and brain stem. Immunocytochemistry also indicated the presence of calbindin-like protein in radial glia cells of several regions of the brain (thalamus, pretectal region, optic tectum, and rhombencephalon). Differences in immunoreactivity between neighbouring ependymal areas suggest that this protein may be a useful marker of different territories. All immunoreactive glial cells were nicotin-adenin-dinucleotide-phosphate diaphorase-positive, although this enzymohistochemical reaction is not specific for these glial cells since it reveals oligodendrocytes and some neurons. Immunoreactivity appears at different developmental stages in the different brain regions, with a broadly caudorostral gradient, suggesting that the expression of this protein is developmentally regulated. Comparison of the distribution of the calbindin-like protein with

  11. Site-specific modification of anti-angiogenesis peptide HM-3 by polyethylene glycol molecular weight of 20 kDa.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beili; Xu, Han-Mei; Zhao, Liming; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengguo

    2010-09-01

    HM-3, an RGD modified endostatin-derived polypeptide, is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor synthesized in our laboratory. Its robust inhibitory effects on endothelial cell migration and tumour growth have been demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro activity assays. However, the drug has relatively short half-life in vivo. For the purpose of prolonging HM-3 half-life and retaining the safety and efficacy of the peptide, the study chose methoxy-polyethylene glycol-Succinimidyl Carbonate (SC-mPEG, molecular weight 20 kDa, named SC-mPEG(20k)) to specifically modify its N terminus. Compared with HM-3, the site-specific mono-PEGylated peptide PEG(20k)-HM-3 was shown the same activity in the inhibition of B16F10 tumour in vivo (the inhibitory effect of PEG(20k)-HM-3, HM-3 and Taxol were 44.35, 39.68%, respectively), while the frequency of drug-administering reduced from twice a day to once every 3 days. Its rate of in vitro degradation in serum was markedly reduced (72.78% could still be detected after 132 h). Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that both HM-3 and PEG(20k)-HM-3 induced large areas of continuous necrosis within tumours and significantly reduced the vessel density compared to control. It might be a breakthrough in PEG modification field to modify a small peptide with a large PEG and reach a good result.

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide against collagen-specific molecular chaperone 47-kDa heat shock protein suppresses scar formation in rat wounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuolin; Inokuchi, Tsugio; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Uehara, Masataka; Baba, Tomomi T

    2003-05-01

    The 47-kDa heat shock protein (HSP47) is a molecular chaperone specifically targeting the processing and quality control of collagen molecules. This study was performed to investigate whether antisense therapy preventing HSP47 expression might affect the scar formation occurring during wound healing of skin. In wound healing of neonatal rat skin, the number of HSP47-positive cells and the amount of HSP47 protein consistently increased up to 7 days after surgical wounding. The increase in HSP47-positive cell number and protein content was efficiently suppressed by daily injections of HSP47-antisense deoxynucleotide (30 nmol) for 7 days. This treatment also suppressed the accumulation of collagen type I in the wound. Moreover, the disorder of collagenous fibers was relieved in the healed portion of the wounds subjected to the antisense treatment. Taken together, the authors propose that HSP47 is an important determinant in scar formation and that the antisense treatment against HSP47 gene may have a therapeutic potential to suppress the scar formation of skin.

  13. Trend of Dark Rates of the COS and STIS NUV MAMA Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, W.; Proffitt, C. R.; Sahnow, D.; Ake, T. B.; Keyes, C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Hodge, P.; Oliveira, C.; Bostroem, A.; Long, C.; Aloisi, A.

    2010-07-01

    The dark rate of the STIS NUV MAMA detector was about an order of magnitude higher after SM4 repair than anticipated, with an initial rate of 0.01 count sec^-1 pixel^-1. Measurements over the past year show a dual-component exponential decline with e-folding timescales of o 30 and 300 days. The most recent measurements show a rate of 2.8 × 10^-3 count sec^-1 pixel^-1. The dark rate of the COS NUV detector started at a very low value of 6 × 10^-5 count sec^-1 pixel^-1, and has displayed a steady increase, approaching the ground-tested level of 3.7 × 10^-4 count sec^-1 pixel^-1. Still, the rate of COS NUV detector is considerably lower than that of its STIS counterpart. The rates for both detectors are sensitive to detector and tube temperatures, and the rate fluctuations can be fit with an empirical model.

  14. The flat fielding and achievable signal-to-noise of the MAMA detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Lindler, Don J.; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) was designed to achieve a signal-to-noise (S/N) of at least 100:1 per resolution element. Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) observations during Servicing Mission Orbital Verification (SMOV) confirm that this specification can be met. From analysis of a single spectrum of GD153, with counting statistics of approximately 165 a S/N of approximately 125 is achieved per spectral resolution element in the far ultraviolet (FUV) over the spectral range of 1280A to 1455A. Co-adding spectra of GRW+7OD5824 to increase the counting statistics to approximately 300 yields a S/N of approximately 190 per spectral resolution element over the region extending from 1347A to 1480A in the FUV. In the near ultraviolet (NUV), a single spectrum of GRW+7OD5824 with counting statistics of approximately 200 yields a S/N of approximately 150 per spectral resolution element over the spectral region extending from 2167 to 2520A. Details of the flat field construction, the spectral extraction, and the definition of a spectral resolution element will be described in the text.

  15. In vivo antimalarial evaluation of MAMA decoction on Plasmodium berghei in mice.

    PubMed

    Adepiti, Awodayo O; Elujoba, Anthony A; Bolaji, Oluseye O

    2014-02-01

    The use of decoctions of different plant materials is common practice in antimalarial ethnomedicine in Africa. Scientific evaluation of such herbal combinations to verify the claims is important. The study has evaluated the antimalarial efficacy of MAMA decoction (MD), a multicomponent herbal preparation and its individual plant components, namely leaves of Morinda lucida Benth [Rubiaceae] (ML), Azadirachta indica A. Juss [Meliaceae] (AI), Alstonia boonei De Wild [Apocynaceae] (AB) and Mangifera indica L [Anacardiaceae] (MI) in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Each decoction was prepared by boiling the powdered leaf in water, concentrated in vacuo and freeze-dried. The acute toxicity of MD (LD50=3.8 g/kg) was determined using Lorke's method. The antimalarial activities of MD and its plant components were evaluated by oral administration of the freeze-dried extracts (15-240 mg/kg) using the early malaria infection test model. The established malaria infection test was used to evaluate MD (60-240 mg/kg) while amodiaquine [10 mg/kg] (AQ) and distilled water were employed as the positive and negative controls, respectively. From the early malaria infection test, the effective doses at 50 % (ED50) and 90 % (ED90) for MD, AB, AI, ML, MI and AQ were 43, 79, 140, 134, 208 and 3.9 mg/kg and 202, 276, 291, 408, 480 and 9.2 mg/kg, respectively. For the established infection test, MD (240 mg/kg) and AQ gave parasite clearance of 55 and 95 % on day 5 of treatment. MD possesses antimalarial activity and is relatively safe.

  16. Influences of wastewater discharges on the water quality of Mamasın dam watershed in Aksaray, Central Anatolian part of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatip, Hatim; Güllü, Özlem

    2005-10-01

    Sustaining the human ecological benefits of surface water requires carefully planned strategies for reducing the cumulative risks posed by diverse human activities. Municipal governments in Aksaray City play a key role in developing solutions to surface water management and protection problems. The responsibility to provide drinking water and sewage works, regulate the use of private land, and protect public health provides the mandate and authority to take action. A large part of Aksaray City uses Mamasın dam water as its primary source for drinking water. Several point sources of contamination may result from direct wastewater discharges from Melendiz and Karasu rivers, which recharge the Mamasın dam watershed. Relevant studies were carried out for monitoring the eutrophication process, which usually occurs in the static water mass of the Mamasın dam lake. This process may be caused by the continual increase in nutrients and decrease of O2 levels, causing anaerobic conditions. Stimulated algae growth in these water bodies consequently reduces water quality. Hydrochemical parameters were evaluated to estimate the types of pollution sources, the level of pollution, and its environmental impacts on the Mamasın dam drinking water reservoir.

  17. A common structure for concepts of individuals, stuffs, and real kinds: more Mama, more milk, and more mouse.

    PubMed

    Millikan, R G

    1998-02-01

    Concepts are highly theoretical entities. One cannot study them empirically without committing oneself to substantial preliminary assumptions. Among the competing theories of concepts and categorization developed by psychologists in the last thirty years, the implicit theoretical assumption that what falls under a concept is determined by description ("descriptionism") has never been seriously challenged. I present a nondescriptionist theory of our most basic concepts, "substances," which include (1) stuffs (gold, milk), (2) real kinds (cat, chair), and (3) individuals (Mama, Bill Clinton, the Empire State Building). On the basis of something important that all three have in common, our earliest and most basic concepts of substances are identical in structure. The membership of the category "cat," like that of "Mama," is a natural unit in nature, to which the concept "cat" does something like pointing, and continues to point despite large changes in the properties the thinker represents the unit as having. For example, large changes can occur in the way a child identifies cats and the things it is willing to call "cat" without affecting the extension of its word "cat." The difficulty is to cash in the metaphor of "pointing" in this context. Having substance concepts need not depend on knowing words, but language interacts with substance concepts, completely transforming the conceptual repertoire. I will discuss how public language plays a crucial role in both the acquisition of substance concepts and their completed structure.

  18. Molecular cloning of the 31 kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2, as an antigen recognized by the lung cancer-specific human monoclonal antibody, AE6F4.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, S; Shoji, M; Setoguchi, Y; Kato, M; Hashizume, S; Ichikawa, A; Osada, K; Katakura, Y; Tachibana, H; Murakami, H

    1995-01-01

    The human monoclonal antibody AE6F4 specifically reacts with human lung cancer tissues but does not with normal tissues. This monoclonal antibody recognizes a cytosolic 31 kDa antigen in the cancer cells. In a previous study, we elucidated that the 31 kDa antigen belonged to a family of proteins collectively designated as 14-3-3 proteins, which were known as protein kinase-dependent activators of tyrosine/trytophan hydroxylases, or protein kinase C inhibitor proteins. Here we report molecular cloning of the 31 kDa antigen from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549. Sequencing analysis indicates that the cloned cDNA is identical to that of previously reported human placental cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which is also a member of the 14-3-3 protein family. Western analysis demonstrated that a 31 kDa recombinant cPLA2 expressed in monkey COS cells was recognized by the AE6F4 monoclonal antibody. Binding of the monoclonal antibody to the recombinant cPLA2 was abolished when treated with sodium periodate, suggesting that not only are carbohydrate chains associated with the cPLA2, but they also play a crucial role in antigen recognition by the monoclonal antibody.

  19. Monooxorhenium(V) complexes with 222-N2S2 MAMA ligands for bifunctional chelator agents: Syntheses and preliminary in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Demoin, Dustin Wayne; Dame, Ashley N; Minard, William D; Gallazzi, Fabio; Seickman, Gary L; Rold, Tammy L; Bernskoetter, Nicole; Fassbender, Michael E; Hoffman, Timothy J; Deakyne, Carol A; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2016-12-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using the bifunctional chelate approach with (186/188)Re(V) is challenging because of the susceptibility of monooxorhenium(V)-based complexes to oxidize in vivo at high dilution. A monoamine-monoamide dithiol (MAMA)-based bifunctional chelating agent was evaluated with both rhenium and technetium to determine its utility for in vivo applications. A 222-MAMA chelator, 222-MAMA(N-6-Ahx-OEt) bifunctional chelator, and 222-MAMA(N-6-Ahx-BBN(7-14)NH2) were synthesized, complexed with rhenium, radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and (186)Re (carrier added and no carrier added), and evaluated in initial biological distribution studies. An IC50 value of 2.0±0.7nM for (nat)ReO-222-MAMA(N-6-Ahx-BBN(7-14)NH2) compared to [(125)I]-Tyr(4)-BBN(NH2) was determined through competitive cell binding assays with PC-3 tumor cells. In vivo evaluation of the no-carrier added (99m)Tc-222-N2S2(N-6-Ahx-BBN(7-14)NH2) complex showed little gastric uptake and blockable pancreatic uptake in normal mice. The (186)ReO-222-N2S2(N-6-Ahx-BBN(7-14)NH2) complex showed stability in biological media, which indicates that the 222-N2S2 chelator is appropriate for chelating (186/188)Re in radiopharmaceuticals involving peptides. Additionally, the in vitro cell studies showed that the ReO-222-N2S2(N-6-Ahx-BBN(7-14)NH2) complex (macroscopically) bound to PC3-tumor cell surface receptors with high affinity. The (99m)Tc analog was stable in vivo and exhibited pancreatic uptake in mice that was blockable, indicating BB2r targeting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular and Structural Characterization of the Tegumental 20.6-kDa Protein in Clonorchis sinensis as a Potential Druggable Target

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Jung; Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Myoung-Ro; Kang, Jung-Mi; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Park, Mi-Yeoun; Ju, Jung-Won

    2017-01-01

    The tegument, representing the membrane-bound outer surface of platyhelminth parasites, plays an important role for the regulation of the host immune response and parasite survival. A comprehensive understanding of tegumental proteins can provide drug candidates for use against helminth-associated diseases, such as clonorchiasis caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. However, little is known regarding the physicochemical properties of C. sinensis teguments. In this study, a novel 20.6-kDa tegumental protein of the C. sinensis adult worm (CsTegu20.6) was identified and characterized by molecular and in silico methods. The complete coding sequence of 525 bp was derived from cDNA clones and encodes a protein of 175 amino acids. Homology search using BLASTX showed CsTegu20.6 identity ranging from 29% to 39% with previously-known tegumental proteins in C. sinensis. Domain analysis indicated the presence of a calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing a basic helix-loop-helix structure and a dynein light chain domain exhibiting a ferredoxin fold. We used a modified method to obtain the accurate tertiary structure of the CsTegu20.6 protein because of the unavailability of appropriate templates. The CsTegu20.6 protein sequence was split into two domains based on the disordered region, and then, the structure of each domain was modeled using I-TASSER. A final full-length structure was obtained by combining two structures and refining the whole structure. A refined CsTegu20.6 structure was used to identify a potential CsTegu20.6 inhibitor based on protein structure-compound interaction analysis. The recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. In C. sinensis, CsTegu20.6 mRNAs were abundant in adult and metacercariae, but not in the egg. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CsTegu20.6 localized to the surface of the tegument in the adult fluke. Collectively, our results contribute to a

  1. Molecular and Structural Characterization of the Tegumental 20.6-kDa Protein in Clonorchis sinensis as a Potential Druggable Target.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jung; Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Myoung-Ro; Kang, Jung-Mi; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Park, Mi-Yeoun; Ju, Jung-Won

    2017-03-04

    The tegument, representing the membrane-bound outer surface of platyhelminth parasites, plays an important role for the regulation of the host immune response and parasite survival. A comprehensive understanding of tegumental proteins can provide drug candidates for use against helminth-associated diseases, such as clonorchiasis caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. However, little is known regarding the physicochemical properties of C. sinensis teguments. In this study, a novel 20.6-kDa tegumental protein of the C. sinensis adult worm (CsTegu20.6) was identified and characterized by molecular and in silico methods. The complete coding sequence of 525 bp was derived from cDNA clones and encodes a protein of 175 amino acids. Homology search using BLASTX showed CsTegu20.6 identity ranging from 29% to 39% with previously-known tegumental proteins in C. sinensis. Domain analysis indicated the presence of a calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing a basic helix-loop-helix structure and a dynein light chain domain exhibiting a ferredoxin fold. We used a modified method to obtain the accurate tertiary structure of the CsTegu20.6 protein because of the unavailability of appropriate templates. The CsTegu20.6 protein sequence was split into two domains based on the disordered region, and then, the structure of each domain was modeled using I-TASSER. A final full-length structure was obtained by combining two structures and refining the whole structure. A refined CsTegu20.6 structure was used to identify a potential CsTegu20.6 inhibitor based on protein structure-compound interaction analysis. The recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. In C. sinensis, CsTegu20.6 mRNAs were abundant in adult and metacercariae, but not in the egg. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CsTegu20.6 localized to the surface of the tegument in the adult fluke. Collectively, our results contribute to a

  2. Complementary study of molecular dynamics and domain sizes in heterogenous nanocomposites PBT/DA-C{sub 60} and PBT/TCNEO-C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Woźniak-Braszak, A. Baranowski, M.; Jurga, K.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Jurga, J.; Brycki, B.; Mikuli, E.

    2014-05-28

    A comprehensive study of molecular dynamics and structure in new heterogenous nanocomposites based on poly(butylene terephthalate) and nanoparticles C{sub 60} modified by n-decylamine or tetracyanoethylene oxide has been performed. The domain structure of new nanocomposites has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray scattering, and differential scanning calorimetry techniques. Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR techniques were used to study molecular dynamics and domain sizes in new nanocomposites. Information about the electronic properties of these nanocomposites was obtained by means of electron paramagnetic resonance method. It was shown that the structure and molecular dynamics of new nanocomposites were strongly dependent on the properties and concentration of fullerene derivates.

  3. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  4. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  5. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  6. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K. P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-08-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 108 yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 106, 108, and 109 yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  7. Identification of the main quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by MAMA-DEG PCR.

    PubMed

    Hormeño, Lorena; Palomo, Gonzalo; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Porrero, M Concepción; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Domínguez, Lucas; Campos, Maria J; Quesada, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Among zoonotic diseases, campylobacteriosis stands out as the major bacterial infection producing human gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial therapy, only recommended in critical cases, is challenged by resistance mechanisms that should be unambiguously detected for achievement of effective treatments. Quinolone (ciprofloxacin) resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, the 2 main Campylobacter detected in humans, is conferred by the mutation gyrA C-257-T, which can be genotyped by several methods that require a previous identification of the pathogen species to circumvent the sequence polymorphism of the gene. A multiplex PCR, based on degenerated oligonucleotides, has been designed for unambiguous identification of the quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter spp. isolates. The method was verified with 249 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans (141 isolates) and from the 3 most important animal sources for this zoonosis: poultry (34 isolates), swine (38 isolates), and cattle (36 isolates). High resistance to ciprofloxacin, MIC above 4μg/mL, linked to the mutated genotype predicted by MAMA-DEG PCR (mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR with degenerated primers) was found frequently among isolates from the different hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations of the Fyn-SH3 domain with free and phospholipid bilayer-associated 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) - Insights into a non-canonical and fuzzy interaction.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Kyrylo; Vassall, Kenrick A; Harauz, George

    2017-04-05

    The molecular details of the association between the human Fyn-SH3 domain, and the fragment of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) spanning residues S38-S107 (denoted as xα2-peptide, murine sequence numbering), were studied in silico via docking and molecular dynamics over 50-ns trajectories. The results show that interaction between the two proteins is energetically favorable and heavily-dependent on the MBP proline-rich region (P93-P98) in both aqueous and membrane environments. In aqueous conditions, the xα2-peptide/Fyn-SH3 complex adopts a "sandwich"-like structure. In the membrane context, the xα2-peptide interacts with the Fyn-SH3 domain via the proline-rich region and the β-sheets of Fyn-SH3, with the latter wrapping around the proline-rich region in a form of a clip. Moreover, the simulations corroborate prior experimental evidence of the importance of upstream segments beyond the canonical SH3-ligand. This study thus provides a more-detailed glimpse into the context-dependent interaction dynamics and importance of the β-sheets in Fyn-SH3 and proline-rich region of MBP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular cloning of a novel human gene encoding a 63-kDa protein and its sublocalization within the 11q13 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Perelman, B.; Dafni, N.; Naiman, T.

    1997-05-01

    A human cDNA previously isolated by virtue of its ability to complement partially the ultraviolet sensitivity of a xeroderma pigmentosum cell line was further characterized. The transcription unit is expressed as a single 4.0-kb mRNA that encodes a novel 63-kDa cytoplasmic protein, possibly initiating from an internal AUG codon. The gene encoding this protein, named UVRAG, has been extremely well conserved during evolution, implying an important role for this gene product in cell metabolism. The transcribed mRNA is constitutively expressed in a wide variety of human tissues. The protein encoded by this gene is predicted to contain a coiled-coil structure and is likely to be metabolically unstable based on the occurrence of a strong PEST domain. UVRAG was assigned to human chromosome 11 by Southern hybridization to a somatic cell hybrid panel. Fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with PCR analysis of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing segments of human chromosome 11 has localized this gene to a subregion of 11q13 in between the D11S916 and the D11S906 loci. Importantly, this region has been shown to be amplified in a variety of human malignancies, including breast cancer. 28 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Crosslinked self-assemblies of lipoid acid-substituted low molecular weight (1800 Da) polyethylenimine as reductive-sensitive non-viral gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaojiao; Yuan, Zhefan; Yi, Xiaoqing; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Feng

    2012-10-01

    In this study, amphiphilic polyethylenimine-graft-thioctic acid (PEI-TA) and polyethylenimine-graft-lauric acid (PEI-LA) were synthesized. Both PEI-TA and PEI-LA could self-assemble into micelles. Due to the existence of disulfide-linked rings at the end of hydrophobic moieties, PEI-TA could form stable micelles with disulfide crosslinked cores (PEI-TA-SS). In comparison with the PEI-LA micelle, PEI-TA-SS possessed higher DNA binding ability according to the gel retardation assay and heparin replacement assay. In vitro transfection experiments indicated that PEI-TA-SS showed comparably high transfection efficiency as compared to 25 kDa PEI. More interestingly, the luciferase expression of PEI-TA-SS was superior to that of PEI-LA at low N/P ratio, which might be ascribed to the stronger binding capacity of PEI-TA-SS facilitating the entering of PEI-TA-SS/pDNA complexes into cells.

  11. Role of the kidney in the production of a low molecular weight growth factor (MW < 1000 Da): experimental study in the pig.

    PubMed

    Jacob, C; Hubert, J; Maachi, F; Punga-Maole, A; Dousset, B; Junke, E; Belleville, F

    1995-07-01

    Small peptide molecules known as low molecular weight growth factor (LMW-GF) have been identified in human serum. They enhance the effect of IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) on proteoglycan synthesis. In the present work we investigated the role played by the kidney in the production of LMW-GF, using the pig as an experimental model. Six pigs underwent bilateral nephrectomy followed 24 h later by orthotopic autotransplantation of the kidney. Renal and liver functions were evaluated by measurement of serum creatinine, urea, electrolytes, amino transferases (ASAT, ALAT), proteins, and bilirubin. LMW-GF was measured by bioassay using 11-day-old pelvic chick embryo cartilages. We observed that LMW-GF quickly disappeared from pig serum after nephrectomy and only reappeared when transplantation was successful. Reappearance of LMW-GF can precede improvement of renal function evaluated by plasma creatinine levels. These data appear to demonstrate that the kidney is involved in LMW-GF production.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1 magnetosome-associated proteins MamA.

    PubMed

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Zarivach, Raz

    2010-07-01

    MamA is a unique magnetosome-associated protein that is predicted to contain six sequential tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) motifs. The TPR structural motif serves as a template for protein-protein interactions and mediates the assembly of multi-protein complexes. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of recombinant and purified Magnetospirillum magneticum and M. gryphiswaldense MamA are reported for the first time. M. gryphiswaldense MamADelta41 crystallized in the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2 or P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 58.88, c = 144.09 A. M. magneticum MamADelta41 crystallized in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 44.75, b = 76.19, c = 105.05 A. X-ray diffraction data were collected to resolutions of 2.0 and 1.95 A, respectively.

  13. Identification, recombinant expression, and characterization of the 100 kDa high molecular weight Hymenoptera venom allergens Api m 5 and Ves v 3.

    PubMed

    Blank, Simon; Seismann, Henning; Bockisch, Benjamin; Braren, Ingke; Cifuentes, Liliana; McIntyre, Mareike; Rühl, Dana; Ring, Johannes; Bredehorst, Reinhard; Ollert, Markus W; Grunwald, Thomas; Spillner, Edzard

    2010-05-01

    Insect stings can cause life-threatening IgE-mediated anaphylactic reactions in venom-allergic patients. Although several compounds have already been described as venom allergens, prominent allergen candidates especially in the higher m.w. range have still remained elusive. Tandem mass spectrometry-based sequencing assigned a candidate gene to the most prominent putative high m.w. allergen Api m 5 (allergen C) in honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom and also allowed identification of its homologue Ves v 3 in yellow jacket (Vespula vulgaris) venom. Both proteins exhibit a pronounced sequence identity to human dipeptidyl peptidase IV or CD26. Reactivity of a human IgE mAb verified the presence of these proteins in the venoms. Both proteins were produced in insect cells and characterized for their enzymatic activity as well as their allergenic potential using sera and basophils from insect venom-allergic patients. Both Api m 5 and Ves v 3 were recognized by specific IgE of the majority of patients even in the absence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants. Serologic IgE reactivity closely matched activation of human basophils by Api m 5 or Ves v 3, thus underlining their relevance in functional assays. With Api m 5 and Ves v 3, a new pair of homologous allergens becomes available for future clinical applications in diagnosis and therapy that may also contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms of insect venoms. Moreover, the patient IgE reactivity together with the cellular activation demonstrates for the first time the relevance of high m.w. allergens in the context of hymenoptera venom allergy.

  14. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Human Milk and Serum from the U.S. EPA MAMA Study: Modeled Predictions of Infant Exposure and Considerations for Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Marchitti, Satori A.; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Mendola, Pauline; Kenneke, John F.; Hines, Erin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serum concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in U.S. women are believed to be among the world’s highest; however, little information exists on the partitioning of PBDEs between serum and breast milk and how this may affect infant exposure. Objectives: Paired milk and serum samples were measured for PBDE concentrations in 34 women who participated in the U.S. EPA MAMA Study. Computational models for predicting milk PBDE concentrations from serum were evaluated. Methods: Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry. Observed milk PBDE concentrations were compared with model predictions, and models were applied to NHANES serum data to predict milk PBDE concentrations and infant intakes for the U.S. population. Results: Serum and milk samples had detectable concentrations of most PBDEs. BDE-47 was found in the highest concentrations (median serum: 18.6; milk: 31.5 ng/g lipid) and BDE-28 had the highest milk:serum partitioning ratio (2.1 ± 0.2). No evidence of depuration was found. Models demonstrated high reliability and, as of 2007–2008, predicted U.S. milk concentrations of BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100 appear to be declining but BDE-153 may be rising. Predicted infant intakes (ng/kg/day) were below threshold reference doses (RfDs) for BDE-99 and BDE-153 but above the suggested RfD for BDE-47. Conclusions: Concentrations and partitioning ratios of PBDEs in milk and serum from women in the U.S. EPA MAMA Study are presented for the first time; modeled predictions of milk PBDE concentrations using serum concentrations appear to be a valid method for estimating PBDE exposure in U.S. infants. Citation: Marchitti SA, Fenton SE, Mendola P, Kenneke JF, Hines EP. 2017. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in human milk and serum from the U.S. EPA MAMA Study: modeled predictions of infant exposure and considerations for risk assessment. Environ Health Perspect 125:706–713; http://dx.doi.org/10

  15. Magnetosome formation and expression of mamA, mms13, mms6 and magA in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 exposed to pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Liang, Likun; Song, Tao; Wu, Longfei

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the effects of pulsed magnetic field on magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, cultures inoculated with either mangetic or non-magnetic pre-cultures were incubated under 1 mT pulsed magnetic field. Magnetism of cells was measured by using spectrophotometer coupled with applied magnetic fields and the values were described as C(mag). Magnetosome in cells was counted by transmission electron microscopy observation. The results showed that pulsed magnetic field did not affect cellular growth, but enhanced magnetosome formation. The applied pulsed magnetic field might exceed the chain of magnetosomes and change the homogeneity of the magnetosome particles. The results implied that magnetite precipitation induced by the adjacent magnetosome was affected by pulsed magnetic field. Moreover, the applied pulsed magnetic field up-regulated the magA and mamA expression in cells, which might account for the increasing number and the exceeding chain of magnetosomes in cells.

  16. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Human Milk and Serum from the U.S. EPA MAMA Study: Modeled Predictions of Infant Exposure and Considerations for Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Marchitti, Satori A; Fenton, Suzanne E; Mendola, Pauline; Kenneke, John F; Hines, Erin P

    2017-04-01

    Serum concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in U.S. women are believed to be among the world's highest; however, little information exists on the partitioning of PBDEs between serum and breast milk and how this may affect infant exposure. Paired milk and serum samples were measured for PBDE concentrations in 34 women who participated in the U.S. EPA MAMA Study. Computational models for predicting milk PBDE concentrations from serum were evaluated. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry. Observed milk PBDE concentrations were compared with model predictions, and models were applied to NHANES serum data to predict milk PBDE concentrations and infant intakes for the U.S. population. Serum and milk samples had detectable concentrations of most PBDEs. BDE-47 was found in the highest concentrations (median serum: 18.6; milk: 31.5 ng/g lipid) and BDE-28 had the highest milk:serum partitioning ratio (2.1 ± 0.2). No evidence of depuration was found. Models demonstrated high reliability and, as of 2007-2008, predicted U.S. milk concentrations of BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100 appear to be declining but BDE-153 may be rising. Predicted infant intakes (ng/kg/day) were below threshold reference doses (RfDs) for BDE-99 and BDE-153 but above the suggested RfD for BDE-47. Concentrations and partitioning ratios of PBDEs in milk and serum from women in the U.S. EPA MAMA Study are presented for the first time; modeled predictions of milk PBDE concentrations using serum concentrations appear to be a valid method for estimating PBDE exposure in U.S. infants.

  18. The impact of extended voice use on the acoustic characteristics of phonation after training and performance of actors from the La MaMa Experimental Theater club.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Carol; Galgano, Jessica; Ramig, Lorraine Olson

    2011-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that extensive use of La MaMa vocal technique may result in symptoms of vocal abuse, an evaluation of the acoustic and perceptual characteristics of voice for eight performers from the Great Jones Repertory Company of the La MaMa Experimental Theater was conducted. This vocal technique includes wide ranges of frequency from 46 to 2003 Hz and vocal intensity that is sustained at 90-108 dB sound pressure level with a mouth-to-microphone distance of 30 cm for 3-4 hours per performance. The actors rehearsed for 4 hours per day, 5 days per week for 14 weeks before the series of performances. Thirty-nine performances were presented in 6 weeks. Three pretraining, three posttraining, and two postperformance series data collection sessions were carried out for each performer. Speech samples were gathered using the CSL 4500 and analyzed using Real-Time Pitch program and Multidimensional Voice Program. Acoustic analysis was performed on 48 tokens of sustained vowel phonation for each subject. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test of related samples. Perceptual analysis included professional listeners rating voice quality in pretraining, posttraining, and postperformance samples of the Rainbow Passage and sample lines from the plays. The majority of professional listeners (11/12) judged that this technique would result in symptoms of vocal abuse; however, acoustic data revealed statistically stable or improved measurements for all subjects in most dependent acoustic variables when compared with both posttraining and postperformance trials. These findings add support to the notion that a technique that may be perceived as vocally abusive, generating 90-100 dB sound pressure level and sustained over 6 weeks of performances, actually resulted in improved vocal strength and flexibility. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria

    2010-09-01

    Internal wavecals will be obtained at primary and secondary central wavelengths chosen to cover Cycle 17 use. There is also overlap with choices of configurations used with previous calibration programs which will enable long-term monitoring. This program uses the LINE lamp for a total of approximately 1.5 hours, typically at a lamp current of 10 mA.

  20. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, Paule

    2012-10-01

    Internal wavecals will be obtained at primary and secondary central wavelengths chosen to cover Cycle 20 use. There is also overlap with choices of configurations used with previous calibration programs which will enable long-term monitoring. This program uses the LINE lamp for a total of approximately 1.5 hours, typically at a lamp current of 10 mA.

  1. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  2. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature. The frequency has been reduced from bi-weekly to once every six weeks to stay within a reasonable orbit count.

  3. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature.

  4. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  5. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, Paule

    2011-10-01

    Internal wavecals will be obtained at primary and secondary central wavelengths chosen to cover Cycle 17 use. There is also overlap with choices of configurations used with previous calibration programs which will enable long-term monitoring. This program uses the LINE lamp for a total of approximately 1.5 hours, typically at a lamp current of 10 mA.

  6. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  7. Homogeneous generation of iDA neurons with high similarity to bona fide DA neurons using a drug inducible system.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanseul; Kim, Hongwon; Yoo, Junsang; Lee, Jaekwang; Choi, Hwan; Baek, Soonbong; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Janghwan; Lengner, Christopher J; Sung, Jung-Suk; Kim, Jongpil

    2015-12-01

    Recent work generating induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons using direct lineage reprogramming potentially provides a novel platform for the study and treatment Parkinson's disease (PD). However, one of the most important issues for iDA-based applications is the degree to which iDA neurons resemble the molecular and functional properties of their endogenous DA neuron counterparts. Here we report that the homogeneity of the reprogramming gene expression system is critical for the generation of iDA neuron cultures that are highly similar to endogenous DA neurons. We employed an inducible system that carries iDA-inducing factors as defined transgenes for direct lineage reprogramming to iDA neurons. This system circumvents the need for viral transduction, enabling a more efficient and reproducible reprogramming process for the generation of genetically homogenous iDA neurons. We showed that this inducible system generates iDA neurons with high similarity to their bona fide in vivo counterparts in comparison to direct infection methods. Thus, our results suggest that homogenous expression of exogenous genes in direct lineage reprogramming is critical for the generation of high quality iDA neuron cultures, making such culture systems a valuable resource for iDA-based drug screening and, ultimately, potential therapeutic intervention in PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sinusoidal magnetic field stimulates magnetosome formation and affects mamA, mms13, mms6, and magA expression in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Liang, Likun; Song, Tao; Wu, Longfei

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic particles are currently one of the most important materials in the industrial sector, where they have been widely used for biotechnological and biomedical applications. To investigate the effects of the imposed magnetic field on biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and to suggest a new approach that enhances formation of magnetosomes, cultures inoculated with either magnetic or nonmagnetic precultures were incubated under a sinusoidal magnetic field or geomagnetic field. The results showed that the sinusoidal magnetic field up-regulated mms6 expression in the cultures inoculated with magnetic cells, and magA, mms6, and mamA expression in the cultures inoculated with nonmagnetic cells. The applied sinusoidal magnetic field could block cell division, which could contribute to a decrease in the OD600 values and an increase in the coefficient of magnetism values of the cultures, which could mean that the percentage of mature magnetosome-containing bacteria was increased. The linearity of magnetosome chains was affected, but the number of magnetic particles in cells was increased when a sinusoidal magnetic field was applied to the cultures. The results imply that the variable intensity and orientation of the sinusoidal magnetic field resulted in magnetic pole conversion in the newly forming magnetic particles, which could affect the formation of magnetic crystals and the arrangement of the adjacent magnetosome.

  9. Effects of static magnetic field on magnetosome formation and expression of mamA, mms13, mms6 and magA in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Liang, Likun

    2009-05-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce nanometer-size intracellular magnetic crystals. The superior crystalline and magnetic properties of magnetosomes have been attracting much interest in medical applications. To investigate effects of intense static magnetic field on magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, cultures inoculated with either magnetic or non-magnetic pre-cultures were incubated under 0.2 T static magnetic field or geomagnetic field. The results showed that static magnetic field could impair the cellular growth and raise C(mag) values of the cultures, which means that the percentage of magnetosome-containing bacteria was increased. Static magnetic field exposure also caused an increased number of magnetic particles per cell, which could contribute to the increased cellular magnetism. The iron depletion in medium was slightly increased after static magnetic field exposure. The linearity of magnetosome chain was also affected by static magnetic field. Moreover, the applied intense magnetic field up-regulated mamA, mms13, magA expression when cultures were inoculated with magnetic cells, and mms13 expression in cultures inoculated with non-magnetic cells. The results implied that the interaction of the magnetic field created by magnetosomes in AMB-1 was affected by the imposed magnetic field. The applied static magnetic field could affect the formation of magnetic crystals and the arrangement of the neighboring magnetosome. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Successful MALDI-MS analysis of synthetic polymers with labile end-groups: the case of nitroxide-mediated polymerization using the MAMA-SG1 alkoxyamine.

    PubMed

    Barrère, Caroline; Chendo, Christophe; Phan, Trang N T; Monnier, Valérie; Trimaille, Thomas; Humbel, Stéphane; Viel, Stéphane; Gigmes, Didier; Charles, Laurence

    2012-06-18

    A sample pretreatment was evaluated to enable the production of intact cationic species of synthetic polymers holding a labile end-group using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. More specifically, polymers obtained by nitroxide-mediated polymerization involving the MAMA-SG1 alkoxyamine were stirred for a few hours in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to induce the substitution of a tert-butyl group on the nitrogen of nitroxide end-group by a hydrogen atom. Nuclear magnetic resonance, electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, and theoretical calculations were combined to scrutinize this sample pretreatment from both mechanistic and energetic points of view. The substitution reaction was found to increase the dissociation energy of the fragile C-ON bond to a sufficient extent to prevent this bond to be spontaneously cleaved during MALDI analysis. This TFA treatment is shown to be very efficient regardless of the nature of the polymer, as evidenced by reliable MALDI mass spectrometric data obtained for poly(ethylene oxide), polystyrene and poly(butylacrylate). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The Ubiquitin Receptor DA1 Interacts with the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase DA2 to Regulate Seed and Organ Size in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Li, Na; Dumenil, Jack; Li, Jie; Kamenski, Andrei; Bevan, Michael W.; Gao, Fan; Li, Yunhai

    2013-01-01

    Seed size in higher plants is determined by the coordinated growth of the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissue. Several factors that act maternally to regulate seed size have been identified, such as AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2, APETALA2, KLUH, and DA1, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms of these factors in seed size control are almost totally unknown. We previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 acts synergistically with the E3 ubiquitin ligase ENHANCER1 OF DA1 (EOD1)/BIG BROTHER to regulate the final size of seeds in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe another RING-type protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, encoded by DA2, which regulates seed size by restricting cell proliferation in the maternal integuments of developing seeds. The da2-1 mutant forms large seeds, while overexpression of DA2 decreases seed size of wild-type plants. Overexpression of rice (Oryza sativa) GRAIN WIDTH AND WEIGHT2, a homolog of DA2, restricts seed growth in Arabidopsis. Genetic analyses show that DA2 functions synergistically with DA1 to regulate seed size, but does so independently of EOD1. Further results reveal that DA2 interacts physically with DA1 in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, our findings define the genetic and molecular mechanisms of three ubiquitin-related proteins DA1, DA2, and EOD1 in seed size control and indicate that they are promising targets for crop improvement. PMID:24045020

  12. The ubiquitin receptor DA1 interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase DA2 to regulate seed and organ size in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tian; Li, Na; Dumenil, Jack; Li, Jie; Kamenski, Andrei; Bevan, Michael W; Gao, Fan; Li, Yunhai

    2013-09-01

    Seed size in higher plants is determined by the coordinated growth of the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissue. Several factors that act maternally to regulate seed size have been identified, such as auxin response factor2, apetala2, KLUH, and DA1, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms of these factors in seed size control are almost totally unknown. We previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 acts synergistically with the E3 ubiquitin ligase enhancer1 OF DA1 (EOD1)/big brother to regulate the final size of seeds in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe another RING-type protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, encoded by DA2, which regulates seed size by restricting cell proliferation in the maternal integuments of developing seeds. The da2-1 mutant forms large seeds, while overexpression of DA2 decreases seed size of wild-type plants. Overexpression of rice (Oryza sativa) grain width and weight2, a homolog of DA2, restricts seed growth in Arabidopsis. Genetic analyses show that DA2 functions synergistically with DA1 to regulate seed size, but does so independently of EOD1. Further results reveal that DA2 interacts physically with DA1 in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, our findings define the genetic and molecular mechanisms of three ubiquitin-related proteins DA1, DA2, and EOD1 in seed size control and indicate that they are promising targets for crop improvement.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterisation of Ts8B1, Ts8B2 and Ts8B3, three new members of the Taenia solium metacestode 8 kDa diagnostic antigen family.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Elizabeth; Bonay, Pedro; Foster-Cuevas, Mildred; González, Luis Miguel; Dávila, Iris; Cortéz, María Milagros; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Gárate, Teresa

    2007-03-01

    Antibody screening of a lambdaZAP-XR Taenia solium metacestode cDNA library yielded a clone (Ts8B1), with an insert of 345 bp, and an open reading frame of 258 bp, that coded for a protein with 85 amino acid residues. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence with sequences from SWISSPROT revealed an 88% identity with TcA5.5, a 10 kDa immunodiagnostic antigen of T. crassiceps, 75% identity with CyDA a T. solium metacestode antigen, 40-50% identity with several variants of the 8 kDa subunit of antigen B of Echinococcus spp. and with members of the T. solium metacestode 8 kDa antigen family. Two other Ts8B1 related molecules, Ts8B2 and Ts8B3, were identified in the metacestode cDNA library by PCR, coding for 85 and 66 amino acid polypeptides, respectively. Both Ts8B1 and Ts8B2 were characterized as E/S antigens through their subcellular localisation in the secretory membrane system when expressed in NRK cells. The three cDNA inserts were expressed, purified and probed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with sera and cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with confirmed neurocysticercosis, and with sera from pigs infected with T. solium. The most promising antigen, Ts8B2, performed with a sensitivity of 96.8% and specificity of 93.1% in the detection of active NCC when using serum samples in the assay and performed similarly in the porcine system. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  15. Applying the COM-B model to creation of an IT-enabled health coaching and resource linkage program for low-income Latina moms with recent gestational diabetes: the STAR MAMA program.

    PubMed

    Handley, Margaret A; Harleman, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-Mendez, Enrique; Stotland, Naomi E; Althavale, Priyanka; Fisher, Lawrence; Martinez, Diana; Ko, Jocelyn; Sausjord, Isabel; Rios, Christina

    2016-05-18

    One of the fastest growing risk groups for early onset of diabetes is women with a recent pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes, and for this group, Latinas are the largest at-risk group in the USA. Although evidence-based interventions, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which focuses on low-cost changes in eating, physical activity and weight management can lower diabetes risk and delay onset, these programs have yet to be tailored to postpartum Latina women. This study aims to tailor a IT-enabled health communication program to promote DPP-concordant behavior change among postpartum Latina women with recent gestational diabetes. The COM-B model (incorporating Capability, Opportunity, and Motivational behavioral barriers and enablers) and the Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) framework, convey a theoretically based approach for intervention development. We combined a health literacy-tailored health IT tool for reaching ethnic minority patients with diabetes with a BCW-based approach to develop a health coaching intervention targeted to postpartum Latina women with recent gestational diabetes. Current evidence, four focus groups (n = 22 participants), and input from a Regional Consortium of health care providers, diabetes experts, and health literacy practitioners informed the intervention development. Thematic analysis of focus group data used the COM-B model to determine content. Relevant cultural, theoretical, and technological components that underpin the design and development of the intervention were selected using the BCW framework. STAR MAMA delivers DPP content in Spanish and English using health communication strategies to: (1) validate the emotions and experiences postpartum women struggle with; (2) encourage integration of prevention strategies into family life through mothers becoming intergenerational custodians of health; and (3) increase social and material supports through referral to social networks, health coaches, and

  16. Funding of a medical research institute in a small country: 15 years of Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto (IPATIMUP)--interview conducted by Ivan Damjanov.

    PubMed

    Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel

    2005-06-01

    This is an interview with Prof Manuel Sobrinho-Simoes, the Director of the Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto (IPATIMUP), Porto, Portugal. The interview was prepared for this Pathology thematic issue, by Prof Ivan Damjanov, from the University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Kansas, USA. The interview deals with the funding and the growth of IPATIMUP, which became, within 15 years from its inception, one of the leading biomedical research institutions of Portugal. The interview touches upon the logistical, political, financial, and personnel-related problems they encountered during these 15 years. It illustrates some of the dilemmas and questions faced by scientists in Porto, which are also relevant to scientists in other small countries.

  17. Molecular breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of molecular and genomic tools to assist selection of parents or progeny has become an integral part of modern cotton breeding. In this chapter, the basic components of molecular cotton breeding are described. These components include: molecular marker development, genetic and physical map const...

  18. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  19. A 45-kDa acetylcholinesterase protoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila: purification and immunogenicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Rodríguez, L A; Fernández-Briera, A; Nieto, T P

    2002-05-21

    A rabbit antiserum to the 15-kDa acetylcholinesterase toxin neutralised the lethal effect of the 15-kDa toxin of Aeromonas hydrophila when injected into trout. However, immunisation of fish with the 15-kDa toxoid failed to induce an antibody response, and a higher molecular mass form of this toxin was purified from the extracellular products with the aim of inducing an immune response in fish. The optimal conditions for production of extracellular products by A. hydrophila strain B32 were studied to increase the concentration of this protoxin. The extracellular products were fractionated by molecular exclusion chromatography to yield a purified protoxin with an estimated molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE and which gave a positive reaction in Western blotting with the rabbit anti-15-kDa toxin serum. Since the 45-kDa protoxin showed lower specific acetylcholinesterase activity than the active 15-kDa toxin, the behaviour of the active site was studied using specific inhibitors. This 45-kDa protoxin was 13.3-fold less toxic than the 15-kDa toxin and induced antibody production in fish.

  20. Average molecular weight of surfactants in aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2007-09-01

    Surfactants in atmospheric aerosols determined as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and ethyl violet active substances (EVAS). The MBAS and EVAS concentrations can be correlated with surface tension as determined by pendant drop analysis. The effect of surface tension was more clearly indicated in fine mode aerosol extracts. The concentration of MBAS and EVAS was determined before and after ultrafiltration analysis using AMICON centrifuge tubes that define a 5000 Da (5 K Da) nominal molecular weight fraction. Overall, MBAS and to a greater extent EVAS predominates in fraction with molecular weight below 5 K Da. In case of aerosols collected in Malaysia the higher molecular fractions tended to be a more predominant. The MBAS and EVAS are correlated with yellow to brown colours in aerosol extracts. Further experiments showed possible sources of surfactants (e.g. petrol soot, diesel soot) in atmospheric aerosols to yield material having molecular size below 5 K Da except for humic acid. The concentration of surfactants from these sources increased after ozone exposure and for humic acids it also general included smaller molecular weight surfactants.

  1. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  2. Mama Software Features: Uncertainty Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-30

    This document reviews how the uncertainty in the calculations is being determined with test image data. The results of this testing give an ‘initial uncertainty’ number than can be used to estimate the ‘back end’ uncertainty in digital image quantification in images. Statisticians are refining these numbers as part of a UQ effort.

  3. STIS MAMA Missed Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, Howard

    1997-07-01

    SMOV proposal 7078 includes the central {prime} wavelengths for the E140H at 1416A and E140M at 1425, and E230H at 2513. Therefore, in this proposal, we will obtain deep engineering wavecals of the two remaining central prime wavelengths of the E140H and all remaining prime settings for the Echelle gratings E230H and E230M will be obatined. The Pt/Cr-Ne {CIM} line lamp will be used with the appropriate supported 2-pixel wide slit. Observations are pure internals.

  4. Chemical and Molecular Biological Aspects of Alkylhydrazine-Induced Carcinogenesis in Human Cells in Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    methylazozy- methanol acetate ( MAMA ), proved to be a potent transformer as well as a carcinogen. The obvious conclusion is that the human cell culture...Negative MMH 62 pg/ml Negative [ AOM Negative at 100 1g/ml Not tested MAMA 3.6 ug/ml 900 2/16’ Tetrazine 50 Ug/ml Positive. No data yet. [j Phenylhydrazine...the tumor incidence data for MAMA is not com-B parable to those of UDMH and Hz. I 11-% C. Conclusion: In our attempts,to correlate toxicity and/or

  5. Molecular Knots

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, Stephen D. P.; Woltering, Steffen L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The first synthetic molecular trefoil knot was prepared in the late 1980s. However, it is only in the last few years that more complex small‐molecule knot topologies have been realized through chemical synthesis. The steric restrictions imposed on molecular strands by knotting can impart significant physical and chemical properties, including chirality, strong and selective ion binding, and catalytic activity. As the number and complexity of accessible molecular knot topologies increases, it will become increasingly useful for chemists to adopt the knot terminology employed by other disciplines. Here we give an overview of synthetic strategies towards molecular knots and outline the principles of knot, braid, and tangle theory appropriate to chemistry and molecular structure. PMID:28477423

  6. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  7. The da Vinci robot.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2006-12-01

    One might assume from the title of this paper that the nuances of a complex mechanical robot will be discussed, and this would be correct. On the other hand, the date of the design and possible construction of this robot was 1495, a little more than five centuries ago. The key point in the title is the lack of a trademarked name, as Leonardo was the designer of this sophisticated system. His notes from the Codex Altanticus represent the foundation of this report. English translations of da Vinci's notebooks are currently available. Beginning in the 1950s, investigators at the University of California began to ponder the significance of some of da Vinci's markings on what appeared to be technical drawings. Such markings also occur in his Codex Atlanticus (the largest single collection of da Vinci's sheets, consisting of 1119 separate pages and 481 folios) along with a large number of other mechanical devices. Continuing research at the Instituto e Museo di Storia della Scienza in Florence has yielded a great deal of information about Leonardo's intentions with regard to his mechanical knight. It is now known that da Vinci's robot would have had the outer appearance of a Germanic knight. It had a complex core of mechanical devices that probably was human powered. The robot had two independent operating systems. The first had three degree-of-freedom legs, ankles, knees, and hips. The second had four degrees of freedom in the arms with articulated shoulders, elbows, wrists, and hands. A mechanical analog-programmable controller within the chest provided the power and control for the arms. The legs were powered by an external crank arrangement driving the cable, which connected to key locations near each lower extremity's joints. Da Vinci also is known to have devised a programmable front-wheel-drive automobile with rack-and-pinion suspension mechanisms at age 26. He would recall this device again, when, at age 40, he is thought to have built a programmable automated

  8. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  9. Molecular Haeckel.

    PubMed

    Elinson, Richard P; Kezmoh, Lorren

    2010-07-01

    More than a century ago, Ernst Haeckel created embryo drawings to illustrate the morphological similarity of vertebrate early embryos. These drawings have been both widely presented and frequently criticized. At the same time that the idea of morphological similarity was recently attacked, there has been a growing realization of molecular similarities in the development of tissues and organs. We have surveyed genes expressed in vertebrate embryos, and we have used them to construct drawings that we call Molecular Haeckels. The Molecular Haeckels emphasize that, based on gene expression, there is a greater similarity among vertebrate embryos than even Haeckel might have imagined. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Molecular printing

    PubMed Central

    Braunschweig, Adam B.; Huo, Fengwei; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular printing techniques, which involve the direct transfer of molecules to a substrate with submicrometre resolution, have been extensively developed over the past decade and have enabled many applications. Arrays of features on this scale have been used to direct materials assembly, in nanoelectronics, and as tools for genetic analysis and disease detection. The past decade has witnessed the maturation of molecular printing led by two synergistic technologies: dip-pen nanolithography and soft lithography. Both are characterized by material and substrate flexibility, but dip-pen nanolithography has unlimited pattern design whereas soft lithography has limited pattern flexibility but is low in cost and has high throughput. Advances in DPN tip arrays and inking methods have increased the throughput and enabled applications such as multiplexed arrays. A new approach to molecular printing, polymer-pen lithography, achieves low-cost, high-throughput and pattern flexibility. This Perspective discusses the evolution and future directions of molecular printing. PMID:21378889

  11. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  12. [Molecular imaging].

    PubMed

    Turetschek, K; Wunderbaldinger, P

    2002-01-01

    The disclosure of the human genoma, the progress in understanding of diseases on molecular and cellular levels, the discovery of new disease-specific targets, and the development of new medications will revolutionize our understanding of the etiology and the treatment of many disease entities. Radiologists are faced with a paradigm shift from unspecific to specific molecular imaging techniques as well as with enormous speed in the development of new methods and should be enrolled actively in this field of medicine.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  14. Purification and characterization of 94kDa and 80kDa forms of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fracek, S.P. Jr.; Venter, J.C.; Kerlavage, A.R.

    1986-05-01

    Two molecular forms of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor have been consistently observed in a variety of species, albeit in variable amounts. Proteins which are specifically labeled by (/sup 3/H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((/sup 3/H)PrBCM) were observed at 94kDa and 80kDa upon SDS-PAGE of membrane proteins prepared from brains and hearts of trout, frog, turtle, chicken, rat, and pig. They have developed a purification procedure which yields each of these proteins in a homogeneous form suitable for structural analysis. The four step procedure involves affinity chromatography on 3-(2'-aminobenzhydryloxy)tropane-sepharose, concentration on hydroxylapatite, preparative SDS-PAGE and extraction of individual bands from the gel. Limited tryptic digestion of purified (/sup 3/H)PrBCM-labeled porcine atrial muscarinic receptor yields (/sup 3/H)-labeled fragments of 75, 65, 52, 40, 35, 30, 25, and 20kDa, in close agreement with results of analogous digestions of muscarinic receptor from other species and tissues. Complete tryptic digestion and subsequent mapping by reverse-phase HPLC yields very similar profiles for (/sup 125/I)-labeled 94kDa and 80kDA receptor forms. Most peaks which elute in the hydrophobic region of the profile overlap for the two proteins while the 94kDa protein contains several additional peaks of apparent low hydrophobicity.

  15. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  16. Chemical and Molecular Biological Aspects of Alkylhydrazine-Induced Carcinogenesis in Human Cells in Vitro. Revised

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    and MAMA, respectively. Except for MMH, the other three compounds transformed HNF cells at an ED 2 5 dose as determined by their anchorage independent...with initiation of transformation. Experiments are in progress to determine if 1,1-DMH, 1,2-DMH and MAMA can cause an aberrant endogenous methylation...culture as assessed by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and tumor production in athymic nude mice. 4 To further explore events leading to

  17. Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  18. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  19. Molecular methods

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 5, describes some of the most important molecular methods used in the study of chromosome structure and function. The methods discussed include fragmentation of DNA, cloning, flow cytometry and chromosome sorting, is situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Improved agarose gel electrophoresis method and molecular mass calculation for high molecular mass hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Mary K; Chen, Cherry C; Pandya, Monika; Yuan, Han; Ramkishun, Dianne; LoBello, Jaclyn; Bhilocha, Shardul; Russell-Puleri, Sparkle; Skendaj, Eraldi; Mijovic, Jovan; Jing, Wei

    2011-10-01

    The molecular mass of the polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is an important determinant of its biological activity and physicochemical properties. One method currently used for the analysis of the molecular mass distribution of an HA sample is gel electrophoresis. In the current work, an improved agarose gel electrophoresis method for analysis of high molecular mass HA is presented and validated. HA mobility in 0.5% agarose minigels was found to be linearly related to the logarithm of molecular mass in the range from approximately 200 to 6000 kDa. A sample load of 2.5 μg for polydisperse HA samples was employed. Densitometric scanning of stained gels allowed analysis of the range of molecular masses present in the sample as well as calculation of weight-average and number-average values. The method was validated for a polydisperse HA sample with a weight-average molecular mass of approximately 2000 kDa. Excellent agreement was found between the weight-average molecular mass determined by electrophoresis and that determined by rheological measurement of the solution viscosity. The revised method was then used to show that heating solutions of HA at 100°C, followed by various cooling procedures, had no effect on the HA molecular mass distribution.

  1. Henrique da Rocha Lima.

    PubMed

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian physician and researcher Henrique da Rocha Lima was born in 1879 in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied medicine and obtained the degree of M.D. in 1901. He specialized in Clinical Medicine in Germany and was the ambassador in European countries of the scientific medicine that emerged from the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in the early twentieth century. Rocha Lima has discovered the causative agent of typhus and had a major contribution to the studies of yellow fever, Chagas disease, Carrión's disease and histoplasmosis. His genius, his research and his discoveries projected his name, and, with it, the image of Brazil in the international scientific scene.

  2. Berengario da Carpi.

    PubMed

    De Santo, N G; Bisaccia, C; De Santo, L S; De Santo, R M; Di Leo, V A; Papalia, T; Cirillo, M; Touwaide, A

    1999-01-01

    Berengario da Carpi was magister of anatomy and surgery at the University of Bologna from 1502 to 1527. Eustachio and Falloppia defined him as 'the restaurator of anatomy'. He was a great surgeon, anatomist and physician of illustrious patients including Lorenzo II dei Medici, Giovanni dalle Bande Nere, Galeazzo Pallavicini, Cardinal Colonna, and Alessandro Soderini. He had strong links to the intellectuals of his time (Forni, Bonamici, Manuzio, Pomponazzi) as well as with the Medici family. He was respected by the Popes Julius II, Leo X and Clement VII. His main contributions are the Isogogae Breves, De Fractura calvae sive cranei, and the illustrated Commentaria on the Anatomy of Mondino de Liucci, a textbook utilized for more than 200 years, which Berengario aimed to restore to its initial text. The Commentaria constitutes the material for the last part of this paper which concludes with a personal translation of some passages on 'The kidney', where the author gives poignant examples of experimental ingenuity.

  3. Henrique da Rocha Lima*

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian physician and researcher Henrique da Rocha Lima was born in 1879 in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied medicine and obtained the degree of M.D. in 1901. He specialized in Clinical Medicine in Germany and was the ambassador in European countries of the scientific medicine that emerged from the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in the early twentieth century. Rocha Lima has discovered the causative agent of typhus and had a major contribution to the studies of yellow fever, Chagas disease, Carrión’s disease and histoplasmosis. His genius, his research and his discoveries projected his name, and, with it, the image of Brazil in the international scientific scene. PMID:26131867

  4. Molecular modeling and cytotoxicity of diffractaic acid: HP-β-CD inclusion complex encapsulated in microspheres.

    PubMed

    Silva, Camilla V N S; Barbosa, Jéssica A P; Ferraz, Milena S; Silva, Nicácio H; Honda, Neli K; Rabello, Marcelo M; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Bezerra, Beatriz P; Cavalcanti, Isabella M F; Ayala, Alejandro P; Santos, Noemia P S; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide S

    2016-11-01

    In this pioneer study, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) was used to improve the solubility of the diffractaic acid (DA) via inclusion complex (DA:HP-β-CD). Subsequently, DA:HP-β-CD was incorporated into poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) microspheres (DA:HP-β-CD-MS). Microspheres containing DA (DA-MS) or DA:HP-β-CD (DA:HP-β-CD-MS) were prepared using the multiple W/O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. The phase-solubility diagram of DA in HP-β-CD (10-50mM) showed an AL type curve with a stability constant K1:1=821M(-1). (1)H NMR, FTIR, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis showed changes in the molecular environment of DA in DA:HP-β-CD. The molecular modeling approach suggests a guest-host complex formation between the carboxylic moiety of both DA and the host (HP-β-CD). The mean particle size of the microspheres were ∅DA-MS=5.23±1.65μm and ∅DA:HP-β-CD-MS=4.11±1.39μm, respectively. The zeta potential values of the microspheres were ζDA-MS=-7.85±0.32mV and ζDA:HP-β-CD-MS=-6.93±0.46mV. Moreover, the encapsulation of DA:HP-β-CD into microspheres resulted in a more slower release (k2=0.042±0.001; r(2)=0.996) when compared with DA-MS (k2=0.183±0.005; r(2)=0.996). The encapsulation of DA or DA:HP-β-CD into microspheres reduced the cytotoxicity of DA (IC50=43.29μM) against Vero cells (IC50 of DA-MS=108.48μM and IC50 of DA:HP-β-CD-MS=142.63μM).

  5. Molecular Rotors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Molecular Dipolar Rotors on Insulating Surfaces," Salamanca , Spain. Trends in Nanotechnology Conference. September 5-9, 2003 [86] Laura I. Clarke, Mary Beth...Horansky at the Trends in Nanotechnology Conference, Salamanca , Spain (September 5-9, 2003). [145] Michl, J. “Unusual Molecules: Artificial Surface...temperature and frequency for difluorophenylene rotor crystal. Figure JP6. Monte Carlo results for the local potential asymmetry at

  6. Molecular Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaud, V.; Bonneviot, L.

    Our senses of smell and taste are able to recognise molecules selectively, to the point where they can even discriminate between different chiral states. This property, called molecular recognition, is essential to all forms of life [1]. It is based on the principle of a specific interaction between a receptor or host and a target molecule, which will be identified among a multitude of others, then selectively adsorbed. If the host is endowed with reactive functions, the attached molecule may be transported or transformed. Enzymes are the archetypal host molecules exploiting the idea of molecular recognition. Their complexation sites comprise a hydrophobic pocket with definite shape within which amino acid residues are located in a precisely defined way. The combined effect of these different characteristics underlies not only the affinity for some specific substrate, but also the transformation of this substrate into the desired product [2]. In fact, the phenomena actually brought into play are much more involved, being made up of an ensemble of physicochemical events that act together in a cooperative way, either simultaneously or sequentially, and in which the molecular processes are difficult to follow in detail.

  7. Molecular Thermometry

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kevin M.; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients’ temperatures could be measured, recorded and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nano-scale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even sub-cellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers. PMID:20139796

  8. Purification, characterization and gene cloning of Da-36, a novel serine protease from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Ye, Feng-Ping; Wang, Jie; Liao, Guo-Yang; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Quan-Shui; Lee, Wen-Hui

    2013-06-01

    A serine protease termed Da-36 was isolated from crude venom of Deinagkistrodon acutus. The enzyme was a single chain protein with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 on SDS-PAGE with an isoelectric point of 6.59. Da-36 could clot human plasma by cleaving the Aα, Bβ and γ chains of fibrinogen and also exhibited arginine esterase activity. The proteolytic activity of Da-36 toward TAME was strongly inhibited by PMSF and moderately affected by benzamidine and aprotinin, indicating that it was a serine protease. Meanwhile, Da-36 showed stability with wide temperature (20-50 °C) and pH value ranges (pH 6-10). Divalent metal ions of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) had no effects but Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) inhibited the arginine esterase activity of Da-36. Total DNA was extracted directly from the lyophilized crude venom and the gene (5.5 kbp) coding for Da-36 had been successfully cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the Da-36 gene contained five exons and four introns. The mature Da-36 was encoded by four separate exons. The deduced mature amino acid sequence of Da-36 was in good agreement with the determined N-terminal sequence of the purified protein and shared high homology with other serine proteases isolated from different snake venoms. Blast search using amino acid sequence of Da-36 against public database revealed that Da-36 showed a maximal identity of 90% with both Dav-X (Swiss-Prot: Q9I8W9.1) and thrombin-like protein 1 (GenBank: AAW56608.1) from the same snake species, indicating that Da-36 is a novel serine protease.

  9. A 23-kDa protein as a substrate for protein kinase C in bovine neutrophils. Purification and partial characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stasia, M.J.; Dianoux, A.C.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1989-12-12

    In {sup 32}P{sub i}-loaded bovine neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), radioactivity was preferentially incorporated into a protein of low molecular mass, suggesting a PKC-dependent phosphorylation. This protein, termed 23-kDa protein, was predominantly localized in the cytosol. The apparent molecular mass of the purified protein range between 20 and 23 kDa. In the absence of mercaptoethanol, a dimer accumulated. Homogeneity of the 23-kDa protein was verified by 2D-PAGE analysis. Gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the purified 23-kDa protein followed by Coomassie blue staining allowed the visualization of our discrete protein bands with isoelectric points ranging between pH 6.3 and 6.7. Phosphorylation of the 23-kDa protein by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence of bovine neutrophil PKC supplemented with Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol or with PMA occurred on serine and required the presence of mercaptoethanol. IEF of the {sup 32}P-labeled 23-kDa protein followed by autoradiography revealed for discrete bands with distinct isoelectric points similar to those of the bands stained by Coomassie blue after IEF on nonlabeled 23-kDa protein. The bands of the 23-kDa protein resolved by IEF and transfered to nitrocellulose showed ability to bind ({sup 35}S)GTP-{gamma}-S. The immunoreactivity of antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine neutrophil 23-kDa protein was demonstrated on immunoblots after SDS-PAGE. The 23-kDa protein differed also from several other proteins of similar molecular mass that have been identified in neutrophils, namely, calmodulin, the small subunit of the low-potential cytochrome b, and a low molecular weight protein which is ADP-ribosylated by the botulinum toxin.

  10. Molecular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Mechanics (MM) force fields are the methods of choice for protein simulations, which are essential in the study of conformational flexibility. Given the importance of protein flexibility in drug binding, MM is involved in most if not all Computational Structure-Based Drug Discovery (CSBDD) projects. This section introduces the reader to the fundamentals of MM, with a special emphasis on how the target data used in the parametrization of force fields determine their strengths and weaknesses. Variations and recent developments such as polarizable force fields are discussed. The section ends with a brief overview of common force fields in CSBDD. PMID:23947650

  11. Probing the molecular determinants of fluorinase specificity.

    PubMed

    Yeo, W L; Chew, X; Smith, D J; Chan, K P; Sun, H; Zhao, H; Lim, Y H; Ang, E L

    2017-02-23

    Molecular determinants of FlA1 fluorinase specificity were probed using 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-ClDA) analogs as substrates and FlA1 active site mutants. Modifications at F213 or A279 residues are beneficial towards these modified substrates, including 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-2-ethynyladenosine, ClDEA (>10-fold activity improvement), and conferred novel activity towards substrates not readily accepted by wild-type FlA1.

  12. Molecular weight of guar gum affects short-chain fatty acid profile in model intestinal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Maria L; Slavin, Joanne L

    2006-10-01

    Dietary fiber exerts many beneficial physiological effects; however, not all types of dietary fiber display the same effects. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), a lower molecular weight form of guar gum, is more easily incorporated into food, but may have less pronounced physiological effects than the native form. The aim of this study was to identify differences in intestinal fermentability based on the molecular weight of guar gum. Guar gum of four molecular masses (15, 20, 400, and 1,100 kDa) was fermented using a batch in vitro fermentation system. Human fecal inoculum was the source of microbes. The 400-kDa fraction produced the greatest concentrations of total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) at 8 h and the highest amounts of butyrate at 24 h. At 24 h, the 400-kDa fraction produced more total SCFA and propionate than the 15 kDa, but was not different than 20 kDa or 1,100 kDa fractions. The molecular weight of guar gum was positively correlated with acetate production and negatively correlated with propionate production. This study concludes that 400-kDa guar gum may be optimal for intestinal fermentability. In conclusion, the molecular weight of guar gum affects in vitro fermentability and should be considered when adding to a food or beverage.

  13. WRS2 UPA DA Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-23

    ISS021-E-032275 (23 Nov. 2009) --- NASA astronaut Leland Melvin, STS-129 mission specialist, holds the failed Urine Processor Assembly / Distillation Assembly (UPA DA) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Atlantis remains docked with the station. Melvin and European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne (out of frame), Expedition 21 commander, removed and packed the UPA DA, then transferred it from the Water Recovery System 2 (WRS-2) rack to Atlantis for stowage on the middeck.

  14. Molecular paleontology.

    PubMed

    Marota, I; Rollo, F

    2002-01-01

    Molecular paleontology, i.e., the recovery of DNA from ancient human, animal, and plant remains is an innovative research field that has received progressively more attention from the scientific community since the 1980s. In the last decade, the field was punctuated by claims which aroused great interest but eventually turned out to be fakes--the most famous being the sequence of dinosaur DNA later shown to be of human origin. At present, the discipline is characterized by some certainties and many doubts. We know, for example, that we have reasonable chances to recover authentic DNA from a mammoth carcass, while our chances are negligible (or nonexistent) in the case of a dynastic mummy from Egypt. On the other hand, though we are developing convincing models of DNA decay in bone, we are not yet able to predict whether a certain paleontological or archeological site will yield material amenable to DNA analysis. This article reviews some of the most important and promising investigations using molecular paleontology approaches, such as studies on the conservation of DNA in human bone, the quest for ancient DNA in permafrost-frozen fauna, the Tyrolean iceman, and the Neandertals.

  15. Molecular spintronics.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The electron spin made its debut in the device world only two decades ago but today our ability of detecting the spin state of a moving electron underpins the entire magnetic data storage industry. This technological revolution has been driven by a constant improvement in our understanding on how spins can be injected, manipulated and detected in the solid state, a field which is collectively named Spintronics. Recently a number of pioneering experiments and theoretical works suggest that organic materials can offer similar and perhaps superior performances in making spin-devices than the more conventional inorganic metals and semiconductors. Furthermore they can pave the way for radically new device concepts. This is Molecular Spintronics, a blossoming research area aimed at exploring how the unique properties of the organic world can marry the requirements of spin-devices. Importantly, after a first phase, where most of the research was focussed on exporting the concepts of inorganic spintronics to organic materials, the field has moved to a more mature age, where the exploitation of the unique properties of molecules has begun to emerge. Molecular spintronics now collects a diverse and interdisciplinary community ranging from device physicists to synthetic chemists to surface scientists. In this critical review, I will survey this fascinating, rapidly evolving, field with a particular eye on new directions and opportunities. The main differences and challenges with respect to standard spintronics will be discussed and so will be the potential cross-fertilization with other fields (177 references).

  16. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Adam; Schlather, Andrea E; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Cui, Yao; McClain, Michael J; Stec, Grant J; García de Abajo, F Javier; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-09-09

    Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the mid- to far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in anthracene to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

  17. Molecular Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cunfeng; van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Jansen, Paul; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Wall, Thomas E.; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2016-12-01

    The resolution of any spectroscopic or interferometric experiment is ultimately limited by the total time a particle is interrogated. Here we demonstrate the first molecular fountain, a development which permits hitherto unattainably long interrogation times with molecules. In our experiments, ammonia molecules are decelerated and cooled using electric fields, launched upwards with a velocity between 1.4 and 1.9 m/s and observed as they fall back under gravity. A combination of quadrupole lenses and bunching elements is used to shape the beam such that it has a large position spread and a small velocity spread (corresponding to a transverse temperature of <10 μ K and a longitudinal temperature of <1 μ K ) when the molecules are in free fall, while being strongly focused at the detection region. The molecules are in free fall for up to 266 ms, making it possible, in principle, to perform sub-Hz measurements in molecular systems and paving the way for stringent tests of fundamental physics theories.

  18. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  19. Electrochemical sensor for dopamine based on a novel graphene-molecular imprinted polymers composite recognition element.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yan; Bao, Yu; Gan, Shiyu; Li, Fenghua; Niu, Li

    2011-10-15

    A novel composite of graphene sheets/Congo red-molecular imprinted polymers (GSCR-MIPs) was synthesized through free radical polymerization (FRP) and applied as a molecular recognition element to construct dopamine (DA) electrochemical sensor. The template molecules (DA) were firstly absorbed at the GSCR surface due to their excellent affinity, and subsequently, selective copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was further achieved at the GSCR surface. Potential scanning was presented to extract DA molecules from the imprinted polymers film, and as a result, DA could be rapidly and completely removed by this way. With regard to the traditional MIPs, the GSCR-MIPs not only possessed a faster desorption and adsorption dynamics, but also exhibited a higher selectivity and binding capacity toward DA molecule. As a consequence, an electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of DA was successfully constructed as demonstration based on the synthesized GSCR-MIPs nanocomposites. Under experimental conditions, selective detection of DA in a linear concentration range of 1.0 × 10(-7)-8.3 × 10(-4)M was obtained, which revealed a lower limit of detection and wider linear response compared to some previously reported DA electrochemical MIPs sensors. The new DA electrochemical sensor based on GSCR-MIPs composites also exhibited excellent repeatability, which expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) was about 2.50% for 30 repeated analyses of 20 μM DA.

  20. Molecular Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, Roger E.; Albrecht, Pierre; McDonald, Gene; Moldowan, J. Michael

    2008-03-01

    Life, as we know it, is based on carbon chemistry operating in an aqueous environment. Living organisms process chemicals, make copies of themselves, are autonomous and evolve in concert with the environment. All these characteristics are driven by, and operate through, carbon chemistry. The carbon chemistry of living systems is an exact branch of science and we have detailed knowledge of the basic metabolic and reproductive machinery of living organisms. We can recognise the residual biochemicals long after life has expired and otherwise lost most life-defining features. Carbon chemistry provides a tool for identifying extant and extinct life on Earth and, potentially, throughout the Universe. In recognizing that certain distinctive compounds isolable from living systems had related fossil derivatives, organic geochemists coined the term biological marker compound or biomarker (e.g. Eglinton et al. in Science 145:263-264, 1964) to describe them. In this terminology, biomarkers are metabolites or biochemicals by which we can identify particular kinds of living organisms as well as the molecular fossil derivatives by which we identify defunct counterparts. The terms biomarker and molecular biosignature are synonymous. A defining characteristic of terrestrial life is its metabolic versatility and adaptability and it is reasonable to expect that this is universal. Different physiologies operate for carbon acquisition, the garnering of energy and the storage and processing of information. As well as having a range of metabolisms, organisms build biomass suited to specific physical environments, habitats and their ecological imperatives. This overall ‘metabolic diversity’ manifests itself in an enormous variety of accompanying product molecules (i.e. natural products). The whole field of organic chemistry grew from their study and now provides tools to link metabolism (i.e. physiology) to the occurrence of biomarkers specific to, and diagnostic for, particular kinds

  1. Axonal patterns and targets of dA1 interneurons in the chick hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Ayelet; Hadas, Yoav; Klar, Avihu; Sela-Donenfeld, Dalit

    2012-04-25

    Hindbrain dorsal interneurons that comprise the rhombic lip relay sensory information and coordinate motor outputs. The progenitor dA1 subgroup of interneurons, which is formed along the dorsal-most region of the caudal rhombic lip, gives rise to the cochlear and precerebellar nuclei. These centers project sensory inputs toward upper-brain regions. The fundamental role of dA1 interneurons in the assembly and function of these brainstem nuclei is well characterized. However, the precise en route axonal patterns and synaptic targets of dA1 interneurons are not clear as of yet. Novel genetic tools were used to label dA1 neurons and trace their axonal trajectories and synaptic connections at various stages of chick embryos. Using dA1-specific enhancers, two contralateral ascending axonal projection patterns were identified; one derived from rhombomeres 6-7 that elongated in the dorsal funiculus, while the other originated from rhombomeres 2-5 and extended in the lateral funiculus. Targets of dA1 axons were followed at later stages using PiggyBac-mediated DNA transposition. dA1 axons were found to project and form synapses in the auditory nuclei and cerebellum. Investigation of mechanisms that regulate the patterns of dA1 axons revealed a fundamental role of Lim-homeodomain (HD) proteins. Switch in the expression of the specific dA1 Lim-HD proteins Lhx2/9 into Lhx1, which is typically expressed in dB1 interneurons, modified dA1 axonal patterns to project along the routes of dB1 subgroup. Together, the results of this research provided new tools and knowledge to the assembly of trajectories and connectivity of hindbrain dA1 interneurons and of molecular mechanisms that control these patterns.

  2. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    nanopillars, the immobilization of CYP2C9 enzymes to those nanopillars, and the utilization of the array to perform conductive probe atomic force microscopy experiments examining the electron transfer process of CYP2C9 in the absence and presence of substrate molecules. Part II. The Src protein has been known to play a role in cancer cell progression for over 30 years. The function of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase such as Src is to relay extracellular signals through intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation. As a tyrosine kinase, Src and the cellular signaling pathways it is involved in play many functional roles in the cell, both in cellular proliferation and in cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesion, motility and invasion. Two of the many proteins comprising Src cellular signaling pathways are actin filament associated protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and cortactin. AFAP-110 is a known activator of Src; one mechanism to abrogate the AFAP-110-induced activation of Src is to inhibit their colocalization within the cell. This colocalization is expected to occur when the pleckstrin homology (PH1 and PH2) domains of AFAP-110 are allowed to interact with membrane-bound phospholipids. Cortactin, on the other hand, is a cytosolic protein capable of being phosphorylated on various tyrosine residues, activating it and allowing it to interact with actin. The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src has been shown to be capable of interacting with cortactin, an association which will be probed here. This section of the dissertation will discuss the use of molecular modeling techniques to develop structural models of the AFAP-110 PH1 and PH2 domains and use them to make predictions about how the protein interacts with phospholipids in the plasma membrane and how they might be stabilized to interact with other proteins. Structural models were designed using homology modeling methods, docking programs were used to predict key residues of AFAP-110 involved in binding to phospholipids and mutational

  3. A novel 29-kDa chicken heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Einat, M F; Haberfeld, A; Shamay, A; Horev, G; Hurwitz, S; Yahav, S

    1996-12-01

    The family of small heat shock proteins is the more variable among the highly conserved superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSP). Using a metabolic labeling procedure with tissue explants, we have detected in chickens a new member of the small HSP family with an apparent molecular weight of 29-kDa. This protein was induced in broiler chickens' heart muscle and lungs following an in vivo heat stress. The 29-kDa band appears after 3 h of heat stress, much later than the induction of HSP 90, HSP 70, and HSP 27. The late onset of induction suggests that HSP 29 plays a more specific role of a "second stage defense protein".

  4. Myelin management by the 18.5-kDa and 21.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M

    2013-05-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP's protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  5. WRS2 UPA DA Removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-23

    ISS021-E-032273 (23 Nov. 2009) --- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 21 commander, holds the failed Urine Processor Assembly / Distillation Assembly (UPA DA) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while space shuttle Atlantis remains docked with the station. De Winne and NASA astronaut Leland Melvin (out of frame), STS-129 mission specialist, removed and packed the UPA DA, then transferred it from the Water Recovery System 2 (WRS-2) rack to Atlantis for stowage on the middeck.

  6. Expression of low molecular weight proteins in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, N; Abid, R; Qureshi, A W; Basheer, T

    2012-06-01

    The current study is conducted to observe the differences in the level of low molecular weight proteins in the sera of patients with leukaemia in comparison to healthy subjects (control group). The sera of patients with leukaemia showed 15 peaks in the densitometric curve in comparison to the seven peaks of the controls. The peaks in the experimental samples that coincide with those in the control were of 134.14, 113.15, 76.06, 63.25, 48.07, 22.85 and 16.47 kDa molecular weights, respectively. Most of the new peaks appeared between the proteins of molecular weight 36-29 kDa in the experimental groups. Mean density of the 134.14 kDa protein band showed an increase in the protein in experimental groups I and II only whereas 113.15 and 22.85 kDa protein were increased in all experimental groups of patients with leukaemia. The expression of 76.06 and 63.25 kDa protein fraction was downregulated in the patients with leukaemia. A decline in the level of the protein of 48.07 kDa was observed in patients with leukaemia except in group I. Unlike the other protein fractions, the level of the protein of 16.47 kDa was significantly (p < 0.05) increased with a maximum density in group II. Intergroup experimental) comparison revealed an increasing pattern of 95.44 and 89.21 kDa with maximum level in group III sera. However the protein fractions of 38.07 and 34.94 kDa varied in the serum with maximum density in Group IV Protein fractions of 32.92 and 31.24 kDa were expressed in all age groups of patients with leukaemia with a maximum density in group III whereas the percentage densities of 14.42 and 13.56 kDa protein were quite different. This preliminary study will provide a basis to study the role of different proteins in patients with leukaemia.

  7. da Vinci decoded: does da Vinci stereopsis rely on disparity?

    PubMed

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2012-11-01

    In conventional stereopsis, the depth between two objects is computed based on the retinal disparity in the position of matching points in the two eyes. When an object is occluded by another object in the scene, so that it is visible only in one eye, its retinal disparity cannot be computed. Nakayama and Shimojo (1990) found that a precept of quantitative depth between the two objects could still be established for such stimuli and proposed that this precept is based on the constraints imposed by occlusion geometry. They named this and other occlusion-based depth phenomena "da Vinci stereopsis." Subsequent research found quantitative depth based on occlusion geometry in several other classes of stimuli grouped under the term da Vinci stereopsis. However, Nakayama and Shimojo's findings were later brought into question by Gillam, Cook, and Blackburn (2003), who suggested that quantitative depth in their stimuli was perceived based on conventional disparity. In order to understand whether da Vinci stereopsis relies on one type of mechanism or whether its function is stimulus dependent we examine the nature and source of depth in the class of stimuli used by Nakayama and Shimojo (1990). We use three different psychophysical and computational methods to show that the most likely source for depth in these stimuli is occlusion geometry. Based on these experiments and previous data we discuss the potential mechanisms responsible for processing depth from monocular features in da Vinci stereopsis.

  8. Molecular Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    In organic molecules and molecular solids the weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions result in extremely long spin-lifetimes reaching up to the second mark. However the same are characterized by a generally poor mobility, so that the spin-diffusion lengths are rather short. These peculiar characteristics position organic molecules in a unique space within Spintronics and one should envision applications where the spins are manipulated close to where they are injected [1]. In this contribution I will review the current state of the art of the theory of spin-transport and manipulation in organic molecules. I will start the discussion by presenting a new mechanism, the electrostatic spin crossover effect, for manipulating electrically the magnetic state of a molecules without calling for current-driven spin-transfer torques [2]. This is based on the fact that the different spin states of a molecule Stark-shift differently and it is mostly effective when inversion symmetry is broken. Then I will move to discuss the consequences of such an effect on the transport properties of a molecule presenting two magnetic centers and demonstrate that there exist a critical voltage at which the current becomes temperature-independent [3]. Finally I will present results for spin-transport in Mn12 and demonstrate that the magnetic state of the molecule can be read electrically with a single I-V read-out obtained by using non-magnetic electrodes [4]. [4pt] [1] G. Szulczewski, S. Sanvito and J.M.D. Coey, Nature Materials 8, 693 (2009).[0pt] [2] N. Baadji, M. Piacenza, T. Tugsuz, F. Della Sala, G. Maruccio and S. Sanvito, Nature Materials 8, 813 (2009).[0pt] [3] S.K. Shukla and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B, in press; also at arXiv:0905.1607.[0pt] [4] C.D. Pemmaraju, I. Rungger and S. Sanvito, Phys. Rev. B 80, 104422 (2009).

  9. Characterization of low molecular weight fragments from gamma irradiated κ-carrageenan used as plant growth promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Lucille V.; Aurigue, Fernando B.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Montefalcon, Djowel Recto V.; Lopez, Girlie Eunice P.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation degraded κ-carrageenan (1% solution at absorbed doses of 20 kGy and 30 kGy) were tested for its plant growth promoter (PGP) effect on pechay plants under hydroponics condition. Results revealed that higher PGP effects were found in κ-carrageenan irradiated at an absorbed dose of 30 kGy. Mw of irradiated κ-carrageenan as measured by GPC were determined to be 7362 Da and 6762 Da for 20 kGy and 30 kGy, respectively. Fractionation of the irradiated κ-carrageenan (30 kGy) was done to separate different Mw fractions using Mw cut-off filters of 1 kDa, 3 kDa, and 5 kDa. The PGP effect of the different retentates showed that biological activity in plants followed the order of 5 kDa>3 kDa>1 kDa using hydroponics condition but the reverse was observed in the order of 1 kDa>3 kDa>5 kDa when absorbed in plants by foliar spraying. GPC chromatogram indicated at least three (3) low molecular weight (LMW) fragments from radiation modified κ-carrageenan solution with an Mw<2000 Da. A fragment has also been identified with an Mw of as low as 160 Da which was produced under acidic (un-neutralized) condition. This may be attributed to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF).

  10. Biliary excretion in dogs: evidence for a molecular weight threshold.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinning; Gandhi, Yash A; Morris, Marilyn E

    2010-04-16

    Molecular weight (MW) is known as an important factor of biliary excretion in rats, guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the biliary excretion and MW of drugs in dogs. Data on the percentage of dose excreted into bile as parent drug (PD(b)) in dogs were collected from the literature for 134 compounds. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was utilized to determine whether a MW threshold exists for PD(b). A MW threshold of 375-400 Da was established for anions in dogs, which is similar with the cutoff value observed in rats (400 Da) but lower than the one in humans (475 Da). No MW threshold was found for cations or cations/neutral compounds. A molecular volume threshold of 300A(3) was also determined for anions in dogs, which corresponds to a MW of 394 Da. In conclusion, our analysis suggested the presence of a MW cutoff for anions in dogs, which may be related with the molecular size of a compound. This represents the first report of the influence of MW or molecular volume as a determinant of biliary excretion for a structurally diverse set of compounds in dogs. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced-molecular-weight derivatives of frost grape polysaccharide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new Type II arabinogalactan was recently described as an abundant gum exudate from stems of wild frost grape (Vitus riparia Michx.). Native frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), with an estimated molecular weight of 1.6 ± 0.1 x 107 Da, was progressively and irreversibly modified by heat treatment to r...

  12. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  13. Nucleus-localized 21.5-kDa myelin basic protein promotes oligodendrocyte proliferation and enhances neurite outgrowth in coculture, unlike the plasma membrane-associated 18.5-kDa isoform.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham S T; Samborska, Bożena; Hawley, Steven P; Klaiman, Jordan M; Gillis, Todd E; Jones, Nina; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2013-03-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) family of central nervous system (CNS) myelin arises from transcription start site 3 of the Golli (gene of oligodendrocyte lineage) complex and comprises splice isoforms ranging in nominal molecular mass from 14 kDa to (full-length) 21.5 kDa. We have determined here a number of distinct functional differences between the major 18.5-kDa and minor 21.5-kDa isoforms of classic MBP with respect to oligodendrocyte (OLG) proliferation. We have found that, in contrast to 18.5-kDa MBP, 21.5-kDa MBP increases proliferation of early developmental immortalized N19-OLGs by elevating the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt1 kinases and of ribosomal protein S6. Coculture of N2a neuronal cells with N19-OLGs transfected with the 21.5-kDa isoform (or conditioned medium from), but not the 18.5-kDa isoform, caused the N2a cells to have increased neurite outgrowth and process branching complexity. These roles were dependent on subcellular localization of 21.5-kDa MBP to the nucleus and on the exon II-encoded segment, suggesting that the nuclear localization of early minor isoforms of MBP may play a crucial role in regulating and/or initiating myelin and neuronal development in the mammalian CNS.

  14. From "seahorse" to "molecular Recording"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong-Jun

    2002-08-01

    We will first present unique dendritic "seahorse" patterns observed when we study structural features in functional C60-TCNQ complex thin films, and their formation mechanism. Then we report a new process for ultrahigh density, erasable data storage, based on the molecular electrical bistability of an organic charge transfer complex, 3-nitrobenzal malononitrile and 1,4-phenylenediamine (NBMN-pDA). Switched by a voltage pulse from a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we demonstrate a data density exceeding 1013 bits/cm2. The experiment results and theoretical ab initio calculations show the writing and erasing mechanism to be a conductance transition of the organic compound due to a structural change from crystalline to noncrystalline. The ultimate bit density appears limited only by the size of the organic complex, less than 1 nm in our case, corresponding to 1014 bits/cm2.

  15. Leonardo da Vinci and the Downburst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    1990-05-01

    Evidence from the drawings, experiments, and writings of Leonardo da Vinci are presented to demonstrate that da Vinci recognized and, possibly, discovered the downburst and understood its associated airflow. Other early references to vortex flows resembling downbursts are mentioned.

  16. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  17. Molecular Heterogeneity of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons – Moving Toward Single Cell Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Anderegg, Angela; Poulin, Jean-Francois; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-01-01

    Since their discovery, midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons have been researched extensively, in part because of their diverse functions and involvement in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Over the last few decades, reports have emerged that midbrain DA neurons were not a homogeneous group, but that DA neurons located in distinct anatomical locations within the midbrain had distinctive properties in terms of physiology, function, and vulnerability. Accordingly, several studies focused on identifying heterogeneous gene expression across DA neuron clusters. Here we review the importance of understanding DA neuron heterogeneity at the molecular level, previous studies detailing heterogeneous gene expression in DA neurons, and finally recent work which brings together previous heterogeneous gene expression profiles in a coordinated manner, at single cell resolution. PMID:26505674

  18. Molecular heterogeneity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons--Moving toward single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, Angela; Poulin, Jean-Francois; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-12-21

    Since their discovery, midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons have been researched extensively, in part because of their diverse functions and involvement in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Over the last few decades, reports have emerged that midbrain DA neurons were not a homogeneous group, but that DA neurons located in distinct anatomical locations within the midbrain had distinctive properties in terms of physiology, function, and vulnerability. Accordingly, several studies focused on identifying heterogeneous gene expression across DA neuron clusters. Here we review the importance of understanding DA neuron heterogeneity at the molecular level, previous studies detailing heterogeneous gene expression in DA neurons, and finally recent work which brings together previous heterogeneous gene expression profiles in a coordinated manner, at single cell resolution. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Outflows: Observed Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Lane, Adair P.

    Introduction Molecular Outflow Characteristics Recent Developments EHV CO Outflows Luminosity Dependence of Flow Properties and Statistics Optical and Near-IR Observations of Molecular Outflows Outflow Models

  20. Average protein density is a molecular-weight-dependent function.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Hannes; Polikarpov, Igor; Craievich, Aldo F

    2004-10-01

    The mass density of proteins is a relevant basic biophysical quantity. It is also a useful input parameter, for example, for three-dimensional structure determination by protein crystallography and studies of protein oligomers in solution by analytic ultracentrifugation. We have performed a critical analysis of published, theoretical, and experimental investigations about this issue and concluded that the average density of proteins is not a constant as often assumed. For proteins with a molecular weight below 20 kDa, the average density exhibits a positive deviation that increases for decreasing molecular weight. A simple molecular-weight-depending function is proposed that provides a more accurate estimate of the average protein density.

  1. Effect of protein molecular weight on the mass transfer in protein mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asad, Ahmed; Chai, Chuan; Wu, JiangTao

    2012-03-01

    The mixing of protein solutions with that of precipitating agents is very important in protein crystallization experiments. In this work, the interferometry images were recorded during the mixing of two proteins with different molecular weights: lysozyme of ˜14.6 kDa, trypsin of ˜23.3 kDa and pepsin of ˜34.8 kDa were placed in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The protein molecular weight dependence on the competition of the transport process and kinetics at the interface was studied. The concentration profiles of protein solutions were calculated to analyze the mass transfer during the mixing process. It was observed that the mass transfer process is more efficient during the mixing of proteins with higher molecular weights. In addition, the more rapid concentration changes above the interface suggest that convection may dominate the diffusion. The phenomenon of convection is higher in the protein solutions with higher molecular weight.

  2. High Molecular Weight Isoforms of Growth Hormone In Cells of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Weigent, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of research exists to support the idea that cells of the immune system produce growth hormone (GH). However, the structure and mechanism of action of lymphocyte-derived GH continues to remain largely unknown. Here we present the results of Western analysis of whole cell extracts showing that different molecular weight isoforms of GH of approximately 100 kDa, 65 kDa, and 48 kDa can be detected in primary mouse cells of the immune system and in the mouse EL4 cell line. The identity of the 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms of GH were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The various isoforms were detected in both enriched T and B spleen cell populations. The large molecular weight isoform appears to reside primarily in the cytoplasm whereas the lower molecular weight 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms were detected primarily in the nucleus. These results also suggest that GH isoforms are induced by oxidative stress. In EL4 cells overexpressing GH, the expression of luciferase controlled by a promoter containing the antioxidant response element is increased almost three-fold above control. The data suggest that the induction of isoforms of the GH molecule in cells of the immune system may be an important mechanism of adaptation and/or protection of lymphoid cells under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:21741628

  3. Molecular determinants of selective dopaminergic vulnerability in Parkinson’s disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Brichta, Lars; Greengard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Numerous disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are attributed to the selective death of distinct neuronal cell populations. Interestingly, in many of these conditions, a specific subset of neurons is extremely prone to degeneration while other, very similar neurons are less affected or even spared for many years. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), the motor manifestations are primarily linked to the selective, progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). In contrast, the very similar DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) demonstrate a much lower degree of degeneration. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of differential DA vulnerability in PD has proven extremely challenging. Moreover, an increasing number of studies demonstrate that considerable molecular and electrophysiologic heterogeneity exists among the DA neurons within the SNpc as well as those within the VTA, adding yet another layer of complexity to the selective DA vulnerability observed in PD. The discovery of key pathways that regulate this differential susceptibility of DA neurons to degeneration holds great potential for the discovery of novel drug targets and the development of promising neuroprotective treatment strategies. This review provides an update on the molecular basis of the differential vulnerability of midbrain DA neurons in PD and highlights the most recent developments in this field. PMID:25565977

  4. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Cho, Hoonsung; Kuruppu, Darshini; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Agarwal, Aayush; Shah, Khalid; Josephson, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR) tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT) injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding) and RAD (control) probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111) In(3+)), a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111)In] RGD and [(111)In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111)In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.). The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide), which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters) for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  5. Morphogenetic Studies of the Drosophila DA1 Ventral Olfactory Projection Neuron.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hung-Chang; Wei, Jia-Yi; Chu, Sao-Yu; Chung, Pei-Chi; Hsu, Tsai-Chi; Yu, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In the Drosophila olfactory system, odorant information is sensed by olfactory sensory neurons and relayed from the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), to higher olfactory centers via olfactory projection neurons (PNs). A major portion of the AL is constituted with dendrites of four groups of PNs, anterodorsal PNs (adPNs), lateral PNs (lPNs), lateroventral PNs (lvPNs) and ventral PNs (vPNs). Previous studies have been focused on the development and function of adPNs and lPNs, while the investigation on those of lvPNs and vPNs received less attention. Here, we study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of a putative male-pheromone responding vPN, the DA1 vPN. Using an intersection strategy to remove background neurons labeled within a DA1 vPN-containing GAL4 line, we depicted morphological changes of the DA1 vPN that occurs at the pupal stage. We then conducted a pilot screen using RNA interference knock-down approach to identify cell surface molecules, including Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 and Semaphorin-1a, that might play essential roles for the DA1 vPN morphogenesis. Taken together, by revealing molecular and cellular basis of the DA1 vPN morphogenesis, we should provide insights into future comprehension of how vPNs are assembled into the olfactory neural circuitry.

  6. Morphogenetic Studies of the Drosophila DA1 Ventral Olfactory Projection Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In the Drosophila olfactory system, odorant information is sensed by olfactory sensory neurons and relayed from the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), to higher olfactory centers via olfactory projection neurons (PNs). A major portion of the AL is constituted with dendrites of four groups of PNs, anterodorsal PNs (adPNs), lateral PNs (lPNs), lateroventral PNs (lvPNs) and ventral PNs (vPNs). Previous studies have been focused on the development and function of adPNs and lPNs, while the investigation on those of lvPNs and vPNs received less attention. Here, we study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of a putative male-pheromone responding vPN, the DA1 vPN. Using an intersection strategy to remove background neurons labeled within a DA1 vPN-containing GAL4 line, we depicted morphological changes of the DA1 vPN that occurs at the pupal stage. We then conducted a pilot screen using RNA interference knock-down approach to identify cell surface molecules, including Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 and Semaphorin-1a, that might play essential roles for the DA1 vPN morphogenesis. Taken together, by revealing molecular and cellular basis of the DA1 vPN morphogenesis, we should provide insights into future comprehension of how vPNs are assembled into the olfactory neural circuitry. PMID:27163287

  7. The Ubiquitin Receptor DA1 Regulates Seed and Organ Size by Modulating the Stability of the Ubiquitin-Specific Protease UBP15/SOD2 in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liang; Li, Na; Chen, Liangliang; Xu, Yingxiu; Li, Yu; Zhang, Yueying; Li, Chuanyou; Li, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    Although the control of organ size is a fundamental question in developmental biology, little is known about the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine the final size of seeds in plants. We previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 acts synergistically with the E3 ubiquitin ligases DA2 and ENHANCER1 OF DA1 (EOD1)/BIG BROTHER to restrict seed growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe UBIQUITIN-SPECIFIC PROTEASE15 (UBP15), encoded by SUPPRESSOR2 OF DA1 (SOD2), which acts maternally to regulate seed size by promoting cell proliferation in the integuments of ovules and developing seeds. The sod2/ubp15 mutants form small seeds, while overexpression of UBP15 increases seed size of wild-type plants. Genetic analyses indicate that UBP15 functions antagonistically in a common pathway with DA1 to influence seed size, but does so independently of DA2 and EOD1. Further results reveal that DA1 physically associates with UBP15 in vitro and in vivo and modulates the stability of UBP15. Therefore, our findings establish a genetic and molecular framework for the regulation of seed size by four ubiquitin-related proteins DA1, DA2, EOD1, and UBP15 and suggest that they are promising targets for increasing seed size in crops. PMID:24585836

  8. Biodegradability enhancement and detoxification of cork processing wastewater molecular size fractions by ozone.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diana C; Silva, Lúcia; Albuquerque, António; Simões, Rogério; Gomes, Arlindo C

    2013-11-01

    Cork boiling wastewater pollutants were fractionated by sequential use of four ultrafiltration membranes and five fractions were obtained: four retentates (>100, 50-100, 20-50 and 10-20 kDa) and one permeate (<10 kDa); which were used to study the correlation of molecular size with biodegradability and toxicity before and after ozonation. The results show that molecular size is correlated with organic load and restrains biodegradability. The fraction with >100 kDa corresponds to 56% of the organic load and the one with <10 kDa only 8%. The biodegradability of fractions increased 182% with fractions molecular size reduction from >100 to <10 kDa and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was from 3436 to 386 mg L(-1). For biodegradability enhancement the best outcome of ozonation was obtained with compounds having molecular size >20 kDa and range from 5% up to 175% for applied ozone doses to COD ratios between 0.15 and 0.38.

  9. Are molecular weights of proteins determined by superose 12 column chromatography correct?

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Whitaker, John R

    2004-08-11

    Our research on several proteins indicates that accurate molecular weights cannot be determined by Superose 12 column chromatography. In support of this statement, we present data on molecular weights of purified red kidney bean alpha-amylase inhibitor (RKB alphaAI) and white kidney bean alpha-amylase inhibitor (WKB alphaAI) to document this problem. The molecular weight of purified RKB alphaAI determined by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Superose 12 gel filtration and cDNA were 49.0, 51.0, 22.9, and 49.805 kDa (not glycosylated), respectively. The molecular weights of WKB alphaAI by several methods were as follows: Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, 51.0 kDa; Superose 12 gel filtration in 0.2 M NaCl buffer, 23.1 kDa; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), 51.0 kDa; sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), 45.0 kDa; multiangle laser light scattering (MALLS), 49.940 kDa; laser-assisted time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LATOFMS), 56.714 kDa; and cDNA sequence (with 12.2% carbohydrate), 55.9 kDa. The data indicate there is ionic interaction between proteins and the matrix of Superose 12 in low ionic strength buffers and hydrophobic interaction at higher ionic strength buffers. Researchers should be cautious when using Superose 12 columns for molecular weight determinations.

  10. The major histocompatibility complex genes impact pain response in DA and DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Li, Li; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xie, Wen; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the difference in basal pain sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation between Dark-Agouti (DA) rats and a novel congenic DA.1U rats is major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes dependent. In the present study, we further used DA and DA.1U rats to investigate the role of MHC genes in formalin-induced pain model by behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. Behavioral results showed biphasic nociceptive behaviors increased significantly following the intraplantar injection of formalin in the hindpaw of DA and DA.1U rats. The main nociceptive behaviors were lifting and licking, especially in DA rats (P<0.001 and P<0.01). The composite pain scores (CPS) in DA rats were significantly higher than those in DA.1U rats in both phases of the formalin test (P<0.01). Electrophysiological results also showed the biphasic increase in discharge rates of C and Aδ fibers of L5 dorsal root in the two strains, and the net change of the discharge rate of DA rats was significantly higher than that of DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The mechanical thresholds decreased after formalin injection in both strains (P<0.01), and the net change in the mechanical threshold in DA was greater than that in DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The expression of RT1-B, representation of MHC class II molecule, in laminae I-II of L4/5 spinal cord in DA rats was significantly higher than that in DA.1U rats in the respective experimental group (P<0.05). These results suggested that both DA and DA.1U rats exhibited nociceptive responses in formalin-induced pain model and DA rats were more sensitive to noxious chemical stimulus than DA.1U rats, indicating that MHC genes might contribute to the difference in pain sensitivity.

  11. Evaluation of high-molecular weight adiponectin in horses.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Anne A; Edwards, Heather Gray; Plaisance, Eric P; Applegate, Rory; Taylor, Debra R; Taintor, Jennifer; Zhong, Qiao; Judd, Robert L

    2012-08-01

    To characterize adiponectin protein complexes in lean and obese horses. 26 lean horses and 18 obese horses. Procedures-Body condition score (BCS) and serum insulin activity were measured for each horse. Denaturing and native western blot analyses were used to evaluate adiponectin complexes in serum. A human ELISA kit was validated and used to quantify high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes. Correlations between variables were made, and HMW values were compared between groups. Adiponectin was present as a multimer consisting of HMW (> 720-kDa), low-molecular weight (180-kDa), and trimeric (90-kDa) complexes in serum. All complexes were qualitatively reduced in obese horses versus lean horses, but the percentage of complexes < 250 kDa was higher in obese versus lean horses. High-molecular weight adiponectin concentration measured via ELISA was negatively correlated with serum insulin activity and BCS and was lower in obese horses (mean ± SD, 3.6 ± 3.9 μg/mL), compared with lean horses (8.0 ± 4.6 μg/mL). HMW adiponectin is measurable via ELISA, and concentration is negatively correlated with BCS and serum insulin activity in horses. A greater understanding of the role of adiponectin in equine metabolism will provide insight into the pathophysiology of metabolic disease conditions.

  12. On molecular graph comparison.

    PubMed

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  13. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  14. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  15. Purification and partial characterization of a 31-kDa cysteine endopeptidase from germinated barley.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Jones, B L

    1996-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes hydrolyze cereal seed storage proteins into small peptides and amino acids, which are very important for seed germination and the malting process. A cysteine-class endopeptidase was purified from 4-d-germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Morex). Four purification steps were used, carboxymethyl cellulose cation-exchange chromatography, chromatofocusing, size-exclusion chromatography, and electroelution from a polyacrylamide gel. The endopeptidase was most active at pH 4.5. It's isoelectric point (pI) was 4.4, as determined by isoelectric focusing, and it's SDS-PAGE molecular size was 31 kDa. The enzyme specifically hydrolyzed peptide bonds when the S2 site contained relatively large hydrophobic amino acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence residues (1-9) of the 31-kDa endopeptidase had high homology to those of the EP-A and EP-B cysteine proteinases reported previously. The 31-kDa endopeptidase had a hydrolytic specificity similar to that of the Morex green malt 30-kDa endopeptidase we characterized previously, and also reacted with the antibody raised against the purified 30-kDa proteinase, but the two had different mobilities on non-denaturing PAGE. The hydrolytic specificities of both 30- and 31-kDa endopeptidases are such that both would very quickly cleave hordein (barley storage) proteins to small glutamine- and proline-rich peptides that could be quickly degraded to amino acids by barley exopeptidases.

  16. DaPKC-dependent phosphorylation of Crumbs is required for epithelial cell polarity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sotillos, Sol; Díaz-Meco, María Teresa; Caminero, Eva; Moscat, Jorge; Campuzano, Sonsoles

    2004-01-01

    Both in Drosophila and vertebrate epithelial cells, the establishment of apicobasal polarity requires the apically localized, membrane-associated Par-3–Par-6–aPKC protein complex. In Drosophila, this complex colocalizes with the Crumbs–Stardust (Sdt)–Pals1-associated TJ protein (Patj) complex. Genetic and molecular analyses suggest a functional relationship between them. We show, by overexpression of a kinase-dead Drosophila atypical PKC (DaPKC), the requirement for the kinase activity of DaPKC to maintain the position of apical determinants and to restrict the localization of basolateral ones. We demonstrate a novel physical interaction between the apical complexes, via direct binding of DaPKC to both Crb and Patj, and identify Crumbs as a phosphorylation target of DaPKC. This phosphorylation of Crumbs is functionally significant. Thus, a nonphosphorylatable Crumbs protein behaves in vivo as a dominant negative. Moreover, the phenotypic effect of overexpressing wild-type Crumbs is suppressed by reducing DaPKC activity. These results provide a mechanistic framework for the functional interaction between the Par-3–Par-6–aPKC and Crumbs–Sdt–Patj complexes based in the posttranslational modification of Crb by DaPKC. PMID:15302858

  17. Authentication of official Da-huang by sequencing and multiplex allele-specific PCR of a short maturase K gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guojie; Wang, Xueyong; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Weidong; Wei, Shengli; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoli; Liu, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Rhubarb (official Da-huang) is an important medicinal herb in Asia. Many adulterants of official Da-huang have been discovered in Chinese markets in recent years, which has resulted in adverse effects in medicinal treatment. Here, novel molecular markers based on a short maturase K (matK) gene were developed for authenticating official Da-huang. This study showed that all the species from official Da-huang were clustered together in one clade in the polygenetic trees based on short matK. Two highly conserved single nucleotide polymorphisms of short matK were mined in the species from official Da-huang. Based on these polymophisms, four improved specific primers of official Da-huang were successfully developed that generated reproducible specific bands. These results suggest that the short matK sequence can be considered as a favorable candidate for distinguishing official Da-huang from its adulterants. The established multiplex allele-specific PCR was determined to be simple and accurate and may serve as a preferable tool for authentication of official Da-huang. In addition, we suggest that short-sized specific bands be developed to authenticate materials used in traditional Chinese medicine.

  18. Determination of Hyaluronan Molecular Mass Distribution in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; De La Motte, Carol A.; Cowman, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection, via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size-specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from twenty unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employingion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size, and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive Enzyme Linked Sorbent Assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M ≤ 20 kDa, M ≈20-60 kDa, and M ≈ 60-110 kDa comprised an average of 1.5%, 1.4% and 2% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M≥110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from thirteen samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of ∼440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low M HA components. PMID:25579786

  19. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-05

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  20. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  1. Identification of the High Molecular Weight Isoform of Phostensin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shan; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Wei-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Phostensin is encoded by KIAA1949. 5′-RACEanalysis has been used to identify the translation start site of phostensin mRNA, indicating that it encodes 165 amino acids with an apparent molecular weight of 26 kDa on SDS-PAGE. This low-molecular-weight phostensin is present in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and many leukemic cell lines. Phostensin is a protein phosphatase-1(PP1) binding protein. It also contains one actin-binding motif at its C-terminal region and binds to the pointed ends of actin filaments, modulating actin dynamics. In the current study, a high-molecular-weight phostensin is identified by using immunoprecipitationin combination with a proteomic approach. This new species of phostensin is also encoded by KIAA1949 and consists of 613 amino acids with an apparent molecular weight of 110 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight phostensins were named as phostensin-α and phostensin-β, respectively. Although phostensin-α is the C-terminal region of phostensin-β, it is not degraded from phostensin-β. Phostensin-β is capable of associating with PP1 and actin filaments, and is present in many cell lines. PMID:24434620

  2. Identification of the high molecular weight isoform of phostensin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Shan; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Wei-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Phostensin is encoded by KIAA1949. 5'-RACEanalysis has been used to identify the translation start site of phostensin mRNA, indicating that it encodes 165 amino acids with an apparent molecular weight of 26 kDa on SDS-PAGE. This low-molecular-weight phostensin is present in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and many leukemic cell lines. Phostensin is a protein phosphatase-1(PP1) binding protein. It also contains one actin-binding motif at its C-terminal region and binds to the pointed ends of actin filaments, modulating actin dynamics. In the current study, a high-molecular-weight phostensin is identified by using immunoprecipitationin combination with a proteomic approach. This new species of phostensin is also encoded by KIAA1949 and consists of 613 amino acids with an apparent molecular weight of 110 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight phostensins were named as phostensin-α and phostensin-β, respectively. Although phostensin-α is the C-terminal region of phostensin-β, it is not degraded from phostensin-β. Phostensin-β is capable of associating with PP1 and actin filaments, and is present in many cell lines.

  3. Pancreastatin molecular forms in normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, N; Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Shimazoe, T; Kono, A; Iwamoto, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1994-01-01

    Circulating molecular forms with pancreastatin (PST)-like immunoreactivity in plasma from normal subjects were examined. An immunoreactive form corresponding to a human PST-like sequence [human chromogranin-A-(250-301)] (hPST-52) and a larger form (mol wt 15-21 kDa) were detected by gel filtration of plasma from normal subjects. On high performance liquid chromatography, predominant immunoreactive forms coeluted with the three larger forms which were purified from the xenograft of human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line QGP-1N cells and with synthetic hPST-52. The fraction containing larger forms purified from xenograft of QGP-1N cells had biological activity equivalent to that of hPST-52 on the inhibition of pancreatic exocrine secretion. These results suggest that the larger molecular forms as well as hPST-52 may be physiologically important circulating forms of PST in human.

  4. Fluorescent properties of low-molecular-weight fractions from chernozem humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubetskoi, O. A.; Demin, D. V.; Trubetskaya, O. E.

    2013-10-01

    The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of chernozem humic acids (HAs) followed by ultraviolet detection (λ = 312 nm) has revealed a new highly fluorescent fraction that has the highest electrophoretic mobility and the lowest nominal molecular weight (NMW). The preparative isolation of the fraction has been performed using the multiple microfiltration of the same HA sample in a 7 M carbamide solution on a membrane with a nominal pore size of 5 kDa. Thirty ultrafiltrates with NMW < 5 kDa and different fluorescence maximums in the region of 475-505 nm have been prepared, as well as a nonfluorescent concentrate with NMW > 5 kDa. Fluorescence maximums at and below 490 nm have been noted only in the first four ultrafiltrates. All the ultrafiltrates have been combined into the fraction with NMW < 5 kDa, which has been successively passed through membranes of 3 and 1 kDa. Solutions of subfractions F 3-5 kDa, F 1-3 kDa, and F < 1 kDa with fluorescence maximums at 505, 488, and 465 nm, respectively, have been prepared. The F < 1 kDa subfraction with the lowest NMW had the highest fluorescence intensity. The distribution of the fluorescence maximums in the ultrafiltrates has indicated the presence of at least two groups of fluorophores and has confirmed the supramolecular organization of the extracted soil HAs.

  5. Isolation and molecular cloning of a secreted immunosuppressant protein from Dermacentor andersoni salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Bergman, D K; Palmer, M J; Caimano, M J; Radolf, J D; Wikel, S K

    2000-06-01

    A 36-kDa immunosuppressant protein (Da-p36) was isolated from salivary glands of feeding female ixodid ticks Dermacentor andersoni, using its affinity for UltraLink Biosupport Medium (Pierce, Rockford, Illinois)/protein complexes. Using a nested set of forward degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to Da-p36 N-terminal amino acids, a cDNA encoding the immunosuppressant protein was isolated by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The resulting 772-base pair cDNA encodes a novel protein with predicted molecular weight of 24.9 kDa. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 5 potential glycosylation sites and 1 myristylation site. Immunoblot analyses showed native Da-p36 is present in salivary glands and saliva from both male and female D. andersoni but not in salivary glands or saliva from Amblyomma americanum or Ixodes scapularis. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that Da-p36 expression is temporally regulated in salivary glands with maximum mRNA levels preceding maximum Da-p36 accumulation that occurred at day 6 of feeding. The levels of Da-p36 mRNA and protein were greatly reduced in salivary glands from near-replete females removed from sheep after 8 days of feeding. These data are consistent with a role of Da-p36 in immunosuppression during feeding.

  6. Descriptive Morphology Terms For MAMA software

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-21

    The table on the following pages lists a set of morphology terms for describing materials. We have organized these terms by categories. Software uses are welcome to suggest other terms that are needed to accurately describe materials. This list is intended as a initial starting point to generating a consensus terminology list.

  7. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  8. "Mama" and "Papa" in Child Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruke-Dravina, Velta

    1976-01-01

    This case study of two Latvian children attempts to show how the parental terms for"mummy" and "daddy" in Latvian are acquired, paying particular attention to the changing relationship between the input and output forms during the acquisition process. (Author/RM)

  9. "Mama" and "Papa" in Child Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruke-Dravina, Velta

    1976-01-01

    This case study of two Latvian children attempts to show how the parental terms for"mummy" and "daddy" in Latvian are acquired, paying particular attention to the changing relationship between the input and output forms during the acquisition process. (Author/RM)

  10. "Mama Talking to Papa Under the Tree."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchue, Leah Gaskin

    Among blacks of low socioeconomic status, mothers have a particularly important role to play in determining the academic paths of their children in public schools. In research conducted by Dr. Virginia Shipman, key indices for minority student academic achievement have been shown to be (1) the extent of maternal encouragement and involvement with…

  11. "Mama Talking to Papa Under the Tree."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchue, Leah Gaskin

    Among blacks of low socioeconomic status, mothers have a particularly important role to play in determining the academic paths of their children in public schools. In research conducted by Dr. Virginia Shipman, key indices for minority student academic achievement have been shown to be (1) the extent of maternal encouragement and involvement with…

  12. STIS-23 FUV MAMA Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will measure the FUV spectroscopic PSF along the length of a long slit. It will do this by observing a point source with the 52X0.1 aperture and the G140L grating, using a seven-point centered perpendicular-to-slit LINE pattern with 0.1 arcsec spacing to measure centering of the target. This seven-point pattern will be done at two different positions along the length of the aperture, the repeller offset aperture position {three arcseconds below repeller wire} and the D1 position, which is located at a position of low FUV dark current 2 arcseconds from the bottom edge. A single exposure at nominal position will also be taken through the photometric 52X2 aperture to provide a reference for estimating the small slit throughput. February 2009 update: Added two targets and visits for GD153 and GD71 as guidestar problem for GRW+70 for a May 2009 servicing mission. All visits have been modified to include an ACQ/PEAK before each scan across the aperture. Note the second scan across nominal center has an ACQ/PEAK just before the end of orbit 1, so there may be a mis-alignment between scan 1 and scan 2 due to thermal alignment drift during earth occultation.

  13. The Phonetics of "Cat" and "Mama."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labov, William; Labov, Teresa

    1978-01-01

    A detailed analysis of a six-month period in a child's acquisition of phonetic and phonological capacities indicates that the apparent plateau of the second year is a site of intensive language learning, which is not reflected in the growth of vocabulary or mean length of utterance. (Author/EJS)

  14. STIS MAMA Dispersion SolutionsMonitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, Paule

    2013-10-01

    Internal wavecals will be obtained at primary and secondary central wavelengths chosen to cover Cycle 21 use. There is also overlap with choices of configurations used with previous calibration programs which will enable long-term monitoring. This program uses the LINE lamp for a total of approximately 1.5 hours, typically at a lamp current of 10 mA.

  15. Molecular genetic survey of European mistletoe (Viscum album) subspecies with allele-specific and dCAPS type markers specific for chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Stefanowicz, Justyna; ŁUczkiewicz, Maria

    2003-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative content of mistletoe metabolites, and bioactivity of extracts is related to the subspecies of Viscum album L. These were indicated to be genetically distinct and host specific. We aimed to check (i) whether the specificity is strict and (ii) how frequently hybridization occurs among the subspecies. We designed two sets of allele-specific and dCAPS molecular genetic markers that would facilitate identification of Viscum album L. subspecies and their hybrid derivatives on the basis of chloroplast trnH(GUG)- trnK(UUU) and nuclear rDNA ITS1&2 sequences. Out of 118 plants surveyed, 103 displayed characteristics that confirmed strict host specificity of the subspecies, in addition, the results were compliant between nuclear and chloroplast markers showing no indication of hybridization among subspecies. From 15 samples that showed deviations from this model 13 came from the Mediterranean Sea basin, and only two originated from Central and Western Europe. Abbreviations. dCAPS:derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence ITS1&2:Internal Transcribed Spacers 1&2 MAMA:Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay

  16. Molecular Research in Aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular research and biotechnology have long been fields of study with applications useful to aquaculture and other animal sciences. Molecular Research in Aquaculture looks to provide an understanding of molecular research and its applications to the aquaculture industry in a format that allows in...

  17. Fluorescence imaging of macromolecule transport in high molecular weight cut-off microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiangtao; Koudriavtsev, Vitali; Hjort, Klas; Dahlin, Andreas P

    2014-11-01

    When microdialysis (MD) membrane exceeds molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 100 kDa, the fluid mechanics are in the ultrafiltration regime. Consequently, fluidic mass transport of macromolecules in the perfusate over the membrane may reduce the biological relevance of the sampling and cause an inflammatory response in the test subject. Therefore, a method to investigate the molecular transport of high MWCO MD is presented. An in vitro test chamber was fabricated to facilitate the fluorescent imaging of the MD sampling process, using fluoresceinylisothiocyanate (FITC) dextran and fluorescence microscopy. Qualitative studies on dextran behavior inside and outside the membrane were performed. Semiquantitative results showed clear dextran leakage from both 40 and 250 kDa dextran when 100 kDa MWCO membranes were used. Dextran 40 kDa leaked out with an order of magnitude higher concentration and the leakage pattern resembled more of a convective flow pattern compared with dextran 250 kDa, where the leakage pattern was more diffusion based. No leakage was observed when dextran 500 kDa was used as a colloid osmotic agent. The results in this study suggest that fluorescence imaging could be used as a method for qualitative and semiquantitative molecular transport and fluid dynamics studies of MD membranes and other hollow fiber catheter membranes.

  18. Molecular weight of polydisperse icodextrin effects its oncotic contribution to water transport.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kohei; Kamiya, Yohei; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Nomura, Shinsuke; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Icodextrin, a mixture of polysaccharides of alpha-(1 --> 4) polyglucopyranose having 10% branched chains, is clinically available as a D-glucose substitute for peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to the high intraperitoneal retention time of this glucose polymer (GP), water transport from the vessels to the peritoneal cavity is prolonged even in PD patients with high peritoneal permeability. The purpose of this study was to elucidate why 7.5% icodextrin solution has such a broad distribution of molecular weights. A gel permeation chromatography study indicated that the average molecular weight was about 18.0 kDa in terms of number average (Mn) and 31.3 kDa in terms of weight average (Mw), respectively, resulting in a polydispersity index (Mn/Mw) of 1.74. Five fractions of GP having Mn values of 41.3, 19.3, 8.3, 3.8, and 2.1 kDa, respectively, produced 0.24, 0.49, 0.50, 0.08, and 0.03 mOsmol/kg H2O of colloid osmotic pressure. Water transport through a membrane having a molecular cutoff of 15 kDa was simulated using the mass transfer coefficient and reflection coefficient for each fraction. Fractions with Mn values of 19.3 and 8.3 kDa contributed to water transport dominantly (approximately 76%), while only 18%, 5%, and 3% of total water removal was contributed by fractions with Mn values of 41.3, 3.8 and 2.1 kDa, respectively. As a result of enzymatic degradation for 10 h by 2, 10, or 20 U/l alpha-amylase, a decrease in the high molecular weight zone (40-60 kDa) and a rise in the low molecular weight zone (1-2 kDa) were seen with few change in the distribution profile between 4 and 30 kDa. These results suggested that fractions in the molecular range between 8.3 and 19.3 kDa, where the distribution profile was less influenced by enzymatic degradation, preferably contributed to water transport.

  19. Deconstructing honeybee vitellogenin: novel 40 kDa fragment assigned to its N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Halskau, Øyvind; Skjaerven, Lars; Smedal, Bente; Amdam, Gro V.

    2011-01-01

    Vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein precursor common to oviparous animals, is found abundantly in honeybee workers – a caste of helpers that do not usually lay eggs. Instead, honeybee vitellogenin (180 kDa) participates in processes other than reproduction: it influences hormone signaling, food-related behavior, immunity, stress resistance and longevity. The molecular basis of these functions is largely unknown. Here, we establish and compare the molecular properties of vitellogenin from honeybee hemolymph (blood) and abdominal fat body, two compartments that are linked to vitellogenin functions. Our results reveal a novel 40 kDa vitellogenin fragment in abdominal fat body tissue, the main site for vitellogenin synthesis and storage. Using MALDI-TOF combined with MS/MS mass-spectroscopy, we assign the 40 kDa fragment to the N terminus of vitellogenin, whereas a previously observed 150 kDa fragment corresponded to the remainder of the protein. We show that both protein units are N glycosylated and phosphorylated. Focusing on the novel 40 kDa fragment, we present a homology model based on the structure of lamprey lipovitellin that includes a conserved β-barrel-like shape, with a lipophilic cavity in the interior and two insect-specific loops that have not been described before. Our data indicate that the honeybee fat body vitellogenin experiences cleavage unlike hemolymph vitellogenin, a pattern that can suggest a tissue-specific role. Our experiments advance the molecular understanding of vitellogenin, of which the multiple physiological and behavioral effects in honeybees are well established. PMID:21270306

  20. Myelin management by the 18.5–kDa and 21.5–kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP’s protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:23398367

  1. Autocorrelation descriptor improvements for QSAR: 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwoski, Gregory; Mendenhall, Jeffrey; Meiler, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is a branch of computer aided drug discovery that relates chemical structures to biological activity. Two well established and related QSAR descriptors are two- and three-dimensional autocorrelation (2DA and 3DA). These descriptors encode the relative position of atoms or atom properties by calculating the separation between atom pairs in terms of number of bonds (2DA) or Euclidean distance (3DA). The sums of all values computed for a given small molecule are collected in a histogram. Atom properties can be added with a coefficient that is the product of atom properties for each pair. This procedure can lead to information loss when signed atom properties are considered such as partial charge. For example, the product of two positive charges is indistinguishable from the product of two equivalent negative charges. In this paper, we present variations of 2DA and 3DA called 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign that avoid information loss by splitting unique sign pairs into individual histograms. We evaluate these variations with models trained on nine datasets spanning a range of drug target classes. Both 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign significantly increase model performance across all datasets when compared with traditional 2DA and 3DA. Lastly, we find that limiting 3DA_Sign to maximum atom pair distances of 6 Å instead of 12 Å further increases model performance, suggesting that conformational flexibility may hinder performance with longer 3DA descriptors. Consistent with this finding, limiting the number of bonds in 2DA_Sign from 11 to 5 fails to improve performance.

  2. Autocorrelation descriptor improvements for QSAR: 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign.

    PubMed

    Sliwoski, Gregory; Mendenhall, Jeffrey; Meiler, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is a branch of computer aided drug discovery that relates chemical structures to biological activity. Two well established and related QSAR descriptors are two- and three-dimensional autocorrelation (2DA and 3DA). These descriptors encode the relative position of atoms or atom properties by calculating the separation between atom pairs in terms of number of bonds (2DA) or Euclidean distance (3DA). The sums of all values computed for a given small molecule are collected in a histogram. Atom properties can be added with a coefficient that is the product of atom properties for each pair. This procedure can lead to information loss when signed atom properties are considered such as partial charge. For example, the product of two positive charges is indistinguishable from the product of two equivalent negative charges. In this paper, we present variations of 2DA and 3DA called 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign that avoid information loss by splitting unique sign pairs into individual histograms. We evaluate these variations with models trained on nine datasets spanning a range of drug target classes. Both 2DA_Sign and 3DA_Sign significantly increase model performance across all datasets when compared with traditional 2DA and 3DA. Lastly, we find that limiting 3DA_Sign to maximum atom pair distances of 6 Å instead of 12 Å further increases model performance, suggesting that conformational flexibility may hinder performance with longer 3DA descriptors. Consistent with this finding, limiting the number of bonds in 2DA_Sign from 11 to 5 fails to improve performance.

  3. Speculations on the molecular structure of eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Swift, J A

    2009-04-01

    Eumelanin is the polymeric black pigment commonly found in hair and skin. Its chemical intractability, to all but vigorous oxidizing agents, has hindered satisfactory understanding of its molecular structure. It is well-established that the immediate precursor to polymerization, indole-5,6-quinone (IQ), is biosynthesized from the amino acid tyrosine. Current views are that the polymer consists of single bond connections between random indole and degraded indole units. In this paper, an alternative chemical scheme for the polymerization of IQ is proposed based upon the original suggestion by Horner in 1949 that a Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction might be involved. The proposed basic chemical scheme for eumelanin formation is that D-A addition occurs specifically between the 2- and 3-positions of one IQ molecule and the 7- and 4- positions respectively of a second IQ molecule, that the ensuing diketo bridge is oxidized to carboxyl groups and that, by decarboxylation and aromatization, a fused indole dimer is produced. It is envisaged that, by further D-A addition of more IQ molecules, oligomers of greater molecular mass are produced. Calculations based on published bond lengths and angles for the indole nucleus show that oligomeric units containing a total of up to 11 fused indoles could be packed into a flat circular disc of 20 A diameter. The discs of the extensively conjugated polymer are envisaged to be stacked above each other by pi-pi interaction and with a spacing of 3.4 A to produce cylindrical units, the mass density of which is calculated to be 1.54 gm cm(-3); approximating with actual physical measurements. The size and shape of the predicted cylinders are in concordance with those observed in atomic force microscope investigations of eumelanin proto-particles. The model is also in agreement with published experimental data that 2/3rds of the carbon dioxide liberated during eumelanin formation derives from positions 5- and 6- of the IQ molecule.

  4. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  5. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of a chemistry space. Although all three concepts molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemistry space are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations, that is, representations of the same mathematical form, into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another.

  6. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  7. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  8. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  9. Chemical synthesis of a 7 kDa insect gonadotropic neurohormone.

    PubMed

    Girardie, J; Girardie, A; Van Dorsselaer, A; Sorokine, O; Geoffre, S; Hospital, M; Precigoux, G

    1995-01-01

    An original insect neurohormone of 65 residues was synthesized by the solid-phase methodology using t-Boc strategy and Boc-Val-PAM-resin. The purification, conducted by several steps of liquid chromatography having mass, polarity or charge as separative criteria, yielded the product with the correct molecular weight of 6922 Da determined by mass spectrometry. The synthetic peptide had both the same affinity for the anti-native neurohormone serum and the same biological activity as the native neurohormone.

  10. Biogeography: molecular trails from hitch-hiking snails.

    PubMed

    Gittenberger, Edmund; Groenenberg, Dick S J; Kokshoorn, Bas; Preece, Richard C

    2006-01-26

    Darwin was fascinated by the transportation of land snails across great swathes of open ocean by birds--he even immersed snails in sea water to see how long they would survive. Here we follow a molecular phylogenetic trail that reveals the incredible transequatorial dispersal of the land snail Balea from Europe to the Azores and the Tristan da Cunha islands, and back again. This long-distance dispersal is unexpected for what are proverbially considered the most pedestrian of creatures.

  11. Isolation, characterization, molecular cloning and molecular modelling of two lectins of different specificities from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L M; Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Allen, A K; Van Leuven, F; Reynolds, C D; Rouge, P; Peumans, W J

    1999-01-01

    Two lectins have been isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs. From their isolation by affinity chromatography, they are characterized as a mannose-binding lectin (SCAman) and a fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet). SCAman preferentially binds oligosaccharides with alpha(1,3)- and alpha(1,6)-linked mannopyranosides. It is a tetramer of four identical protomers of approx. 13 kDa containing 119 amino acid residues; it is not glycosylated. The fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet), which is not inhibited by any simple sugars, is also unglycosylated. It is a tetramer of four identical subunits of approx. 28 kDa containing 244 residues. Each 28 kDa subunit is composed of two 14 kDa domains. Both lectins have been cloned from a cDNA library and sequenced. X-ray crystallographic analysis and molecular modelling studies have demonstrated close relationships in sequence and structure between these lectins and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. A refined model of the molecular evolution of the monocot mannose-binding lectins is proposed. PMID:10229686

  12. Interferon gamma induces the myristoylation of a 48-kDa protein in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Aderem, A A; Marratta, D E; Cohn, Z A

    1988-01-01

    The lymphokine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induces the selective myristoylation of a macrophage protein with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa. The myristic acid-protein bond is resistant to treatment with hydroxylamine, suggesting that the fatty acid moiety is in an amide linkage. As little as 1 unit of IFN-gamma per ml induces the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, with half-maximal myristoylation being observed with 4 units/ml. The effect is observed within 1 hr after exposure to IFN-gamma and is maximal by 3-4 hr, after which it declines. IFN-alpha does not induce the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, and IFN-beta does so very poorly. Neither IFN-alpha nor IFN-beta has any effect on IFN-gamma-induced myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein. The 48-kDa protein is constitutively myristoylated in murine macrophages that have been activated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of Corynebacterium parvum, suggesting that it may be an early intermediate in the activation of macrophages. Images PMID:3137568

  13. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  14. Influence of Molecular Weight and Degree of Deacetylation of Low Molecular Weight Chitosan on the Bioactivity of Oral Insulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Qinna, Nidal A.; Karwi, Qutuba G.; Al-Jbour, Nawzat; Al-Remawi, Mayyas A.; Alhussainy, Tawfiq M.; Al-So’ud, Khaldoun A.; Al Omari, Mahmoud M. H.; Badwan, Adnan A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) with different molecular weight and degrees of deacetylation (DDA) and to optimize their use in oral insulin nano delivery systems. Water in oil nanosized systems containing LMWC-insulin polyelectrolyte complexes were constructed and their ability to reduce blood glucose was assessed in vivo on diabetic rats. Upon acid depolymerization and testing by viscosity method, three molecular weights of LMWC namely, 1.3, 13 and 18 kDa were obtained. As for the DDA, three LMWCs of 55%, 80% and 100% DDA were prepared and characterized by spectroscopic methods for each molecular weight. The obtained LMWCs showed different morphological and in silico patterns. Following complexation of LMWCs with insulin, different aggregation sizes were obtained. Moreover, the in vivo tested formulations showed different activities of blood glucose reduction. The highest glucose reduction was achieved with 1.3 kDa LMWC of 55% DDA. The current study emphasizes the importance of optimizing the molecular weight along with the DDA of the incorporated LMWC in oral insulin delivery preparations in order to ensure the highest performance of such delivery systems. PMID:25826718

  15. Influence of molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of low molecular weight chitosan on the bioactivity of oral insulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Qinna, Nidal A; Karwi, Qutuba G; Al-Jbour, Nawzat; Al-Remawi, Mayyas A; Alhussainy, Tawfiq M; Al-So'ud, Khaldoun A; Al Omari, Mahmoud M H; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-03-27

    The objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) with different molecular weight and degrees of deacetylation (DDA) and to optimize their use in oral insulin nano delivery systems. Water in oil nanosized systems containing LMWC-insulin polyelectrolyte complexes were constructed and their ability to reduce blood glucose was assessed in vivo on diabetic rats. Upon acid depolymerization and testing by viscosity method, three molecular weights of LMWC namely, 1.3, 13 and 18 kDa were obtained. As for the DDA, three LMWCs of 55%, 80% and 100% DDA were prepared and characterized by spectroscopic methods for each molecular weight. The obtained LMWCs showed different morphological and in silico patterns. Following complexation of LMWCs with insulin, different aggregation sizes were obtained. Moreover, the in vivo tested formulations showed different activities of blood glucose reduction. The highest glucose reduction was achieved with 1.3 kDa LMWC of 55% DDA. The current study emphasizes the importance of optimizing the molecular weight along with the DDA of the incorporated LMWC in oral insulin delivery preparations in order to ensure the highest performance of such delivery systems.

  16. [Stimulation of cell cultures recovery after cryopreservation by the cattle cord blood FRACTION (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin].

    PubMed

    Gulevskiĭ, A K; Trifonova, A V; Lavrik, A A

    2013-01-01

    The capacities of the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) and Actovegin (the vealer blood fraction (below 5 kDa)) for recovering functions of cell cultures after cryopreservation compared. Their influence proliferation of the flozen-thawed cell cultures, certain stages of their growth, cell attachment, rate of cell spreading, and mitotic regiment has been studied. Both the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin were shown to stimulate growth of the cell cultures after cryopreservation more efficiently at the concentration of 224 μg/ml. However, despite the stimulating effect discovered, their application did not bring proliferative indices on the 1st passage after cryopreservation to the values of the native culture. The effects of the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin on the human fibroblast culture were identical by the following parameters: cell attachment, rates of cell spreading and proliferation. In culture BHK-21 clone 13/04 the efficiency of Actovegin was low, while the cord blood low-molecular fraction has a conspicuous stimulating effect on its adhesion and proliferation. The investigations carried out can serve as a basis for the development of regenerative media containing the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin as active components at the concentration of 224 μg/ml with the purpose of fast recovery of culture prolifetative properties after cryopreservation.

  17. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a novel 530-kDa protein complex (PC530) capable of associating with the 20S proteasome from starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Takagi Sawada, M; Morinaga, C; Yokosawa, H; Sawada, H

    2000-02-15

    A novel protein complex called PC530 was purified concomitantly with proteasomes from oocytes of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera, by chromatography with DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose, Mono Q, and Superose 6 columns. The molecular mass of this complex was estimated to be 530 kDa by Ferguson plot analysis and about 500 kDa by Superose 6 gel filtration. Since the 1500-kDa proteasome fractions contain the PC530 subunits as well as the 20S proteasomal subunits, and also since the purified PC530 and the 20S proteasome were cross-linked with a bifunctional cross-linking reagent, it is thought that PC530 is able to associate with the 20S proteasome. The PC530 comprises six main subunits with molecular masses of 105, 70, 50, 34, 30, and 23 kDa. The 70-kDa subunit showed a sequence similarity to the S3/p58/Sun2/Rpn3p subunit of the 26S proteasome, whereas the other subunits showed little or no appreciable similarity to the mammalian and yeast regulatory subunits. These results indicate that starfish oocytes contain a novel 530-kDa protein complex capable of associating with the 20S proteasome, which is distinctly different from PA700 or the 19S regulatory complex in molecular size and subunit composition. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  20. Simple nanoparticle-based luminometric method for molecular weight determination of polymeric compounds.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, Sari; Virtamo, Maria; Legrand, Nicolas; Hänninen, Pekka; Härmä, Harri

    2014-01-21

    A nanoparticle-based method utilizing time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) was developed for molecular weight determination. This mix-and-measure nanoparticle method is based on the competitive adsorption between the analyte and the acceptor-labeled protein to donor Eu(III) nanoparticles. The size-dependent adsorption of molecules enables the molecular weight determination of differently sized polymeric compounds down to a concentration level of micrograms per liter. The molecular weight determination from 1 to 10 kDa for polyamino acids and from 0.3 to 70 kDa for polyethylene imines is demonstrated. The simple and cost-effective nanoparticle method as microtiter plate assay format shows great potential for the detection of the changes in molecular weight or for quantification of differently sized molecules in biochemical laboratories and in industrial polymeric processes.

  1. Rapid evolution of hyaluronan synthase to improve hyaluronan production and molecular mass in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linpei; Huang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng; Kang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    To improve the production and molecular mass of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) in Bacillus subtilis by engineering hyaluronan synthase (HAS) from Streptococcus zooepidemicus. By mutating regions within HAS intracellular domains, five positive variants exhibiting higher HA production (from 1.22 to 2.24 g l(-1)) and molecular mass values (from 1.20 to 1.36 × 10(6) Da) were constructed and characterized. Overexpression of the V5 variant and the genes tuaD and glmU increased HA production and molecular mass to 2.8 g l(-1) and 2.4 × 10(6) Da, respectively. This study provides a novel strategy for improving HA production and its molecular mass.

  2. Evidence for Complex Molecular Architectures for Solvent-Extracted Lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Rials, Timothy G; Urban, Volker S; Langan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant, naturally occurring biopolymer, is often considered 'waste' and used as a simple fuel source in the paper-making process. However, lignin has emerged as a promising renewable resource for engineering materials, such as carbon fibers. Unfortunately, the molecular architecture of lignin (in vivo and extracted) is still elusive, with numerous conflicting reports in the literature, and knowledge of this structure is extremely important, not only for materials technologies, but also for production of biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol due to biomass recalcitrance. As such, the molecular structures of solvent-extracted (sulfur-free) lignins, which have been modified using various acyl chlorides, have been probed using small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutron (SANS) scattering in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution along with hydrodynamic characterization using dilute solution viscometry and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) in THF. Mass spectrometry shows an absolute molecular weight {approx}18-30 kDa ({approx}80-140 monomers), while GPC shows a relative molecular weight {approx}3 kDa. A linear styrene oligomer (2.5 kDa) was also analyzed in THF using SANS. Results clearly show that lignin molecular architectures are somewhat rigid and complex, ranging from nanogels to hyperbranched macromolecules, not linear oligomers or physical assemblies of oligomers, which is consistent with previously proposed delignification (extraction) mechanisms. Future characterization using the methods discussed here can be used to guide extraction processes as well as genetic engineering technologies to convert lignin into value added materials with the potential for high positive impact on global sustainability.

  3. The potentially dangerous asteroid 2012 DA14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, I.

    2012-12-01

    We present computing methods that allow us to study the behaviour of the dynamically interesting potentially dangerous asteroid 2012 DA14. Using the freely available ORBFIT software, we can follow the orbit of the asteroid backward and forward in the future, searching for close approaches to the Earth that might lead to possible impacts. The possible impact orbit for 2026 is computed. We show that it should be possible to recover asteroid 2012 DA14, mainly in 2013 February. It is highly unlikely that asteroid 2012 DA14 will hit any geosynchronous satellites during its close approach on 2013 February 15.

  4. 43 kDa and 66 kDa, two blood stage antigens induce immune response in Plasmodium berghei malaria.

    PubMed

    Pirta, Chhaya; Banyal, H S

    2014-08-01

    The hunt for an effective vaccine against malaria still continues. Several new target antigens as candidates for vaccine design are being explored and tested for their efficacy. In the present study the sera from mice immunized with 24,000 x g fraction of Plasmodium berghei has been used to identify highly immunogenic blood stage antigens. The protective antibodies present in immune sera were covalently immobilized on CNBr activated sepharose 4B and used for affinity chromatography purification of antigens present in blood stages of P. berghei. Two polypeptides of 66 and 43 kDa molecular weights proved to be highly immunogenic. They exhibited a strong humoral immune response in mice as evident by high titres in ELISA and IFA. Protective immunity by these two antigens was apparent by in vivo and in vitro studies. These two proteins could further be analysed and used as antigens in malaria vaccine design.

  5. Donor/Acceptor Molecular Orientation-Dependent Photovoltaic Performance in All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ke; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Jiangang; Li, Mingguang; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Han, Yanchun

    2015-11-18

    The correlated donor/acceptor (D/A) molecular orientation plays a crucial role in solution-processed all-polymer solar cells in term of photovoltaic performance. For the conjugated polymers PTB7-th and P(NDI2OD-T2), the preferential molecular orientation of neat PTB7-th films kept face-on regardless of the properties of processing solvents. However, an increasing content of face-on molecular orientation in the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films could be found by changing processing solvents from chloronaphthalene (CN) and o-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) to chlorobenzene (CB). Besides, the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films also exhibited a transformation of preferential molecular orientation from face-on to edge-on when extending film drying time by casting in the same solution. Consequently, a distribution diagram of molecular orientation for P(NDI2OD-T2) films was depicted and the same trend could be observed for the PTB7-th/P(NDI2OD-T2) blend films. By manufacture of photovoltaic devices with blend films, the relationship between the correlated D/A molecular orientation and device performance was established. The short-circuit current (Jsc) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB enhanced gradually from 1.24 to 8.86 mA/cm(2) with the correlated D/A molecular orientation changing from face-on/edge-on to face-on/face-on, which could be attributed to facile exciton dissociation at D/A interface with the same molecular orientation. Therefore, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB improved from 0.53% to 3.52% ultimately.

  6. Origin of the DA and non-DA white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1989-01-01

    Various proposals for the bifurcation of the white dwarf cooling sequence are reviewed. 'Primordial' theories, in which the basic bifurcation of the white dwarf sequence is rooted in events predating the white dwarf stage of stellar evolution, are discussed, along with the competing 'mixing' theories in which processes occurring during the white dwarf stage are responsible for the existence of DA or non-DA stars. A new proposal is suggested, representing a two-channel scenario. In the DA channel, some process reduces the hydrogen layer mass to the value of less than 10 to the -7th. The non-DA channel is similar to that in the primordial scenario. These considerations suggest that some mechanism operates in both channels to reduce the thickness of the outermost layer of the white dwarf. It is also noted that accretion from the interstellar medium has little to do with whether a particular white dwarf becomes a DA or a non-DA star.

  7. Polysaccharide Lyase: Molecular Cloning, Sequencing, and Overexpression of the Xanthan Lyase Gene of Bacillus sp. Strain GL1

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Miki, Hikaru; Tsuchiya, Noriaki; Nankai, Hirokazu; Murata, Kousaku

    2001-01-01

    When grown on xanthan as a carbon source, the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain GL1 produces extracellular xanthan lyase (75 kDa), catalyzing the first step of xanthan depolymerization (H. Nankai, W. Hashimoto, H. Miki, S. Kawai, and K. Murata, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:2520–2526, 1999). A gene for the lyase was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene contained an open reading frame consisting of 2,793 bp coding for a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 99,308. The polypeptide had a signal peptide (2 kDa) consisting of 25 amino acid residues preceding the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme and exhibited significant homology with hyaluronidase of Streptomyces griseus (identity score, 37.7%). Escherichia coli transformed with the gene without the signal peptide sequence showed a xanthan lyase activity and produced intracellularly a large amount of the enzyme (400 mg/liter of culture) with a molecular mass of 97 kDa. During storage at 4°C, the purified enzyme (97 kDa) from E. coli was converted to a low-molecular-mass (75-kDa) enzyme with properties closely similar to those of the enzyme (75 kDa) from Bacillus sp. strain GL1, specifically in optimum pH and temperature for activity, substrate specificity, and mode of action. Logarithmically growing cells of Bacillus sp. strain GL1 on the medium with xanthan were also found to secrete not only xanthan lyase (75 kDa) but also a 97-kDa protein with the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as that of xanthan lyase (75 kDa). These results suggest that, in Bacillus sp. strain GL1, xanthan lyase is first synthesized as a preproform (99 kDa), secreted as a precursor (97 kDa) by a signal peptide-dependent mechanism, and then processed into a mature form (75 kDa) through excision of a C-terminal protein fragment with a molecular mass of 22 kDa. PMID:11157235

  8. Correlation between phosphorylation level of a hippocampal 86kDa protein and extinction of a behaviour in a model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pires, Rita G W; Pereira, Sílvia R C; Carvalho, Fabiana M; Oliveira-Silva, Ieda F; Ferraz, Vany P; Ribeiro, Angela M

    2007-06-04

    The effects of chronic ethanol and thiamine deficiency, alone or associated, on hippocampal protein phosphorylation profiles ranging in molecular weight from 30 to 250kDa molecular weight, in stimulated (high K(+) concentration) and unstimulated (basal) conditions were investigated. These treatments significantly changed the phosphorylation level of an 86kDa phosphoprotein. Thiamine deficiency, but not chronic ethanol, induced a decrease in a behavioural extinction index, which is significantly correlated to the phosphorylation level of the p86 protein. These data add to and extend previous findings by our laboratory implicating the involvement of hippocampal neurotransmission components in extinction of a behaviour which involves learning of environmental spatial cues.

  9. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  10. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  11. Molecular biology of development

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, E.H.; Firtel, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book is a compilation of papers presented at a symposium on the molecular biology of development. Topics discussed include: cytoplasmic localizations and pattern formations, gene expression during oogenesis and early development, developmental expression of gene families molecular aspects of plant development and transformation in whole organisms and cells.

  12. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  13. Biological Molecular Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyński, Michał

    2007-11-01

    Like small molecules taking part in usual chemical reactions, biological molecular machines perform their functions owing to thermal fluctuations and the only difference consists in more complex and specially organized internal dynamics. It is this dynamics that determines processes of free energy transduction in molecular machines. The case of the actomyosin motor is considered in some detail.

  14. Making molecular machines work.

    PubMed

    Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2006-10-01

    In this review we chart recent advances in what is at once an old and very new field of endeavour--the achievement of control of motion at the molecular level including solid-state and surface-mounted rotors, and its natural progression to the development of synthetic molecular machines. Besides a discussion of design principles used to control linear and rotary motion in such molecular systems, this review will address the advances towards the construction of synthetic machines that can perform useful functions. Approaches taken by several research groups to construct wholly synthetic molecular machines and devices are compared. This will be illustrated with molecular rotors, elevators, valves, transporters, muscles and other motor functions used to develop smart materials. The demonstration of molecular machinery is highlighted through recent examples of systems capable of effecting macroscopic movement through concerted molecular motion. Several approaches to illustrate how molecular motor systems have been used to accomplish work are discussed. We will conclude with prospects for future developments in this exciting field of nanotechnology.

  15. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  16. Influence of molecular weight on in vitro immunostimulatory properties of instant coffee.

    PubMed

    Passos, Cláudia P; Cepeda, Márcio R; Ferreira, Sónia S; Nunes, Fernando M; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Madureira, Pedro; Vilanova, Manuel; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2014-10-15

    Instant coffee was prepared and fractionated into higher (>100kDa), medium (5-10, 10-30, 30-100kDa) and lower (1-5, <1kDa) molecular weight fractions. Sugars and linkage composition characteristics of arabinogalactans and galactomannans were recovered in all fractions. Also, amino acid analysis performed after hydrolysis showed similar compositions in all fractions. On the contrary, free chlorogenic acids and caffeine were only detected in the lowest molecular weight fraction (<1kDa). A direct relationship between the melanoidins browning index and the molecular weight was observed. The fractions obtained were incubated in vitro with murine spleen lymphocytes in order to evaluate their possible immunostimulatory abilities. The surface expression of CD69 (early activation marker) on different lymphocyte sub-populations showed that the fraction with 1-5kDa was able to induce activation of B-lymphocytes. This was the only fraction to induce B-lymphocyte activation, since all the other fractions failed, even when higher concentrations were used.

  17. Molecular weight and helix conformation determine intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of exopolysaccharide from Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Du, Bin; Yang, Yuedong; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Baojun

    2017-09-15

    Intestinal anti-inflammatory activities of exopolysaccharide from S. commune were assessed using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice model. The changes of molecular weight (MW), atomic force microscope morphology, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, and viscosity were recorded after sonication treatment. The results indicated that the triple helical structure of exopolysaccharide was dissociated into single helical structure and random coiled structure by ultrasonication via breaking of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The medium (936kDa) and high MW (1437kDa) exopolysaccharide had the mixture of triple helix and single helix conformation, while the low MW (197kDa) exopolysaccharide exhibit random coiled conformation. The intestinal anti-inflammatory activity study showed that oral administration of medium and high MW (1437kDa) exopolysaccharide significantly recovered DSS-induced colitis in inflamed tissues and reduced inflammation induced infiltration of macrophages. These results showed that medium (936kDa) and high MW (1437kDa) exopolysaccharide had intestinal anti-inflammatory activity. The intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of exopolysaccharide was related to helical structure and molecular weight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A surface acoustic wave sensor functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer for selective dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Maouche, Naima; Ktari, Nadia; Bakas, Idriss; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François; Chehimi, Mohammed Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave sensor operating at 104 MHz and functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer has been designed for selective detection of dopamine (DA). Optimization of pyrrole/DA ratio, polymerization and immersion times permitted to obtain a highly selective sensor, which has a sensitivity of 0.55°/mM (≈ 550 Hz/mM) and a detection limit of ≈ 10 nM. Morphology and related roughness parameters of molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces, before and after extraction of DA, as well as that of the non imprinted polymer were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The developed chemosensor selectively recognized dopamine over the structurally similar compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (referred as tyramine), or ascorbic acid,which co-exists with DA in body fluids at a much higher concentration. Selectivity tests were also carried out with dihydroxybenzene, for which an unexpected phase variation of order of 75% of the DA one was observed. Quantum chemical calculations, based on the density functional theory, were carried out to determine the nature of interactions between each analyte and the PPy matrix and the DA imprinted PPy polypyrrole sensing layer in order to account for the important phase variation observed during dihydroxybenzene injection.

  19. An Extension of PPLS-DA for Classification and Comparison to Ordinary PLS-DA

    PubMed Central

    Telaar, Anna; Liland, Kristian Hovde; Repsilber, Dirk; Nürnberg, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Classification studies are widely applied, e.g. in biomedical research to classify objects/patients into predefined groups. The goal is to find a classification function/rule which assigns each object/patient to a unique group with the greatest possible accuracy (classification error). Especially in gene expression experiments often a lot of variables (genes) are measured for only few objects/patients. A suitable approach is the well-known method PLS-DA, which searches for a transformation to a lower dimensional space. Resulting new components are linear combinations of the original variables. An advancement of PLS-DA leads to PPLS-DA, introducing a so called ‘power parameter’, which is maximized towards the correlation between the components and the group-membership. We introduce an extension of PPLS-DA for optimizing this power parameter towards the final aim, namely towards a minimal classification error. We compare this new extension with the original PPLS-DA and also with the ordinary PLS-DA using simulated and experimental datasets. For the investigated data sets with weak linear dependency between features/variables, no improvement is shown for PPLS-DA and for the extensions compared to PLS-DA. A very weak linear dependency, a low proportion of differentially expressed genes for simulated data, does not lead to an improvement of PPLS-DA over PLS-DA, but our extension shows a lower prediction error. On the contrary, for the data set with strong between-feature collinearity and a low proportion of differentially expressed genes and a large total number of genes, the prediction error of PPLS-DA and the extensions is clearly lower than for PLS-DA. Moreover we compare these prediction results with results of support vector machines with linear kernel and linear discriminant analysis. PMID:23408965

  20. An extension of PPLS-DA for classification and comparison to ordinary PLS-DA.

    PubMed

    Telaar, Anna; Liland, Kristian Hovde; Repsilber, Dirk; Nürnberg, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Classification studies are widely applied, e.g. in biomedical research to classify objects/patients into predefined groups. The goal is to find a classification function/rule which assigns each object/patient to a unique group with the greatest possible accuracy (classification error). Especially in gene expression experiments often a lot of variables (genes) are measured for only few objects/patients. A suitable approach is the well-known method PLS-DA, which searches for a transformation to a lower dimensional space. Resulting new components are linear combinations of the original variables. An advancement of PLS-DA leads to PPLS-DA, introducing a so called 'power parameter', which is maximized towards the correlation between the components and the group-membership. We introduce an extension of PPLS-DA for optimizing this power parameter towards the final aim, namely towards a minimal classification error. We compare this new extension with the original PPLS-DA and also with the ordinary PLS-DA using simulated and experimental datasets. For the investigated data sets with weak linear dependency between features/variables, no improvement is shown for PPLS-DA and for the extensions compared to PLS-DA. A very weak linear dependency, a low proportion of differentially expressed genes for simulated data, does not lead to an improvement of PPLS-DA over PLS-DA, but our extension shows a lower prediction error. On the contrary, for the data set with strong between-feature collinearity and a low proportion of differentially expressed genes and a large total number of genes, the prediction error of PPLS-DA and the extensions is clearly lower than for PLS-DA. Moreover we compare these prediction results with results of support vector machines with linear kernel and linear discriminant analysis.

  1. Multifunctionality in molecular magnetism.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Czarnecki, Bernard; Reczyński, Mateusz; Arczyński, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetism draws from the fundamental ideas of structural chemistry and combines them with experimental physics resulting in one of the highest profile current topics, namely molecular materials that exhibit multifunctionality. Recent advances in the design of new generations of multifunctional molecular magnets that retain the functions of the building blocks and exhibit non-trivial magnetic properties at higher temperatures provide promising evidence that they may be useful for the future construction of nanoscale devices. This article is not a complete review but is rather an introduction into thefascinating world of multifunctional solids with magnetism as the leitmotif. We provide a subjective selection and discussion of the most inspiring examples of multifunctional molecular magnets: magnetic sponges, guest-responsive magnets, molecular magnets with ionic conductivity, photomagnets and non-centrosymmetric and chiral magnets.

  2. Molecular imaging in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoetker, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging focuses on the molecular signature of cells rather than morphological changes in the tissue. The need for this novel type of imaging arises from the often difficult detection and characterization especially of small and/or premalignant lesions. Molecular imaging specifically visualizes biological properties of a lesion and might thereby be able to close diagnostic gaps, e.g. when differentiating hyperplastic from neoplastic polyps or detecting the margins of intraepithelial neoplastic spread. Additionally, not only the detection and discrimination of lesions could be improved: based on the molecular features identified using molecular imaging, therapy regimens could be adjusted on the day of diagnosis to allow for personalized medicine and optimized care for each individual patient. PMID:24917945

  3. Crystalline molecular flasks.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Yasuhide; Kawano, Masaki; Fujita, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    A variety of host compounds have been used as molecular-scale reaction vessels, protecting guests from their environment or restricting the space available around them, thus favouring particular reactions. Such molecular 'flasks' can endow guest molecules with reactivities that differ from those in bulk solvents. Here, we extend this concept to crystalline molecular flasks, solid-state crystalline networks with pores within which pseudo-solution-state reactions can take place. As the guest molecules can spontaneously align along the walls and channels of the hosts, structural changes in the substrates can be directly observed by in situ X-ray crystallography during reaction. Recently, this has enabled observation of the molecular structures of transient intermediates and other labile species, in the form of sequential structural snapshots of the chemical transformation. Here, we describe the principles, development and applications of crystalline molecular flasks.

  4. Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; Park, Jinkyu; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of labile low-molecular-mass (LMM, defined as < 10 kDa) metal complexes in cells and super-cellular structures such as the brain has been inferred from chelation studies, but direct evidence is lacking. To evaluate the presence of LMM metal complexes in the brain, supernatant fractions of fresh mouse brain homogenates were passed through a 10 kDa cutoff membrane and subjected to size-exclusion liquid chromatography under anaerobic refrigerated conditions. Fractions were monitored for Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, S and P using an on-line ICP-MS. At least 30 different LMM metal complexes were detected along with numerous P- and S- containing species. Reproducibility was assessed by performing the experiment 13 times, using different buffers, and by examining whether complexes changed with time. Eleven Co, 2 Cu, 5 Mn, 4 Mo, 3 Fe and 2 Zn complexes with molecular masses < 4 kDa were detected. One LMM Mo complex comigrated with the molybdopterin cofactor. Most Cu and Zn complexes appeared to be protein-bound with masses ranging from 4 – 20 kDa. Co was the only metal for which the “free” or aqueous complex was reproducibly observed. Aqueous Co may be sufficiently stable in this environment due to its relatively slow water-exchange kinetics. Attempts were made to assign some of these complexes, but further efforts will be required to identify them unambiguously and to determine their functions. This is among the first studies to detect low-molecular-mass transition metal complexes in the mouse brain using LC-ICP-MS. PMID:23443205

  5. Histopathological effects and determination of the putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Da toxin in Spodoptera littoralis midgut.

    PubMed

    BenFarhat-Touzri, Dalel; Saadaoui, Marwa; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Saadaoui, Imen; Azzouz, Hichem; Tounsi, Slim

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain HD133, known by its effectiveness against Spodoptera species, produces many insecticidal proteins including Cry1Ab, Cry1Ca and Cry1Da. In the present study, the insecticidal activity of Cry1Da against Spodoptera littoralis was investigated. It showed toxicity with an LC(50) of 224.4 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (178.61-270.19) and an LC(90) of 467.77 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (392.89-542.65). The midgut histopathology of Cry1Da fed larvae showed vesicle formation in the apical region, vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells. Biotinylated-activated Cry1Da toxin bound protein of about 65 kDa on blots of S. littoralis brush border membrane preparations. This putative receptor differs in molecular size from those recognized by Cry1C and Vip3A which are active against this polyphagous insect. This difference in midgut receptors strongly supports the use of Cry1Da as insecticidal agent, particularly in case of Cry and/or Vip-resistance management.

  6. Characterization of distinct alpha- and gamma-type gliadins and low molecular weight components from wheat endosperm as coeliac immunoreactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Rocher, A; Soriano, F; Molina, E; González-Limas, G; Méndez, E

    1995-02-22

    Distinct alpha- and gamma-type gliadins, as well as a few low molecular weight components have been identified as coeliac immunoreactive proteins from a chloroform/methanol extract from wheat endosperm. Characterization of these components involved the combination of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, immunoblotting following SDS-PAGE using a coeliac serum and microsequencing analysis. This has allowed the identification of a group of gliadins with different molecular weights, according to their N-terminal amino-acid sequence: five alpha-type gliadins of 31, 35, 38 and two of 45 kDa, one gamma 2-type gliadin of 40 kDa, two gamma 3-type gliadins of 31, and 50 kDa, and two gamma-type gliadins with an atypical gliadin N-terminal of 31, and 40 kDa, as well as a few unidentified low molecular weight components and three N-terminal blocked proteins, all exhibiting similar antigenicity.

  7. Low molecular weight chitosan inhibits obesity induced by feeding a high-fat diet long-term in mice.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Three low molecular weight chitosans (molecular weight: 21, 46 and 130 kDa) obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of a high molecular weight chitosan (average molecular weight: 650 kDa) had low viscosity and were water-soluble. The effects of these water-soluble chitosans on pancreatic lipase (in-vitro) and the elevation of plasma triacylglycerol concentration after the oral lipid tolerance test were examined in mice. The water-soluble 46-kDa chitosan was the most effective at inhibiting pancreatic lipase activity (in-vitro) and plasma triacylglycerol elevation after the oral lipid tolerance test. Based on this result, the effects of the 46-kDa chitosan on increases in bodyweight, various white adipose tissue weights, and plasma and liver lipids were examined in mice fed a high-fat diet for 20 weeks. Water-soluble 46-kDa chitosan (300 mg kg(-1), twice daily) prevented increases in bodyweight, various white adipose tissue weights and liver lipids (cholesterol and triacylglycerol) in mice fed a high-fat diet, and further increased the faecal bile acid and fat. The results suggest that the lipid-lowering effects of the 46-kDa chitosan may be mediated by increases in faecal fat and/or bile acid excretion resulting from the binding of bile acids, and by a decrease in the absorption of dietary lipids (triacylglycerol and cholesterol) from the small intestine as a result of the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity. Water-soluble 46-kDa chitosan (100 and 300 mg kg(-1), twice daily) did not cause liver damage with the elevation of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase, or kidney damage with the elevation of blood nitrogen urea. It was concluded that water-soluble 46-kDa chitosan is a safe functional food.

  8. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  9. Molecular gearing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.

  10. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  11. Molecular gearing systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds thatmore » of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.« less

  12. Molecular Programming with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfree, Erik

    2009-05-01

    Information can be stored in molecules and processed by molecular reactions. Molecular information processing is at the heart of all biological systems; might it soon also be at the heart of non-biological synthetic chemical systems? Perhaps yes. One technological approach comes from DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing, where DNA is used as a non-biological informational polymer that can be rationally designed to create a rich class of molecular systems -- for example, DNA molecules that self-assemble precisely, that fold into complex nanoscale objects, that act as mechanical actuators and molecular motors, and that make decisions based on digital and analog logic. I will argue that to fully exploit their design potential, we will need to invent programming languages for specifying the behavior of information-based molecular systems, to create theoretical tools for understanding and analyzing the behavior of molecular programs, to develop compilers that automate the design of molecules with the desired behaviors, and to expand experimental techniques so that the implementation and debugging of complex molecular systems becomes as commonplace and practical as computer programming.

  13. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  14. Molecular shape sorting using molecular organic cages.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Jelfs, Kim E; Schmidtmann, Marc; Ahmed, Adham; Chong, Samantha Y; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-04-01

    The energy-efficient separation of chemical feedstocks is a major sustainability challenge. Porous extended frameworks such as zeolites or metal-organic frameworks are one potential solution to this problem. Here, we show that organic molecules, rather than frameworks, can separate other organic molecules by size and shape. A molecular organic cage is shown to separate a common aromatic feedstock (mesitylene) from its structural isomer (4-ethyltoluene) with an unprecedented perfect specificity for the latter. This specificity stems from the structure of the intrinsically porous cage molecule, which is itself synthesized from a derivative of mesitylene. In other words, crystalline organic molecules are used to separate other organic molecules. The specificity is defined by the cage structure alone, so this solid-state 'shape sorting' is, uniquely, mirrored for cage molecules in solution. The behaviour can be understood from a combination of atomistic simulations for individual cage molecules and solid-state molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Ultrasensitive dopamine sensor based on novel molecularly imprinted polypyrrole coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tao; Yu, Chenfei; Zhou, Xi; Ma, Peipei; Wu, Shishan; Xu, Lina; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor using the molecularly imprinted (MIP) oxygen-containing polypyrrole (PPy) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite was proposed for in vivo detection of dopamine (DA). The prepared sensor exhibits a remarkable sensitivity of (16.18μA/μM) with a linear range of 5.0×10(-11)-5.0×10(-6)M and limit of detection as low as 1.0×10(-11)M in the detection of DA, which might be due to the plenty cavities for binding DA through π-π stacking between aromatic rings and hydrogen bonds between amino groups of DA and oxygen-containing groups of the novel PPy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of landfill leachates by molecular size distribution, biodegradability, and inert chemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Ferreira, Cynthia F A; Lange, Liséte Celina; Aquino, Sérgio F

    2009-05-01

    This work presents results from a detailed characterization of landfill leachates of different ages from a landfill in a major Brazilian city. This characterization consists of determining the molecular size distribution and the inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biodegradability of both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Results show that leachate with a high COD concentration leachate has low biodegradability. A significant fraction of the COD is not characterized as protein, carbohydrate, or lipids, which reinforces the hypothesis that the remaining fraction was present in all leachate fractions (less than 1 kDa; between 1 and 10 kDa; between 10 and 100 kDa; and greater than 100 kDa) and is refractory. These results suggest that leachates with such characteristics require treatment systems that use physical-chemical processes as a pre- or post-treatment step to biological processes.

  17. Potential molecular wires and molecular alligator clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Jeffry S.; Pearson, Darren L.; Jones, LeRoy, II; Hara, Ryuichiro; Tour, James M.

    1996-12-01

    The synthesis of oligo(2-ethylphenylene-ethynylene)s, oligo(2-(0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s, and oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s is described via an iterative divergent convergent approach. Synthesized were the monomer, dimer, tetramer, octamer and 16-mer of the oligo(3-ethylthiophene-ethynylene)s and oligo(2-0957-4484/7/4/023/img1-ethylheptyl)phenylene-ethynylene)s. The 16-mers are 100 Å and 128 Å long, respectively. At each stage in the iteration, the length of the framework doubles. Only three sets of reaction conditions are needed for the entire iterative synthetic sequence; an iodination, a protodesilylation, and a Pd/Cu-catalyzed cross coupling. The oligomers were characterized spectroscopically and by mass spectrometry. The optical properties are presented which show the stage of optical absorbance saturation. The size exclusion chromatography values for the number average weights, relative to polystyrene, illustrate the tremendous differences in the hydrodynamic volume of these rigid rod oligomers versus the random coils of polystyrene. These differences become quite apparent at the octamer stage. The preparation of thiol-protected end groups is described. These may serve as molecular alligator clips for adhesion to gold surfaces. These oligomers may act as molecular wires in molecular electronic devices and they also serve as useful models for understanding related bulk polymers.

  18. [Molecular diagnostics in neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Lorenz, J; Riemenschneider, M J

    2015-03-01

    As in only few other areas of oncology, molecular markers in neurooncology have become an integral part of clinical decision-making. This development is driven by a bustling scientific activity exploring the molecular basis and pathogenesis of human brain tumors. In addition, a high percentage of brain tumor patients are included in clinical studies in which molecular markers are assessed and linked with clinical informativeness. First steps towards more differentiated therapeutic strategies against brain tumors have thus been taken. The implementation in the clinical and diagnostic routine requires a detailed knowledge and a close collaboration between all medical disciplines involved.

  19. Molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-07-19

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40-50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed.

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  1. Diversity in molecular mass of the common EDTA-soluble antigens of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, T; Terakado, N; Nakamura, S

    1994-01-01

    Common EDTA-soluble antigens of Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum were examined by indirect-immunofluorescence (IFA) and immunoblot analysis. The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the 35 kDa antigen of C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 were used. These mAbs reacted with all 11 strains, 6 of C. chauvoei and 5 of C. septicum, in IFA. In immunoblot analysis with the mAbs, the bands at molecular mass of 35 kDa were found in all C. chauvoei strains, while the bands at 36 kDa were found in 4 of 5 strains of C. septicum. These results indicate that the 35 kDa antigen of C. chauvoei and the 36 kDa antigen of C. septicum possess a similar epitope recognized by the mAb.

  2. Facile Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Graphene Quantum Dots for the Determination of Dopamine with Affinity-Adjustable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xi; Wang, Anqi; Yu, Chenfei; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2015-06-10

    A facilely prepared fluorescence sensor was developed for dopamine (DA) determination based on polyindole/graphene quantum dots molecularly imprinted polymers (PIn/GQDs@MIPs). The proposed sensor exhibits a high sensitivity with a linear range of 5 × 10(-10) to 1.2 × 10(-6) M and the limit of detection as low as 1 × 10(-10) M in the determination of DA, which is probably due to the tailor-made imprinted cavities for binding DA thought hydrogen bonds between amine groups of DA and oxygen-containing groups of the novel composite. Furthermore, the prepared sensor can rebind DA in dual-type: a low affinity type (noncovalent interaction is off) and a high affinity type (noncovalent interaction is on), and the rebinding interaction can be adjusted by tuning the pH, which shows a unique potential for adjusting the binding interaction while keeping the specificity, allowing for wider applications.

  3. Average protein density is a molecular-weight-dependent function

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Hannes; Polikarpov, Igor; Craievich, Aldo F.

    2004-01-01

    The mass density of proteins is a relevant basic biophysical quantity. It is also a useful input parameter, for example, for three-dimensional structure determination by protein crystallography and studies of protein oligomers in solution by analytic ultracentrifugation. We have performed a critical analysis of published, theoretical, and experimental investigations about this issue and concluded that the average density of proteins is not a constant as often assumed. For proteins with a molecular weight below 20 kDa, the average density exhibits a positive deviation that increases for decreasing molecular weight. A simple molecular-weight-depending function is proposed that provides a more accurate estimate of the average protein density. PMID:15388866

  4. Preparation of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue

    2012-06-20

    Recently, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid has been reported to have novel features, such as free radical scavenging activities, antioxidant activities, promotion of excisional wound healing, etc. In the present work, degradation of native hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment was performed for preparation of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid. The molecular weight of native hyaluronic acid was reduced from 1535 to 87 kDa for 120 min at 40°C. The rate of reduction of molecular weight was 94.33%. The FT-IR, 13C NMR, and UV-vis spectra suggested that there was no obvious modification of chemical structure of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid. The use of degradation of native hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment can be a useful alternative for production of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid.

  5. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  6. [Molecular diagnostics in pathology].

    PubMed

    Stenzinger, A; Penzel, R; Endris, V; Weichert, W

    2013-05-01

    Tissue-based molecular diagnostics is a fast growing diagnostic field, which already complements morphologic classifications in many cases. Pathology based molecular diagnosis is performed almost exclusively on paraffin embedded material and always in conjunction with histopathology. Besides the classic field of tissue based detection of pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, molecular diagnostics of tumor tissue is one of the current hot topics in oncology. In this context the detection of predictive molecular biomarkers, such as specific mutations, allows patient stratification for individually tailored treatment strategies and thereby is one of the key components of individualized patient care in oncology. The rapidly growing number of clinically relevant predictive biomarkers together with impressive technical advances, specifically the development of massive parallel sequencing, will modify the care of patients with malignant diseases. Pathology, therefore, has returned in the very center of interdisciplinary patient care.

  7. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  8. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  9. Mistakes and Molecular Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the role mistakes play in the molecular evolution of bacteria. Discusses the interacting physical, chemical, and biological factors that cause changes in DNA and play a role in prokaryotic evolution. (DDR)

  10. Natural Product Molecular Fossils.

    PubMed

    Falk, Heinz; Wolkenstein, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The natural products synthesized by organisms that were living a long time ago gave rise to their molecular fossils. These can consist of either the original unchanged compounds or they may undergo peripheral transformations in which their skeletons remain intact. In cases when molecular fossils can be traced to their organismic source, they are termed "geological biomarkers".This contribution describes apolar and polar molecular fossils and, in particular biomarkers, along the lines usually followed in organic chemistry textbooks, and points to their bioprecursors when available. Thus, the apolar compounds are divided in linear and branched alkanes followed by alicyclic compounds and aromatic and heterocyclic molecules, and, in particular, the geoporphyrins. The polar molecular fossils contain as functional groups or constituent units ethers, alcohols, phenols, carbonyl groups, flavonoids, quinones, and acids, or are polymers like kerogen, amber, melanin, proteins, or nucleic acids. The final sections discuss the methodology used and the fundamental processes encountered by the biomolecules described, including diagenesis, catagenesis, and metagenesis.

  11. Mistakes and Molecular Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the role mistakes play in the molecular evolution of bacteria. Discusses the interacting physical, chemical, and biological factors that cause changes in DNA and play a role in prokaryotic evolution. (DDR)

  12. The Molecular Model Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephanie A.

    2003-04-01

    The Molecular Model Game is used to review Lewis structures and VSEPR theory. In this game, teams of students compete to complete problems quickly. Variations with other types of problems involving stoichiometry or equilibria are also possible.

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Molecular Machines: Nanoscale gadgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A.

    2008-06-01

    Meeting their biological counterparts halfway, artificial molecular machines embedded in liquid crystals, crystalline solids and mesoporous materials are poised to meet the demands of the next generation of functional materials.

  15. [Effect of growth conditions on the molecular weight of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate produced by Azotobacter chroococcum 7B].

    PubMed

    Myshkina, V L; Nikolaeva, D A; Makhina, T K; Bonartsev, A P; Bonartseva, G A

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) of predetermined molecular weight can be obtained by varying the growth conditions of the producer strain, Azotobacter chroococcum 7B: pH, temperature, aeration, presence of sodium acetate as an additional carbon source, or growth on crude complex carbon sources (molasses, vinasse, or starch). High-molecular-weight polymer can be obtained at pH 7.0, optimal for the culture (1485 kDa), temperature 30-37 degrees C (1600-1450 kDa, respectively), and low aeration (2215 kDa). The following factors decrease PHB MW: pH deviation to the acidic (pH 6.0, 476 kDa) or alkaline (pH 8.0, 354 kDa) range or lower temperature (20 degrees C, 897 kDa). Introduction of additional carbon source (sodium acetate) at concentrations in the medium varying from 0 to 5 g/l provides an original method of production of PHB with predetermined MW in a wide range, from 270 to 1515 kDa, with high PHB content in the cell.

  16. Translocation of an 89-kDa periplasmic protein is associated with Holospora infection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Koichi; Dohra, Hideo; Lang, B. Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Hori, Manabu; Fujishima, Masahiro . E-mail: fujishim@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-02

    The symbiotic bacterium Holospora obtusa infects the macronucleus of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. After ingestion by its host, an infectious form of Holospora with an electron-translucent tip passes through the host digestive vacuole and penetrates the macronuclear envelope with this tip. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this process, we raised a monoclonal antibody against the tip-specific 89-kDa protein, sequenced this partially, and identified the corresponding complete gene. The deduced protein sequence carries two actin-binding motifs. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy shows that during escape from the host digestive vacuole, the 89-kDa proteins translocates from the inside to the outside of the tip. When the bacterium invades the macronucleus, the 89-kDa protein is left behind at the entry point of the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of fine fibrous structures that co-localize with the antibody-labeled regions of the bacterium. Our findings suggest that the 89-kDa protein plays a role in Holospora's escape from the host digestive vacuole, the migration through the host cytoplasm, and the invasion into the macronucleus.

  17. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  18. Molecular diagnosis of genodermatoses.

    PubMed

    Wessagowit, Vesarat

    2013-01-01

    The progress of molecular genetics helps clinicians to prove or exclude a suspected diagnosis for a vast and yet increasing number of genodermatoses. This leads to precise genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic haplotyping for many inherited skin conditions. It is also helpful in such occasions as phenocopy, late onset and incomplete penetrance, uniparental disomy, mitochondrial inheritance and pigmentary mosaicism. Molecular methods of two genodermatoses are explained in detail, i.e. genodermatoses with skin fragility and neurofibromatosis type 1.

  19. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  20. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  1. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nearby Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebrun, F.

    1984-01-01

    If the gas-to-dust ratio is sufficiently uniform throughout the local interstellar medium, galaxy counts may provide a useful probe of the large scale structure of the interstellar gas. This idea substantiated by gamma ray observations led to the discovery of nearby molecular cloud complexes. The reddening studies indicate that one of them lies between 80 and 140 pc from the Sun. From CO observations, its molecular mass is estimated to be a few 1000 stellar mass units.

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Ionomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-05

    ion selective electrodes and ion selective optical sensors using a modified version of the molecular imprinting technique. The modification is a...materials may be the means to realize this goal. An additional application of metal ion imprinted polymers is as sensors . The ability to detect a...been shown to have dramatic effects on polymer properties. The benefits of ionic crosslinking on molecular imprinting are two-fold. First, ionic

  4. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  5. PREFACE: Molecular nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtet, Geneviève; Dujardin, Gérald

    2006-08-01

    The concept of molecular nanomachines has become a reality in the past few years in organic and supramolecular chemistry, in biochemistry and in atom-scale manipulation with the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). In chemistry, molecules can be designed and synthesized to have specific electrical, mechanical, optical or reactive properties. In biochemistry, single natural biomolecules can be isolated and activated as nanomachines. In atom-scale manipulation, the STM can be used to power and to control the operation of individual molecules as molecular nanomachines. The fields of chemical synthesis, biomolecular machines and atom-scale manipulations, have each developed as a separate entity. However, mutual integration of these different research fields appears to be a very fruitful approach for the future of molecular nanomachines. This special section of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is the follow-up to a meeting held in Les Houches (France) on 17-21 January 2005 on molecular nanomachines. The section aims to contribute to the readers’ understanding by giving a clear overview of the principal issues of molecular nanomachines. We hope that it will facilitate new collaborations between researchers from these different fields, so necessary for the integrated development of molecular nanomachines.

  6. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  7. Molecular biology in physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, S.; Gargus, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this symposium on molecular biology in physiology was to introduce molecular biology to physiologists who had relatively little exposure to the new developments in this field, so that they can become conversant on this topic and contribute to the advancement of physiology by incorporating molecular biological approaches as a part of their research arsenal. This report is a review of the symposium, which consisted of two four-part sessions. Each session had four papers. After the discussion of the basic concepts, terminology, and methodology used in molecular biology, it was shown how these basic principles have been applied to the study of the genes encoding two membrane proteins that have important transport functions (band 3 and ATPase). The second half of the symposium consisted of papers on the state-of-the-art developments in the application of molecular biology to the studies of the atrial natriuretic factor and renin genes, adenylate cyclase-coupled adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine receptors and sodium channel, and long-term and short-term memories. The ultimate goal is that these examples will provide an impetus for the opening of new frontiers of research in physiology by taking advantage of the tools developed from recent advances in molecular biology.

  8. Workshop on Molecular Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular evolution has become the nexus of many areas of biological research. It both brings together and enriches such areas as biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, population genetics, systematics, developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, in vitro evolution, and molecular ecology. The Workshop provides an important contribution to these fields in that it promotes interdisciplinary research and interaction, and thus provides a glue that sticks together disparate fields. Due to the wide range of fields addressed by the study of molecular evolution, it is difficult to offer a comprehensive course in a university setting. It is rare for a single institution to maintain expertise in all necessary areas. In contrast, the Workshop is uniquely able to provide necessary breadth and depth by utilizing a large number of faculty with appropriate expertise. Furthermore, the flexible nature of the Workshop allows for rapid adaptation to changes in the dynamic field of molecular evolution. For example, the 2003 Workshop included recently emergent research areas of molecular evolution of development and genomics.

  9. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  10. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  11. Nanobody: The “Magic Bullet” for Molecular Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging involves the non-invasive investigation of biological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular level, which can play diverse roles in better understanding and treatment of various diseases. Recently, single domain antigen-binding fragments known as 'nanobodies' were bioengineered and tested for molecular imaging applications. Small molecular size (~15 kDa) and suitable configuration of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of nanobodies offer many desirable features suitable for imaging applications, such as rapid targeting and fast blood clearance, high solubility, high stability, easy cloning, modular nature, and the capability of binding to cavities and difficult-to-access antigens. Using nanobody-based probes, several imaging techniques such as radionuclide-based, optical and ultrasound have been employed for visualization of target expression in various disease models. This review summarizes the recent developments in the use of nanobody-based probes for molecular imaging applications. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is expected that nanobody-based molecular imaging agents will play an important role in the diagnosis and management of various diseases. PMID:24578722

  12. High molecular weight polyglycerol-based multivalent mannose conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Creagh, A Louise; Shenoi, Rajesh A; Rossi, Nicholas A A; Brooks, Donald E; Chan, Timmy; Lam, Jonathan; Dandepally, Srinivasa R; Haynes, Charles A

    2010-10-11

    We report the synthesis and characterization of multivalent mannose conjugates based on high molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycerols (HPG). A range of glycoconjugates were synthesized from high molecular weight HPGs (up to 493 kDa) and varying mannose units (22-303 per HPG). Hemagglutination assays using fresh human red blood cells and concanavalin A (Con A) showed that HPG-mannose conjugates exhibited a large enhancement in the relative potency of conjugates (as high as 40000) along with a significant increment in relative activity per sugar (up to 255). The size of the HPG scaffold and the number of mannose residues per HPG were all shown to influence the enhancement of binding interactions with Con A. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments confirmed the enhanced binding affinity and showed that both molecular size and ligand density play important roles. The enhancement in Con A binding to the high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates is due to a combination of inter- and intramolecular mannose binding. A few fold increments in the binding constant were obtained over mannose upon covalent attachment to HPG. The binding enhancement is due to the highly favorable entropic contribution to the multiple interactions of Con A to mannose residues on HPG. The high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates showed positive cooperativity in binding to Con A. Although carbohydrate density has less of an effect on functional valency of the conjugate compared to the molecular size, it determines the binding affinity.

  13. Impact of molecular weight in four-branched star vectors with narrow molecular weight distribution on gene delivery efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yasushi; Borovkov, Alexey; Zhou, Yue-Min; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2009-12-01

    A series of star-shaped cationic polymers, termed star vectors (SVs), has been developed as effective nonviral gene delivery carriers. In this study, we separated SVs into several fractions having different molecular weights with very narrow molecular weight distributions in order to examine in detail the influence of the molecular weight of the SVs on the gene transfection efficiency. As a model compound for several types of SVs, 4-branched poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide) having a molecular weight (M(n)) of approximately 35 kDa and polydispersity of 1.6 was prepared by iniferter-based radical polymerization. The SVs were separated using size-exclusion chromatography to obtain seven fractions having M(n) ranging from 27 kDa to 73 kDa with polydispersity ranging from 1.1 to 1.2. All the fractionated SVs have similar pH of 10.2-10.4 and were able to interact with and condense luciferase-encoding plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to yield SV/DNA polyplexes. A water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST) assay showed that all SVs had minimal cellular cytotoxicity under an N/P charge ratio of 10. The critical micellar concentration decreased with an increase in the M(n) of the fractionated SVs; however, the particle size of the polyplexes, exclusion activity of ethidium bromide, and zeta-potential of the polyplexes increased. An in vitro evaluation using COS-1 cells at an N/P ratio of 10 showed that transfection activity increased almost linearly with M(n). The highest transfection activity was obtained for SVs with the highest M(n) (73 kDa), which was over 7 times that for the SVs with the lowest M(n) (27 kDa), the nonfractionated original SV, or PEI standard. The transfection efficiency was more correlated with the amphiphilicity or hydrophobicity of the SVs and the surface potential and condensate density of the polyplexes than with the particle size.

  14. The Ubiquitin Receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 Redundantly Regulate Endoreduplication by Modulating the Stability of TCP14/15 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yuancheng; Chen, Liangliang; Lu, Yaru; Wu, Yingbao; Dumenil, Jack; Zhu, Zhengge; Bevan, Michael W.; Li, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    Organ growth involves the coordination of cell proliferation and cell growth with differentiation. Endoreduplication is correlated with the onset of cell differentiation and with cell and organ size, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking cell and organ growth with endoreduplication. We have previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 influences organ growth by restricting cell proliferation. Here, we show that DA1 and its close family members DAR1 and DAR2 are redundantly required for endoreduplication during leaf development. DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 physically interact with the transcription factors TCP14 and TCP15, which repress endoreduplication by directly regulating the expression of cell-cycle genes. We also show that DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 modulate the stability of TCP14 and TCP15 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses demonstrate that DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 function in a common pathway with TCP14/15 to regulate endoreduplication. Thus, our findings define an important genetic and molecular mechanism involving the ubiquitin receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 and the transcription factors TCP14 and TCP15 that links endoreduplication with cell and organ growth. PMID:25757472

  15. The ubiquitin receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 redundantly regulate endoreduplication by modulating the stability of TCP14/15 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuancheng; Chen, Liangliang; Lu, Yaru; Wu, Yingbao; Dumenil, Jack; Zhu, Zhengge; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Yunhai

    2015-03-01

    Organ growth involves the coordination of cell proliferation and cell growth with differentiation. Endoreduplication is correlated with the onset of cell differentiation and with cell and organ size, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking cell and organ growth with endoreduplication. We have previously demonstrated that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 influences organ growth by restricting cell proliferation. Here, we show that DA1 and its close family members DAR1 and DAR2 are redundantly required for endoreduplication during leaf development. DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 physically interact with the transcription factors TCP14 and TCP15, which repress endoreduplication by directly regulating the expression of cell-cycle genes. We also show that DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 modulate the stability of TCP14 and TCP15 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses demonstrate that DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 function in a common pathway with TCP14/15 to regulate endoreduplication. Thus, our findings define an important genetic and molecular mechanism involving the ubiquitin receptors DA1, DAR1, and DAR2 and the transcription factors TCP14 and TCP15 that links endoreduplication with cell and organ growth. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  17. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  18. Effect of molecular weight of dissolved organic matter on toxicity and bioavailability of copper to lettuce.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xudong; Chen, Xianni; Liu, Shuai; Ge, Xizu

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the effects of molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the toxicity and bioavailability of copper (Cu) to plants, DOM extracted from chicken manure was ultra-filtered into four fractions according to their molecular weights by means of sequential-stage ultrafiltration technique. Lettuce seeds were germinated by being exposed to the solutions containing Cu2+ with or without different fractions of DOM. The concentration of copper in roots, leaves, sprouts and the length of roots were investigated. The results showed that not all fractions of DOM could improve copper availability or toxicity. The fraction of DOM with larger molecular weight more than 1 kDa had higher complexation stability with Cu2+ and caused lower concentration of free Cu2+ ion in the solution of copper plus the fraction, resulting in lower availability and toxicity of copper to lettuce, but the fraction with molecular weight less than 1 kDa had the opposite function. Therefore, the molecular weight of 1 kDa may be the division point to determine DOM to increase or decrease copper availability and toxicity.

  19. The isopenicillin N acyltransferases of Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum differ in their ability to maintain the 40-kDa alphabeta heterodimer in an undissociated form.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Francisco J; Cardoza, Rosa E; Montenegro, Eduardo; Velasco, Javier; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Martín, Juan F

    2003-05-01

    The isopenicillin N acyltransferases (IATs) of Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum differed in their ability to maintain the 40-kDa proacyltransferase alphabeta heterodimer in an undissociated form. The native A. nidulans IAT exhibited a molecular mass of 40 kDa by gel filtration. The P. chrysogenum IAT showed a molecular mass of 29 kDa by gel filtration (corresponding to the beta subunit of the enzyme) but the undissociated 40-kDa heterodimer was never observed even in crude extracts. Heterologous expression experiments showed that the chromatographic behaviour of IAT was determined by the source of the penDE gene used in the expression experiments and not by the host itself. When the penDE gene of A. nidulans was expressed in P. chrysogenum npe6 and npe8 or in Acremonium chrysogenum, the IAT formed had a molecular mass of 40 kDa. On the other hand, when the penDE gene originating from P. chrysogenum was expressed in A. chrysogenum, the active IAT had a molecular mass of 29 kDa. The intronless form of the penDE gene cloned from an A. nidulans cDNA library and overexpressed in Escherichia coli formed the enzymatically active 40-kDa proIAT, which was not self-processed as shown by immunoblotting with antibodies to IAT. This 40-kDa protein remained unprocessed even when treated with A. nidulans crude extract. In contrast, the P. chrysogenum penDE intronless gene cloned from a cDNA library was expressed in E. coli, and the IAT was self-processed efficiently into its alpha (29 kDa) and beta (11 kDa) subunits. It is concluded that P. chrysogenum and A. nidulans differ in their ability to self-process their respective proIAT protein and to maintain the alpha and beta subunits as an undissociated heterodimer, probably because of the amino-acid sequence differences in the proIAT which affect the autocatalytic activity.

  20. Cytotoxicity of polycations: Relationship of molecular weight and the hydrolytic theory of the mechanism of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Monnery, Bryn D; Wright, Michael; Cavill, Rachel; Hoogenboom, Richard; Shaunak, Sunil; Steinke, Joachim H G; Thanou, Maya

    2017-04-15

    The mechanism of polycation cytotoxicity and the relationship to polymer molecular weight is poorly understood. To gain an insight into this important phenomenon a range of newly synthesised uniform (near monodisperse) linear polyethylenimines, commercially available poly(l-lysine)s and two commonly used PEI-based transfectants (broad 22kDa linear and 25kDa branched) were tested for their cytotoxicity against the A549 human lung carcinoma cell line. Cell membrane damage assays (LDH release) and cell viability assays (MTT) showed a strong relationship to dose and polymer molecular weight, and increasing incubation times revealed that even supposedly "non-toxic" low molecular weight polymers still damage cell membranes. The newly proposed mechanism of cell membrane damage is acid catalysed hydrolysis of lipidic phosphoester bonds, which was supported by observations of the hydrolysis of DOPC liposomes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE PAGES

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; ...

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  2. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  3. The Supernova Impostor SN 2010da

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova impostors are optical transients that, despite being assigned a supernova designation, do not signal the death of a massive star or accreting white dwarf. Instead, many impostors are thought to be major eruptions from luminous blue variables. Although the physical cause of these eruptions is still debated, tidal interactions from a binary companion has recently gained traction as a possible explanation for observations of some supernova impostors. In this talk, I will discuss the particularly interesting impostor SN 2010da, which exhibits high-luminosity, variable X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is consistent with accretion onto a neutron star, making SN 2010da a likely high mass X-ray binary in addition to a supernova impostor. SN 2010da is a unique laboratory for understanding both binary interactions as drivers of massive star eruptions and the evolutionary processes that create high mass X-ray binaries.

  4. Preparation of low molecular weight fucoidan by gamma-irradiation and its anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2013-09-12

    Fucoidan is a marine sulfated polysaccharide with a wide variety of biological activities. Recently, it has been reported that low molecular weight fucoidan has the enhanced antioxidant and anticoagulative activities. However, degradation techniques such as enzymolysis and acid hydrolysis for obtaining low molecular weight fucoidan, have the disadvantages such as narrow substrate specificity and unfavorable hydrolysis of side groups, respectively. In this study, low molecular weight fucoidan was prepared by gamma-irradiation. When fucoidan was gamma-irradiated, the molecular weight rapidly dropped to 38 kDa when the sample was irradiated at 10 kGy, then gradually dropped to 7 kDa without the significant elimination of the sulfate groups. Low molecular weight fucoidan had higher cytotoxicity than native fucoidan in cancer cells, such as AGS, MCF-7, and HepG-2. In addition, low molecular weight fucoidan showed higher inhibitory activity of cell transformation, which resulted in higher anticarcinogenicity. This result suggests that low molecular weight fucoidan with enhanced biological activities can be produced by a simple irradiation method without changing the functional groups.

  5. Immunostimulative Activity of Low Molecular Weight Chitosans in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Xiang, Xing-Wei; Huang, Yan-Na; Gao, Yang; Qu, You-Le

    2015-09-30

    Chitosan and its derivatives such as low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs) have been reported to exert many biological activities, such as antioxidant and antitumor effects. However, complex and molecular weight dependent effects of chitosan remain controversial and the mechanisms that mediate these complex effects are still poorly defined. This study was carried out to investigate the immunostimulative effect of different molecular weight chitosan in RAW264.7 macrophages. Our data suggested that two LMWCs (molecular weight of 3 kDa and 50 kDa) both possessed immunostimulative activity, which was dependent on dose and, at the higher doses, also on the molecular weight. LMWCs could significantly enhance the the pinocytic activity, and induce the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a molecular weight and concentration-dependent manner. LMWCs were further showed to promote the expression of the genes including iNOS, TNF-α. Taken together, our findings suggested that LMWCs elicited significantly immunomodulatory response through up-regulating mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and activated RAW264.7 macrophage in a molecular weight- and concentration-dependent manner.

  6. Immunostimulative Activity of Low Molecular Weight Chitosans in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Xiang, Xing-Wei; Huang, Yan-Na; Gao, Yang; Qu, You-Le

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives such as low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs) have been reported to exert many biological activities, such as antioxidant and antitumor effects. However, complex and molecular weight dependent effects of chitosan remain controversial and the mechanisms that mediate these complex effects are still poorly defined. This study was carried out to investigate the immunostimulative effect of different molecular weight chitosan in RAW264.7 macrophages. Our data suggested that two LMWCs (molecular weight of 3 kDa and 50 kDa) both possessed immunostimulative activity, which was dependent on dose and, at the higher doses, also on the molecular weight. LMWCs could significantly enhance the the pinocytic activity, and induce the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a molecular weight and concentration-dependent manner. LMWCs were further showed to promote the expression of the genes including iNOS, TNF-α. Taken together, our findings suggested that LMWCs elicited significantly immunomodulatory response through up-regulating mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and activated RAW264.7 macrophage in a molecular weight- and concentration-dependent manner. PMID:26437419

  7. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2009-07-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called "phylogenomics") is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  8. An Active 32-kDa Cathepsin L Is Secreted Directly from HT 1080 Fibrosarcoma Cells and Not via Lysosomal Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoko; Kondo, Chihiro; Katunuma, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin L [EC 3.4.22.15] is secreted via lysosomal exocytosis by several types of cancer cells, including prostate and breast cancer cells. We previously reported that human cultured fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells secrete cathepsin L into the medium; this secreted cathepsin is 10-times more active than intracellular cathepsin. This increased activity was attributed to the presence of a 32-kDa cathepsin L in the medium. The aim of this study was to examine how this active 32-kDa cathepsin L is secreted into the medium. To this end, we compared the secreted active 32-kDa cathepsin L with lysosomal cathepsin L by using a novel gelatin zymography technique that employs leupeptin. We also examined the glycosylation and phosphorylation status of the proteins by using the enzymes endoglycosidase H [EC 3.2.1.96] and alkaline phosphatase [EC 3.1.3.1]. Strong active bands corresponding to the 32-kDa and 34-kDa cathepsin L forms were detected in the medium and lysosomes, respectively. The cell extract exhibited strong active bands for both forms. Moreover, both forms were adsorbed onto a concanavalin A-agarose column. The core protein domain of both forms had the same molecular mass of 30 kDa. The 32-kDa cathepsin L was phosphorylated, while the 34-kDa lysosomal form was dephosphorylated, perhaps because of the lysosomal marker enzyme, acid phosphatase. These results suggest that the active 32-kDa form does not enter the lysosomes. In conclusion, our results indicate that the active 32-kDa cathepsin L is secreted directly from the HT 1080 cells and not via lysosomal exocytosis. PMID:26674348

  9. Comprehensive characterization of molecular interactions based on nanomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin; Braun, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (approximately 748*10(6) Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions.

  10. Comprehensive Characterization of Molecular Interactions Based on Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (∼748*106 Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions. PMID:18978938

  11. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  12. Purification and characterization of novel antioxidant peptides of different molecular weights from mackerel Pneumatophorus japonicus protein hydrolysate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueqin; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Yu, Huahua; Li, Kecheng; Chen, Zuoyuan; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Mackerel ( Pneumatophorus japonic u s) proteins were hydrolyzed by five proteases: trypsin, papain, neutrase, acid protease, and flavourzyme. The hydrolysate treated by neutrase exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the hydrolysis conditions in an effort to obtain a mackerel protein hydrolysate (MPH) with the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity. The MPH was fractioned using a series of ultrafiltration membranes and five fractions, namely, MPH-I (>10 kDa), MPH-II (10-2.5 kDa), MPH-III (1-2.5 kDa), MPH-IV (0.4-1 kDa), and MPH-V (below 0.4 kDa), were obtained. DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and the lipid peroxidation inhibition capability of these fractions were evaluated. The fractions in molecular weights <2.5 kDa (MPH-III, MPH-IV, and MPH-V), which occupied 93.4% of the total fractions, showed the strongest antioxidant activity; and the antioxidant activities of the three fractions are similar to each other. Using SP Sephadex C-25 and Sephadex G-25 columns, eight fractions were obtained from the MPH (<2.5 kDa). The isolated peptide I (1 664 kDa) displayed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity. Therefore, MPH is a potential source of antioxidant peptides.

  13. Molecular weight distribution of a full-scale landfill leachate treatment by membrane bioreactor and nanofiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Marco; Cakmakcı, Mehmet; Yaman, F Büşra; Ozkaya, Bestamin

    2013-04-01

    In this study, Molecular weight (MW) distributions of a full-scale landfill leachate treatment plant consisting of membrane bioreactor (MBR) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane were investigated. The leachate was sampled from the equalization tank, and effluents of MBR and NF membrane in the landfill leachate treatment plant. Parameters of COD, TOC, TKN, NH4(+)-N and UV(254, 280 and 320) absorbance were analyzed to evaluate both the removal performance of the plant and MW distributions. MW distribution of samples were determined by ultrafiltration (UF) (100 kDa, 10 kDa, 5 kDa, 1 kDa and 500 Da) membranes. The results indicated that organic matter of one third percent is particulate or colloidal form and almost half of the organic fraction has a lower MW than 500 Da. In addition, organic matter had hydrophilic character. Most part of TKN was>500 Da with the corresponding rate of 92%. Further, UV absorbance of raw leachate (RW) decreased 85% after 500 Da.

  14. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm.

  15. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  16. Molecular size and molecular size distribution affecting traditional balsamic vinegar aging.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Pasquale Massimiliano; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-08-27

    A first attempt at a semiquantitative study of molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) in cooked grape must and traditional balsamic vinegar (TBV) with increasing well-defined age was performed by high-performance liquid size exclusion chromatography (SEC) using dual detection, that is, differential refractive index (DRI) and absorbance (UV-vis) based detectors. With this aim, MW and MWD, including number- and weight-average MW and polydispersity, were determined with respect to a secondary standard and then analyzed. All investigated vinegar samples were recognized as compositionally and structurally heterogeneous blends of copolymers (melanoidins) spreading over a wide range of molecular sizes: the relative MW ranged from 2 to >2000 kDa. The extent of the polymerization reactions was in agreement with the TBV browning kinetics. MWD parameters varied asymptotically toward either upper or lower limits during aging, reflecting a nonequilibrium status of the balance between polymerization and depolymerization reactions in TBV. MWD parameters were proposed as potential aging markers of TBV.

  17. Evolutionary molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Randolph M; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2012-05-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but some major advances in evolutionary biology from the twentieth century that provide foundations for evolutionary medicine are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the need for both proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, competition between alleles, co-evolution, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are transforming evolutionary biology in ways that create even more opportunities for progress at its interfaces with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and related principles to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine.

  18. Molecular interaction databases.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Sandra

    2012-05-01

    Molecular interaction databases are playing an ever more important role in our understanding of the biology of the cell. An increasing number of resources exist to provide these data and many of these have adopted the controlled vocabularies and agreed-upon standardised data formats produced by the Molecular Interaction workgroup of the Human Proteome Organization Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO PSI-MI). Use of these standards allows each resource to establish PSI Common QUery InterfaCe (PSICQUIC) service, making data from multiple resources available to the user in response to a single query. This cooperation between databases has been taken a stage further, with the establishment of the International Molecular Exchange (IMEx) consortium which aims to maximise the curation power of numerous data resources, and provide the user with a non-redundant, consistently annotated set of interaction data. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [Molecular techniques in mycology].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuesta, Isabel; Gómez-López, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-11-01

    An increasing number of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of fungal infections have been developed in the last few years, due to the growing prevalence of mycoses and the length of time required for diagnosis when classical microbiological methods are used. These methods are designed to resolve the following aspects of mycological diagnosis: a) Identification of fungi to species level by means of sequencing relevant taxonomic targets; b) early clinical diagnosis of invasive fungal infections; c) detection of molecular mechanisms of resistance to antifungal agents; and d) molecular typing of fungi. Currently, these methods are restricted to highly developed laboratories. However, some of these techniques will probably be available in daily clinical practice in the near future.

  20. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  1. Stueckelberg and Molecular Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Jan

    The first period of E. C. G. Stueckelberg's scientific career was marked by important contributions he made to molecular physics.1 After publishing his thesis in 1927 in Basel [1] Stueckelberg joined the prestigious Palmer Physical Laboratory in Princeton where he worked under the guidance of Karl Taylor Compton, brother of Arthur Holly Compton. Stueckelberg owed this position devoted several papers to problems of molecular physics. Stueckelberg had the benefit at Princeton of exchanges with other gifted members of the Palmer Physical Laboratory, Philip M. Morse and E. U. Condon among others.3 to a recommendation by A. Sommerfeld.2 In this stimulating environment, he devoted several papers to problems of molecular physics. Stueckelberg had the benefit at Princeton of exchanges with other gifted members of the Palmer Physical Laboratory, Philip M. Morse and E. U. Condon among others.3

  2. [Molecular diagnosis of ADPKD].

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Mazza, Cinzia; Izzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with ADPKD do not need molecular genetic testing. When indicated, Sanger sequencing is the most commonly used technique. When a pathogenic mutation is not identified by Sanger, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis (MLPA) should be performed to detect gene rearrangement (insertion or deletion). The next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques can provide high-throughput and comprehensive diagnostic screening at lower cost. Finally, in the future, targeted (TS) or whole exome sequencing (WES) will likely play a role in the molecular diagnostics of ADPKD. Molecular genetic testing is indicated in several conditions: no family history; equivocal/atypical renal imaging; marked discordant disease within family; early and severe PKD; reproductive counseling and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis; related living donor transplantation.

  3. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  4. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  5. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  6. Applications of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Craig; Galbán, Stefanie; Van Dort, Marcian; Luker, Gary D.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtualla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Today molecular imaging technologies play a central role in clinical oncology. The use of imaging techniques in early cancer detection, treatment response and new therapy development is steadily growing and has already significantly impacted clinical management of cancer. In this chapter we will overview three different molecular imaging technologies used for the understanding of disease biomarkers, drug development, or monitoring therapeutic outcome. They are (1) optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging) (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) nuclear imaging (e.g, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)). We will review the use of molecular reporters of biological processes (e.g. apoptosis and protein kinase activity) for high throughput drug screening and new cancer therapies, diffusion MRI as a biomarker for early treatment response and PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology. PMID:21075334

  7. Microfluidic Western Blotting of Low-Molecular-Mass Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic Western blot assay (μWestern) using a Tris tricine discontinuous buffer system suitable for analyses of a wide molecular mass range (6.5–116 kDa). The Tris tricine μWestern is completed in an enclosed, straight glass microfluidic channel housing a photopatterned polyacrylamide gel that incorporates a photoactive benzophenone methacrylamide monomer. Upon brief ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, the hydrogel toggles from molecular sieving for size-based separation to a covalent immobilization scaffold for in situ antibody probing. Electrophoresis controls all assay stages, affording purely electronic operation with no pumps or valves needed for fluid control. Electrophoretic introduction of antibody into and along the molecular sieving gel requires that the probe must traverse through (i) a discontinuous gel interface central to the transient isotachophoresis used to achieve high-performance separations and (ii) the full axial length of the separation gel. In-channel antibody probing of small molecular mass species is especially challenging, since the gel must effectively sieve small proteins while permitting effective probing with large-molecular-mass antibodies. To create a well-controlled gel interface, we introduce a fabrication method that relies on a hydrostatic pressure mismatch between the buffer and polymer precursor solution to eliminate the interfacial pore-size control issues that arise when a polymerizing polymer abuts a nonpolymerizing polymer solution. Combined with a new swept antibody probe plug delivery scheme, the Tris tricine μWestern blot enables 40% higher separation resolution as compared to a Tris glycine system, destacking of proteins down to 6.5 kDa, and a 100-fold better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for small pore gels, expanding the range of applicable biological targets. PMID:25268977

  8. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  9. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  10. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  11. Circumstellar radio molecular lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NGUYEN-QUANG-RIEU

    1987-01-01

    Radio molecular lines appear to be useful probes into the stellar environment. Silicon oxide masers provide information on the physical conditions in the immediate vicinity of the stellar photosphere. Valuable information on the physics operating in the envelope of IRC + 10216 was recently obtained by high sensitivity observations and detailed theoretical analyses. Infrared speckle interferometry in the molecular lines and in the continuum is helpful in the investigation of the inner region of the envelope. These techniques are discussed in terms of late-type star mass loss.

  12. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  14. A relevant IgE-reactive 28kDa protein identified from Salsola kali pollen extract by proteomics is a natural degradation product of an integral 47kDa polygalaturonase.

    PubMed

    Mas, Salvador; Oeo-Santos, Carmen; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Colás, Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Barber, Domingo; Rodríguez, Rosalía; de Los Ríos, Vivian; Barderas, Rodrigo; Villalba, Mayte

    2017-08-01

    A highly prevalent IgE-binding protein band of 28kDa is observed when Salsola kali pollen extract is incubated with individual sera from Amaranthaceae pollen sensitized patients. By an immunoproteomic analysis of S. kali pollen extract, we identified this protein band as an allergenic polygalacturonase enzyme. The allergen, named Sal k 6, exhibits a pI of 7.14 and a molecular mass of 39,554.2Da. It presents similarities to Platanaceae, Poaceae, and Cupressaceae allergenic polygalacturonases. cDNA-encoding sequence was subcloned into the pET41b vector and produced in bacteria as a His-tag fusion recombinant protein. The far-UV CD spectrum determined that rSal k 6 was folded. Immunostaining of the S. kali pollen protein extract with a rSal k 6-specific pAb and LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses confirmed the co-existence of the 28kDa band together with an allergenic band of about 47kDa in the pollen extract. Therefore, the 28kDa was assigned as a natural degradation product of the 47kDa integral polygalacturonase. The IgE-binding inhibition to S. kali pollen extract using rSal k 6 as inhibitor showed that signals directed to both protein bands of 28 and 47kDa were completely abrogated. The average prevalence of rSal k 6 among the three populations analyzed was 30%, with values correlating well with the levels of grains/m(3) of Amaranthaceae pollen. Sal k 6 shares IgE epitopes with Oleaceae members (Fraxinus excelsior, Olea europaea and Syringa vulgaris), with IgE-inhibition values ranging from 20% to 60%, respectively. No IgE-inhibition was observed with plant-derived food extracts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hidden sketches by Leonardo da Vinci revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-02-01

    Three drawings on the back of Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin and Child with St Anne (circa 1508) have been discovered by researchers led by Michel Menu from the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF) and the Louvre Museum in Paris.

  16. DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, T. F.; Howell, S. B.; Petit, V.; Lépine, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present 16 new, and confirm 7 previously identified, DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field through ground-based spectroscopy with the Hale 200″, Kitt Peak 4-m, and Bok 2.3-m telescopes. Using atmospheric models, we determine their effective temperatures and surface gravities to constrain their position with respect to the ZZ Ceti (DA pulsator) instability strip, and look for the presence or absence of pulsation with Kepler's unprecedented photometry. Our results are as follows. (i) From our measurements of temperature and surface gravity, 12 of the 23 DA white dwarfs from this work fall well outside of the instability strip. The Kepler photometry available for 11 of these WDs allows us to confirm that none are pulsating. One of these 11 happens to be a presumed binary, KIC 11604781, with a period of ˜5 d. (ii) The remaining 11 DA white dwarfs are instability strip candidates, potentially falling within the current, empirical instability strip, after accounting for uncertainties. These WDs will help constrain the strip's location further, as eight are near the blue edge and three are near the red edge of the instability strip. Four of these WDs do not have Kepler photometry, so ground-based photometry is needed to determine the pulsation nature of these white dwarfs. The remaining seven have Kepler photometry available, but do not show any periodicity on typical WD pulsation time-scales.

  17. How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caouette, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    To be effective and relevant in twenty-first-century learning, art needs to be more inclusive. In this article, the author discusses how teachers can find a good example in Leonardo da Vinci for building an art program. His art, design, and curiosity are the perfect foundation for any art program, at any level. (Contains 3 resources and 3 online…

  18. How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caouette, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    To be effective and relevant in twenty-first-century learning, art needs to be more inclusive. In this article, the author discusses how teachers can find a good example in Leonardo da Vinci for building an art program. His art, design, and curiosity are the perfect foundation for any art program, at any level. (Contains 3 resources and 3 online…

  19. VerSeDa: vertebrate secretome database

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Ana R.; Oguiza, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the current tools, de novo secretome (full set of proteins secreted by an organism) prediction is a time consuming bioinformatic task that requires a multifactorial analysis in order to obtain reliable in silico predictions. Hence, to accelerate this process and offer researchers a reliable repository where secretome information can be obtained for vertebrates and model organisms, we have developed VerSeDa (Vertebrate Secretome Database). This freely available database stores information about proteins that are predicted to be secreted through the classical and non-classical mechanisms, for the wide range of vertebrate species deposited at the NCBI, UCSC and ENSEMBL sites. To our knowledge, VerSeDa is the only state-of-the-art database designed to store secretome data from multiple vertebrate genomes, thus, saving an important amount of time spent in the prediction of protein features that can be retrieved from this repository directly. Database URL: VerSeDa is freely available at http://genomics.cicbiogune.es/VerSeDa/index.php PMID:28365718

  20. VerSeDa: vertebrate secretome database.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Ana R; Oguiza, José A; Aransay, Ana M; Lavín, José L

    2017-01-01

    Based on the current tools, de novo secretome (full set of proteins secreted by an organism) prediction is a time consuming bioinformatic task that requires a multifactorial analysis in order to obtain reliable in silico predictions. Hence, to accelerate this process and offer researchers a reliable repository where secretome information can be obtained for vertebrates and model organisms, we have developed VerSeDa (Vertebrate Secretome Database). This freely available database stores information about proteins that are predicted to be secreted through the classical and non-classical mechanisms, for the wide range of vertebrate species deposited at the NCBI, UCSC and ENSEMBL sites. To our knowledge, VerSeDa is the only state-of-the-art database designed to store secretome data from multiple vertebrate genomes, thus, saving an important amount of time spent in the prediction of protein features that can be retrieved from this repository directly. VerSeDa is freely available at http://genomics.cicbiogune.es/VerSeDa/index.php.

  1. Effects of membrane molecular weight cutoff on performance of a novel bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Yue; Han, Bing; Gu, Jin-yang; Chu, Xue-hui; Xiao, Jiang-qiang; Ren, Hao-zhen; Tan, Jiao-jun; Ding, Yi-tao

    2011-03-01

    Immunoisolation using semipermeable membranes has been incorporated into bioartificial liver (BAL) devices to separate cellular components of the recipient's immune system from the cells within the BAL device. This study was designed to explore the influence of membrane molecular weight cutoff on performance of the multilayer radial-flow BAL using porcine hepatocytes cocultured with mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, healthy beagles underwent 6-h treatment with a BAL containing membrane with 200 kDa retention rating or 1200 kDa retention rating. Functional markers of BAL performance were monitored before and after treatment, as well as cytotoxic immune response to BAL therapy. The results showed that hepatocyte performance levels such as albumin secretion, urea synthesis, and viability were all significantly higher in 200 kDa retention rating group compared with the 1200 kDa retention rating group after treatment (P <  0.05). Significant levels of canine proteins were detected in BAL medium from the 1200 kDa retention rating group. Fluorescence microscopy further verified that heavy deposition of canine IgG, IgM, and complement (C3) on coculture cells was obtained after BAL treatment in the 1200 kDa retention rating group. However, only trace deposits of canine immunoproteins were observed on coculture cells obtained from BAL in the 200 kDa retention rating group. Small membrane molecular weight cutoff of the BAL could reduce the transfer of xenoreactive antibodies into the BAL medium and improve the performance of the BAL.

  2. The local effect of octreotide on mechanical pain sensitivity is more sensitive in DA rats than DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fan-Rong; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A recent study by the authors indicated that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with the differences in basal pain sensitivity and in formalin model between Dark-Agouti (DA) and novel congenic DA.1U rats, which have the same genetic background as DA rats except for the u alleles of MHC. The objective of the present study is to investigate whether there is a difference in the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model and local analgesic effect of octreotide (OCT) between DA and DA.1U rats. The hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and heat withdrawal latency (HWL) were observed. The C unit firings of the tibial nerve evoked by non-noxious and noxious toe movements were recorded by electrophysiological methods in normal and PIA models in DA and DA.1U rats before and after local OCT administration. The expression of somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A) was observed by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that DA rats have a higher mechanical sensitivity than DA.1U rats after PIA. Local OCT administration significantly elevated MWT in DA rats under normal and PIA sate, but not in DA.1U rats. The electrophysiological experiments showed OCT significantly attenuated the firings of C units evoked by non-noxious and noxious stimulation in DA rats more than those in DA.1U rats both in normal and PIA states. In addition, the expression of SSTR2A in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord was significantly higher in DA than in DA.1U rats. All of the findings suggest a higher local analgesic effect of OCT in DA rats than DA.1U rats, which might be associated with the MHC genes.

  3. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-05-03

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding.

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of the 47 kDa Protein Isolated from Aged Garlic Extract on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Namdar Ahmadabad; Zuhair, Mohammad Hassan; Safari, Elahe; Bozorgmehr, Mahmood; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Garlic (Allium sativum) is known as a potent spice and a medicine with broad therapeutic properties ranging from antibacterial to anticancer, and anticoagulant. One of the major purified garlic protein components is the 47 kDa protein. In this study, the effect of 47 kDa protein extracted from aged garlic (AGE) was evalua Materials and Methods Forty seven kDa protein was purified from AGE by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the molecular weight and purity of the isolated protein. DCs were purified from spleen of BALB/c mice by Nycodenz centrifugation and their adhesiveness to the plastic dish. The 47 kDa protein isolated from AGE was added to DCs medium during the overnight culture and the expression of DC surface markers was assessed via flowcytometry. Results The 47 kDa protein-treated DCs lowered the expression of DC maturation markers including: CD40, CD86 and MHC-II in comparison with non-treated DCs; (median of 41% versus 47%, 84% versus 91% and 83% versus 90%, respectively) but we observed no statistical difference between the two groups. Conclusion Upon treatment with DCs with 47 kDa protein, DCs down regulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC-II surface molecules, which is similar to tolerogenic DC phenotype. According to the results of the present study, we found that 47 kDa protein purified from AGE can be considered as a potential candidate to generate tolerogenic DCs in vitro. PMID:23493446

  5. Possible hypoglycemic effect of Aloe vera L. high molecular weight fractions on type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Akira; Hegazy, Sahar; Kabbash, Amal; Wahab, Engy Abd-El

    2009-07-01

    Aloe vera L. high molecular weight fractions (AHM) containing less than 10 ppm of barbaloin and polysaccharide (MW: 1000 kDa) with glycoprotein, verectin (MW: 29 kDa), were prepared by patented hyper-dry system in combination of freeze-dry technique with microwave and far infrared radiation. AHM produced significant decrease in blood glucose level sustained for 6 weeks of the start of the study. Significant decrease in triglycerides was only observed 4 weeks after treatment and continued thereafter. No deterious effects on kidney and liver functions were apparent. Treatment of diabetic patients with AHM may relief vascular complications probably via activation of immunosystem.

  6. Molecular target size of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor in pig dorsal root ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The size of the vanilloid receptor was examined by high-energy radiation inactivation analysis of the binding of ({sup 3}H)resiniferatoxin to pig dorsal root ganglion membranes; it was found to be 270 {plus minus} 25 kDa. This value most likely represents the size of a receptor complex rather than of an individual subunit. Other ligand-gated cation channel complexes have reported molecular weights in this range, e.g. 300 kDa for the acetylcholine receptor.

  7. Quadrupole Ion Mass Spectrometer for Masses of 2 to 50 Da

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, William; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew; Harrison, Willard

    2005-01-01

    A customized quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer (QITMS) has been built to satisfy a need for a compact, rugged instrument for measuring small concentrations of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon in a nitrogen atmosphere. This QITMS can also be used to perform quantitative analyses of other gases within its molecular-mass range, which is 2 to 50 daltons (Da). (More precisely, it can be used to perform quantitative analysis of gases that, when ionized, are characterized by m/Z ratios between 2 and 50, where m is the mass of an ion in daltons and Z is the number of fundamental electric charges on the ion.

  8. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C.; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues. PMID:26496429

  9. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues.

  10. Molecular tectonics: from simple tectons to complex molecular networks.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2005-04-01

    Molecular networks in the crystalline phase are infinite periodic molecular assemblies formed under self-assembly conditions between self-complementary or complementary tectons. These millimeter-size structures may be regarded as hypermolecules formed by supramolecular synthesis using reversible intertecton interactions. Molecular tectonics, based on molecular recognition events and their iteration, is the approach dealing with design and preparation of molecular networks in the solid state. In this Account, an overview of the rational behind this approach is presented. A variety of molecular networks based on van der Waals interactions and hydrogen and coordination bonding possessing diverse connectivity and topology are discussed.

  11. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  12. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  13. Molecular contributions to conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have opened a new chapter in species conservation efforts, as well as population biology. DNA sequencing, MHC (major histocompatibility complex), minisatellite, microsatellite, and RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) procedures allow for identification of parentage, more distant relatives, founders to new populations, unidentified individuals, population structure, effective population size, population-specific markers, etc. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification of mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, ribosomal DNA, chloroplast DNA, and other systems provide for more sophisticated analyses of metapopulation structure, hybridization events, and delineation of species, subspecies, and races, all of which aid in setting species recovery priorities. Each technique can be powerful in its own right but is most credible when used in conjunction with other molecular techniques and, most importantly, with ecological and demographic data collected from the field. Surprisingly few taxa of concern have been assayed with any molecular technique. Thus, rather than showcasing exhaustive details from a few well-known examples, this paper attempts to present a broad range of cases in which molecular techniques have been used to provide insight into conservation efforts.

  14. Clickable molecularly imprinted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changgang; Ye, Lei

    2011-06-07

    Terminal alkynyl and azide groups are introduced on the surface of molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using precipitation polymerization. These clickable groups enable simple nanoparticle conjugation and surface modification under mild reaction conditions, opening new opportunities for nanoparticle-based assays and chemical sensing.

  15. The molecular universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2013-07-01

    Molecular absorption and emission bands dominate the visible, infrared, and submillimeter spectra of most objects with associated gas. These observations reveal a surprisingly rich array of molecular species and attest to a complex chemistry taking place in the harsh environment of the interstellar medium of galaxies. Molecules are truly everywhere and an important component of interstellar gas. This review surveys molecular observations in the various spectral windows and summarizes the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of interstellar molecules. The rich organic inventory of space reflects the multitude of chemical processes involved that, on the one hand, build up molecules an atom at a time and, on the other hand, break down large molecules injected by stars to smaller fragments. Both this bottom-up and the trickle-down chemistry are reviewed. The emphasis is on understanding the characteristics of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and fullerenes and their role in chemistry as well as the intricate interaction of gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions and the chemistry taking place on grain surfaces in dense clouds in setting the organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation and their implications for the chemical history of the Solar System. Many aspects of molecular astrophysics are illustrated with recent observations of the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory.

  16. Polypeptides Based Molecular Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-06

    Molecular Electronics 4 Figure 3. Dehydration synthesis reaction CHAPTER 2 Review of Literature 2.1 Peptides 2.1.1 Introduction to peptides...Peptides are biomolecules formed from the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Figure 3 shows dehydration synthesis reaction (known as condensation

  17. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  18. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  19. Reading the Molecular Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Suggesting that the evolutionary record may be written in proteins and genes, discusses research in which species are compared by immunology, DNA, and radioimmunoassay. Molecular studies show that DNA from humans and chimps is 98 percent identical, a degree of similarity usually occurring only among animals of the same genus. (JN)

  20. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  1. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik R

    2008-01-01

    Molecular simulation is a very powerful toolbox in modern molecular modeling, and enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail--literally on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. This chapter focuses on the two most commonly used methods, namely, energy minimization and molecular dynamics, that, respectively, optimize structure and simulate the natural motion of biological macromolecules. The common theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics is covered briefly as well as limitations of the computational approach, for instance, the lack of quantum effects and limited timescales accessible. As a practical example, a full simulation of the protein lysozyme in water is described step by step, including examples of necessary hardware and software, how to obtain suitable starting molecular structures, immersing it in a solvent, choosing good simulation parameters, and energy minimization. The chapter also describes how to analyze the simulation in terms of potential energies, structural fluctuations, coordinate stability, geometrical features, and, finally, how to create beautiful ray-traced movies that can be used in presentations.

  3. Molecular Imaging Without Radiopharmaceuticals?

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd. E.; Avison, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    The limitations on the sensitivity for detecting small changes in MRI, CT, and ultrasound pulse-echo images are used to estimate the practical requirements for molecular imaging and targeted contrast enhancement for these modalities. These types of imaging are highly unlikely to approach the sensitivity for detecting molecular processes of radionuclear methods, and the prospects for achieving sufficient concentrations of appropriate agents in vivo are poor for several types of applications such as small-molecule targeting of specific receptors. However, using relatively large carrier systems such as particles and liposomes, sufficient concentrations of paramagnetic agents may be delivered to achieve MR-signal changes adequate for detection. The use of higher-resolution MR images will aid the prospects for molecular imaging in small animals. Theoretic considerations also predict that a similar approach, using rather large particles or carriers of materials with a high atomic number, may also be successful for CT, especially with additional developments such as the use of monochromatic x-rays. The prospects of molecular imaging by x-ray imaging may not be as bleak as has been predicted. For ultrasound detection, gas-filled bubbles can provide a sufficient backscattered sound intensity to be detectable at concentrations and sizes not much different from agents designed for these other modalities. PMID:19443583

  4. Reading the Molecular Clock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Suggesting that the evolutionary record may be written in proteins and genes, discusses research in which species are compared by immunology, DNA, and radioimmunoassay. Molecular studies show that DNA from humans and chimps is 98 percent identical, a degree of similarity usually occurring only among animals of the same genus. (JN)

  5. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  6. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  7. Electron transfer through organic molecular wires: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Petsalakis, Ioannis D.

    2017-01-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations have been carried out on a series of Donor-Bridge-Acceptor (DBA) systems, where the bridges are π-conjugated molecular wires. In these systems a lack of strong dependence of the charge-transfer (CT) rate on large variations in the D-A distance has been observed. The results show that a suitably defined length, Reff, shows significantly smaller variation over the different bridges which have widely varying geometrical lengths. The distance Reff is determined on the basis of application of a modified Mulliken's formula for the CT energies and comparison to those calculated by TDDFT.

  8. Subset of Kappa and Lambda Germline Sequences Result in Light Chains with a Higher Molecular Mass Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barnidge, David R; Lundström, Susanna L; Zhang, Bo; Dasari, Surendra; Murray, David L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-04

    In our previous work, we showed that electrospray ionization of intact polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains isolated from normal serum generates two distinct, Gaussian-shaped, molecular mass distributions representing the light-chain repertoire. During the analysis of a large (>100) patient sample set, we noticed a low-intensity molecular mass distribution with a mean of approximately 24 250 Da, roughly 800 Da higher than the mean of the typical kappa molecular-mass distribution mean of 23 450 Da. We also observed distinct clones in this region that did not appear to contain any typical post-translational modifications that would account for such a large mass shift. To determine the origin of the high molecular mass clones, we performed de novo bottom-up mass spectrometry on a purified IgM monoclonal light chain that had a calculated molecular mass of 24 275.03 Da. The entire sequence of the monoclonal light chain was determined using multienzyme digestion and de novo sequence-alignment software and was found to belong to the germline allele IGKV2-30. The alignment of kappa germline sequences revealed ten IGKV2 and one IGKV4 sequences that contained additional amino acids in their CDR1 region, creating the high-molecular-mass phenotype. We also performed an alignment of lambda germline sequences, which showed additional amino acids in the CDR2 region, and the FR3 region of functional germline sequences that result in a high-molecular-mass phenotype. The work presented here illustrates the ability of mass spectrometry to provide information on the diversity of light-chain molecular mass phenotypes in circulation, which reflects the germline sequences selected by the immunoglobulin-secreting B-cell population.

  9. A Day in the Life at DaVita Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company name means "giving life," the bar for learning and development programs is held high. In this article, the author describes what it takes to graduate from DaVita Academy, the soft skills training program dialysis services company DaVita offers all its employees. DaVita's chief executive officer, Kent Thiry, states that the Academy…

  10. A Day in the Life at DaVita Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company name means "giving life," the bar for learning and development programs is held high. In this article, the author describes what it takes to graduate from DaVita Academy, the soft skills training program dialysis services company DaVita offers all its employees. DaVita's chief executive officer, Kent Thiry, states that the Academy…

  11. 32 CFR 516.25 - DA Form 4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true DA Form 4. 516.25 Section 516.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Reporting Legal Proceedings to HQDA § 516.25 DA Form 4. (a) General. The DA Form 4 (See figure...

  12. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  13. Multimodality Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Matthew; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Strauss, H. William; Tanaka, Atsushi; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Guttman, Michael A.; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a new discipline that integrates scientific advances in both functional imaging and molecular probes to improve our understanding of the molecular basis of the cardiovascular system. These advances are driven by in vivo imaging of molecular processes in animals, usually small animals, and are rapidly moving toward clinical applications. Molecular imaging has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The 2 key components of all molecular imaging systems are the molecular contrast agents and the imaging system providing spatial and temporal localization of these agents within the body. They must deliver images with the appropriate sensitivity and specificity to drive clinical applications. As work in molecular contrast agents matures and highly sensitive and specific probes are developed, these systems will provide the imaging technologies required for translation into clinical tools. This is the promise of molecular medicine. PMID:20457794

  14. Molecular weight determination of high molecular mass (glyco)proteins using CGE-on-a-chip, planar SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Müller, Roland; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Elgass, Helmut; Breiteneder, Heimo; Kratzmeier, Martin; Allmaier, Günter

    2010-12-01

    The molecular weights (MW) of seven (glyco)proteins, of which five were plasma-derived, with MWs higher than 200 kDa were determined with three techniques: CGE-on-a-chip, SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS. While the analysis of medium to high MW proteins with SDS-PAGE was an already well-established technique, the usefulness of MALDI-TOF-MS for the exact MW determination of high mass proteins was only partly described in literature so far. CGE-on-a-chip is the newest of all three applied techniques and was so far not applicable. Therefore, it was not evaluated for high MW (glyco)proteins. All proteins were analyzed under nonreducing as well as reducing conditions. In this work, it was demonstrated that all three described techniques were capable of determining the MW of all high molecular weight (glyco)proteins. The noncommercial CGE-on-a-chip assay allowed for the first time the electrophoretic separation of proteins in the MW range from 14 to 1000 kDa. MW assignment was limited to 500 kDa in the case of SDS-PAGE and 660 kDa in the case of the high MW CGE-on-a-chip assay. With the proper matrix and sample preparation, analysis with a standard MALDI-TOF-MS provided accurate MWs for all high MW proteins up to 1 MDa.

  15. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  16. Some Stereochemical Principles from Polymers: Molecular Symmetry and Molecular Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Charles C.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the properties of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisobutylene, and their three epoxides to illustrate the relationships of entropy to molecular properties and the concepts of molecular chirality, geometry, and flexibility. (CC)

  17. Some Stereochemical Principles from Polymers: Molecular Symmetry and Molecular Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Charles C.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the properties of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisobutylene, and their three epoxides to illustrate the relationships of entropy to molecular properties and the concepts of molecular chirality, geometry, and flexibility. (CC)

  18. Characterization of molecular transport in ultrathin hydrogel coatings for cellular immunoprotection.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Romero, Gabriela; Xu, Weijie; Shin, Hainsworth Y; Berron, Brad J

    2015-02-09

    PEG hydrogels are routinely used in immunoprotection applications to hide foreign cells from a host immune system. Size-dependent transport is typically exploited in these systems to prevent access by macromolecular elements of the immune system while allowing the transport of low molecular weight nutrients. This work studies a nanoscale hydrogel coating for improved transport of beneficial low molecular weight materials across thicker hydrogel coatings while completely blocking transport of undesired larger molecular weight materials. Coatings composed of PEG diacrylate of molecular weight 575 and 3500 Da were studied by tracking the transport of fluorescently labeled dextrans across the coatings. The molecular weight of dextran at which the transport is blocked by these coatings are consistent with cutoff values in analogous bulk PEG materials. Additionally, the diffusion constants of 4 kDa dextrans across PEG 575 coatings (9.5 × 10(-10)-2.0 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s) was lower than across PEG 3500 coatings (5.9-9.8 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s), and these trends and magnitudes agree with bulk scale models. Overall, these nanoscale thin PEG diacrylate films offer the same size selective transport behavior of bulk PEG diacrylate materials, while the lower thickness translates directly to increased flux of beneficial low molecular weight materials.

  19. The 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein in gliomas: from the bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Janczar, Karolina; Su, Zhangjie; Raccagni, Isabella; Anfosso, Andrea; Kelly, Charlotte; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gerhard, Alexander; Roncaroli, Federico

    2015-08-01

    The 18-kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) is known to be highly expressed in several types of cancer, including gliomas, whereas expression in normal brain is low. TSPO functions in glioma are still incompletely understood. The TSPO can be quantified pre-operatively with molecular imaging making it an ideal candidate for personalized treatment of patient with glioma. Studies have proposed to exploit the TSPO as a transporter of chemotherapics to selectively target tumour cells in the brain. Our studies proved that positron emission tomography (PET)-imaging can contribute to predict progression of patients with glioma and that molecular imaging with TSPO-specific ligands is suitable to stratify patients in view of TSPO-targeted treatment. Finally, we proved that TSPO in gliomas is predominantly expressed by tumour cells. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. P2X1 Receptor-Mediated Ca(2+) Influx Triggered by DA-9801 Potentiates Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Back, Moon Jung; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Joo Hyun; Fu, Zhicheng; Son, Mi Won; Choi, Sang Zin; Go, Hyo Sang; Yoo, Sungjae; Hwang, Sun Wook; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2016-11-16

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal regeneration has emerged as a strategy to treat neuronal degeneration-associated disorders. However, direct NGF administration is limited by the occurrence of adverse effects at high doses of NGF. Therefore, development of a therapeutic strategy to promote the NGF trophic effect is required. In view of the lack of understanding of the mechanism for potentiating the NGF effect, this study investigated molecular targets of DA-9801, a well-standardized Dioscorea rhizome extract, which has a promoting effect on NGF. An increase in intracellular calcium ion level was induced by DA-9801, and chelation of extracellular calcium ions with ethylene-bis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA) suppressed the potentiating effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. In addition, EGTA treatment reduced the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), the major mediators of neurite outgrowth. To find which calcium ion-permeable channel contributes to the calcium ion influx induced by DA-9801, we treated PC12 cells with various inhibitors of calcium ion-permeable channels. NF449, a P2X1 receptor selective antagonist, significantly abolished the potentiating effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and abrogated the DA-9801-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, transfection with siRNA of P2X1 receptor significantly reduced the DA-9801-enhanced neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, calcium ion influx through P2X1 receptor mediated the promoting effect of DA-9801 on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  1. The heliothis virescens 170 kDa aminopeptidase functions as "receptor A" by mediating specific Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A delta-endotoxin binding and pore formation.

    PubMed

    Luo, K; Sangadala, S; Masson, L; Mazza, A; Brousseau, R; Adang, M J

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac delta-endotoxin binding and pore formation was investigated using a purified 170 kDa aminopeptidase N (APN) from Heliothis virescens brush border membranes. Aminopeptidases with molecular sizes of 110, 140 and 170 kDa were eluted from a Cry1Ac toxin affinity column using N-acetylgalactosamine. The 140 kDa aminopeptidase has a cross-reacting determinant typical of a cleaved glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. After mild base treatment to de-acylate the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage and incubation in phosphatidyl inositol phospholipase C, anti-cross-reacting determinant antibody recognized the 170 kDa protein. Kinetic binding characteristics of Cry1A toxins to purified 170 kDa APN were determined using surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac, but not Cry1C and Cry1E toxins recognized 170 kDa APN. Each Cry1A toxin recognized two binding sites: a high affinity site with KD ranging from 41 to 95 nM and a lower affinity site with KD in the 325 to 623 nM range. N-acetylgalactosamine inhibited Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa and Cry1Ab binding to 170 kDa APN. When reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, the 170 kDa APN promoted toxin-induced 86Rb+ release for Cry1A toxins, but not Cry1C toxin. Furthermore Cry1Ac, the Cry protein most toxic to H. virescens larvae, caused 86Rb+ release at lower concentrations, and to a greater extent than Cry1Aa and Cry1Ab toxins. The correlation between toxin-binding specificity and 86Rb+ release strongly suggests that the purified 170 kDa APN is the functional receptor A in the H. virescens midgut epithelial cell brush border membranes.

  2. Evolving understanding of translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-09-01

    The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) has been the focus of intense research by the biomedical community and the pharmaceutical industry because of its apparent involvement in many disease-related processes. These include steroidogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, neurological disease and cancer, resulting in the use of TSPO as a biomarker and its potential as a drug target. Despite more than 30 years of study, the precise function of TSPO remains elusive. A recent breakthrough in determining the high-resolution crystal structures of bacterial homologs of mitochondrial TSPO provides new insight into the structural and functional properties at a molecular level and new opportunities for investigating the significance of this ancient and highly conserved protein family. The availability of atomic level structural information from different species also provides a platform for structure-based drug development. Here we briefly review current knowledge regarding TSPO and the implications of the new structures with respect to hypotheses and controversies in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  4. Molecular biology of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Revers, Frédéric; García, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Potyvirus is the largest genus of plant viruses causing significant losses in a wide range of crops. Potyviruses are aphid transmitted in a nonpersistent manner and some of them are also seed transmitted. As important pathogens, potyviruses are much more studied than other plant viruses belonging to other genera and their study covers many aspects of plant virology, such as functional characterization of viral proteins, molecular interaction with hosts and vectors, structure, taxonomy, evolution, epidemiology, and diagnosis. Biotechnological applications of potyviruses are also being explored. During this last decade, substantial advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular biology of these viruses and the functions of their various proteins. After a general presentation on the family Potyviridae and the potyviral proteins, we present an update of the knowledge on potyvirus multiplication, movement, and transmission and on potyvirus/plant compatible interactions including pathogenicity and symptom determinants. We end the review providing information on biotechnological applications of potyviruses.

  5. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  6. Activating the molecular spinterface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinchetti, Mirko; Dediu, V. Alek; Hueso, Luis E.

    2017-05-01

    The miniaturization trend in the semiconductor industry has led to the understanding that interfacial properties are crucial for device behaviour. Spintronics has not been alien to this trend, and phenomena such as preferential spin tunnelling, the spin-to-charge conversion due to the Rashba-Edelstein effect and the spin-momentum locking at the surface of topological insulators have arisen mainly from emergent interfacial properties, rather than the bulk of the constituent materials. In this Perspective we explore inorganic/molecular interfaces by looking closely at both sides of the interface. We describe recent developments and discuss the interface as an ideal platform for creating new spin effects. Finally, we outline possible technologies that can be generated thanks to the unique active tunability of molecular spinterfaces.

  7. Managing molecular diversity.

    PubMed

    Perez, Juan J

    2005-02-01

    The present work provides an overview of the different methods used in molecular diversity analysis. Issues like identifying voids in proprietary databases, reducing the number of redundancies present in databases, or designing focused libraries by grouping compounds similar to a template with the aim to fine tune its properties, are potent diversity analysis tools that may be used to optimize molecules based on their properties and specifically, to speed up the process of lead discovery and optimization. The present work describes first methods that are used to describe molecular systems. This is followed by a section devoted to describe different measures of similarity between molecules, to finish with a description of different methods used to select subsets molecules according to the constraints imposed. The final section deals with the validation of these methods, based on different studies available in the literature.

  8. Wholly Synthetic Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuyang; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-06-17

    The past quarter of a century has witnessed an increasing engagement on the part of physicists and chemists in the design and synthesis of molecular machines de novo. This minireview traces the development of artificial molecular machines from their prototypes in the form of shuttles and switches to their emergence as motors and pumps where supplies of energy in the form of chemical fuel, electrochemical potential and light activation become a minimum requirement for them to function away from equilibrium. The challenge facing this rapidly growing community of scientists and engineers today is one of putting wholly synthetic molecules to work, both individually and as collections. Here, we highlight some of the recent conceptual and practical advances relating to the operation of wholly synthetic rotary and linear motors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Molecular psychiatry of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Ullmann, Jeremy F.P.; Norton, William H.J.; Brennan, Caroline H.; Parker, Matthew O.; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their well-characterized neural development and high genetic homology to mammals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a powerful model organism in the field of biological psychiatry. Here, we discuss the molecular psychiatry of zebrafish, and its implications for translational neuroscience research and modeling CNS disorders. In particular, we outline recent genetic and technological developments allowing for in-vivo examinations, high-throughput screening and whole-brain analyses in larval and adult zebrafish. We also summarize the application of these molecular techniques to the understanding of neuropsychiatric disease, outlining the potential of zebrafish for modeling complex brain disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression, post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of larval and adult fish tests, we suggest that zebrafish models become a rapidly emerging new field in modern biological psychiatry research. PMID:25349164

  10. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts

    PubMed Central

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-01-01

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ∼3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal–ligand coordination bonds and aromatic–aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures. PMID:28656977

  11. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-06-01

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ~3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal-ligand coordination bonds and aromatic-aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures.

  12. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-06-28

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ∼3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal-ligand coordination bonds and aromatic-aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures.

  13. An Artificial Molecular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Colasson, Benoit; La Rosa, Marcello; Silvi, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The transport of substrates is one of the main tasks of biomolecular machines in living organisms. We report a synthetic small‐molecule system designed to catch, displace, and release molecular cargo in solution under external control. The system consists of a bistable rotaxane that behaves as an acid–base controlled molecular shuttle, whose ring component bears a tether ending with a nitrile group. The latter can be coordinated to a ruthenium complex that acts as the load, and dissociated upon irradiation with visible light. The cargo loading/unloading and ring transfer/return processes are reversible and can be controlled independently. The robust coordination bond ensures that the cargo remains attached to the device while the transport takes place. PMID:27308223

  14. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  15. An artificial molecular pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R.; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Petinataud, D; Berger, S; Contet-Audonneau, N; Machouart, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent cause of nail infections due to dermatophytes. Molds and yeast may also be responsible of these pathologies. Antifungal treatments are frequently given without a mycological diagnosis, partly because of the requisite time for obtaining the biological results. The mycological diagnosis requires a direct microscopic examination and a culture in order to accurately identify the fungal genus and species. Nevertheless, this conventional diagnosis is often time consuming due to the delay of fungal cultures and presents disadvantages that make it not sufficient enough to give a precise and confident response to the clinicians. Therefore additional tests have been developed to help distinguish onychomycosis from other nail disorders. Among them, molecular biology techniques offer modern and rapid tools to improve traditional microbiological diagnosis. In this review, we first present the conventional diagnosis methods for onychomycosis and then we describe the main molecular biology tools and the currently available commercial kits that allow a rapid detection of the pathology.

  17. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  18. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy.

  19. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  20. Molecular Biology of Archaebacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-31

    elucidate at the molecular level some of the features that make archaebacteria unique and distinguish them from eubacteria and eucaryotes. Three types...regulate translation of the mRNA by a mechanism similar to that employed in eubacteria . Thus halophilic archaebacteria retain the same gene order and...possibly also the same regulatory mechanism for controlling ribosomal protein synthesis that is found in eubacteria . Ribosomal protein structure: The

  1. [Hereditary deafness: molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Denoyelle, Françoise; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Petit, Christine

    2004-03-01

    This article outlines recent advances in explaining hereditary deafness in molecular terms, focusing on isolated (i.e. nonsyndromic) hearing loss. The number of genes identified (36 to date) is growing rapidly. However, difficulties inherent in genetic linkage analysis, coupled with the possible involvement of environmental causes, have so far prevented the characterization of the main genes causative or predisposing to the late-onset forms of deafness.

  2. Atomic and molecular theory

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, Mitio.

    1990-01-01

    The multifaceted role of theoretical physics in understanding the earliest stages of radiation action is discussed. Scientific topics chosen for the present discourse include photoabsorption, electron collisions, and ionic collisions, and electron transport theory, Connections of atomic and molecular physics with condensed-matter physics are also discussed. The present article includes some historical perspective and an outlook for the future. 114 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Primer on molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  4. Communication: Molecular gears.

    PubMed

    Burnell, E Elliott; de Lange, Cornelis A; Meerts, W Leo

    2016-09-07

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of hexamethylbenzene orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. The spectrum contains over 350 000 lines with many overlapping transitions, from which four independent direct dipolar couplings are obtained. The rotations of the six methyl groups appear to be correlated due to mutual steric hindrance. Adjacent methyl groups show counter-rotating or geared motion. Hexamethylbenzene thus behaves as a molecular hexagonal gear.

  5. Linear artificial molecular muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Flood, Amar H; Bonvallet, Paul A; Vignon, Scott A; Northrop, Brian H; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Jeppesen, Jan O; Huang, Tony J; Brough, Branden; Baller, Marko; Magonov, Sergei; Solares, Santiago D; Goddard, William A; Ho, Chih-Ming; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2005-07-13

    Two switchable, palindromically constituted bistable [3]rotaxanes have been designed and synthesized with a pair of mechanically mobile rings encircling a single dumbbell. These designs are reminiscent of a "molecular muscle" for the purposes of amplifying and harnessing molecular mechanical motions. The location of the two cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings can be controlled to be on either tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) or naphthalene (NP) stations, either chemically ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) or electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry), such that switching of inter-ring distances from 4.2 to 1.4 nm mimics the contraction and extension of skeletal muscle, albeit on a shorter length scale. Fast scan-rate cyclic voltammetry at low temperatures reveals stepwise oxidations and movements of one-half of the [3]rotaxane and then of the other, a process that appears to be concerted at room temperature. The active form of the bistable [3]rotaxane bears disulfide tethers attached covalently to both of the CBPQT(4+) ring components for the purpose of its self-assembly onto a gold surface. An array of flexible microcantilever beams, each coated on one side with a monolayer of 6 billion of the active bistable [3]rotaxane molecules, undergoes controllable and reversible bending up and down when it is exposed to the synchronous addition of aqueous chemical oxidants and reductants. The beam bending is correlated with flexing of the surface-bound molecular muscles, whereas a monolayer of the dumbbell alone is inactive under the same conditions. This observation supports the hypothesis that the cumulative nanoscale movements within surface-bound "molecular muscles" can be harnessed to perform larger-scale mechanical work.

  6. Functional Molecular Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jizhong; Deng, Ye; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes are central issues in ecology and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity research focuses on “species” richness and abundance but not on their interactions. Although a network approach is powerful in describing ecological interactions among species, defining the network structure in a microbial community is a great challenge. Also, although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity are well established, its influences on belowground microbial communities, especially microbial interactions, are poorly understood. Here, a random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks was developed with the high-throughput functional gene array hybridization data of soil microbial communities in a long-term grassland FACE (free air, CO2 enrichment) experiment. Our results indicate that RMT is powerful in identifying functional molecular ecological networks in microbial communities. Both functional molecular ecological networks under eCO2 and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed the general characteristics of complex systems such as scale free, small world, modular, and hierarchical. However, the topological structures of the functional molecular ecological networks are distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, at the levels of the entire communities, individual functional gene categories/groups, and functional genes/sequences, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the network interactions among different microbial functional genes/populations. Such a shift in network structure is also significantly correlated with soil geochemical variables. In short, elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes is fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change. PMID:20941329

  7. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  8. Molecular Vaccines for Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns for cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Gene Ther 200S; 16:310-9. 105. Dempsey PW, Allison ME, Akkaraju S, Goodnow CC ...malaria immunity elicited by recombinant adenovirus. Parasite lmmunol 2000; 22:157-60. 149. Sridhar S, Reyes- Sandoval A, Draper SJ, Moore AC...AT, Koup RA, Roederer M, Bailer RT, 166. Fitzgerald JC, Gao GP, Reyes- Sandoval A, Pavlakis hyperanenuated strain of Listeria monocytogenes. J Enama

  9. Conceptual Considerations in Molecular Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Donald T.

    2005-01-01

    There are significant misconceptions within the chemical community and molecular science, particularly in the undergraduate curriculum and the associated textbooks. Some of the misconceptions are described, which give poor basis to understand molecular bonding and structure, and reaction mechanisms.

  10. Conceptual Considerations in Molecular Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Donald T.

    2005-01-01

    There are significant misconceptions within the chemical community and molecular science, particularly in the undergraduate curriculum and the associated textbooks. Some of the misconceptions are described, which give poor basis to understand molecular bonding and structure, and reaction mechanisms.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform μs-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation.

  12. Fluorinated benzalkylsilane molecular rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamport, Zachary A.; Broadnax, Angela D.; Harrison, David; Barth, Katrina J.; Mendenhall, Lee; Hamilton, Clayton T.; Guthold, Martin; Thonhauser, Timo; Welker, Mark E.; Jurchescu, Oana D.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrical properties of nine new alkylated silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) – (EtO)3Si(CH2)nN = CHPhX where n = 3 or 11 and X = 4-CF3, 3,5-CF3, 3-F-4-CF3, 4-F, or 2,3,4,5,6-F, and explore their rectification behavior in relation to their molecular structure. The electrical properties of the films were examined in a metal/insulator/metal configuration, with a highly-doped silicon bottom contact and a eutectic gallium-indium liquid metal (EGaIn) top contact. The junctions exhibit high yields (>90%), a remarkable resistance to bias stress, and current rectification ratios (R) between 20 and 200 depending on the structure, degree of order, and internal dipole of each molecule. We found that the rectification ratio correlates positively with the strength of the molecular dipole moment and it is reduced with increasing molecular length.

  13. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-10

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  14. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  15. Mammalian Molecular Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ilmin; Choe, Han Kyoung; Son, Gi Hoon

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the Earth's rotation, almost all organisms experience day and night cycles within a 24-hr period. To adapt and synchronize biological rhythms to external daily cycles, organisms have evolved an internal time-keeping system. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus generates circadian rhythmicity and orchestrates numerous subsidiary local clocks in other regions of the brain and peripheral tissues. Regardless of their locations, these circadian clocks are cell-autonomous and self-sustainable, implicating rhythmic oscillations in a variety of biochemical and metabolic processes. A group of core clock genes provides interlocking molecular feedback loops that drive the circadian rhythm even at the single-cell level. In addition to the core transcription/translation feedback loops, post-translational modifications also contribute to the fine regulation of molecular circadian clocks. In this article, we briefly review the molecular mechanisms and post-translational modifications of mammalian circadian clock regulation. We also discuss the organization of and communication between central and peripheral circadian oscillators of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:22110358

  16. Molecular biology of hearing

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Diensthuber, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is our most sensitive sensory organ and can be subdivided into three functional units: organ of Corti, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. The appropriate stimulus for the organ of hearing is sound, which travels through the external auditory canal to the middle ear where it is transmitted to the inner ear. The inner ear houses the hair cells, the sensory cells of hearing. The inner hair cells are capable of mechanotransduction, the transformation of mechanical force into an electrical signal, which is the basic principle of hearing. The stria vascularis generates the endocochlear potential and maintains the ionic homeostasis of the endolymph. The dendrites of the spiral ganglion form synaptic contacts with the hair cells. The spiral ganglion is composed of neurons that transmit the electrical signals from the cochlea to the central nervous system. In recent years there has been significant progress in research on the molecular basis of hearing. An increasing number of genes and proteins related to hearing are being identified and characterized. The growing knowledge of these genes contributes not only to greater appreciation of the mechanism of hearing but also to a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary hearing loss. This basic research is a prerequisite for the development of molecular diagnostics and novel therapies for hearing loss. PMID:22558056

  17. Molecular Classification of Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    KIJIMA, Noriyuki; KANEMURA, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is one of the most frequent malignant brain tumors in children. The current standard treatment regimen consists of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although these treatments have the potential to increase the survival of 70–80% of patients with MB, they are also associated with serious treatment-induced morbidity. The current risk stratification of MB is based on clinical factors, including age at presentation, metastatic status, and the presence of residual tumor following resection. In addition, recent genomic studies indicate that MB consists of at least four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, sonic hedgehog (SHH), Group 3, and Group 4. WNT and SHH MBs are characterized by aberrations in the WNT and SHH signaling pathways, respectively. WNT MB has the best prognosis compared to the other MBs, while SHH MB has an intermediate prognosis. The underlying signaling pathways associated with Group 3 and 4 MBs have not been identified. Group 3 MB is frequently associated with metastasis, resulting in a poor prognosis, while Group 4 is sometimes associated with metastasis and has an intermediate prognosis. Group 4 is the most frequent MB and represents 35% of all MBs. These findings suggest that MB is a heterogeneous disease, and that MB subgroups have distinct molecular, demographic, and clinical characteristics. The molecular classification of MBs is redefining the risk stratification of patients with MB, and has the potential to identify new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of MB. PMID:27238212

  18. Fluorinated benzalkylsilane molecular rectifiers

    PubMed Central

    Lamport, Zachary A.; Broadnax, Angela D.; Harrison, David; Barth, Katrina J.; Mendenhall, Lee; Hamilton, Clayton T.; Guthold, Martin; Thonhauser, Timo; Welker, Mark E.; Jurchescu, Oana D.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrical properties of nine new alkylated silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) – (EtO)3Si(CH2)nN = CHPhX where n = 3 or 11 and X = 4-CF3, 3,5-CF3, 3-F-4-CF3, 4-F, or 2,3,4,5,6-F, and explore their rectification behavior in relation to their molecular structure. The electrical properties of the films were examined in a metal/insulator/metal configuration, with a highly-doped silicon bottom contact and a eutectic gallium-indium liquid metal (EGaIn) top contact. The junctions exhibit high yields (>90%), a remarkable resistance to bias stress, and current rectification ratios (R) between 20 and 200 depending on the structure, degree of order, and internal dipole of each molecule. We found that the rectification ratio correlates positively with the strength of the molecular dipole moment and it is reduced with increasing molecular length. PMID:27897250

  19. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.